WorldWideScience

Sample records for p16 jnc map

  1. Report of 'JNC monitor Ibaraki'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Seiichi; Kaji, Mikio; Ohwada, Toshio

    2005-08-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) had entrusted residents in Tokai and the neighboring towns with monitors in order to introduce the basic knowledge of atomic energy and its works and to reflect their opinions to its management from fiscal 1999 to 2004. The report consists of objects, abstract of activity, results and discussion of questionnaire, reflection on management, and conclusion. An appendix contains opinion of monitors, questions, results of questionnaire. An impression of JNC has not changed from the beginning to the last. After all, JNC should manage free from danger and continue to promote a better understanding and symbiotic relationship between JNC and people. (S.Y.)

  2. HAT-P-16b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-16b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 10.8 mag F8 dwarf GSC 2792-01700, with a period P = 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455027.59293 ± 0.00031 (BJD10), and transit duration 0.1276 ± 0.0013 days. The host star has a mass of 1.22 ± 0.0...

  3. Safety research basic plan of JNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) formally succeeded to Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) on October, 1 1998. This report describes the basic plan for major program of JNC which consists of two parts: management philosophy of the new institute and the latest revised medium term program. In the first part, the primary mission of JNC is to perform its R and D concentrating on fast breeder reactor and its fuel cycle, and treatment and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, while at the same time giving special consideration to safety. In the second, individual programs in the new basic plan are discussed in detail. The outline and schedule of each program are also attached in the table form. (H. Itami)

  4. JNC's experience of complementary accesses provided by the additional protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) examined problems on implementation of the Additional Protocol to Japan/IAEA Safeguards Agreement with the Government of Japan and International Atomic Energy Agency through trials performed at Oarai Engineering Center before it entered into force. On December 16th 1999, the Additional Protocol entered into force, and in last January JNC provided the first JNC site information to STA. Then our Government provided it of all Japan to IAEA in last June. Also in this January, we sent the additional information changed from old one to MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). The first Complementary Access of not only JNC but also Japan was implemented on JNC Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center on the end of last November. Since then, we have had over 10 times experience of Complementary Accesses for about one year especially on Tokai works and Ningyo-Toge. JNC's experience of Complementary Accesses will be introduced. (author)

  5. High CpG island methylation of p16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study subjects consisted of 75 healthy ... that p16 protein expression was significantly lower in ToF group compared to ... in p16 promoters in ToF patients was negatively correlated with p16 protein ... studies, human foetal ventricular cardiomyocytes (HFCs) are ..... oral epithelial dysplasia: a prospective cohort study.

  6. High CpG island methylation of p16 gene and loss of p16 protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was employed to detect CpG island methylation in p16 promoter region andWestern blotting was used to detect p16 expression of all subjects. Real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was performed to test p16 mRNA expression.

  7. Establishment of a rationalized safety assurance logic aiming at FBRs with enhanced social acceptance (1). Interim report of CEA/JNC collaboration NWP-5(a) from 1999 to 2001: common view and JNC's contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Hajime; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Kurisaka, Kenichi; Kubo, Shigenobu; Kamiyama, Kenji

    2001-12-01

    This is an interim report describing the progress and the results of the collaborative research works between JNC and CEA on the safety logic in future fast reactors under the title of 'Establishment of a Rationalized Safety Assurance Logic Aiming at FBRs with Enhanced Social Acceptance' from 1999 to 2001. This contains JNC's contribution and common view of both partners. (1) Safety goals are proposed from JNC and CEA. Significant coherency is found such as to keep defense-in depth concept, mitigation measures against core melt are taken into account for containment design, evacuation free' concept is pursued, quantitative safety target is also considered as well as deterministic approach, and improvement of social acceptance is considered from the development stage of the fuel cycle including nuclear power plants. (2) Safety characteristics of each candidate coolant were compared and discussed. Gas-cooled fast reactor is a common interest area. Discussions are focused on: safety design requirements, safety evaluation events list, transient behavior analysis, core catcher designs, and so on. (3) JNC's results include criticality map for predicting CDA behavior and consequences, and CDA analysis results of lead-cooled and gas-cooled fast reactors with SIMMER-III. The collaboration on the action NWP-5a is recognized as being of great importance for the orientation of the innovative design studies. (author)

  8. High CpG island methylation of p16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SI-JU GAO

    The study subjects consisted of 75 healthy controls and 63 ToF ... Additionally, our analysis suggested that CpG island methylation in p16 promoters in ToF ..... reduced p16 protein expression in lung cancer (Kondo et al. 2006). In this context ..... promoter methylation in gastric carcinogenesis: a meta-analysis. Mol. Biol. Rep.

  9. Treament Response in the neck: p16+ versus p16- oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Daisy; Hicks, Rodney J.; Rischin, Danny; Solomon, Ben; Peters, Lester; Corry, June; Bressel, Mathias; Young, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    To compare nodal response rates following chemoradiotherapy in patients with p16+ and p16− oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Patients with node-positive OPSCC treated at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre on the published phase I–III tirapazamine trials were identified. All patients had conventional assessment (clinical examination (CA), CT and/or MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) at both baseline and 2–4 months post-treatment. There were 30 p16+ and 18 p16− patients, the former group having significantly higher stage nodal disease (P=0.016). The mean overall reduction in nodal size at post-treatment assessment was similar in p16+ and p16− patients (78% vs. 75%), and no statistically significant difference in nodal complete response (CR) rates was detected by either CA (50% vs. 39%, P=0.35) or PET/PET-CT (93% vs. 83%, P=0.19). PET was significantly more accurate in determining the true nodal CR rate in both groups, with a negative predictive value of 96%. Nodal response rates following chemoradiotherapy appear to be similar in p16+ and p16− patients when assessed by either CA or PET/PET-CT. However, higher nodal CR was seen in PET/PET-CT compared with CA in both groups. Metabolic imaging is more accurate than CA in assessing nodal response post-treatment.

  10. Clinical Implications and Limitations of JNC7 in HTN Management and Recommendations for JNC8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youness R. Karodeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension (HTN is the persistent elevation of arterialblood pressure, and if untreated, it leads to coronary heartdisease (CHD and target organ disease (TOD. 5 HTN is themost common primary diagnosis in the United States, affectingover 52 million Americans.6 The prevalence of HTN increaseswith age, is more common among African Americans, and ismore common among men. Since 2003, the current practiceguidelines for the evaluation and management of HTN in theUnited States have been made available by the National Heart,Lung, and Blood Institute. The Seventh Report of the JointNational Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, andTreatment of High Blood Pressure, or JNC 7, revised previousrecommendations. The practice guidelines were necessitatedby the findings of many observational studies and clinical trialsdealing with HTN; the need for useful, clear and concise clinicalguidelines; the JNC’s consensus that a simplified classificationof blood pressure (BP was necessary; and a realization thatclinicians were not using previous guidelines very much.1–4

  11. A renewal of the JNC-sorption database (JNC-SDB) addition of literature data published from 1998 to 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Tadahiro; Sasamoto, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    The sorption database was developed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute for 'H12:Project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan' in 1999. The database includes distribution coefficient of important radionuclides for estimating a retardation capacity on engineered barrier and natural barrier. At this time, we collected the newest sorption data (distribution coefficient) using UNIS (International Nuclear Information System) in order to extend and renew the database. The up dated database includes the published data from 1998 to 2003. When the JNC-SDB was developed for the H12 report, it was not completed to include some literature data used in OECD/NEA sorption database. At this time, we collected the missing literatures and added the data to the JNC-SDB. In the up dated JNC-SDB, important elements on performance assessment such as Am, Cm, Cs, Np, Pb, Pu, Se, Tc and U, additional elements such as Ag, Ba, Co, Eu, Fe, I, Mn, Mo, Sr and Zn were increased. It was increased 1,236 data of 19 elements. As the result, the frequency of distribution coefficient for some elements clearly shows increased data. And also, input miss in the previous JNC-SDB developed in 1999 were corrected at this time. (author)

  12. High CpG island methylation of p16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SI-JU GAO

    abnormality or family history of congenital heart disease, as well as the exclusion of ... Germany) according to the manufacture's protocol. A total of. 45 μL of DNA was ... islands and the primer sites are illustrated in figure 1. Detection of p16 ...

  13. R and D for fast reactor fuel cycle technologies in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyoto, Aizawa

    2001-01-01

    Research and development on innovative FR cycle systems including P and T of TRU and LLFP is being performed at JNC in Japan. The commercialization of FR cycle system can be expected to contribute greatly to security of energy resource and preservation of global environment in the world. As a result of the Phase I of the Feasibility Study on Commercialized FR Cycle Systems (Feasibility Study), a few promising FR plant concepts and these related several promising fuel cycle concepts to be able to achieve the goals for commercialization have emerged, and a road-map related to these concepts is under preparation. A concept of innovative recycle system that can efficiently reprocess and fabricate TRU, and burn them in the FR is studied in the first step. Studies on partitioning and transmutation for long-lived fission products will be performed as the long-term R and D including isotope separation. Economic competitiveness is especially a key issue to establish the isotope separation technology. JNC will actively promote international collaboration from the viewpoint of the most effective use of available resources. (author)

  14. Immunohistochemical study of p53, pRb, p16 in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zo, Jae Ill; Zo, Kyung Ja; Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Mi Hee

    1998-01-01

    To confirm the expression of molecular genetic alterations of p53, pRb, p16 in esophageal cancer and to investigate the expression of p53, pRb, p16 in esophageal cancer according to the pathologic steps of carcinogenesis, immuno-histochemistry was performed in 15 resected esophageal cancer specimens with multiple separated lesions after pathologic mapping. The accumulation of mutant p53 was observed in 60 % of dysplasia and 47 % of invasive cancer, while pRb was not detected in 91 % of dysplasia and 72.7 % of invasive cancer. But p16 was not observed in 0 % in dysplasia and 7 % of invasive cancer. But p16 was not observed in 0 % in dysplasia and 28.6 % in invasive cancer. There was no simultaneous negative pRb and p16 expression. There was no relations between p53 and p16, pRb. As a results, the expression of p53, pRb, p16 was co-related well with molecular genetic changes and inactivation of p53, pRb, p16 was co-related well with molecular genetic changes and inactivation of p53 and pRb was common and early event in esophageal carcinogenesis in Korea, but inactivation of p16 was a infrequent change. (author). 17 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  15. Brief report on the research by JNC postdoctoral fellows for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) commenced a JNC Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in 1997 in order to raise capable researchers by providing an appropriate research environment to young postdoctoral researchers, which means that fiscal year 2002 was the sixth year of the program. The purpose of this program is to provide young researchers full of originality with opportunities to perform research independently on themes related to leading research, and basic and fundamental research of JNC, selected by the researchers themselves and approved by JNC, for a period of two or three years and also to promote the efficiency of JNC's research. This report includes a summary of the results of the research on sixteen themes performed by JNC Postdoctoral Fellows in the fiscal year 2002. Of these, research into four themes ended in 2002. (author)

  16. Description of JNC's analytical method and its performance for FBR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2000-01-01

    The description of JNC's analytical method and its performance for FBR cores includes: an outline of JNC's Analytical System Compared with ERANOS; a standard data base for FBR Nuclear Design in JNC; JUPITER Critical Experiment; details of Analytical Method and Its Effects on JUPITER; performance of JNC Analytical System (effective multiplication factor k eff , control rod worth, and sodium void reactivity); design accuracy of a 600 MWe-class FBR Core. JNC developed a consistent analytical system for FBR core evaluation, based on JENDL library, f-table method, and three dimensional diffusion/transport theory, which includes comprehensive sensitivity tools to improve the prediction accuracy of core parameters. JNC system was verified by analysis of JUPITER critical experiment, and other facilities. Its performance can be judged quite satisfactory for FBR-core design work, though there is room for further improvement, such as more detailed treatment of cross-section resonance regions

  17. Decadal Anthropogenic Carbon Storage Along P16 and P02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. R.; Feely, R. A.; Talley, L. D.; Cross, J. N.; Macdonald, A. M.; Mecking, S.; Siedlecki, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Pacific Ocean has the largest ocean basin anthropogenic carbon (Canth) inventory due to the large size of the basin. We estimate anthropogenic carbon (Canth) concentrations and decadal storages along the meridional P16 and zonal P02 lines since the mid 90s using a modified version of the extended multiple linear regression (EMLR) technique with data from the WOCE, CLIVAR, and GO-SHIP occupations of these lines. We present our estimates and map the aragonite saturation state (ΩA) decreases and saturation horizon shoaling resulting from continued Canth storage. The average storage rate was larger along both sections during the most recent decade (2000's to 2010's) than during the previous decade (1990's to 2000's), especially along P02. Significant decadal concentration increases were found in the mixed layers, shallow thermoclines, mode waters, and portions of the intermediate water masses.

  18. Environment radiological monitoring by JNC related to the JCO criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    Concerning the criticality accident at JCO Co., Ltd. (JCO) which occurred at 10:35 on 30th Sep. 1999, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) established ''JNC's task force'' at 12:35 on the same data in conjunction with Head Office and Tokai Works. JNC's task force had collaborated on environmental radiological monitoring with the government of Japan and the local governments. This report compiles the results of the environmental monitoring performed by JNC's task force based on the request from the government of Japan and the local governments. (author)

  19. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is the result of phase 3 BN-600 core benchmark problem, meaning burnup and heterogeneity. Analytical method applied consisted of: JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library, group constants (70 group, ABBN type self shielding transport factors), heterogeneous cell model for fuel and control rod, basic diffusion calculation (CITATION code), transport theory and mesh size correction (NSHEX code based on SN transport nodal method developed by JNC). Burnup and heterogeneity calculation results are presented obtained by applying both diffusion and transport approach for beginning and end of cycle

  20. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The present work is the results of JNC, Japan, for the Phase 4 of the BN-600 core benchmark problem (Hex-Z fully MOX fuelled core model) organized by IAEA. The benchmark specification is based on 1) the RCM report of IAEA CRP on 'Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of LMFR Reactivity Effects, Action 3.12' (Calculations for BN-600 fully fuelled MOX core for subsequent transient analyses). JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library was used for calculating 70 group ABBN-type group constants. Cell models for fuel assembly and control rod calculations were applied: homogeneous and heterogeneous (cylindrical supercell) model. Basic diffusion calculation was three-dimensional Hex-Z model, 18 group (Citation code). Transport calculations were 18 group, three-dimensional (NSHEC code) based on Sn-transport nodal method developed at JNC. The generated thermal power per fission was based on Sher's data corrected on the basis of ENDF/B-IV data library. Calculation results are presented in Tables for intercomparison

  1. Brief report of the JNC Cooperative Research (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2004 was the sixth year of the scheme and ended in 2004. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the result of the research carried out in fiscal year 2004 on four selected themes related the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  2. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (C) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc. 'below'), which means that the fiscal year 2002 was the fourth year of the scheme. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on twenty selected themes related to the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; eight of which ended in 2002. Of these, three were related to fast breeder reactors, two to the nuclear fuel cycle and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  3. The relationship of JNC and JCO in the uranium processing plant criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Yanagibashi, Katsumi; Okamoto, Naritoshi

    2002-12-01

    On September 30th 1999, the criticality accident occurred at JCO's uranium conversion building in Tokai. The accident occurred during reconversion from U 3 O 8 to uranium nitrate solution (UNH) with uranium enriched 18.8% and about 60 kgU. JCO contacted with JNC to supply UNH that is fuel material for the experimental fast breeder reactor 'JOYO'. JNC has contracted with JCO that had started nuclear fuel material processing business following a definite policy of Japanese government and developed SUMITOMO ADU PROCESS'. JNC made the first contract with JCO in 1985 and has made a contact every year. There had never been a problem in their products. JNC inspected products based on contract. JNC discharge our duty as customer inspecting products based on contract. As for safety control, JCO had taken licensing safety review and had been permitted to be 'a processing facility'. Therefore JNC understood that JCO produced following this license. 'The Uranium Processing Plant Criticality Accident Investigation' showed that JCO had been taking a different method from the permit and violating the license. However JNC had never been explained about that and JCO's operation procedures had never described about that. Therefore the Criticality Accident couldn't be avoided. This report describes the relationship of JNC and JCO in the uranium reconversion contract for JOYO, atomic development policy of Japanese government, process to the order and the contents of contract. (author)

  4. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (C) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2003 was the fifth year of the scheme. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2003 on twelve selected themes related to the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; eight of which ended in 2003. Of these, four were related to fast breeder reactors, one to radiation safety and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  5. Meiotic and pedigree segregation analyses in carriers of t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) differing in localization of breakpoint positions at 4p subband 4p16.3 and 4p16.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, Alina T; Zollino, Marcella; Wiland, Ewa; Panasiuk, Barbara; Iwanowski, Piotr S; Murdolo, Marina; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Pilch, Jacek; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare meiotic segregation in sperm cells from two carriers with t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) reciprocal chromosome translocations (RCTs), differing in localization of the breakpoint positions at the 4p subband-namely, 4p16.3 (carrier 1) and 4p16.1 (carrier 2)-and to compare data of the pedigree analyses performed by direct method. Three-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm cells and FISH mapping for the evaluation of the breakpoint positions, data from pedigrees, and direct segregation analysis of the pedigrees were performed. Similar proportions of normal/balanced and unbalanced sperm cells were found in both carriers. The most common was an alternate type of segregation (about 52 % and about 48 %, respectively). Unbalanced adjacent I and adjacent II karyotypes were found in similar proportions about 15 %. The direct segregation analysis (following Stengel-Rutkowski) of the pedigree of carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was performed and results were compared with the data of the pedigree segregation analysis obtained earlier through the indirect method. The probability of live-born progeny with unbalanced karyotype for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was moderately high at 18.8 %-comparable to the value obtained using the indirect method for the same carriership, which was 12 %. This was, however, markedly lower than the value of 41.2 % obtained through the pedigree segregation indirect analysis estimated for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.3;p23.1), perhaps due to the unique composition of genes present within the 4p16.1-4p 16.3 region. Revealed differences in pedigree segregation analysis did not correspond to the very similar profile of meiotic segregation patterns presented by carrier 1 and carrier 2. Most probably, such discordances may be due to differences in embryo survival rates arising from different genetic backgrounds.

  6. Austin Community College District's P-16 Initiative Graduates America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Mary; Madsen, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Austin Community College (ACC) District's P-16 Initiative supports partnerships with 30 school districts--reaching traditionally underserved students and bridging the gap between high school and college--so more Texas students can reach their educational goals. The P-16 Initiative is a constellation of efforts designed to provide broad-based…

  7. Safety Evaluation for Hull Waste Treatment Process in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, H.; Kurakata, K.

    2002-01-01

    Hull wastes and some scrapped equipment are typical radioactive wastes generated from reprocessing process in Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). Because hulls are the wastes remained in the fuel shearing and dissolution, they contain high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started the project of Hull Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF) to treat these solid wastes using compaction and incineration methods since 1993. It is said that Zircaloy fines generated from compaction process might burn and explode intensely. Therefore explosive conditions of the fines generated in compaction process were measured. As these results, it was concluded that the fines generated from the compaction process were not hazardous material. This paper describes the outline of the treatment process of hulls and results of safety evaluation

  8. Scenario development and analysis in JNC'S second progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, H.; Makino, H.; Miyahara, K.; Naito, M.

    2001-01-01

    Scenario development and analysis is an integral part of the performance assessment in the JNC's second progress report which will be issued by the end of November 1999. A systematic approach has been elaborated to ensure traceability and transparency in overall context of the scenario development and set up of calculation cases for assessment of the repository performance. In this approach, the hierarchical FEP matrix was designed to flexibly identify FEPs at different level of detail. The reasoned argument with clearly defined criteria was then applied for screening and grouping of FEPs to define scenarios in the form of influence diagrams. Scenarios and calculation cases were developed based on the expected safety functions of disposal system and relationships with potential detrimental/favorable factors and perturbation factors. The process to develop scenarios and calculation cases are recorded and managed in a computer system. (authors)

  9. Introduction of a super speed network in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosaki, Nobuhisa; Aoki, Kazuhisa; Narita, Nobuiku

    2002-01-01

    The construction of a super speed and broadband network with high cost performance is now possible through the resent remarkable development of information-communication technologies. Under such circumstances, the modification of LAN and WAN to the super speed network was required in accordance with the recent network demand in JNC. The trend of the information-communication technologies and the needs of information-communication infrastructure were reviewed as the first step. A modification of WAN to the super speed network with high cost performance was established in fiscal year 2000. This paper introduces the work procedures and the modification of the WAN in order to acquire a reduction in the running cost and the super speed network in the fiscal year. (author)

  10. Near Real-Time Accountancy at JNC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richet, S.

    2015-01-01

    The JNC-1 site in Japan includes four large Pu/MOX bulk handling facilities for which standard plutonium accountancy would not be sufficient to give high confidence in the timely detection of diversion. Other safeguards measures are needed to strengthen the ability for early detection, and Near Real Time Accountancy (NRTA) provides the capability of performing a short-term evaluation of material accountancy in the field as well as at Headquarters. NRTA was introduced at the main JNC-1 facilities on a facility-by-facility basis, starting at the MOX fuel fabrication plant (Plutonium Fuel Production Facility, PFPF) in 1999, followed by the reprocessing plant (Tokai Reprocessing Plant, TRP) in 2000, the MOX fuel fabrication and R&D facility (Plutonium fuel centre, Plutonium Fuel Facility, PPFF) in 2007, and finally at the conversion facility (Plutonium Conversion and Development Facility, PCDF) in 2014. In all four facilities, the main process areas are covered. This paper summarizes the experience gained with NRTA in PFPF, TRP, and PPFF since it was introduced in the respective facilities and describes the development work performed in implementing it in the last facility, PCDF. The key NRTA signatures which help guide the analysts' decisions on possible follow-up activities, i.e., the early detection of changes in parameters toward which NRTA is geared, are described based on the experience gained over the years. Furthermore, the paper describes the basis of the algorithms used in NRTA and the important relationships and dependencies between vessel calibrations, the determination of calibration curves and the associated uncertainty matrices on one side and the implemented structure and algorithms employed in the software on the other side. These algorithms were developed using Oracle SQL PLUS, MS Excel and Visual Basic, and batch commands. (author)

  11. Brief report of the JNC Cooperative Research (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2004 was the tenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JNC's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JNC as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JNC. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2004 on 42 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; seventeen of which ended in 2004. Of these, eight were related to fast breeder reactors, eight to the nuclear fuel cycle, and one to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  12. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16?positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. Study Design This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. Methods We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16?positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5?fluorouracil. ...

  13. p16 mutation spectrum in the premalignant condition Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Paulson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation, promoter hypermethylation and loss of heterozygosity involving the tumor suppressor gene p16 (CDKN2a/INK4a have been detected in a wide variety of human cancers, but much less is known concerning the frequency and spectrum of p16 mutations in premalignant conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have determined the p16 mutation spectrum for a cohort of 304 patients with Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition that predisposes to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Forty seven mutations were detected by sequencing of p16 exon 2 in 44 BE patients (14.5% with a mutation spectrum consistent with that caused by oxidative damage and chronic inflammation. The percentage of patients with p16 mutations increased with increasing histologic grade. In addition, samples from 3 out of 19 patients (15.8% who underwent esophagectomy were found to have mutations. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest the environment of the esophagus in BE patients can both generate and select for clones with p16 mutations.

  14. JNC thermodynamic database for performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste disposal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yui, Mikazu; Azuma, Jiro; Shibata, Masahiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Waste Isolation Research Division, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    This report is a summary of status, frozen datasets, and future tasks of the JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) thermodynamic database (JNC-TDB) for assessing performance of high-level radioactive waste in geological environments. The JNC-TDB development was carried out after the first progress report on geological disposal research in Japan (H-3). In the development, thermodynamic data (equilibrium constants at 25degC, I=0) for important radioactive elements were selected/determined based on original experimental data using different models (e.g., SIT, Pitzer). As a result, the reliability and traceability of the data for most of the important elements were improved over those of the PNC-TDB used in H-3 report. For detailed information of data analysis and selections for each element, see the JNC technical reports listed in this document. (author)

  15. Study on neutron dosimetry in JNC Tokai Works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Norio [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    2003-03-01

    The author developed the neutron reference calibration fields using a {sup 252}Cf standard source surrounded with PMMA (polymethylmethacrylates) moderators at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Tokai Works. The moderators are concentric, annular cylinders made of lead-contained PMMA with a thickness of 13.5, 35.0, 59.5 and 77.0mm, and the {sup 252}Cf source is guided to the geometric center of moderators by the pneumatic system. These fields can provide the moderated neutron spectra very similar to those encountered around the globe-boxes of the fabrication process of MOX (PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} mixed oxide) fuel. The neutron energy spectrum at the reference calibration point was evaluated from the calculations by MCNP4B and the measurements by the INS-type Bonner multi-sphere spectrometer and the hydrogen-filled proportional counters. The calculated neutron spectra were in good agreements with the measured ones. These fields were characterized in terms of the neutron fluence rate, spectral composition and ambient dose equivalent rate, and have served for the response-characterization of various neutron survey instruments. (author)

  16. Evaluation of P16 expression in canine appendicular osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B G; Mok, M Y; York, D; Rebhun, R; Woolard, K D; Hillman, C; Dickinson, P; Skorupski, K

    2017-06-20

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a common malignant bone tumor of large breed dogs that occurs at predictable anatomic sites. At the time of initial diagnosis, most affected dogs have occult pulmonary metastases. Even with aggressive surgical treatment combined with chemotherapy, the majority of dogs diagnosed with OSA live less than 1 year from the time of diagnosis. The ability to identify canine OSA cases most responsive to treatment is needed. In humans, OSA is also an aggressive tumor that is histologically and molecularly similar to canine OSA. The expression of the tumor suppressor gene product P16 by human OSA tissue has been linked to a favorable response to chemotherapy. We identified an antibody that binds canine P16 and developed a canine OSA tissue microarray in order to test the hypothesis that P16 expression by canine OSA tissue is predictive of clinical outcome following amputation and chemotherapy. Although statistical significance was not reached, a trend was identified between the lack of canine OSA P16 expression and a shorter disease free interval. The identification of a molecular marker for canine OSA is an important goal and the results reported here justify a larger study.

  17. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2002 was the eighth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JNC's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JNC as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JNC. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. The report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on 42 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; twelve of which ended in 2002. Of these, five were related to fast breeder reactors, three to the nuclear fuel cycle, one to radiation safety and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  18. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2003 was the ninth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JNC's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JNC as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JNC. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2003 on 43 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; fourteen of which ended in 2003. Of these, seven were related to fast breeder reactors, five to the nuclear fuel cycle, one to radiation safety and one to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  19. JNC results of BFS-62-3A benchmark calculation (CRP: Phase 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    The present work is the results of JNC, Japan, for the Phase 5 of IAEA CRP benchmark problem (BFS-62-3A critical experiment). Analytical Method of JNC is based on Nuclear Data Library JENDL-3.2; Group Constant Set JFS-3-J3.2R: 70-group, ABBN-type self-shielding factor table based on JENDL-3.2; Effective Cross-section - Current-weighted multigroup transport cross-section. Cell model for the BFS as-built tube and pellets was (Case 1) Homogeneous Model based on IPPE definition; (Case 2) Homogeneous atomic density equivalent to JNC's heterogeneous calculation only to cross-check the adjusted correction factors; (Case 3) Heterogeneous model based on JNC's evaluation, One-dimensional plate-stretch model with Tone's background cross-section method (CASUP code). Basic diffusion Calculation was done in 18-groups and three-dimensional Hex-Z model (by the CITATION code), with Isotropic diffusion coefficients (Case 1 and 2), and Benoist's anisotropic diffusion coefficients (Case 3). For sodium void reactivity, the exact perturbation theory was applied both to basic calculation and correction calculations, ultra-fine energy group correction - approx. 100,000 group constants below 50 keV, and ABBN-type 175 group constants with shielding factors above 50 keV. Transport theory and mesh size correction 18-group, was used for three-dimensional Hex-Z model (the MINIHEX code based on the S4-P0 transport method, which was developed by JNC. Effective delayed Neutron fraction in the reactivity scale was fixed at 0.00623 by IPPE evaluation. Analytical Results of criticality values and sodium void reactivity coefficient obtained by JNC are presented. JNC made a cross-check of the homogeneous model and the adjusted correction factors submitted by IPPE, and confirmed they are consistent. JNC standard system showed quite satisfactory analytical results for the criticality and the sodium void reactivity of BFS-62-3A experiment. JNC calculated the cross-section sensitivity coefficients of BFS

  20. New safeguards system and JNC's activities in the new safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been developing the various area of the technology in the nuclear fuel cycle more than 30 years, as the leading organization. Standing on the accumulated experiences through those activities, JNC will construct the new fuel cycle concept based on the principle for safety, environment, economy and nonproliferation. In this process, evaluation of the specific nonproliferation features with the nuclear material control methods taking in to account of the safegurdability might have one of the major importance. On the other hand, recently, in addition to the conventional safeguards (INFCIRC153), an additional protocol (INFCIRC540) which defines the activities that complement the integrity of a member country's declaration has come into effect in several countries, including Japan. IAEA and other international organizations are now discussing the safeguards concept, which integrates the conventional as well as new safeguards measures. In JNC's efforts to construct the new fuel cycle concept, it is necessary to give sufficient consideration to reflect the integrated safeguards concept. In the process of implementing the concept of the new integrated safeguards system, we presume that changes will have to be made in the traditional approach, which mainly deals with nuclear material. It will become necessary to develop a concrete method and approach in order to analyze and evaluate information, and work will have to be undertaken to optimize such a method based on its effects and efficiency. JNC will make contributions to international society by making the best use of its experience and technological infrastructure to reflect further safeguards development program in JNC so that the new IAEA safeguards can be firmly established. Related to this point of view, the following two subjects is to be introduced on the whole; 1. JNC's experiences and expertise of the development of safeguards technology with the fuel

  1. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16-positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. We measured the survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. We reviewed 23 patients (18 men and 5 women; age, 42-79 years). Induction chemotherapy resulted in partial or complete remission (20 patients) and in stable (2 patients) or progressive (1 patient) disease. In partial or complete remission, subsequent radiotherapy was performed in 16 patients, chemoradiotherapy in two, and transoral resection in two. In stable or progressive disease, subsequent open surgery was performed. Overall, one patient died of cervical lymph node metastasis, one died of kidney cancer, and one died of myocardial infarction. Event-free, distant-metastasis-free survival was present for 20 patients. The 3-year disease-specific survival was 95%; the overall survival was 87%. Two patients required gastrostomies during chemoradiotherapy and three required tracheotomies, but these were closed in all patients. The therapeutic response to induction chemotherapy for p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer was good. Partial or complete remission was achieved in almost 90% patients, and control of local and distant metastases was possible when it was followed by radiotherapy alone or with transoral resection of the primary tumor. A multicenter study is required to confirm these findings. 4.

  2. HAT-P-16b: A Bayesian Atmospheric Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Kathleen; Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Challener, Ryan; Bakos, Gaspar

    2017-10-01

    HAT-P-16b is a hot (equilibrium temperature 1626 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and efficient energy redistribution), 4.19 ± 0.09 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting an F8 star every 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days (Buchhave et al 2010). We observed two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-16b using the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels of the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (program ID 60003). We applied our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits (POET) code to produce normalized eclipse light curves, and our Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code to constrain the temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric molecular abundances of the planet. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  3. HPV infection and P16 expression in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adilbay, Dauren; Adilbayev, Galim; Kidirbayeva, Gulzhan; Shipilova, Viktoria; Sadyk, Zhanat; Koyanbekova, Gulsum; Sokolenko, Ekaterina; Klozar, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important etiologic factor in different cancers of anogenital region and also in a fraction of head and neck cancers (HNC) particularly oropharyngeal tumors. The HPV16 genotype associated with the majority of HPV-related head and neck carcinomas. Th incidence of oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in many countries, and the rate of HPV positive tumors is about 70% in Europe and North America. Little known about the prevalence of HPV in HNC in Central Asia. It's a prospective analysis of patients with verified oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Sociodemographic and clinical data obtained on admission to treatment. The diagnosis of HPV positivity assessed by both the P16 expression on immunohistochemistry(IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)with HPV DNA detection and HR HPV type determination. Seventy six patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer tested for HPV. Forteen cases were positive for HPV by PCR and 15 cases by P16 IHC. Of the 35 oropharyngeal tumors, nine were HPV DNA and p16 IHC positive, giving the rate of 25.7%. Of the 41 oral tumors, five were HPV DNA and six p16 IHC positive, giving the rate of 12.2%. It is the first study mapping prevalence of HPV positivity in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the Central Asian region. The rate of HPV positivity was higher in oropharyngeal than in oral cancer, the nonsmokers were significantly more frequent in the HPV positive group and HPV 16 was the most frequent type. However, the HPV positivity rates are lower than referred in the western world.

  4. Energy-dependent inversion of p+16O scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    A fast iterative procedure is developed to determine potentials by inversion from elastic cross section, analysing powers and reaction cross-section measurements covering a wide energy range. The procedure incorporates both energy and parity dependence. The method is applied to extensive p+ 16 O scattering data for an energy range from 27.3 to 46.1 MeV, giving a solution which simultaneously reproduces the data at all energies. The wide angle data is well reproduced by including parity dependence and a linear energy dependence is established for the real potential, including the parity-dependent component. The real terms agree qualitatively with potentials derived from the single channel RGM, but the central and spin-orbit imaginary components have distinct features strongly suggestive of further non-local contributions, possibly arising from channel coupling. The large data set is found essential to reduce the potential ambiguities present when fitting scattering data. (orig.)

  5. Fabrication drawings of fuel pins for FUJI project among PSI, JNC and NRG. Revised version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Abe, Tomoyuki; Nagayama, Masahiro

    2002-02-01

    Irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations in the framework of JNC-PSI-NRG collaboration project will be performed in 2003-2005. Irradiation fuel pins will be fabricated by the middle of 2003. The fabrication procedure for irradiation fuel pins has been started in 2001. Several fabrication tests and qualification tests in JNC and PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland) have been performed before the fuel pin fabrication. According to the design assignment between PSI and JNC in the frame of this project, PSI should make a specification document for the fuel pellet, the sphere-pac fuel particles, the vipac fuel particles, and the fuel pin. JNC should make a fabrication drawing for irradiation pins. JNC has been performed the fuel design in cooperation with PSI and NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Netherlands). In this project, the pelletized fuel, the sphere-pac fuel, and the vipac fuel will be simultaneously irradiated on HFR (High Flux Reactor, Netherlands). This fabrication drawing has been made under the design assignment with PSI, and consists of the drawing of MOX pellet, thermal insulator pellet, pin components, fuel segments, and the constructed pin. The fabrication drawings were approved in October 2001, but after that, the optimization of specifications has been discussed and agreed among all partners. In this report, the revised fabrication drawings will be shown. Based on the commission of Plutonium Fuel Technology Group, Advanced Fuel Recycle Technology Division, this design work has been performed in Fuel Design and Evaluation Group, Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Division, Plutonium Fuel Center. (author)

  6. Fabrication drawings of fuel pins for FUJI project among PSI, JNC and NRG. Revised version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Abe, Tomoyuki; Nagayama, Masahiro

    2002-10-01

    Irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations in the framework of JNC-PSI-NRG collaboration project will be performed in 2003-2005. Irradiation fuel pins will be fabricated by the middle of 2003. The fabrication procedure for irradiation fuel pins has been started in 2001. Several fabrication tests and qualification tests in JNC and PSI (Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland) have been performed before the fuel pin fabrication. According to the design assignment between PSI and JNC in the frame of this project, PSI should make specification documents for the fuel pellet, the sphere-pac fuel particles, the vipac fuel fragments, and the fuel segment fabrication. JNC should make the fabrication drawings for irradiation pins. JNC has been performed the fuel design in cooperation with PSI and NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Holland). In this project, the pelletized fuel, the sphere-pac fuel, and the vipac fuel will be simultaneously irradiated on HFR (High Flux Reactor, Holland). The fabrication drawings have been made under the design assignment with PSI, and consist of the drawings of MOX pellet, thermal insulator pellet, pin components, fuel segments, and the constructed pin. The fabrication drawings were approved in October 2001, but after that, the optimization of specifications was discussed and agreed among all partners. According to this agreement, the fabrication drawings were revised in January 2002. After the earlier revision, the shape of particle retainer to be made by PSI was modified from its drawing beforehand delivered. In this report, the fabrication drawings revised again will be shown, and the fabrication procedure (welding Qualification Tests) will be modified in accordance with the result of discussion on the 3rd technical meeting held in September 2002. These design works have been performed in Fuel Design and Evaluation Group, Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Division, Plutonium Fuel Center under the commission of Plutonium Fuel

  7. High CpG island methylation ofp16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    employed to detect CpG island methylation in p16 promoter region and ... of Fallot;p16 gene;p16 protein;CpG islands;Methylation;Promoter regions ..... Our findings that p16 has a role in heart development is ... Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 15, 75-84. .... phenotype in colorectal cancer using a large population-based sample.

  8. p16(INK4a translation suppressed by miR-24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Lal

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the tumor suppressor p16(INK4a increases during aging and replicative senescence.Here, we report that the microRNA miR-24 suppresses p16 expression in human diploid fibroblasts and cervical carcinoma cells. Increased p16 expression with replicative senescence was associated with decreased levels of miR-24, a microRNA that was predicted to associate with the p16 mRNA coding and 3'-untranslated regions. Ectopic miR-24 overexpression reduced p16 protein but not p16 mRNA levels. Conversely, introduction of antisense (AS-miR-24 blocked miR-24 expression and markedly enhanced p16 protein levels, p16 translation, and the production of EGFP-p16 reporter bearing the miR-24 target recognition sites.Together, our results suggest that miR-24 represses the initiation and elongation phases of p16 translation.

  9. 4p16.3 microdeletions and microduplications detected by chromosomal microarray analysis: New insights into mechanisms and critical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau-Wai; Breman, Amy M; Bacino, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the 4p16.3 region cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a well known contiguous microdeletion syndrome with the critical region for common phenotype mapped in WHSCR2. Recently, duplications in 4p16.3 were reported in three patients with developmental delay and dysmorphic features. Through chromosomal microarray analysis, we identified 156 patients with a deletion (n = 109) or duplication (n = 47) in 4p16.3 out of approximately 60,000 patients analyzed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Seventy-five of the postnatally detected deletions encompassed the entire critical region, 32 (43%) of which were associated with other chromosome rearrangements, including six patients (8%) that had a duplication adjacent to the terminal deletion. Our data indicate that Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions with an adjacent duplication occur at a higher frequency than previously appreciated. Pure deletions (n = 14) or duplications (n = 15) without other copy number changes distal to or inside the WHSCR2 were identified for mapping of critical regions. Our data suggest that deletion of the segment from 0.6 to 0.9 Mb from the terminus of 4p causes a seizure phenotype and duplications of a region distal to the previously defined smallest region of overlap for 4p16.3 microduplication syndrome are associated with neurodevelopmental problems. We detected seven Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions and one 4p16.3 duplication prenatally; all of the seven are either >8 Mb in size and/or associated with large duplications. In conclusion, our study provides deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms, the critical regions and effective prenatal diagnosis for 4p16.3 deletions/ duplications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Development of hot test equipment for advanced nuclear fuel cycle development in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, K.; Shibata, A.; Nemoto, S.; Aoshima, A.; Funasaka, H.

    2001-01-01

    JNC (Japan nuclear fuel cycle development institute) has been developing a mini centrifugal contactor. JNC has experience of the development of the RETF (Recycle equipment test facility; under construction at Tokai-works) type centrifugal contactor and the mini centrifugal contactor is designed on the basis of this knowledge. The followings were carried out in order to estimate the performance of the mini centrifugal contactor: functional test for evaluating basic performance of this extractor, acid-solvent test and uranium test for confirming that sufficient performance is attained. The results showed wide performance in comparison with the mini mixer settler used so far and it is expected that shortening in operating time and higher efficiency of extracting tests will be achieved. (author)

  11. Nuclear engineering experiments at experimental facilities of JNC in graduate course of Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Takahashi, Minoru; Aoyama, Takafumi; Onose, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear engineering experiments using outside facilities of the campus have been offered for graduate students in the nuclear engineering course in Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech.). The experiments are managed with the collaboration of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KUR). This report presents the new curriculum of the nuclear engineering experiments at JNC since 2002. The change is due to the shutdown of Deuterium Criticality Assembly Facility (DCA) that was used as an experimental facility until 2001. Reactor physics experiment using the training simulator of the experimental fast reactor JOYO is continued from the previous curriculum with the addition of the criticality approach experiment and control rods calibration. A new experimental subject is an irradiated material experiment at the Material Monitoring Facility (MMF). As a result, both are acceptable as the student experiments on the fast reactor. (author)

  12. Prevalence of arterial hypertension in diabetic patients before and after the JNC-V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Rossing, P; Gall, Mari-Anne

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) according to blood pressure (BP) criteria from the World Health Organization (WHO) and The Fifth Report of the Joint National...... had stage 2 (160-179/100-109 mmHg) hypertension. Two out of three untreated hypertensive patients had isolated systolic hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: The new JNC-V criteria approved by the American Diabetes Association leads to a considerable increase in the prevalence of arterial hypertension...... treatment were classified as hypertensives. RESULTS: In IDDM patients, the prevalence of arterial hypertension rose from 15 to 42% in the normoalbuminuric group, from 26 to 52% in the microalbuminuric group, and from 61 to 79% in the macroalbuminuric group when WHO and JNC-V criteria were compared...

  13. Survey of secular change for the buildings of nuclear fuel facility in JNC Tokai Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uryu, Mitsuru; Kyue, Tadashi; Satoko, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Toshihiko

    2002-06-01

    Some nuclear facilities of JNC such as Tokai Reprocessing Plant or Tokai Plutonium Fuel plant have been operating over 20 years since their completion. These facilities' buildings are constructed near the seaside, so we are that, we are surveying the secular change, estimating the tendency and counterplan to operate the facilities stably. In this paper, we report the abstract of the result of the survey, and the maintenance stage of the diagnostic techniques etc. (author)

  14. Opinions of 'JNC monitor Ibaraki'. The 1st period (fiscal 1999) to the 3rd period (fiscal 2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, Noriko; Senda, Masaki; Kanno, Hideo

    2002-06-01

    To reflect the opinions of inhabitants of the district to the business management of JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute), it charged local residents with monitor of J NC monitor Ibaraki . Their tenures of office are one year. The meetings are held for three periods from fiscal 1999 to fiscal 2001. Abstract of monitor's opinions and consciousness change are reported. On JNC, 1) many monitors wish to give safety the highest priority. 2) Many monitors demand easy explanation without the technical terms. 3) Many monitors think that the JNC staffs do not react to the accident for their parts and not to open information. 4) Many monitors wish to continue the monitor system, because it is good system for an interchange of opinions between local resident and the staff. On consciousness change of monitor, the impression on JNC was changed by experience of monitor. Almost monitor think nuclear power is needed, but about 80% of them felt unrest after experience of monitor. It consists of ten chapters as followings; introduction, JNC monitors Ibaraki, abstract of meetings, main opinions from monitors, an attitude survey on JNC accident and before and after of experience of monitor, results of the questionnaire, discussion of each question, determination of JCO, conclusions and data. (S.Y.)

  15. Development of JNC geological disposal technical information integration system for geological environment field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Makoto; Ueta, Shinzo; Ohashi, Toyo

    2004-02-01

    Enormous data on geology, geological structure, hydrology, geochemistry and rock properties should be obtained by various investigation/study in the geological disposal study. Therefore, 'JNC Geological Disposal Technical Information Integration System for Geological Environment Field' was developed in order to manage these data systematically and to support/promote the use of these data for the investigators concerned. The system is equipped with data base to store the information of the works and the background information of the assumptions built up in the works on each stage of data flow ('instigative', → 'data sampling' → interpretation' → conceptualization/modeling/simulation' → 'output') in the geological disposal study. In this system the data flow is shown as 'plan' composed of task' and 'work' to be done in the geological disposal study. It is possible to input the data to the database and to refer data from the database by using GUI that shows the data flow as 'plan'. The system was installed to the server computer possessed by JNC and the system utilities were checked on both the server computer and client computer also possessed by JNC. (author)

  16. Ageing, chronic alcohol consumption and folate are determinants of genomic DNA methylation, p16 promoter methylation and the expression of p16 in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  17. Aging and chronic alcohol consumption are determinants of p16 gene expression, genomic DNA methylation and p16 promoter methylation in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  18. Brief of the joint research with universities, etc. for 2002. Except the research by the JNC cooperative research scheme on the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) promote the basic and fundamental research in relation to the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below). This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on 15 joint researches with universities, etc. In addition, this report removes the research by the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. (author)

  19. Prognostic Relevance of HPV Infection and p16 Overexpression in Squamous Cell Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, Sabine; Welzel, Grit; Ottstadt, Martine; Lohr, Frank; Severa, Sebastin; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Trunk, Marcus J.; Wenz, Frederik; Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus von; Reuschenbach, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and p16 status have both been reported as prognostic factors in anal cancer, but the prognostic relevance of combined detection and particularly HPV−/p16+ and HPV+/p16− signatures is unknown. We evaluated combined HPV DNA and p16 status as a prognostic factor of treatment response in anal cancer. Methods: 106 patients treated with radiochemotherapy (RCT+5-FU/MMC) with available paraffin-embedded tumor tissue specimens were evaluated regarding local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. In addition to HPV DNA/p16 status, the influence of age, gender, previous surgery, initial recurrence, T stage, N status, and tumor localization was analyzed. Results: 63 patients were HPV+/p16+, 9 were HPV+/p16−, 11 were HPV−/p16+, and 23 were HPV−/p16−. In univariate analysis, LC was significantly better in patients with T1/2 stage, female gender, and HPV/p16 status. HPV+/p16+ was associated with significantly better LC (88.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.89-97.31) compared with HPV−/p16+ (63.6%; 95% CI: 35.18-92.02; P=.021) and especially HPV−/p16− (55.8%; 95% CI: 33.46-78.14; P=.002) but not with HPV+/p16− (77.8%; 95% CI: 50.56-105.04; P=.270). OS was influenced by T stage and LC. HPV+/p16+ patients showed a trend toward better OS compared with HPV−/p16− patients (HPV+/p16+: 81.1%; 95% CI: 70.12-92.08 vs HPV−/p16−: 68.8%; 95%CI: 47.44-90.16; P=.138). On multivariate analysis, T3/4 stage and HPV/p16 status (HPV−/p16+, HPV−/p16− vs HPV+/p16+) predicted poorer LC (T3/4: 50.3% vs T1/2: 86.6%, hazard ratio [HR] 0.22; 95% CI: 0.09-0.53; P<.001; HPV+/p16+ vs HPV−/p16+: HR 4.73; 95% CI: 1.33-16.82; P=.016, and HPV+/p16+ vs HPV−/p16−: HR 6.40; 95% CI: 2.23-18.35; P<.001), whereas local relapse dramatically influenced OS. Conclusion: Our data suggest that HPV/p16 signature determines prognosis. HPV+/p16+ patients had the best prognosis, and HPV−/p16+ and HPV−/p16− patients

  20. Prognostic Relevance of HPV Infection and p16 Overexpression in Squamous Cell Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.mai@umm.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Welzel, Grit; Ottstadt, Martine; Lohr, Frank; Severa, Sebastin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Prigge, Elena-Sophie [Department of Applied Tumor Biology, Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, and Clinical Cooperation Unit Applied Tumor Biology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wentzensen, Nicolas [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Trunk, Marcus J. [Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus von; Reuschenbach, Miriam [Department of Applied Tumor Biology, Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, and Clinical Cooperation Unit Applied Tumor Biology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and p16 status have both been reported as prognostic factors in anal cancer, but the prognostic relevance of combined detection and particularly HPV−/p16+ and HPV+/p16− signatures is unknown. We evaluated combined HPV DNA and p16 status as a prognostic factor of treatment response in anal cancer. Methods: 106 patients treated with radiochemotherapy (RCT+5-FU/MMC) with available paraffin-embedded tumor tissue specimens were evaluated regarding local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. In addition to HPV DNA/p16 status, the influence of age, gender, previous surgery, initial recurrence, T stage, N status, and tumor localization was analyzed. Results: 63 patients were HPV+/p16+, 9 were HPV+/p16−, 11 were HPV−/p16+, and 23 were HPV−/p16−. In univariate analysis, LC was significantly better in patients with T1/2 stage, female gender, and HPV/p16 status. HPV+/p16+ was associated with significantly better LC (88.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.89-97.31) compared with HPV−/p16+ (63.6%; 95% CI: 35.18-92.02; P=.021) and especially HPV−/p16− (55.8%; 95% CI: 33.46-78.14; P=.002) but not with HPV+/p16− (77.8%; 95% CI: 50.56-105.04; P=.270). OS was influenced by T stage and LC. HPV+/p16+ patients showed a trend toward better OS compared with HPV−/p16− patients (HPV+/p16+: 81.1%; 95% CI: 70.12-92.08 vs HPV−/p16−: 68.8%; 95%CI: 47.44-90.16; P=.138). On multivariate analysis, T3/4 stage and HPV/p16 status (HPV−/p16+, HPV−/p16− vs HPV+/p16+) predicted poorer LC (T3/4: 50.3% vs T1/2: 86.6%, hazard ratio [HR] 0.22; 95% CI: 0.09-0.53; P<.001; HPV+/p16+ vs HPV−/p16+: HR 4.73; 95% CI: 1.33-16.82; P=.016, and HPV+/p16+ vs HPV−/p16−: HR 6.40; 95% CI: 2.23-18.35; P<.001), whereas local relapse dramatically influenced OS. Conclusion: Our data suggest that HPV/p16 signature determines prognosis. HPV+/p16+ patients had the best prognosis, and HPV−/p16+ and HPV−/p16− patients

  1. Relationship between HPV infection/p16 expression and radiotherapy prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Yuan; Gao Li; Yi Junlin; Huang Xiaodong; Luo Jingwei; Zhang Shiping; Wang Kai; Xu Guozhen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection/p16 expression and radiotherapy prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and the prognostic value of p16 in OSCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods: Tissue samples were collected from 42 patients newly diagnosed with OSCC in our hospital from January 1999 to December 2008. PCR was performed to detect HPV DNA, and p16 expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. The chi-square test was used to compare the local/regional control rate (CR) between HPV (+)/p16 (+) patients and HPV (-)/p16 (-) patients after radical radiotherapy and evaluate the association between HPV infection and p16 expression; the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate overall survival (OS), and the log-rank test was used for survival difference analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%.The HPV infection rate was 19%, and the positive rate of p16 was 43%. In patients who received radical radiotherapy, the local CR for HPV (+) patients was 100%, versus 54% for HPV (-) patients (P =0.026); the local CR for p16 (+) patients was 92%, versus 44% for p16 (-) patients (P=0.006); the locoregional CR for p16(-) patients was 69%, versus 22% for p16 (-) patients (P=0.009). For high-risk patients, HPV infection was significantly associated with p16 expression (P=0.000). The 3-year OS rates for p16 (+) and p16 (-) patients were 91% and 2 6 %, respectively (P=0.001). Conclusions: The p16 expression is closely associated with HPV infection in OSCC patients, and it is expected to become one of the prognostic markers in OSCC patients treated with radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. Prognostic Significance of p16 Expression in Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lewis, James S. [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Pfeifer, John [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Huettner, Phyllis [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 126 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages Ib1-IVb cervical cancer treated with radiation. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was given to 108 patients. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from the paraffin-embedded diagnostic biopsy specimens. Immunoperoxidase staining was performed on the TMA and a p16 monoclonal antibody was utilized. IHC p16 extent was evaluated and scored in quartiles: 0 = no staining, 1 = 1-25% of cells staining, 2 = 26 to 50%, 3 = 51 to 75%, and 4 = 76 to 100%. Results: The p16 IHC score was 4 in 115 cases, 3 in 1, 2 in 3 and 0 in 7. There was no relationship between p16 score and tumor histology. Patients with p16-negative tumors were older (mean age at diagnosis 65 vs. 52 years for p16-positive tumors; p = 0.01). The 5-year cause-specific survivals were 33% for p16-negative cases (score = 0) compared with 63% for p16-positive cases (scores 1, 2, 3 or 4; p = 0.07). The 5-year recurrence-free survivals were 34% for those who were p16-negative vs. 57% for those who were p16-positive (p = 0.09). In addition, patients with p16-positive tumors (score > 0) were more likely to be complete metabolic responders as assessed by the 3-month posttherapy 18 [F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomograph compared with patients with p16-negative tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusion: p16 expression is predictive of improved survival outcome after chemoradiation therapy for advanced-stage invasive cervical carcinoma. Further testing will be needed to evaluate p16-negative cervical tumors.

  3. Proceedings of second JAERI-JNC joint conference on nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Anoda, Yoshinari; Araya, Fumimasa; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2004-08-01

    The second JAERI-JNC Joint Conference on Nuclear Safety Research was held on February 6, 2004 in Tokyo for those who are relevant to nuclear industries and regulatory organizations, and general public. The nuclear safety research has been conducted in both institutes according to the Five-Year Program for Nuclear Safety Research established periodically by the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) and needs from the regulatory organizations. The objectives of the conference are to present its recent results and to collect views and opinions from the participants for its future program through the discussion after each presentation and panel discussion on how to conduct efficiently the nuclear safety in the New Organization. A total of 259 people participated in the conference mainly from the nuclear industries and regulatory organizations and the number was much larger than that in the last conference of 188. The conference consisted of presentations on the safety research results, a special lecture and a panel discussion. First, the overview of safety research results was presented from each institute. Then, the results in the field of nuclear installations, environmental radioactivity and radioactive waste were presented from each institute. Then, Dr. Higashi, the Nuclear Safety Commissioner, made a special lecture on the radiation protection from the high-level radioactive waste disposal. Finally, a panel discussion was conducted with the title of ''how to conduct efficiently the nuclear safety research in the New Organization'' chaired by Prof. Kimura, the chairperson of Standing Committee on Nuclear Safety Research under the NSC. The panelists from the regulatory organizations, nuclear industry, JAERI and JNC discussed the subject together with the participants on the floor. The panelists not from JAERI and JNC expressed their views and opinions on how to conduct efficiently the nuclear safety research in the New Organization that were valuable inputs for developing

  4. The Site Approach - Lessons Learned from the Integrated Safeguards Approach for JNC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, M.; Iso, S.; Tomine, K.; Hirato, Y.; Namekawa, M.; Takasugi, N.; Watanabe, M.; Tsutaki, Y.; Asano, T.; Nagatani, T.; Ninagawa, J.; Fujiwara, S.; Takahashi, S.; Kimura, T.; Kodani, Y.; Fukuhara, J.; Miyaji, N.; Kawakami, Y.; Koizumi, A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Nishinosono, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated safeguards approaches for specific sites are recognized important elements in the design of a State-level approach under the concept of grouping facilities. Japan and the IAEA agreed further improvement of integrated safeguards implementation in effective and efficient manner, particularly at large complex nuclear sites in Japan. Japan and the IAEA developed the integrated safeguards approach for specific sites defined at Article 18 of Additional Protocol. In 2008, the IAEA started the three-year test implementation of JNC-1 site approach for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards implementation of UDU material handling facilities. Japan and IAEA agreed to adopt the sector concept in order to make clear of subjected nuclear material to be verified. The sector is defined as spatial assignment that treats the same material stratum beyond MBAs in the site. The arrangement of MBAs and related material balance calculations as well as statistical analysis is maintained as a fundamental safeguards measure. At the boundaries of each sector, appropriate unattended NDA system and/or C/S system are installed, and material flows across the boundaries are verified by the system or attendance of resident inspectors. For inventory verification of the nuclear material stayed in sectors, an appropriate numbers of randomly scheduled inspections will be implemented. IAEA can access to the randomly selected sectors within 2 hours after notification. NRTA based on frequent operator's declaration will be performed for achievement of timeliness detection goal. The JNC-1 site approach has been implemented under the enhanced co-operation between the IAEA and SSAC through joint use of equipment and arrangements for DA analysis. Especially, national inspectors are working with IAEA together for coordination with operators. Because NMCC lab analyses all DA samples taken from facilities and the analysis results will be shared by the IAEA, certain numbers of DA

  5. Current status of research and development on partitioning of long-lived radionuclides in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funasaka, H.; Sano, Y.; Nomura, K.; Koma, Y.; Koyama, T.

    2000-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) is conducting research and development on the partitioning of actinides and long-lived fission products for the Feasibility Study of the Advanced Fuel Cycle. The SETFICS process was compared with other neutral extractant system, and the effect of higher TBP concentration on the recovery and decontamination was examined. A soft donor ligands TPTZ was studied on the selectivity among the lanthanide series, and their protonation and coordination behavior. With regarding to electrolytic extraction of some platinum elements, the chemical form of the Ru, Re and Pd deposit was identified. (authors)

  6. Expression of Anion Exchanger 1 Sequestrates p16 in the Cytoplasm in Gastric, Colonic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Shen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available p16INK4A (p16 binds to cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6, negatively regulates cell growth. Recent studies have led to an understanding of additional biologic functions for p16; however, the detailed mechanisms involved are still elusive. In this article, we show an unexpected expression of anion exchanger 1 (AEi in the cytoplasm in poorly, moderately differentiated gastric, colonic adenocarcinoma cells, in its interaction with p16, thereby sequestrating the protein in the cytoplasm. Genetic alterations of p16, AEi were not detectable. Forced expression of AEi in these cells sequestrated more p16 in the cytoplasm, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of AEi in the cells induced the release of p16 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, leading to cell death, growth inhibition of tumor cells. By analyzing tissue samples obtained from patients with gastric, colonic cancers, we found that 83.33% of gastric cancers, 56.52% of colonic cancers coexpressed AEi, p16 in the cytoplasm. We conclude that AEi plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of gastric, colonic adenocarcinoma, that p16 dysfunction is a novel pathway of carcinogenesis.

  7. Not all hypochondroplasia families are linked to chromosome 4p16.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, F.; Munnich, A.; Merrer, M.Le. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH, MIM 100800) and hypochondroplasia (HCH, MIM 146000) are short limb dwarfism with enlarged head sharing some specific radiological features. Inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability and histolopathological aspects of the growth cartilage suggested that ACH and HCH are allelic disorders. Recently, the gene for achondroplasia was mapped to chromosome 4p and no recombinants were found in 9 families with hypochondroplasia between D4S111 and the telomere (Zmax=1.70, {theta}=0). By using an additional polymorphic DNA marker which detects VNTR-like polymorphism at the D4S227 locus and a new microsatellite at locus D4S? (AFM163yc1), we observed recombinant events with markers of the chromosome 4p16.3 in 3/10 hypochondroplasia families, indicating that not all hypochondroplasia families are linked to chromosome 4p. A fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3) expressed in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification which is located in the 2.5 Mb candidate region for achondroplasia was regarded as a good candidate gene. No major rearrangement of the FGFR3 gene was detected by Southern blot analysis using an FGFR3 cDNA probe. Further investigations will be required to conclude as to the possible involvement of this gene in ACH.

  8. High CpG island methylation ofp16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    :Tetralogy of Fallot;p16 gene;p16 protein;CpG islands;Methylation;Promoter regions ... of congenital heart disease, as well as the exclusion of previous history of ..... malignant progression of oral epithelial dysplasia: a prospective cohort study.

  9. Analysis of human papilloma virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma using p16: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S.; Rao, R. S.; Amrutha, N.; Sanketh, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of human papilloma virus (HPV) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to correlate the association of HPV in histological grades of OSCC using p16 (p16INK4a) immunohistochemistry (IHC). Subjects and Methods: This study consists of 30 histological diagnosed cases of OSCC (10-well-differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma [WDOSCC], 10-moderately differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma [MDOSCC] and 10-poorly differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma [PDOSCC]). The sections were subjected to IHC procedure using p16. Two parameters in immunohistochemical p16 expression were evaluated by 3 observers based on the criteria by Galgano M. Tetal (2010) (a) percentage of p16 positive cases (b) pattern of p16 staining in various grades of OSCC. Statistical Analysis Used: Kappa test. Results: Totally, 30 samples of 0SCC, p16 positivity was noted in 26/30 (86.66%). Of 26 positive cases, p16 staining was positive in 7/10 (70%) of WDOSCC, 9/10 (90%) in MDOSCC and, 10/10 (100%) PDOSCC. Incidentally, we also found single dispersed cell staining in WDOSCC, patchy staining in MDOSCC and more diffuse staining pattern predominant in PDOSCC. Conclusions: Our study revealed an association between HPV and OSCC. Diffuse staining pattern was noted in PDOSCC, which in turn depicts the increase viral overload, which might have an influence on its aggressive behavior. PMID:24818098

  10. Immunohistochemical comparison of cyclin D1 and P16 in odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Razavi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Cyclin D1 did show a higher staining intensity in UAs compared to the keratocysts, although the expression of P16 was similar in the studied groups. The invasive growth of OKC might be related to the state of expression of cyclin D1 and P16 in the epithelium of this cyst.

  11. Correlation between human papillomavirus and p16 overexpression in oropharyngeal tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, C; Gyldenløve, M; Jensen, D H

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (OP-SCC) are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and p16 overexpression. This subgroup proves better prognosis and survival but no evidence exists on the correlation between HPV and p16 overexpression based on diag...

  12. Proceedings of third JAERI-JNC joint conference on nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Oikawa, Tetsukuni; Araya, Fumimasa; Suzuki, Tsugio

    2006-03-01

    The present report is the proceedings of the third JAERI-JNC joint conference on nuclear safety research held on July 29, 2005 in Tokyo before integration of JAERI and JNC to JAEA. The conference was held for those who are relevant to nuclear industries and regulatory organizations, and general public. The nuclear safety research has been conducted in both institutes according to the Five-Year Program for Nuclear Safety Research established periodically by the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) and needs from the regulatory organizations. The objectives of the conference are to present its recent results and to collect views and opinions from the participants for its future program through the discussion after each presentation and panel discussion on how to conduct efficiently the nuclear safety research in the new organization. A total of 234 people participated in the conference mainly from the nuclear industries and regulatory organizations. The conference consisted of presentations on the safety research results, a special lecture and a panel discussion. First, the overview of safety research results was presented from each institute. Then, the results in the field of nuclear installations, environmental radioactivity and radioactive waste were presented from each institute. Then, Dr. Suzuki, deputy chairperson of NSC, made a special lecture on recent trends in nuclear safety regulation and expectation for the new organization. Finally, a panel discussion was conducted with the title of 'how to conduct efficiently the nuclear safety research in the new organization' chaired by Prof. Kimura, the chairperson of Standing Committee on Nuclear Safety Research under the NSC. The panelists from JAERI and JNC presented and discussed the subject together with the participants on the floor. Through vigorous exchange of views in the panel discussion and descriptions on the questionnaires, it was obviously expressed that expectation to the safety research of the new

  13. Analysis of the Rossendorf SEG experiments using the JNC route for reactor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, Klaus

    1999-11-01

    The integral experiments performed at the Rossendorf fast-thermal coupled reactor RRR/SEG have been reanalyzed using the JNC route for reactor calculation JENDL3.2/SLAROM/CITATION/JOINT/PERKY. The Rossendorf experiments comprise sample reactivity measurements with pure fission products and structural material in five configurations with different neutron and adjoint spectra. The shapes of the adjoint spectra have been designed to get high sensitivities to neutron capture or the scattering effect. The calculated neutron and adjoint spectra are in good agreement with former results obtained with the European route JEF2.2/ECCO/ERANOS. The C/E-values of the central reactivity worths of samples under investigation are given. Deviations in the results of both routes are due to the different libraries, codes, and self-shielding treatments used in the calculations. Results exceeding the experimental error are discussed. (author)

  14. Gas cooled fast reactor benchmarks for JNC and Cea neutronic tools assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, G.; Sugino, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to verify the adequacy of JNC and Cea computational tools for the definition of GCFR (gas cooled fast reactor) core characteristics, GCFR neutronic benchmarks have been performed. The benchmarks have been carried out on two different cores: 1) a conventional Gas-Cooled fast Reactor (EGCR) core with pin-type fuel, and 2) an innovative He-cooled Coated-Particle Fuel (CPF) core. Core characteristics being studied include: -) Criticality (Effective multiplication factor or K-effective), -) Instantaneous breeding gain (BG), -) Core Doppler effect, and -) Coolant depressurization reactivity. K-effective and coolant depressurization reactivity at EOEC (End Of Equilibrium Cycle) state were calculated since these values are the most critical characteristics in the core design. In order to check the influence due to the difference of depletion calculation systems, a simple depletion calculation benchmark was performed. Values such as: -) burnup reactivity loss, -) mass balance of heavy metals and fission products (FP) were calculated. Results of the core design characteristics calculated by both JNC and Cea sides agree quite satisfactorily in terms of core conceptual design study. Potential features for improving the GCFR computational tools have been discovered during the course of this benchmark such as the way to calculate accurately the breeding gain. Different ways to improve the accuracy of the calculations have also been identified. In particular, investigation on nuclear data for steel is important for EGCR and for lumped fission products in both cores. The outcome of this benchmark is already satisfactory and will help to design more precisely GCFR cores. (authors)

  15. Proceedings of JAERI-JNC joint conference on nuclear safety research. March 7, 2003, Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Anoda, Yoshinari; Araya, Fumimasa; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2003-08-01

    The JAERI-JNC Joint Conference on Nuclear Safety Research was held on March 7, 2003 in Tokyo with 188 participants, ahead of planned unification of JAERI and JNC in 2005. The objectives of the conference are to present recent results of safety research conducted in both institutes in accordance with the Five-Year Safety Research Plan by the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC), and to reflect suggestions from the participants for future research program. Prof. Matsubara, Vice Chairperson of NSC, first presented a special lecture entitled 'Expectation on Future Nuclear Safety Research in Japan'. Twelve papers were then presented on the overview of research results and those of individual research activities in the fields of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste and environmental radioactivity. In the final session, a panel discussion was conducted with a title of 'Expectation on Future Nuclear Safety Research' chaired by Prof. Kimura, Chairperson of Special Committee on Nuclear Safety Research under NSC. Through the presentations and discussions, consensus has almost been obtained among participants for several key issues on safety research to be conducted by a unified new organization, such as giving priority to safety research as one of major missions, assurance of independence of safety research with the governmental funds, assurance of transparency of the planning process of safety research, separation and harmonization between safety research and developmental research, importance of maintaining fundamental research and research facilities, promotion of cooperation with relevant organizations considering the needs from industries, and importance of dissemination of research results and personnel training. The present report compiles the summaries of special lecture, papers, questions and comments, panel discussions, and OHPs presented in the conference. (author)

  16. Role of p16 testing in cervical cancer screening among HIV-infected women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine J McGrath

    Full Text Available p16 immunohistochemistry is used to evaluate for HPV-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The diagnostic performance of p16 in HIV infection is unclear.Between June-December 2009, HIV-infected women underwent Papanicolaou (Pap smear, human papillomavirus (HPV testing, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA, and colposcopy-directed biopsy as the disease gold standard at a HIV clinic in Kenya. Pap smears were evaluated for p16 expression. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of p16 to detect CIN2/3 on histology and the impact of immunosuppression and ART was assessed.Of 331 cervical samples with p16 expression, p16 sensitivity and specificity to detect CIN2/3 was 54.1% and 72.4% respectively, which was lower than Pap and HPV in sensitivity, but higher in specificity than Pap, HPV, and VIA. Combining tests and p16 reduced sensitivity and increased specificity of Pap from 90.5% to 48.7% and 51.4% to 81.7%; of VIA from 59.5% to 37.8% and 67.6% to 89.9%; and of HPV from 82.4% to 50.0% and 55.3% to 84.8%. Combination p16 increased the PPV of Pap from 34.9% to 43.4%; of HPV from 34.7% to 48.7%; and VIA from 34.9% to 51.9%. Adjunctive p16 did not change AUC (P>0.05. P16 performance was not altered by immunosuppression or ART use. Combining p16 with HPV and VIA reduced the variation in HPV and VIA performance associated with CD4 and ART.As an adjunctive test in HIV-infected women, p16 immunohistochemistry increased specificity and PPV of HPV and VIA for CIN2/3, and was not altered in performance by immunosuppression, ART, or age.

  17. Companied P16 genetic and protein status together providing useful information on the clinical outcome of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Liya; Fu, Yao; Fan, Zhiwen; Zheng, Jinyu; Zhang, Biao; Yang, Jun; Guan, Wenyan; Wu, Hongyan; Ye, Qing; Huang, Qing

    2018-04-01

    SPEC P16/CEN3/7/17 Probe fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization (FISH) has become the most sensitive method in indentifying the urothelial tumors and loss of P16 has often been identified in low-grade urothelial lesions; however, little is known about the significations of other P16 genetic status (normal and amplification) in bladder cancer.We detected P16 gene status by FISH in 259 urine samples and divided these samples into 3 groups: 1, normal P16; 2, loss of P16; and 3, amplified P16. Meanwhile, p16 protein expression was measured by immunocytochemistry and we characterized the clinicopathologic features of cases with P16 gene status.Loss of P16 occurred in 26.2%, P16 amplification occurred in 41.3% and P16 gene normal occurred in 32.4% of all cases. P16 genetic status was significantly associated with tumor grade and primary tumor status (P = .008 and .017), but not with pathological tumor stage, overall survival, and p16 protein expression. However, P16 gene amplification accompanied protein high-expression has shorter overall survival compared with the overall patients (P = .023), and P16 gene loss accompanied loss of protein also had the tendency to predict bad prognosis (P = .067).Studies show that the genetic status of P16 has a close relation with the stages of bladder cancer. Loss of P16 is associated with low-grade urothelial malignancy while amplified P16 donotes high-grade. Neither P16 gene status nor p16 protein expression alone is an independent predictor of urothelial bladder carcinoma, but combine gene and protein status together providing useful information on the clinical outcome of these patients.

  18. Malignant transformation of neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis 1 is associated with CDKN2A/p16 inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G P; Stemmer-Rachamimov, A O; Ino, Y

    1999-01-01

    examined the CDKN2A/p16 gene and p16 protein in NFs and MPNSTs from patients with NF1. On immunohistochemical analysis, all NFs expressed p16 protein. The MPNSTs, however, were essentially immunonegative for p16, with striking transitions in cases that contained both benign and malignant elements. None...

  19. HFE polymorphisms influence the response to chemotherapeutic agents via induction of p16INK4A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Y; Liu, Siying; Mitchell, Ryan M; Slagle-Webb, Becky; Hong, Young-Soo; Sheehan, Jonas M; Connor, James R

    2011-11-01

    HFE is a protein that impacts cellular iron uptake. HFE gene variants are identified as risk factors or modifiers for multiple diseases. Using HFE stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells, we found that cells carrying the C282Y HFE variant do not differentiate when exposed to retinoic acid. Therefore, we hypothesized HFE variants would impact response to therapeutic agents. Both the human neuroblastoma and glioma cells that express the C282Y HFE variant are resistant to Temodar, geldanamycin and γ-radiation. A gene array analysis revealed that p16INK4A (p16) expression was increased in association with C282Y expression. Decreasing p16 protein by siRNA resulted in increased vulnerability to all of the therapeutic agents suggesting that p16 is responsible for the resistance. Decreasing HFE expression by siRNA resulted in a 85% decrease in p16 expression in the neuroblastoma cells but not the astrocytoma cells. These data suggest a potential direct relationship between HFE and p16 that may be cell specific or mediated by different pathways in the different cell types. In conclusion, the C282Y HFE variant impacts the vulnerability of cancer cells to current treatment strategies apparently by increasing expression of p16. Although best known as a tumor suppressor, there are multiple reports that p16 is elevated in some forms of cancer. Given the frequency of the HFE gene variants, as high as 10% of the Caucasian population, these data provide compelling evidence that the C282Y HFE variant should be part of a pharmacogenetic strategy for evaluating treatment efficacy in cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  20. High frequency of p 16 promoter methylation in non-small cell lung carcinomas from Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEDA M GUZMAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by aberrant methylation of promoter regions has been described as a frequent event in neoplasia development, including lung cancer. The p16 gene is a tumour suppressor gene involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression that has been reported to be inactivated by promoter methylation in lung carcinomas at variable frequencies around the world in a smoking habit dependent manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the methylation status of the promoter region of the p16 gene in 74 non-small cell lung carcinomas from Chile. The frequency of p16 gene inactivation by promoter methylation was determined as 79.7% (59/74. When we considered histological type, we observed that p16 promoter methylation was significantly higher in squamous cell carcinomas (30/33, 91% compared with adenocarcinomas (21/30, 70% (p=0.029. In addition, no association between p16 promoter methylation and gender, age or smoking habit was found (p=0.202, 0.202 and 0.147 respectively. Our results suggest that p16 promoter hypermethylation is a very frequent event in non-small cell lung carcinomas from Chile and could be smoking habit-independent

  1. Radionuclides in cigarettes may lead to carcinogenesis via p16INK4a inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prueitt, Robyn L.; Goodman, Julie E.; Valberg, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that tobacco smoke is responsible for the vast majority of lung cancers worldwide. There are many known and suspected carcinogens present in cigarette smoke, including α-emitting radioisotopes. Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased lung cancer risk is associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, and it is estimated that the majority of smoking-induced lung cancers may be at least partly attributable to the inhaled and deposited radiation dose from radioisotopes in the cigarette smoke itself. Recent research shows that silencing of the tumor suppressor gene p16 INK4a (p16) by promoter methylation plays a role in smoking-related lung cancer. Inactivation of p16 has also been associated with lung cancer incidence in radiation-exposed workers, suggesting that radionuclides in cigarette smoke may be acting with other compounds to cause smoking-induced lung cancer. We evaluated the mechanism of ionizing radiation as an accepted cause of lung cancer in terms of its dose from tobacco smoke and silencing of p16. Because both radiation and cigarette smoking are associated with inactivation of p16, and p16 inactivation has been shown to play a major role in carcinogenesis, ionizing radiation from cigarette smoke likely plays a role in lung cancer risk. How large a role it plays, relative to chemical carcinogens and other modes of action, remains to be elucidated

  2. Significance of p16 expression in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Grah, Anja; Kranz, Alexander; Selzer, Edgar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Oberndorfer, Felicitas; Wrba, Fritz [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, Gabriela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I - Division of Clinical Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    HPV-infection, p16 positivity, and EGFR expression have been correlated with favorable responses of head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy. However, a possible correlation of HPV/p16 and EGFR status on the effect of RT in combination with cetuximab has not been sufficiently investigated. We analyzed tumor samples for p16 and EGFR expression and correlated these variables with treatment outcome. Cox-proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results were compared with an institutional historical control group treated without cetuximab and with published data. Expression of p16 was predominantly found in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer patients (OPSCC; 36.6 % positivity; 92 % of all cases), while EGFR was expressed at high levels in all tumor subsites (82 %). p16 expression was associated with improved overall survival in irradiated OPSCC patients (2-year overall survival of 80 % in p16-positive vs. 33 % overall survival in p16-negative patients). In a multivariable analysis covering all tumor sites, nodal stage (> N2a vs. ≤ N2a) and tumor site (OPSSC vs. non-OPSCC) had an impact on overall survival. Our results show that p16 positivity is associated with a favorable outcome in OPSCC patients treated with RT and cetuximab. (orig.) [German] HPV-Infektion, p16-Positivitaet und EGFR-Expression wurden bei Kopf-Hals-Tumorpatienten, die mit einer Strahlentherapie (RT) mit oder ohne Chemotherapie behandelt wurden, mit einem besseren Ergebnis in Verbindung gebracht. Bis jetzt wurde eine solche Korrelation bei Patienten, die mit einer RT in Kombination mit Cetuximab therapiert wurden, nicht untersucht. Es wurden die p16- und die EGFR-Expression in Tumormaterial untersucht und die Daten mit dem Behandlungsergebnissen korreliert. Um die Sterberisiken zu vergleichen, wurden Cox

  3. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  4. p16(INK4a) promoter methylation and protein expression in breast fibroadenoma and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vinci, Angela; Perdelli, Luisa; Banelli, Barbara; Salvi, Sandra; Casciano, Ida; Gelvi, Ilaria; Allemanni, Giorgio; Margallo, Edoardo; Gatteschi, Beatrice; Romani, Massimo

    2005-04-10

    The potential role of p16(INK4a) methylation in breast cancer is controversial whereas there are no data on fibroadenoma. To assess if inactivation of p16(INK4a) by promoter hypermethylation occurs in this hyperproliferative benign breast lesion or, on the contrary, it is strictly related to the carcinogenic process, we have tested the different histological components of 15 cases of fibroadenoma and the intraductal and infiltrating components of 15 cases of carcinoma and their adjacent non-tumoral epithelium. All samples were obtained by laser-assisted microdissection. The relationship between promoter methylation status, immunohistochemical protein expression and ki67 proliferative activity was evaluated for each lesion. Our data demonstrate that hypermethylation of p16(INK4a) promoter is a common event occurring at similar frequency in all the different histological areas of the benign and malignant breast lesions taken into exam. Conversely, protein p16 expression, although heterogeneously distributed within the section, is considerably higher in breast carcinoma as compared to fibroadenoma in both tumoral and non-tumoral epithelia and stroma. The protein localization was almost exclusively nuclear in fibroadenoma and non-tumoral epithelia whereas, in carcinoma, the staining was both nuclear and cytoplasmic or cytoplasmic alone. Furthermore, in a subset of fibroadenoma with higher proliferative activity, p16 protein expression was substantially decreased as compared to those showing lower proliferation. We did not observe this association in carcinomas. Our data demonstrate that the hypermethylation of the p16(INK4a) promoter is not specifically associated with malignancy and that, on the contrary, the overexpression of p16 and its cytoplasmic sequestration is a feature of breast carcinoma. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Human papillomavirus DNA and p16 expression in Japanese patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Hisato; Okamoto, Isamu; Terao, Kyoichi; Sakai, Kazuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Ueda, Shinya; Tanaka, Kaoru; Kuwata, Kiyoko; Morita, Yume; Ono, Koji; Nishio, Kazuto; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Doi, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major etiologic factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). However, little is known about HPV-related OPSCC in Japan. During the study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded OPSCC specimens from Japanese patients were analyzed for HPV DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the surrogate marker p16 by immuno-histochemistry. For HPV DNA-positive, p16-negative specimens, the methylation status of the p16 gene promoter was examined by methylation-specific PCR. Overall survival was calculated in relation to HPV DNA and p16 status and was subjected to multivariate analysis. OPSCC cell lines were examined for sensitivity to radiation or cisplatin in vitro. The study results showed that tumor specimens from 40 (38%) of the 104 study patients contained HPV DNA, with such positivity being associated with tumors of the tonsils, lymph node metastasis, and nonsmoking. Overall survival was better for OPSCC patients with HPV DNA than for those without it (hazard ratio, 0.214; 95% confidence interval, 0.074–0.614; P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis revealed HPV DNA to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.015). Expression of p16 was associated with HPV DNA positivity. However, 20% of HPV DNA-positive tumors were negative for p16, with most of these tumors manifesting DNA methylation at the p16 gene promoter. Radiation or cisplatin sensitivity did not differ between OPSCC cell lines positive or negative for HPV DNA. Thus, positivity for HPV DNA identifies a distinct clinical subset of OPSCC with a more favorable outcome in Japanese

  6. Immunohistochemical study of p16 INK4A and survivin expressions in cervical squamous neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Geok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer affecting Malaysian women. Despite the implementation of pap smear screening, many women are still diagnosed only in the advanced stage of cervical cancer. This could partly be due to failure of detection of its precursor lesions; hence the need to search for novel biomarkers to assist in the screening and diagnosis of cervical neoplasia. This study aims to determine the expression of p16INK4A and survivin as possible predictive biomarkers in cervical squamous neoplasm. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective study on 201 cases of cervical neoplasm comprising of 129 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and 72 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. All samples were evaluated by two independent observers using p16INK4A and survivin monoclonal antibodies. The p16 INK4A expression was graded as negative, focal and diffuse positivity. The intensity for survivin expression was graded as weak, moderate and intense. Results: It is seen that p16 INK4A expression in CIN 1, CIN 2 and CIN 3 were 25.4%, 42.9% and 95.9% respectively. Majority of SCC (98.6% showed p16 INK4A expression. Survivin expressions in CIN 1, CIN 2, CIN 3 and SCC were 56.7%, 33.4%, 87.5% and 98.6%. There was a linear relationship between increasing grade of CIN and p16 INK4A expressions. Conclusion: Our study showed that p16 INK4A expressions correlate well with the increasing grade of CIN. Although survivin does not correlate well to the increasing grade of CIN, it could be useful in differentiating CIN 3 from SCC.

  7. Expression of p16(INK4A) gene in human pituitary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria; Cotignola, Javier; Danilowicz, Karina; Carbonara, Carolina; Paes de Lima, Andrea; Basso, Armando; Bruno, Oscar Domingo; Szijan, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise 10-15% of primary intracranial tumours but the mechanisms leading to tumour development are yet to be clearly established. The retinoblastoma pathway, which regulates the progression through the cell cycle, is often deregulated in different types of tumours. We studied the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4A) gene expression at mRNA level in human pituitary adenomas. Forty-six tumour specimens of different subtypes, 21 clinically non-functioning, 12 growth hormone-secreting, 6 prolactin-secreting, 6 adrenocorticotropin-secreting, and 1 thyrotropin-secreting tumours were studied. All clinically non-functioning and most of the hormone-secreting tumours were macroadenomas (38/46). The RT-PCR assay and electrophoresis of the PCR-products showed that p16(INK4A) mRNA was undetectable in: 62% of non-functioning, 8% of growth hormone-secreting, 17% of prolactin-secreting and 17% of adrenocorticotropin-secreting adenomas. Forty percent of all macroadenomas and 25% of microadenomas had negative p16(INK4A) mRNA, the latter results suggest that the absence of p16(INK4A) product might be an early event in tumours with no expression of this suppressor gene. Within the non-functioning adenomas 63% were "null cell" and 37% were positive for some hormone, both subgroups showed similar percentage of cases with absence of p16(INK4A) mRNA. Our results show that clinically non-functioning macroadenomas have impaired p16(INK4A) expression in a clearly higher proportion than any other pituitary tumour subtype investigated. Other regulatory pathways may be implicated in the development of tumours with positive p16(INK4A) expression.

  8. The role of human papillomavirus in p16-positive oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belobrov, Simone; Cornall, Alyssa M; Young, Richard J; Koo, Kendrick; Angel, Christopher; Wiesenfeld, David; Rischin, Danny; Garland, Suzanne M; McCullough, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence and frequency of human papillomavirus (HPV) nucleic acid in p16-positive oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), to assess whether the virus was transcriptionally active and to assess the utility of p16 overexpression as a surrogate marker for HPV in OSCC. Forty-six OSCC patients treated between 2007 and 2011 with available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens were included. Twenty-three patients were positive for p16 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and these were matched with 23 patients with p16-negative tumours. Laser capture microdissection of the FFPE OSCC tissues was undertaken to isolate invasive tumour tissue. DNA was extracted and tested for high-risk HPV types using a PCR-ELISA method based on the L1 SPF10 consensus primers, and a real-time PCR method targeting HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 region. Genotyping of HPV-positive cases was performed using a reverse line blot hybridization assay (Inno-LiPA). RNAScope ® (a chromogenic RNA in situ hybridization assay) was utilized to detect E6/E7 mRNA of known high-risk HPV types for detection of transcriptionally active virus. HPV DNA was found in 3 OSCC cases, all of which were p16 IHC-positive. Two cases were genotyped as HPV-16 and one as HPV-33. Only one of the HPV-16 cases was confirmed to harbour transcriptionally active virus via HPV RNA ISH. We have shown that the presence of transcriptionally active HPV rarely occurs in OSCC and that p16 is not an appropriate surrogate marker for HPV in OSCC cases. We propose that non-viral mechanisms are responsible for the majority of IHC p16 overexpression in OSCC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Development of the JNC geological disposal technical information integration system subjected for repository design and safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ito, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Neyama, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    On this work, system manufacture about disposal technology and safety assessment field was performed towards construction of the JNC Geological Disposal Technical Information Integration System which systematized three fields of technical information acquired in investigation (site characteristic investigation) of geology environmental conditions, disposal technology (design of deep repository), and performance/safety assessment. The technical information database managed focusing on the technical information concerning individual research of an examination, analysis, etc. and the parameter set database managed focusing on the set up data set used in case of comprehensive evaluation are examined. In order to support and promote share and use of the technical information registered and managed by the database, utility functions, such as a technical information registration function, technical information search/browse function, analysis support function, and visualization function, are considered, and the system realized in these functions is built. The built system is installed in the server of JNC, and the functional check examination is carried out. (author)

  10. Evidence for a modifier of onset age in Huntington disease linked to the HD gene in 4p16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Knowlton, Beth; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russel L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Durr, Alexandra; Dode, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Trent, Ronald J. A.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Mayo Cabrero, David; Jones, Randi; Zanko, Andrea; Nance, Martha; Abramson, Ruth K.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Paulsen, Jane S.; Harrison, Madaline B.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2007-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the HD gene on chromosome 4p16.3. A recent genome scan for genetic modifiers of age at onset of motor symptoms (AO) in HD suggests that one modifier may reside in the region close to the HD gene itself. We used data from 535 HD participants of the New England Huntington cohort and the HD MAPS cohort to assess whether AO was influenced by any of the three markers in the 4p16 region: MSX1 (Drosophila homeo box homologue 1, formerly known as homeo box 7, HOX7), Δ2642 (within the HD coding sequence), and BJ56 (D4S127). Suggestive evidence for an association was seen between MSX1 alleles and AO, after adjustment for normal CAG repeat, expanded repeat, and their product term (model P value 0.079). Of the variance of AO that was not accounted for by HD and normal CAG repeats, 0.8% could be attributed to the MSX1 genotype. Individuals with MSX1 genotype 3/3 tended to have younger AO. No association was found between Δ2642 (P=0.44) and BJ56 (P=0.73) and AO. This study supports previous studies suggesting that there may be a significant genetic modifier for AO in HD in the 4p16 region. Furthermore, the modifier may be present on both HD and normal chromosomes bearing the 3 allele of the MSX1 marker. PMID:15029481

  11. JNC-JAERI united research report. A study on degradation of structural materials under irradiation environment in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Aoto, Kazumi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yasuo; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Ohmi, Masao; Saito, Junichi; Shimizu, Michio

    2004-10-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have started a JNC-JAERI united research program cooperatively in fiscal year 2003, which has been aimed for efficient progress and synergistic effect on the research activities of both Institutes in order to lead the facing task of unification between JNC and JAERI. This study has been chosen one of the united research themes because it has been common objective for both Institutes in the research field of structural materials such as Fast Breeder Reactor and Light Water Reactors components. The purpose of the study is to clarify damage mechanism of structural materials under irradiation, and then to develop the methods for damage evaluation and detection in earlier stage of progressing process of damage along grain boundaries. In fiscal year 2003, magnetic flux density distribution (JNC) and micro-corrosion (JAERI) measurement apparatus were newly developed and equipped in Hot Facilities in two Institutes, respectively. The former apparatus, supersensitive Flux Gate sensor was installed, could detector leaked magnetic flux from material damaged by neutron irradiation. The latter one, Atomic Force Microscope was installed, could detect grain boundary corrosion loss after an electrochemical corrosion test of irradiated material. These apparatus were designed and produced in consideration of radiation resistance and remote-controlled operation to equip in hot cells. As the results of preliminary studies using Ni ion irradiated specimen, damage detection by corrosion property in grain boundary was possible but magnetic property change could not detect. We will start the study on neutron irradiation damage by employing the two apparatus as the next step. (author)

  12. Annual report on activities of Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal year of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kunihiko

    2002-08-01

    This annual report is summary of the activities of Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal year of 2001. This report consists of the introduction of the radiation control in working area of the reprocessing plant, the MOX fuel fabrication facilities and laboratories, the discharges control of these facilities, the personal dosimetry, the environmental monitoring, the control of radiation standards and calibration, the maintenance of radiation measurement instruments, the safety study, the technical support for outside organizations and other activities. (author)

  13. Studies on migration behavior of radionuclides under reducing conditions in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, A.; Sato, H.

    2002-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has performed extensive researches and developments to investigate the geochemistry and radionuclide migration in buffer materials and geosphere. Experimental and modeling studies have been carried out related to the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) as a link in the chair of a follow-up of the second progress report, which has explained in the technical feasibility of HLW geological disposal in Japan. In this paper, three experimental studies on solubility, sorption and diffusion of radionuclides under reducing conditions for assuring the reliability and for improving the quality of the databases are introduced. Solubility and sorption behavior of neptunium (Np) have been studied under reducing conditions in carbonate media. For the solubility study, thermodynamic equilibrium constants of carbonatohydroxo complexes of Np(IV) have been determined from a solubility measurement in alkaline solutions. For the sorption study, distribution coefficient (K d ) of Np onto smectite has been determined in weak alkaline solutions under reducing conditions in carbonate media. For the diffusion study, apparent diffusivity (D a ) of selenium (Se) in compacted bentonite have been determined under reducing conditions as a function of silica sand content and temperature

  14. Evaluation of room-scattered neutrons at the JNC Tokai neutron reference field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Tsujimura, Norio [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Oyanagi, Katsumi [Japan Radiation Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Neutron reference fields for calibrating neutron-measuring devices in JNC Tokai Works are produced by using radionuclide neutron sources, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf sources. The reference field for calibration includes scattered neutrons from the material surrounding sources, wall, floor and ceiling of the irradiation room. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the scattered neutrons contribution and their energy spectra at reference points. Spectral measurements were performed with a set of Bonner multi-sphere spectrometers and the reference fields were characterized in terms of spectral composition and the fractions of room-scattered neutrons. In addition, two techniques stated in ISO 10647, the shadow-cone method and the polynomial fit method, for correcting the contributions from the room-scattered neutrons to the readings of neutron survey instruments were compared. It was found that the two methods gave an equivalent result within a deviation of 3.3% at a source-to-detector distance from 50cm to 500cm. (author)

  15. Evaluation of room-scattered neutrons at the JNC Tokai neutron reference field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Tsujimura, Norio

    2002-01-01

    Neutron reference fields for calibrating neutron-measuring devices in JNC Tokai Works are produced by using radionuclide neutron sources, 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf sources. The reference field for calibration includes scattered neutrons from the material surrounding sources, wall, floor and ceiling of the irradiation room. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the scattered neutrons contribution and their energy spectra at reference points. Spectral measurements were performed with a set of Bonner multi-sphere spectrometers and the reference fields were characterized in terms of spectral composition and the fractions of room-scattered neutrons. In addition, two techniques stated in ISO 10647, the shadow-cone method and the polynomial fit method, for correcting the contributions from the room-scattered neutrons to the readings of neutron survey instruments were compared. It was found that the two methods gave an equivalent result within a deviation of 3.3% at a source-to-detector distance from 50cm to 500cm. (author)

  16. Study on advanced systematic function of the JNC geological disposal technical information integration system. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Fukui, Hiroshi; Sagawa, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kenichi; Ito Takaya

    2004-02-01

    In this study, while attaining systematization about the technical know-how mutually utilized between geology environmental field, disposal technology (design) field and safety assessment field, the share function of general information in which the formation of an information share and the use promotion between the technical information management databases built for every field were aimed at as an advancement of the function of JNC Geological Disposal Technical Information Integration System considered, and the system function for realizing considered in integration of technical information. (1) Since the concrete information about geology environment which is gradually updated with progress of stratum disposal research, or increases in reflected suitable for research of design and safety assessment. After arranging the form suitable for systematizing technical information, while arranging the technical information in both the fields of design and safety assessment with the form of two classes based on tasks/works, it systematized planning adjustment about delivery of technical information with geology environmental field. (2) In order to aim at integration of 3-fields technical information of geological disposal, based on the examination result of systematization of technical information, the function of mutual use of the information managed in two or more databases was considered. Moreover, while considering system functions, such as management of the use history of technical information, connection of information use, and a notice of common information, the system operation windows in consideration of the ease of operation was examined. (author)

  17. Expression of cdk4 and p16 in Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sinny; Khurana, Nita; Marwah, Akanksha; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of cdk4 and p16, the proteins implicated in hyperproliferation and arrest in oral lichen planus and to compare their expression in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus and with normal mucosa and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Analysis of cdk4 and p16 expression was done in 43 erosive oral lichen planus (EOLP) and 17 non-erosive oral lichen planus (NOLP) cases, 10 normal mucosa and 10 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cases with immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrated a significantly increased expression of cytoplasmic cdk4 (80% cases, cells stained - 19.6%), and cytoplasmic p16 (68.3% cases, cells stained - 16.4%) in oral lichen planus (OLP) compared to normal mucosa. cdk4 was much higher in OSCC in both cytoplasm and nuclei compared to normal mucosa. Also, while comparing OLP with positive control, significant difference was noted for cdk4 and p16, with expression being more in OSCC. While comparing EOLP with NOLP; significant differences were seen for cdk4 cytoplasmic staining only, for number of cases with positive staining as well as number of cells stained. Overexpression of cytoplasmic cdk4 and p16 was registered in oral lichen planus, however considerably lower than in squamous cell carcinoma. Erosive oral lichen planus demonstrated overexpression of cytoplasmic cdk4 and premalignant nature compared to non-erosive lesion. Therefore there is an obvious possibility for cytoplasmic expression of cdk4 and p16 to predict malignant potential of oral lichen planus lesions.

  18. Prognostic value of HMGA2, P16, and HPV in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeschke, S.; Ohlmann, A. K.; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Molecular markers are only occasionally used in diagnostics of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), even though they could influence decision making in individually designed cancer therapies. We analyzed the predictive value of the markers HPV, p16, and HMGA2 and the TNM classification...... in regard to survival and recurrence rates. Material and methods A total of 91 OSCC cases were included in this study, with a follow up of up to 131 months. HPV-DNA was present in 7 carcinomas. p16 was detected by immunohistochemical staining in 14 samples. HMGA2 expression was determined by real...

  19. Aberrant Methylation of Preproenkephalin and p16 Genes in Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Sato, Norihiro; Ueki, Takashi; Rosty, Christophe; Walter, Kimberly M.; Wilentz, Robb E.; Yeo, Charles J.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic intraductal neoplasia (PanIN) is thought to be the precursor to infiltrating pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. We have previously shown that the preproenkephalin (ppENK) and p16 genes are aberrantly methylated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this study we define the methylation status of the ppENK and p16 genes in various grades of PanINs. One hundred seventy-four samples (28 nonneoplastic pancreatic epithelia, 7 reactive epithelia, 29 PanIN-1A, 48 PanIN-1B, 27 PanIN-2, 14 PanIN-3...

  20. Screening for cervical cancer precursors with p16/Ki-67 dual-stained cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikenberg, Hans; Bergeron, Christine; Schmidt, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Pap cytology is known to be more specific but less sensitive than testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) for the detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+). We assessed whether p16/Ki-67 dual-stained cytology, a biomarker combination indicative of transforming HPV infections...

  1. p16 expression is not associated with human papillomavirus in urinary bladder squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Riley E; Hu, Yingchuan; Kum, Jennifer B; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Maclennan, Gregory T; Idrees, Muhammad T; Emerson, Robert E; Ulbright, Thomas M; Grignon, David G; Eble, John N; Cheng, Liang

    2012-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is unusual and of unknown etiology. There is a well-established association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of cervical and head/neck squamous cell carcinomas. However, the role of HPV in the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is uncertain. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible role of HPV in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and to determine if p16 expression could serve as a surrogate marker for HPV in this malignancy. In all, 42 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and 27 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation were investigated. HPV infection was analyzed by both in situ hybridization at the DNA level and immunohistochemistry at the protein level. p16 protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA and protein were not detected in 42 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (0%, 0/42) or 27 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation (0%, 0/15). p16 expression was detected in 13 cases (31%, 13/42) of squamous cell carcinoma and 9 cases (33%, 9/27) of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. There was no correlation between p16 expression and the presence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. Our data suggest that HPV does not play a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. p16 expression should not be used as a surrogate marker for evidence of HVP infection in either squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation as neither HVP DNA nor protein is detectable in these neoplasms.

  2. Investigation of p16(INK4a) as a prognostic biomarker in oral epithelial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankivell, Paul; Williams, Hazel; Webster, Keith; Pearson, David; High, Alec; MacLennan, Kenneth; Senguven, Burcu; McConkey, Christopher; Rabbitts, Pamela; Mehanna, Hisham

    2014-04-01

    Human papilloma virus is a risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer. Evidence for a similar aetiological role in the development of oral dysplasia or its transformation to oral cancer is not as clear. Meta-analyses estimate the prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) serotypes to be three times higher in pre-malignant lesions and cancer than in normal oral mucosa. However, this does not imply a causal relationship. Conflicting results are reported from the few studies examining the prognostic significance of HPV positivity in the development of oral cancer. We aimed to examine the ability of p16(INK4a) protein expression, a surrogate marker of HPV infection, to predict malignant progression in a large cohort of oral dysplasia patients. One hundred forty eight oral dysplasia cases underwent immunohistochemical analysis using a monoclonal antibody against p16(INK4a) . Clinical factors were also collated on each case. Slides were double scored independently by two trained observers. Univariate analyses using both logistic and Cox regression models were performed. Thirty nine of 148 cases progressed to cancer. Ten of 148 cases (7%) were p16(INK4a) positive. High grade of dysplasia (P = 0.0002) and lesion morphology (P = 0.03) were found to be prognostic of malignant progression. p16(INK4a) score was not prognostic in this cohort (P = 0.29). This did not change with a time to event analysis (P = 0.24). Few studies have assessed the aetiological role of HPV in cancer development from dysplastic lesions. Our study, using one of the largest cohorts of oral dysplasia, demonstrated a low rate of p16(INK4a) positivity and was unable to confirm a prognostic ability for this biomarker. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Distant metastasis in p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: a critical analysis of patterns and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, P; Thorstad, W T; Nussenbaum, B; Haughey, B H; Adkins, D R; Kallogjeri, D; Lewis, J S

    2014-01-01

    With good loco-regional control, disease failure in p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) mainly results from distant metastasis (DM). Our objective was to characterize the patterns and clinical outcomes of DM in p16-positive OPSCC and compare these to patients with p16-negative disease. Primary OPSCC patients who developed DM after completing surgical or non-surgical treatment were identified and p16 status was evaluated. Patterns of DM and post-DM progression-free (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were assessed. Forty-one of the 66 (62%) patients with DM were p16-positive. DM patterns were not statistically different by p16 status. However, p16-positive patients developed DM later in their course and had longer survival. All p16-negative patients either had progression or died within 24 months of DM detection whereas the 2-year post-DM PFS in the p16-positive group was 20% (95% CI: 8-32.5%, p=0.003). The 3-year post-DM disease-specific survival (DSS) estimate in the p16-positive patients was 16% (95% CI: 7-18%) while all p16-negative patients died within 34 months (p<0.001). p16-negativity, loco-regional disease, and no/palliative versus curative intent treatment were all associated with reduced post-DM DSS in multivariate analysis. The DM pattern did not differ remarkably between p16-positive and negative OPSCC patients in our practice. In p16-positive OPSCC with pulmonary oligometastatic disease, curative intent treatment and optimized locoregional control for the index primary prolonged survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Discussions on JNC roles and issues on management and disposition of surplus plutonium from the dismantlement of nuclear warhead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Russian Federation are now promoting the collaborative project to use the fast breeder reactor of BN-600 for the Russian surplus plutonium under the framework of the bilateral agreement on peaceful use of atomic energy. Based upon this background, JNC organized a study group to survey the world aspect on surplus plutonium resulting in START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty). The study group, including technical experts and also experts on international affairs, made a report after their survey and gave wide range discussion on various issues. The surplus plutonium of Russian Federation was estimated to be 102 - 136 tones. There were shortages of back end technologies in Russian infrastructures for dismantling, reprocessing and disposition of the surplus plutonium. A supporting leadership of USA to Russian Federation met some difficulties due to the strategic gap between both countries. One of the examples is the temporal evolution of USA attitude toward the CANDU (thermal power reactors of Canadian design characterized by heavy water moderator, pressure tube construction, and on-power refuelling) option to use surplus plutonium as MOX (Mixed OXide) fuels. Additional supports from the G8 (Group of eight) countries except USA and Russian Federation came up to their expectation. For examples, the joint group of French, German and Russian is promoting DEMOX (Demonstration of MOX fuel) project but is on the way to discussion depending on various thoughts about mutual benefits. Many issues remained in joint project with CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States), such as safeguard, nonproliferation, energy supply and demand, and environmental impacts. In addition, public opinions will give some impacts to policy makers, especially in USA. This report had analyzed many viewpoints for technical and political issues on surplus plutonium in the world, and pointed out consequences, merits and demerits after possible many

  5. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Ding Xin; Li Xiangyang; Cen Jiannong; Shen Hongjie; Chen Zixing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expression on p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Methods: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which expressed CD34 +, CD38 - and CD123 + were isolated from bone marrow cells obtained from twenty patients newly-diagnosedas chronic myeloid leukemia with EasySep TM magnet beads. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which expressed CD34 + and CD38 - were isolated from human cord blood cells obtained from twenty full-term deliveries with EasySep TM magnet beads as control. HSCs vs LSCs samples were further divided into three dose groups, including 0, 12.5 and 50 cGy, respectively. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to detect mRNA expression of p16 gene in HSCs and LSCs after irradiation. Cells were harvested at different time for detection of cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometer. Results: p16 mRNA level in CML-LSCs was increased slightly at 12.5 cGy, and significantly increased at 50 cGy (Z=-3.39, P 0 /G 1 stagewas increased 48 h after 12.5 cGy irradiation, and 72 h post-irradiation with 50 cGy. The apoptosis rate of CML-LSCs was gradually raised after LDR, especially at 72 h post-irradiation of 50 cGy [(17.75±11.760% vs (6.13±4.71)%, Z=-2.37, P<0.01]. Conclusions: p16 gene transcription could be up-regulated by low dose radiation, which might provide a theoretical evidence for CML therapy and LDR in leukemic clinical application. (authors)

  6. Inside report on arrangement progress of an open-air pit for tools and materials of Plutonium Fuel Center, JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, Kenji; Sato, Shunichi; Gunji, Yasutoshi; Sawayama, Takeo; Nogami, Tetsuya; Matsuno, Kazuya; Tominaga, Setsuo; Osawa, Takayasu

    1999-03-01

    In the course of arranging the wasted tools and materials in the open-air pit (B-pit) of Plutonium Fuel Center, JNC, a radioactive contamination occurred on June 25, 1998, on working clothes of an operator. The B-pit was immediately set up as a temporarily radiation-controlled area and the necessary works such as disposing contaminated wastes, decontamination and surface coatings as well as cleaning have been finished on February 2, 1999. The present report describes the main procedure of actual operations, a possible cause of the contamination, and the resulting wastes from the present work amounting to about 250 drums. (Ohno, S.)

  7. Exogenous And Endogenous Factors Connected With P16 Gene Alteration In Egyptian Patients With Oesophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-KASHEF, H.S.; KAYED, A.; ELMAGHRABY, T.K.; EL-GANZURI, M.A.; SELIEM, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Certain areas of Egypt have a high incidence of oesophageal cancer which is one of the most common causes of cancer related deaths in the world. Comparisons of the dietary and cultural habits of people from geographically distinct high-incidence areas in the world have revealed very few similarities to suggest a common induction mechanism. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of sex, age and smoking on some biochemical parameters, p16 gene mutations, methylation and incidence of oesophageal cancer. The study included 50 Egyptian patients with oesophageal cancer with average age 55.6 years (aged between 23-79 years). The results showed significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), increase in glutathione reductase (GR), increase in lipid peroxidation end product (malonaldehyde) and incidence of oesophageal cancer. Moreover, two mutations were detected in exon 2 of gene p16 and significant increase in p16 methylation in tissues and plasma of oesophageal cancer patients, as compared to healthy control, were observed.

  8. High-level pullulan production by Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanogenium P16 isolated from mangrove system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zai-Chao; Fu, Wen-Juan; Liu, Guang-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    After over 100 strains of Aureobasidium spp. isolated from mangrove system were screened for their ability to produce exopolysaccharide (EPS), it was found that Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanogenium P16 strain among them could produce high level of EPS. Under the optimal conditions, 65.3 g/L EPS was produced by the P16 strain within 120 h at flask level. During 10-L batch fermentation, when the medium contained 120.0 g/L sucrose, 67.4 g/L of EPS and 23.1 g/L of cell dry weight in the culture were obtained within 120 h, leaving 0.78 g/L of reducing sugar and 11.4 g/L of total sugar in the fermented medium. It should be stressed that during the fermentation, no melanin was observed. After purification, the purified EPS was confirmed to be pullulan. This is the first time to report that A. pullulans var. melanogenium P16 strain isolated from the mangrove system can produce high level of pullulan.

  9. The cell cycle regulator protein P16 and the cellular senescence of dental follicle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Hullmann, Markus; Reck, Anja; Reichert, Torsten E

    2018-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a restricting factor for regenerative therapies with somatic stem cells. We showed previously that the onset of cellular senescence inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in stem cells of the dental follicle (DFCs), although the mechanism remains elusive. Two different pathways are involved in the induction of the cellular senescence, which are driven either by the cell cycle protein P21 or by the cell cycle protein P16. In this study, we investigated the expression of cell cycle proteins in DFCs after the induction of cellular senescence. The induction of cellular senescence was proved by an increased expression of β-galactosidase and an increased population doubling time after a prolonged cell culture. Cellular senescence regulated the expression of cell cycle proteins. The expression of cell cycle protein P16 was up-regulated, which correlates with the induction of cellular senescence markers in DFCs. However, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and 4 and the expression of the cell cycle protein P21 were successively decreased in DFCs. In conclusion, our data suggest that a P16-dependent pathway drives the induction of cellular senescence in DFCs.

  10. Current status of PIE activities in O-arai Engineering Center of JNC on FBR MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Shin-ichi; Osaka, Masahiko; Namekawa, Takashi; Itoh, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) is now totally promoting the development of commercialized fast reactors to realize stable supply of energy in future. One of the important items is to develop high-performance fuel. For this purpose, it is essential to carry out post-irradiation examinations (PIE) for evaluation of irradiated fuel performance and also to establish the PIE technology. This paper describes the current status of PIE results including its technology in O-arai Engineering Center of JNC. The facilities have been operating safely and successfully since the 1960's. Obtained PIE data were reflected to the design and operation of the experimental fast reactor JOYO, the prototype fast reactor MONJU and future fast reactors. The core modification from the breeding core (MK-I) to the irradiation core (MK-II) of JOYO was performed in 1982. Irradiation tests of fuels and materials in MK-II core started in 1982. At PIE facilities in OEC, 65 of driver fuels, fuel irradiation test rigs, material irradiation test rigs and several other components were examined related to JOYO MK-II core operation, and thus a lot of aspects were accumulated for irradiated fuel behaviors. As topical activities of these PIE techniques, burnup measurement and analytical technique for Minor Actinides (MA), such as neptunium and americium were described here. (author)

  11. Quantitative study on the significance of FR cycle. Interim report of JNC/CEA joint study on advanced technology R and D for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.; Shinoda, Yoshihiko; Kofuji, Hirohide; Hirao, Kazunori

    2001-09-01

    This study on quantitative study on significance of FR cycle was carried out under the agreement between JNC and CEA in the field of advanced technology R and D for nuclear energy. JNC has been developing the quantitative evaluation method to be constructed by combining Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT). CEA has been caring out the qualitative evaluation from expert judgement from viewpoint of sustainability such as the response to the energetic demand, the saving of the resources and the minimization of the environmental impact. (author)

  12. p16/CDKN2A FISH in Differentiation of Diffuse Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma From Mesothelial Hyperplasia and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Hamasaki, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shinji; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Tsujimura, Tohru; Kawai, Toshiaki; Shimao, Yoshiya; Marutsuka, Kousuke; Moriguchi, Sayaka; Maruyama, Riruke; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2015-06-01

    It can be difficult to differentiate diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (DMPM) from reactive mesothelial hyperplasia (RMH) or peritoneal dissemination of gynecologic malignancies, such as epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), which cause a large amount of ascites. Detection of the homozygous deletion of p16/CDKN2A (p16) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an effective adjunct in the diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the p16 FISH assay to differentiate DMPM from RMH and EOC. p16 FISH was performed in 28 DMPMs (successful in 19), 30 RMHs, and 40 EOC cases. The cutoff values of p16 FISH were more than 10% for homozygous deletion and more than 40% for heterozygous deletion. According to the above criteria, nine (47.4%) of 19 successful DMPM cases were homozygous deletion positive, and three (15.8%) of 19 were heterozygous deletion positive, whereas all RMH cases were negative for the p16 deletion. In all four major histologic subtypes of EOC, neither p16 homozygous nor heterozygous deletions were detected. To differentiate DMPM from RMH or EOC, the sensitivity of the p16 homozygous deletion was 32% (9/28), and the specificity was 100%. Our study suggests that p16 FISH analysis is useful in differentiating DMPM from RMH and EOC when homozygous deletion is detected. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  13. Clinicopathological significance of p16, cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 levels in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qi Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the expression of p16, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb and MIB-1 in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma tissues, and to determine the clinicopathological significance of the above indexes in these diseases. Methods: A total of 100 skull base chordoma, 30 chondrosarcoma, and 20 normal cartilage tissue samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of p16, cyclinD1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins were assessed for potential correlation with the clinicopathological features. Results: As compared to normal cartilage specimen (control, there was decreased expression of p16, and increased expression of cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins, in both skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma specimens. MIB-1 LI levels were significantly increased in skull base chordoma specimens with negative expression of p16, and positive expression of cyclin D1 and Rb (P  0.05. However, p16 and MIB-1 levels correlated with the intradural invasion, and expression of p16, Rb and MIB-1 correlated with the number of tumor foci (P < 0.05. Further, the expression of p16 and MIB-1 appeared to correlate with the prognosis of patients with skull base chordoma. Conclusions: The abnormal expression of p16, cyclin D1 and Rb proteins might be associated with the tumorigenesis of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Keywords: p16, Cyclin D1, Rb, MIB-1, Skull base chordoma, Skull base chondrosarcoma

  14. Technical report on dismantling of incinerator building of JNC with strict environmental assessments especially for the contamination of surroundings of incinerator by Dioxin's in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Masanori; Ohmori, Koji; Nomura, Takeshi; Numano, Tatuo; Usui, Kazuya; Irinouchi, Shigenori

    2003-03-01

    Building of incinerator for general waste located at Tokai of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC in short) were dismantled form April 2002 to March 2003 under environmental control According to the regulation entitled 'Outline for the prevention of exposure of Dioxin's to operators engaged in dismantling of waste incinerator' issued on June 01, 2000 by Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan, the regulation requests proper protection methodology to dismantling the incinerator and surroundings contaminated by Dioxin's. This report consists of Environmental assessment under Japanese law and regulations and Procedure of actual dismantling of incinerator building with law-abiding stand point. 1. Environmental assessment; Survey of several laws and regulations concerning on the Dioxin's and actual site assessment to analyze the content of Dioxin's for surroundings of incinerator building. Ground design of dismantling procedures, waste management for disposed during dismantling and scheduling for dismantling of building. 2. Dismantling procedures; Prior to dismantling operation, contamination map by Dioxin's were established then restricted areas were determined. Protection methodology to dioxin's exposure for operators were selected and started dismantling operation after getting permission from the Labor Standards Bureau of Ibaraki Prefecture. Dismantling operations were carried out with respect o above mentioned regulations to prevent the operators exposure to Dioxin's if they are exists in soil or surroundings of building. Finally, dismantling operations were completed without accidents and confirmed no-exposure of Dioxin's to operators of dismantling. Waste generated during dismantling were recycled using specialized recycling companies in Ibaraki prefecture. Dismantling operation of incinerator was first experience at Ibaraki Prefecture, so the officials of Labor Standards Bureau were carried out on-the-spot inspection and have no claim from

  15. The chromatin remodelling factor BRG1 is a novel binding partner of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Graham J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDKN2A/p16INK4a is frequently altered in human cancers and it is the most important melanoma susceptibility gene identified to date. p16INK4a inhibits pRb phosphorylation and induces cell cycle arrest, which is considered its main tumour suppressor function. Nevertheless, additional activities may contribute to the tumour suppressor role of p16INK4a and could help explain its specific association with melanoma predisposition. To identify such functions we conducted a yeast-two-hybrid screen for novel p16INK4a binding partners. Results We now report that p16INK4a interacts with the chromatin remodelling factor BRG1. We investigated the cooperative roles of p16INK4a and BRG1 using a panel of cell lines and a melanoma cell model with inducible p16INK4a expression and BRG1 silencing. We found evidence that BRG1 is not required for p16INK4a-induced cell cycle inhibition and propose that the p16INK4a-BRG1 complex regulates BRG1 chromatin remodelling activity. Importantly, we found frequent loss of BRG1 expression in primary and metastatic melanomas, implicating this novel p16INK4a binding partner as an important tumour suppressor in melanoma. Conclusion This data adds to the increasing evidence implicating the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex in tumour development and the association of p16INK4a with chromatin remodelling highlights potentially new functions that may be important in melanoma predisposition and chemoresistance.

  16. Case report of a p16INK4A-positive branchial cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, T; Iseli, C; Amott, D; Taylor, M

    2015-06-01

    To report the occurrence of a concurrent oropharyngeal papilloma and branchial cleft cyst linked by p16(INK4A) and human papillomavirus immunohistochemistry. A 42-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of a left lateral neck mass. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a hypodense lesion 20 mm in diameter anteromedial to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration suggested a branchial cleft cyst. Panendoscopy was performed at the time of neck mass removal, and a papillomatous lesion was removed from the left hypopharynx. Histopathological analysis showed the neck lesion to be a branchial cyst containing lymphoid tissue, and the oral lesion to be a squamous papilloma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed both the branchial cleft cyst and papilloma to be positive for p16(INK4A) expression and human papillomavirus DNA. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses support the cystic transformation of lymph nodes, or the 'Inclusion Theory', as the aetiology of branchial apparatus anomalies, and raise the possibility that human papillomavirus infection may play a much larger role in disease of the head and neck than previously supposed.

  17. The prognostic value of HPV combined p16 status in patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guorui; Dong, Xiaoyuan; Tang, Xiaolong; Qu, Hui; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Ensheng

    2018-01-30

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and p16 expression have been identified to be related to the progression of anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC). However, the prognostic relevance of combined detection, particularly HPV-/p16+ and HPV+/p16- signatures, is unknown. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Data were collected from studies comparing overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) / disease-specific survival (DSS) / relapse-free survival (RFS) / progression-free survival (PFS) in ASCC patients with HPV and p16 status. The electronic databases of MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from their inception till 31 May 2017. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a fixed-effects model for OS and DFS/DSS/RFS/PFS. Four studies involving a total of 398 ASCC cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that HPV+/p16+ cancers were significantly associated with improved OS (HR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.17-0.51) and DFS/DSS/RFS/PFS (HR = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.14-0.36). However, patients with HPV-/p16+ or HPV+/p16- do not have a comparably good prognosis compared with HPV+/p16+ patients. The meta-analysis indicated that concomitant detection of HPV-DNA and p16 expression may be of prognostic or therapeutic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to ASCC. Testing tumor specimens for HPV-DNA and p16 expression might indirectly affect treatment decisions.

  18. Architectural patterns of p16 immunohistochemical expression associated with cancer immunity and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyang Joo; Kim, Eun Kyung; Heo, Su Jin; Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Hye Ryun; Yoon, Sun Och

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the expression patterns of p16, which is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), in regard to their biological and prognostic implications. p16 expression patterns and infiltrated immune cells were analyzed through immunohistochemistry of p16, CD3, CD8, PD-1, FOXP3, and CD163 on surgically resected HNSCCs (n = 393). Patterns of p16 immunoexpression were defined as STRONG (strong, diffuse expression in cytoplasm, and nucleus in >70% of tumor cells), MARGINAL (expression restricted to tumor margins), MOSAIC (ragged, discontinued expression), NUCLEAR (expression in nuclei only), and ABSENT (no expression). The STRONG pattern was more frequent in the oropharynx, and the MARGINAL pattern was noted only in the oral cavity. MOSAIC and NUCLEAR patterns were noted at variable sites. No two patterns of p16 expression showed the same immune cell composition of CD3+ T cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, PD-1+ T cells, FOXP3+ regulatory T cells, and CD163+ macrophages. In overall and disease-free survival analyses, the STRONG pattern showed the most favorable prognosis, while the NUCLEAR pattern had the worst prognosis. HNSCC anatomical sites, tumor-related immune cell components, and patient outcomes were associated with p16 expression patterns. Each architectural pattern of p16 expression may be related to different biological and prognostic phenotypes. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Double positivity for HPV DNA/p16 in tonsillar and base of tongue cancer improves prognostication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnaes, Emilie; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Kiss, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) when stratifying for HPV DNA status, p16 expression and combined HPV/p16 status. We included all patients (n = 797) diagnosed with TSCCs and BSCCs in Eastern Denmark as registered in the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) database and the Danish Pathology...... Databank, 2000–2010. Patients were treated according to national guidelines (radiotherapy +/− concomitant cisplatin). All specimens were analysed using HPV DNA PCR and p16 immunohistochemistry. Clinical information was retrieved from the DAHANCA database and the Danish National Patient Registry....... Information on vital status was obtained from the Danish Civil Registration System. We observed improved OS for HPV+/p16+ BSCCs compared to HPV−/p16− (hazard ratio for death [HR], 0.15; 95% CI, 0.09–0.24). Among STSCCs, HPV+/p16+ showed the lowest HR (0.19, 95% CI, 0.13–0.29); whereas, HPV−/p16+ showed...

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity often overexpresses p16 but is rarely driven by human papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafereo, Mark E.; Xu, Li; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Viamonte, Carlo A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal and prognostic factor for oropharyngeal cancer, but its role in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC) is unclear. We sought to clarify HPV's role in SCCOC. Materials and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed SCCOC (N=460) were prospectively recruited, treated, and followed at one institution. p16/HPV status was determined by p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) (N=210), PCR-based HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA testing (N=403), and/or HPV in situ hybridization (ISH) (N=178). Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests were used to compare survival by p16/HPV status. Results p16 expression was detected in 30% of tumors (62/210) and HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA in 28% (114/403), although correlation between these two assays was poor (r=−0.01). Patients with p16-positive tumors were more likely to be younger and have primary tumors of the oral tongue. Only 4% of tumors (7/171) were positive for HPV by ISH. Comparisons of patients with p16-positive and p16-negative tumors, patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by PCR, and patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by ISH showed no significant differences in disease-specific or disease-free survival by p16/HPV status. When we applied a more stringent definition of HPV positivity based on a combination of assay results, only 10 of 166 tumors were HPV positive, and there were no significant differences in demographic, exposure, clinical, or survival characteristics between these patients and the 156 HPV-negative patients. Conclusions Very few patients with SCCOC have HPV-driven tumors. SCCOC that overexpresses p16 may be a unique subset deserving of further study. PMID:27086486

  1. Determination of p16 overexpression as an indicator of human papillomavirus infection in oral dysplasia and carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrija Pathak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Oral and pharyngeal cancer, grouped together, is the sixth most common cancer in the world. In the past few years, human papillomavirus (HPV infection has been suggested as a risk factor for oral cancer apart from traditional risk factors such as smoking, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine HPV status of the tumors using polymerase chain reaction (HPV-DNA PCR and p16 immunostaining and to correlate p16 overexpression as an indicator of HPV-associated oral dysplasia and carcinoma. Settings and Design: A prospective study was conducted in fifty cases of suspected oral cancer. Materials and Methods: PCR Amplification of extracted HPV-DNA was done for HPV-DNA status in fresh tissue of suspected oral cancer cases. Histomorphological features of the cases were analyzed, and p16 immunohistochemistry was performed on the same specimen after making paraffin blocks to study p16 overexpression. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test was used to analyze the differences between discrete variables. Results: 5/6 (83.3% HPV-DNA-positive cases were positive for p16 expression, whereas 26/44 (59.09% p16-positive cases which were negative for HPV-DNA. Sensitivity and specificity of p16 as a surrogate marker for HPV-DNA were found to be 83.3% and 40%, respectively. Conclusions: p16 immunostaining is a good first-line assay for eliminating HPV-negative cases from additional analysis, but other causes of p16 overexpression in oral tumorigenesis related to tobacco consumption in keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma needs to be explored further.

  2. Protein p 16INK4A expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ruchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of human papilloma virus (HPV infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN is well recognized. Interaction of HPV oncogenic proteins with cellular regulatory proteins leads to up regulation of p16 INK4A , a CDK inhibitor, which is a biomarker for HPV infection. We investigated p16 expression in CIN and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC which has not been reported in the Indian population previously. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 100 cases with 20 cases each of histologically normal cervical epithelium, CIN1, 2, 3 and invasive SCC for p16 expression was performed by immunohistochemistry using commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody to p16 (clone 6H12. Statistical Analysis: For differences in expression among groups, statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA and post hoc test of Scheffe. Results: p16 immunoreactivity was found to be both nuclear and/or cytoplasmic. The normal cervical epithelium was predominantly negative for p16 (18/20. There was a progressive increase of p16 expression with the grade of CIN. In CIN 1, two cases (20% showed nuclear and nucleocytoplasmic positivity respectively. In contrast, diffuse strong nuclear or nucleocytoplasmic expression was observed in 45 and 55% cases of CIN 2 and CIN 3 respectively. All except one squamous cell carcinoma stained strongly positive for p16. The difference in expression between CIN 2/3 and SCC versus normal cervix was found highly significant (p is equal to 0.008 and p less than 0.001. Conclusions: p16 expression correlates excellently with the grade of CIN and is a sensitive marker of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

  3. p16 gene methylation in colorectal cancer patients with long-term follow-up Metilación de p16 en pacientes intervenidos de cáncer colorrectal tras un largo periodo de seguimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Veganzones-de-Castro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: p16 gene plays an important role in the cell cycle regulation and is considered an important tumor suppressor gene. Several mechanisms of gene inactivation have been described; in this study we have focused on p16 gene promoter methylation. In colorectal cancer p16 gene methylation is a frequent event. Methods: 326 patients with sporadic colorectal cancer were included. DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples obtained during the surgical procedure. Promoter methylation was analyzed using bisulfite modification and was detected by quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Frequency of p16 methylation was analyzed and compared with other clinicopathological variables. Results: p16 gene methylation was detected in 24,8% of patients. Methylation was associated with differentiation grade and with tumor location: methylation was frequent in poorly differentiated tumors and had low frequency in distal colon. The p16 promoter methylation discriminated a subgroup of patients with better prognosis in poorly differentiated tumors. Conclusions: p16 methylation was a frequent event in our population and was able to induce differences in the overall survival of patients with poorly differentiated tumors.Introducción: el gen p16 está implicado en la regulación del ciclo celular y se considera un importante gen supresor de tumores. Objetivos: se han descrito diferentes mecanismos de inactivación génica, en este estudio nos hemos centrado en la metilación del promotor del gen p16. En el cáncer colorrectal la metilación de p16 es una alteración frecuente. Material y métodos: se incluyeron 326 pacientes con cáncer colorrectal esporádico. El ADN se extrajo de muestras tumorales obtenidas durante la cirugía. La metilación del promotor se analizó mediante un proceso de modificación con bisulfito y posterior PCR cuantitativa especifica para metilación. Se analizó la frecuencia de la metilación de p16 y se comparó con las variables

  4. p16 expression in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: a potential mimicker of human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingxin; Yang, Chen; Lewis, James S; El-Mofty, Samir K; Chernock, Rebecca D

    2017-08-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly occurs in cervical lymph nodes. It has histologic and clinical overlap with the much more common p16-positive human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, which characteristically has nonkeratinizing morphology and often presents as an isolated neck mass. Not surprisingly, follicular dendritic cell sarcomas are commonly misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry is helpful in separating the 2 entities. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma expresses dendritic markers such as CD21 and CD23 and is almost always cytokeratin negative. However, in many cases of HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma, only p16 immunohistochemistry as a prognostic and surrogate marker for HPV is performed. p16 expression in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma has not been characterized. Here, we investigate the expression of p16 in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and correlate it with retinoblastoma protein expression. A pilot study of dendritic marker expression in HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma was also performed. We found that 4 of 8 sarcomas expressed p16 with strong and diffuse staining in 2 cases. In 2 of the 4 cases, p16 expression corresponded to loss of retinoblastoma protein expression. Dendritic marker expression (CD21 and CD23) was not found in HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. As such, positive p16 immunohistochemistry cannot be used as supportive evidence for the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma as strong and diffuse p16 expression may also occur in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. Cytokeratins and dendritic markers are critical in separating the two tumor types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stathmin 1 and p16(INK4A) are sensitive adjunct biomarkers for serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marián; Lester, Jenny; Karst, Alison M; Parkash, Vinita; Hirsch, Michelle S; Crum, Christopher P; Karlan, Beth Y; Drapkin, Ronny

    2015-10-01

    To credential Stathmin 1 (STMN1) and p16(INK4A) (p16) as adjunct markers for the diagnosis of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), and to compare STMN1 and p16 expression in p53-positive and p53-negative STIC and invasive high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to examine STMN1 and p16 expression in fallopian tube specimens (n=31) containing p53-positive and p53-negative STICs, invasive HGSCs, and morphologically normal FTE (fallopian tube epithelium). STMN1 and p16 expression was scored semiquantitatively by four individuals. The semiquantitative scores were dichotomized, and reported as positive or negative. Pooled siRNA was used to knockdown p53 in a panel of cell lines derived from immortalized FTE and HGSC. STMN1 and p16 were expressed in the majority of p53-positive and p53-negative STICs and concomitant invasive HGSCs, but only scattered positive cells were present in morphologically normal FTE. Both proteins were expressed consistently across multiple STICs from the same patient and in concomitant invasive HGSC. Knockdown of p53 in immortalized FTE cells and in four HGSC-derived cell lines expressing different missense p53 mutations did not affect STMN1 protein levels. This study demonstrates that STMN1 and p16 are sensitive and specific adjunct biomarkers that, when used with p53 and Ki-67, improve the diagnostic accuracy of STIC. The addition of STMN1 and p16 helps to compensate for practical limitations of p53 and Ki-67 that complicate the diagnosis in up to one third of STICs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stathmin 1 and p16INK4A are sensitive adjunct biomarkers for serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marián; Lester, Jenny; Karst, Alison M.; Parkash, Vinita; Hirsch, Michelle S.; Crum, Christopher P.; Karlan, Beth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To credential Stathmin 1 (STMN1) and p16INK4A (p16) as adjunct markers for the diagnosis of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), and to compare STMN1 and p16 expression in p53-positive and p53-negative STIC and invasive high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC). Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to examine STMN1 and p16 expression in fallopian tube specimens (n=31) containing p53-positive and p53-negative STICs, invasive HGSCs, and morphologically normal FTE (fallopian tube epithelium). STMN1 and p16 expression was scored semiquantitatively by four individuals. The semiquantitative scores were dichotomized, and reported as positive or negative. Pooled siRNA was used to knockdown p53 in a panel of cell lines derived from immortalized FTE and HGSC. Results STMN1 and p16 were expressed in the majority of p53-positive and p53-negative STICs and concomitant invasive HGSCs, but only scattered positive cells were positive in morphologically normal FTE. Both proteins were expressed consistently across multiple STICs from the same patient and in concomitant invasive HGSC. Knockdown of p53 in immortalized FTE cells and in four HGSC-derived cell lines expressing different missense p53 mutations did not affect STMN1 protein levels. Conclusions This study demonstrates that STMN1 and p16 are sensitive and specific adjunct biomarkers that, when used with p53 and Ki-67, improve the diagnostic accuracy of STIC. The addition of STMN1 and p16 helps to compensate for practical limitations of p53 and Ki-67 that complicate the diagnosis in up to one third of STICs. PMID:26206555

  7. Interobserver reproducibility and accuracy of p16/Ki-67 dual-stain cytology in cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Fetterman, Barbara; Tokugawa, Diane; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Wood, Shannon N; Stiemerling, Eric; Poitras, Nancy; Lorey, Thomas; Kinney, Walter

    2014-12-01

    Dual-stain cytology for p16 and Ki-67 has been proposed as a biomarker in cervical cancer screening. The authors evaluated the reproducibility and accuracy of dual-stain cytology among 10 newly trained evaluators. In total, 480 p16/Ki-67-stained slides from human papillomavirus-positive women were evaluated in masked fashion by 10 evaluators. None of the evaluators had previous experience with p16 or p16/Ki-67 cytology. All participants underwent p16/Ki-67 training and subsequent proficiency testing. Reproducibility of dual-stain cytology was measured using the percentage agreement, individual and aggregate κ values, as well as McNemar statistics. Clinical performance for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) was evaluated for each individual evaluator and for all evaluators combined compared with the reference evaluation by a cytotechnologist who had extensive experience with dual-stain cytology. The percentage agreement of individual evaluators with the reference evaluation ranged from 83% to 91%, and the κ values ranged from 0.65 to 0.81. The combined κ value was 0.71 for all evaluators and 0.73 for cytotechnologists. The average sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CIN2+ among novice evaluators was 82% and 64%, respectively; whereas the reference evaluation had 84% sensitivity and 63% specificity, respectively. Agreement on dual-stain positivity increased with greater numbers of p16/Ki-67-positive cells on the slides. Good to excellent reproducibility of p16/Ki-67 dual-stain cytology was observed with almost identical clinical performance of novice evaluators compared with reference evaluations. The current findings suggest that p16/Ki-67 dual-stain evaluation can be implemented in routine cytology practice with limited training. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  8. Parental preferences for CDKN2A/p16 testing of minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Jennifer M; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Kohlmann, Wendy; Dow, Reed; Leachman, Sancy A

    2010-12-01

    Genetic testing of minors is controversial, as ethical considerations depend on multiple aspects of the particular disease and familial context. For melanoma, there is a well-established and avoidable environmental influence and a documented benefit of early detection. We surveyed 61 CDKN2A/p16 mutation-tested adults from two kindreds about their attitudes toward genetic testing of minors immediately posttesting and 2 years later. Overall, 86.9% expressed support of melanoma genetic testing of minors, with the importance of risk awareness (77.4%) and the likelihood of improved prevention and screening behaviors (69.8%) as the most frequently cited potential benefits. Among mutation carriers, 82.6% wanted genetic testing for their own children. These preferences remained stable over a 2-year period. Most respondents (62.3%) favored complete involvement of their children in genetic counseling and test reporting; 19.7% suggested that children be tested but not informed of the results. Concerns about inducing psychological distress or compromising children's decision autonomy were infrequently cited. Testing preferences did not vary by respondent age, gender, or melanoma history. Respondents strongly supported melanoma genetic testing of minors, with most citing improved health behavior as a likely outcome. We discuss options for melanoma genetic counseling and testing of minors.

  9. Post-irradiation pericardial malignant mesothelioma with deletion of p16: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeini, Yalda B; Arcega, Ramir; Hirschowitz, Sharon; Rao, Nagesh; Xu, Haodong

    2018-02-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas are rather uncommon neoplasms associated primarily with asbestos exposure; however, they may also arise as second primary malignancies after radiation therapy, with a latency period of 15-25 years. Numerous studies have reported an association between pleural malignant mesothelioma and chest radiation performed for other malignancies; on the other hand, post-irradiation mesotheliomas of the pericardium have been reported in only a few published cases to date, and no homozygous deletion of 9p21 has been described in such cases. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with a history of Hodgkin's lymphoma and no prior asbestos exposure who developed pericardial malignant epithelioid mesothelioma. We further discuss the cytologic, histologic, immunophenotypic, and fluorescence in situ hybridization findings in this case. To our knowledge, this is the first well-documented case of post-radiation pericardial malignant mesothelioma showing homozygous deletion of 9p21. Homozygous deletion of 9p21, the locus harboring the p16 gene, is present in post-irradiation pericardial malignant mesothelioma.

  10. The change of p16 gene expression in glioma cell line C6 after radiation with gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xingli; Zhao Conghai; Tian Yu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: T observe the change of expression of p16 gene product, P16 protein, after treated by gamma knife on glioma cell line C6. Methods: Glioma C6 cells proliferated in vitro, treated by γ-knife in dose of 5.00 and 6.22 Gy, respectively. P16 protein was detected by immunohistochemical technique and image analysis. Results: The P16 protein in glioma C6 cells was notably increased after treatment with γ knife (P < 0.01). The grey number in C6 group (control group) was 167.1 +- 6.2 and was 155.4 +- 2.0 and 124.9 +- 7.1, respectively, in 5.00 Gy and 6.22 Gy gamma knife treated group. Conclusion: It is suggests that one of the mechanisms of glioma cell C6 apoptosis induced by γ-knife radiation may be associated with activation of p16 gene and increase of P16 protein expression

  11. Influence of human papillomavirus and p16INK4a on treatment outcome of patients with anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerber, Stefan Alexander; Schoneweg, Clara; Slynko, Alla; Krug, David; Haefner, Matthias F.; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Sterzing, Florian; Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus von

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate HPV-DNA and p16 INK4a (p16) expression as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with anal cancer. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2011 a cohort of 105 anal cancer patients was treated with definitive chemoradiation at our institution. Tumor biopsies from 90 patients were analyzed for HPV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction and for p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: Median follow-up was 48.6 months (range 2.8–169.1 months). HPV-DNA or p16-expression was found in 75 anal cancers each (83.3%), concordance was detectable in 70 tumors (77.8%). Significantly improved overall survival (OS) [77.1% vs. 51.4%, p = 0.005], progression-free survival (PFS) [64.0% vs. 35.0%, p < 0.001] and improved local control [81.0% vs. 55.9%, p = 0.023] was found for concomitant HPV- and p16-positive anal carcinomas (cHPPAC) in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed better OS [p = 0.015] and PFS [p = 0.002] for cHPPAC. Conclusion: The combination of HPV-DNA and p16 can be used as an independent prognostic parameter in anal cancer patients

  12. Impact of HPV-associated p16-expression on radiotherapy outcome in advanced oropharynx and non-oropharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassen, Pernille; Primdahl, Hanne; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus A.; Andersen, Elo; Andersen, Lisbeth J.; Evensen, Jan F.; Eriksen, Jesper G.; Overgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV is found in head and neck cancer from all sites with a higher prevalence in oropharynx cancer (OPC) compared to non-OPC. HPV/p16-status has a significant impact on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in advanced OPC, but less is known about the influence in non-OPC. We analyzed HPV-associated p16-expression in a cohort of patients with stage III–IV pharynx and larynx cancer treated with primary, curatively intended (chemo-)RT, aiming to test the hypothesis that the impact of HPV/p16 also extends to tumors of non-oropharyngeal origin. Material and methods: 1294 patients enrolled in previously conducted DAHANCA-trials between 1992 and 2012 were identified. Tumors were evaluated by p16-immunohistochemistry and classified as positive in case of staining in >70% of tumors cells. Results: Thirty-eight percent (490/1294) of the tumors were p16-positive with a significantly higher frequency in OPC (425/815) than in non-OPC (65/479), p < .0001. In OPC p16-positivity significantly improved loco-regional control (LRC) (adjusted HR [95% CI]: 0.43 [0.32–0.57]), event-free survival (EFS) (HR 0.44 [0.35–0.56]), and overall survival (OS) (HR: 0.38 [0.29–0.49]), respectively, compared with p16-negativity. In non-OPC no prognostic impact of p16-status was found for either endpoint: LRC (HR: 1.13 [0.75–1.70]), EFS (HR: 1.06 [0.76–1.47]), and OS (HR: 0.82 [0.59–1.16]). Conclusions: The independent influence of HPV-associated p16-expression in advanced OPC treated with primary RT was confirmed. However, RT-outcome in the group of non-OPC did not differ by tumor p16-status, indicating that the prognostic impact may be restricted to OPC only

  13. A de-novo interstitial microduplication involving 2p16.1-p15 and mirroring 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome: Clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Yeshaya, Josepha; Kahana, Sarit; Maya, Idit; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Microdeletions of various sizes in the 2p16.1-p15 chromosomal region have been grouped together under the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome. Children with this syndrome generally share certain features including microcephaly, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, urogenital and skeletal abnormalities. We present a child with a de-novo interstitial 1665 kb duplication of 2p16.1-p15. Clinical features of this child are distinct from those of children with the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome, specifically the head circumference which is within the normal range and mild intellectual disability with absence of autistic behaviors. Microduplications many times bear milder clinical phenotypes in comparison with corresponding microdeletion syndromes. Indeed, as compared to the microdeletion syndrome patients, the 2p16.1-p15 microduplication seems to have a milder cognitive effect and no effect on other body systems. Limited information available in genetic databases about cases with overlapping duplications indicates that they all have abnormal developmental phenotypes. The involvement of genes in this location including BCL11A, USP34 and PEX13, affecting fundamental developmental processes both within and outside the nervous system may explain the clinical features of the individual described in this report. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunohistochemistry Analysis of CD44, EGFR, and p16 in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Erin R; Reis, Isildinha M; Gomez, Carmen; Pereira, Lutecia; Freiser, Monika E; Hoosien, Gia; Franzmann, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-01

    Objectives We analyze the relationship between CD44, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and p16 expression in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers in a diverse population. We also describe whether particular patterns of staining are associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Study Design Prospective study, single-blind to pathologist and laboratory technologist. Setting Hospital based. Subjects and Methods Immunohistochemistry, comprising gross staining and cellular expression, was performed and interpreted in a blinded fashion on 24 lip/oral cavity and 40 oropharyngeal cancer specimens collected between 2007 and 2012 from participants of a larger study. Information on overall survival and progression-free survival was obtained from medical records. Results Nineteen cases were clinically p16 positive, 16 of which were oropharyngeal. Oral cavity lesions were more likely to exhibit strong CD44 membrane staining ( P = .0002). Strong CD44 membrane and strong EGFR membrane and/or cytoplasmic staining were more common in p16-negative cancers ( P = .006). Peripheral/mixed gross p16 staining pattern was associated with worse survival than the universal staining on univariate and multivariate analyses ( P = .006, P = .030). This held true when combining gross and cellular localization for p16. For CD44, universal gross staining demonstrated poorer overall survival compared with the peripheral/mixed group ( P = .039). CD44 peripheral/mixed group alone and when combined with universal p16 demonstrated the best survival on multivariate analysis ( P = .010). Conclusion In a diverse population, systematic analysis applying p16, CD44, and EGFR gross staining and cellular localization on immunohistochemistry demonstrates distinct patterns that may have prognostic potential exceeding current methods. Larger studies are warranted to investigate these findings further.

  15. Epigenetic alteration of p16 and retinoic acid receptor beta genes in the development of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Rahul; Kumar, Sandeep Sriram; Vaderhobli, Shilpa; Premalata, Chennagiri S; Pallavi, Venkateshaiah Reddihalli; Ramesh, Gawari; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2014-09-01

    Silencing of tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes by promoter hypermethylation is one of the major events in ovarian carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed aberrant promoter methylation of p16 and RAR-β genes in 134 epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), 23 low malignant potential (LMP) tumors, 26 benign cystadenomas, and 15 normal ovarian tissues. Methylation was investigated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and the results were confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Relative gene expression of p16 and RAR-β was done using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) on 51 EOC cases, 9 LMP tumors, and 7 benign cystadenomas with 5 normal ovarian tissues. Aberrant methylation for p16 and RAR-β was present in 43 % (58/134) and 31 % (41/134) in carcinoma cases, 22 % (05/23) and 52 % (12/23) in LMP tumors, and 42 % (11/26) and 69 % (18/26) in benign cystadenomas. No methylation was observed in any of the normal ovarian tissues. The mRNA expression level of p16 and RAR-β was significantly downregulated in EOC and LMP tumors than the corresponding normal tissues whereas the expression level was normal in benign cystadenomas for p16 and slightly reduced for RAR-β. A significant correlation of p16 promoter methylation was observed with reduced gene expression in EOC. For RAR-β, no significant correlation was observed between promoter methylation and gene expression. Our results suggest that epigenetic alterations of p16 and RAR-β have an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis and that mechanism along with methylation plays a significant role in downregulation of RAR-β gene in ovarian cancer.

  16. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  17. The prognostic value of HPV status and p16 expression in patients with carcinoma of the anal canal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria B Roldán Urgoiti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In anal cancer studies, the detection frequency of high-risk HPV (human papillomavirus is variable, depending on the method used. There are limited data reporting results of different HPV detection techniques in the same clinical series, and very few correlating results with clinical outcome. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate tumor expression of p16/HPV16 using three different methods, and to determine their association with clinical outcome in patients with anal canal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC. DESIGN: This retrospective study included patients with anal canal SCC treated with definitive radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy at a single institution between 1992 and 2005. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 53 of the 89 (60% patient pre-treatment biopsies were adequate for tissue microarray construction. HPV status was determined using: p16 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC and quantitative IHC (AQUA, HPV genotype analysis by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH and HPV linear array sub-typing. Expression status was correlated with clinical outcome. RESULTS: 80% (28/35 of patient tumors had high p16 expression using conventional IHC. HPV16 CISH was positive in 81% (34/42 of tumors, and 78% (28/36 of tumors were HPV subtype 16. HPV16 CISH correlated with p16 evaluated by conventional IHC (correlation coefficient 0.46; p = 0.01 and by p16 AQUA score (correlation coefficient 0.49; p = 0.001. A subset of cases (15% had very high p16 quantitative IHC scores (>244 and were associated with a higher incidence of local or distant recurrence (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority (80% of anal canal SCC in our series were positive for HPV16/p16, regardless of the testing method used. The exploratory analysis of automated quantitative IHC scoring was the only technique to define a subset of patients with a worse prognosis by p16 expression status on univariate analysis. Further exploration of the molecular

  18. PROMILLE database as a part of JNC reactor physics analytical system for BFS-2 fast critical facility experiments analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, Sergey

    2000-12-01

    The PROMILLE database for experimental data from the BFS-2 fast critical facility (Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Russia) has been developed and embedded into the JNC reactor physics analytical system to provide a strict documentation format, a common data source for different analytical tools and a unique export interface with different reactor codes. PROMILLE should be considered not only as a database but also as a bank of interfaces because of its dynamic role in the analytical process. The database currently accepts data from the simulation materials (pellets, tubes and bars) as well as full cores descriptions. A core description involves all different unit cells forming loading elements, all types of the loading elements forming a layout and the layout itself. In fact it is a description of criticality experiments. Export interfaces for the CITATION-FBR code and the SLAROM and CASUP codes have been developed. The PROMILLE software was developed with MS Visual Basic 6.0 and the data is kept in the data tables generated with the MS Access database management system. Data for eight BFS-2 assembly configurations have been incorporated. They include BFS-58-1i1 uranium-free plutonium assembly with inert material included in its fuel matrix and also seven BFS-62 modifications simulating different stages of investigation of MOX fuel based BN-600 core. (author)

  19. Screening for human papillomavirus in basaloid squamous carcinoma: utility of p16(INK4a), CISH, and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ryan; Trotman, Winifred; Adamson, Christine S C; Rajendran, Vanitha; Tang, Alice; Elhosseiny, Abdelmonem; Evans, Mark F

    2011-06-01

    This study compares p16( INK4a) immunohistochemistry (IHC), HPV chromogenic in situ hybridization (ISH), and HPV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping for detection of HPV infection in basaloid squamous carcinoma (BSCC). A retrospective histopathological analysis of 40 BSCC from a single institution was carried out. p16 IHC, HPV DNA extraction and ISH, and HPV PCR genotyping were performed, and there was excellent agreement between all 3 methods of HPV detection. Analysis of variance yielded no significant differences between the results of the 3 tests ( P = .354) and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients calculated for each pair of tests demonstrated direct correlation (r = .61 for PCR and IHC, r = .61 for PCR and ISH, and r = 1.00 for ISH and IHC). This supports the use of p16(INK4a) IHC as an initial screening tool for HPV infection in BSCC, while definitive evidence of HPV DNA can be sought subsequently with PCR or CISH.

  20. p16 as a diagnostic marker of cervical neoplasia: a tissue microarray study of 796 archival specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesnikova, Iana; Lidang, Marianne; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    from archival formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded donor tissues from 796 patients, and included cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1 (n = 249), CIN2 (n = 233), CIN3 (n = 181), and invasive cervical carcinoma (n = 133). p16INK4a expression was scored using two different protocols: 1......BACKGROUND: To evaluate the usefulness of this biomarker in the diagnosis of cases of cervical neoplasia we studied the immunohistochemical expression of p16INK4a in a large series of archival cervical biopsies arranged into tissue microarray format. METHODS: TMAs were constructed with tissue cores...... dysplasia or the presence of invasive carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Immunohistochemical analysis of p16INK4a expression is a useful diagnostic tool. Expression is related to the degree of histological dysplasia, suggesting that it may have prognostic and predicative value in the management of cervical neoplasia....

  1. p16 (INK4a) has clinicopathological and prognostic impact on oropharynx and larynx squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, S.D. [Departamento de Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço e Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Oncology, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research and Segal Cancer Centre, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Nonogaki, S. [Departamento de Anatomia Patológica, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Soares, F.A. [Departamento de Anatomia Patológica, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Estomatologia, Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kowalski, L.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço e Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-07

    CDKN2A encodes proteins such as p16 (INK4a), which negatively regulate the cell-cycle. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that deletions in CDKN2A occur frequently in cancer. Although p16 (INK4a) may be involved in tumor progression, the clinical impact and prognostic implications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the immunohistochemical expression of p16 (INK4a) in 40 oropharynx and 35 larynx from HNSCC patients treated in a single institution and followed-up at least for 10 years in order to explore potential associations with clinicopathological outcomes and prognostic implications. Forty cases (53.3%) were positive for p16 (INK4a) and this expression was more intense in non-smoking patients (P = 0.050), whose tumors showed negative vascular embolization (P = 0.018), negative lymphatic permeation (P = 0.002), and clear surgical margins (P = 0.050). Importantly, on the basis of negative p16 (INK4a) expression, it was possible to predict a probability of lower survival (P = 0.055) as well as tumors presenting lymph node metastasis (P = 0.050) and capsular rupture (P = 0.0010). Furthermore, increased risk of recurrence was observed in tumors presenting capsular rupture (P = 0.0083). Taken together, the alteration in p16 (INK4a) appears to be a common event in patients with oropharynx and larynx squamous cell carcinoma and the negative expression of this protein correlated with poor prognosis.

  2. p16 (INK4a) has clinicopathological and prognostic impact on oropharynx and larynx squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.D.; Nonogaki, S.; Soares, F.A.; Kowalski, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    CDKN2A encodes proteins such as p16 (INK4a), which negatively regulate the cell-cycle. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that deletions in CDKN2A occur frequently in cancer. Although p16 (INK4a) may be involved in tumor progression, the clinical impact and prognostic implications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the immunohistochemical expression of p16 (INK4a) in 40 oropharynx and 35 larynx from HNSCC patients treated in a single institution and followed-up at least for 10 years in order to explore potential associations with clinicopathological outcomes and prognostic implications. Forty cases (53.3%) were positive for p16 (INK4a) and this expression was more intense in non-smoking patients (P = 0.050), whose tumors showed negative vascular embolization (P = 0.018), negative lymphatic permeation (P = 0.002), and clear surgical margins (P = 0.050). Importantly, on the basis of negative p16 (INK4a) expression, it was possible to predict a probability of lower survival (P = 0.055) as well as tumors presenting lymph node metastasis (P = 0.050) and capsular rupture (P = 0.0010). Furthermore, increased risk of recurrence was observed in tumors presenting capsular rupture (P = 0.0083). Taken together, the alteration in p16 (INK4a) appears to be a common event in patients with oropharynx and larynx squamous cell carcinoma and the negative expression of this protein correlated with poor prognosis

  3. Post-treatment PET/CT and p16 status for predicting treatment outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer after definitive radiation

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    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad; Rezaee, Rod; Fowler, Nicole [University Hospitals, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Karapetyan, Lilit; Gibson, Michael [University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wasman, Jay [University Hospitals, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Faulhaber, Peter [University Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively review post-treatment (post-tx) FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and known p16 status, treated with definitive (chemo)radiation (RT). A total of 108 eligible patients had N2A or greater HNSCC treated with chemoRT from August 1, 2008, to February 28, 2015, with post-tx PET/CT within 6 months after RT. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank statistics, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used for statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 2.38 years. Sixty-eight (63.0%) patients had p16+ and 40 (37.0%) had p16- status. Two-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival were 93.4% and 77.8%, respectively. The negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT for local recurrence (LR) was 100%. The NPV for regional recurrence (RR) was 96.5% for all patients, 100% for p16+ patients, and 88.5% for p16- patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PET/CT for recurrence was 77.3% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+, and 78.6% for p16-. The PPV for LR was 72.7% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+ patients, and 72.7% for p16- patients. The PPV for RR was 50.0% for all patients, 33% for p16+, and 66.6% for p16-. Post-tx PET/CT and p16 status were independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (p < 0.01). Post-tx PET/CT predicts treatment outcomes in both p16 + and p16- patients, and does so independently of p16 status. P16- patients with negative PET have a 10% risk of nodal recurrence, and closer follow-up in these patients is warranted. (orig.)

  4. The correlations between alteration of p16 gene and clinicopathological factors and prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas of the buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuying; Wang, Jie; Dong, Fusheng; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yinghuai

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate relationships between the alteration of p16 gene and the clinical status and prognosis of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa. Thirty buccal cancers were included in the analysis. Deletion analysis was performed by PCR. Point mutation analysis was used by PCR-SSCP and direct sequencing. Methylation-specific PCR methods were adopted for the evaluation of p16 methylation. The correlation between alteration of p16 gene and clinicopathological factors buccal cancer was evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression were used to investigate the relationship between p16 alteration and survival time. The frequency of p16 alteration was 63.3% in buccal carcinomas. P16 deletion was associated significantly with tumor size (P = 0.01). P16 point mutation was associated significantly with differentiation (P = 0.006). P16 methylation was associated significantly with nodes metastasis (P = 0.027). The overall survival rate of 30 buccal carcinomas was 53.3%. The Log-rank test (P = 0.021) and univariate Cox regression analysis (P = 0.030) revealed that p16 methylation was significantly associated with the overall survival rate. Multivariate analysis showed that p16 deletion, p16 mutation, and p16 methylation were not statistically significant. The alterations of p16 gene may play a major role in malignancy and development and metastases of buccal carcinoma and may be an excellent marker of aggressive clinical behavior. P16 methylation has a prognostic value in buccal carcinoma but not an independent prognosis factor. P16 point mutation and p16 deletion have not prognostic significance in buccal carcinoma. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Diagnostic value of progesterone receptor, p16, p53 and pHH3 expression in uterine atypical leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yun; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Xiaoduan; Lü, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between atypical leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma may be hard based on morphological criterion at times. It would be helpful to find out biomarkers that can be used to distinguish them. The aim of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of progesterone receptor (PR), p16, p53 and pHH3 expression in a series of uterine smooth muscle tumors. Immunohistochemical expression of PR, p16, p53 and pHH3 was investigated on 32 atypical leiomyomas, 15 leiomyosarcomas and 15 usual leomyomas. The difference in expression was compared between atypical leiomyoma and other groups. The expression of PR, p16, and pHH3 was found significantly different between atypical leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, but lack of significant difference between atypical leiomyomas and usual leiomyomas. There was no significant difference with regard to p53 distribution among these uterine smooth muscle tumors. High p16, pHH3 expression and low PR expression preferred the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. The panel of antibodies used in this study is a useful complementary analysis in the assessment of problematic uterine smooth muscle tumors.

  6. Magnetite nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and upregulate the expression of p53/p16 in Ehrlich solid carcinoma bearing mice.

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    Heba Bassiony

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used as contrast agents and have promising approaches in cancer treatment. In the present study we used Ehrlich solid carcinoma (ESC bearing mice as a model to investigate MNPs antitumor activity, their effect on expression of p53 and p16 genes as an indicator for apoptotic induction in tumor tissues. METHOD: MNPs coated with ascorbic acid (size: 25.0±5.0 nm were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized. Ehrlich mice model were treated with MNPs using 60 mg/Kg day by day for 14 injections; intratumorally (IT or intraperitoneally (IP. Tumor size, pathological changes and iron content in tumor and normal muscle tissues were assessed. We also assessed changes in expression levels of p53 and p16 genes in addition to p53 protein level by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Our results revealed that tumor growth was significantly reduced by IT and IP MNPs injection compared to untreated tumor. A significant increase in p53 and p16 mRNA expression was detected in Ehrlich solid tumors of IT and IP treated groups compared to untreated Ehrlich solid tumor. This increase was accompanied with increase in p53 protein expression. It is worth mentioning that no significant difference in expression of p53 and p16 could be detected between IT ESC and control group. CONCLUSION: MNPs might be more effective in breast cancer treatment if injected intratumorally to be directed to the tumor tissues.

  7. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine protects against emphysema in mice via suppressing p16Ink4a expression in lung tissue

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    He ZH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Hui He,1 Yan Chen,2 Ping Chen,2 Sheng-Dong He,2 Hui-Hui Zeng,2 Ji-Ru Ye,2 Da Liu,2 Jun Cao3 1Intensive Care Unit, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hunan Provincial People’s Hospital, Changsha, China Background: There is a growing realization that COPD, or at least emphysema, involves several processes presenting in aging and cellular senescence. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contribute to neovascularization and play an important role in the development of COPD. The gene for p16Ink4a is a major dominant senescence one. The aim of the present study was to observe changes in lung function, histomorphology of lung tissue, and expression of p16Ink4a in lung tissue and bone marrow-derived EPCs in emphysematous mice induced by cigarette-smoke extract (CSE, and further to search for a potential candidate agent protecting against emphysema induced by CSE. Materials and methods: An animal emphysema model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of CSE. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR was administered to the emphysematous mice. Lung function and histomorphology of lung tissue were measured. The p16Ink4a protein and mRNA in EPCs and lung tissues were detected using Western blotting and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Results: CSE induced emphysema with increased p16Ink4a expression in lung tissue and bone marrow-derived EPCs. 5-Aza-CdR partly protected against emphysema, especially in the lung-morphology profile, and partly protest against the overexpression of p16Ink4a in EPCs and lung tissue induced by CSE. Conclusion: 5-Aza-CdR partly protected against emphysema in mice via suppressing p16Ink4a expression in EPCs and lung tissue. Keywords: 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, cigarette smoke, emphysema, endothelial progenitor cells, p16Ink4a

  8. Expression of Bmi-1, P16, and CD44v6 in Uterine Cervical Carcinoma and Its Clinical Significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Mei-ying; Li, Lin; Feng, Shu-ying; Hong, Shun-jia

    2012-01-01

    Bmi-1, a putative proto-oncogene, is a core member of the polycomb gene family, which is expressed in many human tumors. The p16 protein negatively regulated cell proliferation, whereas CD44v6 is associated with proliferation as an important protein. Additionally, CD44v6 is an important nuclear antigen closely correlated to tumor metastasis. The present study aims to investigate the expression and significance of Bmi-1, p16, and CD44v6 in uterine cervical carcinoma (UCC). A total of 62 UCC, 30 cervical neoplasic, and 20 normal cervical mucosal tissues were used in the current study. The expression of Bmi-1, p16, and CD44v6 in these tissues was determined using immunohistochemical assay. The relationships among the expression of these indices, the clinicopathologic features of UCC, and the survival rate of UCC patients were also discussed. The correlation between Bmi-1 protein expression and p16 or CD44v6 protein in UCC was analyzed. The expression of Bmi-1, p16, and CD44v6 was significantly high in cervical carcinoma compared with that in the cervical neoplasia and normal colorectal mucosa (P<0.05). The over-expression of Bmi-1 protein in UCC was apparently related to the distant metastasis (P<0.01) and the tumor, nodes and metastasis-classification, i.e. the TNM staging, World Health Organization (P<0.05). Nevertheless, the positive expression of p16 protein in UCC was not significantly associated with the clinicopathologic features (P>0.05). The Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that the over-expression of Bmi-1 significantly decreased the survival rate of UCC patients (P<0.05). A strong correlation indicated that there was statistical significance between the expression of Bmi-1 and CD44V6 proteins in UCC (r=0.419, P=0.001). The over-expression of Bmi-1 and CD44v6 protein closely correlate to the tumorigenesis, metastasis, and prognosis of UCC. Bmi-1 and CD44v6 may be used to predict the prognosis of cervical carcinoma. Bmi-1 may indirectly regulate the

  9. Simulation of Different Truncated p16INK4a Forms and In Silico Study of Interaction with Cdk4

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    Najmeh Fahham

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions studies can greatly increase the amount of structural and functional information pertaining to biologically active molecules and processes. The information obtained from such studies can lead to design and application of new modification in order to obtain a desired bioactivity. Many application packages and servers performing docking, such as HEX, DOT, AUTODOCK, and ZDOCK are now available for predicting the lowest free energy state of a protein complex. In this study, we have focused on cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4, a key molecule in the regulation of cell cycle progression at the G1-S phase restriction point and p16INK4a, a tumor suppressor which inhibits Cdk4 activity. Truncated structures were created to find the more critical regions of p16 for interaction. The tertiary structures were determined by ProSAL, GENO3D Web Server. We evaluated their interactions with Cdk4 using two docking systems, HEX 4.5 and DOT 1. Calculations were performed on a high-speed computer. Minimizations and visualizations were carried out by PdbViewer 3.7. Considering shape and shape/electrostatic total energy, structures containing ANK II, III and IV motifs that lack the N-terminal region of the full length p16 molecule showed the best fi t complexes among the p16 truncated forms. The free energies were compatible with that of p16 full length original form, the full length. It seems that the N-terminal of the molecule is not crucial for the interaction since the truncated structure containing only this region did not show a good total energy.

  10. Prognostic importance of HPV and p16 in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma in ENT clinic in Nove Zamky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurinec, F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas in other subsides of the head and neck, in spite of the reduced prevalence of smoking in developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, is now recognized as a significant marker in the onset of HPV positive OPSCC, with different epidemiological, clinical, anatomical, radiological, behavioural, biological and prognostic characteristics from HPV negative OPSCC. Aim: The aim of our work was to measure the impact of HPV infection and anti-oncogene p16 on survival and analyze lifestyles in our sample of patients. Material and methods: 61 patients with newly diagnosed oropharyngeal cancer in ENT clinic in Nove Zamky included in our study from March 2011 till February 2014. They were divided into two categories- HPV positive and HPV negative patients (n-39 versus 22). Results: HPV infection was analysed by DNA detection viral DNA with PCR (Cobas 4800 HPV Test) and expression E6/E7 oncogenes by mRNA. In addition, we detected p16 overexpression immunohistochemistry as a surrogate marker for high risk HPV(HR HPV). We analysed clinicopatological characteristic, smoking and alcohol abuse history, sexual behaviours and compared treatment and overall survival between HPV positive and HPV negative patients. The 2- year rates of overall survival were 86% versus 41% in HPV + and HPV – patients and 88% versus 25% in p16+ and p16- tumors, respectively. Conclusion: These observations lead to questions regarding management choices for patients based on tumour HPV and p16status with important consequences on treatment and on the role of targeted therapy and vaccines and over the upcoming years. (author)

  11. The effect of phenobarbital on the methylation level of the p16 promoter region in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostka, Grazyna; Urbanek, Katarzyna; Ludwicki, Jan K.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that non-genotoxic carcinogens (NGCs) may cause modification of the DNA methylation status. We studied the effects of phenobarbital (PB) - a non-genotoxic rodent liver carcinogen - on the methylation level of the promoter region of the p16 suppressor gene, as well as on hepatomegaly, DNA synthesis, and DNA-methyltransferase (DNMTs) activity in the rat liver. Male Wistar rats received PB in 1, 3 or 14 daily oral doses (at 24-h intervals), each equivalent to 1/10 of the LD 50 value. The study showed that PB has caused persistent elevation in relative liver weight (RLW) as well as a transient increase in DNA synthesis. This suggests that the PB-induced increase in RLW was due to a combination of both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of liver cells. The effect of PB on DNA synthesis corresponded to an increase in the methylation pattern of the p16 promoter sequence. Methylation of cytosine in the analyzed CpG sites of the p16 gene was found after short exposure of the animals to PB. Treatment of rats with PB for 1 and 3 days also produced an increase in nuclear DNMTs activity. After prolonged administration (14 days), DNA synthesis declined, returning to the control level. No changes in methylation of the p16 gene nor in DNMTs activity were observed. The reversibility of early induced changes in target tissues is a mark characteristic of tumor promoters. Thus, transient changes in methylation of the p16 gene, although their direct role in the mechanisms of PB toxicity, including its carcinogenic action, remains doubtful, may therefore be a significant element of such processes

  12. Expression of EGFR and HPV-associated p16 in head and neck cancer: correlation and influence on prognosis after radiotherapy in 1088 patients from the randomised DAHANCA 5, 6 & 7 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Tramm, Trine

    2009-01-01

    -expression (27%) compared to p16neg tumours (16%, poro-pharynx the frequency of p16 was highest (132/329, 40%) and the inverse correlation between EGFR and p16 most pronounced (63% of tumours with low EGFR were p16pos). Prognosis was significantly improved for p16pos tumours compared to p16neg...

  13. Annual report on the present state and activities of the radiation protection division, JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities, such as radiation control in the radiation facilities, personnel monitoring, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, safety research, and technical support, undertaken by the Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2003. The major radiation facilities in the Tokai Works are the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), three MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF), and various other radioisotope and uranium research laboratories. The Radiation Protection Division is responsible for radiation control in and around these radiation facilities, including personnel monitoring, workplace monitoring, consultation on radiological work planning and evaluation, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, calibration, quality assurance, and safety research. The Division also provides technical support and cooperation to other international and domestic institutes in the radiation protection field. In fiscal 2003, the results of radiological monitoring showed the situation to be normal, and no radiological incident or accident occurred. The maximum annual effective dose to radiation workers was 6.2 mSv and the mean annual effective dose was 0.1 mSv. Individual doses were kept within the annual dose limit specified in the safety regulations. The estimated effective dose caused by gas and liquid effluents form the TRP to members of the public around the Tokai Works was 4.2 x 10 -4 mSv. Environmental monitoring and effluent control were performed appropriately in compliance with safety regulation and standards. In addition, the various preparations were made for introduction of the quality assurance to regulation since fiscal 2004. (author)

  14. Annual report on the present state and activities of the radiation protection division, JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities on radiation control in the radiation facilities, personnel monitoring, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, safety research, and technical support, undertaken by the Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2004. The major radiation facilities in the Tokai Works are the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), three MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF), and various other radioisotope and uranium research laboratories. The Radiation Protection Division is responsible for radiation control in and around these radiation facilities, including personnel monitoring, workplace monitoring, consultation on radiological work planning and evaluation, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, calibration, quality assurance, and safety research. The Division also provides technical support and cooperation to other international and domestic institutes in the radiation protection field. In fiscal 2004, the results of radiological monitoring showed the situation to be normal, and no radiological incident or accident occurred. The maximum annual effective dose to radiation workers was 6.1 mSv and the mean annual effective dose was 0.1 mSv. Individual doses were kept within the annual dose limit specified in the safety regulations. The estimated effective dose caused by gas and liquid effluents from the TRP to members of the public around the Tokai Works was 4.4x10 -4 mSv. Environmental monitoring and effluent control were performed appropriately in compliance with safety regulation and standards. Research and development on radiation protection in nuclear fuel cycle are also performed actively. Safety audit and Nuclear Safety Inspection were made in accordance with the quality assurance system which had been introduced to safety regulation since fiscal 2004. (author)

  15. Implications of Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of CDKN2A (p16INK4a in Cancer

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    Ran Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant gene silencing is highly associated with altered cell cycle regulation during carcinogenesis. In particular, silencing of the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene, which encodes the p16INK4a protein, has a causal link with several different types of cancers. The p16INK4a protein plays an executional role in cell cycle and senescence through the regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK 4/6 and cyclin D complexes. Several genetic and epigenetic aberrations of CDKN2A lead to enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis with recurrence of cancer and poor prognosis. In these cases, the restoration of genetic and epigenetic reactivation of CDKN2A is a practical approach for the prevention and therapy of cancer. This review highlights the genetic status of CDKN2A as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in various cancers.

  16. Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Increase p16INK4a Expression, a Biomarker of T-cell Aging

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    William A. Wood

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The expression of markers of cellular senescence increases exponentially in multiple tissues with aging. Age-related physiological changes may contribute to adverse outcomes in cancer survivors. To investigate the impact of high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation on senescence markers in vivo, we collected blood and clinical data from a cohort of 63 patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. The expression of p16INK4a, a well-established senescence marker, was determined in T-cells before and 6 months after transplant. RNA sequencing was performed on paired samples from 8 patients pre- and post-cancer therapy. In patients undergoing allogeneic transplant, higher pre-transplant p16INK4a expression was associated with a greater number of prior cycles of chemotherapy received (p = 0.003, prior autologous transplantation (p = 0.01 and prior exposure to alkylating agents (p = 0.01. Transplantation was associated with a marked increase in p16INK4a expression 6 months following transplantation. Patients receiving autologous transplant experienced a larger increase in p16INK4a expression (3.1-fold increase, p = 0.002 than allogeneic transplant recipients (1.9-fold increase, p = 0.0004. RNA sequencing of T-cells pre- and post- autologous transplant or cytotoxic chemotherapy demonstrated increased expression of transcripts associated with cellular senescence and physiological aging. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially alkylating agents, and stem cell transplantation strongly accelerate expression of a biomarker of molecular aging in T-cells.

  17. Promoter methylation of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and p16 is a phenomenon of advanced-stage HCCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Kemp, Matthias; Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Passmann, Sandra; Plotz, Guido; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes has been observed in various cancers. Looking at hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific protein silencing was previously demonstrated to be associated with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the proposed HCV dependent promoter methylation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and thereby enhanced progression of hepatocarcinogenesis has been the subject of controversial discussion. We investigated promoter methylation pattern of the MMR genes MLH1, MSH2 and PMS2 as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A gene (p16) in 61 well characterized patients with HCCs associated with HCV, Hepatitis B virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour and non-tumour adjacent tissue and analysed by methylation-specific PCR. Moreover, microsatellite analysis was performed in tissues showing methylation in MMR gene promoters. Our data demonstrated that promoter methylation of MLH1, MSH2, PMS2 and p16 is present among all considered HCCs. Hereby, promoter silencing was detectable more frequently in advanced-stage HCCs than in low-stage ones. However, there was no significant correlation between aberrant DNA methylation of MMR genes or p16 and HCV infection in related HCC specimens. In summary, we show that promoter methylation of essential MMR genes and p16 is detectable in HCCs most dominantly in pT3 stage tumour cases. Since loss of MMR proteins was previously described to be not only responsible for tumour development but also for chemotherapy resistance, the knowledge of mechanisms jointly responsible for HCC progression might enable significant improvement of individual HCC therapy in the future.

  18. Promoter methylation of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and p16 is a phenomenon of advanced-stage HCCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Hinrichsen

    Full Text Available Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes has been observed in various cancers. Looking at hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC specific protein silencing was previously demonstrated to be associated with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV. However, the proposed HCV dependent promoter methylation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes and thereby enhanced progression of hepatocarcinogenesis has been the subject of controversial discussion. We investigated promoter methylation pattern of the MMR genes MLH1, MSH2 and PMS2 as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A gene (p16 in 61 well characterized patients with HCCs associated with HCV, Hepatitis B virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour and non-tumour adjacent tissue and analysed by methylation-specific PCR. Moreover, microsatellite analysis was performed in tissues showing methylation in MMR gene promoters. Our data demonstrated that promoter methylation of MLH1, MSH2, PMS2 and p16 is present among all considered HCCs. Hereby, promoter silencing was detectable more frequently in advanced-stage HCCs than in low-stage ones. However, there was no significant correlation between aberrant DNA methylation of MMR genes or p16 and HCV infection in related HCC specimens. In summary, we show that promoter methylation of essential MMR genes and p16 is detectable in HCCs most dominantly in pT3 stage tumour cases. Since loss of MMR proteins was previously described to be not only responsible for tumour development but also for chemotherapy resistance, the knowledge of mechanisms jointly responsible for HCC progression might enable significant improvement of individual HCC therapy in the future.

  19. Shell model description of 16O(p,γ)17F and 16O(p,p)16O reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennaceur, K.; Michel, N.; Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Nowacki, F.; Okolowicz, J.

    2000-01-01

    We present shell model calculations of both the structure of 17 F and the reactions 16 O(p,γ) 17 F, 16 O(p,p) 16 O. We use the ZBM interaction which provides a fair description of the properties of 16 O and neighbouring nuclei and, in particular it takes account for the complicated correlations in coexisting low-lying states of 16 O. (authors)

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, p16 and hTERT in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant disorders

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    Aline Correa Abrahao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. One possible step is the development of potentially malignant disorders known as leukoplakia and erytroplakia. The objective of this study was to use immunohistochemistry to analyze the patterns of expression of the cell-cycle regulatory proteins p53 and p16INK4a in potentially malignant disorders (PMD of the oral mucosa (with varying degrees of dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC to correlate them with the expression of telomerase (hTERT. Fifteen PMD and 30 OSCC tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, 5 cases of oral epithelial hyperplasia (OEH were added to analyze clinically altered mucosa presenting as histological hyperplasia without dysplasia. p53 positivity was observed in 93.3% of PMD, in 63.3% of OSCC and in 80% of OEH. Although there was no correlation between p53 expression and the grade of dysplasia, all cases with severe dysplasia presented p53 suprabasal immunoexpression. p16INK4a expression was observed in 26.7% of PMD, in 43.3% of OSCC and in 2 cases of OEH. The p16INK4a expression in OEH, PMD and OSCC was unable to differentiate non-dysplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. hTERT positivity was observed in all samples of OEH and PMD and in 90% of OSCC. The high hTERT immunoexpression in all three lesions indicates that telomerase is present in clinically altered oral mucosa but does not differentiate hyperplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. In PMD of the oral mucosa, the p53 immunoexpression changes according to the degree of dysplasia by mechanisms independent of p16INK4a and hTERT.

  1. High Stromal Carbonic Anhydrase IX Expression Is Associated With Decreased Survival in p16-Negative Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockton, Nigel; Dort, Joseph; Lau, Harold; Hao, Desiree; Brar, Sony; Klimowicz, Alexander; Petrillo, Stephanie; Diaz, Roman; Doll, Corinne; Magliocco, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide. Alcohol use and tobacco use are the most established risk factors; however, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a subset of HNSCCs. Although HPV-positive tumors typically present at a more advanced stage at diagnosis, they are associated with a better prognosis. Tumor hypoxia confers poor prognosis and treatment failure, but direct tumor oxygen measurement is challenging. Endogenous markers of hypoxia (EMHs) have been proposed but have not replicated the prognostic utility of direct oxygen measurement. The expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia may be influenced by oxygen-independent factors, such as the HPV status of the tumor. Methods and Materials: Consecutive cases of locally advanced HNSCC, treated with a uniform regimen of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, were identified. Tissue microarrays were assembled from triplicate 0.6-mm cores of archived tumor tissue. HPV status was inferred from semiquantitative p16 immunostaining and directly measured by use of HPV-specific chromogenic in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Automated quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemistry was conducted to measure epithelial and stromal expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Results: High stromal CAIX expression was associated with significantly reduced overall survival (p = 0.03) in patients with p16-negative tumors. Conclusions: This is the first study to use quantitative immunohistochemistry to examine endogenous markers of hypoxia stratified by tumor p16/HPV status. Assessment of CAIX expression in p16-negative HNSCC could identify patients with the least favorable prognosis and inform therapeutic strategies.

  2. Two unique patients with novel microdeletions in 4p16.3 that exclude the WHS critical regions: implications for critical region designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Sarah T; Bleyl, Steven B; Carey, John C

    2007-09-15

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is characterized by growth delay, developmental delay, hypotonia, seizures, feeding difficulties, and characteristic facial features. Deletion of either of two critical regions (WHSCR and WHSCR-2) within chromosome band 4p16.3 has been proposed as necessary for the minimal clinical manifestations of WHS and controversy remains regarding their designation. We describe two patients with novel terminal microdeletions in 4p16.3 who lack the characteristic facial features but do show some of the more nonspecific manifestations of WHS. The first patient had a ring chromosome 4 with an intact 4q subtelomere and a terminal 4p microdeletion of approximately 1.27-1.46 Mb. This deletion was distal to both proposed critical regions. The second patient had a normal karyotype with a terminal 4p microdeletion of approximately 1.78 Mb. This deletion was distal to WHSCR and the breakpoint was near or within the known distal boundary for WHSCR-2. Both patients showed significant postnatal growth delay, mild developmental delays and feeding difficulties. Their facial features were not typical for WHS. The phenotype of the first patient may have been influenced by the presence of a ring chromosome. Seizures were absent in the first patient whereas the second patient had a complex seizure disorder. Characterization of these patients supports the hypothesis that a gene in WHSCR-2, LETM1, plays a direct role in seizure development, and demonstrates that components of the WHS phenotype can be seen with deletions distal to the known boundaries of the two proposed critical regions. These patients also emphasize the difficulty of mapping clinical manifestations common to many aneusomy syndromes. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Polymorphisms in promoter sequences of MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a genes in normal Japanese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Ohsaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has been conducted to identify sequence polymorphisms of gene promoter regions in patients and control subjects, including normal individuals, and to determine the influence of these polymorphisms on transcriptional regulation in cells that express wild-type or mutant p53. In this study we isolated genomic DNA from whole blood of healthy Japanese individuals and sequenced the promoter regions of the MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a genes. We identified polymorphisms comprising 3 nucleotide substitutions at exon 1 and intron 1 regions of the MDM2 gene and 1 nucleotide insertion at a poly(C nucleotide position in the p53 gene. The Japanese individuals also exhibited p16INK4a polymorphisms at several positions, including position -191. Reporter gene analysis by using luciferase revealed that the polymorphisms of MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a differentially altered luciferase activities in several cell lines, including the Colo320DM, U251, and T98G cell lines expressing mutant p53. Our results indicate that the promoter sequences of these genes differ among normal Japanese individuals and that polymorphisms can alter gene transcription activity.

  4. Grape juice concentrate modulates p16 expression in high fat diet-induced liver steatosis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Andressa Orlandeli; Gollücke, Andréa Pittelli Boiago; Noguti, Juliana; da Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; Yamamura, Elsa Tiemi Hojo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether subchronic treatment with grape juice concentrate is able to protect the liver from high fat diet injury in rats. The effects of grape juice concentrate treatment on histopathological changes, and immunohistochemistry for p53, p16 and p21 were evaluated. Male Wistar rats (n = 18) were distributed into three groups: group 1: negative control; group 2: cholesterol at 1% (w/w) in their diet, treated during 5 weeks; and group 3: cholesterol at 1% in their chow during 5 weeks, and grape juice concentrate at 222 mg per day in their drinking-water in the last week only. The results pointed out that treatment with grape juice concentrate did not show remarkable differences regarding liver tissue in the cholesterol-exposed group when compared to group 2. However, grape juice concentrate was able to modulate p16 immunoexpression when compared to high fat diet group. p53 and p21 did not show any significant statistical differences among groups. Taken together, our results suggest that subchronic grape juice concentrate administration was able to modulate cell cycle control by downregulation of p16 immunoexpression in high fat diet-induced liver steatosis in rats.

  5. HIV positivity but not HPV/p16 status is associated with higher recurrence rate in anal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joshua E; Panico, Vinicius J A; Marconato, Heloisa M F; Sherr, David L; Christos, Paul; Pirog, Edyta C

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a pathogenic factor of squamous cell carcinoma in various mucosal locations, including anal carcinoma (ACA). It is also known that patients positive for HIV are at high risk of ACA. The goal of this study was to examine clinical outcome in ACA in relation to HPV/p16 positivity, histologic tumor differentiation, and HIV status. Patients with oropharyngeal cancers that are positive for HPV and show overexpression of p16 as well as having non-keratinizing/basaloid histology have been reported to have better outcomes following chemoradiation (CRT). However, such relationships in ACA remain unknown. Forty-two patients with SCC of the anus treated with CRT between 1997 and 2009 were identified. The tumors were subclassified as either non-keratinizing (including basaloid) or keratinizing categories. HPV testing was performed using SPF10-PCR, and all cases were immunostained for p16. There were 23 men and 19 women; 43% of men and 11% of women were HIV-positive (p = 0.04). Fifty-five percent of patients had local disease (stages I and II) and 41% were stages III and IV, with 4% stage unknown. All tumors were positive for high-oncogenic risk HPVs, and all were positive with p16 immunostain. Sixty-four percent of tumors were non-keratinizing/basaloid and 36 % were keratinizing. The keratinizing tumors were more common in HIV-positive patients (67%), whereas non-keratinizing/basaloid tumors were more common in HIV-negative patients (77%) (p = 0.008). Thirty-one percent of patients had recurrence of disease, including 50% HIV-positive patients and 23% HIV-negative patients (p = 0.09). There was no difference in the recurrence rate between non-keratinizing and keratinizing tumor subtypes (p = 0.80). The 24-month recurrence-free survival for the cohort was 66% (95% CI = 46%, 81%), with HIV-positive patients having worse recurrence-free survival compared to HIV-negative patients (HR = 2.85, 95% CI = 0.95, 8.53; p = 0

  6. Clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in cisplatin versus cetuximab chemoradiation for locally advanced p16 positive oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Christian L; Walston, Steve; Zamora, Pedro; Healy, Erin H; Nolan, Nicole; Diavolitsis, Virginia M; Neki, Anterpreet; Rupert, Robert; Savvides, Panos; Agrawal, Amit; Old, Matthew; Ozer, Enver; Carrau, Ricardo; Kang, Stephen; Rocco, James; Teknos, Theodoros; Grecula, John C; Wobb, Jessica; Mitchell, Darrion; Blakaj, Dukagjin; Bhatt, Aashish D

    2018-04-01

    Randomized trials evaluating cisplatin versus cetuximab chemoradiation (CRT) for p16+ oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) have yet to report preliminary data. Meanwhile, as a preemptive step toward morbidity reduction, the off-trial use of cetuximab in p16+ patients is increasing, even in those who could potentially tolerate cisplatin. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of cisplatin versus cetuximab CRT in the treatment of p16+ OPC and to identify prognostic factors and predictors of tumor response. Cases of p16+ OPC treated with cisplatin or cetuximab CRT at our institution from 2010 to 2014 were identified. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification was used to determine low-risk (LR-RPA) and intermediate-risk (IR-RPA) groups. Log-rank/Kaplan-Meier and Cox Regression methods were used to compare groups. We identified 205 patients who received cisplatin (n = 137) or cetuximab (n = 68) CRT in the definitive (n = 178) or postoperative (n = 27) setting. Median follow-up was 3 years. Cisplatin improved 3-year locoregional control (LRC) [92.7 vs 65.4%], distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) [88.3 vs 71.2%], recurrence-free survival (RFS) [86.6 vs 50.6%], and overall survival (OS) [92.6 vs 72.2%] compared to cetuximab [all p < .001]. Concurrent cisplatin improved 3-year OS for LR-RPA (97.1 vs 80.3%, p < .001) and IR-RPA (97.1 vs 80.3%, p < .001) groupings. When treating p16+ OPC with CRT, the threshold for substitution of cisplatin with cetuximab should be maintained appropriately high in order to prolong survival times and optimize locoregional and distant tumor control. When cetuximab is used in cisplatin-ineligible patients, altered fractionation RT should be considered in an effort to improve LRC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of 9p deletion and p16, Cyclin D1, and Myc hyperexpression on the outcome of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Michaud

    Full Text Available To study the presence of 9p deletion and p16, cyclin D1 and Myc expression and their respective diagnostic and prognostic interest in oligodendrogliomas.We analyzed a retrospective series of 40 consecutive anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (OIII from a single institution and compared them to a control series of 10 low grade oligodendrogliomas (OII. Automated FISH analysis of chromosome 9p status and immunohistochemistry for p16, cyclin D1 and Myc was performed for all cases and correlated with clinical and histological data, event free survival (EFS and overall survival (OS.Chromosome 9p deletion was observed in 55% of OIII (22/40 but not in OII. Deletion was highly correlated to EFS (median = 29 versus 53 months, p<0.0001 and OS (median = 48 versus 83 months, p<0.0001 in both the total cohort and the OIII population. In 9p non-deleted oligodendrogliomas, p16 hyperexpression correlated with a shorter OS (p = 0.02 in OII and p = 0.0001 in OIII whereas lack of p16 expression was correlated to a shorter EFS and OS in 9p deleted OIII (p = 0.001 and p = 0.0002 respectively. Expression of Cyclin D1 was significantly higher in OIII (median expression 45% versus 14% for OII, p = 0.0006 and was correlated with MIB-1 expression (p<0.0001, vascular proliferation (p = 0.002, tumor necrosis (p = 0.04 and a shorter EFS in the total cohort (p = 0.05. Hyperexpression of Myc was correlated to grade (median expression 27% in OII versus 35% in OIII, p = 0.03, and to a shorter EFS in 9p non-deleted OIII (p = 0.01.Chromosome 9p deletion identifies a subset of OIII with significantly worse prognosis. The combination of 9p status and p16 expression level identifies two distinct OIII populations with divergent prognosis. Hyperexpression of Bcl1 and Myc appears highly linked to anaplasia but the prognostic value is unclear and should be investigated further.

  8. Report on fabrication of pin components for fuel fabrication in FUJI project (Co-operation in the research and development of advanced sphere-pac fuel among PSI, JNC, and NRG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Hinai, Hiroshi; Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Kono, Shusaku; Matsuzaki, Masaaki

    2003-03-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has conducted the co-operation concerning vibro-packed fuels with Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland and Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) in the Netherlands. The project 'Research and Development of advanced Sphere-pac Fuel' is called FUJI (FUel irradiations for JNC and PSI) Project. In this project, three types of fuels that are sphere-pac fuels, vipac fuels, and pellet fuels will be irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) to compare their performance. Based on the drawing which has been agreed among three parties, fabrication of the pin components and welding of the upper and lower connection end plugs were performed in accordance with ISO9001 in JNC. This report describes data of the fabricated pin components, results of welding qualification tests, and quality assurance of the welded components. The fabrication of pin components was successfully completed and they were delivered to PSI in October 2002. (author)

  9. Up-regulation of expression and lack of 5' CpG island hypermethylation of p16 INK4a in HPV-positive cervical carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, Tatiana A; Golovina, Daria A; Zavalishina, Larisa E; Volgareva, Galina M; Katargin, Alexey N; Andreeva, Yulia Y; Frank, Georgy A; Kisseljov, Fjodor L; Kisseljova, Natalia P

    2007-01-01

    High risk type human papilloma viruses (HR-HPV) induce carcinomas of the uterine cervix by expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7. Oncogene E7 of HR-HPV disrupts the pRb/E2F interaction, which negatively regulates the S phase entry. Expression of tumor suppressor p16 ink4a drastically increases in majority of HR-HPV associated carcinomas due to removal of pRb repression. The p16 ink4a overexpression is an indicator of an aberrant expression of viral oncogenes and may serve as a marker for early diagnostic of cervical cancer. On the other hand, in 25–57% of cervical carcinomas hypermethylation of the p16 INK4a promoter has been demonstrated using a methylation-specific PCR, MSP. To evaluate a potential usage of the p16 INK4a 5' CpG island hypermethylation as an indicator of tumor cell along with p16 ink4a overexpression, we analyzed the methylation status of p16 INK4a in cervical carcinomas Methylation status of p16 INK4a was analyzed by MSP and by bisulfite-modified DNA sequencing. The expression of p16 ink4a was analyzed by RT-PCR and by immunohistochemical technique. The extensive methylation within p16 INK4a 5' CpG island was not detected either in 13 primary cervical carcinomas or in 5 cancer cell lines by bisulfite-modified DNA sequencing (including those that were positive by MSP in our hands). The number and distribution of rare partially methylated CpG sites did not differ considerably in tumors and adjacent normal tissues. The levels of the p16 INK4a mRNA were increased in carcinomas compared to the normal tissues independently of the number of partially methylated CpGs within 5'CpG island. The transcriptional activation of p16 INK4a was accompanied by p16 ink4a cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in the majority of tumor cells and presence of a varied number of the p16 positive nuclei in different tumors. Hypermethylaion of the p16INK4a 5' CpG island is not a frequent event in HR-HPV-positive cervical carcinomas and cannot be an effective

  10. Report of the collaboration project for research and development of sphere-pac fuel among JNC-PSI-NRG (1). Planning, fuel design, pin fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morihira, Masayuki; Ozawa, Takayuki; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kihara, Yoshiyuki; Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Kohno, Shusaku

    2004-07-01

    The collaboration project concerning sphere-pac fuel among JNC, Swiss PSI (Paul Scherrer Institut) and Dutch NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group) is in progress. Final target of the project is comparative irradiation tests of sphere-pac fuel in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in Petten in the Netherlands with pellet type fuel and vipack fuel. Total 16 fuel segments (8 pins) of these three types of fuel are planned to be irradiated. Two sphere-pac fuel segments contain 5%Np in addition to 20%Pu-MOX. Other segments contain no Np. The objective of the irradiation tests is to obtain the restructuring data in the early beginning of life for SPF as well as power-to-melt test data for the potential study of SPF. At the same time introduction of modeling technique for irradiation performance analysis, fuel design, fuel fabrication is also important objective for JNC. Fabrication of irradiation test pins was completed till May 2003 in PSI. After transportation of the fuel pins to Petten, two times of irradiation were performed in January to March in 2004 and now post irradiation tests are in progress. Later two irradiations will be done till the autumn in 2004. This report summarized the basic plan, fuel design, and fabrication of irradiation test pins concerning this collaboration project. (author)

  11. Pre-radiotherapy feeding tube identifies a poor prognostic subset of postoperative p16 positive oropharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Liu, Jingxia; Eschen, Laura; Danieley, Jonathan; Spencer, Christopher; Lewis, James S; Diaz, Jason; Piccirillo, Jay F; Adkins, Douglas R; Nussenbaum, Brian; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram A

    2015-01-09

    This study explores variables associated with poor prognosis in postoperative p16 positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Specifically, analysis was done related to timing of feeding tube insertion relative to radiotherapy. From 1997-2009, of 376 consecutive patients with OPSCC, 220 received adjuvant IMRT, and 97 were p16 positive and eligible. Of these, 23 had feeding tube placement before IMRT (B-FT), 32 during/after IMRT (DA-FT), and 42 had no feeding tube (NO-FT). Feeding tubes were not placed prophylactically. These three groups were analyzed for differential tumor, patient, treatment, and feeding tube characteristics, as well as differences in overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Pre-RT FT insertion was associated with higher tumor size and depth, T (but not N) and overall stage, comorbidities, presence of chemotherapy, and less use of transoral laser microsurgery/transoral bovie. Additionally, time from surgery to IMRT completion was also statistically longer in the B-FT group. The feeding tube was permanent in 52% of patients in the B-FT group versus 16% in the DA-FT group (p = 0.0075). The 5-year OS for the NO-FT, DA-FT, and B-FT groups was 90%, 86%, and 50%, respectively. The 5-year DFS for the NO-FT, DA-FT, and B-FT groups was 87.6%, 83.6%, and 42.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that for OS and DFS, feeding tube placement timing and smoking history were statistically significant. Due to the poor prognosis of early FT insertion, the presence of FTs at time of radiotherapy consultation can be used as an alternate marker to identify a subset of p16 positive OPSCC patients that have a poor prognosis.

  12. Germline CDKN2A/P16INK4A mutations contribute to genetic determinism of sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouenne, Fanélie; Chauvot de Beauchene, Isaure; Bollaert, Emeline; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Caron, Olivier; Ingster, Olivier; Lecesne, Axel; Benusiglio, Patrick; Terrier, Philippe; Caumette, Vincent; Pissaloux, Daniel; de la Fouchardière, Arnaud; Cabaret, Odile; N'Diaye, Birama; Velghe, Amélie; Bougeard, Gaelle; Mann, Graham J; Koscielny, Serge; Barrett, Jennifer H; Harland, Mark; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Gruis, Nelleke; Van Doorn, Remco; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Pierron, Gaelle; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Coupier, Isabelle; Guimbaud, Rosine; Delnatte, Capucine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Eggermont, Alexander M; Feunteun, Jean; Tchertanov, Luba; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Frebourg, Thierry; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte

    2017-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare mesenchymal malignancies whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; both environmental and genetic risk factors could contribute to their aetiology. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a familial aggregation of three individuals affected with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) without TP53 mutation (Li-Fraumeni-like, LFL) and found a shared pathogenic mutation in CDKN2A tumour suppressor gene. We searched for individuals with sarcoma among 474 melanoma-prone families with a CDKN2A -/+ genotype and for CDKN2A mutations in 190 TP53 -negative LFL families where the index case was a sarcoma. Including the initial family, eight independent sarcoma cases carried a germline mutation in the CDKN2A /p16 INK4A gene. In five out of seven formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sarcomas, heterozygosity was lost at germline CDKN2A mutations sites demonstrating complete loss of function. As sarcomas are rare in CDKN2A /p16 INK4A carriers, we searched in constitutional WES of nine carriers for potential modifying rare variants and identified three in platelet-derived growth factor receptor ( PDGFRA ) gene. Molecular modelling showed that two never-described variants could impact the PDGFRA extracellular domain structure. Germline mutations in CDKN2A /P16 INK4A , a gene known to predispose to hereditary melanoma, pancreatic cancer and tobacco-related cancers, account also for a subset of hereditary sarcoma. In addition, we identified PDGFRA as a candidate modifier gene. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Pre-radiotherapy feeding tube identifies a poor prognostic subset of postoperative p16 positive oropharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vivek; Liu, Jingxia; Eschen, Laura; Danieley, Jonathan; Spencer, Christopher; Lewis, James S Jr; Diaz, Jason; Piccirillo, Jay F; Adkins, Douglas R; Nussenbaum, Brian; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram A

    2015-01-01

    This study explores variables associated with poor prognosis in postoperative p16 positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Specifically, analysis was done related to timing of feeding tube insertion relative to radiotherapy. From 1997–2009, of 376 consecutive patients with OPSCC, 220 received adjuvant IMRT, and 97 were p16 positive and eligible. Of these, 23 had feeding tube placement before IMRT (B-FT), 32 during/after IMRT (DA-FT), and 42 had no feeding tube (NO-FT). Feeding tubes were not placed prophylactically. These three groups were analyzed for differential tumor, patient, treatment, and feeding tube characteristics, as well as differences in overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Pre-RT FT insertion was associated with higher tumor size and depth, T (but not N) and overall stage, comorbidities, presence of chemotherapy, and less use of transoral laser microsurgery/transoral bovie. Additionally, time from surgery to IMRT completion was also statistically longer in the B-FT group. The feeding tube was permanent in 52% of patients in the B-FT group versus 16% in the DA-FT group (p = 0.0075). The 5-year OS for the NO-FT, DA-FT, and B-FT groups was 90%, 86%, and 50%, respectively. The 5-year DFS for the NO-FT, DA-FT, and B-FT groups was 87.6%, 83.6%, and 42.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that for OS and DFS, feeding tube placement timing and smoking history were statistically significant. Due to the poor prognosis of early FT insertion, the presence of FTs at time of radiotherapy consultation can be used as an alternate marker to identify a subset of p16 positive OPSCC patients that have a poor prognosis

  14. Contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21 as a cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Lynn, Patricio B; Wang, Lu; Walsh, Michael; Gopalan, Anuradha; Shia, Jinru; Tran, Christina; Man, Fung Ying; McBride, Sean; Schattner, Mark; Zhang, Liying; Weiser, Martin R; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by pathogenic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although commonly associated with clinical features such as intellectual disability and congenital anomalies, contiguous gene deletions may also result in cancer predisposition syndromes. We report on a 52-year-old male with Lynch syndrome caused by deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21. The patient had intellectual disability and presented with a prostatic adenocarcinoma with an incidentally identified synchronous sigmoid adenocarcinoma that exhibited deficient MMR with an absence of MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression. Family history was unrevealing. Physical exam revealed short stature, brachycephaly with a narrow forehead and short philtrum, brachydactyly of the hands, palmar transverse crease, broad and small feet with hyperpigmentation of the soles. The patient underwent total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis for a pT3N1 sigmoid adenocarcinoma. Germline genetic testing of the MSH2, MSH6, and EPCAM genes revealed full gene deletions. SNP-array based DNA copy number analysis identified a deletion of 4.8 Mb at 2p16.3-p21. In addition to the three Lynch syndrome associated genes, the deleted chromosomal section encompassed genes including NRXN1, CRIPT, CALM2, FBXO11, LHCGR, MCFD2, TTC7A, EPAS1, PRKCE, and 15 others. Contiguous gene deletions have been described in other inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. Our report and review of the literature suggests that contiguous gene deletion within the 2p16-p21 chromosomal region is a rare cause of Lynch syndrome, but presents with distinct phenotypic features, highlighting the need for recognition and awareness of this syndromic entity.

  15. Internal friction of metallic glass Ni74P16B6Al4 near T/sub x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiao-Guang; He Yizhen

    1986-01-01

    The internal friction of metallic glass Ni 74 P 16 B 6 Al 4 near the crystallization temperature T/sub x/ is investigated using a conventional torsion pendulum. Two internal friction peaks, P 1 and P 2 , are observed and the dependence of the peak positions on heating rate is described by the Kissinger equation. Pre-crystallization reduces the height of the peaks (P 1 and P 2 ) and shifts the positions of these peaks but in opposite directions. A formula showing the dependence of apparent internal friction on volume fraction transformed is derived. The variation of internal friction with annealing corresponds to the variation of the fraction transformed. (author)

  16. Atmospheric Retrievals of HAT-P-16b and WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Kathleen; Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan; Lenius, Maria; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Cameron, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    We report Bayesian atmospheric retrievals performed on the exoplanets HAT-P-16b and WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b. HAT-P-16b is a hot (equilibrium temperature 1626 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and efficient energy redistribution), 4.19 ± 0.09 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting an F8 star every 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days (Buchhave et al 2010). WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b is a cooler (1020 ± 17 K), 0.487 ± 0.018 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting a K3 star every 3.7224747 ± 0.0000065 days (Bakos et al. 2009, co-discovered by West et al. 2008). We observed secondary eclipses of both planets using the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels of the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (program ID 60003). We applied our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits (POET) code to produce normalized eclipse light curves, and our Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code to constrain the temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric molecular abundances of the two planets. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  17. Age-specific functional epigenetic changes in p21 and p16 in injury-activated satellite cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ju; Han, Suhyoun; Cousin, Wendy; Conboy, Irina M.

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of muscle dramatically decreases with age because old muscle stem cells fail to proliferate in response to tissue damage. Here we uncover key age-specific differences underlying this proliferative decline: namely, the genetic loci of CDK inhibitors (CDKI) p21 and p16 are more epigenetically silenced in young muscle stem cells, as compared to old, both in quiescent cells and those responding to tissue injury. Interestingly, phosphorylated ERK (pERK) induced in these cells by ectopic FGF-2 is found in association with p21 and p16 promoters, and moreover, only in the old cells. Importantly, in the old satellite cells FGF-2/pERK silences p21 epigenetically and transcriptionally, which leads to reduced p21 protein levels and enhanced cell proliferation. In agreement with the epigenetic silencing of the loci, young muscle stem cells do not depend as much as old on ectopic FGF/pERK for their myogenic proliferation. In addition, other CDKIs, such asp15INK4B and p27KIP1, become elevated in satellite cells with age, confirming and explaining the profound regenerative defect of old muscle. This work enhances our understanding of tissue aging, promoting strategies for combating age-imposed tissue degeneration. PMID:25447026

  18. Expression of cancer stem markers could be influenced by silencing of p16 gene in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Zhang, J; Shi, H

    2016-01-01

    Effect of the tumor suppression gene p16 on the biological characteristics of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells was explored. The expression of p16 protein was increased in HeLa tumor sphere cells, and no significant difference in tumor spheres from the first to the fourth passages. Compared with those of parental HeLa cells, the proportion of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ cells increased significantly in tumor spheres. However after the cells were silenced by the p16-sh289 vector, expression of P16 protein and the cell number of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ decreased. Moreover, HeLa cells with p16 gene silencing showed decreased abilities of sphere formation and matrigel invasion. More HeLa cells with p16 gene silence were needed for tumor formation in nude mice. Tumor size and weight in mouse model established with p16 gene silenced HeLa cells were less than those with HeLa parental cell model. The present results indicate that silencing of the p16 gene inhibits expression of cancer stem cell markers and tumorigenic ability of HeLa cells.

  19. Overexpression of c-erbB-2 and loss of p16 have molecular diagnostic relevance but no prognostic value in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-li; Li, Ling; Gao, Yan-ning; Zhang, Jian-jun; Xiao, Ting; Ying, Jian-ming; Gao, Ji-dong; Sun, Yun-tian; Cheng, Shu-jun

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the expression of C-erbB-2 and p16 in lung cancers using tissue microarray technology and to determine their clinical and pathological significance. Immunohistochemical C-erbB-2 and p16 expressions and their associations with clinical and pathological features were analyzed in two tissue microarrays. The membranous and cytoplasmic expression rates of C-erbB-2 were 40.5 and 66.5% in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), and 0 and 9.5% in small cell lung cancers (SCLCs), respectively. The nuclear and cytoplasmic expression rates of p16 were 11.5 and 32.2% in NSCLs, and 45 and 80% in SCLCs, respectively. The cytoplasmic expression of both C-erbB-2 and p16 was more frequent than the membranous expression of C-erbB-2 and the nuclear expression of p16. The rates of overexpression of C-erbB-2 and loss of p16 expression were significantly higher in NSCLCs than in SCLCs (P < 0.05). Neither C-erbB-2 nor p16 expression was significantly associated with age, tumor grade or stage, presence of lymph node metastasis or survival duration. The abnormal expressions of p16 and C-erbB-2 may play a role in the progression of lung cancers. The variations in the expression patterns of C-erbB-2 and p16 between NSCLCs and SCLCs may aid the molecular classification of lung cancer. The abnormal expression of p16 may be involved in the development of NSCLCs, and the overexpression of C-erbB-2 in NSCLCs indicates that it can be a candidate target for gene therapy.

  20. The Contrasting Role of p16Ink4A Patterns of Expression in Neuroendocrine and Non-Neuroendocrine Lung Tumors: A Comprehensive Analysis with Clinicopathologic and Molecular Correlations.

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    Nicola Fusco

    Full Text Available Lung cancer encompasses a constellation of malignancies with no validated prognostic markers. p16Ink4A expression has been reported in different subtypes of lung cancers; however, its prognostic value is controversial. Here, we sought to investigate the clinical significance of p16Ink4A immunoexpression according to specific staining patterns and its operational implications. A total of 502 tumors, including 277 adenocarcinomas, 84 squamous cell carcinomas, 22 large cell carcinomas, 47 typical carcinoids, 12 atypical carcinoids, 28 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 32 small cell carcinomas were reviewed and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis for p16Ink4A and Ki67. The spectrum of p16Ink4A expression was annotated for each case as negative, sporadic, focal, or diffuse. Expression at immunohistochemical level showed intra-tumor homogeneity, regardless tumor histotype. Enrichments in cells expressing p16Ink4A were observed from lower- to higher-grade neuroendocrine malignancies, whereas a decrease was seen in poorly and undifferentiated non-neuroendocrine carcinomas. Tumor proliferation indices were higher in neuroendocrine tumors expressing p16Ink4A while non-neuroendocrine malignancies immunoreactive for p16Ink4A showed a decrease in Ki67-positive cells. Quantitative statistical analyses including each histotype and the p16Ink4A status confirmed the independent prognostic role of p16Ink4A expression, being a high-risk indicator in neuroendocrine tumors and a marker of good prognosis in non-neuroendocrine lung malignancies. In this study, we provide circumstantial evidence to suggest that the routinary assessment of p16Ink4A expression using a three-tiered scoring algorithm, even in a small biopsy, may constitute a reliable, reproducible, and cost-effective substrate for a more accurate risk stratification of each individual patient.

  1. Curcumin Triggers p16-Dependent Senescence in Active Breast Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts and Suppresses Their Paracrine Procarcinogenic Effects

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    Siti-Fauziah Hendrayani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Activated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts not only facilitate tumor growth and spread but also affect tumor response to therapeutic agents. Therefore, it became clear that efficient therapeutic regimens should also take into account the presence of these supportive cells and inhibit their paracrine effects. To this end, we tested the effect of low concentrations of curcumin, a pharmacologically safe natural product, on patient-derived primary breast CAF cells. We have shown that curcumin treatment upregulates p16INK4A and other tumor suppressor proteins while inactivates the JAK2/STAT3 pathway. This reduced the level of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and the migration/invasion abilities of these cells. Furthermore, curcumin suppressed the expression/secretion of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and transforming growth factor-β, which impeded their paracrine procarcinogenic potential. Intriguingly, these effects were sustained even after curcumin withdrawal and cell splitting. Therefore, using different markers of senescence [senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal activity, Ki-67 and Lamin B1 levels, and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation], we have shown that curcumin markedly suppresses Lamin B1 and triggers DNA damage-independent senescence in proliferating but not quiescent breast stromal fibroblasts. Importantly, this curcumin-related senescence was p16INK4A-dependent and occurred with no associated inflammatory secretory phenotype. These results indicate the possible inactivation of cancer-associated myofibroblasts and present the first indication that curcumin can trigger DNA damage-independent and safe senescence in stromal fibroblasts.

  2. Hotair mediates hepatocarcinogenesis through suppressing miRNA-218 expression and activating P14 and P16 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Wei-Mao; Lu, Ying-Fei; Hu, Bao-Guang; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Shan-Shan; Ko, Chun-Hay; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jin-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNA Hotair has been considered as a pro-oncogene in multiple cancers. Although there is emerging evidence that reveals its biological function and the association with clinical prognosis, the precise mechanism remains largely elusive. We investigated the function and mechanism of Hotair in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell models and a xenograft mouse model. The regulatory network between miR-218 and Hotair was elucidated by RNA immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays. Finally, the correlation between Hotair, miR-218 and the target gene Bmi-1 were evaluated in 52 paired HCC specimens. In this study, we reported that Hotair negatively regulated miR-218 expression in HCC, which might be mediated through an EZH2-targeting-miR-218-2 promoter regulatory axis. Further investigation revealed that Hotair knockdown dramatically inhibited cell viability and induced G1-phase arrest in vitro and suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo by promoting miR-218 expression. Oncogene Bmi-1 was shown to be a functional target of miR-218, and the main downstream targets signaling, P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF), were activated in Hotair-suppressed tumorigenesis. In primary human HCC specimens, Hotair and Bmi-1 were concordantly upregulated whereas miR-218 was downregulated in these tissues. Furthermore, Hotair was inversely associated with miR-218 expression and positively correlated with Bmi-1 expression in these clinical tissues. Hotair silence activates P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF) signaling by enhancing miR-218 expression and suppressing Bmi-1 expression, resulting in the suppression of tumorigenesis in HCC. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and testing of radionuclide transport models for fractured crystalline rock. An overview of the Nagra/JNC radionuclide retardation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kunio; Alexander, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    The joint Nagra/JNC radionuclide Retardation Programme has now been ongoing for more thean 10 years with the main aim of direct testing of radionuclide transport models for fractured crystalline rocks in as realistic a manner as possible. A large programme of field, laboratory and natural analogue studies has been carried out at the Grimsel Test Site in the central Swiss Alps. The understanding and modelling of both the processes and the structures influencing radionuclide transport in fractured crystalline rocks have matured as has the experimental technology, which has contributed to develop confidence in the applicability of the underlying research models in a repository performance assessment. In this report, the successes and set-backs of this programme are discussed as is the general approach to the thorough testing of the process models and of model assumptions. (author)

  4. Efficient immortalization of primary human cells by p16INK4a-specific short hairpin RNA or Bmi-1, combined with introduction of hTERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Kei; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Yugawa, Takashi; Narisawa-Saito, Mako; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Michiie; Galloway, Denise A; Kiyono, Tohru

    2007-02-01

    Activation of telomerase is sufficient for immortalization of some types of human cells but additional factors may also be essential. It has been proposed that stress imposed by inadequate culture conditions induces senescence due to accumulation of p16(INK4a). Here, we present evidence that many human cell types undergo senescence by activation of the p16(INK4a)/Rb pathway, and that introduction of Bmi-1 can inhibit p16(INK4a) expression and extend the life span of human epithelial cells derived from skin, mammary gland and lung. Introduction of p16(INK4a)-specific short hairpin RNA, as well as Bmi-1, suppressed p16(INK4a) expression in human mammary epithelial cells without promoter methylation, and extended their life span. Subsequent introduction of hTERT, the telomerase catalytic subunit, into cells with low p16(INK4a) levels resulted in efficient immortalization of three cell types without crisis or growth arrest. The majority of the human mammary epithelial cells thus immortalized showed almost normal ploidy as judged by G-banding and spectral karyotyping analysis. Our data suggest that inhibition of p16(INK4a) and introduction of hTERT can immortalize many human cell types with little chromosomal instability.

  5. Aberrant Expression of ID2 protein and its correlation with EBV-LMP1 and P16(INK4A) in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Po; Lu, Yali; Liu, Lin; Zhong, Mei

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between the expression of ID2, EBV-LMP1 and P16(INK4A) in Chinese classical Hodgkin lymphoma are unknown and need exploring. Samples of classical Hodgkin lymphoma from 60 Chinese patients were analyzed for the expression of ID2, EBV-LMP1 and p16(INK4A) proteins by immunohistochemistry. ID2 protein was expressed in 83.3% of this group of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, staining strongly in both cytoplasm and nucleus of the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. EBV-LMP1 and P16(INK4A) were overexpressed in 85.0% and 71.7% of Hodgkin lymphoma, respectively. EBV-LMP1 was noted in the cytoplasm, membrane and nucleus of HRS cells; P16(INK4A) was in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Microscopically, ID2, EBV-LMP1 and P16(INK4A) staining distinguished the HRS cells from the complex background of lymphocytes. ID2 was positively correlated with EBV-LMP1(P < 0.01), but P16(INK4A) was inversely related to EBV-LMP1 (P < 0.05). It is suggested that ID2, EBV-LMP1 and P16(INK4A) could play an important role in the evolution of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, and be considered as potential adjunct markers to identify HRS cells in diagnosis

  6. The overexpression of p16 is not a surrogate marker for high-risk human papilloma virus genotypes and predicts clinical outcomes for vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznurkowski, Jacek J; Żawrocki, Anton; Biernat, Wojciech

    2016-07-13

    We aimed to evaluate the correlation between p16(ink4a)-overexpression and high risk (hr)HPV-DNA in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC) tumors as well as the impact of both biomarkers on the prognosis of vSCC patients. PCR-detection of (hr)HPV-DNA and immunohistochemical staining for p16(ink4a) were conducted in 85 vSCC tumors. Survival analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model. p16(ink4a)-overexpression and (hr)HPV-DNA were detected in 35 and 37 of the 85 tumors, respectively. Among the 35 p16(ink4a)-positive tumors, 10 lacked (hr)HPV-DNA (29 %). Among the 50 p16(ink4a)-negative tumors, (hr)HPV-DNA was detected in 12 cases (24 %). The median follow-up was 89.20 months (range 1.7-189.5 months). P16(ink4a)-overexpression, but not (hr)HPV-DNA positivity of the primary tumor, was correlated with prolonged overall survival (OS) (p = 0.009). P16(ink4a)-overexpression predicted a better response to radiotherapy (p overexpression (p = 0.022), and adjuvant RTX (p overexpression (HR 1-2.11, 95 % CI 1.13-3.95, p = 0.001) are independent prognostic factors. The discovered overlap suggests the use of p16(ink4a) in combination with HPV-DNA detection as an ancillary test for future research and clinical studies in vSCC. The prognostic and predictive value of p16(ink4a)-overexpression should be tested in larger cohort studies.

  7. Multiple Pharmacological Properties of a Novel Parthenin Analog P16 as Evident by its Cytostatic and Antiangiogenic Potential Against Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma PANC -1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Akshra; Shah, Bhahwal Ali; Batra, Navneet; Kumar, Ajay; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Malik, Fayaz Ahmad; Joshi, Amit; Singh, Jagtar

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains one of the deadliest types of cancers. Median survival rate is very poor with the currently available chemotherapeutical regimens. Therefore, discovery of new antineoplastic agents against PDA is one of the focused areas of contemporary research. The present study was undertaken to explore the antitumour activity of a potent parthenin analog P16. Among PANC-1, Mia PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells, PANC-1 showed highest sensitivity to P16 with an IC50 value of 3.4 μM. Time dependent cell cycle studies revealed that P16 suppressed the growth of PANC-1 cells by arresting the progression through the cell cycle in G2/M phase via downregulation of cyclin B1 and cyclin A. However, P16 did not alter the expressions of CDK-1 and CDC25C in PANC-1 cells. The P16 induced cell cycle arrest, which consequently, led to induction of apoptosis, which was accompanied by activation of caspase-9 and -3. Interestingly, PANC-1 cells displayed increasing loss of mitochondrial potential, which seemed to be correlated to the activation of caspase-3. Additionally, P16 was also able to down-regulate the cell migration in PANC-1 cells. Furthermore, P16 treatment of hypoxic PANC-1 cells strongly suppressed the expression of proangiogenic factors VEGFR-2, HIF1α and HIF1β. Antiangiogenic ability of P16 was also reflected in the human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), where it effectively suppressed the migration and inhibited the formation of the tube in a matrigel based assay. Therefore, cytostatic and antiangiogenic properties of P16 against pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells make it a suitable candidate for further investigation.

  8. Cancer stage and pack-years, but not p16 or HPV, are relevant for survival in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Valerie; Haitel, Andrea; Kaider, Alexandra; Stanisz, Isabella; Beer, Andrea; Lill, Claudia

    2018-05-09

    Recently, p16 has been included in the TNM guideline for oropharyngeal carcinomas. The role of HPV and p16 in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas has not yet been established sufficiently. Hundred and thirty-four patients with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with known HPV status were eligible for the investigation. Survival probabilities were estimated for different risk factors. Eighty-five patients presented with laryngeal carcinoma and 49 patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma. 8% were HPV positive (10.6% laryngeal, 4.1% hypopharyngeal carcinoma). Median follow-up time was 58 months. We observed a significantly better overall survival for patients with an early tumor stage compared to advanced carcinoma. One of the hypopharyngeal HPV positive carcinomas was also p16 positive and one was p16 negative. Of the nine HPV positive laryngeal carcinomas, four were p16 positive and five p16 negative. Neither patients who were HPV positive nor patients positive for p16 showed a significantly better outcome than HPV or p16 negative patients. In contrast, nicotine pack-years showed a highly significant correlation with survival in our patient collective. The data suggest that tumor stage and nicotine exposure seem to have the highest impact on survival in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients. There is no evidence for a better survival for p16 positive or HPV positive patients with hypopharyngeal or laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. HPV seems to play a minor role in these entities of head and neck carcinoma.

  9. P16INK4a Positive Cells in Human Skin Are Indicative of Local Elastic Fiber Morphology, Facial Wrinkling, and Perceived Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaijer, Mariëtte E C; Gunn, David A; Adams, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells are more prevalent in aged human skin compared to young, but evidence that senescent cells are linked to other biomarkers of aging is scarce. We counted cells positive for the tumor suppressor and senescence associated protein p16INK4a in sun-protected upper-inner arm skin biopsies...... wrinkles and a higher perceived age. Participants in the lowest tertile of epidermal p16INK4a counts looked 3 years younger than those in the highest tertile, independently of chronological age and elastic fiber morphology. In conclusion, p16INK4a positive cell numbers in sun-protected human arm skin...

  10. Up-regulation of expression and lack of 5' CpG island hypermethylation of p16 INK4a in HPV-positive cervical carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Georgy A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High risk type human papilloma viruses (HR-HPV induce carcinomas of the uterine cervix by expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7. Oncogene E7 of HR-HPV disrupts the pRb/E2F interaction, which negatively regulates the S phase entry. Expression of tumor suppressor p16ink4a drastically increases in majority of HR-HPV associated carcinomas due to removal of pRb repression. The p16ink4a overexpression is an indicator of an aberrant expression of viral oncogenes and may serve as a marker for early diagnostic of cervical cancer. On the other hand, in 25–57% of cervical carcinomas hypermethylation of the p16 INK4a promoter has been demonstrated using a methylation-specific PCR, MSP. To evaluate a potential usage of the p16 INK4a 5' CpG island hypermethylation as an indicator of tumor cell along with p16ink4a overexpression, we analyzed the methylation status of p16 INK4a in cervical carcinomas Methods Methylation status of p16 INK4a was analyzed by MSP and by bisulfite-modified DNA sequencing. The expression of p16ink4a was analyzed by RT-PCR and by immunohistochemical technique. Results The extensive methylation within p16 INK4a 5' CpG island was not detected either in 13 primary cervical carcinomas or in 5 cancer cell lines by bisulfite-modified DNA sequencing (including those that were positive by MSP in our hands. The number and distribution of rare partially methylated CpG sites did not differ considerably in tumors and adjacent normal tissues. The levels of the p16 INK4a mRNA were increased in carcinomas compared to the normal tissues independently of the number of partially methylated CpGs within 5'CpG island. The transcriptional activation of p16 INK4a was accompanied by p16ink4a cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in the majority of tumor cells and presence of a varied number of the p16 positive nuclei in different tumors. Conclusion Hypermethylaion of the p16INK4a 5' CpG island is not a frequent event in HR-HPV-positive cervical

  11. Human papillomavirus genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic factors for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    -specific survival (DSS) in patients diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. PATIENTS AND METHODS: HPV genotyping polymerase chain reaction (high-risk subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) and immunohistochemical expression of p16 were analyzed......PURPOSE: Carcinomas of the anal canal are strongly associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Expression of p16 is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection. In a retrospective study, we evaluated HPV genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic markers of overall survival (OS) and disease...... by using paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies from 143 anal carcinomas. The patients were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. RESULTS: HPV16 was detected in 81.0% of the tumors, followed by HPV33 (5.1%), HPV18 (2.2%), and HPV58 (0.7%). p16 positivity was found in 92.9% of the tumors...

  12. Prognostic impact of HPV-associated p16-expression and smoking status on outcomes following radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: The MARCH-HPV project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Lacas, Benjamin; Pignon, Jean-Pierre

    2018-01-01

    -Analysis of Radiotherapy in Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with OPC, known tumor p16-status and smoking history were identified from the MARCH update, resulting in a dataset of 815 patients from four randomized trials (RTOG9003, DAHANCA6&7, RTOG0129, ARTSCAN). Analysis was performed......; in the p16-positive subgroup, never smokers had significantly better PFS than former/current smokers (HR = 0.49 [0.33-0.75], 24.2% survival benefit at 10 years). CONCLUSIONS: No predictive impact of p16-status on response to AFRT could be detected but the strong prognostic impact of p16-status...

  13. The overexpression of p16 is not a surrogate marker for high-risk human papilloma virus genotypes and predicts clinical outcomes for vulvar cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sznurkowski, Jacek J.; Żawrocki, Anton; Biernat, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the correlation between p16 ink4a -overexpression and high risk (hr)HPV-DNA in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC) tumors as well as the impact of both biomarkers on the prognosis of vSCC patients. PCR-detection of (hr)HPV-DNA and immunohistochemical staining for p16 ink4a were conducted in 85 vSCC tumors. Survival analyses included the Kaplan–Meier method, log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model. p16 ink4a -overexpression and (hr)HPV-DNA were detected in 35 and 37 of the 85 tumors, respectively. Among the 35 p16 ink4a -positive tumors, 10 lacked (hr)HPV-DNA (29 %). Among the 50 p16 ink4a -negative tumors, (hr)HPV-DNA was detected in 12 cases (24 %). The median follow-up was 89.20 months (range 1.7–189.5 months). P16 ink4a -overexpression, but not (hr)HPV-DNA positivity of the primary tumor, was correlated with prolonged overall survival (OS) (p = 0.009). P16 ink4a -overexpression predicted a better response to radiotherapy (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis has demonstrated that age (p = 0.025), tumor grade (p = 0.001), lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001), FIGO stage (p < 0.001), p16 ink4a -overexpression (p = 0.022), and adjuvant RTX (p < 0.001) were prognostic factors for OS. Multivariate analysis has demonstrated that lymph node metastasis (HR 1–2.74, 95 % CI 1.50–5.02, p = 0.019), tumor grade (HR 1–2.80, 95 % CI 1.33–5.90, p = 0.007) and p16 ink4a -overexpression (HR 1–2.11, 95 % CI 1.13–3.95, p = 0.001) are independent prognostic factors. The discovered overlap suggests the use of p16 ink4a in combination with HPV-DNA detection as an ancillary test for future research and clinical studies in vSCC. The prognostic and predictive value of p16 ink4a -overexpression should be tested in larger cohort studies. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2503-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  14. The p16INK4alpha/p19ARF gene mutations are infrequent and are mutually exclusive to p53 mutations in Indian oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, K; Munirajan, A K; Krishnamurthy, J; Bhuvarahamurthy, V; Mohanprasad, B K; Panishankar, K H; Tsuchida, N; Shanmugam, G

    2000-03-01

    Eighty-seven untreated primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) associated with betel quid and tobacco chewing from Indian patients were analysed for the presence of mutations in the commonly shared exon 2 of p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing analysis were used to detect mutations. SSCP analysis indicated that only 9% (8/87) of the tumours had mutation in p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Seventy-two tumours studied here were previously analysed for p53 mutations and 21% (15/72) of them were found to have mutations in p53 gene. Only one tumour was found to have mutation at both p53 and p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Thus, the mutation rates observed were 21% for p53, 9% for p16INK4alpha/p19ARF, and 1% for both. Sequencing analysis revealed two types of mutations; i) G to C (GCAG to CCAG) transversion type mutation at intron 1-exon 2 splice junction and ii) another C to T transition type mutation resulting in CGA to TGA changing arginine to a termination codon at p16INK4alpha gene codon 80 and the same mutation will alter codon 94 of p19ARF gene from CCG to CTG (proline to leucine). These results suggest that p16INK4alpha/p19ARF mutations are less frequent than p53 mutations in Indian oral SCCs. The p53 and p16INK4alpha/p19ARF mutational events are independent and are mutually exclusive suggesting that mutational inactivation of either p53 or p16INK4alpha/p19ARF may alleviate the need for the inactivation of the other gene.

  15. p16(INK4a suppression by glucose restriction contributes to human cellular lifespan extension through SIRT1-mediated epigenetic and genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Although caloric restriction (CR has been shown to increase lifespan in various animal models, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been revealed. We developed an in vitro system to mimic CR by reducing glucose concentration in cell growth medium which excludes metabolic factors and allows assessment of the effects of CR at the cellular and molecular level. We monitored cellular proliferation of normal WI-38, IMR-90 and MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction (GR can inhibit cellular senescence and significantly extend cellular lifespan compared with cells receiving normal glucose (NG in the culture medium. Moreover, GR decreased expression of p16(INK4a (p16, a well-known senescence-related gene, in all of the tested cell lines. Over-expressed p16 resulted in early replicative senescence in glucose-restricted cells suggesting a crucial role of p16 regulation in GR-induced cellular lifespan extension. The decreased expression of p16 was partly due to GR-induced chromatin remodeling through effects on histone acetylation and methylation of the p16 promoter. GR resulted in an increased expression of SIRT1, a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, which has positive correlation with CR-induced longevity. The elevated SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of the Akt/p70S6K1 signaling pathway in response to GR. Furthermore, knockdown of SIRT1 abolished GR-induced p16 repression as well as Akt/p70S6K1 activation implying that SIRT1 may affect p16 repression through direct deacetylation effects and indirect regulation of Akt/p70S6K1 signaling. Collectively, these results provide new insights into interactions between epigenetic and genetic mechanisms on CR-induced longevity that may contribute to anti-aging approaches and also provide a general molecular model for studying CR in vitro in mammalian systems.

  16. EVALUATION OF P16INK4A PROTEIN AS A BIOMARKER FOR CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA AND SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE UTERINE CERVIX

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    Biljana Đorđević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The association of human papilloma virus (HPV infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN is well known. Interaction of HPV proteins with cellular regulatory proteins leads to up regulation of p16INK4A. The aim of this study was to evaluate p16INK4A protein as a biomarker for CIN lesions and squamous cell carcinoma on biopsy specimens of patients who underwent biopsy of the uterine cervix due to abnormal cytological finding.The authors analyzed biopsies from 50 patients with CIN and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Expression of p16INK4A in CIN and invasive squamous cell carcinoma was immunohistochemically analyzed by using monoclonal anti-p16INK4A antibody.A total of 50 patients with CIN and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (mean age 40.2±11.5 years, range 20-74 years were analyzed. CIN I lesions were found in 27 (54%, CIN II/CIN III lesions in 9 (18%, and invasive squamous cell carcinoma in 14 (28% patients. Differences in the expression of p16INK4A between CIN I, CIN II/CIN III and squamous cell carcinoma were statistically significant (p<0.0001. Expression of p16INK4A showed low sensitivity (7%, specificity (8%, positive predictive value (8%, and negative predictive value (7% for CIN I. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of p16INK4A were 78%, 61%, 30%, and 93% for CIN II/CIN III, and 100%, 75%, 61%, and 100% for squamous cell carcinoma, respectively.Results of this study suggest that p16INK4A protein may be a sensitive biomarker for CIN II/CIN III lesions and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

  17. p16/ki-67 dual-stain cytology in the triage of ASCUS and LSIL papanicolaou cytology: results from the European equivocal or mildly abnormal Papanicolaou cytology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Dietmar; Bergeron, Christine; Denton, Karin J; Ridder, Ruediger

    2011-06-25

    The objective of this study was to analyze the diagnostic performance of a newly established immunocytochemical dual-stain protocol, which simultaneously detects p16(INK4a) and Ki-67 expression in cervical cytology samples, for identifying high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in women with Papanicolaou (Pap) cytology results categorized as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). Residual liquid-based cytology material from 776 retrospectively collected ASCUS/LSIL cases that were available from a recent study evaluating p16 cytology and HPV testing were subjected to p16/Ki-67 dual staining. The presence of 1 or more double-immunoreactive cell(s) was regarded as a positive test outcome, irrespective of morphology. Test results were correlated to histology follow-up. Sensitivity of p16/Ki-67 dual-stain cytology for biopsy-confirmed CIN2+ was 92.2% (ASCUS) and 94.2% (LSIL), while specificity rates were 80.6% (ASCUS) and 68.0% (LSIL), respectively. Similar sensitivity/specificity profiles were found for both age groups of women aged aged ≥30 years. Dual-stain cytology showed comparable sensitivity, but significantly higher specificity, when compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. The results of this study show that p16/Ki-67 dual-stain cytology provided a high sensitivity for the detection of underlying CIN2+ in women with ASCUS or LSIL Pap cytology results, comparable to the rates previously reported for HPV testing and p16 single-stain cytology. However, the specificity of this morphology-independent interpretation of p16/Ki-67 dual-stain cytology testing was further improved compared with the earlier p16 single-stain cytology approach, which required morphology interpretation, and it is significantly higher when compared with HPV testing. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  18. CPP2-p16MIS treatment–induced colon carcinoma cell death in vitro and prolonged lifespan of tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Chen, Haijin; Yu, Jinlong; Lin, Xiaohua; Qi, Jia; Cui, Chunhui; Xie, Lang; Huang, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a research hotspot due to their noninvasive delivery ability. Among the identified CPPs, the TAT and R8 peptides have been preferentially applied to transduction into different cells. However, this process is nonselective among various cells. Recent research suggested that CPP2 could selectively penetrate human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Using in vitro experiments, the mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate–labeled CPPs (CPPs-FITC) incubated with different cell lines was compared to corroborate the colon tumor targeting ability of CPP2. The targeting ability of CPP2 was determined in the same way in tumor-bearing mice. We synthesized antitumor peptides by fusing CPP2 to the minimal inhibitory sequence of p16 (p16MIS), which had the ability to restore the function of lost p16, the expression of which was absent in tumor cell lines of various origins. The antitumor effect of the combined peptide was tested in both CRC cell lines and tumor-bearing mice. In each CRC cell line, the mean fluorescence intensity of CPP2-FITC was higher than that of the TAT-FITC (p < 0.001) and R8-FITC (p < 0.001) groups. CPP2-p16MIS, the targeting carrier, showed a higher antitumor response in the in vitro cell research. CPP2-p16MIS showed a prolonged mean lifespan of tumor-bearing mice, further characterizing its role in specific tumor-targeting ability in vivo. Survival analysis showed that the mice treated with CPP2-p16MIS had significantly longer survival than the mice treated with phosphate-buffered saline (p < 0.05) or those treated with control peptides, including the CPP2 (p < 0.05) and p16MIS (p < 0.05) groups. CPP2 could more selectively penetrate CRC cells than TAT or R8 as well as effectively deliver the p16MIS to the tumor

  19. The inhibition of PARP but not EGFR results in the radiosensitization of HPV/p16-positive HNSCC cell lines

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    Güster, Julian David; Weissleder, Stephanie Valerie; Busch, Chia-Jung; Kriegs, Malte; Petersen, Cordula; Knecht, Rainald; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Rieckmann, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV-negative and HPV-positive HNSCC comprise distinct tumor entities with different biological characteristics. Specific regimens for the comparably well curable HPV-positive entity that reduce side effects without compromising outcome have yet to be established. Therefore, we tested here whether the inhibition of EGFR or PARP may be used to specifically enhance the radiosensitivity of HPV-positive HNSCC cells. Materials and methods: Experiments were performed with five HPV/p16-positive HNSCC cell lines. Inhibitors used were cetuximab, olaparib and PF-00477736. The respective inhibition of EGFR, PARP and Chk1 was evaluated by Western blot, immunofluorescence analysis and assessment of cell cycle distribution. Cell survival was assessed by colony formation assay. Results: Inhibition of EGFR by cetuximab failed to radiosensitize any of the HPV-positive HNSCC cell lines tested. In contrast, PARP-inhibition resulted in a substantial radiosensitization of all strains, with the sensitization being further enhanced by the additional inhibition of Chk1. Conclusions: PARP-inhibition effectively radiosensitizes HPV-positive HNSCC cells and may therefore represent a viable alternative to chemotherapy possibly even allowing for a reduction in radiation dose. For the latter, PARP-inhibition may be combined with the inhibition of Chk1. In contrast, the inhibition of EGFR cannot be expected to radiosensitize HPV-positive HNSCC through the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity

  20. Tumor suppressor p16 INK4a: Downregulation of galectin-3, an endogenous competitor of the pro-anoikis effector galectin-1, in a pancreatic carcinoma model.

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    Sanchez-Ruderisch, Hugo; Fischer, Christian; Detjen, Katharina M; Welzel, Martina; Wimmel, Anja; Manning, Joachim C; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2010-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p16(INK4a) has functions beyond cell-cycle control via cyclin-dependent kinases. A coordinated remodeling of N- and O-glycosylation, and an increase in the presentation of the endogenous lectin galectin-1 sensing these changes on the surface of p16(INK4a)-expressing pancreatic carcinoma cells (Capan-1), lead to potent pro-anoikis signals. We show that the p16(INK4a)-dependent impact on growth-regulatory lectins is not limited to galectin-1, but also concerns galectin-3. By monitoring its expression in relation to p16(INK4a) status, as well as running anoikis assays with galectin-3 and cell transfectants with up- or downregulated lectin expression, a negative correlation between anoikis and the presence of this lectin was established. Nuclear run-off and northern blotting experiments revealed an effect of the presence of p16(INK4a) on steady-state levels of galectin-3-specific mRNA that differed from decreasing the transcriptional rate. On the cell surface, galectin-3 interferes with galectin-1, which initiates signaling toward its pro-anoikis activity via caspase-8 activation. The detected opposite effects of p16(INK4a) at the levels of growth-regulatory galectins-1 and -3 shift the status markedly towards the galectin-1-dependent pro-anoikis activity. A previously undescribed orchestrated fine-tuning of this effector system by a tumor suppressor is discovered.

  1. Dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway provokes an aging-associated decline of submandibular gland function

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    Yamakoshi, Kimi; Katano, Satoshi; Iida, Mayu; Kimura, Hiromi; Okuma, Atsushi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Ohtani, Naoko; Hara, Eiji; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Bmi-1 prevents stem cell aging, at least partly, by blocking expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16Ink4a. Therefore, dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway is considered key to the loss of tissue homeostasis and development of associated degenerative diseases during aging. However, because Bmi-1 knockout (KO) mice die within 20 weeks after birth, it is difficult to determine exactly where and when dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway occurs during aging in vivo. Using real-time in vivo imaging of p16Ink4a expression in Bmi-1-KO mice, we uncovered a novel function of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway in controlling homeostasis of the submandibular glands (SMGs), which secrete saliva into the oral cavity. This pathway is dysregulated during aging in vivo, leading to induction of p16Ink4a expression and subsequent declined SMG function. These findings will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the aging-related decline of SMG function and associated salivary gland hypofunction, which is particularly problematic among the elderly. PMID:25832744

  2. The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p15, p16, p21, and p27 during ovarian follicle growth initiation in the mouse

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    Bayrak Aykut

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclins regulate the cell cycle in association with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs. CDKs are under inhibitory control of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs. Method In this study we tested the expression of CDKIs p15, p16, p21 and p27 by immunohistochemistry to determine the role of CDKIs in the initiation of primordial follicle growth. Ovaries were collected from 60-day-old cycling B6D2F1/J mice (n = 16. Results Expression of p15, p16, p21 and p27 did not vary in granulosa and theca cells by the follicle stage. However, p16 staining was stronger (++ in the oocytes of all primordial, and 57.4 ± 3.1% of primary follicles compared to the remaining primary and more advanced follicles (+. Interestingly, primary follicles with weaker (+ oocyte staining for p16 had significantly larger mean follicle diameter compared to the primary and primordial follicles with stronger (++ oocyte staining (55.6 ± 2.1 vs. 32.0 ± 1.0 and 26.5 ± 0.7 μm, respectively, p Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that the initiation of oocyte growth, which seems to lead follicle growth, is associated with diminished p16 expression in the mouse ovary. Further studies are needed to investigate the factors that regulate the expression of p16 in the oocyte, which might also govern the initiation of primordial follicle growth.

  3. Elevated p16ink4a Expression in Human Labial Salivary Glands as a Potential Correlate of Cognitive Aging in Late Midlife.

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    Christiane Elisabeth Sørensen

    Full Text Available The cell-cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, p16ink4a, is one of the two gene products of the ink4a/ARF (cdkn2a locus on chromosome 9q21. Up-regulation of p16ink4a has been linked to cellular senescence, and findings from studies on different mammalian tissues suggest that p16ink4a may be a biomarker of organismal versus chronological age.The aim of this study was to examine the immunolocalization pattern of p16ink4a in human labial salivary gland (LSG tissue, and to analyze whether its expression level in LSGs is a peripheral correlate of cognitive decline in late midlife.The present study was a part of a study of causes and predictors of cognitive decline in middle-aged men in a Danish birth cohort. It is based on data from 181 male participants from the Danish Metropolit birth cohort, born in 1953, who were examined for age-associated alterations in cognition, dental health, and morphological and autonomic innervation characteristics of the LSGs. The participants were allocated to two groups based on the relative change in cognitive performance from young adulthood to late midlife. LSG biopsies were analyzed by qRT-PCR for the expression level of p16ink4a. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of LSGs.p16ink4a immunoreactivity was observed in LSG ductal, myoepithelial, and stromal cells, but not in acinar cells. The mean relative expression of p16ink4a in LSGs was higher in the group of participants with decline in cognitive performance. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the relative p16 expression was predictive of the participant's group assignment. A negative correlation was found between relative p16ink4a expression and the participant's standardized regression residuals from early adulthood to late midlife cognitive performance scores.p16ink4a expression in human LSGs may constitute a potential peripheral correlate of cognitive decline. Human labial

  4. Atypical Clinical Behavior of p16-Confirmed HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radical Radiotherapy

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    Huang Shaohui; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Liu Feifei; Waldron, John; Ringash, Jolie; Irish, Jonathan; Cummings, Bernard; Siu, Lillian L.; Kim, John; Weinreb, Ilan; Hope, Andrew; Gullane, Patrick; Brown, Dale; Shi, Willa; O’Sullivan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report atypical clinical behavior observed in human papillomavirus (HPV)–related oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all newly diagnosed OPC cases treated with radiotherapy on July 1, 2003 to April 30, 2009. HPV positivity was determined by p16 immunostaining in tumors. The incidence of additional malignancies and the pattern of distant metastases (DMs) were compared between the HPV-positive (HPV+) and HPV-negative (HPV–) cohorts. Results: HPV status was evaluated in 318 of 613 consecutive OPC cases (52%), showing 236 HPV+ and 82 HPV– patients. Compared with HPV–, HPV+ cases were less likely to have additional malignancies (prior: 11% vs. 20%, p = 0.038; synchronous: 1% vs. 9%, p = 0.001; metachronous: 6% vs. 16%, p = 0.003). Whereas the majority (10 of 12) of HPV– additional head-and-neck (HN) mucosal malignancies were in the oral cavity, there was none (0 of 7) in the HPV+ cohort (p < 0.001). HPV+ synchronous HN second primaries (SPs) were in the supraglottis, post-cricoid, and nasopharynx; metachronous HN SPs were in the glottis, supraglottis, and ethmoid plus glottis/post-cricoid region. All SPs that could be tested were HPV+. There was no difference in DM rate (10% vs. 15%, p = 0.272), but HPV+ DMs were more likely to involve multiple organs (46% vs. 0%, p = 0.005) and unusual sites. Conclusions: This study reports atypical clinical behavior seen in HPV+ OPC, including multicentric lesions in HN mucosa and DM to multiple organs and unusual sites. The frequency of these events is low, but they may have clinical implications. The routine assessment of HPV status for all OPC is warranted.

  5. Atypical Clinical Behavior of p16-Confirmed HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radical Radiotherapy

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    Huang Shaohui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo [Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Liu Feifei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Division of Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Waldron, John; Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Irish, Jonathan [Department of Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Siu, Lillian L. [Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinreb, Ilan [Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gullane, Patrick; Brown, Dale [Department of Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shi, Willa [Division of Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O' Sullivan, Brian, E-mail: Brian.OSullivan@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report atypical clinical behavior observed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all newly diagnosed OPC cases treated with radiotherapy on July 1, 2003 to April 30, 2009. HPV positivity was determined by p16 immunostaining in tumors. The incidence of additional malignancies and the pattern of distant metastases (DMs) were compared between the HPV-positive (HPV+) and HPV-negative (HPV-) cohorts. Results: HPV status was evaluated in 318 of 613 consecutive OPC cases (52%), showing 236 HPV+ and 82 HPV- patients. Compared with HPV-, HPV+ cases were less likely to have additional malignancies (prior: 11% vs. 20%, p = 0.038; synchronous: 1% vs. 9%, p = 0.001; metachronous: 6% vs. 16%, p = 0.003). Whereas the majority (10 of 12) of HPV- additional head-and-neck (HN) mucosal malignancies were in the oral cavity, there was none (0 of 7) in the HPV+ cohort (p < 0.001). HPV+ synchronous HN second primaries (SPs) were in the supraglottis, post-cricoid, and nasopharynx; metachronous HN SPs were in the glottis, supraglottis, and ethmoid plus glottis/post-cricoid region. All SPs that could be tested were HPV+. There was no difference in DM rate (10% vs. 15%, p = 0.272), but HPV+ DMs were more likely to involve multiple organs (46% vs. 0%, p = 0.005) and unusual sites. Conclusions: This study reports atypical clinical behavior seen in HPV+ OPC, including multicentric lesions in HN mucosa and DM to multiple organs and unusual sites. The frequency of these events is low, but they may have clinical implications. The routine assessment of HPV status for all OPC is warranted.

  6. p16INK4a immunostaining in cytological and histological specimens from the uterine cervix: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Tsoumpou, I; Arbyn, M; Kyrgiou, M; Wentzensen, N; Koliopoulos, G; Martin-Hirsch, P; Paraskevaidis, E

    2009-01-01

    Background P16INK4a is a biomarker for transforming HPV infections that could act as an adjunct to current cytological and histological assessment of cervical smears and biopsies, allowing the identification of those women with ambiguous results that require referral to colposcopy and potentially treatment. Material and Methods We conducted a systematic review of all studies that evaluated the use of p16INK4a in cytological or histological specimens from the uterine cervix. We also estimated the mean proportion of samples that were positive for p16INK4a in cytology and histology, stratified by the grade of the lesion. Results Sixty-one studies were included. The proportion of cervical smears overexpressing p16INK4a increased with the severity of cytological abnormality. Among normal smears, only 12% (95% CI: 7–17%) were positive for the biomarker compared to 45% of ASCUS and LSIL (95% CI: 35–54% and 37– 57% respectively) and 89% of HSIL smears (95% CI: 84–95%). Similarly, in histology only 2% of normal biopsies (95% CI: 0.4– 30%) and 38% of CIN1 (95% CI: 23– 53%) showed diffuse staining for p16INK4a compared to 68% of CIN2 (95% CI: 44– 92%) and 82% of CIN3 (95% CI: 72– 92%). Conclusion Although there is good evidence that p16INK4a immunostaining correlates with the severity of cytological/histological abnormalities, the reproducibility is limited due to insufficiently standardized interpretation of the immunostaining. Therefore, a consensus needs to be reached regarding the evaluation of p16INK4a staining and the biomarker needs to be evaluated in various clinical settings addressing specific clinical questions. PMID:19261387

  7. Clinical and prognosis value of the CIMP status combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadallah-Kallel, Amana; Abdelmaksoud-Dammak, Rania; Triki, Mouna; Charfi, Slim; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Sallemi-Boudawara, Tahia; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation of CpG islands occurred frequently in CRC and associated with transcriptional silencing of key genes. In this study, the CIMP combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation status was determined in CRC patients and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and overall survival. Our data showed that CIMP+ CRCs were identified in 32.9% of cases and that CACNAG1 is the most frequently methylated promoter. When we combined the CIMP with the MLH1 or the p16 INK4a methylation status, we found that CIMP-/MLH1-U (37.8%) and CIMP-/p16 INK4a -U (35.4%) tumors were the most frequent among the four subtypes. Statistical analysis showed that tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, TNM stage, and MSI differed among the group of patients. Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed differences in overall survival according to the CIMP combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation status. In a multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 and CIMP/p16 INK4a methylation statuses were predictive of prognosis, and the OS was longer for patients with tumors CIMP-/MLH1-M, as well as CIMP-/p16 INK4a -M. Furthermore, DNMT1 is significantly overexpressed in tumors than in normal tissues as well as in CIMP+ than CIMP- tumors. Our results suggest that tumor classification based on the CIMP status combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation is useful to predict prognosis in CRC patients.

  8. Nucleosomes correlate with in vivo progression pattern of de novo methylation of p16 CpG islands in human gastric carcinogenesis.

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    Zhe-Ming Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exact relationship between nucleosome positioning and methylation of CpG islands in human pathogenesis is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we characterized the nucleosome position within the p16 CpG island and established a seeding methylation-specific PCR (sMSP assay based on bisulfite modification to enrich the p16 alleles containing methylated-CpG at the methylation "seeding" sites within its intron-1 in gastric carcinogenesis. The sMSP-positive rate in primary gastric carcinoma (GC samples (36/40 was significantly higher than that observed in gastritis (19/45 or normal samples (7/13 (P<0.01. Extensive clone sequencing of these sMSP products showed that the density of methylated-CpGs in p16 CpG islands increased gradually along with the severity of pathological changes in gastric tissues. In gastritis lesions the methylation was frequently observed in the region corresponding to the exon-1 coding-nucleosome and the 5'UTR-nucleosome; the methylation was further extended to the region corresponding to the promoter-nucleosome in GC samples. Only few methylated-CpG sites were randomly detected within p16 CpG islands in normal tissues. The significantly inversed relationship between the p16 exon-1 methylation and its transcription was observed in GC samples. An exact p16 promoter-specific 83 bp-MSP assay confirms the result of sMSP (33/55 vs. 1/6, P<0.01. In addition, p16 methylation in chronic gastritis lesions significantly correlated with H. pylori infection; however, such correlation was not observed in GC specimens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It was determined that de novo methylation was initiated in the coding region of p16 exon-1 in gastritis, then progressed to its 5'UTR, and ultimately to the proximal promoter in GCs. Nucleosomes may function as the basic extension/progression unit of de novo methylation of p16 CpG islands in vivo.

  9. [Sorting role of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining in the cervical cytology specimens of ASCUS and LSIL cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Zhu, H T; Zhao, J J; Su, J Z; Xia, Y D

    2017-05-08

    Objective: To investigate the sorting effect of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining method in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) cytology results. Methods: Four-hundred and twenty cases collected during April 2014 to February 2015 of cervical cytology of ASCUS ( n =318) and LSIL ( n =102) were selected, and residual liquid-based cytology specimens were used for p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining. The sensitivity and specificity of the detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer were calculated, and the results were compared with high risk HPV. Taking histological follow-up as the gold standard, the test was considered positive when at least one cell exhibited p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 co-staining, without requirement of adjunct morphologic interpretation of positive cells. Results: Further screening CIN2+ in cytology ASCUS and LSIL group , the sensitivity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining was slightly lower than high risk HPV (84.2% vs . 94.7%), while the specificity was higher (84.0% vs . 53.9%). For ASCUS patients, the sensitivity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining and high risk HPV was 82.6% and 91.3%, and the specificity was 88.8% and 63.7%, respectively. For LSIL patients, the sensitivity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining and high risk HPV was 86.7% and 100.0%, and the specificity was 67.8% and 20.7%, respectively. For patients younger and older than 30 years, specificity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining was both higher than that of high risk HPV (80.8% vs . 42.3%; 84.6% vs . 56.9%). Conclusions: p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining can effectively identify the high risk population in ASCUS or LSIL, with higher specificity than high risk HPV test. p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining may benefit patients younger than 30 years of age as a preliminary or potential cytology-combining screening tool.

  10. p16INK4A, p53, EGFR expression and KRAS mutation status in squamous cell cancers of the anus: Correlation with outcomes following chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, Duncan C; Williams, Anthony; Allan, Kimberley; Stokoe, Joanna; Jackson, Tim; Linsdall, Suzanne; Bailey, Charles MH; Summers, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Squamous cell carcinomas of the anal canal are associated with infection with Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs). Chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) gives 70% 3-year relapse-free survival. Improved predictive markers and therapeutic options are required. Methods: Tumours from 153 patients treated with radical chemo-radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 with concurrent Mitomycin and 5-Fluorouracil between 2004 and 2009) were retrieved and immunohistochemistry performed for p16 INK4A , p53 and EGFR and correlated with outcome. Primary and relapsed samples were analysed for mutations in KRAS. Results: 137/153 (89.5%) stained moderately or strongly for p16 INK4A . p16 INK4A correlated strongly with outcome. 37/137 patients demonstrating moderate/strong p16 INK4A expression relapsed (27.0%), as opposed to 10/16 (62.5%) with absent/weak staining (log rank test p INK4A negative tumours were more frequent in men. p16 INK4A negative patients had significantly worse overall survival (p INK4A is strongly associated with relapse in SCC of the anus and identifies patients with very poor rates of relapse-free and overall survival. Primary and recurrent anal cancer expresses wild type KRAS, unaffected by treatment, supporting trials targeting EGFR in poor risk/recurrent anal cancer

  11. p16/Ki-67 Dual Stain Cytology for Detection of Cervical Precancer in HPV-Positive Women.

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    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Fetterman, Barbara; Castle, Philip E; Schiffman, Mark; Wood, Shannon N; Stiemerling, Eric; Tokugawa, Diane; Bodelon, Clara; Poitras, Nancy; Lorey, Thomas; Kinney, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-based cervical cancer screening requires triage markers to decide who should be referred to colposcopy. p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology has been proposed as a biomarker for cervical precancers. We evaluated the dual stain in a large population of HPV-positive women. One thousand five hundred and nine HPV-positive women screened with HPV/cytology cotesting at Kaiser Permanente California were enrolled into a prospective observational study in 2012. Dual stain cytology was performed on residual Surepath material, and slides were evaluated for dual stain-positive cells. Disease endpoints were ascertained from the clinical database at KPNC. We evaluated the clinical performance of the assay among all HPV-positive women and among HPV-positive, cytology-negative women. We used internal benchmarks for clinical management to evaluate the clinical relevance of the dual stain assay. We evaluated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the dual stain compared with Pap cytology. All statistical tests were two-sided. The dual stain had lower positivity (45.9%) compared with cytology at an ASC-US threshold (53.4%). For detection of CIN2+, the dual stain had similar sensitivity (83.4% vs 76.6%, P = .1), and statistically higher specificity (58.9% vs 49.6%, P < .001), PPV (21.0% vs 16.6%, P < .001), and NPV (96.4% vs 94.2%, P = .01) compared with cytology. Similar patterns were observed for CIN3+. Women with a positive test had high enough risk for referral to colposcopy, while the risk for women with negative tests was below a one-year return threshold based on current US management guidelines. Dual stain cytology showed good risk stratification for all HPV-positive women and for HPV-positive women with normal cytology. Additional follow-up is needed to determine how long dual stain negative women remain at low risk of precancer. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a

  12. Comparative analysis of Homo sapiens and Mus musculus cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor genes p16 (MTS1) and p15 (MTS2).

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    Jiang, P; Stone, S; Wagner, R; Wang, S; Dayananth, P; Kozak, C A; Wold, B; Kamb, A

    1995-12-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors are a growing family of molecules that regulate important transitions in the cell cycle. At least one of these molecules, p16, has been implicated in human tumorigenesis while its close homolog, p15, is induced by cell contact and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). To investigate the evolutionary and functional features of p15 and p16, we have isolated mouse (Mus musculus) homologs of each gene. Comparative analysis of these sequences provides evidence that the genes have similar functions in mouse and human. In addition, the comparison suggests that a gene conversion event is part of the evolution of the human p15 and p16 genes.

  13. The expression patterns of p53 and p16 and an analysis of a possible role of HPV in primary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

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    Riley E Alexander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder is rare. The molecular and cellular events leading to its pathogenesis are not well delineated. The goal of this study was to investigate p53 and p16 expression, as well as HPV status, in a relatively large series of primary bladder adenocarcinomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty six cases of urinary bladder adenocarcinoma were chosen from participating institutions. The diagnosis and available clinical history were reviewed in each case. Immunostains for p53, p16 and HPV and high-risk and low-risk HPV-ISH were performed on all tumors. RESULTS: Patients had an average age of 61 years with a male predominance (1.5 ∶ 1 male ∶ female ratio. The average tumor size in cystectomy specimens was 4.3 cm. Of the cases managed by transurethral resection, 40% were pT2 at the time of diagnosis. In cystectomy specimens, 77% were either pT3 or pT4. Strong nuclear p16 expression was seen in 67% of all cases and p53 expression was present in 58% of the cases. Expression of both markers was seen in 33% of cases. Expression of p16 or p53 alone was present in 12 (33% and 9 (25% cases, respectively. Neither marker was expressed in only 3 (8% of the tumors. No significant correlation between clinical variables and any of the markers we studied was identified. No HPV infection was detected in any case. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of p53 and/or p16 is very common in urinary bladder adenocarcinoma. These findings implicate a high likelihood that alterations in these cell cycle proteins contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors. Despite frequent immunohistochemical labeling for p16, no evidence of HPV infection was found.

  14. Aging of mice is associated with p16(Ink4a)- and β-galactosidase-positive macrophage accumulation that can be induced in young mice by senescent cells.

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    Hall, Brandon M; Balan, Vitaly; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Strom, Evguenia; Krasnov, Peter; Virtuoso, Lauren P; Rydkina, Elena; Vujcic, Slavoljub; Balan, Karina; Gitlin, Ilya; Leonova, Katerina; Polinsky, Alexander; Chernova, Olga B; Gudkov, Andrei V

    2016-07-01

    Senescent cells (SCs) have been considered a source of age-related chronic sterile systemic inflammation and a target for anti-aging therapies. To understand mechanisms controlling the amount of SCs, we analyzed the phenomenon of rapid clearance of human senescent fibroblasts implanted into SCID mice, which can be overcome when SCs were embedded into alginate beads preventing them from immunocyte attack. To identify putative SC killers, we analyzed the content of cell populations in lavage and capsules formed around the SC-containing beads. One of the major cell types attracted by secretory factors of SCs was a subpopulation of macrophages characterized by p16(Ink4a) gene expression and β-galactosidase activity at pH6.0 (β-gal(pH6)), thus resembling SCs. Consistently, mice with p16(Ink4a) promoter-driven luciferase, developed bright luminescence of their peritoneal cavity within two weeks following implantation of SCs embedded in alginate beads. p16(Ink4a)/β-gal(pH6)-expressing cells had surface biomarkers of macrophages F4/80 and were sensitive to liposomal clodronate used for the selective killing of cells capable of phagocytosis. At the same time, clodronate failed to kill bona fide SCs generated in vitro by genotoxic stress. Old mice with elevated proportion of p16(Ink4a)/β-gal(pH6)-positive cells in their tissues demonstrated reduction of both following systemic clodronate treatment, indicating that a significant proportion of cells previously considered to be SCs are actually a subclass of macrophages. These observations point at a significant role of p16(Ink4a)/β-gal(pH6)-positive macrophages in aging, which previously was attributed solely to SCs. They require re-interpretation of the mechanisms underlying rejuvenating effects following eradication of p16(Ink4a)/β-gal(pH6)-positive cells and reconsideration of potential cellular target for anti-aging treatment.

  15. Association of antibody to E2 protein of human papillomavirus and p16INK4A with progression of HPV-infected cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Swangphon, Piyawut; Luanratanakorn, Sanguanchoke; Sangkomkamhang, Ussanee; Tungsiriwattana, Thumwadee; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan; Burassakarn, Ati; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2018-05-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 and L1 proteins are expressed in cervical cells during the lytic stage of infection. Overexpression of p16 INK4A is a biomarker of HPV-associated cervical neoplasia. This study investigated antibodies to HPV16 E2, HPV16 L1, and p16 INK4A in sera from women with no squamous intraepithelial lesion (No-SIL) of the cervix, low-grade SIL, high-grade SIL, and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). HPV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-E2, -L1, and -p16 INK4A antibodies in sera were determined by western blot. Among 116 samples, 69 (60%) were HPV DNA-positive. Percentages seropositive for anti-E2, -L1, and -p16 INK4A antibodies were 39.6, 22.4, and 23.3%, respectively. Anti-E2 antibody was significantly correlated with HPV DNA-positive cases. Eighty-seven women (75%) were regarded as infected with HPV, having at least one positive result from HPV DNA, L1, or E2 antibody. Antibody to p16 INK4A was associated with HPV infection (odds = 5.444, 95% CI 1.203-24.629, P = 0.028) and precancerous cervical lesions (odds = 5.132, 95% CI 1.604-16.415, P = 0.006). Interestingly, the concurrent detection of anti-E2 and -p16 INK4A antibodies was significantly associated with HPV infection (odds = 1.382, 95% CI 1.228-1.555, P = 0.044). These antibodies might be good candidate biomarkers for monitoring HPV-associated cervical lesion development to cancer.

  16. p16(INK4A) inhibits the pro-metastatic potentials of osteosarcoma cells through targeting the ERK pathway and TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a downstream component of the evolutionarily conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway, which controls the expression of a plethora of genes implicated in various physiological processes. This pathway is often hyper-activated by mutations or abnormal extracellular signaling in different types of human cancer, including the most common primary malignant bone tumor osteosarcomas. p16(INK4A) is an important tumor suppressor gene frequently lost in osteosarcomas, and is associated with the progression of these malignancies. We have shown, here, that the ERK1/2 protein kinase is also activated by p16(INK4A) down-regulation in osteosarcoma cells and normal human as well as mouse cells. This inhibitory effect is associated with the suppression of the upstream kinase MEK1/2, and is mediated via the repression of miR-21-5p and the consequent up-regulation of the MEK/ERK antagonist SPRY2 in osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, we have shown that p16(INK4) inhibits the migration/invasion abilities of these cells through miR-21-5p-dependent inhibition of ERK1/2. In addition, we present clear evidence that p16(INK4) represses the paracrine pro-migratory effect of osteosarcoma cells on stromal fibroblasts through the inhibition of the TGF-β1 expression/secretion. This effect is also ERK1/2-dependent, indicating that in addition to their cell-autonomous actions, p16(INK4) and ERK1/2 have also non-cell-autonomous cancer-related functions. Together, these results indicate that the tumor suppressor p16(INK4) protein represses the carcinogenic process of osteosarcoma cells not only as a cell cycle regulator, but also as a negative regulator of pro-carcinogenic/-metastatic pathways. This indicates that targeting the ERK pathway is of utmost therapeutic value. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Usefulness of p16ink4a, ProEX C, and Ki-67 for the diagnosis of glandular dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Giovanni; Bellisano, Giulia; Carico, Elisabetta; Faa, Gavino; Kasal, Armin; Antoniazzi, Sonia; Egarter-Vigl, Eduard; Piccin, Andrea; Dalla Palma, Paolo; Vittadello, Fabio

    2011-07-01

    Although the diagnostic criteria of in-situ and invasive adenocarcinomas of the cervix uteri are well established, the differentiation from benign mimics may be difficult and the morphologic features of the precursors of endocervical adenocarcinoma are still debated. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of p16ink4a (p16), ProEX C, and Ki-67 for the diagnosis of endocervical adenocarcinoma and its precursors. Immunohistochemistry with p16, ProEX C, and Ki-67 was performed in 82 glandular lesions including 15 invasive adenocarcinomas, 29 adenocarcinomas in situ (AIS), 22 non-neoplastic samples, and 16 cases of glandular dysplasia (GD), which showed significant nuclear abnormalities but did not meet the diagnostic criteria for AIS. The immunohistochemical expression pattern was scored according to the percentage of the stained cells (0, 1+, 2+, and 3+ when 0% to 5%, 6% to 25%, 26% to 50%, and more than 50% of the cells were stained, respectively) and was evaluated for each antibody. p16 was at least focally expressed (1+ or more) in 14 of 15 invasive adenocarcinomas, in all AIS and in 7 negative samples. ProEX C and Ki-67 both scored 1+ or more in all adenocarcinomas and AIS and in 8 and 6 negative samples, respectively. Of the GD 15, 14, and 15 expressed p16, ProEX C, and Ki-67, respectively. The score differences between neoplastic and non-neoplastic samples were highly significant for each marker (Pcervix uteri and may also improve the diagnostic accuracy of endocervical GD. In particularly problematic cases, the combination of p16 and a proliferation marker can provide additional help for the interpretation of these lesions.

  18. Immunohistochemical characteristic of expression levels of Kі-67, p16INK4a, HPV16 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cervical cancer (SCC is a common tumor in women, which is preceded by the series of pathological processes, among which the key role is played by cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. Aim. To study the characteristics of immunohistochemical (IHC expression of Ki-67, p16INK4a, HPV16 in squamous cervical epithelium (SCE with dysplastic changes of varying degree (CIN I–III and also in the tumor cells of SCC. Materials and methods. Pathohistological and IHC studies of uterine cervix biopsies from 53 patients (the age ranged from 18 to 45 years were performed. Results. It was found that SCE with CIN I is characterized by the low Ki-67 expression level (Me = 17.87 % (13.76, 22.44 and the extremely low p16INK4a expression level (Me = 0.00 CUOD (0.00; 29.64. The proportion of HPV16-positive patients with CIN I is 27.27 %. CIN II is characterized by the average proliferation level in SCE (Me = 44.96 % (34.91, 55.41 and the moderate p16INK4a expression level (Me = 75.71 CUOD (51.24, 82, 41. The proportion of HPV16-positive patients with CIN II is 71.43 %. CIN III is characterized by the high proliferation level (Me = 74.62 % (68.50, 84.67 and by the high p16INK4a expression level of in SCE (Me = 117.47 CUOD (95.38, 123, 93; the proportion of HPV16-positive patients with CIN III is 77.78%. In all the patients with SСС, nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of HPV16 was detected in the tumor cells. High expression levels of Ki-67 and p16INK4a were detected in the tumor cells. There are direct correlations between the expression levels of Ki-67, p16INK4a, HPV16 and CIN degree. Conclusions. These data indicate that the expression levels of Ki-67, p16INK4a and HPV16 increase with the increasing of CIN grade. The absence of statistically significant differences between the expression levels of Ki-67, p16INK4a and HPV16 in CIN III and the same levels in the tumor cells of SCC indicates that these markers cannot be used for differential diagnosis

  19. Molecular Analysis of a Multistep Lung Cancer Model Induced by Chronic Inflammation Reveals Epigenetic Regulation of p16, Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Blanco

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers, genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR, proliferative stress, telomeric stress: δ-H2AX, p16, p53, TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic, genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A, APC, CDH13, Rassf1, Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase, p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression, was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias, tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras, epidermal growth factor receptor, a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A, CDH13, APC, but not in Rassf1, Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer.

  20. Elevated p16ink4a Expression in Human Labial Salivary Glands as a Potential Correlate of Cognitive Aging in Late Midlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Christiane Elisabeth; Tritsaris, Katerina; Reibel, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cell-cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, p16ink4a, is one of the two gene products of the ink4a/ARF (cdkn2a) locus on chromosome 9q21. Up-regulation of p16ink4a has been linked to cellular senescence, and findings from studies on different...... mammalian tissues suggest that p16ink4a may be a biomarker of organismal versus chronological age. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the immunolocalization pattern of p16ink4a in human labial salivary gland (LSG) tissue, and to analyze whether its expression level in LSGs is a peripheral...... correlate of cognitive decline in late midlife. METHODS: The present study was a part of a study of causes and predictors of cognitive decline in middle-aged men in a Danish birth cohort. It is based on data from 181 male participants from the Danish Metropolit birth cohort, born in 1953, who were examined...

  1. Survey of familial glioma and role of germline p16INK4A/p14ARF and p53 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Lindsay B; Armstrong, Georgina N; Olver, Bianca D

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of familial propensity to glioma as a distinct clinical entity beyond a few rare syndromes; however its genetic basis is poorly understood. The role of p16(INK4A)/p14(ARF) and p53 mutations in sporadic glioma provides a strong rationale for investigating germline m...

  2. The role of human papilloma virus and p16 in occult primary of the head and neck: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, George; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Cancer of unknown primary of the head and neck is a challenging entity for the oncologist. The role of human papilloma virus/p16 in carcinogenesis and in prognosis is well established in certain HNSCC especially in that of the oropharynx. In the case of occult primary of the head and neck the role of HPV/p16 positivity is not well defined regarding prognosis and localization of the primary. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect database was performed up to May 2014 using combinations of terms such as "occult primary of the head and neck", "CUP of the head and neck" "metastatic cervical squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary", "HPV" and "HPV and head and neck cancer". Literature review shows a strong association between HPV/p16 positivity and primary location in the oropharynx in patients with CUP of the head and neck as well as a better clinical outcome. HPV positivity and p16 overexpression could be used as surrogate markers in the search of the primary site of patients with CUP of the head and neck therefore maybe guiding treatment decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-express...

  4. Deregulated expression of p16INK4a and p53 pathway members in benign and malignant myoepithelial tumours of the salivary glands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vékony, H.; Röser, K.; Löning, T.; Raaphorst, F.M.; Leemans, C.R.; van der Waal, I.; Bloemena, E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Myoepithelial salivary gland tumours are uncommon and follow an unpredictable biological course. The aim was to examine their molecular background to acquire a better understanding of their clinical behaviour. Methods and results: Expression of protein (E2F1, p16INK4a, p53, cyclin D1, Ki67 and

  5. The negative predictive value of p16INK4a to assess the outcome of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 in the uterine cervix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jalil; Øster, Anne

    2007-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression of p16 in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded histological sections was evaluated in a retrospective study comprising a low-grade group of 100 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1, a high-grade group of 50 cases of CIN 2 to 3, and a benign group...

  6. Segregation of a 4p16.3 duplication with a characteristic appearance, macrocephaly, speech delay and mild intellectual disability in a 3-generation family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Ravn, Kirstine; Hamborg-Petersen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    delay/intellectual disability. In contrast small duplications of 4p are rare but with the advent of microarray techniques a few cases have been reported in recent years. Here we describe a 3 Mb duplication at 4p16.3 segregating with a characteristic phenotype, macrocephaly, speech delay and mild...

  7. Prognostic relevance of human papillomavirus L1 capsid protein detection within mild and moderate dysplastic lesions of the cervix uteri in combination with p16 biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilfrich, Ralf; Hariri, Jalil

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To proof the prognostic relevance of HPV L1 capsid protein detection on colposcopically-guided punch biopsies in combination with p16. STUDY DESIGN: Sections of colposcopically-guided punch biopsies from 191 consecutive cases with at least 5 years of follow-up were stained with HPV L1 ...

  8. Evaluation of the 8th TNM classification on p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas in the Netherlands, and the importance of additional HPV DNA-testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, I H; Rietbergen, M M; van Bokhoven, A A J D; Bloemena, E; Witte, B I; Heideman, D A M; Baatenburg de Jong, R J; Brakenhoff, R H; Leemans, C R

    2018-02-09

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) are traditionally caused by smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. However, in the last decades high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections play an increasingly important role in tumorigenesis. HPV-driven OPSCCs are known to have a more favorable prognosis, which has led to important and marked changes in the recently released TNM-8. In this edition, OPSCCs are divided based on p16-immunostaining, with p16-overexpression as surrogate marker for the presence of HPV. The aims of this study are to evaluate TNM-8 on a Dutch consecutive cohort of patients with p16-positive OPSCC and to determine the relevance of additional HPV DNA-testing. All OPSCC patients without distant metastases at diagnosis and treated with curative intent at VU University Medical Center (2000-2015) and Erasmus Medical Center (2000-2006) were included (N = 1,204). HPV-status was established by p16-immunostaining followed by HPV DNA-PCR on the p16-immunopositive cases. We compared TNM-7 and TNM-8 using the Harrell's C index. In total, 388 of 1,204 (32.2%) patients were p16-immunopositive. In these patients, TNM-8 had a markedly better predictive prognostic power than TNM-7 (Harrell's C index 0.63 versus 0.53). Of the 388 p16-positive OPSCCs, 48 tumors (12.4%) were HPV DNA-negative. This subgroup had distinct demographic, clinical and morphologic characteristics and showed a significantly worse five-year overall survival compared to the HPV DNA-positive tumors (P HPV DNA-negative subgroup with distinct features and a worse overall survival, indicating the importance to perform additional HPV DNA-testing when predicting prognosis and particularly for selecting patients for de-intensified treatment regimens. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. p16(INK4A) mediates age-related changes in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp through the DNA damage and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingmei; Xing, Jing; Feng, Guijuan; Huang, Dan; Lu, Xiaohui; Liu, Suzhe; Tan, Wei; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp (DP-MSCs) are characterized by self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, which play important roles in regenerative medicine. Autologous transfers, as non-immunogenic, constitute the safest approach in cellular transplantations. However, their use may be limited by age-related changes. In the study, we compared DP-MSCs isolated from human in five age groups: 5-12 y, 12-20 y, 20-35 y, 35-50 y, and >50 y. We tested the effect of age on proliferation, differentiation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), cell cycle and programmed cell death. DP-MSCs showed characteristics of senescence as a function of age. Meanwhile, the expression of p16(INK4A) and γ-H2A.X significantly increased with age, whereas heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) was decreased in the senescent DP-MSCs. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed the number of ROS-stained cells and the DCFH fluorescent level were higher in the aged group. Further we examined the senescence of DP-MSCs after modulating p16(INK4A) signaling. The results indicated the dysfunction of DP-MSCs was reversed by p16(INK4A) siRNA. In summary, our study indicated p16(INK4A) pathway may play a critical role in DP-MSCs age-related changes and the DNA damage response (DDR) and stress response may be the main mediators of DP-MSCs senescence induced by excessive activation of p16(INK4A) signaling. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. AN UPWARD TREND IN DNA P16INK4A METHYLATION PATTERN AND HIGH RISK HPV INFECTION ACCORDING TO THE SEVERITY OF THE CERVICAL LESION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Nahoum Carestiato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY High-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV infection is necessary but not sufficient for cervical cancer development. Recently, P16INK4A gene silencing through hypermethylation has been proposed as an important cofactor in cervical carcinogenesis due to its tumor suppressor function. We aimed to investigate P16INK4A methylation status in normal and neoplastic epithelia and evaluate an association with HPV infection and genotype. This cross-sectional study was performed with 141 cervical samples from patients attending Hospital Moncorvo Filho, Rio de Janeiro. HPV detection and genotyping were performed through PCR and P16INK4A methylation by nested-methylation specific PCR (MSP. HPV frequency was 62.4% (88/141. The most common HPV were HPV16 (37%, HPV18 (16.3% and HPV33/45(15.2%. An upward trend was observed concerning P16INK4A methylation and lesion degree: normal epithelia (10.7%, low grade lesions (22.9%, high grade (57.1% and carcinoma (93.1% (p < 0.0001. A multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate an association between methylation, age, tobacco exposure, HPV infection and genotyping. A correlation was found concerning methylation with HPV infection (p < 0.0001, hr-HPV (p = 0.01, HSIL (p < 0.0007 and malignant lesions (p < 0.0001. Since viral infection and epigenetic alterations are related to cervical carcinoma, we suggest that P16INK4A methylation profile maybe thoroughly investigated as a biomarker to identify patients at risk of cancer.

  11. PD-L1 expression is associated with p16INK4A expression in non-oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, San-Chi; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin; Wang, Hsiao-Jung; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Yang, Muh-Hwa

    2018-01-01

    PD-L1 expression is critical in helping tumor cells evade the immune system. However, the level of PD-L1 expression in non-oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (non-OPHNSCC) and its association with patient prognosis remains unclear. A retrospective clinicopathological analysis was performed on 106 patients with non-OPHNSCC diagnosed between 2007 and 2014. In the current study, tissue arrays from paraffin-embedded non-OPHNSCC samples obtained from patients were constructed, and PD-L1 and p16INK4A expression were determined using immunohistochemistry. Systemic inflammatory factors, including C-reactive protein, serum white blood cell, neutrophil, monocyte and lymphocyte counts were also analyzed. The current study demonstrated that PD-L1 was overexpressed in 32.1% (34/106) and p16INK4A in 20.8% (22/106) of patients. The expression of PD-L1 was associated with p16INK4A expression (P<0.01) but was not associated with levels of systemic inflammatory factors. Tumor stage was determined to be a significant prognostic value (stage I/II vs. III/IV, P=0.03), however, PD-L1, p16INK4A or other clinicopathological factors were not. The current study identified an association between PD-L1 and p16INK4A expression in non-OPHNSCC. This may facilitate the development of anti-PD1/PDL1 therapies to treat patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:29434933

  12. Decreased D2-40 and increased p16INK4A immunoreactivities correlate with higher grade of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhouping

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D2-40 has been shown a selective marker for lymphatic endothelium, but also shown in the benign cervical basal cells. However, the application of D2-40 immunoreactivity in the cervical basal cells for identifying the grade of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN has not been evaluated. Methods In this study, the immunoreactive patterns of D2-40, compared with p16INK4A, which is currently considered as the useful marker for cervical cancers and their precancerous diseases, were examined in total 125 cervical specimens including 32 of CIN1, 37 of CIN2, 35 of CIN3, and 21 of normal cervical tissue. D2-40 and p16INK4A immunoreactivities were scored semiquantitatively according to the intensity and/or extent of the staining. Results Diffuse D2-40 expression with moderate-to-strong intensity was seen in all the normal cervical epithelia (21/21, 100% and similar pattern of D2-40 immunoreactivity with weak-to-strong intensity was observed in CIN1 (31/32, 97.2%. However, negative and/or focal D2-40 expression was found in CIN2 (negative: 20/37, 54.1%; focal: 16/37, 43.2% and CIN3 (negative: 22/35, 62.8%; focal: 12/35, 34.3%. On the other hand, diffuse immunostaining for p16INK4A was shown in 37.5% of CIN1, 64.9% of CIN2, and 80.0% of CIN3. However, the immunoreactive pattern of D2-40 was not associated with the p16INK4A immunoreactivity. Conclusions Immunohistochemical analysis of D2-40 combined with p16INK4A may have a significant implication in clinical practice for better identifying the grade of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, especially for distinguishing CIN1 from CIN2/3.

  13. The PPARα/p16INK4a Pathway inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by repressing Cell Cycle-dependent Telomerase Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizard, Florence; Nomiyama, Takashi; Zhao, Yue; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Jones, Karrie L.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) α, the molecular target for fibrates used to treat dyslipidemia, exerts pleiotropic effects on vascular cells. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we have previously demonstrated that PPARα activation suppresses G1→S cell cycle progression by targeting the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4a (p16). In the present study, we demonstrate that this inhibition of VSMC proliferation by PPARα is mediated through a p16-dependent suppression of telomerase activity, which has been implicated in key cellular functions including proliferation. PPARα activation inhibited mitogen-induced telomerase activity by repressing the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) through negative cross-talk with an E2F-1-dependent trans-activation of the TERT promoter. This trans-repression involved the recruitment of the retinoblastoma (RB) family proteins p107 and p130 to the TERT promoter resulting in impaired E2F-1 binding, an effect which was dependent on p16. The inhibition of cell proliferation by PPARα activation was lost in VSMC following TERT overexpression or knock-down, pointing to a key role of telomerase as a target for the antiproliferative effects of PPARα. Finally, we demonstrate that PPARα agonists suppress telomerase activation during the proliferative response following vascular injury indicating that these findings are applicable in vivo. In concert, these results demonstrate that the anti-proliferative effects of PPARα in VSMCs depend on the suppression of telomerase activity by targeting the p16/RB/E2F transcriptional cascade. PMID:18818403

  14. Biosphere assessment for high-level radioactive waste disposal: modelling experiences and discussion on key parameters by sensitivity analysis in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoko; Makino, Hitoshi; Uchida, Masahiro; Suzuki, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    In the safety assessment of the deep geological disposal system of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW), biosphere assessment is often necessary to estimate future radiological impacts on human beings (e.g. radiation dose). In order to estimate the dose, the surface environment (biosphere) into which future releases of radionuclides might occur and the associated future human behaviour needs to be considered. However, for a deep repository, such releases might not occur for many thousands of years after disposal. Over such timescales, it is impossible to predict with any certainty how the biosphere and human behaviour will evolve. To avoid endless speculation aimed at reducing such uncertainty, the 'Reference Biospheres' concept has been developed for use in the safety assessment of HLW disposal. As the aim of the safety assessment with a hypothetical HLW disposal system by JNC was to demonstrate the technical feasibility and reliability of the Japanese disposal concept for a range of geological and surface environments, some biosphere models were developed using the 'Reference Biospheres' concept and the BIOMASS Methodology. These models have been used to derive factors to convert the radionuclide flux from a geosphere to a biosphere into a dose (flux to dose conversion factors). Moreover, sensitivity analysis for parameters in the biosphere models was performed to evaluate and understand the relative importance of parameters. It was concluded that transport parameters in the surface environments, annual amount of food consumption, distribution coefficients on soils and sediments, transfer coefficients of radionuclides to animal products and concentration ratios for marine organisms would have larger influence on the flux to dose conversion factors than any other parameters. (author)

  15. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 dual labelling as a marker for the presence of high-grade cancer cells or disease progression in urinary cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaton, E; Advenier, A S; Carré, C; Decaussin-Petrucci, M; Mege-Lechevallier, F; Ruffion, A

    2013-10-01

    Overexpression of p16(INK4a) independent of the presence of E6-E7 oncoproteins of high-risk papillomaviruses has been identified in bladder carcinoma in situ lesions with or without concurrent papillary or invasive high-grade (HG) urothelial carcinoma. As p16(INK4a) and Ki-67 co-expression clearly indicates deregulation of the cell cycle, the aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 dual labelling in urinary cytology samples. Immunolabelling was performed in demounted, destained Papanicolaou slides after ThinPrep(®) processing. A total of 84 urinary cytology samples (18 negative, 10 low grade, 19 atypical urothelial cells and 37 high grade) were analysed for p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression. We assessed underlying urothelial malignancy with cystoscopy, histopathology and follow-up data in every case. Compared with raw histopathological results, p16 (INK4a) /Ki-67 dual labelling was observed in 48 out of 55 (87.3%) HG lesions and in 11 out of 29 (37.9%) negative, papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential or low-grade carcinomas (P = 0.05). All cases with high-grade/malignant cytology were dual labelled. Sixteen out of 17 (94.1%) carcinoma in situ cases and eight out of 14 (57.1%) cases with atypical urothelial cells matching with HG lesions were dual labelled. Extended follow-up allowed three cases of progression to be diagnosed in dual-labelled cases with negative/low-grade cytology results after a 9- to 11-months delay. The data show that p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression allows most HG cancer cells to be detected initially and in the follow-up period. Additional studies are needed in order to determine whether dual labelling can be used as a triage tool for atypical urothelial cells in the urine. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Thomas Thompson repeat hydrography cruises in the Pacific Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 sections P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February, 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, Alex [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Feely, R. A. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabine, C. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Millero, F. J. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Langdon, C. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Dickson, A. G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Fine, R. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Bullister, J. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansell, D. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Carlson, C. A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Sloyan, B. M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); McNichol, A. P. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Key, R. M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Byrne, R. H. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrients, total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, discrete CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), radiocarbon, δ13C, and underway carbon measurements performed during the P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006) cruises in the Pacific Ocean. The research vessel (R/V) Roger Revelle departed Papeete, Tahiti, on January 9, 2005 for the Repeat Section P16S, nominally along 150°W, ending in Wellington, New Zealand, on February 19. During this cruise, samples were taken from 36 depths at 111 CTD stations between 16°S and 71°S. The Repeat Section P16N, nominally along 152°W, consisted of two legs. Leg 1 started on February 13, 2006 in Papeete, Tahiti, and finished on March 3, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The R/V Thomas G. Thompson departed Honolulu for Leg 2 on March 10, 2006 and arrived in Kodiak, Alaska, on March 30. During the P16N cruises, samples were taken from 34 or 36 depths at 84 stations between 17°S and 56.28°N. The research conducted on these cruises was part of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the Climate Variability Program (CLIVAR)/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program. The P16S and P16N data sets are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  17. Prognostic Value of p16 Status on the Development of a Complete Response in Involved Oropharynx Cancer Neck Nodes After Cisplatin-Based Chemoradiation: A Secondary Analysis of NRG Oncology RTOG 0129

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Thomas J., E-mail: thomas.galloway@fccc.edu [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zhang, Qiang [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Notre Dame, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Rosenthal, David I. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Soulieres, Denis [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Notre Dame, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Fortin, André [L Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Québec City, Québec (Canada); Silverman, Craig L. [The James Brown Cancer Center–University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Daly, Megan E. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Ridge, John A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hammond, J. Alexander [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Le, Quynh-Thu [Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between p16 status and the regional response of patients with node-positive oropharynx cancer treated on NRG Oncology RTOG 0129. Methods and Materials: Patients with N1-N3 oropharynx cancer and known p16 status who underwent treatment on RTOG 0129 were analyzed. Pathologic complete response (pCR) rates in patients treated with a postchemoradiation neck dissection (with p16-positive or p16-negative cancer) were compared by Fisher exact test. Patients managed expectantly were compared with those treated with a neck dissection. Results: Ninety-nine (34%) of 292 patients with node-positive oropharynx cancer and known p16 status underwent a posttreatment neck dissection (p16-positive: n=69; p16-negative: n=30). The remaining 193 patients with malignant lymphadenopathy at diagnosis were observed. Neck dissection was performed a median of 70 (range, 17-169) days after completion of chemoradiation. Neither the pretreatment nodal stage (P=.71) nor the postradiation, pre-neck dissection clinical/radiographic neck assessment (P=.42) differed by p16 status. A pCR was more common among p16-positive patients (78%) than p16-negative patients (53%, P=.02) and was associated with a reduced incidence of local–regional failure (hazard ratio 0.33, P=.003). On multivariate analysis of local–regional failure, a test for interaction between pCR and p16 status was not significant (P=.37). One-hundred ninety-three (66%) of 292 of initially node-positive patients were managed without a posttreatment neck dissection. Development of a clinical (cCR) was not significantly influenced by p16-status (P=.42). Observed patients with a clinical nodal CR had disease control outcomes similar to those in patients with a pCR neck dissection. Conclusions: Patients with p16-positive tumors had significantly higher pCR and locoregional control rates than those with p16-negative tumors.

  18. Concurrent disruption of p16INK4a and the ARF-p53 pathway predicts poor prognosis in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, K; de Nully Brown, P; Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    . By using a panel of PCR-based methods, we have examined the status of the p16INK4a, ARF and p53 genes in 123 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) at diagnosis. Alterations of one or more of these genes were detected in seven of 36 (19%) cases with low- to intermediate-grade histology, and in 35 of 87 (40...

  19. p38 MAPK and JNK antagonistically control senescence and cytoplasmic p16INK4A expression in doxorubicin-treated endothelial progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Spallarossa

    Full Text Available Patients treated with low-dose anthracyclines often show late onset cardiotoxicity. Recent studies suggest that this form of cardiotoxicity is the result of a progenitor cell disease. In this study we demonstrate that Cord Blood Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs exposed to low, sub-apoptotic doses of doxorubicin show a senescence phenotype characterized by increased SA-b-gal activity, decreased TRF2 and chromosomal abnormalities, enlarged cell shape, and disarrangement of F-actin stress fibers accompanied by impaired migratory ability. P16( INK4A localizes in the cytoplasm of doxorubicin-induced senescent EPCs and not in the nucleus as is the case in EPCs rendered senescent by different stimuli. This localization together with the presence of an arrest in G2, and not at the G1 phase boundary, which is what usually occurs in response to the cell cycle regulatory activity of p16(INK4A, suggests that doxorubicin-induced p16( INK4A does not regulate the cell cycle, even though its increase is closely associated with senescence. The effects of doxorubicin are the result of the activation of MAPKs p38 and JNK which act antagonistically. JNK attenuates the senescence, p16( INK4A expression and cytoskeleton remodeling that are induced by activated p38. We also found that conditioned medium from doxorubicin-induced senescent cardiomyocytes does not attract untreated EPCs, unlike conditioned medium from apoptotic cardiomyocytes which has a strong chemoattractant capacity. In conclusion, this study provides a better understanding of the senescence of doxorubicin-treated EPCs, which may be helpful in preventing and treating late onset cardiotoxicity.

  20. Inmunohistoquímica de la proteína p16INK4a en biopsias y extendidos cervicovaginales y su relación con HPV por PCR Immunohistochemistry of p16INK4a in biopsies and cervicovaginal smears, and its correlation with HPV detected by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudios recientes sugieren que la sobreexpresión de p16, determinada por inmunohistoquímica, sería un marcador específico de células escamosas displásicas y neoplásicas con alta asociación con HPV de alto riesgo. Nuestro objetivo fue correlacionar los hallazgos cito/histológicos con la expresión de p16 y el subtipo de HPV por PCR. Seleccionamos 95 biopsias de cuello uterino y 4 legrados endocervicales de 99 individuos, y 30 extendidos cervicovaginales de otros 30 individuos, que se dividieron según el diagnóstico morfológico. Inmunomarcamos cortes del material incluido en parafina y los extendidos con el kit CINtecT p16INK4a (DAKO. Evaluamos HPV por PCR utilizando 25/99 biopsias con lesión intraepitelial escamosa de bajo grado. Observamos marcación positiva para p16 en 1/35 biopsias (2.9% y 1/11 extendidos (9% en los grupos sin HPV ni displasia; 16/25 biopsias (64% y 6/10 extendidos (60% en aquellos con lesión de bajo grado y 38/39 biopsias (97.4% y 8/9 extendidos (89% en los grupos con lesión de alto grado y carcinoma escamoso. Todas las muestras con HPV-6/11 fueron negativas o positivas focales para p16, en tanto que aquellas con HPV-18 u otros subtipos fueron mayoritariamente positivas de tipo difuso. Concluimos que la expresión de p16 presenta alta correlación con el diagnóstico cito/histológico y alta asociación entre la marcación difusa y la presencia de HPV de alto riesgo, aportando mayor objetividad en casos dudosos y ayudando a seleccionar grupos de individuos con riesgo de progresión de enfermedad, con un costo aceptable para estudiar grandes grupos.Recent studies suggest that p16 overexpression determined by immunohistochemistry would be a specific marker for neoplastic and dysplastic squamous cells associated with high-risk HPV. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between cyto-histological findings, p16 expression and HPV subtype. A total of 99 biopsies were selected, 4 endocervical

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured under hypoxia escape from senescence via down-regulation of p16 and extracellular signal regulated kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yonghui; Kato, Tomohisa; Furu, Moritoshi; Nasu, Akira; Kajita, Yoichiro; Mitsui, Hiroto; Ueda, Michiko; Aoyama, Tomoki; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia has been considered to affect the properties of tissue stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Effects of long periods of exposure to hypoxia on human MSCs, however, have not been clearly demonstrated. MSCs cultured under normoxic conditions (20% pO 2 ) ceased to proliferate after 15-25 population doublings, while MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions (1% pO 2 ) retained the ability to proliferate with an additional 8-20 population doublings. Most of the MSCs cultured under normoxic conditions were in a senescent state after 100 days, while few senescent cells were found in the hypoxic culture, which was associated with a down-regulation of p16 gene expression. MSCs cultured for 100 days under hypoxic conditions were superior to those cultured under normoxic conditions in the ability to differentiate into the chondro- and adipogenic, but not osteogenic, lineage. Among the molecules related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) was significantly down-regulated by hypoxia, which helped to inhibit the up-regulation of p16 gene expression. Therefore, the hypoxic culture retained MSCs in an undifferentiated and senescence-free state through the down-regulation of p16 and ERK.

  2. Double positivity for HPV-DNA/p16ink4a is the biomarker with strongest diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value for human papillomavirus related oropharyngeal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Marisa; Taberna, Miren; Tous, Sara; Marquez, Sandra; Clavero, Omar; Quiros, Beatriz; Lloveras, Belen; Alejo, Maria; Leon, Xavier; Quer, Miquel; Bagué, Silvia; Mesia, Ricard; Nogués, Julio; Gomà, Montserrat; Aguila, Anton; Bonfill, Teresa; Blazquez, Carmen; Guix, Marta; Hijano, Rafael; Torres, Montserrat; Holzinger, Dana; Pawlita, Michael; Pavon, Miguel Angel; Bravo, Ignacio G; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, Francesc Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2018-03-01

    The etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is well established. Nevertheless, information on survival differences by anatomic sub-site or treatment remains scarce, and it is still unclear the HPV-relatedness definition with best diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients diagnosed with a primary OPC in four Catalonian hospitals from 1990 to 2013. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissues were subjected to histopathological evaluation, DNA quality control, HPV-DNA detection, and p16 INK4a /pRb/p53/Cyclin-D1 immunohistochemistry. HPV-DNA positive and a random sample of HPV-DNA negative cases were subjected to HPV-E6*I mRNA detection. Demographic, tobacco/alcohol use, clinical and follow-up data were collected. Multivariate models were used to evaluate factors associated with HPV positivity as defined by four different HPV-relatedness definitions. Proportional-hazards models were used to compare the risk of death and recurrence among HPV-related and non-related OPC. 788 patients yielded a valid HPV-DNA result. The percentage of positive cases was 10.9%, 10.2%, 8.5% and 7.4% for p16 INK4a , HPV-DNA, HPV-DNA/HPV-E6*I mRNA, and HPV-DNA/p16 INK4a , respectively. Being non-smoker or non-drinker was consistently associated across HPV-relatedness definitions with HPV positivity. A suggestion of survival differences between anatomic sub-sites and treatments was observed. Double positivity for HPV-DNA/p16 INK4a showed strongest diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value. Double positivity for HPV-DNA/p16 INK4a , a test that can be easily implemented in the clinical practice, has optimal diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value. Our results have strong clinical implications for patients' classification and handling and also suggest that not all the HPV-related OPC behave similarly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Mechanism of Enhanced Anticancer Effect of Nanoparticle Formulated LY2835219 via p16-CDK4/6-pRb Pathway in Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available LY2835219 is a dual inhibitor to CDK4 and CDK6. This study was to prepare LY2835219-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CNP/LY and LY2835219-loaded hyaluronic acid-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (HACNP/LY and revealed their anticancer effect and influence on p16-CDK4/6-pRb pathway against colon cell line. The nanoparticle sizes of CNP/LY and HACNP/LY were approximately 195±39.6 nm and 217±31.1 nm, respectively. The zeta potentials of CNP/LY and HACNP/LY were 37.3±1.5 mV and 30.3±2.2 mV, respectively. And the preparation process showed considerable drug encapsulation efficiency and loading efficiency. LY2835219, CNP/LY, and HACNP/LY inhibited HT29 cell proliferation with 0.68, 0.54, and 0.30 μM of IC50, respectively. G1 phase was arrested by LY2835219 and its formulations. Furthermore, inhibition of CDK4/6 by LY2835219 formulations induced CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1, and pRb decrease and p16 increase at both protein and mRNA levels. Overall, nanoparticle formulated LY2835219 could enhance the cytotoxicity and cell cycle arrest, and HACNP/LY strengthened the trend furtherly compared to CNP/LY. It is the first time to demonstrate the anticancer effect and mechanism against HT29 by LY2835219 and its nanoparticles. The drug and its nanoparticle formulations delay the cell growth and arrest cell cycle through p16-CDK4/6-pRb pathway, while the nanoparticle formulated LY2835219 could strengthen the process.

  4. Two decades of Pacific anthropogenic carbon storage and ocean acidification along Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographic Investigations Program sections P16 and P02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. R.; Feely, R. A.; Mecking, S.; Cross, J. N.; Macdonald, A. M.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Talley, L. D.; Sabine, C. L.; Millero, F. J.; Swift, J. H.; Dickson, A. G.; Rodgers, K. B.

    2017-02-01

    A modified version of the extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) method is used to estimate anthropogenic carbon concentration (Canth) changes along the Pacific P02 and P16 hydrographic sections over the past two decades. P02 is a zonal section crossing the North Pacific at 30°N, and P16 is a meridional section crossing the North and South Pacific at 150°W. The eMLR modifications allow the uncertainties associated with choices of regression parameters to be both resolved and reduced. Canth is found to have increased throughout the water column from the surface to 1000 m depth along both lines in both decades. Mean column Canth inventory increased consistently during the earlier (1990s-2000s) and recent (2000s-2010s) decades along P02, at rates of 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.46 ± 0.11 mol C m-2 a-1, respectively. By contrast, Canth storage accelerated from 0.29 ± 0.10 to 0.45 ± 0.11 mol C m-2 a-1 along P16. Shifts in water mass distributions are ruled out as a potential cause of this increase, which is instead attributed to recent increases in the ventilation of the South Pacific Subtropical Cell. Decadal changes along P16 are extrapolated across the gyre to estimate a Pacific Basin average storage between 60°S and 60°N of 6.1 ± 1.5 PgC decade-1 in the earlier decade and 8.8 ± 2.2 PgC decade-1 in the recent decade. This storage estimate is large despite the shallow Pacific Canth penetration due to the large volume of the Pacific Ocean. By 2014, Canth storage had changed Pacific surface seawater pH by -0.08 to -0.14 and aragonite saturation state by -0.57 to -0.82.

  5. Avaliação da expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a no adenocarcinoma de esôfago Protein p16INK4a immunohistochemical expression in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique Osanai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O adenocarcinoma de esôfago apresenta aumento de frequência nas últimas décadas, particularmente em países desenvolvidos. O esôfago de Barrett é reconhecido como a principal lesão precursora e o estudo da sequência metaplasia-displasia-adenocarcinoma mostra a ocorrência de alterações genéticas desde suas fases mais incipientes. As alterações no p16INK4a são relatadas como frequentes no esôfago de Barrett e no carcinoma de esôfago. OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência da expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a em exames anatomopatológicos de pacientes com adenocarcinoma de esôfago. MÉTODO: A população do estudo foi constituída de 37 pacientes com adenocarcinoma de esôfago. A expressão da proteína p16 foi detectada por meio de análise imunoistoquímica, com anticorpo primário p16INK4aAb-7, clone 16P07, NeoMarkers e avaliada de acordo com o Sistema de Escore de Imunorreatividade (Immunoreactive scoring system - IRS modificado. RESULTADOS: No grupo houve predominância de pacientes do sexo masculino (86,5% e a maioria dos casos correspondia a estádios avançados (III e IV = 67,5%. Em 12 casos (32,4% foi identificada expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a. Não foi observada relação significativa entre a perda da expressão da proteína p16INK4a e o grau de diferenciação histológica (p=0,81 nem com o estadiamento da doença (p=0,485. CONCLUSÃO: Ocorre perda da expressão imunoistoquímica da proteína p16INK4a, corroborando as informações de que a inativação do gene p16 é um evento frequente e que pode exercer papel importante na carcinogênese do adenocarcinoma de esôfago.BACKGROUND: The esophageal adenocarcinoma shows an increasing frequence in the last decades, specially in the developed countries. The Barrett´s esophagus is accepted as the major premalignant lesion and the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence presents a lot of genetic changes since its early

  6. Loss of heterozygosity of CDKN2A (p16INK4a) and RB1 tumor suppressor genes in testicular germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladusic, Tomislav; Hrascan, Reno; Pecina-Slaus, Nives; Vrhovac, Ivana; Gamulin, Marija; Franekic, Jasna; Kruslin, Bozo

    2010-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most frequent malignances in young adult men. The two main histological forms, seminomas and nonseminomas, differ biologically and clinically. pRB protein and its immediate upstream regulator p16INK4a are involved in the RB pathway which is deregulated in most TGCTs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the CDKN2A (p16INK4a) and RB1 tumor suppressor genes in TGCTs. Forty TGCTs (18 seminomas and 22 nonseminomas) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using the restriction fragment length polymorphism or the nucleotide repeat polymorphism method. LOH of the CDKN2A was found in two (6%) out of 34 (85%) informative cases of our total TGCT sample. The observed changes were assigned to two (11%) nonseminomas out of 18 (82%) informative samples. Furthermore, LOH of the RB1 was detected in two (6%) out of 34 (85%) informative cases of our total TGCT sample. Once again, the observed changes were assigned to two (10.5%) nonseminomas out of 19 (86%) informative samples. Both LOHs of the CDKN2A were found in nonseminomas with a yolk sac tumor component, and both LOHs of the RB1 were found in nonseminomas with an embryonal carcinoma component. The higher incidence of observed LOH in nonseminomas may provide a clue to their invasive behavior

  7. Culturing on Wharton's jelly extract delays mesenchymal stem cell senescence through p53 and p16INK4a/pRb pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haojie; Chen, Guanghui; Liu, Jiejie; Ti, Dongdong; Zhao, Yali; Xu, Shenjun; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great therapeutic potential. However, MSCs undergo replication senescence during the in vitro expansion process. Wharton's jelly from the human umbilical cord harbors a large number of MSCs. In this study, we hypothesized that Wharton's jelly would be beneficial for in vitro expansion of MSCs. Wharton's jelly extract (WJEs), which is mainly composed of extracellular matrix and cytokines, was prepared as coating substrate. Human MSCs were isolated and cultured on WJE-coated plates. Although the proliferation capacity of cells was not augmented by WJE in early phase culture, adynamic growth in late-phase culture was clearly reduced, suggesting that the replicative senescence of MSCs was efficiently slowed by WJE. This was confirmed by β-galactosidase staining and telomere length measurements of MSCs in late-phase culture. In addition, the decreased differentiation ability of MSCs after long-term culture was largely ameliorated by WJE. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), p53, and p16INK4a/pRb expression increased with passaging. Analysis at the molecular level revealed that WJE-based culture efficiently suppressed the enhancement of intracellular ROS, p53, and p16INK4a/pRb in MSCs. These data demonstrated that WJE provided an ideal microenvironment for MSCs culture expansion in vitro preserved MSC properties by delaying MSCs senescence, and allowed large numbers of MSCs to be obtained for basic research and clinical therapies.

  8. Expression Analysis of p16, c-Myc, and mSin3A in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer by Computer Aided Scoring and Analysis (CASA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaninejad, Arash; Estiar, Mehrdad Asghari; Gill, Rajbir K; Shih, Joanna H; Hewitt, Stephen; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Fukuoka, Junya; Shilo, Konstantin; Shakoori, Abbas; Jen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) of tissue microarray (TMA) slides enables large sets of tissue samples to be analyzed simultaneously on a single slide. However, manual evaluation of small cores on a TMA slide is time consuming and error prone. We describe a computer aided scoring and analysis (CASA) method to allow facile and reliable scoring of IHC staining using TMA containing 300 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. In the two previous published papers utilizing our TMA slides of lung cancer we examined 18 proteins involved in the chromatin machinery. We developed our study using more proteins of the chromatin complex and several transcription factors that facilitate the chromatin machinery. Then, a total of 78 antibodies were evaluated by CASA to derive a normalized intensity value that correlated with the overall staining status of the targeting protein. The intensity values for TMA cores were then examined for association to clinical variables and predictive significance individually and with other factors. RESULTs: Using our TMA, the intensity of several protein pairs were significantly correlated with an increased risk of death in NSCLC. These included c-Myc with p16, mSin3A with p16 and c-Myc with mSinA. Predictive values of these pairs remained significant when evaluated based on standard IHC scores. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of CASA as a valuable tool for systematic assessment of TMA slides to identify potential predictive biomarkers using a large set of primary human tissues.

  9. Imunolocalização das proteínas dos genes supressores de tumores TP53 e p16CDKN2 no front invasivo do carcinoma epidermóide de cavidade bucal Immunolocalization of TP53 and p16CDKN2 tumour suppressor genes proteins in invasive front of oral epidermoid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Maurício Batista De-Paula

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A carcinogênese bucal é um processo multipassos no qual eventos genéticos promovem o rompimento de vias regulatórias normais que controlam funções celulares básicas. O carcinoma epidermóide de cavidade bucal (CECB surge como conseqüência de múltiplos eventos moleculares induzidos pelos efeitos de vários carcinógenos influenciados por fatores ambientais contra um quadro de resistência ou suscetibilidade herdada geneticamente. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a importância clínica e morfológica da imunoexpressão das proteínas p53 e p16 na região do front invasivo de uma série de 35 casos rotineiramente processados de CECB. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Amostras de CECB primários tratados exclusivamente por cirurgia foram investigadas. O sistema TNM foi empregado para o estadiamento clínico dos pacientes. Para a gradação morfológica das lesões foi adotado o sistema de gradação do front invasivo. A técnica de imuno-histoquímica foi realizada nas lesões fixadas em formalina tamponada a 10% e emblocadas em parafina para identificação das proteínas p53 e p16. As contagens foram realizadas e submetidas a tratamentos estatísticos específicos. RESULTADOS: As taxas de imunolocalização para as proteínas p53 e p16 foram de 63% e 66%, respectivamente, nas 35 amostras de carcinoma estudadas. Não houve relação entre as expressões das proteínas p53 e p16 com os parâmetros clínico-morfológicos analisados. Não houve correlação entre a expressão imuno-histoquímica das proteínas p53/p16. CONCLUSÃO: A expressão das proteínas p53 e p16 não influenciou os parâmetros clínico-morfológicos analisados neste estudo e aparentemente não representa base molecular para o significado biológico da região do front invasivo tumoral. A ausência de forte correlação entre as expressões imuno-histoquímicas das proteínas p53 e p16 sugere que as mesmas podem participar de atividade biológicas do controle do ciclo celular por

  10. Are adjunctive markers useful in routine cervical cancer screening? Application of p16(INK4a) and HPV-PCR on ThinPrep samples with histological follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schledermann, D; Andersen, B T; Bisgaard, K

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate 1) the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of p16(INK4a) as a marker for high-grade cervical lesions, 2) the results of a real-time polymerase chain reaction detecting high-risk human papillomavirus, and 3) the interobserver variability of the p16(INK...

  11. KRAS Mutant Status, p16 and β-catenin Expression May Predict Local Recurrence in Patients Who Underwent Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEMS) for Stage I Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Michail; Moorhead, Jane; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Bjarnason, Ingvar; Haji, Amyn; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas

    2016-10-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is emerging as an alternative treatment for rectal cancer Stage I. There remains a risk of local recurrence. The Aim of the study was to study the effect of biomarkers in local recurrence for Stage I rectal cancer following TEMS plus or minus radiotherapy. This is a case control study where we compared 10 early rectal cancers that had recurred, against 19 cases with no recurrence, total 29 patients (age=28.25-86.87, mean age=67.92 years, SD=14.91, Male, N=18, Female, N=11). All patients underwent TEMS for radiological Stage I rectal cancer (yT1N0M0 or yT2N0M0) established with combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endorectal ultrasound. We prospectively collected all data on tumour histology, morphological features, as well as follow-up parameters. Molecular analysis was performed to identify their status on BRAF, KRAS, p16 O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and β-catenin. Out of 29 specimens analyzed, 19 were KRAS wild type (65.9%) and 10 mutant (34.5%). Recurrence of the tumour was noted in 10 cases (34.5%) from which 60% were pT1 (N=6) and 40% pT2 (N=4). There was a statistically significant association between KRAS mutant status and local recurrence (N=6, p=0.037). P16 expression greater than 5% (mean=10.8%, min=0, max=95) is linked with earlier recurrence within 11.70 months (N=7, p=0.004). Membranous β-catenin expression (N=12, 48%) was also related with KRAS mutant status (p=0.006) but not with survival (p>0.05). BRAF gene was found to be wild type in all cases tested (N=23). KRAS/p16/β-catenin could be used as a combined biomarker for prediction of local recurrence and stratification of the risk for further surgery. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Expressão de p53, p16 E COX-2 em carcinoma escamoso de esôfago e associação histopatológica p53, p16 E COX-2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and histopathological association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Paz Danezi Felin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O câncer de esôfago representa cerca de 2% dos tumores malignos e a terceira causa mais comum de câncer do trato gastrointestinal. A associação do prognóstico do câncer de esôfago com alguns marcadores imunoistoquímicos, como as proteínas p53, p16 e a ciclooxigenase 2 (COX-2 tem sido relatada. A detecção de marcadores moleculares através de imunoistoquímica pode ser utilizada para avaliação prognóstica. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a associação entre a expressão das proteínas p53, p16 e a COX-2 com o estádio do carcinoma escamoso de esôfago. MÉTODOS: Foram analisadas 31 amostras de ressecção cirúrgica por esofagectomia diagnosticadas como carcinoma de células escamosas de esôfago e 31 amostras não-tumorais referentes a cada caso. Realizou-se a revisão histopatológica e o estádio pTNM. Amostras tumorais e não-tumorais adjacentes foram submetidas a análise imunoistoquímica para avaliar o conteúdo das proteínas p53, p16 e COX-2. Foi considerada positiva a expressão nuclear para p53 em quantidade igual ou superior a 10,00% das células e presença da expressão citoplasmática de acordo com três escores (1, 2, 3 de intensidade (leve, moderada, acentuada de imunocoloração para COX-2. RESULTADOS: Em área tumoral, as análises revelaram 48,38% de positividade para p53, 16,12% de positividade para p16, e 100,00% de positividade escores 1+, 2+ ou 3+ para COX-2. No entanto, quando se avaliou possível relação da expressão destes marcadores com o estádio, apenas a COX-2, escore 3+ intensidade acentuada mostraram associação significativa. CONCLUSÃO: O presente estudo demonstrou que existe relação positiva entre a expressão de COX-2, escore 3+ e estádio mais avançado no carcinoma de esôfago.BACKGROUND: The esophageal carcinoma represents about 2% of malignant tumors and is the third most common cause of gastrointestinal cancer. The correlation between immunohistochemistry markers, such as p53, p16

  13. Expressão de p53, p16 E COX-2 em carcinoma escamoso de esôfago e associação histopatológica p53, p16 E COX-2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and histopathological association

    OpenAIRE

    Izabella Paz Danezi Felin; Ivana Grivicich; Carlos Roberto Felin; Andrea Regner; Adriana Brondani da Rocha

    2008-01-01

    RACIONAL: O câncer de esôfago representa cerca de 2% dos tumores malignos e a terceira causa mais comum de câncer do trato gastrointestinal. A associação do prognóstico do câncer de esôfago com alguns marcadores imunoistoquímicos, como as proteínas p53, p16 e a ciclooxigenase 2 (COX-2) tem sido relatada. A detecção de marcadores moleculares através de imunoistoquímica pode ser utilizada para avaliação prognóstica. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a associação entre a expressão das proteínas p53, p16 e a...

  14. Genome-wide association study of multiple congenital heart disease phenotypes identifies a susceptibility locus for atrial septal defect at chromosome 4p16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Heather J.; Bentham, Jamie; Topf, Ana; Zelenika, Diana; Heath, Simon; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Cosgrove, Catherine; Blue, Gillian; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Breckpot, Jeroen; Soemedi, Rachel; Martin, Ruairidh; Rahman, Thahira J.; Hall, Darroch; van Engelen, Klaartje; Moorman, Antoon F.M.; Zwinderman, Aelko H; Barnett, Phil; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Varro, Andras; George, Alfred L.; dos Remedios, Christobal; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Bezzina, Connie R.; O’Sullivan, John; Gewillig, Marc; Bu’Lock, Frances A.; Winlaw, David; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Brook, J. David; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Mital, Seema; Postma, Alex V.; Lathrop, G. Mark; Farrall, Martin; Goodship, Judith A.; Keavney, Bernard D.

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD). Our discovery cohort comprised 1,995 CHD cases and 5,159 controls, and included patients from each of the three major clinical CHD categories (septal, obstructive and cyanotic defects). When all CHD phenotypes were considered together, no regions achieved genome-wide significant association. However, a region on chromosome 4p16, adjacent to the MSX1 and STX18 genes, was associated (P=9.5×10−7) with the risk of ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) in the discovery cohort (N=340 cases), and this was replicated in a further 417 ASD cases and 2520 controls (replication P=5.0×10−5; OR in replication cohort 1.40 [95% CI 1.19-1.65]; combined P=2.6×10−10). Genotype accounted for ~9% of the population attributable risk of ASD. PMID:23708191

  15. Does elimination of planned postoperative radiation to the primary bed in p16-positive, transorally-resected oropharyngeal carcinoma associate with poorer outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Parul; Pipkorn, Patrik; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram A; Haughey, Bruce H

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of our study is to compare oncologic and functional outcomes of p16-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) patients, in the presence and absence of planned radiation to the primary bed following transoral surgery (TOS), stratified by T-classification. Retrospective cohort study of 261, T1-T4, consecutively TOS-treated OPSCC patients. At a median follow-up of 61months, local recurrence (LR) occurred in 6 (2.3%)patients (3 each in T1-T2 and T3-T4 groups), of which 5 had tumors in the tongue base and one in the tonsil. Of patients not receiving planned primary bed radiation, LR occurred in 3% of T1-T2s versus 17% of T3-T4s. In patients with T1-T2 tumors, Absolute Risk Reduction of LR with primary bed radiation was 3.26% (95% CI: -0.37%, 7%); Number Needed to Treat to prevent one LR was 31 (95% CI: 14.5, 271). Absolute Risk Increase for gastrostomy-tube with primary bed radiation was 34.4% (95% CI: 24%, 45%); Number Needed to Harm was 3 (95% CI: 2.2, 4.2), i.e., for every three patients with T1-T2 tumors receiving primary bed radiation, one had a gastrostomy-tube. Elimination of primary bed radiation in margin-negative resected, T1-T2 p16-positive OPSCC was not associated with significant compromise of local control, and correlated with superior swallowing preservation, assessed using gastrostomy rate as a surrogate. Lack of primary bed radiation in T3-T4 tumors associated with significantly increased LR rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oridonin induces apoptosis and senescence in colorectal cancer cells by increasing histone hyperacetylation and regulation of p16, p21, p27 and c-myc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Liu, Feng; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Fang, Yong; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Wu, Ying-Li; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Li, Wei; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Yan-Jie; Guo, Zhu-Ying; Xu, Mang-Hua; Wang, Shi-Ting; Jiang, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Oridonin, a tetracycline diterpenoid compound, has the potential antitumor activities. Here, we evaluate the antitumor activity and action mechanisms of oridonin in colorectal cancer. Effects of oridonin on cell proliferation were determined by using a CCK-8 Kit. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was examined by analyzing subdiploid population and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. Senescent cells were determined by senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity analysis. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine the changes of mRNA of p16, p21, p27 and c-myc. The concomitant changes of protein expression were analyzed with Western blot. Expression of AcH3 and AcH4 were examined by immunofluorescence staining and Western blots. Effects of oridonin on colony formation of SW1116 were examined by Soft Agar assay. The in vivo efficacy of oridonin was detected using a xenograft colorectal cancer model in nude mice. Oridonin induced potent growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, senescence and colony-forming inhibition in three colorectal cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Daily i.p. injection of oridonin (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg) for 28 days significantly inhibited the growth of SW1116 s.c. xenografts in BABL/C nude mice. With western blot and reverse transcription-PCR, we further showed that the antitumor activities of oridonin correlated with induction of histone (H3 and H4) hyperacetylation, activation of p21, p27 and p16, and suppression of c-myc expression. Oridonin possesses potent in vitro and in vivo anti-colorectal cancer activities that correlated with induction of histone hyperacetylation and regulation of pathways critical for maintaining growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest. Therefore, oridonin may represent a novel therapeutic option in colorectal cancer treatment

  17. Sexual behaviour, HPV status and p16INK4a expression in oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas: a case-case comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Sarah; Boros, Samuel; Whiteman, David C; Porceddu, Sandro V; Panizza, Benedict J; Antonsson, Annika

    2018-06-01

    A significant proportion of mucosal squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC; particularly of the oropharynx) are directly attributable to the human papillomavirus (HPV). The increase in the incidence of HPV-related tumours has been postulated to be due to changing sexual practices in the community. We analysed 136 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded squamous cell carcinomas from the oral cavity (n=40) and oropharynx (n=96) recruited from the Princess Alexandra Hospital (Brisbane, Australia). Samples were analysed for the presence of HPV DNA using a combination of mucosal HPV general primer GP+ PCR and sequencing; p 16INK4a expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Each patient completed a questionnaire detailing their lifestyle factors, such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption, marital status, and sexual behaviour and history. The HPV DNA prevalence was 5 % in the oral cavity cancers and 72 % in the oropharyngeal cancers (P<0.0001). HPV-16 was the most commonly detected HPV type (found in 91 % of all HPV-positive tumours). There was a strong correlation between HPV DNA positivity and positive p16 INK4a staining in oropharyngeal tumours (P<0.0001). Having an HPV-related tumour was associated with being married or having been married previously (P=0.046), an increasing number of passionate kissing partners (P=0.046), ever having given oral sex (P=0.0007) and an increasing number of oral sex partners (P=0.0015). This study found a higher prevalence of HPV in oropharyngeal compared to oral cavity tumours, with a strong association being identified between oral sex behaviours and HPV-positive tumours. Further research is needed to establish that vaccines will reduce the transmission and carriage of oropharyngeal HPV infections.

  18. Oridonin induces apoptosis and senescence in colorectal cancer cells by increasing histone hyperacetylation and regulation of p16, p21, p27 and c-myc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ying-Zheng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oridonin, a tetracycline diterpenoid compound, has the potential antitumor activities. Here, we evaluate the antitumor activity and action mechanisms of oridonin in colorectal cancer. Methods Effects of oridonin on cell proliferation were determined by using a CCK-8 Kit. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was examined by analyzing subdiploid population and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. Senescent cells were determined by senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity analysis. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine the changes of mRNA of p16, p21, p27 and c-myc. The concomitant changes of protein expression were analyzed with Western blot. Expression of AcH3 and AcH4 were examined by immunofluorescence staining and Western blots. Effects of oridonin on colony formation of SW1116 were examined by Soft Agar assay. The in vivo efficacy of oridonin was detected using a xenograft colorectal cancer model in nude mice. Results Oridonin induced potent growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, senescence and colony-forming inhibition in three colorectal cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Daily i.p. injection of oridonin (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg for 28 days significantly inhibited the growth of SW1116 s.c. xenografts in BABL/C nude mice. With western blot and reverse transcription-PCR, we further showed that the antitumor activities of oridonin correlated with induction of histone (H3 and H4 hyperacetylation, activation of p21, p27 and p16, and suppression of c-myc expression. Conclusion Oridonin possesses potent in vitro and in vivo anti-colorectal cancer activities that correlated with induction of histone hyperacetylation and regulation of pathways critical for maintaining growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest. Therefore, oridonin may represent a novel therapeutic option in colorectal cancer treatment.

  19. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16INK4A expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan; Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim; Burfeind, Peter; Reichardt, Holger M.; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16 INK4A expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16 INK4A expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16 INK4A expression only, and patients without p16 INK4A expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16 INK4A expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16 INK4A expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16 INK4A expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [de

  20. Expression of EGFR and HPV-associated p16 in head and neck cancer: correlation and influence on prognosis after radiotherapy in 1088 patients from the randomised DAHANCA 5, 6 & 7 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Tramm, Trine

    2009-01-01

    Head and Neck Cancer group (DAHANCA) conducted the nationwide DAHANCA 5, 6& 7 randomised trials, focusing on overcoming the disadvantages of tumour cell hypoxia and accelerated tumour cell proliferation in relation to RT. In the present study 1088 pre-treatment tumour tissues from patients...... tumours had lower expression of EGFR than p16neg tumours. p16 status was found to have major prognostic impact on outcome after RT whereas EGFR-expression had no prognostic implication on its own and did not contribute to a refinement of the prognostic value of p16 status.Presented on behalf of the Danish...

  1. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16{sup INK4A} expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim [University Medical Center, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Burfeind, Peter [University Medical Center, Institute for Human Genetics, Goettingen (Germany); Reichardt, Holger M. [University Medical Center, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, Martin [Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16{sup INK4A} expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16{sup INK4A} expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression only, and patients without p16{sup INK4A} expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16{sup INK4A} expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16{sup INK4A} expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [German] Ein besseres Therapieansprechen von humanen Papillomavirus (HPV)-positiven Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist durch Studien belegt. Weniger Beachtung hat bisher die Relevanz unerwuenschter

  2. Estudo de p27, p21, p16 em epitélio escamoso normal, papiloma escamoso e carcinoma de células escamosas da cavidade oral Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemistry expression of p27, p21WAF/Cip1, and p16INK4a in oral normal epithelium, squamous papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Piazza Queiroz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVO: O tipo de câncer oral mais frequente é o carcinoma de células escamosas, que corresponde a 95% dos casos(9. O papiloma escamoso oral é uma neoplasia benigna normalmente associada à infecção pelo papilomavírus humano (HPV(21. A análise da literatura mostra alterações nos genes reguladores do ciclo celular p27, p21WAF/Cip1 e p16INK4a, porém sem uma definição de seus papéis na carcinogênese oral. O objetivo foi caracterizar imuno-histoquimicamente p27, p21WAF/Cip1 e p16NK4a em epitélio escamoso normal, papilomas escamosos e carcinomas de células escamosas da cavidade oral. MÉTODOS: Imuno-histoquímica para p27, p21WAF/Cip1 e p16NK4a em 32 casos de epitélio escamoso normal, 30 casos de papiloma escamoso e 34 de carcinoma de células escamosas da cavidade oral. RESULTADOS: p27: 97,06% dos casos de carcinoma de células escamosas apresentaram imunopositividade focal. O grupo papiloma escamoso apresentou 33,33% e o grupo controle, 18,75%. p21WAF/Cip1: 100% de imunopositividade focal tanto no grupo controle como no grupo carcinoma de células escamosas, e 90% no grupo papiloma escamoso. p16INK4a: 100% de imunopositividade focal para os grupos controle e papiloma escamoso, e 94% para o grupo carcinoma de células escamosas. CONCLUSÃO: Imuno-histoquimicamente demonstrou-se diferença significativa para p27 quando feita comparação dos grupos controle e papiloma escamoso com o grupo carcinoma de células escamosas. O p21WAF/Cip1 não demonstrou poder de diferenciar os grupos analisados. O p16INK4a apresentou imunopositividade difusa em uma minoria dos casos do grupo carcinoma de células escamosas. O grupo papiloma escamoso se comportou de maneira similar ao grupo controle em relação aos três marcadores.INTRODUCTION: The most frequent type of oral cancer is the squamous cell carcinoma, which corresponds to 95% of the cases(9.The oral squamous papilloma is a benign neoplasia, commonly associated with

  3. CBX7 regulates stem cell-like properties of gastric cancer cells via p16 and AKT-NF-κB-miR-21 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Su-Jie; Zhao, Li-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Zhen-Hua; Hua, Rui-Xi; Wan, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jie-Yun; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Gan, Lu; Sun, Hua-Lin; Dimri, Goberdhan P; Guo, Wei-Jian

    2018-02-08

    Chromobox protein homolog 7 (CBX7), a member of the polycomb group (PcG) family of proteins, is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and cancer progression. PcG family members, such as BMI, Mel-18, and EZH2, are integral constituents of the polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) and have been known to regulate cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. However, the role of other PRCs' constituents such as CBX7 in the regulation of CSC phenotype remains largely elusive. This study was to investigate the role of CBX7 in regulating stem cell-like properties of gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the role of CBX7 in regulating stem cell-like properties of gastric cancer was investigated using sphere formation, Western blot, and xenograft tumor assays. Next, RNA interference and ectopic CBX7 expression were employed to determine the impact of CBX7 on the expression of CSC marker proteins and CSC characteristics. The expression of CBX7, its downstream targets, and stem cell markers were analyzed in gastric stem cell spheres, common cancer cells, and gastric cancer tissues. Finally, the pathways by which CBX7 regulates stem cell-like properties of gastric cancer were explored. We found that CBX7, a constituent of the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), plays an important role in maintaining stem cell-like characteristics of gastric cancer cells via the activation of AKT pathway and the downregulation of p16. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed positive correlations among the expression of CBX7 and phospho-AKT (pAKT), stem cell markers OCT-4, and CD133 in gastric cancer tissues. In addition, CBX7 was found to upregulate microRNA-21 (miR-21) via the activation of AKT-NF-κB pathway, and miR-21 contributes to CBX7-mediated CSC characteristics. CBX7 positively regulates stem cell-like characteristics of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting p16 and activating AKT-NF-κB-miR-21 pathway.

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy of the four tests (p16 immunochemistry, PCR, DNA and RNA In situ Hybridization) to evaluate a Human Papillomavirus infection in head and neck cancers: a cohort of 348 French squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Jérémy; Outh-Gauer, Sophie; Mandavit, Marion; Gasne, Cassandre; Grard, Ophélie; Denize, Thomas; Nervo, Marine; Mirghani, Haïtham; Laccourreye, Ollivier; Bonfils, Pierre; Bruneval, Patrick; Veyer, David; Péré, Hélène; Tartour, Eric; Badoual, Cécile

    2018-04-20

    It is now established that HPV plays a role in the development of a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), notably oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, it is not clear which test one should use to detect HPV in oropharyngeal (OP) and non-OP SCCs. In this study, using 348 HNSCCs (126 OP SCCs and 222 non-OP SCCs), we evaluated diagnostic performances of different HPV tests in OP and non-OP SCCs: PCR, p16 immunostaining, in situ hybridization targeting DNA (DNA-CISH) and RNA (RNA-CISH), combined p16 + DNA-CISH, and combined p16 + RNA-CISH. HPV DNA (PCR) was detected in 26% of all tumors (44% of OP SCCs and 17% of non-OP SCCs). For OP SCCs, RNA-CISH was the most sensitive standalone test (88%), but p16 + RNA-CISH was even more sensitive (95%). Specificities were the same for RNA-CISH and DNA-CISH (97%) but it was better for p16 + RNA-CISH (100%). For non-OP SCCs, all tests had sensitivities below 50%, and RNA-CISH, DNA-CISH and p16 + DNA-CISH had respectively 100%, 97% and 99% specificities. As a standalone test, RNA-CISH is the most performant assay to detect HPV in OP SCCs, and combined p16 + RNA-CISH test slightly improves its performances. However, RNA-CISH has the advantage of being one single test. Like p16 and DNA-CISH, RNA-CISH performances are poor in non-OP SCCs to detect HPV, and combining tests does not improve performances. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Inactivation of the P16INK4/MTS1 gene by a chromosome translocation t(9;14)(p21-22;q11) in an acute lymphoblastic leukemia of B-cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, D; Bernard, O; Della Valle, V; Leblanc, T; Berger, R; Larsen, C J

    1996-02-15

    We have reported previously a preliminary study of a t(9;14)(p21-22; q11) in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This translocation had rearranged the TCRA/D locus on chromosome band 14q11 and the locus encoding the tumor suppressor gene P16INK4/MTS1 (P16) on band 9p21 (D. Duro et al., Oncogene, 11: 21-29, 1995). In the present report, the breakpoints were precisely localized on each chromosome partner. On the 14q- derivative, the sequence derived from chromosome 9 was interrupted at 1.0 kb upstream of the first exon of P16, close to a consensus recombination heptamer, CACTGTG. In addition, the chromosome 14 breakpoint was localized at the end of the TCRD2 (delta 2) segment, and 22 residues with unknown origin were present at the translocation junction. On the 9p+ derivative, chromosome 9 sequences were in continuity with those displaced onto chromosome 14, and the 14q11 breakpoint was located within TCRJA29 segment. These features are consistent with aberrant activity of the TCR gene recombinase complex. Although all three coding exons of P16 were displaced onto the chromosome 14q-derivative, no P16 transcript was detected in the leukemic cells. Because the region spanning the P16 exon 1 was not inactivated by methylation and because the other P16 allele was deleted, the implication is that the chromosome breakpoint was likely to disrupt regulatory elements involved in the normal expression of the gene. As a whole, then, our results show that translocations affecting band 9p21 can participate to the inactivation of P16, thus justifying a systematic survey of translocations of the 9p21 band in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  7. 1.5Mb deletion of chromosome 4p16.3 associated with postnatal growth delay, psychomotor impairment, epilepsy, impulsive behavior and asynchronous skeletal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misceo, D; Barøy, T; Helle, J R; Braaten, O; Fannemel, M; Frengen, E

    2012-10-01

    Several Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome patients have been studied, mouse models for a few candidate genes have been constructed and two WHS critical regions have been postulated, but the molecular basis of the syndrome remains poorly understood. Single gene contributions to phenotypes of microdeletion syndromes have often been based on the study of patients carrying small, atypical deletions. We report a 5-year-old girl harboring an atypical 1.5Mb del4p16.3 and review seven previously published patients carrying a similar deletion. They show a variable clinical presentation and the only consistent feature is post-natal growth delay. However, four of eight patients carry a ring (4), and ring chromosomes in general are associated with growth deficiency. The Greek helmet profile is absent, although a trend towards common dysmorphic features exists. Variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance might play a role in WHS, resulting in difficult clinical diagnosis and challenge in understanding of the genotype/phenotype correlation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunostaining for p16(INK4a) used as a conjunctive tool improves interobserver agreement of the histologic diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, L.C.; Reichert, A.; Oster, A.

    2008-01-01

    The quality of cervical histopathology is critical to cervical cancer prevention, cancer treatment, and research programs. On the basis of the histology results further patient management is determined. However, the diagnostic interpretation of histologic hematoxylin-eosin (H&E)-stained slides is...... immunohistochemistry as an adjunct to conventional H&E-stained specimens thus contributes to a more reproducible diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and may be a valuable aid for the interpretation of cervical histology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4......The quality of cervical histopathology is critical to cervical cancer prevention, cancer treatment, and research programs. On the basis of the histology results further patient management is determined. However, the diagnostic interpretation of histologic hematoxylin-eosin (H&E)-stained slides......) immunohistochemistry may increase the performance of pathologists in diagnosing squamous lesions in cervical punch and cone biopsies. When using a consecutive p 16(INK4a)-stained slide in conjunction to the H&E-stained slide, interobserver agreement between 6 pathologists improved significantly for both cervical punch...

  9. Alterations of tumor suppressor genes (Rb, p16, p27 and p53) and an increased FDG uptake in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Sugio, Kenji; Kuwabara, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    The FDG uptake in lung cancer is considered to reflect the degree of malignancy, while alterations of some tumor suppressor genes are considered to be related to the malignant biological behavior of tumors. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between FDG-PET and alterations in the tumor suppression genes of lung cancer. We examined 28 patients with primary lung cancer who underwent FDG-PET before surgery consisting of 17 patients with adenocarcinoma, 10 with squamous cell carcinoma and 1 with large cell carcinoma. The FDG-PET findings were evaluated based on the standardized uptake value (SUV). Alterations in the tumor suppressor genes, Rb, p16, p27 and p53, were evaluated immunohistochemically. The FDG uptake in lung cancer with alteration in each tumor suppressor gene tended to be higher than in those genes without alterations, although the differences were not significant. In 15 tumors with alterations in either tumor suppressor genes, the FDG uptake was 6.83±3.21. On the other hand, the mean FDG uptake was 1.95 in 2 tumors without alterations in any genes. The difference in the FDG uptake between the 2 groups was statistically significant (p<0.001). In conclusion, the presence of abnormalities in the tumor suppressor genes, which results in an accelerated cell proliferation, is thus considered to increase the FDG uptake in lung cancer. (author)

  10. Expression of MDM2 mRNA, MDM2, P53 and P16 Proteins in Urothelial Lesions in the View of the WHO 4th Edition Guidelines as A Molecular Insight towards Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Hammam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Here we imposed a multimarker molecular panel composed of P53, MDM2 protein & mRNA & P16 with the identification of sensitive and specific cut offs among the Egyptian urothelial carcinomas bilharzial or not emphasize the pathological and molecular classifications, pathways and prognosis as a privilege for adjuvant therapy. METHODS: Three hundred and ten urothelial lesions were pathologically evaluated and grouped as follows: 50 chronic cystitis as benign, 240 urothelial carcinomas and 20 normal bladder tissue as a control. Immunohistochemistry for MDM Protein, P16 & p53 and In Situ Hybridization for MDM2mRNA were done. RESULTS: MDM2mRNA overexpression correlated with low grade low stage non invasive tumors, while P53 > 40% & p16 40% & P16 10% from high grade, high stage invasive urothelial carcinomas (with p53 > 40, p16 40 & p16 < 10%, together with the histopathological features can distinguish in situ urothelial lesions from dysplastic and atypical lesions.

  11. Molecular and clinical description of a girl with a 46,X,t(Y;4)(q11.2;p16)/45,X,der(4)t(Y;4)(q11.2;p16) karyotype and a small cryptic 4p subtelomeric deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahed, Laila; Sismani, Carolina; Ioannides, M; Saleh, Monzer; Koumbaris, G; Kenj, Mazen; Abdallah, Amal; Ayyache, Maya; Patsalis, Philippos

    2008-04-01

    We report on a 13-year-old female with short stature, minimal axillary and pubic hair, no breast development, absence of uterus and ovaries, with the following karyotype on lymphocyte cultures: 46,X,t(Y;4)(q11.2;p16)[40]/45,X,der(4)t(Y;4)(q11.2;p16)[10]. Loss of the small derivative Y chromosome in 20% of the cells was also confirmed in skin fibroblast cultures. FISH analyses using Y centromere, SRY, subtelomere XpYp/XqYq, Y and 4 painting probes, confirmed the cytogenetic findings. High-resolution STS analyses using 40 markers covering the Y chromosome did not identify any deletion on the Y. However, de novo absence of the 4p subtelomeric region was noted by FISH, although this deletion was not revealed by Array-CGH at 1 Mb resolution, the last array clone being 0.35 or 1 Mb distal to the 4p FISH probe. The female phenotype of this patient must be due to the loss of the derivative Y chromosomes in some of her cells, especially the gonads, while the 4p subtelomeric deletion does not seem to contribute to her phenotype. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Common variants on 2p16.1, 6p22.1 and 10q24.32 are associated with schizophrenia in Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H; Yan, H; Li, J; Li, Z; Zhang, X; Ma, Y; Mei, L; Liu, C; Cai, L; Wang, Q; Zhang, F; Iwata, N; Ikeda, M; Wang, L; Lu, T; Li, M; Xu, H; Wu, X; Liu, B; Yang, J; Li, K; Lv, L; Ma, X; Wang, C; Li, L; Yang, F; Jiang, T; Shi, Y; Li, T; Zhang, D; Yue, W

    2017-07-01

    Many schizophrenia susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in European populations. However, until recently, schizophrenia GWASs in non-European populations were limited to small sample sizes and have yielded few loci associated with schizophrenia. To identify genetic risk variations for schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population, we performed a two-stage GWAS of schizophrenia comprising 4384 cases and 5770 controls, followed by independent replications of 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an additional 4339 schizophrenia cases and 7043 controls of Han Chinese ancestry. Furthermore, we conducted additional analyses based on the results in the discovery stage. The combined analysis confirmed evidence of genome-wide significant associations in the Han Chinese population for three loci, at 2p16.1 (rs1051061, in an exon of VRK2, P=1.14 × 10 -12 , odds ratio (OR)=1.17), 6p22.1 (rs115070292 in an intron of GABBR1, P=4.96 × 10 -10 , OR=0.77) and 10q24.32 (rs10883795 in an intron of AS3MT, P=7.94 × 10 -10 , OR=0.87; rs10883765 at an intron of ARL3, P=3.06 × 10 -9 , OR=0.87). The polygenic risk score based on Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS data modestly predicted case-control status in the Chinese population (Nagelkerke R 2 : 1.7% ~5.7%). Our pathway analysis suggested that neurological biological pathways such as GABAergic signaling, dopaminergic signaling, cell adhesion molecules and myelination pathways are involved in schizophrenia. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. Further studies are needed to establish the biological context and potential clinical utility of these findings.

  13. On two patients with and without the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) sharing the same chromosome 4p16.3 specific probe deletion: evidence of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, P; Schmit, J; Van den Berghe, H; Fryns, J P

    1996-07-01

    We report here on phenotype-karyotype correlations in two patients with and without complete features of the WHS but sharing the lack of a specific cosmic probe (D4S96/D4Z1) from 4p16.3. These findings indicate that WHS is true a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in nature and expression.

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of a 1.6-Mb 4p16.3 interstitial microdeletion encompassing FGFRL1 and TACC3 associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome facial dysmorphism and short long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Haploinsufficiency of FGFRL1 and TACC3 at 4p16.3 can be associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate of WHS facial dysmorphism and short long bones. Prenatal diagnosis of facial cleft with short long bones should raise a suspicion of chromosome microdeletion syndromes.

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Squamous Cell Carcinomas Arising From the Oropharynx: Detection of HPV DNA and p16 Immunohistochemistry as Diagnostic and Prognostic Indicators—A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussu, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.bussu.md@gmail.com [Institute of Otolaryngology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Sali, Michela [Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Gallus, Roberto [Institute of Otolaryngology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Petrone, Gianluigi; Zannoni, Gian Franco [Institute of Histopathology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Autorino, Rosa; Dinapoli, Nicola [Institute of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Santangelo, Rosaria [Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Vellone, Valerio Gaetano [Institute of Histopathology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Graziani, Cristina [Institute of Otolaryngology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Miccichè, Francesco [Institute of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Almadori, Giovanni; Galli, Jacopo [Institute of Otolaryngology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Delogu, Giovanni; Sanguinetti, Maurizio [Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); Rindi, Guido [Institute of Histopathology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli, Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection is associated with oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and is likely the cause of the reported increase in disease incidence. We evaluated the prevalence of HPV infection and the reliability of different diagnostic tools using primary tumor samples from a cohort of 50 patients. Methods and Materials: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples were collected from all 50 consecutive primary oropharyngeal SCC patients who were enrolled in the study; fresh tumor samples were available in 22 cases. NucliSENS EasyQ HPVv1 was used for RNA, and Digene Hybrid Capture-2(HC2) was used for DNA detection. p16 Expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in FPPE specimens. Results: Based on the DNA detection assay on FFPE samples, the frequency of high-risk HPV infection was 32%. The agreement rate between HPV RNA and HPV DNA detection in fresh samples was 100%. The agreement rate between p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the detection of HPV DNA in the FFPE samples was fair but not excellent (κ = 0.618). HPV DNA detection was highly significant, as measured by disease-specific survival and determined using a Wilcoxon test (P=.001). p16 IHC also exhibited a prognostic value but with a lower statistical significance (P=.0475). The detection of HPV DNA, but not p16 IHC, was also significantly correlated with locoregional control (P=.0461). Conclusion: Diagnostic methods based on the detection of HPV nucleic acids appear to be more reliable and objective because they do not require reading by a trained histopathologist. Furthermore, the detection of HPV DNA exhibits an improved correlation with survival, and therefore appears definitely more reliable than p16 IHC for routine use in clinical practice.

  16. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Squamous Cell Carcinomas Arising From the Oropharynx: Detection of HPV DNA and p16 Immunohistochemistry as Diagnostic and Prognostic Indicators—A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussu, Francesco; Sali, Michela; Gallus, Roberto; Petrone, Gianluigi; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Autorino, Rosa; Dinapoli, Nicola; Santangelo, Rosaria; Vellone, Valerio Gaetano; Graziani, Cristina; Miccichè, Francesco; Almadori, Giovanni; Galli, Jacopo; Delogu, Giovanni; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rindi, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection is associated with oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and is likely the cause of the reported increase in disease incidence. We evaluated the prevalence of HPV infection and the reliability of different diagnostic tools using primary tumor samples from a cohort of 50 patients. Methods and Materials: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples were collected from all 50 consecutive primary oropharyngeal SCC patients who were enrolled in the study; fresh tumor samples were available in 22 cases. NucliSENS EasyQ HPVv1 was used for RNA, and Digene Hybrid Capture-2(HC2) was used for DNA detection. p16 Expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in FPPE specimens. Results: Based on the DNA detection assay on FFPE samples, the frequency of high-risk HPV infection was 32%. The agreement rate between HPV RNA and HPV DNA detection in fresh samples was 100%. The agreement rate between p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the detection of HPV DNA in the FFPE samples was fair but not excellent (κ = 0.618). HPV DNA detection was highly significant, as measured by disease-specific survival and determined using a Wilcoxon test (P=.001). p16 IHC also exhibited a prognostic value but with a lower statistical significance (P=.0475). The detection of HPV DNA, but not p16 IHC, was also significantly correlated with locoregional control (P=.0461). Conclusion: Diagnostic methods based on the detection of HPV nucleic acids appear to be more reliable and objective because they do not require reading by a trained histopathologist. Furthermore, the detection of HPV DNA exhibits an improved correlation with survival, and therefore appears definitely more reliable than p16 IHC for routine use in clinical practice

  17. Inactivation of p16INK4a, with retention of pRB and p53/p21cip1 function, in human MRC5 fibroblasts that overcome a telomere-independent crisis during immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lisa M; James, Alexander; Schuller, Christine E; Brce, Jesena; Lock, Richard B; Mackenzie, Karen L

    2004-10-15

    Recent investigations, including our own, have shown that specific strains of fibroblasts expressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) have an extended lifespan, but are not immortal. We previously demonstrated that hTERT-transduced MRC5 fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC5hTERTs) bypassed senescence but eventually succumbed to a second mortality barrier (crisis). In the present study, 67 MRC5hTERT clones were established by limiting dilution of a mass culture. Whereas 39/67 clones had an extended lifespan, all 39 extended lifespan clones underwent crisis. 11 of 39 clones escaped crisis and were immortalized. There was no apparent relationship between the fate of clones at crisis and the level of telomerase activity. Telomeres were hyperextended in the majority of the clones analyzed. There was no difference in telomere length of pre-crisis compared with post-crisis and immortal clones, indicating that hyperextended telomeres were conducive for immortalization and confirming that crisis was independent of telomere length. Immortalization of MRC5hTERT cells was associated with repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4a and up-regulation of pRB. However, the regulation of pRB phosphorylation and the response of the p53/p21cip1/waf1 pathway were normal in immortal cells subject to genotoxic stress. Overexpression of oncogenic ras failed to de-repress p16INK4a in immortal cells. Furthermore, expression of ras enforced senescent-like growth arrest in p16INK4a-positive, but not p16INK4a-negative MRC5hTERT cells. Immortal cells expressing ras formed small, infrequent colonies in soft agarose, but were non-tumorigenic. Overall, these results implicate the inactivation of p16INK4a as a critical event for overcoming telomere-independent crisis, immortalizing MRC5 fibroblasts and overcoming ras-induced premature senescence.

  18. SM22α-induced activation of p16INK4a/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of γ-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan; Paik, Sang Gi; Cho, Eun Wie; Kim, In Gyu

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → SM22α overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of γ-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. → SM22α overexpression elevates p16 INK4a followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21 WAF1/Cip1 pathway. → SM22α-induced MT-1G activates p16 INK4a /pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22α) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22α overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22α overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of γ-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 μg/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21 WAF1/Cip1 induction or p16 INK4a /retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22α overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16 INK4a followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21 WAF1/Cip1 pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22α overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16 INK4a /pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22α modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16 INK4a /pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22α are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  19. A pilot study to compare the detection of HPV-16 biomarkers in salivary oral rinses with tumour p16INK4a expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Ryan C.; Lim, Yenkai; Frazer, Ian H.; Wan, Yunxia; Perry, Christopher; Jones, Lee; Lambie, Duncan; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-01-01

    Human papilloma virus-16 (HPV-16) infection is a major risk factor for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), in particular oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Current techniques for assessing the HPV-16 status in HNSCC include the detection of HPV-16 DNA and p16 INK4a expression in tumor tissues. When tumors originate from hidden anatomical sites, this method can be challenging. A non-invasive and cost-effective alternative to biopsy is therefore desirable for HPV-16 detection especially within a community setting to screen at-risk individuals. The present study compared detection of HPV-16 DNA and RNA in salivary oral rinses with tumor p16 INK4a status, in 82 HNSCC patients using end-point and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 42 patients with p16 INK4a -positive tumours, 39 (sensitivity = 92.9 %, PPV = 100 % and NPV = 93 %) had oral rinse samples with detectable HPV-16 DNA, using end-point and quantitative PCR. No HPV-16 DNA was detected in oral rinse samples from 40 patients with p16 INK4a negative tumours, yielding a test specificity of 100 %. For patients with p16 INK4a positive tumours, HPV-16 mRNA was detected using end-point reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) in 24/40 (sensitivity = 60 %, PPV = 100 % and NPV = 71 %), and using quantitative RT-PCR in 22/40 (sensitivity = 55 %, PPV = 100 % and NPV = 69 %). No HPV-16 mRNA was detected in oral rinse samples from the p16 INK4a -negative patients, yielding a specificity of 100 %. We demonstrate that the detection of HPV-16 DNA in salivary oral rinse is indicative of HPV status in HNSCC patients and can potentially be used as a diagnostic tool in addition to the current methods. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2217-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  1. Expressão de p53, p16 E COX-2 em carcinoma escamoso de esôfago e associação histopatológica

    OpenAIRE

    Felin,Izabella Paz Danezi; Grivicich,Ivana; Felin,Carlos Roberto; Regner,Andrea; Rocha,Adriana Brondani da

    2008-01-01

    RACIONAL: O câncer de esôfago representa cerca de 2% dos tumores malignos e a terceira causa mais comum de câncer do trato gastrointestinal. A associação do prognóstico do câncer de esôfago com alguns marcadores imunoistoquímicos, como as proteínas p53, p16 e a ciclooxigenase 2 (COX-2) tem sido relatada. A detecção de marcadores moleculares através de imunoistoquímica pode ser utilizada para avaliação prognóstica. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a associação entre a expressão das proteínas p53, p16 e a...

  2. Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization and p16/Ki67 Dual Staining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Specimens: Correlation with HPV-DNA Test, E6/E7 mRNA Test, and Potential Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Zappacosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HPV-DNA test and E6/E7 mRNA analyses remain the current standard for the confirmation of human papillomavirus (HPV infections in cytological specimens, no universally adopted techniques exist for the detection of HPV in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Particularly, in routine laboratories, molecular assays are still time-consuming and would require a high level of expertise. In this study, we investigated the possible use of a novel HPV tyramide-based chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH technology to locate HPV on tissue specimens. Then, we evaluate the potential usefulness of p16INK4a/Ki-67 double stain on histological samples, to identify cervical cells expressing HPV E6/E7 oncogenes. In our series, CISH showed a clear signal in 95.2% of the specimens and reached a sensitivity of 86.5%. CISH positivity always matched with HPV-DNA positivity, while 100% of cases with punctated signal joined with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+. p16/Ki67 immunohistochemistry gave an interpretable result in 100% of the cases. The use of dual stain significantly increased the agreement between pathologists, which reached 100%. Concordance between dual stain and E6/E7 mRNA test was 89%. In our series, both CISH and p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain demonstrated high grade of performances. In particular, CISH would help to distinguish episomal from integrated HPV, in order to allow conclusions regarding the prognosis of the lesion, while p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain approach would confer a high level of standardization to the diagnostic procedure.

  3. Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization and p16/Ki67 Dual Staining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Specimens: Correlation with HPV-DNA Test, E6/E7 mRNA Test, and Potential Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, Roberta; Colasante, Antonella; Viola, Patrizia; D'Antuono, Tommaso; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Capanna, Serena; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Rosini, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Although HPV-DNA test and E6/E7 mRNA analyses remain the current standard for the confirmation of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in cytological specimens, no universally adopted techniques exist for the detection of HPV in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Particularly, in routine laboratories, molecular assays are still time-consuming and would require a high level of expertise. In this study, we investigated the possible use of a novel HPV tyramide-based chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) technology to locate HPV on tissue specimens. Then, we evaluate the potential usefulness of p16INK4a/Ki-67 double stain on histological samples, to identify cervical cells expressing HPV E6/E7 oncogenes. In our series, CISH showed a clear signal in 95.2% of the specimens and reached a sensitivity of 86.5%. CISH positivity always matched with HPV-DNA positivity, while 100% of cases with punctated signal joined with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). p16/Ki67 immunohistochemistry gave an interpretable result in 100% of the cases. The use of dual stain significantly increased the agreement between pathologists, which reached 100%. Concordance between dual stain and E6/E7 mRNA test was 89%. In our series, both CISH and p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain demonstrated high grade of performances. In particular, CISH would help to distinguish episomal from integrated HPV, in order to allow conclusions regarding the prognosis of the lesion, while p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain approach would confer a high level of standardization to the diagnostic procedure. PMID:24369532

  4. Detection of HPV and the role of p16INK4A overexpression as a surrogate marker for the presence of functional HPV oncoprotein E7 in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lardon Filip

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the well-recognized etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, a potential role of HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis has been suggested. For that reason, the aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of HPV DNA in colorectal carcinomas (CRC and to study overexpression of p16INK4A as a marker for the presence of an active HPV oncoprotein E7. These findings were correlated with clinical and pathological prognostic factors of CRC. Methods The presence of HPV was assessed using a multiplex PCR system of 10 non-biotinylated primers. The amplified fragments of HPV positive samples were further analyzed by a highly sensitive, broad spectrum SPF10 PCR and subsequently genotyped using reverse hybridization in a line probe assay. P16INK4A protein expression was investigated in a subset of 90 (30 HPV positive and 60 HPV negative CRC samples by immunohistochemistry. Results HPV DNA was found in 14.2% of the CRC samples with HPV16 as the most prevalent type. No significant differences in clinical and pathological variables were found between HPV positive and negative CRCs, except for age. HPV positive patients were significantly younger (p = 0.05. There was no significant correlation between the presence of HPV and overexpression of p16INK4A (p = 0.325. Conclusions In conclusion, the presence of oncogenic HPV DNA in a small cohort of CRC samples may suggest that HPV may be involved in the carcinogenesis of some CRC. However, contrary to what has been observed in head and neck squamous cell cancer and cancer of the uterine cervix, p16INK4A does not seem to be a surrogate marker for an active HPV infection in CRC. Therefore, further functional analyses are necessary to elucidate the role of HPV in CRC.

  5. Duplication 4p and deletion 4p (Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome) due to complementary gametes from a 3:1 segregation of a maternal balanced t(4;13)(p16;q11) translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, S S; Corbani, M; Andrade, J A D; Smith, M de A C; Brunoni, D; Melaragno, M I

    2004-08-30

    We present clinical and cytogenetic data on a family with a t(4;13)(p16;q11) translocation present in four generations. The balanced translocation resulted in one individual with monosomy 4p and one individual with trisomy 4p, due to 3:1 segregation. The male patient with trisomy 4p was fertile and transmitted the extra chromosome to his daughter. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Disruptive cell cycle regulation involving epigenetic downregulation of Cdkn2a (p16Ink4a) in early-stage liver tumor-promotion facilitating liver cell regeneration in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Takuma; Wang, Liyun; Yafune, Atsunori; Kimura, Masayuki; Ohishi, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle aberration was immunohistochemically examined in relation to preneoplastic liver cell foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) at early stages of tumor-promotion in rats with thioacetamide (TAA), a hepatocarcinogen facilitating liver cell regeneration. Immunoexpression of p16 Ink4a following exposure to other hepatocarcinogens/promoters and its DNA methylation status were also analyzed during early and late tumor-promotion stages. GST-P + liver cell foci increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis when compared with surrounding liver cells. In concordance with GST-P + foci, checkpoint proteins at G 1 /S (p21 Cip1 , p27 Kip1 and p16 Ink4a ) and G 2 /M (phospho-checkpoint kinase 1, Cdc25c and phospho-Wee1) were either up- or downregulated. Cellular distribution within GST-P + foci was either increased or decreased with proteins related to G 2 -M phase or DNA damage (topoisomerase IIα, phospho-histone H2AX, phospho-histone H3 and Cdc2). In particular, p16 Ink4a typically downregulated in GST-P + foci and regenerative nodules at early tumor-promotion stage with hepatocarcinogens facilitating liver cell regeneration and in neoplastic lesions at late tumor-promotion stage with hepatocarcinogens/promoters irrespective of regenerating potential. Hypermethylation at exon 2 of Cdkn2a was detected at both early- and late-stages. Thus, diverse disruptive expression of G 1 /S and G 2 /M proteins, which allows for clonal selection of GST-P + foci, results in the acquisition of multiple aberrant phenotypes to disrupt checkpoint function. Moreover, increased DNA-damage responses within GST-P + foci may be the signature of genetic alterations. Intraexonic hypermethylation may be responsible for p16 Ink4a -downregulation, which facilitates cell cycle progression in early preneoplastic lesions produced by repeated cell regeneration and late-stage neoplastic lesions irrespective of the carcinogenic mechanism.

  7. Comparative modeling and docking studies of p16ink4/Cyclin D1/Rb pathway genes in lung cancer revealed functionally interactive residue of RB1 and its functional partner E2F1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    e Zahra Syeda Naqsh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the major cause of mortality worldwide. Major signalling pathways that could play significant role in lung cancer therapy include (1 Growth promoting pathways (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Ras/ PhosphatidylInositol 3-Kinase (2 Growth inhibitory pathways (p53/Rb/P14ARF, STK11 (3 Apoptotic pathways (Bcl-2/Bax/Fas/FasL. Insilico strategy was implemented to solve the mystery behind selected lung cancer pathway by applying comparative modeling and molecular docking studies. Results YASARA [v 12.4.1] was utilized to predict structural models of P16-INK4 and RB1 genes using template 4ELJ-A and 1MX6-B respectively. WHAT CHECK evaluation tool demonstrated overall quality of predicted P16-INK4 and RB1 with Z-score of −0.132 and −0.007 respectively which showed a strong indication of reliable structure prediction. Protein-protein interactions were explored by utilizing STRING server, illustrated that CDK4 and E2F1 showed strong interaction with P16-INK4 and RB1 based on confidence score of 0.999 and 0.999 respectively. In order to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the complex interactions between candidate genes with their functional interactors, GRAMM-X server was used. Protein-protein docking investigation of P16-INK4 revealed four ionic bonds illustrating Arg47, Arg80,Cys72 and Met1 residues as actively participating in interactions with CDK4 while docking results of RB1 showed four hydrogen bonds involving Glu864, Ser567, Asp36 and Arg861 residues which interact strongly with its respective functional interactor E2F1. Conclusion This research may provide a basis for understanding biological insights of P16-INK4 and RB1 proteins which will be helpful in future to design a suitable drug to inhibit the disease pathogenesis as we have determined the interacting amino acids which can be targeted in order to design a ligand in-vitro to propose a drug for clinical trials. Protein -protein docking of

  8. Analysis of Human Papilloma Virus 16/18 DNA and its Correlation with p16 Expression in Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma in North-Eastern India: A Chromogenic in-situ Hybridization Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitani, Ankit Kumar; Mishra, Jaya; Shunyu, N. Brian; Khonglah, Yookarin; Medhi, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is quite high in North Eastern India. Apart from the traditional risk factors like tobacco and alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus (HPV) is now considered an established causative agent. These HPV related tumour have a clinico-pathological profile that is quite divergent from conventional non-HPV related tumours. Association of HPV in oral cancers has not been explored in north-east India. Materials and Methods Thirty-one patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) on treatment from October 2010 to January 2013 were included in the study. Patients who received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. HPV 16/18 DNA was evaluated using Chromogenic in-situ Hybridization (CISH). Presence of nuclear signals was taken as positive HPV expression. p16 was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and was considered positive if ≥ 80% of the tumour cells showed strong and diffuse nuclear/cytoplasmic immunostaining. The results were analysed using Fisher exact test and confidence interval was calculated where required. Results The study group age ranged from 30 to 80 years (median age- 54.2 years). The most common site was gum, with well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma being the most common histology. HPV 16/18 DNA was positive in 29% (95% CI: 13.03% - 44.97%) cases and had a clear tendency towards statistical significance with non-smoker cases (p=0.05), lymph node metastasis (p=0.05) and a significant correlation with p16 overexpression (p=0.04). There was no significant correlation with other clinico-pathological parameters. Conclusion HPV 16/18 is associated with OSCC, commonly seen among non-smokers and may be related to nodal metastasis. So, HPV may be used as a prognostic factor in OSCC and p16 may be considered as a surrogate marker for HPV. PMID:26435951

  9. P16.29 Malignant craniopharyngioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, E.; Kilic, K.; Ozdemir, N.; Gunver, F.; Isik, S.; Can, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Malignant transformation of craniopharyngioma has rarely been described. In this article, we report a case of 28th malignant craniopharyngioma ever mentioned in English literature. Materials and Methods: We performed a PUBMED, HUBMED, BAU Library Database and Ovid search on malignant craniopharyngiomas and identified 27 reported cases. CASE DESCRIPTION: 44 years old female patient was diagnosed with craniopharyngioma two years ago and underwent surgical resection of a typical craniopharyngioma, the histopathological result was adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma of Grade I. There was no malignancy. One year ago cavernous sinus invasion has been detected and gamma knife irradiation has been made. At admission she was blind in the right eye for the last six months and the vision was diminished in the left eye for a month. The MRI showed that nasal cavity was full of tumor, that the clivus was almost completely destructed and that orbita and maxillary sinus were also invaded. Firstly the ENT surgeons debulked the tumor via transmaxillary route and then the transcranial approach allowed only a subtotal removal due to a profuse bleeding. The histopatological examination showed malignant tumoral infiltration rich in cells with many mitoses. The patient died two years later. CONCLUSION: The relevant literature of malignant craniopharyngioma is reviewed and discussed. The surgeon must be aware that total removal of a malignant craniopharyngioma can be hazardous because of intractable bleedings occurring during surgery.

  10. Involvement of Bmi-1 gene in the development of gastrointestinal stromal tumor by regulating p16Ink4A/p14ARF gene expressions: An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-Li; Wu, Jiang-Hong; Hong, Cai; Wang, Ya-Nong; Zhou, Ye; Long, Zi-Wen; Zhou, Ying; Qin, Hai-Shu

    2017-12-01

    This study was conducted in order to explore the role that Bmi-1 plays during the development of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) by regulation of the p16 Ink4A and p14 ARF expressions. Eighty-six patients diagnosed with GIST were selected to take part in this experiment. The Bmi-1 protein expressions in GIST and adjacent normal tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry and further analyzed by using photodensitometry. To monitor and track the progression of the GIST, a 3-year follow-up was conducted for all affected patients. After cell transfection, the GIST cells were assigned into the control group (without transfection), the negative control (NC) group (transfected with Bmi-1-Scramble plasmid), and the Bmi-1 shRNA group (transfected with the pcDNA3.1-Bmi-1 shRNA plasmid). Protein and mRNA expressions collected from Bmi-1, p16 lnk4A , P14 ARF , cyclin D1, and CDK4 were measured using both the RT-qPCR and western blotting methods Cell senescence was assessed and obtained by using the β-Galactosidase (β-Gal) activity assay. The use of a Soft agar colony formation assay and CCK-8 assay were performed in order to detect the cell growth and subsequent proliferation. Cell invasion and migration were analyzed using the Transwell assay and scratch test. Bmi-1 in the GIST tissues was found to be significantly higher and the p16 lnk4A and P14 ARF expressions were lower than those in the adjacent normal tissues. Bmi-1 was negatively correlated with p16 lnk4A and P14 ARF expressions according to the correlation analysis. Bmi-1 expression was associated with the TNM stage, postoperative recurrence, metastasis, tumor size, and the 5-year survival rate. Area under ROC curve was calculated at 0.884, and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Bmi-1 predicting the GIST were 67.44%, 97.67%, and 65.12%, respectively. Patients exhibiting a high Bmi-1 expression in the GIST tissues had lower survival rates than those with low Bmi-1 expression. In comparison with

  11. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  12. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism...... of a geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. InfoAmazonia is defined as a digitally created map-space within which journalistic practice can be seen as dynamic, performative interactions between journalists, ecosystems, space, and species...

  13. A expressão da proteína p16 e herpes simples vírus tipo 2 em lesões pré-neoplásicas e neoplásicas do colo do útero

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo,Mila de Moura Behar Pontremoli; Silveira,Gustavo Py Gomes da; Zettler,Cláudio Galeano

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: demonstrar a expressão de biomarcadores, detectados por técnicas de imunohistoquímica, em tecidos sadios, lesões pré-neoplásicas e neoplásicas do colo do útero. MÉTODOS: para avaliação da reatividade imunohistoquímica de tecidos do colo do útero ao p16 e ao herpes simples vírus tipo 2 (HSV-2), foram avaliadas 187 amostras de lesões intra-epiteliais de baixo grau (LIE-BG) e lesões intra-epiteliais de alto grau (LIE-AG) e carcinoma do colo do útero, e comparadas com grupo de pacientes...

  14. The prognostic implication of the expression of EGFR, p53, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and p16 in primary locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma cases: a tissue microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Monica Charlotte; Vidyasagar, M S; Fernandes, Donald; Guddattu, Vasudev; Mathew, Mary; Shergill, Ankur Kaur; Carnelio, Sunitha; Chandrashekar, Chetana

    2016-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas comprise a heterogeneous tumor cell population with varied molecular characteristics, which makes prognostication of these tumors a complex and challenging issue. Thus, molecular profiling of these tumors is advantageous for an accurate prognostication and treatment planning. This is a retrospective study on a cohort of primary locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas (n = 178) of an Indian rural population. The expression of EGFR, p53, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and p16 in a cohort of primary locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas was evaluated. A potential biomarker that can predict the tumor response to treatment was identified. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor blocks of (n = 178) of histopathologically diagnosed cases of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas were selected. Tissue microarray blocks were constructed with 2 cores of 2 mm diameter from each tumor block. Four-micron-thick sections were cut from these tissue microarray blocks. These tissue microarray sections were immunohistochemically stained for EGFR, p53, Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and p16. In this cohort, EGFR was the most frequently expressed 150/178 (84%) biomarker of the cases. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant association (p = 0.038) between expression of p53 and a poor prognosis. A Poisson regression analysis showed that tumors that expressed p53 had a two times greater chance of recurrence (unadjusted IRR-95% CI 2.08 (1.03, 4.5), adjusted IRR-2.29 (1.08, 4.8) compared with the tumors that did not express this biomarker. Molecular profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas will enable us to categorize our patients into more realistic risk groups. With biologically guided tumor characterization, personalized treatment protocols can be designed for individual patients, which will improve the quality of life of these patients.

  15. Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  16. Mapping racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Donald B

    2006-01-01

    The author uses the metaphor of mapping to illuminate a structural feature of racist thought, locating the degraded object along vertical and horizontal axes. These axes establish coordinates of hierarchy and of distance. With the coordinates in place, racist thought begins to seem grounded in natural processes. The other's identity becomes consolidated, and parochialism results. The use of this kind of mapping is illustrated via two patient vignettes. The author presents Freud's (1905, 1927) views in relation to such a "mapping" process, as well as Adorno's (1951) and Baldwin's (1965). Finally, the author conceptualizes the crucial status of primitivity in the workings of racist thought.

  17. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... greatly advanced genetics research. The improved quality of genetic data has reduced the time required to identify a ... cases, a matter of months or even weeks. Genetic mapping data generated by the HGP's laboratories is freely accessible ...

  18. Dual p16 and Ki-67 Expression in Liquid-Based Cervical Cytological Samples Compared to Pap Cytology Findings, Biopsies, and HPV Testing in Cervical Cancer Screening: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigenzi, Karla Calaça Kabbach; Heinke, Thaís; Salim, Rafael Calil; Focchi, Gustavo Rubino de Azevedo

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to verify the sensitivity and specificity of dual immunocytochemistry staining for p16 and Ki-67 in liquid-based samples (the "dual" assay) for cervical lesion screening, compared to biopsy findings and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA molecular detection. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values for the "dual immunocytochemistry assay" were calculated and compared to histopathological results and to high-risk HPV DNA detection in adult women or teenagers submitted to cervical cancer screening. A total of 151 women were included. The majority (96.2%) of those with negative dual assay results had lower biopsy grades (p cytology results suggestive of cervical cancer had positive dual immunocytochemistry assay results more frequently (p < 0.001), and these positive results were also significantly associated with biopsy findings (p < 0.001) and with high-risk genotype HPV infection (p = 0.007). Specificity and PPV for the dual assay were 0.972 (0.855-0.999) and 0.800 (0.284-0.995), respectively, and 1.000 (0.590-1.000) and 1.000 (0.631-1.000) for HPV detection. The dual immunocytochemistry assay had high specificity and PPV. It reveals a persistent HPV infection, avoiding the need for new tissue collections for biopsies or hybrid capture. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. 4p16.1-p15.31 duplication and 4p terminal deletion in a 3-years old Chinese girl: Array-CGH, genotype-phenotype and neurological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Maria; Salzano, Emanuela; Vecchio, Davide; Ferrara, Dante; Malacarne, Michela; Pierluigi, Mauro; Ferrara, Ines; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Microscopically chromosome rearrangements of the short arm of chromosome 4 include the two known clinical entities: partial trisomy 4p and deletions of the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical regions 1 and 2 (WHSCR-1 and WHSCR-2, respectively), which cause cranio-facial anomalies, congenital malformations and developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on clinical findings detected in a Chinese patient with a de novo 4p16.1-p15.32 duplication in association with a subtle 4p terminal deletion of 6 Mb in size. This unusual chromosome imbalance resulted in WHS classical phenotype, while clinical manifestations of 4p trisomy were practically absent. This observation suggests the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency of sensitive dosage genes with regulatory function placed in WHS critical region, is more pathogenic than concomitant 4p duplicated segment. Additionally clinical findings in our patient confirm a variable penetrance of major malformations and neurological features in Chinese children despite of WHS critical region's deletion. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunoexpression of P16INK4a, Rb and TP53 proteins in bronchiolar columnar cell dysplasia (BCCD in lungs resected due to primary non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chyczewski

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. High mortality comes out mainly of the fact that majority of the cases are diagnosed in advanced stadium. An expanded diagnostics of precancerous conditions would certainly contribute to lowering the mortality rate. Many of the molecular changes accompanying the multistep cancer development could be observed using the immunohistochemistry method. In this paper we describe the morphology and cell cycle proteins immunoexpression of the novel probable preinvasive lesion - bronchiolar columnar cell dysplasia (BCCD. Thirty cases of BCCD selected out of 193 patients population, treated for primary non-small cell lung cancer were investigated. Loss of P16INK4a protein was observed in 70% of all cases and was statistically significant in patients with adenocarcinoma. Two cases show abnormal cytoplasmic localization of this protein. TP53 protein accumulates in 26.7% of all BCCD. Rb protein was active in 48.3% of the BCCD cases. In two cases we observed differentiation of the cells composing BCCD into multilayer epithelium of the squamous type, which occurs with formation of desmosomes. We suppose that BCCD may be preneoplastic lesion leading to adenocarcinoma as well as to peripheral squamous cell lung cancer.

  1. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    by the practical testing environment. As a result of the changes, a reasonable assumption would be to question the consequences caused by the variations in method procedures. Here, the aim is to highlight the proven or hypothetic consequences of variations of Projective Mapping. Presented variations will include...... instructions and influence heavily the product placements and the descriptive vocabulary (Dehlholm et.al., 2012b). The type of assessors performing the method influences results with an extra aspect in Projective Mapping compared to more analytical tests, as the given spontaneous perceptions are much dependent......Projective Mapping (Risvik et.al., 1994) and its Napping (Pagès, 2003) variations have become increasingly popular in the sensory field for rapid collection of spontaneous product perceptions. It has been applied in variations which sometimes are caused by the purpose of the analysis and sometimes...

  2. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    . In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology. This type...... of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...

  3. Epigenetic changes in the CDKN2A locus are associated with differential expression of P16INK4A and P14ARF in HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlecht, Nicolas F; Ben-Dayan, Miriam; Anayannis, Nicole; Lleras, Roberto A; Thomas, Carlos; Wang, Yanhua; Smith, Richard V; Burk, Robert D; Harris, Thomas M; Childs, Geoffrey; Ow, Thomas J; Prystowsky, Michael B; Belbin, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is recognized as a distinct disease entity associated with improved survival. DNA hypermethylation profiles differ significantly by HPV status suggesting that a specific subset of methylated CpG loci could give mechanistic insight into HPV-driven OPSCC. We analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation of primary tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa from 46 OPSCC patients undergoing treatment at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY using the Illumina HumanMethylation27 beadchip. For each matched tissue set, we measured differentially methylated CpG loci using a change in methylation level (M value). From these analyses, we identified a 22 CpG loci panel for HPV+ OPSCC that included four CDKN2A loci downstream of the p16(INK4A) and p14(ARF) transcription start sites. This panel was significantly associated with overall HPV detection (P < 0.05; ROC area under the curve = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91–1.0) similar to the subset of four CDKN2A-specific CpG loci (0.90, 95% CI: 0.82–0.99) with equivalence to the full 22 CpG panel. DNA hypermethylation correlated with a significant increase in alternative open reading frame (ARF) expression in HPV+ OPSCC primary tumors, but not to the other transcript variant encoded by the CDKN2A locus. Overall, this study provides evidence of epigenetic changes to the downstream region of the CDKN2A locus in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer that are associated with changes in expression of the coded protein products

  4. Energetic map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report explains the energetic map of Uruguay as well as the different systems that delimits political frontiers in the region. The electrical system importance is due to the electricity, oil and derived , natural gas, potential study, biofuels, wind and solar energy

  5. Necklace maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speckmann, B.; Verbeek, K.A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data associated with geographic regions is nowadays globally available in large amounts and hence automated methods to visually display these data are in high demand. There are several well-established thematic map types for quantitative data on the ratio-scale associated with regions:

  6. Participatory maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    towards a new political ecology. This type of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper...

  7. Association between the European GWAS-identified susceptibility locus at chromosome 4p16 and the risk of atrial septal defect: a case-control study in Southwest China and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhao

    Full Text Available Atrial septal defect (ASD is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS of congenital heart disease (CHD identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal the 3 susceptibility SNPs, but reported 2 different risk SNPs: rs2474937 and rs1531070. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the 3 European GWAS-identified susceptibility SNPs and ASD risk in the Han population in southwest China. Additionally, to increase the robustness of our current analysis, we conducted a meta-analysis combining published studies and our current case-control study. We performed association, linkage disequilibrium, and haplotype analysis among the 3 SNPs in 190 ASD cases and 225 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies among the 3 SNPs showed statistically significant differences between the cases and controls. Our study found that individuals carrying the allele T of rs870142, the allele A of rs16835979, and the allele T of rs6824295 had a respective 50.1% (odds ratio (OR = 1.501, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.122-2.009, PFDR-BH = 0.018, 48.5% (OR = 1.485, 95%CI = 1.109-1.987, PFDR-BH = 0.012, and 38.6% (OR = 1.386, 95%CI = 1.042-1.844, PFDR-BH = 0.025 increased risk to develop ASD than wild-type allele carriers in our study cohort. In the haplotype analysis, we identified a disease-risk haplotype (TAT (OR = 1.540, 95%CI = 1.030-2.380, PFDR-BH = 0.016. Our meta-analysis also showed that the investigated SNP was associated with ASD risk (combined OR (95%CI = 1.35 (1.24-1.46, P < 0.00001. Our study provides compelling evidence to motivate better understanding of the etiology

  8. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  9. Mapping filmmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Øystein; Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus ...... is on their learning practices and how they create ‘learning paths’ in relation to resources in diverse learning contexts, whether formal, non-formal and informal contexts.......This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus...

  10. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...

  11. Mapping of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Arafat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover map of North Sinai was produced based on the FAO-Land Cover Classification System (LCCS of 2004. The standard FAO classification scheme provides a standardized system of classification that can be used to analyze spatial and temporal land cover variability in the study area. This approach also has the advantage of facilitating the integration of Sinai land cover mapping products to be included with the regional and global land cover datasets. The total study area is covering a total area of 20,310.4 km2 (203,104 hectare. The landscape classification was based on SPOT4 data acquired in 2011 using combined multispectral bands of 20 m spatial resolution. Geographic Information System (GIS was used to manipulate the attributed layers of classification in order to reach the maximum possible accuracy. GIS was also used to include all necessary information. The identified vegetative land cover classes of the study area are irrigated herbaceous crops, irrigated tree crops and rain fed tree crops. The non-vegetated land covers in the study area include bare rock, bare soils (stony, very stony and salt crusts, loose and shifting sands and sand dunes. The water bodies were classified as artificial perennial water bodies (fish ponds and irrigated canals and natural perennial water bodies as lakes (standing. The artificial surfaces include linear and non-linear features.

  12. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  13. Maps & minds : mapping through the ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1984-01-01

    Throughout time, maps have expressed our understanding of our world. Human affairs have been influenced strongly by the quality of maps available to us at the major turning points in our history. "Maps & Minds" traces the ebb and flow of a few central ideas in the mainstream of mapping. Our expanding knowledge of our cosmic neighborhood stems largely from a small number of simple but grand ideas, vigorously pursued.

  14. Lunar Map Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Map Catalog includes various maps of the moon's surface, including Apollo landing sites; earthside, farside, and polar charts; photography index maps; zone...

  15. Baby Brain Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Member Home Resources & Services Professional Resource Baby Brain Map Mar 17, 2016 The Brain Map was adapted in 2006 by ZERO TO ... supports Adobe Flash Player. To view the Baby Brain Map, please visit this page on a browser ...

  16. Snapshots for Semantic Maps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nielsen, Curtis W; Ricks, Bob; Goodrich, Michael A; Bruemmer, David; Few, Doug; Walton, Miles

    2004-01-01

    .... Semantic maps are a relatively new approach to information presentation. Semantic maps provide more detail about an environment than typical maps because they are augmented by icons or symbols that provide meaning for places or objects of interest...

  17. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  18. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  19. 7. Annex II: Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Aeberli, Annina

    2012-01-01

    Map 1: States of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – States, as of 15 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-states-15-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 2: Counties of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – Counties, as of 16 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-counties-16-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 3: Eastern Equato...

  20. Applicability of vulnerability maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, L.J.; Gosk, E.

    1989-01-01

    A number of aspects to vulnerability maps are discussed: the vulnerability concept, mapping purposes, possible users, and applicability of vulnerability maps. Problems associated with general-type vulnerability mapping, including large-scale maps, universal pollutant, and universal pollution scenario are also discussed. An alternative approach to vulnerability assessment - specific vulnerability mapping for limited areas, specific pollutant, and predefined pollution scenario - is suggested. A simplification of the vulnerability concept is proposed in order to make vulnerability mapping more objective and by this means more comparable. An extension of the vulnerability concept to the rest of the hydrogeological cycle (lakes, rivers, and the sea) is proposed. Some recommendations regarding future activities are given

  1. Differential maps, difference maps, interpolated maps, and long term prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talman, R.

    1988-06-01

    Mapping techniques may be thought to be attractive for the long term prediction of motion in accelerators, especially because a simple map can approximately represent an arbitrarily complicated lattice. The intention of this paper is to develop prejudices as to the validity of such methods by applying them to a simple, exactly solveable, example. It is shown that a numerical interpolation map, such as can be generated in the accelerator tracking program TEAPOT, predicts the evolution more accurately than an analytically derived differential map of the same order. Even so, in the presence of ''appreciable'' nonlinearity, it is shown to be impractical to achieve ''accurate'' prediction beyond some hundreds of cycles of oscillation. This suggests that the value of nonlinear maps is restricted to the parameterization of only the ''leading'' deviation from linearity. 41 refs., 6 figs

  2. VEGETATION MAPPING IN WETLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. PEDROTTI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work examines the main aspects of wetland vegetation mapping, which can be summarized as analysis of the ecological-vegetational (ecotone gradients; vegetation complexes; relationships between vegetation distribution and geomorphology; vegetation of the hydrographic basin lo which the wetland in question belongs; vegetation monitoring with help of four vegetation maps: phytosociological map of the real and potential vegetation, map of vegetation dynamical tendencies, map of vegetation series.

  3. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  4. Mapping in the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text provides a solid introduction to mapmaking in the era of cloud computing. It takes students through both the concepts and technology of modern cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and Web-based mapping. Conceptual chapters delve into the meaning of maps and how they are developed, covering such topics as map layers, GIS tools, mobile mapping, and map animation. Methods chapters take a learn-by-doing approach to help students master application programming interfaces and build other technical skills for creating maps and making them available on the Internet. Th

  5. Mapping with Drupal

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzolo, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Build beautiful interactive maps on your Drupal website, and tell engaging visual stories with your data. This concise guide shows you how to create custom geographical maps from top to bottom, using Drupal 7 tools and out-of-the-box modules. You'll learn how mapping works in Drupal, with examples on how to use intuitive interfaces to map local events, businesses, groups, and other custom data. Although building maps with Drupal can be tricky, this book helps you navigate the system's complexities for creating sophisticated maps that match your site design. Get the knowledge and tools you ne

  6. LLNL/JNC repository collaboration interim progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.; Couch, R.G.; Gansemer, J.; Halsey, W.G.; Palmer, C.E.; Sinz, K.H.; Stout, R.B.; Wijesinghe, A.; Wolery, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    Under this Annex, a research program on the near-field performance assessment related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste will be carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in close collaboration with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC). This program will focus on activities that provide direct support for PNC's near-term and long-term needs that will, in turn, utilize and further strengthen US capabilities for radioactive waste management. The work scope for two years will be designed based on the PNC's priorities for its second progress report (the H12 report) of research and development for high-level radioactive waste disposal and on the interest and capabilities of the LLNL. The work will focus on the chemical modeling for the near-field environment and long-term mechanical modeling of engineered barrier system as it evolves. Certain activities in this program will provide for a final iteration of analyses to provide additional technical basis prior to the year 2000 as determined in discussions with the PNC's technical coordinator. The work for two years will include the following activities: Activity 1: Chemical Modeling of EBS Materials Interactions--Task 1.1 Chemical Modeling of Iron Effects on Borosilicate Glass Durability; and Task 1.2 Changes in Overpack and Bentonite Properties Due to Metal, Bentonite and Water Interactions. Activity 2: Thermodynamic Database Validation and Comparison--Task 2.1 Set up EQ3/6 to Run with the Pitzer-based PNC Thermodynamic Data Base; Task 2.2 Provide Expert Consultation on the Thermodynamic Data Base; and Task 2.3 Provide Analysis of Likely Solubility Controls on Selenium. Activity 3: Engineered Barrier Performance Assessment of the Unsaturated, Oxidizing Transient--Task 3.1 Apply YMIM to PNC Transient EBS Performance; Task 3.2 Demonstrate Methods for Modeling the Return to Reducing Conditions; and Task 3.3 Evaluate the Potential for Stress Corrosion Cracking in PNC Waste Packages. Activity 4: Coupled Displacement and Degradation Analysis of Carbon Steel Overpack Embedded in Bentonite--Task 4.1 Demonstration of NIKE-2D/ALE-3D Mesh Adaptation Capability; Task 4.2 Demonstration of NIKE-2D/ALE-3D Code Capability to Compute Realistic Repository Problems; Task 4.3 Implementation and Verification of the Cam Clay Model in NIKE-2D/ALE-3D Code; and Task 4.4 Estimation of the Timing and Spatial Distribution of Rewetting

  7. Meso(topoclimatic maps and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Plánka

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric characteristics can be studied from many points of view, most often we talk about time and spatial standpoint. Application of time standpoint leads either to different kinds of the synoptic and prognostic maps production, which presents actual state of atmosphere in short time section in the past or in the near future or to the climatic maps production which presents longterm weather regime. Spatial standpoint then differs map works according to natural phenomenon proportions, whereas the scale of their graphic presentation can be different. It depends on production purpose of each work.In the paper there are analysed methods of mapping and climatic maps production, which display longterm regime of chosen atmospheric features. These athmosphere features are formed in interaction with land surface and also have direct influence on people and their activities throughout the country. At the same time they’re influenced by anthropogenic intervention to the landscape.

  8. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of whole extract and isolated indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica associated with re-activation of the onco-suppressor p16{sup INK4a} gene in human colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naselli, Flores; Tesoriere, Luisa; Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Attanzio, Alessandro; Gentile, Carla; Livrea, Maria A., E-mail: maria.livrea@unipa.it

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Cactus pear fruit extract and indicaxanthin cause apoptosis of colon cancer cells. • Indicaxanthin does not cause ROS formation, but affects epigenoma in Caco-2 cells. • Indicaxanthin reverses methylation of oncosuppressor p16{sup INK4a} gene in Caco-2 cells. • Indicaxanthin reactivates retinoblastoma in Caco-2 cells. • Bioavailable indicaxanthin may have chemopreventive activity in colon cancer. - Abstract: Phytochemicals may exert chemo-preventive effects on cells of the gastro-intestinal tract by modulating epigenome-regulated gene expression. The effect of the aqueous extract from the edible fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI extract), and of its betalain pigment indicaxanthin (Ind), on proliferation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells has been investigated. Whole extract and Ind caused a dose-dependent apoptosis of proliferating cells at nutritionally relevant amounts, with IC{sub 50} 400 ± 25 mg fresh pulp equivalents/mL, and 115 ± 15 μM (n = 9), respectively, without toxicity for post-confluent differentiated cells. Ind accounted for ∼80% of the effect of the whole extract. Ind did not cause oxidative stress in proliferating Caco-2 cells. Epigenomic activity of Ind was evident as de-methylation of the tumor suppressor p16{sup INK4a} gene promoter, reactivation of the silenced mRNA expression and accumulation of p16{sup INK4a}, a major controller of cell cycle. As a consequence, decrease of hyper-phosphorylated, in favor of the hypo-phosphorylated retinoblastoma was observed, with unaltered level of the cycline-dependent kinase CDK4. Cell cycle showed arrest in the G2/M-phase. Dietary cactus pear fruit and Ind may have chemo-preventive potential in intestinal cells.

  9. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of whole extract and isolated indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica associated with re-activation of the onco-suppressor p16INK4a gene in human colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naselli, Flores; Tesoriere, Luisa; Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Attanzio, Alessandro; Gentile, Carla; Livrea, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cactus pear fruit extract and indicaxanthin cause apoptosis of colon cancer cells. • Indicaxanthin does not cause ROS formation, but affects epigenoma in Caco-2 cells. • Indicaxanthin reverses methylation of oncosuppressor p16 INK4a gene in Caco-2 cells. • Indicaxanthin reactivates retinoblastoma in Caco-2 cells. • Bioavailable indicaxanthin may have chemopreventive activity in colon cancer. - Abstract: Phytochemicals may exert chemo-preventive effects on cells of the gastro-intestinal tract by modulating epigenome-regulated gene expression. The effect of the aqueous extract from the edible fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI extract), and of its betalain pigment indicaxanthin (Ind), on proliferation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells has been investigated. Whole extract and Ind caused a dose-dependent apoptosis of proliferating cells at nutritionally relevant amounts, with IC 50 400 ± 25 mg fresh pulp equivalents/mL, and 115 ± 15 μM (n = 9), respectively, without toxicity for post-confluent differentiated cells. Ind accounted for ∼80% of the effect of the whole extract. Ind did not cause oxidative stress in proliferating Caco-2 cells. Epigenomic activity of Ind was evident as de-methylation of the tumor suppressor p16 INK4a gene promoter, reactivation of the silenced mRNA expression and accumulation of p16 INK4a , a major controller of cell cycle. As a consequence, decrease of hyper-phosphorylated, in favor of the hypo-phosphorylated retinoblastoma was observed, with unaltered level of the cycline-dependent kinase CDK4. Cell cycle showed arrest in the G2/M-phase. Dietary cactus pear fruit and Ind may have chemo-preventive potential in intestinal cells

  10. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  11. Using maps in genealogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2002-01-01

    In genealogical research, maps can provide clues to where our ancestors may have lived and where to look for written records about them. Beginners should master basic genealogical research techniques before starting to use topographic maps.

  12. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  13. National Pipeline Mapping System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The NPMS Public Map Viewer allows the general public to view maps of transmission pipelines, LNG plants, and breakout tanks in one selected county. Distribution and...

  14. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  15. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  16. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  17. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  18. P16.30 4th ventricle glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, E.; Isik, S.; Gurbuz, M.; Kilic, K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We present the 2nd case ever known in English literature describing a glioblastoma of the fourth ventricle originating from cerebellar peduncle. CASE DESCIPTION: A 66 years old woman was admitted to hospital with dizziness and nausea for four months. An MRI scan showed fourth ventricle mass. First impression was an ependymoma due to MRI scan characteristics. Results: A surgery was performed and histopathology revealed Grade IV glial tumor. Radiotherapy was done. CONCLUSION: This report suggests that GBM can mimic every tumor in the CNS. Surgery is the best option for these tumors not only for aggressive behaviour of glioblastoma but also to prevent hydrocephalus and associated symptoms.

  19. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere....

  20. Multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swann, Andrew Francis; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a notion of moment map adapted to actions of Lie groups that preserve a closed three-form. We show existence of our multi-moment maps in many circumstances, including mild topological assumptions on the underlying manifold. Such maps are also shown to exist for all groups whose second...

  1. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  2. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  3. On parabolic external maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomonaco, Luna; Petersen, Carsten Lunde; Shen, Weixiao

    2017-01-01

    We prove that any C1+BV degree d ≥ 2 circle covering h having all periodic orbits weakly expanding, is conjugate by a C1+BV diffeomorphism to a metrically expanding map. We use this to connect the space of parabolic external maps (coming from the theory of parabolic-like maps) to metrically expan...

  4. Digitised Maps in the Danish Map Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Annie Lenschau-Teglers; Vivi Gade Rønsberg

    2005-01-01

    As in the rest of the library world, The Royal Library in Copenhagen is in the process of digitising its collections. At the moment we are mainly working on the handwritten manual catalogue - but digitising the material is also a major working assignment. The Map Collection at The Royal Library has today divided the effort in digitising its materials into 3 groups: 1. Digitised maps as a vital addition to the records in our bibliographic database REX 2. Digitised maps presented as a Digital F...

  5. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of whole extract and isolated indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica associated with re-activation of the onco-suppressor p16(INK4a) gene in human colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naselli, Flores; Tesoriere, Luisa; Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Attanzio, Alessandro; Gentile, Carla; Livrea, Maria A

    2014-07-18

    Phytochemicals may exert chemo-preventive effects on cells of the gastro-intestinal tract by modulating epigenome-regulated gene expression. The effect of the aqueous extract from the edible fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI extract), and of its betalain pigment indicaxanthin (Ind), on proliferation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells has been investigated. Whole extract and Ind caused a dose-dependent apoptosis of proliferating cells at nutritionally relevant amounts, with IC50 400±25 mg fresh pulp equivalents/mL, and 115±15 μM (n=9), respectively, without toxicity for post-confluent differentiated cells. Ind accounted for ∼80% of the effect of the whole extract. Ind did not cause oxidative stress in proliferating Caco-2 cells. Epigenomic activity of Ind was evident as de-methylation of the tumor suppressor p16(INK4a) gene promoter, reactivation of the silenced mRNA expression and accumulation of p16(INK4a), a major controller of cell cycle. As a consequence, decrease of hyper-phosphorylated, in favor of the hypo-phosphorylated retinoblastoma was observed, with unaltered level of the cycline-dependent kinase CDK4. Cell cycle showed arrest in the G2/M-phase. Dietary cactus pear fruit and Ind may have chemo-preventive potential in intestinal cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mapping of wine industry

    OpenAIRE

    Віліна Пересадько; Надія Максименко; Катерина Біла

    2016-01-01

    Having reviewed a variety of approaches to understanding the essence of wine industry, having studied the modern ideas about the future of wine industry, having analyzed more than 50 maps from the Internet we have set the trends and special features of wine industry mapping in the world, such as: - the vast majority of maps displays the development of the industry at regional or national level, whereas there are practically no world maps; - wine-growing regions are represented on maps very un...

  7. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch ...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  8. On palaeogeographic map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Zhao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic map is a graphic representation of physical geographical characteristics in geological history periods and human history periods. It is the most important result of palaeogeographic study. The author, as the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palaeogeography, Chinese Edition and English Edition, aimed at the problems of the articles submitted to and published in the Journal of Palaeogeography in recent years and the relevant papers and books of others, and integrated with his practice of palaeogeographic study and mapping, wrote this paper. The content mainly includes the data of palaeogeographic mapping, the problems of palaeogeographic mapping method, the “Single factor analysis and multifactor comprehensive mapping method —— Methodology of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography”, i.e., the “4 steps mapping method”, the nomenclature of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of significance of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, the evaluative standards of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, and the self-evaluation. Criticisms and corrections are welcome.

  9. Mapping Urban Social Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ball

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of increased levels of interest in space and images beyond the field of geography, this article (re- introduces earlier work on the semiotics of maps undertaken by geographers in the 1960s. The data limitations, purpose and cultural context in which a user interprets a map's codes and conventions are highlighted in this work, which remains relevant to the interpretation of maps—new and old—forty years later. By means of drawing on geography's contribution to the semiotics of maps, the article goes on to examine the concept of urban social divisions as represented in map images. Using a small number of map images, including two of the most widely known maps of urban social division in Europe and North America, the roles of context, data and purpose in the production and interpretation of maps are discussed. By presenting the examples chronologically the article shows that although advances in data collection and manipulation have allowed researchers to combine different social variables in maps of social division, and to interact with map images, work by geographers on the semiotics of maps is no less relevant today than when it was first proposed forty years ago. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002372

  10. Use of human papillomavirus DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry to detect and predict anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nittaya Phanuphak

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM are at high risk of having anal cancer. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL is the precursor of anal cancer. We explored the use of different biomarkers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infection and HPV-mediated cell transformation to detect and predict HSIL among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM.A total of 123 HIV-positive and 123 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled and followed for 12 months. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA with biopsies were performed at every visit along with anal sample collection for cytology, high-risk HPV DNA genotyping, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry. Performance characteristics and area under the receiver operator characteristics curve were calculated for these biomarkers at baseline, and Cox regression compared the usefulness of these biomarkers in predicting incident HSIL. High-risk HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry each identified 43-46% of MSM whose baseline test positivity would trigger HRA referral. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity (64.7% and correctly classified the highest number of prevalent HSIL cases. With the exception of p16 immunochemistry, most tests showed significant increases in sensitivity but decreases specificity versus anal cytology, while the overall number of correctly classified cases was not significantly different. Baseline or persistent type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA was the only test significantly predicting incident histologic HSIL within 12 months in models adjusted for HIV status and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions at baseline.Countries with a high HIV prevalence among MSM and limited HRA resources may consider using biomarkers to identify individuals at high risk of HSIL. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity for prevalent HSIL detection regardless of HIV status, whereas type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA performed best in predicting development of incident HSIL within 12 months.

  11. Mapping of wine industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віліна Пересадько

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Having reviewed a variety of approaches to understanding the essence of wine industry, having studied the modern ideas about the future of wine industry, having analyzed more than 50 maps from the Internet we have set the trends and special features of wine industry mapping in the world, such as: - the vast majority of maps displays the development of the industry at regional or national level, whereas there are practically no world maps; - wine-growing regions are represented on maps very unevenly; - all existing maps of the industry could be classified as analytical ascertaining inventory type; - the dominant ways of cartographic representation are area method and qualitative background method, sign method and collation maps are rarely used; - basically all the Internet maps have low quality as they are scanned images with poor resolution; - the special feature of maps published lately is lack of geographical basis (except for state borders and coastline. We created wine production and consumption world map «Wine Industry» in the scale of 1:60 000 000 with simple geographical basis (state names, state borders, major rivers, coastline. It was concluded that from the methodological point of view it is incorrect not to show geographical basis on maps of wine industry. Analysis of this map allowed us to identify areas of traditional wine-making, potential wine-making areas and countries which claim to be the world leaders in the field of wine production. We found disbalans between wine production and wine consumption - increasing wine production in South America, China and the United States and increasing wine consumption (mainly due to the import products in countries where the grape is not the primary agricultural product.

  12. Introduction to "Mapping Vietnameseness"

    OpenAIRE

    Hue-Tam Ho Tai

    2016-01-01

    Vietnam and China are currently engaged in a map war, with each country using ancient maps to buttress its claims to territorial sovereignty over some uninhabited islands in the South China Sea (in Chinese terminology), also known as the Eastern Sea (in Vietnamese). But what do maps in fact represent? What is meant by “territory”? How are territorial limits conceived? These questions were raised in a May 2015 workshop inspired by Thongchai Winichakul’s Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-Body o...

  13. North America pipeline map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    This map presents details of pipelines currently in place throughout North America. Fifty-nine natural gas pipelines are presented, as well as 16 oil pipelines. The map also identifies six proposed natural gas pipelines. Major cities, roads and highways are included as well as state and provincial boundaries. The National Petroleum Reserve is identified, as well as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The following companies placed advertisements on the map with details of the services they provide relating to pipeline management and construction: Ferus Gas Industries Trust; Proline; SulfaTreat Direct Oxidation; and TransGas. 1 map

  14. Open land use map

    OpenAIRE

    Mildorf, T.; Charvát, K.; Jezek, J.; Templer, Simon; Malewski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Open Land Use Map is an initiative that has been started by the Plan4business project and that will be extended as part of the SDI4Apps project in the future. This service aims to create an improved worldwide land use map. The initial map will be prepared using the CORINE Land Cover, Global Cover dataset and Open Street Map. Contributors, mainly volunteers, will able to change the geometry and assign up-to-date land use according to the HILUCS specification. For certain regions more detailed ...

  15. Basaloid Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Subclassification into Basal, Ductal, and Mixed Subtypes Based on Comparison of Clinico-pathologic Features and Expression of p53, Cyclin D1, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, p16, and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ja Cho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma with distinct pathologic characteristics. The histogenesis of BSCC is not fully understood, and the cancer has been suggested to originate from a totipotent primitive cell in the basal cell layer of the surface epithelium or in the proximal duct of secretory glands. Methods Twenty-six cases of head and neck BSCC from Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, reported during a 14-year-period were subclassified into basal, ductal, and mixed subtypes according to the expression of basal (cytokeratin [CK] 5/6, p63 or ductal markers (CK7, CK8/18. The cases were also subject to immunohistochemical study for CK19, p53, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and p16 and to in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus (HPV, and the results were clinico-pathologically compared. Results Mixed subtype (12 cases was the most common, and these cases showed hypopharyngeal predilection, older age, and higher expression of CK19, p53, and EGFR than other subtypes. The basal subtype (nine cases showed frequent comedo-necrosis and high expression of cyclin D1. The ductal subtype (five cases showed the lowest expression of p53, cyclin D1, and EGFR. A small number of p16- and/or HPV-positive cases were not restricted to one subtype. BSCC was the cause of death in 19 patients, and the average follow-up period for all patients was 79.5 months. Overall survival among the three subtypes was not significantly different. Conclusions The results of this study suggest a heterogeneous pathogenesis of head and neck BSCC. Each subtype showed variable histology and immunoprofiles, although the clinical implication of heterogeneity was not determined in this study.

  16. On circle map coupled map lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, E

    2002-01-01

    Circle map in one and two dimensions is studied. Both its stability, synchronization using bounded control and persistence is discussed. This work is expected to be applicable in ecology where spatial effects are known to be important. Also it will be relevant to systems where delay effects are not negligible.

  17. Mapping online consumer search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronnenberg, B.J.; Kim, J.; Albuquerque, P.

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose a new method to visualize browsing behavior in so-called product search maps. Manufacturers can use these maps to understand how consumers search for competing products before choice, including how information acquisition and product search are organized along brands, product

  18. Map of Nasca Geoglyphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzalová, K.; Pavelka, K.

    2013-07-01

    The Czech Technical University in Prague in the cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences in Dresden (Germany) work on the Nasca Project. The cooperation started in 2004 and much work has been done since then. All work is connected with Nasca lines in southern Peru. The Nasca project started in 1995 and its main target is documentation and conservation of the Nasca lines. Most of the project results are presented as WebGIS application via Internet. In the face of the impending destruction of the soil drawings, it is possible to preserve this world cultural heritage for the posterity at least in a digital form. Creating of Nasca lines map is very useful. The map is in a digital form and it is also available as a paper map. The map contains planimetric component of the map, map lettering and altimetry. Thematic folder in this map is a vector layer of the geoglyphs in Nasca/Peru. Basis for planimetry are georeferenced satellite images, altimetry is created from digital elevation model. This map was created in ArcGis software.

  19. Mapping of Outdoor Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Victor G.

    Mapping symbols adopted by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources are presented with their explanations. In an effort to provide standardization and familiarity teachers and other school people involved in an outdoor education program are encouraged to utilize the same symbols in constructing maps. (DK)

  20. MAP OF NASCA GEOGLYPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hanzalová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Technical University in Prague in the cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences in Dresden (Germany work on the Nasca Project. The cooperation started in 2004 and much work has been done since then. All work is connected with Nasca lines in southern Peru. The Nasca project started in 1995 and its main target is documentation and conservation of the Nasca lines. Most of the project results are presented as WebGIS application via Internet. In the face of the impending destruction of the soil drawings, it is possible to preserve this world cultural heritage for the posterity at least in a digital form. Creating of Nasca lines map is very useful. The map is in a digital form and it is also available as a paper map. The map contains planimetric component of the map, map lettering and altimetry. Thematic folder in this map is a vector layer of the geoglyphs in Nasca/Peru. Basis for planimetry are georeferenced satellite images, altimetry is created from digital elevation model. This map was created in ArcGis software.

  1. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  2. Maps between Grassmann manifolds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parameswaran Sankaran Institute of Mathematical Sciences Chennai, India sankaran@imsc.res.in Indian Academy of Sciences Platinum Jubilee Meeting Hyderabad

    2009-07-02

    Jul 2, 2009 ... Classification of all manifolds (or maps between them) is an impossible task. The coarser, homotopical classification, is relatively easier–but only relatively! Homotopy is, roughly speaking, the study of properties of spaces and maps invariant under continuous deformations. Denote by [X, Y ] the set of all ...

  3. Constructing Maps Collaboratively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhardt, Gaea; Stainton, Catherine; Bausmith, Jennifer Merriman

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes a study that maintains that students who work together in small groups had a better understanding of map concepts. Discusses why making maps in groups can enhance students' conceptual geographic understanding and offers suggestions for improving geography instructions using small group configurations. Includes statistical and graphic…

  4. Algorithms for necklace maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speckmann, B.; Verbeek, K.A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Necklace maps visualize quantitative data associated with regions by placing scaled symbols, usually disks, without overlap on a closed curve (the necklace) surrounding the map regions. Each region is projected onto an interval on the necklace that contains its symbol. In this paper we address the

  5. Text 2 Mind Map

    OpenAIRE

    Iona, John

    2017-01-01

    This is a review of the web resource 'Text 2 Mind Map' www.Text2MindMap.com. It covers what the resource is, and how it might be used in Library and education context, in particular for School Librarians.

  6. Formal genetic maps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-12-24

    Dec 24, 2014 ... ome/transcriptome/proteome, experimental induced maps that are intentionally designed and con- ... genetic maps imposed their application in nearly all fields of medical genetics including ..... or genes located adjacent to, or near, them. ...... types of markers, e.g., clinical markers (eye color), genomic.

  7. Bodily maps of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K

    2014-01-14

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions.

  8. Application of ecological mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherk, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service has initiated the production of a comprehensive ecological inventory map series for use as a major new planning tool. Important species data along with special land use designations are displayed on 1:250,000 scale topographic base maps. Sets of maps have been published for the Atlantic and Pacific coastal areas of the United States. Preparation of a map set for the Gulf of Mexico is underway at the present time. Potential application of ecological inventory map series information to a typical land disposal facility could occur during the narrowing of the number of possible disposal sites, the design of potential disposal site studies of ecological resources, the preparation of the environmental report, and the regulatory review of license applications. 3 figures, 3 tables

  9. The projective heat map

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces a simple dynamical model for a planar heat map that is invariant under projective transformations. The map is defined by iterating a polygon map, where one starts with a finite planar N-gon and produces a new N-gon by a prescribed geometric construction. One of the appeals of the topic of this book is the simplicity of the construction that yet leads to deep and far reaching mathematics. To construct the projective heat map, the author modifies the classical affine invariant midpoint map, which takes a polygon to a new polygon whose vertices are the midpoints of the original. The author provides useful background which makes this book accessible to a beginning graduate student or advanced undergraduate as well as researchers approaching this subject from other fields of specialty. The book includes many illustrations, and there is also a companion computer program.

  10. USGS Topo Base Map from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Topographic Base Map from The National Map. This tile cached web map service combines the most current data services (Boundaries, Names, Transportation,...

  11. Analyzing thematic maps and mapping for accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two problems which exist while attempting to test the accuracy of thematic maps and mapping are: (1) evaluating the accuracy of thematic content, and (2) evaluating the effects of the variables on thematic mapping. Statistical analysis techniques are applicable to both these problems and include techniques for sampling the data and determining their accuracy. In addition, techniques for hypothesis testing, or inferential statistics, are used when comparing the effects of variables. A comprehensive and valid accuracy test of a classification project, such as thematic mapping from remotely sensed data, includes the following components of statistical analysis: (1) sample design, including the sample distribution, sample size, size of the sample unit, and sampling procedure; and (2) accuracy estimation, including estimation of the variance and confidence limits. Careful consideration must be given to the minimum sample size necessary to validate the accuracy of a given. classification category. The results of an accuracy test are presented in a contingency table sometimes called a classification error matrix. Usually the rows represent the interpretation, and the columns represent the verification. The diagonal elements represent the correct classifications. The remaining elements of the rows represent errors by commission, and the remaining elements of the columns represent the errors of omission. For tests of hypothesis that compare variables, the general practice has been to use only the diagonal elements from several related classification error matrices. These data are arranged in the form of another contingency table. The columns of the table represent the different variables being compared, such as different scales of mapping. The rows represent the blocking characteristics, such as the various categories of classification. The values in the cells of the tables might be the counts of correct classification or the binomial proportions of these counts divided by

  12. Color on emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Qingwen; Zhang, An

    2007-06-01

    There are so many emergency issues in our daily life. Such as typhoons, tsunamis, earthquake, fires, floods, epidemics, etc. These emergencies made people lose their lives and their belongings. Every day, every hour, even every minute people probably face the emergency, so how to handle it and how to decrease its hurt are the matters people care most. If we can map it exactly before or after the emergencies; it will be helpful to the emergency researchers and people who live in the emergency place. So , through the emergency map, before emergency is occurring we can predict the situation, such as when and where the emergency will be happen; where people can refuge, etc. After disaster, we can also easily assess the lost, discuss the cause and make the lost less. The primary effect of mapping is offering information to the people who care about the emergency and the researcher who want to study it. Mapping allows the viewers to get a spatial sense of hazard. It can also provide the clues to study the relationship of the phenomenon in emergency. Color, as the basic element of the map, it can simplify and clarify the phenomenon. Color can also affects the general perceptibility of the map, and elicits subjective reactions to the map. It is to say, structure, readability, and the reader's psychological reactions can be affected by the use of color.

  13. Cognitive maps and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Oliver; Nadel, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive map theory suggested that exploring an environment and attending to a stimulus should lead to its integration into an allocentric environmental representation. We here report that directed attention in the form of exploration serves to gather information needed to determine an optimal spatial strategy, given task demands and characteristics of the environment. Attended environmental features may integrate into spatial representations if they meet the requirements of the optimal spatial strategy: when learning involves a cognitive mapping strategy, cues with high codability (e.g., concrete objects) will be incorporated into a map, but cues with low codability (e.g., abstract paintings) will not. However, instructions encouraging map learning can lead to the incorporation of cues with low codability. On the other hand, if spatial learning is not map-based, abstract cues can and will be used to encode locations. Since exploration appears to determine what strategy to apply and whether or not to encode a cue, recognition memory for environmental features is independent of whether or not a cue is part of a spatial representation. In fact, when abstract cues were used in a way that was not map-based, or when they were not used for spatial navigation at all, they were nevertheless recognized as familiar. Thus, the relation between exploratory activity on the one hand and spatial strategy and memory on the other appears more complex than initially suggested by cognitive map theory.

  14. Crowdsourcing The National Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elizabeth; Craun, Kari J.; Korris, Erin M.; Brostuen, David A.; Moore, Laurence R.

    2015-01-01

    Using crowdsourcing techniques, the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) project known as “The National Map Corps (TNMCorps)” encourages citizen scientists to collect and edit data about man-made structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative map data for the USGS National Geospatial Program’s web-based The National Map. VGI is not new to the USGS, but past efforts have been hampered by available technologies. Building on lessons learned, TNMCorps volunteers are successfully editing 10 different structure types in all 50 states as well as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

  15. Region & Gateway Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Schröter, Derik

    2007-01-01

    State-of-the-art robot mapping approaches are capable of acquiring impressively accurate 2D and 3D models of their environments. To the best of our knowledge, few of them represent structure or acquire models of task-relevant objects. In this work, a new approach to mapping of indoor environments is presented, in which the environment structure in terms of regions and gateways is automatically extracted, while the robot explores. Objects, both in 2D and 3D, are modeled explicitly in those map...

  16. MUTYH Associated Polyposis (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, M L

    2008-01-01

    Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and to a lesser extend Lynch Syndrome, which are caused by germline mutations in the APC and Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes, respectively.Here we review research findings regarding MUTYH interactions, genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MAP, as well as surveillance......MUTYH Associated Polyposis (MAP), a Polyposis predisposition caused by biallelic mutations in the Base Excision Repair (BER) gene MUTYH, confers a marked risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The MAP phenotype is difficult to distinguish from other hereditary CRC syndromes. Especially from Familial...

  17. Elevation data for floodplain mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    .... Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping shows that there is sufficient two-dimensional base map imagery to meet FEMA's flood map modernization goals, but that the three-dimensional base elevation data...

  18. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  19. DOT Official County Highway Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The County Highway Map theme is a scanned and rectified version of the original MnDOT County Highway Map Series. The cultural features on some of these maps may be...

  20. Tools for mapping ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Ignacio; Adamescu, Mihai; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Cazacu, Constantin; Klug, Hermann; Nedkov, Stoyan; Burkhard, Benjamin; Maes, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Mapping tools have evolved impressively in recent decades. From early computerised mapping techniques to current cloud-based mapping approaches, we have witnessed a technological evolution that has facilitated the democratisation of Geographic Information

  1. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  2. Haz-Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the adverse effects of workplace...

  3. TOXMAP®: Environmental Health Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — TOXMAP® is a Geographic Information System (GIS) that uses maps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the EPA's Toxics...

  4. The CPD Maps System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CPD Maps includes data on the locations of existing CDBG, HOME, public housing and other HUD-funded community assets, so that users can view past investments...

  5. MetaMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MetaMap is a highly configurable application developed by the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to...

  6. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Bandera, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  7. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Atascosa, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  9. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  10. Mapping Intermediality in Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Mapping Intermediality in Performance benadert het vraagstuk van intermedialiteit met betrekking tot performance (vooral theater) vanuit vijf verschillende invalshoeken: performativiteit en lichaam; tijd en ruimte; digitale cultuur en posthumanisme; netwerken; pedagogiek en praxis. In deze boeiende

  11. Mapping the HISS Dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, C.; Bieser, F.

    1984-01-01

    The principal component of the Bevalac HISS facility is a large super-conducting 3 Tesla dipole. The facility's need for a large magnetic volume spectrometer resulted in a large gap geometry - a 2 meter pole tip diameter and a 1 meter pole gap. Obviously, the field required detailed mapping for effective use as a spectrometer. The mapping device was designed with several major features in mind. The device would measure field values on a grid which described a closed rectangular solid. The grid would be a regular with the exact measurement intervals adjustable by software. The device would function unattended over the long period of time required to complete a field map. During this time, the progress of the map could be monitored by anyone with access to the HISS VAX computer. Details of the mechanical, electrical, and control design follow

  12. NOS Bathymetric Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection of bathymetric contour maps which represent the seafloor topography includes over 400 individual titles and covers US offshore areas including Hawaii...

  13. Survey on Ontology Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junwu

    To create a sharable semantic space in which the terms from different domain ontology or knowledge system, Ontology mapping become a hot research point in Semantic Web Community. In this paper, motivated factors of ontology mapping research are given firstly, and then 5 dominating theories and methods, such as information accessing technology, machine learning, linguistics, structure graph and similarity, are illustrated according their technology class. Before we analyses the new requirements and takes a long view, the contributions of these theories and methods are summarized in details. At last, this paper suggest to design a group of semantic connector with the ability of migration learning for OWL-2 extended with constrains and the ontology mapping theory of axiom, so as to provide a new methodology for ontology mapping.

  14. Interest rates mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevski, M.; Maignan, M.; Pozdnoukhov, A.; Timonin, V.

    2008-06-01

    The present study deals with the analysis and mapping of Swiss franc interest rates. Interest rates depend on time and maturity, defining term structure of the interest rate curves (IRC). In the present study IRC are considered in a two-dimensional feature space-time and maturity. Exploratory data analysis includes a variety of tools widely used in econophysics and geostatistics. Geostatistical models and machine learning algorithms (multilayer perceptron and Support Vector Machines) were applied to produce interest rate maps. IR maps can be used for the visualisation and pattern perception purposes, to develop and to explore economical hypotheses, to produce dynamic asset-liability simulations and for financial risk assessments. The feasibility of an application of interest rates mapping approach for the IRC forecasting is considered as well.

  15. National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) is designed to provide high-resolution elevation and imagery data along U.S....

  16. BaseMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The goal of this project is to provide a convenient base map that can be used as a starting point for CA projects. It's simple, but designed to work at a number of...

  17. Stochasticity in the Josephson map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.H.; Filippov, A.T.

    1996-04-01

    The Josephson map describes nonlinear dynamics of systems characterized by standard map with the uniform external bias superposed. The intricate structures of the phase space portrait of the Josephson map are examined on the basis of the tangent map associated with the Josephson map. Numerical observation of the stochastic diffusion in the Josephson map is examined in comparison with the renormalized diffusion coefficient calculated by the method of characteristic function. The global stochasticity of the Josephson map occurs at the values of far smaller stochastic parameter than the case of the standard map. (author)

  18. Ogallala Aquifer Mapping Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    A computerized data file has been established which can be used efficiently by the contour-plotting program SURFACE II to produce maps of the Ogallala aquifer in 17 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The data collected have been evaluated and compiled into three sets, from which SURFACE II can generate maps of well control, aquifer thickness, saturated thickness, water level, and the difference between virgin (pre-1942) and recent (1979 to 1981) water levels. 29 figures, 1 table

  19. Maps for the future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina D’Alessandro-Scarpari

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Geographers’ relations with maps have a long story of attraction and repulsion. The map has always fascinated Geographers (even before the institutionalization of the discipline as a powerful tool, able to demarcate territories, to produce different visions of them and to transform them by the actions they may cause or influence. Sometimes for strategic reasons Geographers have also denigrated cartography as a secondary and technical form of knowledge, a tool merely for understanding and ...

  20. Dynamics of exponential maps

    OpenAIRE

    Rempe, Lasse

    2003-01-01

    This thesis contains several new results about the dynamics of exponential maps $z\\mapsto \\exp(z)+\\kappa$. In particular, we prove that periodic external rays of exponential maps with nonescaping singular value always land. This is an analog of a theorem of Douady and Hubbard for polynomials. We also answer a question of Herman, Baker and Rippon by showing that the boundary of an unbounded exponential Siegel disk always contains the singular value. In addition to the presentation of new resul...

  1. The National Map - Orthoimagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, James; Brown, Kim; Carswell, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Orthorectified digital aerial photographs and satellite images of 1-meter (m) pixel resolution or finer make up the orthoimagery component of The National Map. The process of orthorectification removes feature displacements and scale variations caused by terrain relief and sensor geometry. The result is a combination of the image characteristics of an aerial photograph or satellite image and the geometric qualities of a map. These attributes allow users to: *Measure distance *Calculate areas *Determine shapes of features *Calculate directions *Determine accurate coordinates *Determine land cover and use *Perform change detection *Update maps The standard digital orthoimage is a 1-m or finer resolution, natural color or color infra-red product. Most are now produced as GeoTIFFs and accompanied by a Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)-compliant metadata file. The primary source for 1-m data is the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) leaf-on imagery. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilizes NAIP imagery as the image layer on its 'Digital- Map' - a new generation of USGS topographic maps (http://nationalmap.gov/digital_map). However, many Federal, State, and local governments and organizations require finer resolutions to meet a myriad of needs. Most of these images are leaf-off, natural-color products at resolutions of 1-foot (ft) or finer.

  2. MAPS of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lincoln

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to produce an interactive visualization from a mathematical model that successfully predicts metastases from head and neck cancer. We met this goal early in the project. The visualization is available for the public to view. Our work appears to fill a need for more information about this deadly disease. The idea of this project was to make an easily interpretable visualization based on what we call "functional maps" of disease. A functional map is a graphic summary of medical data, where distances between parts of the body are determined by the probability of disease, not by anatomical distances. Functional maps often beat little resemblance to anatomical maps, but they can be used to predict the spread of disease. The idea of modeling the spread of disease in an abstract multidimensional space is difficult for many people. Our goal was to make the important predictions easy to see. NASA must face this problem frequently: how to help laypersons and professionals see important trends in abstract, complex data. We took advantage of concepts perfected in NASA's graphics libraries. As an analogy, consider a functional map of early America. Suppose we choose travel times, rather than miles, as our measures of inter-city distances. For Abraham Lincoln, travel times would have been the more meaningful measure of separation between cities. In such a map New Orleans would be close to Memphis because of the Mississippi River. St. Louis would be close to Portland because of the Oregon Trail. Oklahoma City would be far from Little Rock because of the Cheyenne. Such a map would look puzzling to those of us who have always seen physical maps, but the functional map would be more useful in predicting the probabilities of inter-site transit. Continuing the analogy, we could predict the spread of social diseases such as gambling along the rivers and cattle rustling along the trails. We could simply print the functional map of America, but it would be more interesting

  3. Dynamic map labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Ken; Daiches, Eli; Yap, Chee

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of filtering, selecting and placing labels on a dynamic map, which is characterized by continuous zooming and panning capabilities. This consists of two interrelated issues. The first is to avoid label popping and other artifacts that cause confusion and interrupt navigation, and the second is to label at interactive speed. In most formulations the static map labeling problem is NP-hard, and a fast approximation might have O(nlogn) complexity. Even this is too slow during interaction, when the number of labels shown can be several orders of magnitude less than the number in the map. In this paper we introduce a set of desiderata for "consistent" dynamic map labeling, which has qualities desirable for navigation. We develop a new framework for dynamic labeling that achieves the desiderata and allows for fast interactive display by moving all of the selection and placement decisions into the preprocessing phase. This framework is general enough to accommodate a variety of selection and placement algorithms. It does not appear possible to achieve our desiderata using previous frameworks. Prior to this paper, there were no formal models of dynamic maps or of dynamic labels; our paper introduces both. We formulate a general optimization problem for dynamic map labeling and give a solution to a simple version of the problem. The simple version is based on label priorities and a versatile and intuitive class of dynamic label placements we call "invariant point placements". Despite these restrictions, our approach gives a useful and practical solution. Our implementation is incorporated into the G-Vis system which is a full-detail dynamic map of the continental USA. This demo is available through any browser.

  4. Introduction to "Mapping Vietnameseness"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hue-Tam Ho Tai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam and China are currently engaged in a map war, with each country using ancient maps to buttress its claims to territorial sovereignty over some uninhabited islands in the South China Sea (in Chinese terminology, also known as the Eastern Sea (in Vietnamese. But what do maps in fact represent? What is meant by “territory”? How are territorial limits conceived? These questions were raised in a May 2015 workshop inspired by Thongchai Winichakul’s Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-Body of a Nation (1994, a groundbreaking book that traces the transformation of Thai geographical consciousness as a result of Siam’s encounter with Western powers in the nineteenth century. While many of Thongchai’s insights apply to the Vietnamese case, as the first of the three articles included in this special issue of Cross-Currents shows, some of the 2015 workshop participants’ conclusions departed from his, especially regarding the formation of a Vietnamese geographical consciousness before the colonial period.[i] This is true of the other two papers, which focus specifically on the construction of borders and the associated production of maps in the nineteenth century before French colonial conquest... Notes 1 Thanks are due to the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Change in Gottingen, Germany, for its gracious hosting and generous funding of the conference, together with the Asia Center of Harvard University.

  5. Mapping sequences by parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guziolowski Carito

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: We present the N-map method, a pairwise and asymmetrical approach which allows us to compare sequences by taking into account evolutionary events that produce shuffled, reversed or repeated elements. Basically, the optimal N-map of a sequence s over a sequence t is the best way of partitioning the first sequence into N parts and placing them, possibly complementary reversed, over the second sequence in order to maximize the sum of their gapless alignment scores. Results: We introduce an algorithm computing an optimal N-map with time complexity O (|s| × |t| × N using O (|s| × |t| × N memory space. Among all the numbers of parts taken in a reasonable range, we select the value N for which the optimal N-map has the most significant score. To evaluate this significance, we study the empirical distributions of the scores of optimal N-maps and show that they can be approximated by normal distributions with a reasonable accuracy. We test the functionality of the approach over random sequences on which we apply artificial evolutionary events. Practical Application: The method is illustrated with four case studies of pairs of sequences involving non-standard evolutionary events.

  6. The evolving Alaska mapping program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P.D.; O'Brien, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the development of mapping in Alaska, the current status of the National Mapping Program, and future plans for expanding and improving the mapping coverage. Research projects with Landsat Multispectral Scanner and Return Vidicon imagery and real- and synthetic-aperture radar; image mapping programs; digital mapping; remote sensing projects; the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act; and the Alaska High-Altitude Aerial Photography Program are also discussed.-from Authors

  7. Ergodicity of polygonal slap maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Magno, Gianluigi; Pedro Gaivão, José; Lopes Dias, João; Duarte, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Polygonal slap maps are piecewise affine expanding maps of the interval obtained by projecting the sides of a polygon along their normals onto the perimeter of the polygon. These maps arise in the study of polygonal billiards with non-specular reflection laws. We study the absolutely continuous invariant probabilities (acips) of the slap maps for several polygons, including regular polygons and triangles. We also present a general method for constructing polygons with slap maps with more than one ergodic acip. (paper)

  8. Mapping Unknown Knowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diogo de Andrade Silva, Elisa; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    representative dimensions of travellers’ embodied ‘dwelling-in-motion’ (Urry, 2007) and experiences. The paper foregrounds a ‘Mapping-in-Motion’ graphic example, an experimental urban design student assignment aiming to map some of the less representative dimensions of journeys between A and B in Berlin...... in relation to analysis, representation, exploration and design of everyday travelling in the city. Such ‘mobilities design’ (Jensen and Lanng 2017) concerns routes, sites and artefacts of mobilities, e.g., road networks, train stations, and bike parking facilities. Some dimensions of these structures...

  9. Learning Bing maps API

    CERN Document Server

    Sinani, Artan

    2013-01-01

    This is a practical, hands-on guide with illustrative examples, which will help you explore the vast universe of Bing maps.If you are a developer who wants to learn how to exploit the numerous features of Bing Maps then this book is ideal for you. It can also be useful for more experienced developers who wish to explore other areas of the APIs. It is assumed that you have some knowledge of JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. For some chapters a working knowledge of .Net and Visual Studio is also needed.

  10. Graphene Conductance Uniformity Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of micro four-point probe (M4PP) and non-contact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements for centimeter scale quantitative mapping of the sheet conductance of large area chemical vapor deposited graphene films. Dual configuration M4PP measurements......, demonstrated on graphene for the first time, provide valuable statistical insight into the influence of microscale defects on the conductance, while THz-TDS has potential as a fast, non-contact metrology method for mapping of the spatially averaged nanoscopic conductance on wafer-scale graphene with scan times......, dominating the microscale conductance of the investigated graphene film....

  11. 2004 Alaska Lidar Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data sets are generated using the OPTECH ALTM 70 kHz LIDAR system mounted onboard AeroMap's twin-engine Cessna 320 aircraft. Classified data sets such as this...

  12. Ramachandran and his Map

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramachandran map, detailed in this article. His current interests are peptide, cyclic peptide and protein conforma- tions, energetics, data analysis, computer modeling as well as development of new algorithms useful for the conformational studies. C Ramakrishnan. Introduction. Professor G N Ramachandran was one of the ...

  13. Photogrammetry and Digital Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Technical tour to Lithuania, Poland and Estonia for 13 technical staff and managers of State Land Service, HQ, Latvia. Focus on technical aspects and management of geographical data for map production and administration. Visits to state and local government organisations and newly established...

  14. Mapping World Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet, Lucille W.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to involve students in grades 6 through 8 in learning how geography was affected the problem of world hunger. Emphasis is placed on using maps, globes, atlases, and geographic dictionaries, as well as books, magazines, and other resources. (MES)

  15. Fluence map segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: 'Interpreting' the fluence map; The sequencer; Reasons for difference between desired and actual fluence map; Principle of 'Step and Shoot' segmentation; Large number of solutions for given fluence map; Optimizing 'step and shoot' segmentation; The interdigitation constraint; Main algorithms; Conclusions on segmentation algorithms (static mode); Optimizing intensity levels and monitor units; Sliding window sequencing; Synchronization to avoid the tongue-and-groove effect; Accounting for physical characteristics of MLC; Importance of corrections for leaf transmission and offset; Accounting for MLC mechanical constraints; The 'complexity' factor; Incorporating the sequencing into optimization algorithm; Data transfer to the treatment machine; Interface between R and V and accelerator; and Conclusions on fluence map segmentation (Segmentation is part of the overall inverse planning procedure; 'Step and Shoot' and 'Dynamic' options are available for most TPS (depending on accelerator model; The segmentation phase tends to come into the optimization loop; The physical characteristics of the MLC have a large influence on final dose distribution; The IMRT plans (MU and relative dose distribution) must be carefully validated). (P.A.)

  16. Mapping the Heavens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    results of astrophysical mapping along multi- ple dimensions of space and time that deter- mine the distribution ... discipline, the book evocatively charts out the enormous impact of these advances on human culture, in that our ... And her evocative writing skills make the de- scriptions of these various discoveries come alive.

  17. Bike Map Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Chapel Hill Bike Map Lines from KMZ file.This data came from the wiki comment board for the public, not an “official map” showing the Town of Chapel Hill's plans or...

  18. Copenhagen Sonic Experience Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of present European interest for mapping urban noise, it seems increasingly relevant to investigate the multiple ways in which sound intersects with the everyday experiences of urban citizens. Focusing on the polluting effects of infrastructural noise, the EU-initiated project of asse...

  19. Extending Lipschitz mappings continuously

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecká, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2012), s. 167-177 ISSN 1425-6908 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Lipschitz mapping * Hilbert space * extension Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jaa.2012.18.issue-2/jaa-2012-0011/jaa-2012-0011. xml

  20. STOCHASTIC FLOWS OF MAPPINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the stochastic flow of mappings generated by a Feller convolution semigroup on a compact metric space is studied. This kind of flow is the generalization of superprocesses of stochastic flows and stochastic diffeomorphism induced by the strong solutions of stochastic differential equations.

  1. Mapping the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    As the utilization of various e-voting technologies has notably increased in the past few years, so has the amount of publications on experiences with these technologies. This article, will, therefore map the literature while highlighting some of the important topics discussed within the field of e...

  2. eMAPS

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Starting with the 2005 performance appraisal and advancement exercise (MAPS), the paper version of the annual appraisal report has been replaced by an electronic EDH version - eMAPS (see Weekly Bulletin 48/2004). As announced in Weekly Bulletin 2/2005, information sessions to explain the features of eMAPS using EDH have been arranged as follows: 18 January 2005: Main Auditorium (500-1-001) from 14:00 to 15:30. 20 January 2005: AB Auditorium II (864-1-D02) from 14:00 to 15:30. 24 January 2005: AT Auditorium (30-7-018) from 10:00 to 11:30. The changeover to an electronic appraisal report is designed to reduce the administrative workload involving, e.g. photocopying, tracing and filing paper copies, while allowing staff members and their hierarchy access to the report form at the appropriate times. There is no change in the procedure for the annual interview and the advancement exercise, though Administrative Circular No 26 (Rev. 5) has been updated to take account of the introduction of eMAPS. The content...

  3. Mapping functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Vogt; Joseph R. Ferrari; Todd R. Lookingbill; Robert H. Gardner; Kurt H. Riitters; Katarzyna Ostapowicz

    2009-01-01

    An objective and reliable assessment of wildlife movement is important in theoretical and applied ecology. The identification and mapping of landscape elements that may enhance functional connectivity is usually a subjective process based on visual interpretations of species movement patterns. New methods based on mathematical morphology provide a generic, flexible,...

  4. Historical Topographic Map Collection bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, Kristin A.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2017-06-29

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the historical scanned maps in 2011, is to provide a digital repository of USGS topographic maps, available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of printed topographic maps, and prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic printing process. As the USGS continues the release of a new generation of topographic maps (US Topo) in electronic form, the topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, land management planning, and leisure.

  5. Generalized Smooth Transition Map Between Tent and Logistic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Wafaa S.; Fahmy, Hossam A. H.; Rezk, Ahmed A.; Radwan, Ahmed G.

    There is a continuous demand on novel chaotic generators to be employed in various modeling and pseudo-random number generation applications. This paper proposes a new chaotic map which is a general form for one-dimensional discrete-time maps employing the power function with the tent and logistic maps as special cases. The proposed map uses extra parameters to provide responses that fit multiple applications for which conventional maps were not enough. The proposed generalization covers also maps whose iterative relations are not based on polynomials, i.e. with fractional powers. We introduce a framework for analyzing the proposed map mathematically and predicting its behavior for various combinations of its parameters. In addition, we present and explain the transition map which results in intermediate responses as the parameters vary from their values corresponding to tent map to those corresponding to logistic map case. We study the properties of the proposed map including graph of the map equation, general bifurcation diagram and its key-points, output sequences, and maximum Lyapunov exponent. We present further explorations such as effects of scaling, system response with respect to the new parameters, and operating ranges other than transition region. Finally, a stream cipher system based on the generalized transition map validates its utility for image encryption applications. The system allows the construction of more efficient encryption keys which enhances its sensitivity and other cryptographic properties.

  6. USGS Imagery Only Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Only is a tile cache base map of orthoimagery in The National Map visible to the 1:18,000 scale. Orthoimagery data are typically high resolution images...

  7. Letters of Map Change (LOMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Documents, including different types of Letters of MAP Revision (LOMR) and Letters of Map Amendment (LOMA), which are issued by FEMA to revise or amend the flood...

  8. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  9. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  10. Map Usage in Virtual Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cevik, Helsin

    1998-01-01

    ... of map representation as an aid in performing navigation tasks. The approach taken was first to determine and then investigate the parameters that affect virtual map representation through an experiment designed specifically for this thesis...

  11. q-Deformed nonlinear maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 64; Issue 3 ... Keywords. Nonlinear dynamics; logistic map; -deformation; Tsallis statistics. ... As a specific example, a -deformation procedure is applied to the logistic map. Compared ...

  12. The Europa Global Geologic Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, E. J.; Patthoff, D. A.; Senske, D. A.; Collins, G. C.

    2018-06-01

    The Europa Global Geologic Map reveals three periods in Europa's surface history as well as an interesting distribution of microchaos. We will discuss the mapping and the interesting implications of our analysis of Europa's surface.

  13. Map projections cartographic information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grafarend, Erik W; Syffus, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a timely review of map projections including sphere, ellipsoid, rotational surfaces, and geodetic datum transformations. Coverage includes computer vision, and remote sensing space projective mappings in photogrammetry.

  14. Map projections cartographic information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grafarend, Erik W

    2006-01-01

    In the context of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) the book offers a timely review of map projections (sphere, ellipsoid, rotational surfaces) and geodetic datum transformations. For the needs of photogrammetry, computer vision, and remote sensing space projective mappings are reviewed.

  15. Universal map for cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2012-01-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  16. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  17. Associators in generalized octonionic maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, C.J.; Joshi, G.C.

    1994-01-01

    Generalizing previous work, it is shown that structural transitions are a general property of a large class of octonionic maps. They can thus be used as an indicator of non-associativity in an octonionic map. 7 refs., ills

  18. Mapping earthworm communities in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Orgiazzi, A.; Gardi, C.; Römbke, J.; Jansch, S.; Keith, A.; Neilson, R.; Boag, B.; Schmidt, O.; Murchie, A.K.; Blackshaw, R.P.; Pérès, G.; Cluzeau, D.; Guernion, M.; Briones, M.J.I.; Rodeiro, J.; Pineiro, R.; Diaz Cosin, D.J.; Sousa, J.P.; Suhadolc, M.; Kos, I.; Krogh, P.H.; Faber, J.H.; Mulder, C.; Bogte, J.J.; Wijnen, van H.J.; Schouten, A.J.; Zwart, de D.

    2016-01-01

    Existing data sets on earthworm communities in Europe were collected, harmonized, collated, modelled and depicted on a soil biodiversity map. Digital Soil Mapping was applied using multiple regressions relating relatively low density earthworm community data to soil characteristics, land use,

  19. Map Usage in Virtual Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cevik, Helsin

    1998-01-01

    .... Instead, we can determine the parameters that affect virtual map representation and that help to construct a mental map, and then manipulate these parameters in order to increase the effectiveness...

  20. Mapping Deviant Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A number of countries have emerged as stable (though minimalist) democracies despite low levels of modernization, lack of democratic neighbouring countries and other factors consistently related to democratic stability in the literature. The study of these deviant democracies is a promising new...... research field but it is afflicted by a notable problem, viz. the lack of a consensus as to which countries are actually instances of deviant democracy. The present article attempts to solve this problem by carrying out a comprehensive mapping of deviant democracies. First, I review the existing literature...... to provide an overview of the cases most often identified as deviant democracies. Second, I use a large-N analysis to systematically map deviant democracies. The analysis includes 159 countries covering the time period 1993–2008. The analysis points to 12 cases that merits further attention, viz...

  1. MAPS Appraisal Report Form

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2005-01-01

    As announced in Weekly Bulletin 48/2004, from now onwards, the paper MAPS appraisal report form has been replaced by an electronic form, which is available via EDH (on the EDH desktop under Other Tasks / HR & Training) No changes have been made to the contents of the form. Practical information will be available on the web page http://cern.ch/ais/projs/forms/maps/info.htm, and information meetings will be held on the following dates: 18 January 2005: MAIN AUDITORIUM (500-1-001) from 14:00 to 15:30. 20 January 2005: AB AUDITORIUM II (864-1-D02) from14:00 to 15:30. 24 January 2005: AT AUDITORIUM (30-7-018) from 10:00 to 11:30. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  2. Graphene mobility mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly...... assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over...... graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties....

  3. Mixed Map Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Löffler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Point feature map labeling is a geometric visualization problem, in which a set of input points must be labeled with a set of disjoint rectangles (the bounding boxes of the label texts. It is predominantly motivated by label placement in maps but it also has other visualization applications. Typically, labeling models either use internal labels, which must touch their feature point, or external (boundary labels, which are placed outside the input image and which are connected to their feature points by crossing-free leader lines. In this paper we study polynomial-time algorithms for maximizing the number of internal labels in a mixed labeling model that combines internal and external labels. The model requires that all leaders are parallel to a given orientation θ ∈ [0, 2π, the value of which influences the geometric properties and hence the running times of our algorithms.

  4. ASTROMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yue

    2012-01-01

    Spatially extended emission regions of active galactic nuclei respond to continuum variations, if such emission regions are powered by energy reprocessing of the continuum. The response from different parts of the reverberating region arrives at different times lagging behind the continuum variation. The lags can be used to map the geometry and kinematics of the emission region (i.e., reverberation mapping, RM). If the extended emission region is not spherically symmetric in configuration and velocity space, reverberation may produce astrometric offsets in the emission region photocenter as a function of time delay and velocity, detectable with future μas to tens of μas astrometry. Such astrometric responses provide independent constraints on the geometric and kinematic structure of the extended emission region, complementary to traditional RM. In addition, astrometric RM is more sensitive to infer the inclination of a flattened geometry and the rotation angle of the extended emission region.

  5. Mapping Homophobia in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Flood, Michael Gaston; Flood, Michael; Flood, C.; Hamilton, Clive

    2008-01-01

    One-third of the Australian population believe that 'homosexuality is immoral', and this belief is spread in distinct ways across the nation. Using data from a survey of nearly 25,000 Australians, we can 'map' homophobia in Australia. Homophobic attitudes are worst in country areas of Queensland and Tasmania. Men are far more likely than women to feel that homosexuality does not have moral legitimacy, and this gender gap in attitudes persists across age, socioeconomic, educational, and region...

  6. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  7. MAP user's manual copyright

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The program MITMAP represents a set of general purpose, two- dimensional, finite element programs for the calculation of magnetic fields. It consists of the program MAP and MAP2DJ. The two programs are used to solve different electromagnetic problems, but they have a common set of subrountines for pre- and postprocessing. Originally separate programs, they have been combined to make modification easier. The manuals, however, will remain separate. The program MAP is described in this manual. MAP is applicable to the class of problems with two-dimensional-planar or axisymmetric - geometries, in which the current density and the magnetic vector potential have only a single nonvanishing component. The single component is associated with the direction that is perpendicular to the plane of the problem and is invariant with respect to that direction. Maxwell's equations can be reduced to a solver diffusion equation in terms of the single, nonvanishing component of the magnetic vector potential for planar problems and to a single component of a vector potential for planar problems and to a single component of a vector diffusion equation for axisymmetric problems. The magnetic permeability appears in the governing equation. The permeability may be a function of the magnetic flux density. In addition, any electrically conducting material present will have eddy currents induced by a time varying magnetic field. These eddy currents must be included in the solution process. This manual provides a description of the structure of the input data and output for the program. There are several example problems presented that illustrate the major program features. Appendices are included that contain a derivation of the governing equations and the application of the finite element method to the solution of the equations

  8. Algebraic entropy for algebraic maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hone, A N W; Ragnisco, Orlando; Zullo, Federico

    2016-01-01

    We propose an extension of the concept of algebraic entropy, as introduced by Bellon and Viallet for rational maps, to algebraic maps (or correspondences) of a certain kind. The corresponding entropy is an index of the complexity of the map. The definition inherits the basic properties from the definition of entropy for rational maps. We give an example with positive entropy, as well as two examples taken from the theory of Bäcklund transformations. (letter)

  9. Mind mapping in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Christopher; Powell, Julia; Stroud, James; Pringle, Jan

    We tested a theory that mind mapping could be used as a tool in qualitative research to transcribe and analyse an interview. We compared results derived from mind mapping with those from interpretive phenomenological analysis by examining patients' and carers' perceptions of a new nurse-led service. Mind mapping could be used to rapidly analyse simple qualitative audio-recorded interviews. More research is needed to establish the extent to which mind mapping can assist qualitative researchers.

  10. Fermion to boson mappings revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.; Johnson, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    We briefly review various mappings of fermion pairs to bosons, including those based on mapping operators, such as Belyaev-Zelevinskii, and those on mapping states, such as Marumori; in particular we consider the work of Otsuka-Arima-Iachello, aimed at deriving the Interacting Boson Model. We then give a rigorous and unified description of state-mapping procedures which allows one to systematically go beyond Otsuka-Arima-Iachello and related approaches, along with several exact results. (orig.)

  11. System of automated map design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarjov, S.Yu.; Rybalko, S.I.; Proskura, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Preprint 'System of automated map design' contains information about the program shell for construction of territory map, performing level line drawing of arbitrary two-dimension field (in particular, the radionuclide concentration field). The work schedule and data structures are supplied, as well as data on system performance. The preprint can become useful for experts in radioecology and for all persons involved in territory pollution mapping or multi-purpose geochemical mapping. (author)

  12. Mapping in inertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1989-05-01

    World space mapping in inertial frames is used to examine the Lorentz covariance of symmetry operations. It is found that the Galilean invariant concepts of simultaneity (S), parity (P), and time reversal symmetry (T) are not Lorentz covariant concepts for inertial observers. That is, just as the concept of simultaneity has no significance independent of the Lorentz inertial frame, likewise so are the concepts of parity and time reversal. However, the world parity (W) [i.e., the space-time reversal symmetry (P-T)] is a truly Lorentz covariant concept. Indeed, it is shown that only those mapping matrices M that commute with the Lorentz transformation matrix L (i.e., [M,L] = 0) are the ones that correspond to manifestly Lorentz covariant operations. This result is in accordance with the spirit of the world space Mach's principle. Since the Lorentz transformation is an orthogonal transformation while the Galilean transformation is not an orthogonal transformation, the formal relativistic space-time mapping theory used here does not have a corresponding non-relativistic counterpart. 12 refs

  13. Lectures on quasiconformal mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlfors, Lars V

    2006-01-01

    Lars Ahlfors's Lectures on Quasiconformal Mappings, based on a course he gave at Harvard University in the spring term of 1964, was first published in 1966 and was soon recognized as the classic it was shortly destined to become. These lectures develop the theory of quasiconformal mappings from scratch, give a self-contained treatment of the Beltrami equation, and cover the basic properties of Teichm�ller spaces, including the Bers embedding and the Teichm�ller curve. It is remarkable how Ahlfors goes straight to the heart of the matter, presenting major results with a minimum set of prerequisites. Many graduate students and other mathematicians have learned the foundations of the theories of quasiconformal mappings and Teichm�ller spaces from these lecture notes. This edition includes three new chapters. The first, written by Earle and Kra, describes further developments in the theory of Teichm�ller spaces and provides many references to the vast literature on Teichm�ller spaces and quasiconformal ...

  14. Using Playground Maps for Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, A. Vonnie

    2016-01-01

    Many schools now decorate their outside hard surface areas with maps. These maps provide color and excitement to a playground and are a terrific teaching tool for geography. But these maps can easily be integrated into physical education as well to promote both physical activity as well as knowledge of geography. The purpose of this article is to…

  15. Drawing subway maps : a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with automating the drawing of subway maps. There are two features of schematic subway maps that make them different from drawings of other networks such as flow charts or organigrams. First, most schematic subway maps use not only horizontal and vertical lines, but also diagonals.

  16. Genetic algorithms for map labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Steven Ferdinand van

    2001-01-01

    Map labeling is the cartographic problem of placing the names of features (for example cities or rivers) on the map. A good labeling has no intersections between labels. Even basic versions of the problem are NP-hard. In addition, realistic map-labeling problems deal with many cartographic

  17. Try This: Collaborative Mind Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In this "Try This" article, students learn about collaborative mind mapping. A mind map is a type of graphic organizer that allows for short ideas to be written and linked to related ideas on a "map." A central idea is placed in the middle of the paper with related ideas connected to the central idea as well as to other ideas.…

  18. Single-edition quadrangle maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1998-01-01

    In August 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Mapping Division and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service signed an Interagency Agreement to begin a single-edition joint mapping program. This agreement established the coordination for producing and maintaining single-edition primary series topographic maps for quadrangles containing National Forest System lands. The joint mapping program saves money by eliminating duplication of effort by the agencies and results in a more frequent revision cycle for quadrangles containing national forests. Maps are revised on the basis of jointly developed standards and contain normal features mapped by the USGS, as well as additional features required for efficient management of National Forest System lands. Single-edition maps look slightly different but meet the content, accuracy, and quality criteria of other USGS products. The Forest Service is responsible for the land management of more than 191 million acres of land throughout the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, including 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands. These areas make up the National Forest System lands and comprise more than 10,600 of the 56,000 primary series 7.5-minute quadrangle maps (15-minute in Alaska) covering the United States. The Forest Service has assumed responsibility for maintaining these maps, and the USGS remains responsible for printing and distributing them. Before the agreement, both agencies published similar maps of the same areas. The maps were used for different purposes, but had comparable types of features that were revised at different times. Now, the two products have been combined into one so that the revision cycle is stabilized and only one agency revises the maps, thus increasing the number of current maps available for National Forest System lands. This agreement has improved service to the public by requiring that the agencies share the same maps and that the maps meet a

  19. Timed bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hune, Thomas; Nielsen, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    of timed bisimulation. Thus the abstract results from the theory of open maps apply, e.g. the existence of canonical models and characteristic logics. Here, we provide an alternative proof of decidability of bisimulation for finite timed transition systems in terms of open maps, and illustrate the use......Open maps have been used for defining bisimulations for a range of models, but none of these have modelled real-time. We define a category of timed transition systems, and use the general framework of open maps to obtain a notion of bisimulation. We show this to be equivalent to the standard notion...... of open maps in presenting bisimulations....

  20. A guide of patent map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    This book introduces application and characteristic of patent information, types of patent information data and research of patent information, arrangement of patent information and patent map, analysis of patent information, necessity, writing period arrangement way of patent map, cases of patent map on selection of task of research and development, system of research and development and application, examples of PM such as MAP by year, application, technique, Inventor, and claim point map and computerization like data arrangement of PM patent, collection of analysis range and item analysis of patent, cases and written reports on patent analysis.

  1. Proportional Symbol Mapping in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Tanimura

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of spatial data on a map aids not only in data exploration but also in communication to impart spatial conception or ideas to others. Although recent carto-graphic functions in R are rapidly becoming richer, proportional symbol mapping, which is one of the common mapping approaches, has not been packaged thus far. Based on the theories of proportional symbol mapping developed in cartography, the authors developed some functions for proportional symbol mapping using R, including mathematical and perceptual scaling. An example of these functions demonstrated the new expressive power and options available in R, particularly for the visualization of conceptual point data.

  2. Derivation of the dipole map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh; Boozer, Allen

    2004-01-01

    In our method of maps [Punjabi et al., Phy. Rev. Lett. 69, 3322 (1992), and Punjabi et al., J. Plasma Phys. 52, 91 (1994)], symplectic maps are used to calculate the trajectories of magnetic field lines in divertor tokamaks. Effects of the magnetic perturbations are calculated using the low MN map [Ali et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 1908 (2004)] and the dipole map [Punjabi et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3992 (2003)]. The dipole map is used to calculate the effects of externally located current carrying coils on the trajectories of the field lines, the stochastic layer, the magnetic footprint, and the heat load distribution on the collector plates in divertor tokamaks [Punjabi et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3992 (2003)]. Symplectic maps are general, efficient, and preserve and respect the Hamiltonian nature of the dynamics. In this brief communication, a rigorous mathematical derivation of the dipole map is given

  3. Looking for an old map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1996-01-01

    Many people want maps that show an area of the United States as it existed many years ago. These are called historical maps, and there are two types. The most common type consists of special maps prepared by commercial firms to show such historical features as battle-fields, military routes, or the paths taken by famous travelers. Typically, these maps are for sale to tourists at the sites of historical events. The other type is the truly old map--one compiled by a surveyor or cartographer many years ago. Lewis and Clark, for example, made maps of their journeys into the Northwest Territories in 1803-6, and originals of some of these maps still exist.

  4. Conceptual maps as evaluation strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionísio Borsato

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The following work shows the conceptual map as an evaluation tool. In this study, an opening text was used as a previous organizer, with a theme related to the students’ daily lives. The developed activity consisted in elaborating conceptual maps before and after the experimental works. The evaluation was applied to 21 students of the 1st grade and 22 of the 3rd grade of High School. The elaborated maps were scored according to hierarchy, propositions, linking words, cross linking and examples. The classification of the maps elaborated before and after the experimental activity, was obtained having as a parameter, a referential conceptual map. In this classification many differences were observed between the first and second maps of both grades and among the groups. The elaboration of conceptual maps showed great potential as evaluation resources.

  5. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  6. Probability mapping of contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A.; Kaplan, P.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McGraw, M.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Istok, J.D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Sigda, J.M. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. The probability mapping approach illustrated in this paper appears to offer site operators a reasonable, quantitative methodology for many environmental remediation decisions and allows evaluation of the risk associated with those decisions. For example, output from this approach can be used in quantitative, cost-based decision models for evaluating possible site characterization and/or remediation plans, resulting in selection of the risk-adjusted, least-cost alternative. The methodology is completely general, and the techniques are applicable to a wide variety of environmental restoration projects. The probability-mapping approach is illustrated by application to a contaminated site at the former DOE Feed Materials Production Center near Fernald, Ohio. Soil geochemical data, collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project, have been used to construct a number of geostatistical simulations of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit (the 3-m width of a bulldozer blade). Each such simulation accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination (potential clean-up or personnel-hazard thresholds).

  7. Probability mapping of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; McGraw, M.A.; Istok, J.D.; Sigda, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. The probability mapping approach illustrated in this paper appears to offer site operators a reasonable, quantitative methodology for many environmental remediation decisions and allows evaluation of the risk associated with those decisions. For example, output from this approach can be used in quantitative, cost-based decision models for evaluating possible site characterization and/or remediation plans, resulting in selection of the risk-adjusted, least-cost alternative. The methodology is completely general, and the techniques are applicable to a wide variety of environmental restoration projects. The probability-mapping approach is illustrated by application to a contaminated site at the former DOE Feed Materials Production Center near Fernald, Ohio. Soil geochemical data, collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project, have been used to construct a number of geostatistical simulations of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit (the 3-m width of a bulldozer blade). Each such simulation accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination (potential clean-up or personnel-hazard thresholds)

  8. Mapping the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, S.; Wright, L.; Church, V.; Hager, M.

    1992-01-01

    With powerful new technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference device that peer through the skull and see the brain at work, neuroscientists seek the wellsprings of thoughts and emotions, the genesis of intelligence and language. A functional map of the brain is thus obtained and its challenge is to move beyond brain structure to create a detailed diagram of which part do what. For that the brain's cartographers rely on a variety of technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference devices. Their performances and uses are briefly reviewed. ills

  9. Mapping the gendered city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almahmood, Mohammed Abdulrahman M; Scharnhorst, Eric; Carstensen, Trine Agervig

    2017-01-01

    opportunities for gender interaction. However, streets are socially conceived as men’s walkscapes, which limits women’s presence, especially at certain times of the day. This paper reveals how walking experience, tempo-rhythm, sense of place and range of walkscapes are not only determined by ‘universal’ spatial...... Peninsula, where socio-cultural values and restrictions regulate men and women’s use and access to public spaces. The methodology used is a combination of movement tracking data using GPS technology and map-based workshops where participants can reflect on their walking behaviour and spatial preferences...

  10. Bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1993-01-01

    Petri nets), and labeled event structures are considered. On transition systems, the abstract definition readily specialises to Milner's (1989) strong bisimulation. On event structures, it explains and leads to a revision of the history-preserving bisimulation of Rabinovitch and Traktenbrot (1988......), and Goltz and van Glabeek (1989). A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos brings to light a promising new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labeled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise, this new presheaf model has refinement...

  11. Journal of Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Maps (JoM (http://www.journalofmaps.com počeo je izlaziti 2005. godine isključivo kao elektronički časopis. Izdavač je School of Earth Sciences and Geography, Kingston University, UK. Budući da ne izlazi u tiskanom izdanju, časopis nema uobičajene sveske. Svescima se, ipak, mogu smatrati članci srodne tematike koji se objavljuju tri puta godišnje – u travnju, kolovozu i prosincu.

  12. Corrosion mapping in pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Alekseychuk, O.; Bellon, C.; Ewert, U.; Rost, P.; Schmid, M.

    2002-01-01

    In a joint research project, BASF AG and BAM analyzed the state of the art of tangential radiography of pipes and developed more efficient methods of evaluation. Various PC applications were developed and tested: 1. A program for routine evaluation of digital radiographic images. 2. 3D simulation of the tangential projection of pipes for common radiation sources and various different detectors. 3. Preliminary work on combined evaluation of digital projections and wall thickness changes in radiation direction resulted in a new manner of image display, i.e. the so-called 'corrosion mapping', in which the wall thickness is displayed as a 2D picture above the pipe surface [de

  13. Mapping Wind Energy Controversies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    As part the Wind2050 project funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research we have mapped controversies on wind energy as they unfold online. Specifically we have collected two purpose built datasets, a web corpus containing information from 758 wind energy websites in 6 different countries......, and a smaller social media corpus containing information from 14 Danish wind energy pages on Facebook. These datasets have been analyzed to answer questions like: How do wind proponents and opponents organize online? Who are the central actors? And what are their matters of concern? The purpose of this report...

  14. Mapping of renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, V.

    2013-01-01

    Germany is the champion of green energy in Europe: the contribution of renewable energies to electricity generation reached about 20% in 2011. This article describes the situation of renewable energies in Germany in 2011 with the help of 2 maps, the first one gives the installed electrical generation capacity for each region and for each renewable energy source (wind power, hydro-electricity, biomass, photovoltaic energy and biogas) and the second one details the total number of jobs (direct and indirect) for each renewable energy source and for each region. In 2011 about 372000 people worked in the renewable energy sector in Germany. (A.C.)

  15. Between Maps and Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmboe, Rasmus; Stricker, Jan Høgh

    2016-01-01

    This audio paper departs from an artwork made by Andreas Führer called The Map is Not The Territory D’Or; a score for a soundwalk in the town of Roskilde, Denmark. The basic sound materials used in the audio paper are 1) an interview in Danish with the artist, 2) a voice over of a theoretical text...... in English, and 3) recordings from performances of the piece, including walking, breathing exercises, and the sounds of ventilation systems and other environmental sound. By mingling these different materials, and by using ‘map’ and ‘territory’ as metaphors, the paper complicates issues of representation...

  16. YouGenMap: a web platform for dynamic multi-comparative mapping and visualization of genetic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Batesole; Kokulapalan Wimalanathan; Lin Liu; Fan Zhang; Craig S. Echt; Chun Liang

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genetic maps are used in examination of genome organization, detection of conserved gene order, and exploration of marker order variations. YouGenMap is an open-source web tool that offers dynamic comparative mapping capability of users' own genetic mapping between 2 or more map sets. Users' genetic map data and optional gene annotations are...

  17. Online maps with APIs and webservices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    With the Internet now the primary method of accessing maps, this volume examines developments in the world of online map delivery, focusing in particular on application programmer interfaces such as the Google Maps API, and their utility in thematic mapping.

  18. BAC-HAPPY mapping (BAP mapping: a new and efficient protocol for physical mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T H Vu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Physical and linkage mapping underpin efforts to sequence and characterize the genomes of eukaryotic organisms by providing a skeleton framework for whole genome assembly. Hitherto, linkage and physical "contig" maps were generated independently prior to merging. Here, we develop a new and easy method, BAC HAPPY MAPPING (BAP mapping, that utilizes BAC library pools as a HAPPY mapping panel together with an Mbp-sized DNA panel to integrate the linkage and physical mapping efforts into one pipeline. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as an exemplar, a set of 40 Sequence Tagged Site (STS markers spanning approximately 10% of chromosome 4 were simultaneously assembled onto a BAP map compiled using both a series of BAC pools each comprising 0.7x genome coverage and dilute (0.7x genome samples of sheared genomic DNA. The resultant BAP map overcomes the need for polymorphic loci to separate genetic loci by recombination and allows physical mapping in segments of suppressed recombination that are difficult to analyze using traditional mapping techniques. Even virtual "BAC-HAPPY-mapping" to convert BAC landing data into BAC linkage contigs is possible.

  19. Mapping the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goerres, Achim; Vanhuysse, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post-Industri......Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post...... boxes by asking a number of central questions. How does population aging change political support for redistribution towards different age groups in society, including not just elderly people but also families with children? How, and when, do established parties in aging democracies implement policies......? The answers provided in this volume promise to be of major interest to scholars in fields such as political economy, political sociology, social policy, comparative politics, demography, and gerontology....

  20. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  1. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  2. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.O.

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work

  3. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  4. Planetary Geologic Mapping Handbook - 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Skinner, J. A.; Hare, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic maps present, in an historical context, fundamental syntheses of interpretations of the materials, landforms, structures, and processes that characterize planetary surfaces and shallow subsurfaces (e.g., Varnes, 1974). Such maps also provide a contextual framework for summarizing and evaluating thematic research for a given region or body. In planetary exploration, for example, geologic maps are used for specialized investigations such as targeting regions of interest for data collection and for characterizing sites for landed missions. Whereas most modern terrestrial geologic maps are constructed from regional views provided by remote sensing data and supplemented in detail by field-based observations and measurements, planetary maps have been largely based on analyses of orbital photography. For planetary bodies in particular, geologic maps commonly represent a snapshot of a surface, because they are based on available information at a time when new data are still being acquired. Thus the field of planetary geologic mapping has been evolving rapidly to embrace the use of new data and modern technology and to accommodate the growing needs of planetary exploration. Planetary geologic maps have been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since 1962 (Hackman, 1962). Over this time, numerous maps of several planetary bodies have been prepared at a variety of scales and projections using the best available image and topographic bases. Early geologic map bases commonly consisted of hand-mosaicked photographs or airbrushed shaded-relief views and geologic linework was manually drafted using mylar bases and ink drafting pens. Map publishing required a tedious process of scribing, color peel-coat preparation, typesetting, and photo-laboratory work. Beginning in the 1990s, inexpensive computing, display capability and user-friendly illustration software allowed maps to be drawn using digital tools rather than pen and ink, and mylar bases became obsolete

  5. Visualizing Dynamic Data with Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, Daisuke; Kobourov, Stephen G; Hu, Yifan

    2012-09-01

    Maps offer a familiar way to present geographic data (continents, countries), and additional information (topography, geology), can be displayed with the help of contours and heat-map overlays. In this paper, we consider visualizing large-scale dynamic relational data by taking advantage of the geographic map metaphor. We describe a map-based visualization system which uses animation to convey dynamics in large data sets, and which aims to preserve the viewer's mental map while also offering readable views at all times. Our system is fully functional and has been used to visualize user traffic on the Internet radio station last.fm, as well as TV-viewing patterns from an IPTV service. All map images in this paper are available in high-resolution at [1] as are several movies illustrating the dynamic visualization.

  6. Knowledge Map of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenonen, Suvi; Jensen, Per Anker; Lindahl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    both the research community and FM-practitioners can develop new models for identifying knowledge needs and gaps and to improve knowledge sharing and knowledge flow and thus the fulfilment of their mission and goals. Knowledge maps can also help in organizing research activities and analysing......Purpose This paper aims to draft a knowledge map of the fragmented and multidisciplinary research of and relevant to FM. Facilities management knowledge map is a tool for presenting what relevant data and knowledge, a.k.a. knowledge, resides in different disciplines. Knowledge mapping is a step...... in creating an inventory of knowledge (i.e. the knowledge base) and developing/improving the processes of knowledge sharing in research, education and practice. Theory Knowledge mapping is discussed in terms of knowledge management. The research is connected to knowledge mapping in the facilities management...

  7. Quantum Programs as Kleisli Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Westerbaan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Furber and Jacobs have shown in their study of quantum computation that the category of commutative C*-algebras and PU-maps (positive linear maps which preserve the unit is isomorphic to the Kleisli category of a comonad on the category of commutative C*-algebras with MIU-maps (linear maps which preserve multiplication, involution and unit. [Furber and Jacobs, 2013] In this paper, we prove a non-commutative variant of this result: the category of C*-algebras and PU-maps is isomorphic to the Kleisli category of a comonad on the subcategory of MIU-maps. A variation on this result has been used to construct a model of Selinger and Valiron's quantum lambda calculus using von Neumann algebras. [Cho and Westerbaan, 2016

  8. Synchronizability of coupled PWL maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polynikis, A.; Di Bernardo, M.; Hogan, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the phenomenon of synchronization of chaotic systems in the case of coupled piecewise linear (PWL) continuous and discontinuous one-dimensional maps. We present numerical results for two examples of coupled systems consisting of two PWL maps. We illustrate how the coupled system can achieve synchronization and discuss the nature of the bifurcation that occurs at a critical value of the coupling strength. We then determine this critical coupling using linear stability analysis. We discuss the effects of variation of the parameters of the PWL maps on the critical coupling and present different bifurcation scenarios obtained for different sets of values of these parameters. Finally, we discuss an extension of our work to the synchronizability of networks consisting of two or more PWL maps. We show how the synchronizability of a network of PWL maps can be improved by tuning the map parameters.

  9. Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambition of this issue of Portal is to reach across the methodological boundaries of history, politics, literature and geography to apply their complementary perspectives to the study of identity and its relation to space and place, an aim that involves attempting to identify the many different ways the notoriously slippery concepts of identity and geography may intersect. For this issue we have selected articles that cast a fresh perspective on two areas where identity and geography intersect: the construction of identity through the imaginative recreation of place in literature: Mapping Literary Spaces; and the study of the shifting relationships of centre and periphery, exclusion and inclusion in urban settings and geopolitical confrontations: Social and Political Peripheries. Gerard Toal has written that geography is not a noun but a verb: it does not describe what space is but studies what we do with space, imaginatively and politically. The articles in this issue illustrate the exercise of the literary and political imagination and the role of materiality and memory in the creation of geographic representation. They show too a new awareness of the centrality of space in the constitution of identities, and the need for a new geocritical reading of its discourse, as the interrelations of place and community are played out on the many scales of social and political life, from the local to the global.   The special issue is organised thus: Introduction Matthew Graves (Aix-Marseille University & Liz Rechniewski (Sydney University: “Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities.” I. Mapping Literary Spaces - Isabelle Avila (University of Paris XIII, "Les Cartes de l'Afrique au XIXe siècle et Joseph Conrad : Perceptions d'une Révolution Cartographique." - Daniela Rogobete (University of Craiova, "Global vs Glocal: Dimensions of the post-1981 Indian English Novel." II. Social and Political Peripheries - Elizabeth Rechniewski (Sydney

  10. General Galilei Covariant Gaussian Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarri, Giulio; Toroš, Marko; Bassi, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    We characterize general non-Markovian Gaussian maps which are covariant under Galilean transformations. In particular, we consider translational and Galilean covariant maps and show that they reduce to the known Holevo result in the Markovian limit. We apply the results to discuss measures of macroscopicity based on classicalization maps, specifically addressing dissipation, Galilean covariance and non-Markovianity. We further suggest a possible generalization of the macroscopicity measure defined by Nimmrichter and Hornberger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 16 (2013)].

  11. Cosmic string induced CMB maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landriau, M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2011-01-01

    We compute maps of CMB temperature fluctuations seeded by cosmic strings using high resolution simulations of cosmic strings in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We create full-sky, 18 deg. and 3 deg. CMB maps, including the relevant string contribution at each resolution from before recombination to today. We extract the angular power spectrum from these maps, demonstrating the importance of recombination effects. We briefly discuss the probability density function of the pixel temperatures, their skewness, and kurtosis.

  12. Transfer maps and projection formulas

    OpenAIRE

    Tabuada, Goncalo

    2010-01-01

    Transfer maps and projection formulas are undoubtedly one of the key tools in the development and computation of (co)homology theories. In this note we develop an unified treatment of transfer maps and projection formulas in the non-commutative setting of dg categories. As an application, we obtain transfer maps and projection formulas in algebraic K-theory, cyclic homology, topological cyclic homology, and other scheme invariants.

  13. Information technology road map 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    This book introduces information technology road map 2015 with presentation, process, plan and conclusion of it. It also has introduction of IT road map by field : information technology road map 2015 on the next-generation of semiconductor, display, light emitting diode and light industry, home network and home electronic appliances, digital TV and broadcasting, radio technology, satellite communications, mobile communication for the next-generation, BcN field, software, computer for the next-generation and security of knowledge information.

  14. Symplectic maps for accelerator lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.; Gabella, W.

    1988-05-01

    We describe a method for numerical construction of a symplectic map for particle propagation in a general accelerator lattice. The generating function of the map is obtained by integrating the Hamilton-Jacobi equation as an initial-value problem on a finite time interval. Given the generating function, the map is put in explicit form by means of a Fourier inversion technique. We give an example which suggests that the method has promise. 9 refs., 9 figs

  15. Introduction: Hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Miyagi, Toyohiko; Lee, Saro; Trofymchuk, Oleksandr M

    2014-01-01

    Twenty papers were accepted into the session on landslide hazard mapping for oral presentation. The papers presented susceptibility and hazard analysis based on approaches ranging from field-based assessments to statistically based models to assessments that combined hydromechanical and probabilistic components. Many of the studies have taken advantage of increasing availability of remotely sensed data and nearly all relied on Geographic Information Systems to organize and analyze spatial data. The studies used a range of methods for assessing performance and validating hazard and susceptibility models. A few of the studies presented in this session also included some element of landslide risk assessment. This collection of papers clearly demonstrates that a wide range of approaches can lead to useful assessments of landslide susceptibility and hazard.

  16. Turkey Reading Culture Map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Akkılık

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Derived from the project with the same name, the work was published into a book by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Directorate General of Libraries and Publications, the project coordinator. Goal of the project is defined as follows: "specifying the solutions to problems faced directly or indirectly in accessing information, making suggestions to related corporations and persons, determining the perception of libraries in the society, raising the quality of services provided at public libraries and children's libraries affiliated with the Ministry, diversifying these libraries and designating the road map for the future." Carried out with the "method of face-to-face surveys" with 6.212 people in 26 cities, the research revealed the society's habits of reading and library usage.

  17. Mapping cultural ecosystem services:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paracchini, Maria Luisa; Zulian, Grazia; Kopperoinen, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Research on ecosystem services mapping and valuing has increased significantly in recent years. However, compared to provisioning and regulating services, cultural ecosystem services have not yet been fully integrated into operational frameworks. One reason for this is that transdisciplinarity...... surveys are a main source of information. Among cultural ecosystem services, assessment of outdoor recreation can be based on a large pool of literature developed mostly in social and medical science, and landscape and ecology studies. This paper presents a methodology to include recreation...... in the conceptual framework for EU wide ecosystem assessments (Maes et al., 2013), which couples existing approaches for recreation management at country level with behavioural data derived from surveys, and population distribution data. The proposed framework is based on three components: the ecosystem function...

  18. Mapping the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, M J; Huchra, J P

    1989-11-17

    Maps of the galaxy distribution in the nearby universe reveal large coherent structures. The extent of the largest features is limited only by the size of the survey. Voids with a density typically 20 percent of the mean and with diameters of 5000 km s(-1) are present in every survey large enough to contain them. Many galaxies lie in thin sheet-like structures. The largest sheet detected so far is the "Great Wall" with a minimum extent of 60 h(-1) Mpc x 170 h(-1) Mpc, where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The frequent occurrence of these structures is one of several serious challenges to our current understanding of the origin and evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe.

  19. Mapping of nitrogen risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Andersen, Hans Estrup; Carstensen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    risk mapping part of the tool, we combined a modelled root zone N leaching with a catchment-specific N reduction factor which in combination determines the N load to the marine recipient. N leaching was calculated using detailed information of agricultural management from national databases as well...... will be more effective if they are implemented in N loss hot spots or risk areas. Additionally, the highly variable N reduction in groundwater and surface waters needs to be taken into account as this strongly influences the resulting effect of mitigation measures. The objectives of this study were to develop...... and apply an N risk tool to the entire agricultural land area in Denmark. The purpose of the tool is to identify high risk areas, i.e. areas which contribute disproportionately much to diffuse N losses to the marine recipient, and to suggest cost-effective measures to reduce losses from risk areas. In the N...

  20. Mapping eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2007-01-01

    The emerging research area of eParticipation can be characterized as the study of technology-facilitated citizen participation in (democratic) deliberation and decision-making. Using conventional literature study techniques, we identify 105 articles that are considered to be highly relevant to e......Participation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging socio-technical research area and use this schema to map the research contributions identified. This allows us make an initial sketch of the scientific character of the area and its central concerns, theories......, and methods. We extend the analysis to define four central research challenges for the field: understanding technology and participation; the strategic challenge; the design challenge; and the evaluation challenge. This article thus contributes to a developing account of eParticipation, which will help future...