WorldWideScience

Sample records for oxygen reaction kinetics

  1. Kinetics of liquid lithium reaction with oxygen-nitrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, T.K.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in order to characterize the kinetics of lithium chemical reaction with a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. Three mixed gas compositions were used; 80% N 2 and 20% O 2 , 90% N 2 and 10% O 2 , and 95% N 2 and 5% O 2 . The reaction rate was obtained as a function of lithium temperature and the oxygen fraction. Liquid lithium temperature varied from 400 to 1100 0 C. By varying the composition, the degree of inhibition of the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate due to the presence of oxygen was observed. The results indicate that the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate depended on both the fraction of oxygen present and lithium temperature. The lithium nitride layer formed from the reaction also had a significant inhibition effect on the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate while the lithium-oxygen reaction rate was not as greatly hindered. LITFIRE, a computer code which simulates temperature and pressure history in a containment building following lithium spills, was modified by including (1) an improved model for the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate and (2) a model for the lithium-CO 2 reaction. LITFIRE was used to simulate HEDL's LC-2 and LA-5 experiments, and the predicted temperatures and pressures were in a reasonable agreement. Furthermore, LITFIRE was applied to a prototypical fusion reactor containment in order to simulate the consequences of a lithium spill accident. The result indicated that if nitrogen was used as containment building gas during the accident, the consequences of the accident would be less severe than those with air. The pressure rise in the building was found to be reduced by 50% and the maximum temperature of the combustion zone was limited to 900 0 C instead of 1200 0 C in the case of air

  2. Online Measurement of Oxygen-Dependent Enzyme Reaction Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Murray Peter; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John M

    2018-01-01

    accurate measurement of the oxygen mass balance in the gas-phase of a reactor. The method was successfully validated and demonstrated using two model reactions: firstly the oxidation of glucose by glucose oxidase and secondly the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of macrocyclic ketones to lactones. Initial...

  3. Reaction kinetics of oxygen on single-phase alloys, oxidation of nickel and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalauze, Rene

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis first addresses the reaction kinetics of oxygen on alloys. It presents some generalities on heterogeneous reactions (conventional theory, theory of jumps), discusses the core reaction (with the influence of pressure), discusses the influence of metal self-diffusion on metal oxidation kinetics (equilibrium conditions at the interface, hybrid diffusion regime), reports the application of the hybrid diffusion model to the study of selective oxidation of alloys (Wagner model, hybrid diffusion model) and the study of the oxidation kinetics of an alloy forming a solid solution of two oxides. The second part reports the investigation of the oxidation of single phase nickel and niobium alloys (phase α, β and γ)

  4. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on 238PuO2 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiting, Christofer E.; Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO 2 suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO 2 . Previous CeO 2 surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO 2 is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO 2 , in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO 2 oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here. - Highlights: • PuO 2 Oxygen exchange kinetics can be influenced by at least 3 different mechanisms. • An internal chemical reaction controls the rate at high temperature and large SSA. • Surface mobility and surface exchange influence rate at lower temperatures and SSA. • Exchange temperatures may alter SSA and make data difficult to interpret.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction at CoPd system synthesized on XC72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasevich, M.R.; Chalykh, A.E.; Bogdanovskaya, V.A.; Kuznetsova, L.N.; Kapustina, N.A.; Efremov, B.N.; Ehrenburg, M.R.; Reznikova, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Studies are presented of the kinetics and mechanism of oxygen electroreduction reaction on CoPd catalysts synthesized on carbon black XC72. As shown both in model conditions and in the tests within the cathodes of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells with proton conducting electrolyte, CoPd/C system features a higher activity, as compared to Co/C. The highest activity in the oxygen reduction reaction is demonstrated by the catalysts with the Pd:Co atomic ratio being 7:3 and 4:1. The structural studies (XPS and XRD, and also the data of CO desorption measurements) evidence the CoPd alloy formation, which is reflected in the negative shift of the bonding energy maximum as compared to Pd/C and in the appearance of the additional CO desorption maximums on the voltammograms. It is found by means of structural research that CoPd alloy is formed in the course of the catalyst synthesis which features a higher catalytic activity of the binary systems. Besides, CoPd/C catalyst is more stable in respect to corrosion than Pd supported on carbon black. The measurements on the rotating disc electrode and rotating ring-disc electrode evidence that CoPd/C system provides the predominant oxygen reduction to water in the practically important range of potentials (E > 0.7 V). The proximity of kinetic parameters of the oxygen reduction reaction on CoPd/C and Pt/C catalysts points to the similar reaction mechanism. The slow step of the reaction is the addition of the first electron to the adsorbed and previously protonated O 2 molecule. The assumptions are offered about the reasons causing the higher activity and selectivity of the binary catalyst towards oxygen reduction to water, as compared to Co/C. The studies of the most active catalysts within the fuel cell cathodes are performed

  6. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%

  7. Pulse radiolysis study of reaction of bull serum albumin electron adduct with oxygen. Polychromatic kinetics of reaction with adsorbed oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribush, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    By the method of pulse radiolysis the reaction of bull serum albumin electron adduct with oxygen is investigated. As pulsed radiation source electron linear accelerators with particle energy of 8.0 and 4.5 MeV and pulse time of 40 ns and 2.2 μs, respectively have been used. It is assumed that the disappearance of protein electron adduct occurs in the course of its interaction with oxygen adsorbed on protein globular molecule

  8. Kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction at electrochemically fabricated tin-palladium bimetallic electrocatalyst in acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Md. Rezwan, E-mail: mrmche@yahoo.co [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Masud, Jahangir [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Ohsaka, Takeo, E-mail: ohsaka@echem.titech.ac.j [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In the present article, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at electrochemically fabricated tin-palladium (Sn-Pd) bimetallic electrocatalyst-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode (Sn-Pd/GC electrode) in acidic media is addressed. Hydrodynamic voltammetric measurements were employed with a view to evaluating various kinetic parameters of the ORR at the Sn-Pd/GC electrode. The obtained results obviously demonstrated that the Sn-Pd bimetallic electrocatalyt substantially promoted the activity of the GC electrode and drove the ORR through an exclusive one-step four-electron pathway forming H{sub 2}O as the final product.

  9. Kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction at tin-adatoms-modified gold electrodes in acidic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, Md. Rezwan; Ohsaka, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    In the present report, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at polycrystalline gold (Au (poly)) electrode in situ modified by the underpotential deposition (upd) of Sn-adatoms is addressed. The ORR was investigated at the Sn-adatoms-modified Au (poly) electrode by the hydrodynamic voltammetric technique with a view to evaluating the various related kinetic parameters. The results demonstrated that the underpotential deposited Sn-adatoms on the Au (poly) electrode substantially promoted the activity of the electrode towards an exclusive one-step four-electron ORR forming H 2 O as the final product.

  10. Kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction at electrochemically fabricated tin-palladium bimetallic electrocatalyst in acidic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, Md. Rezwan; Masud, Jahangir; Ohsaka, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    In the present article, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at electrochemically fabricated tin-palladium (Sn-Pd) bimetallic electrocatalyst-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode (Sn-Pd/GC electrode) in acidic media is addressed. Hydrodynamic voltammetric measurements were employed with a view to evaluating various kinetic parameters of the ORR at the Sn-Pd/GC electrode. The obtained results obviously demonstrated that the Sn-Pd bimetallic electrocatalyt substantially promoted the activity of the GC electrode and drove the ORR through an exclusive one-step four-electron pathway forming H 2 O as the final product.

  11. Kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction at tin-adatoms-modified gold electrodes in acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Md. Rezwan [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: mrmche@yahoo.com; Ohsaka, Takeo [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: ohsaka@echem.titech.ac.jp

    2009-10-01

    In the present report, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at polycrystalline gold (Au (poly)) electrode in situ modified by the underpotential deposition (upd) of Sn-adatoms is addressed. The ORR was investigated at the Sn-adatoms-modified Au (poly) electrode by the hydrodynamic voltammetric technique with a view to evaluating the various related kinetic parameters. The results demonstrated that the underpotential deposited Sn-adatoms on the Au (poly) electrode substantially promoted the activity of the electrode towards an exclusive one-step four-electron ORR forming H{sub 2}O as the final product.

  12. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, Christofer E., E-mail: chris.whiting@udri.udayton.edu [University of Dayton – Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0172 (United States); Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton – Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0172 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO{sub 2} suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO{sub 2}. Previous CeO{sub 2} surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO{sub 2} is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO{sub 2}, in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO{sub 2} oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here. - Highlights: • PuO{sub 2} Oxygen exchange kinetics can be influenced by at least 3 different mechanisms. • An internal chemical reaction controls the rate at high temperature and large SSA. • Surface mobility and surface exchange influence rate at lower temperatures and SSA. • Exchange temperatures may alter SSA and make data difficult to interpret.

  13. Electrodeposited ultrafine TaOx/CB catalysts for PEFC cathode application: Their oxygen reduction reaction kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Seo, Jeongsuk

    2014-12-01

    Ultrafine TaOx nanoparticles were electrodeposited on carbon black (CB) powder in a nonaqueous Ta complex solution at room temperature, and the resultant TaOx/CB catalysts were assessed as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) cathodes. The Ta electrodeposition process was scaled up using a newly designed working electrode containing a CB dense layer, without introducing any binder such as the ionomer Nafion in the electrode for electrodeposition. The electrodeposited TaOx/CB powders were removed from the deposition electrode and subsequent H2 treatment at varying temperatures between 523 and 1073 K was attempted to increase the ORR performance. The TaOx/CB samples were characterized by SEM, STEM, XPS, and EELS measurements. XPS and EELS results indicated the reduced nature of the Ta species caused by the high-temperature treatment in H2, while STEM images clearly revealed that the TaOx particles aggregated as the treatment temperature increased. When the TaOx/CB catalyst, which was treated at 873 K for 2 h, was deposited on a glassy carbon substrate with Nafion ionomer, it resulted in the highest activity among the samples investigated, giving an onset potential of 0.95 VRHE at -2 μA cm-2 in a 0.1 M H2SO4 solution. Moreover, the long-term stability test with 10,000 cycles of the voltammetry only led to a 6% loss in the ORR currents, demonstrating the high stability of the TaOx/CB catalysts. Kinetic analysis by R(R)DE indicated that the four-electron transfer pathway in the ORR process was dominant for this TaOx/CB catalyst, and Tafel plots showed a slope corresponding to a one-electron reaction for the rate-determining step.

  14. Electrodeposited ultrafine TaOx/CB catalysts for PEFC cathode application: Their oxygen reduction reaction kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine TaOx nanoparticles were electrodeposited on carbon black (CB) powder in a nonaqueous Ta complex solution at room temperature, and the resultant TaOx/CB catalysts were assessed as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) cathodes. The Ta electrodeposition process was scaled up using a newly designed working electrode containing a CB dense layer, without introducing any binder such as the ionomer Nafion in the electrode for electrodeposition. The electrodeposited TaOx/CB powders were removed from the deposition electrode and subsequent H2 treatment at varying temperatures between 523 and 1073 K was attempted to increase the ORR performance. The TaOx/CB samples were characterized by SEM, STEM, XPS, and EELS measurements. XPS and EELS results indicated the reduced nature of the Ta species caused by the high-temperature treatment in H2, while STEM images clearly revealed that the TaOx particles aggregated as the treatment temperature increased. When the TaOx/CB catalyst, which was treated at 873 K for 2 h, was deposited on a glassy carbon substrate with Nafion ionomer, it resulted in the highest activity among the samples investigated, giving an onset potential of 0.95 VRHE at -2 μA cm-2 in a 0.1 M H2SO4 solution. Moreover, the long-term stability test with 10,000 cycles of the voltammetry only led to a 6% loss in the ORR currents, demonstrating the high stability of the TaOx/CB catalysts. Kinetic analysis by R(R)DE indicated that the four-electron transfer pathway in the ORR process was dominant for this TaOx/CB catalyst, and Tafel plots showed a slope corresponding to a one-electron reaction for the rate-determining step.

  15. Kinetics of Several Oxygen-Containing Carbon-Centered Free Radical Reactions with Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Ihlenborg, Marvin; Pekkanen, Timo T; Timonen, Raimo S

    2015-07-16

    Kinetics of four carbon-centered, oxygen-containing free radical reactions with nitric oxide (NO) were investigated as a function of temperature at a few Torr pressure of helium, employing flow tube reactors coupled to a laser-photolysis/resonance-gas-discharge-lamp photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-RPIMS). Rate coefficients were directly determined from radical (R) decay signals under pseudo-first-order conditions ([R]0 ≪ [NO]). The obtained rate coefficients showed negative temperature dependences, typical for a radical-radical association process, and can be represented by the following parametrizations (all in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO) = (4.76 × 10(-21)) × (T/300 K)(15.92) × exp[50700/(RT)] (T = 266-363 K, p = 0.79-3.44 Torr); k(CH3CHOH + NO) = (1.27 × 10(-16)) × (T/300 K)(6.81) × exp[28700/(RT)] (T = 241-363 K, p = 0.52-3.43 Torr); k(CH3OCH2 + NO) = (3.58 ± 0.12) × 10(-12) × (T/300 K)(-3.17±0.14) (T = 221-363 K, p = 0.50-0.80 Torr); k(T)3 = 9.62 × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-5.99) × exp[-7100/(RT)] (T = 221-473 K, p = 1.41-2.95 Torr), with the uncertainties given as standard errors of the fits and the overall uncertainties estimated as ±20%. The rate of CH3OCH2 + NO reaction was measured in two density ranges due to its observed considerable pressure dependence, which was not found in the studied hydroxyalkyl reactions. In addition, the CH3CO + NO rate coefficient was determined at two temperatures resulting in k298K(CH3CO + NO) = (5.6 ± 2.8) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). No products were found during these experiments, reasons for which are briefly discussed.

  16. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multi-zone Reaction Kinetics: Model Derivation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoff; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Sun, Jianjun

    2018-04-01

    A multi-zone kinetic model coupled with a dynamic slag generation model was developed for the simulation of hot metal and slag composition during the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) operation. The three reaction zones (i) jet impact zone, (ii) slag-bulk metal zone, (iii) slag-metal-gas emulsion zone were considered for the calculation of overall refining kinetics. In the rate equations, the transient rate parameters were mathematically described as a function of process variables. A micro and macroscopic rate calculation methodology (micro-kinetics and macro-kinetics) were developed to estimate the total refining contributed by the recirculating metal droplets through the slag-metal emulsion zone. The micro-kinetics involves developing the rate equation for individual droplets in the emulsion. The mathematical models for the size distribution of initial droplets, kinetics of simultaneous refining of elements, the residence time in the emulsion, and dynamic interfacial area change were established in the micro-kinetic model. In the macro-kinetics calculation, a droplet generation model was employed and the total amount of refining by emulsion was calculated by summing the refining from the entire population of returning droplets. A dynamic FetO generation model based on oxygen mass balance was developed and coupled with the multi-zone kinetic model. The effect of post-combustion on the evolution of slag and metal composition was investigated. The model was applied to a 200-ton top blowing converter and the simulated value of metal and slag was found to be in good agreement with the measured data. The post-combustion ratio was found to be an important factor in controlling FetO content in the slag and the kinetics of Mn and P in a BOF process.

  17. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  18. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-06-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  19. Kinetic and mechanisms of methanimine reactions with singlet and triplet molecular oxygen: Substituent and catalyst effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, Somaie; Vahedpour, Morteza

    2018-06-01

    Methanimine reaction with O2 on singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces are investigated using B3PW91, M06-2X, MP2 and CCSD(T) methods. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are calculated at M06-2X method. The most favorable channel involves H-abstraction of CH2NH+O2 to the formation of HCN + H2O2 products via low level energy barrier. The catalytic effect of water molecule on HCN + H2O2 products pathway are investigated. Result shows that contribution of water molecule using complex formation with methanimine can decreases barrier energy of transition state and the reaction rate increases. Also, substituent effect of fluorine atom as deactivating group are investigated on the main reaction pathway.

  20. Pulse radiolysis investigation of the reaction of the electronic adduct of bovine serum albumin with oxygen. Polychromatic kinetics of the reaction with adsorbed oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribush, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The method of pulse radiolysis was used to investigate the reaction of the electronic adduct of bovine serum albumin with oxygen. It was suggested that the disappearance of the electronic adduct of the protein occurs in the course of its interaction with oxygen adsorbed on the globular protein molecule

  1. Kinetics of several oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Arppe, Suula L; Timonen, Raimo S

    2013-05-16

    Five oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been studied in direct time-resolved measurements. Experiments were conducted in a temperature-controlled flow tube reactor coupled to a 193 nm exciplex laser photolysis and a resonance gas lamp photoionization mass spectrometer. Reactions were investigated under pseudofirst-order conditions, with the NO2 concentrations of the experiments in great excess over the initial radical concentrations ([R]0 CH3CO radical reactions with NO2 and, hence, includes the three smallest hydroxyalkyl radical species (CH2OH, CH2CH2OH, and CH3CHOH). The obtained rate coefficients are high with the temperature-dependent rate coefficients given by a formula k(T) = k300K × (T/300 K)(-n) as (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO2) = (8.95 ± 2.70) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.54±0.27) (T = 298-363 K), k(CH2CH2OH + NO2) = (5.99 ± 1.80) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.49±0.45)(T = 241-363 K), k(CH3CHOH + NO2) = (7.48 ± 2.24) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.36±0.41) (T = 266-363 K), k(CH3OCH2 + NO2) = (7.85 ± 2.36) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.93±0.28) (T = 243-363 K), and k(CH3CO + NO2) = (2.87 ± 0.57) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-2.45±0.49) (T = 241-363 K), where the uncertainties refer to the estimated overall uncertainties of the values obtained. The determined rate coefficients show negative temperature dependence with no apparent bath gas pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions (241-363 K and about 1-3 Torr helium). This behavior is typical for a radical-radical addition mechanism with no potential energy barrier above the energy of the separated reactants in the entrance channel of the reaction. Unfortunately the absence of detected product signals prevented gaining deeper insight into the reaction mechanism.

  2. Effects of grain boundaries at the electrolyte/cathode interfaces on oxygen reduction reaction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Gi; Koo, Ja Yang; Ahn, Min Woo; Lee, Won Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    We systematically investigated the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) at the electrolyte/cathode interface of two conventional electrolyte materials, i.e., yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC). We deposited additional layers by pulsed laser deposition to control the GB density on top of the polycrystalline substrates, obtaining significant improvements in peak power density (two-fold for YSZ and three-fold for GDC). The enhanced performance at high GB density in the additional layer could be ascribed to the accumulation of oxygen vacancies, which are known to be more active sites for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) than grain cores. GDC exhibited a higher enhancement than YSZ, due to the easier formation, and thus higher concentration, of oxygen vacancies for ORR. The strong relation between the concentration of oxygen vacancies and the surface exchange characteristics substantiated the role of GBs at electrolyte/cathode interfaces on ORR kinetics, providing new design parameters for highly performing solid oxide fuel cells.

  3. Kinetics and mechanisms of the reactions of alkyl radicals with oxygen and with complexes of Co(III), Ru(III), and Ni(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, D.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of C 2 H 5 radical with Co(NH 3 ) 5 X 2+ , Ru(NH 3 ) 5 X 2+ , and Co(dmgH) 2 (X) (Y) (X = Br, Cl, N 3 , SCN; Y = H 2 O, CH 3 CN) complexes were studied using laser flash photolysis of ethylcobalt complexes. The kinetics were obtained by the kinetic probe method. Some relative rate constants were also determined by a competition method based on ethyl halide product ratios. The kinetics of colligation reactions of a series of alkyl radicals with β-Ni(cyclam) 2+ were studied using flaser flash photolysis of alkylcobalt complexes. Again, the kinetics were obtained by employing the kinetic probe competition method. The kinetics of the unimolecular homolysis of a series of RNi(cyclam)H 2 O 2+ were studied. Activation parameters were obtained for the unimolecular homolysis of C 2 H 5 Ni(cyclam)H 2 O 2+ . Kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained from these reactions were compared with those for the σ-bonded organometallic complexes. The kinetics of the unimolecular homolysis of a series of RNi(cyclam)H 2 O 2+ complexes were studied by monitoring the formation of the oxygen insertion product RO 2 Ni(cyclam)H 2 O 2+ . The higher rate constants for the reactions of alkyl radicals with oxygen in solution, as compared with those measured in the gas phase, were discussed. 30 refs

  4. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  5. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  6. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  7. Electrochemical kinetics and X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations of select chalcogenide electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.; Murthi, Vivek S.; O'Laoire, Cormac; Gulla, Andrea F.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    Transition metal-based chalcogenide electrocatalysts exhibit a promising level of performance for oxygen reduction reaction applications while offering significant economic benefits over the state of the art Pt/C systems. The most active materials are based on Ru x Se y clusters, but the toxicity of selenium will most likely limit their embrace by the marketplace. Sulfur-based analogues do not suffer from toxicity issues, but suffer from substantially less activity and stability than their selenium brethren. The structure/property relationships that result in these properties are not understood due to ambiguities regarding the specific morphologies of Ru x S y -based chalcogenides. To clarify these properties, an electrochemical kinetics study was interpreted in light of extensive X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy evaluations. The performance characteristics of ternary M x Ru y S z /C (M = Mo, Rh, or Re) chalcogenide electrocatalysts synthesized by the now-standard low-temperature nonaqueous (NA) route are compared to commercially available (De Nora) Rh- and Ru-based systems. Interpretation of performance differences is made in regards to bulk and surface properties of these systems. In particular, the overall trends of the measured activation energies in respect to increasing overpotential and the gross energy values can be explained in regards to these differences

  8. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  9. Dissolution kinetics of small amounts of oxygen in tantalum alloy T-111 and internal oxide displacement reactions during annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    Oxygen was added to T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf, wt. %) at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about 0.0003 torr. The technique employed permitted predetermined and reproducible doping of T-111 up to 3.0 at. % oxygen. Based on the temperature dependence of the doping reaction, it is concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the latter oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and of other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high-temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent affect on the doping reaction.

  10. Exploring the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of four-electron electrochemical reactions: electrocatalysis of oxygen evolution by metal oxides and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent C-C

    2016-08-10

    Finding fundamental and general mechanisms for electrochemical reactions, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and reduction of CO2, plays vital roles in developing the desired electrocatalysts for facilitating solar fuel production. Recently, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have shown that there is a universal scaling relation of adsorption energy between key intermediate species, HO(ad) and HOO(ad), on the surface of metal oxides as OER electrocatalysts. In this paper, a kinetic and thermodynamic model for the four-electron electrochemical reaction based on previous OER mechanisms proposed by DFT calculations is developed to further investigate the electrocatalytic properties over a wide range of metal oxides and photosystem II. The OER activity of metal oxides (i.e. electrocatalytic current) calculated from the DFT-calculated equilibrium potentials with kinetic properties, such as the rate constants for interfacial electron transfer and catalytic turnover, can lead to a volcano-shaped trend that agrees with the results observed in experiments. In addition, the kinetic aspects of the impact on the electrocatalysts are evaluated. Finally, comparing the results of metal oxides and photosystem II, and fitting experimental voltammograms give further insights into kinetic and thermodynamic roles. Here, the general guidelines for designing OER electrocatalysts with unified kinetic and thermodynamic properties are presented.

  11. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  12. Laboratory Studies of Stratospheric Bromine Chemistry: Kinetics of the Reactions of Bromine Monoxide with Nitrogen Dioxide and Atomic Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Robert Peyton, Jr.

    A laser flash photolysis - long path absorption technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reaction rm BrO + NO_2 + M{k _{16}atopto} products as a function of temperature (248-346 K), pressure (16 -800 Torr), and buffer gas identity (rm N _2,CF_4). 351 nm photolysis of rm NO_2/Br_2/N_2 mixtures generated BrO. The BrO decay in the presence of excess NO_2 was followed by UV absorption at 338.3 nm. The reaction is in the falloff regime between third and second order over the entire range of conditions investigated. This is the first study where temperature dependent measurements of k_{16} (P,T) have been reported at pressures greater than 12 Torr; hence, these results help constrain choices of k_{16}(P,T) for use in modeling stratospheric BrO_{rm x} chemistry. The kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction rm BrO+O(^3P)_sp{to }{k_{14}}Br+O_2 in N_2 buffer gas have been studied as a function of temperature (233-328 K) and pressure (25 -150 Torr) using a novel dual laser flash photolysis/long path absorption/resonance fluorescence technique. 248 nm pulsed laser photolysis of rm Br_2/O _3/N_2 mixtures produces O atoms in excess over Br_2. After a delay sufficient for BrO to be generated, a 532 nm laser pulse photolyses a small fraction of the O_3 to generate O(^3P). The decay of O(^3P) in the presence of an excess, known concentration of BrO, as determined by UV absorption at 338.3 nm and by numerical simulation, is then followed by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results have shown the reaction kinetics to be independent of pressure, to increase with decreasing temperature, and to be faster than suggested by the only previous (indirect) measurement. The resulting Anhenius expression for k_{14}(T) is given below.rm k_{14 }(T) = 1.64times 10^{-11} exp (263/T) cm^3 molecule ^{-1} s^{-1} The absolute accuracy of k_{14 }(T) at any temperature within the range studied is estimated to be +/-25%. Possible kinetic

  13. An investigation on the electrocatalytic properties of polypyrrole films on the kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction in PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saremi, M.; Sharifi Asl, S.; Kazemi, Sh. [Tehran Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). School of Metallurgy and Material Science Engineering

    2008-07-01

    A proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has high power density, low weight, very short start-up time and no leakage of electrolytes. However, there are some disadvantages when operating the PEM fuel cell at room temperature. Many studies involving the widespread commercial use of Pt-based electrocatalysts search for low-cost electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. In recent years, much attention has been placed on the use of electrocatalysis for the conducting polymer electrode. Polypyrrole has attracted much attention as an advanced conducting material because of its good environmental stability, easy synthesis and high conductivity. This study examined the effect of the polypyrrole catalyst in a PEMFC cathode. The electropolymerization of pyrrole was carried out in a 3-electrode cell using pure hydrogen and oxygen as the reactants. Tests were carried out at room temperature and cell impedance was measured. The polymer was formed galvanostatically in a 0.1 M pyrrole with a 0.15 KCl aqueous solution with a 20 mA/cm{sup 2} current density. The effect of operating voltage and oxygen mass transport was examined by EIS method, which separates these two phenomena. The study showed that polypyrrole has a catalytic effect for oxygen reduction reaction in PEMFC comparable to a Pt catalyzed electrode. Although the cell potential with polypyrrole was slightly lower than a Pt coated cell, it was found to be more economical. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Kinetics of oxygen uncoupling of a copper based oxygen carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenting; Donat, Felix; Scott, S.A.; Dennis, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetics of a Cu-based oxygen carrier was determined using a TGA. • A diffusion model was applied to remove mass transfer effects from rate parameters. • Thermodynamics are separated from kinetics, usually difficult for the CLOU reaction. • The rate parameters correctly described the behaviour in a fluidised bed. • The rate parameters can be used to predict performance of large CLOU systems. - Abstract: Here, an oxygen carrier consisting of 60 wt% CuO supported on a mixture of Al_2O_3 and CaO (23 wt% and 17 wt% respectively) was synthesised by wet-mixing powdered CuO, Al(OH)_3 and Ca(OH)_2, followed by calcination at 1000 °C. Its suitability for chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) was investigated. After 25 repeated redox cycles in either a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) or a laboratory-scale fluidised bed, (with 5 vol% H_2 in N_2 as the fuel, and air as the oxidant) no significant change in either the oxygen uncoupling capacity or the overall oxygen availability of the carrier was found. In the TGA, it was found that the rate of oxygen release from the material was controlled by intrinsic chemical kinetics and external transfer of mass from the surface of the particles to the bulk gas. By modelling the various resistances, values of the rate constant for the decomposition were obtained. The activation energy of the reaction was found to be 59.7 kJ/mol (with a standard error of 5.6 kJ/mol) and the corresponding pre-exponential factor was 632 m"3/mol/s. The local rate of conversion within a particle was assumed to occur either (i) by homogeneous chemical reaction, or (ii) in uniform, non-porous grains, each reacting as a kinetically-controlled shrinking core. Upon cross validation against a batch fluidised bed experiment, the homogeneous reaction model was found to be more plausible. By accurately accounting for the various artefacts (e.g. mass transfer resistances) present in both TGA and fluidised bed experiments, it was

  15. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  16. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  17. First kinetic discrimination between carbon and oxygen reactivity of enols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Río, Luis; Mejuto, Juan C; Parajó, Mercedes; Pérez-Lorenzo, Moisés

    2008-11-07

    Nitrosation of enols shows a well-differentiated behavior depending on whether the reaction proceeds through the carbon (nucleophilic catalysis is observed) or the oxygen atom (general acid-base catalysis is observed). This is due to the different operating mechanisms for C- and O-nitrosation. Nitrosation of acetylacetone (AcAc) shows a simultaneous nucleophilic and acid-base catalysis. This simultaneous catalysis constitutes the first kinetic evidence of two independent reactions on the carbon and oxygen atom of an enol. The following kinetic study allows us to determine the rate constants for both reaction pathways. A similar reactivity of the nucleophilic centers with the nitrosonium ion is observed.

  18. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  19. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  20. Recent advances in the kinetics of oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, R.

    1996-07-01

    Oxygen reduction is considered an important electrocatalytic reaction; the most notable need remains improvement of the catalytic activity of existing metal electrocatalysts and development of new ones. A review is given of new advances in the understanding of reaction kinetics and improvements of the electrocatalytic properties of some surfaces, with focus on recent studies of relationship of the surface properties to its activity and reaction kinetics. The urgent need is to improve catalytic activity of Pt and synthesize new, possibly non- noble metal catalysts. New experimental techniques for obtaining new level of information include various {ital in situ} spectroscopies and scanning probes, some involving synchrotron radiation. 138 refs, 18 figs, 2 tabs.

  1. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  2. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Our research program is concerned with the kinetics of elementary gas phase reactions and energy transfer involving polyatomic molecules. We report here on three ongoing projects: The reaction of oxygen atoms with hydrogen molecules, the electronic relaxation of NH radicals, and the vibrational relaxation of highly excited SF 6 molecules. 10 refs., 5 figs

  3. Muscular Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Baum, K; Eichberg, S; Schiffer, T; Latsch, J; Brixius, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics and heart rate kinetics are influenced by age and fitness. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics can be estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V˙O2. In this study the applicability of a test using pseudo-random binary sequences in combination with a model to estimate muscular V˙O2 kinetics was tested. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were expected to be faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics, slowed in aged subjects and correlated with maximum V˙O2 and heart rate kinetics. 27 elderly subjects (73±3 years; 81.1±8.2 kg; 175±4.7 cm) participated. Cardiorespiratory kinetics were assessed using the maximum of cross-correlation functions, higher maxima implying faster kinetics. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics (0.31±0.1 vs. 0.29±0.1 s; p=0.004). Heart rate kinetics were not correlated with muscular or pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics or maximum V˙O2. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics correlated with maximum V˙O2 (r=0.35; p=0.033). This suggests, that muscular V˙O2 kinetics are faster than estimates from pulmonary V˙O2 and related to maximum V˙O2 in aged subjects. In the future this experimental approach may help to characterize alterations in muscular V˙O2 under various conditions independent of motivation and maximal effort. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1990-06-01

    During the past three years we have been working on four problems in the general area of gas phase kinetics and energy transfer of small molecules. These are: (1) measurements of the fine structure populations of ground state oxygen atoms produced in photodissociation reactions; (2) quenching of the Rydberg B ( 1 Σ + ) state of CO; (3) vibrational relaxation of highly excited molecules; and (4) kinetics of hydrogen molecules. The first two topics, which involve transitions between different electronic states of the parent molecule, are a departure from our previous research interests. In the accompanying renewal proposal we discuss plans to pursue these new topics vigorously during the coming year. The third topic is a continuation of our long interest in the energy dependence of the rates laws governing vibrational-to-translational energy transfer of molecules having large initial amounts of vibrational excitation. The final topic is a continuation of our studies of the reaction of O( 3 P) + H 2 . In this work we measured the rate constant for the reaction O( 3 P) with deuterium and also analyzed spectroscopically different sources of vibrationally excited hydrogen for possible future work. We discuss each of these four studies in the following sections

  5. Chemistry and reaction kinetics of biowaste torrefaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses the question of how the chemistry and reaction kinetics of torrefaction are influenced by reaction conditions and the effects occuring during the reaction. This research question can be specified by questions such as, what controls their kinetics during torrefaction and what

  6. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  7. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  8. Hydrogen electrode reaction: A complete kinetic description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaino, P.M.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic description of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) in the whole range of overpotentials (-0.2 < η (V) < 0.40) is presented. The Volmer-Heyrovsky-Tafel mechanism was solved considering simultaneously the following items: (i) the diffusional contribution of the molecular hydrogen from and towards the electrode surface, (ii) the forward and backward reaction rates of each elementary step and (iii) a Frumkin type adsorption for the reaction intermediate. In order to verify the descriptive capability of the kinetic expressions derived, an experimental study of the HER was carried out on a rotating platinum disc electrode in acid solution. From the correlation of these results the elementary kinetic parameters were evaluated and several aspects related to the kinetic mechanism were discussed. Finally, the use of these kinetic expressions to interpret results obtained on microelectrodes is also analysed

  9. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  10. Uranium dioxide sintering Kinetics and mechanisms under controlled oxygen potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1980-06-01

    The initial, intermediate, and final sintering stages of uranium dioxide were investigated as a function of stoichiometry and temperature by following the kinetics of the sintering reaction. Stoichiometry was controlled by means of the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere, which was measured continuously by solid-state oxygen sensors. Included in the kinetic study were microspheres originated from UO 2 gels and UO 2 pellets produced by isostatic pressing ceramic grade powders. The microspheres sintering behavior was examined using hot-stage microscopy and a specially designed high-temperature, controlled atmosphere furnace. This same furnace was employed as part of an optical dilatometer, which was utilized in the UO 2 pellet sintering investigations. For controlling the deviations from stoichiometry during heat treatment, the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere was varied by passing the gas through a Cu-Ti-Cu oxygen trap. The trap temperature determined the oxygen partial pressure of the outflowing mixture. Dry hydrogen was also used in some of the UO sub(2+x) sintering experiments. The determination of diametrial shrinkages and sintering indices was made utilizing high-speed microcinematography and ultra-microbalance techniques. It was observed that the oxygen potential has a substantial influence on the kinetics of the three sintering stages. The control of the sintering atmosphere oxygen partial pressure led to very fast densification of UO sub(2+x). Values in the interval 95.0 to 99.5% of theoretical density were reached in less than one minute. Uranium volume diffusion is the dominant mechanism in the initial and intermediate sintering stages. For the final stage, uranium grain boundary diffusion was found to be the main sintering mechanism. (Author) [pt

  11. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azyazov, V.N.; Torbin, A.P.; Pershin, A.A.; Mikheyev, P.A.; Heaven, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Vibrational excitation of O_3 increases the rate constant for O_3 + O_2(a) → 2O_2(X) + O. • Vibrationally excited O_3 is produced by the O + O_2(X) + M → O_3 + M reaction. • Ozone concentrations are impacted by the reactions of vibrationally excited O_3. • Relevant to ozone concentrations in oxygen discharges and the upper atmosphere. - Abstract: The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O_3(υ) formed in O + O_2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O_2(a"1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O_3(υ ⩾ 2) + O_2(a"1Δ) → 2O_2 + O is the main O_2(a"1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O_2(a"1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Determination of rate constants for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, A.; Walter, T.; Stimming, U. [Munich Technical Univ., Garching (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells is a complex and fundamental electrochemical reaction. However, greater insight is needed into this multi-electron reaction in order to develop efficient and innovative catalysts. The rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) is a useful tool for studying reaction intermediates of the ORR and to better understand the reaction pathway. Carbon materials such as carbon nanofilaments-platelets (CNF-PL) have high electrical conductivity and may be considered for fuel cells. In particular Pt and RuSe{sub x}, deposited on CNF-PL materials could act as efficient catalysts in fuel cells. This study used the RRDE to evaluate the oxygen reduction kinetics of these catalysts in oxygen-saturated, diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature. Kinetic data and hydrogen peroxide formation were determined by depositing a thin-film of the catalyst on the Au disc. The values for the constants k1, k2 and k3 were obtained using diagnostic criteria and expressions to calculate the rate constants of the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction for RuSe on new carbon supports. A potential dependency of the constants k1 and k2 for RuSe{sub x}/CNF-PL was observed. The transition of the Tafel slopes for this catalyst was obtained. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. III. Oxygen diffusion in oxide and alpha Zircaloy phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, R.E.

    1976-10-01

    The reaction of Zircaloy in steam at elevated temperature involves the growth of discrete layers of oxide and oxygen-rich alpha Zircaloy from the parent beta phase. The multiphase, moving boundary diffusion problem involved is encountered in a number of important reaction schemes in addition to that of Zircaloy-oxygen and can be completely (albeitly ideally) characterized through an appropriate model in terms of oxygen diffusion coefficients and equilibrium concentrations for the various phases. Conversely, kinetic data for phase growth and total oxygen consumption rates can be used to compute diffusion coefficients. Equations are developed that express the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide and alpha phases in terms of the reaction rate constants and equilibrium solubility values. These equations were applied to recent experimental kinetic data on the steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 to determine the effective oxygen diffusion coefficients in these phases over the temperature range 1000--1500 0 C

  14. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Pang, Genny A.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David Frank

    2013-01-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we

  15. Kinetic modeling of reactions in Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2008-01-01

    The level of quality that food maintains as it travels down the production-to-consumption path is largely determined by the chemical, biochemical, physical, and microbiological changes that take place during its processing and storage. Kinetic Modeling of Reactions in Foods demonstrates how to

  16. Enhancing Activity for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Rasmus; Busch, Michael; Halck, Niels Bendtsen

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical production of hydrogen, facilitated in electrolyzers, holds great promise for energy storage and solar fuel production. A bottleneck in the process is the catalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction, involving the transfer of four electrons. The challenge is that the binding energies...... of all reaction intermediates cannot be optimized individually. However, experimental investigations have shown that drastic improvements can be realized for manganese and cobalt-based oxides if gold is added to the surface or used as substrate. We propose an explanation for these enhancements based...... that the oxygen evolution reaction overpotential decreases by 100–300 mV for manganese oxides and 100 mV for cobalt oxides....

  17. Chalcogenide metal centers for oxygen reduction reaction: Activity and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Gago, Aldo; Timperman, Laure; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes materials design methods, oxygen reduction kinetics, tolerance to small organic molecules and fuel cell performance of chalcogenide metal catalysts, particularly, ruthenium (Ru x Se y ) and non-precious transition metals (M x X y : M = Co, Fe and Ni; X = Se and S). These non-platinum catalysts are potential alternatives to Pt-based catalysts because of their comparable catalytic activity (Ru x Se y ), low cost, high abundance and, in particular, a high tolerance to small organic molecules. Developing trends of synthesis methods, mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction and applications in direct alcohol fuel cells as well as the substrate effect are highlighted.

  18. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azyazov, V.N., E-mail: azyazov@fian.smr.ru [Samara State Aerospace University, 443086 (Russian Federation); Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Samara 443011 (Russian Federation); Torbin, A.P.; Pershin, A.A. [Samara State Aerospace University, 443086 (Russian Federation); Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Samara 443011 (Russian Federation); Mikheyev, P.A., E-mail: mikheyev@fian.smr.ru [Samara State Aerospace University, 443086 (Russian Federation); Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Samara 443011 (Russian Federation); Heaven, M.C., E-mail: mheaven@emory.edu [Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2015-12-16

    Highlights: • Vibrational excitation of O{sub 3} increases the rate constant for O{sub 3} + O{sub 2}(a) → 2O{sub 2}(X) + O. • Vibrationally excited O{sub 3} is produced by the O + O{sub 2}(X) + M → O{sub 3} + M reaction. • Ozone concentrations are impacted by the reactions of vibrationally excited O{sub 3}. • Relevant to ozone concentrations in oxygen discharges and the upper atmosphere. - Abstract: The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O{sub 3}(υ) formed in O + O{sub 2} recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O{sub 3}(υ ⩾ 2) + O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}Δ) → 2O{sub 2} + O is the main O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  20. Reaction kinetics of bond rotations in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Skowron, Stephen T.; Koroteev, Victor O.; Baldoni, Matteo; Lopatin, Sergei; Zurutuza, Amaia; Chuvilin, Andrey; Besley, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The formation and healing processes of the fundamental topological defect in graphitic materials, the Stone-Wales (SW) defect, are brought into a chemical context by considering the rotation of a carbon-carbon bond as chemical reaction. We investigate the rates and mechanisms of these SW transformations in graphene at the atomic scale using transmission electron microscopy. We develop a statistical atomic kinetics formalism, using direct observations obtained under different conditions to determine key kinetic parameters of the reactions. Based on the obtained statistics we quantify thermally and irradiation induced routes, identifying a thermal process of healing with an activation energy consistent with predicted adatom catalysed mechanisms. We discover exceptionally high rates for irradiation induced SW healing, incompatible with the previously assumed mechanism of direct knock-on damage and indicating the presence of an efficient nonadiabatic coupling healing mechanism involving beam induced electronic excitations of the SW defect.

  1. Reaction kinetics of bond rotations in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Skowron, Stephen T.

    2016-04-12

    The formation and healing processes of the fundamental topological defect in graphitic materials, the Stone-Wales (SW) defect, are brought into a chemical context by considering the rotation of a carbon-carbon bond as chemical reaction. We investigate the rates and mechanisms of these SW transformations in graphene at the atomic scale using transmission electron microscopy. We develop a statistical atomic kinetics formalism, using direct observations obtained under different conditions to determine key kinetic parameters of the reactions. Based on the obtained statistics we quantify thermally and irradiation induced routes, identifying a thermal process of healing with an activation energy consistent with predicted adatom catalysed mechanisms. We discover exceptionally high rates for irradiation induced SW healing, incompatible with the previously assumed mechanism of direct knock-on damage and indicating the presence of an efficient nonadiabatic coupling healing mechanism involving beam induced electronic excitations of the SW defect.

  2. Kinetics of catalytic reactions solutions manual

    CERN Document Server

    Vannice, M Albert

    2005-01-01

    Including countless exercises and worked examples, this advanced reference work and textbook will be extremely useful for the work of many industrial scientists. It teaches readers to design kinetic experiments involving heterogeneous catalysts, to characterize these catalysts, to acquire rate data, to find heat and mass transfer limitations in these data, to select reaction models, to derive rate expressions based on these models, and to assess the consistency of these rate equations.

  3. Insights into the importance of oxygen functional groups in carbon reactions with oxygen containing gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Zhu, Max Lu

    2005-01-01

    The role of pore structure of carbon in carbon-related adsorptions and reactions has been extensively investigated. However the studies on the role of surface chemistry of carbon are limited. In this paper, we present the importance of oxygen functional groups in carbon reactions with oxygen-containing gases. It is found that there is a good correlation between the electronic structures and reactivities of carbon edge sites. Zigzag sites are more active in oxygen adsorption because of the unpaired electrons and armchair sites are less active in oxygen adsorption due to the triple character. However, the desorption of semi-quinone oxygen from zigzag sites needs a bond energy ca. 30% higher than that of o-quinone oxygen from armchair edge sites. CO 2 and H 2 O adsorb on carbon surface much less favorably than O 2 . H 2 O is first physically adsorbed on the virgin graphite surface followed by chemisorption through oxygen atom approaching the carbon edge site and the movements of two hydrogen atoms to produce H 2 . The adsorption mechanism of H 2 O is different from that for CO 2 , but the final result is quite similar, i.e. producing only semi-quinone oxygen. Based upon the above studies, a new generalized mechanism, as shown in Fig. 1, is developed and can account for all the important kinetic phenomena of carbon-gas reactions. The key point is that in CO 2 /H 2 O-carbon reaction only semi-quinone formed; while, in O 2 -carbon reaction, semi-quinone, o-quinone (at lower pressure), and off-plane epoxy oxygen (at relatively higher pressure) can be formed. This is the main reason for the different reaction kinetics of O 2 -carbon reaction and CO 2 /H 2 O-carbon reactions as observed experimentally. The oxygen functional groups of carbon can be characterized by XPS, PZC (point of zero charge), IEP (isoelectric point) and TPD (temperature-programmed desorption), which were used in our previous studies. We treated the carbon surface with different acids, finding that HNO 3

  4. Kinetic modelling of the Maillard reaction between proteins and sugars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Maillard reaction, sugar isomerisation, kinetics, multiresponse modelling, brown colour formation, lysine damage, mutagenicity, casein, monosaccharides, disaccharides, aldoses, ketoses

    The aim of this thesis was to determine the kinetics of the Maillard reaction between

  5. Molecular controls of the oxygenation and redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2013-06-10

    The broad classes of O(2)-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O(2)-binding functions. The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes.

  6. Molecular Controls of the Oxygenation and Redox Reactions of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I.; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The broad classes of O2-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O2-binding functions. Recent Advances: The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. Critical Issues: An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. Future Directions: This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2298–2313. PMID:23198874

  7. High-temperature reaction of ''anisotropic'' pyrolitic graphite with oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenko, V.A.; Pomytkin, A.P.; Neshpor, V.S.; Vinokur, F.L.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the kinetics of initial interaction stages of highly dense crystalloorientated pyrographite with oxygen. Oxidation was carried out in pure oxygen within 0.1-740 mm Hg pressure range and 500-1100 deg C temperature range. It is stated, that at the temperatures below 700 deg C pyrographite oxidation is subjected to a linear law. Above 700-800 deg C the linear law is preserved only at the initial oxidation stage, then the process is described by a parabolic law. Extension of the linear site is decreased in time with the reduction of oxygen pressure. The reaction has apparent fractional order. Activation energy of pyrogrpahite oxidation by the linear low constitutes approximately 58 kcal/mol within 600-800 deg C range and 14 kcal/mol within 800-1100 deg C range. The apparent activation energy constitutes approximately 13 kcal/mol in the region of correspondence to the parabolic law

  8. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yili.

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ν 1 band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ν 1 data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO 2 reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm 3 molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF 6 buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO 2 . The product channel, H + CO 2 + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  10. an improved solution of first order kinetics for biochemical oxygen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    Accuracies of these methods were evaluated using relative error, Akaike ... Keywords: Wastewater, Environmental Engineering, Biochemical Oxygen Demand Kinetic Parameters,. Statistical ... evaluating organic pollution level and quality of wastewaters. ... compounds ...... method can be applied on electronic devices, and.

  11. Reaction kinetic analysis of reactor surveillance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiie, T., E-mail: yoshiie@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Kinomura, A. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    In the reactor pressure vessel surveillance data of a European-type pressurized water reactor (low-Cu steel), it was found that the concentration of matrix defects was very high, and a large number of precipitates existed. In this study, defect structure evolution obtained from surveillance data was simulated by reaction kinetic analysis using 15 rate equations. The saturation of precipitation and the growth of loops were simulated, but it was not possible to explain the increase in DBTT on the basis of the defect structures. The sub-grain boundary segregation of solutes was discussed for the origin of the DBTT increase.

  12. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  13. An improved solution of first order kinetics for biochemical oxygen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper evaluated selected Biochemical Oxygen Demand first order kinetics methods. Domesticinstitutional wastewaters were collected twice in a month for three months from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife waste stabilization ponds. Biochemical Oxygen Demand concentrations at different days were determined ...

  14. Kinetic aspects of the Maillard reaction: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The literature concerning the kinetics of the Maillard reaction was critically discussed according to the initial, intermediate and advanced stages, as this is the way the Maillard reaction is traditionally analysed. For each stage, a division is made between simple kinetics and complex kinetics.

  15. Kinetic therapy improves oxygenation in critically ill pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Theresa Ryan; Lin, Richard; Francis, Barbara A; Hales, Roberta L; Colborn, Shawn; Napoli, Linda A; Helfaer, Mark A

    2005-07-01

    To compare changes in oxygenation after manual turning and percussion (standard therapy) and after automated rotation and percussion (kinetic therapy). Randomized crossover trial. General and cardiac pediatric intensive care units. Intubated and mechanically ventilated pediatric patients who had an arterial catheter and no contraindications to using a PediDyne bed. Patients were placed on a PediDyne bed (Kinetic Concepts) and received 18 hrs blocks of standard and kinetic therapy in an order determined by randomization. Arterial blood gases were measured every 2 hrs during each phase of therapy. Oxygenation index and arterial-alveolar oxygen tension difference [P(A-a)O(2)] were calculated. Indexes calculated at baseline and after each 18-hr phase of therapy were analyzed. Fifty patients were enrolled. Data from 15 patients were either not collected or not used due to reasons that included violation of protocol and inability to tolerate the therapies in the study. Indexes of oxygenation were not normally distributed and were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank testing. Both therapies led to improvements in oxygenation, but only those from kinetic therapy achieved statistical significance. In patients receiving kinetic therapy first, median oxygenation index decreased from 7.4 to 6.19 (p = .015). The median P(A-a)O(2) decreased from 165.2 to 126.4 (p = .023). There were continued improvements in oxygenation after the subsequent period of standard therapy, with the median oxygenation index decreasing to 5.52 and median P(A-a)O(2) decreasing to 116.0, but these changes were not significant (p = .365 and .121, respectively). When standard therapy was first, the median oxygenation index decreased from 8.83 to 8.71 and the median P(a-a)o(2) decreased from 195.4 to 186.6. Neither change was significant. Median oxygenation index after the subsequent period of kinetic therapy was significantly lower (7.91, p = .044) and median P(A-a)O(2) trended lower (143.4, p = .077

  16. Oxygen evolution reaction in nanoconfined carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Yunfang; Zhang, Xueqing

    2018-05-01

    Improving oxygen electrochemistry through nanoscopic confinement has recently been highlighted as a promising strategy. In-depth understanding the role of confinement is therefore required. In this study, we simulate the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on iron oxide nanoclusters under confinement of (7,7) and (8,8) armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The free energies of the four proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) steps and the OER overpotentials are calculated. The Fe4O6 nanocluster confined in (7,7) CNT is found to be the most active for OER among the systems considered in this work. This leads to an increase in catalytic efficiency of OER compared to the hematite (110) surface, which was reported recently as an active surface towards OER. The calculated results show that the OER overpotential depends strongly on the magnetic properties of the iron oxide nanocluster. These findings are helpful for experimental design of efficient catalyst for water splitting applications.

  17. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  18. UV-cured methacrylic-silica hybrids: Effect of oxygen inhibition on photo-curing kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Striani, R.; Frigione, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic behavior of novel photopolymerizable organic–inorganic hybrid system was studied as a function of the composition and of the atmosphere for reactions. • The UV-curing reaction of the hybrid mixture was found fast and complete. • The combined presence of thiol monomer and nanostructured silica allows to reduce the effect of inhibition of oxygen towards the radical photopolymerization. - Abstract: The kinetic behavior of innovative photopolymerizable UV-cured methacrylic–silica hybrid formulations, previously developed, was studied and compared to that of a reference control system. The organic–inorganic (O–I) hybrids proposed in this study are obtained from organic precursors with a high siloxane content mixed with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in such a way to produce co-continuous silica nano-domains dispersed within a cross-linked organic phase, as a result of the hydrolysis and condensation reactions. The kinetics of the radical photopolymerization mechanism induced by UV-radiations, in presence of a suitable photoinitiator, was studied by calorimetric, FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analyses, by varying the composition of the mixtures and the atmosphere for reactions. The well known effect of oxygen on the kinetic mechanism of the free radical photopolymerization of the methacrylic–siloxane based monomers was found to be strongly reduced in the hybrid system, especially when a proper thiol was used. The experimental calorimetric data were fitted using a simple kinetic model for radical photopolymerization reactions, obtaining a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model. From the comparison of the kinetic constants calculated for control and hybrid systems, it was possible to assess the effect of the composition, as well as of the atmosphere used during the photo-polymerization process, on the kinetic of photopolymerization reaction

  19. Kinetic study of the alkaline metals oxidation by dry oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzain, Ph.

    1967-06-01

    The oxidation of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and sodium-potassium alloys by dry oxygen is studied at several temperatures and in the oxygen pressure range 40 to 400 mmHg. One distinguishes three different oxidation behaviours (inflammation, ignition and slow combustion) whose zones are precised in function of the temperature. The slow oxidation kinetic laws, the composition of oxides and the motive of oxides colorations are determined. At least, the experimental data are construed theoretically. (author) [fr

  20. Oxygen reduction kinetics on mixed conducting SOFC model cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, F.S.

    2006-07-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction at the surface of mixed conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes is one of the main limiting factors to the performance of these promising systems. For ''realistic'' porous electrodes, however, it is usually very difficult to separate the influence of different resistive processes. Therefore, a suitable, geometrically well-defined model system was used in this work to enable an unambiguous distinction of individual electrochemical processes by means of impedance spectroscopy. The electrochemical measurements were performed on dense thin film microelectrodes, prepared by PLD and photolithography, of mixed conducting perovskite-type materials. The first part of the thesis consists of an extensive impedance spectroscopic investigation of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3 (LSCF) microelectrodes. An equivalent circuit was identified that describes the electrochemical properties of the model electrodes appropriately and enables an unambiguous interpretation of the measured impedance spectra. Hence, the dependencies of individual electrochemical processes such as the surface exchange reaction on a wide range of experimental parameters including temperature, dc bias and oxygen partial pressure could be studied. As a result, a comprehensive set of experimental data has been obtained, which was previously not available for a mixed conducting model system. In the course of the experiments on the dc bias dependence of the electrochemical processes a new and surprising effect was discovered: It could be shown that a short but strong dc polarisation of a LSCF microelectrode at high temperature improves its electrochemical performance with respect to the oxygen reduction reaction drastically. The electrochemical resistance associated with the oxygen surface exchange reaction, initially the dominant contribution to the total electrode resistance, can be reduced by two orders of magnitude. This &apos

  1. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  2. Oxygen reduction kinetics on graphite cathodes in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Donovan, Conrad; Shim, Matthew; Babauta, Jerome; Nannapaneni, Srilekha; Schenk, James; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-12-28

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) have been used as renewable power sources for sensors in fresh and ocean waters. Organic compounds at the anode drive anodic reactions, while oxygen drives cathodic reactions. An understanding of oxygen reduction kinetics and the factors that determine graphite cathode performance is needed to predict cathodic current and potential losses, and eventually to estimate the power production of SMFCs. Our goals were to (1) experimentally quantify the dependence of oxygen reduction kinetics on temperature, electrode potential, and dissolved oxygen concentration for the graphite cathodes of SMFCs and (2) develop a mechanistic model. To accomplish this, we monitored current on polarized cathodes in river and ocean SMFCs. We found that (1) after oxygen reduction is initiated, the current density is linearly dependent on polarization potential for both SMFC types; (2) current density magnitude increases linearly with temperature in river SMFCs but remains constant with temperature in ocean SMFCs; (3) the standard heterogeneous rate constant controls the current density temperature dependence; (4) river and ocean SMFC graphite cathodes have large potential losses, estimated by the model to be 470 mV and 614 mV, respectively; and (5) the electrochemical potential available at the cathode is the primary factor controlling reduction kinetic rates. The mechanistic model based on thermodynamic and electrochemical principles successfully fit and predicted the data. The data, experimental system, and model can be used in future studies to guide SMFC design and deployment, assess SMFC current production, test cathode material performance, and predict cathode contamination.

  3. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO2 films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a

  4. Effect of Oxygen on the Mg-H Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1984-01-01

    Two identical samples of magnesium powder (purity, 99.58%) were hydrogenated at approximately 30 bar and 380 °C and dehydrogenated under vacuum at the same temperature about 500 times. The first sample was exposed to pure hydrogen (purity, 99.9999%) and the second was exposed to hydrogen containi...... absorption measurement performed after the cycling experiment. Despite the decreased absorption rate, which was mainly observed at higher degrees of reaction, little change in the desorption kinetics was observed....... 85 ppm O and 8 ppm H2O vapour. In both experiments a moderate overall reduction in the amount of hydrogen absorbed and desorbed was observed. This can be ascribed to a reduced absorption rate with increased number of cycles. The effect of oxygen was negligible, and this was confirmed by a precision...

  5. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Kinetics of photodissociated oxygen recombination to human oxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokut', S.B.; Syakhovich, V.E.; Parul', D.A.; Lepeshkevich, S.V.; Dzhagarov, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxygen binding to the tetrameric hemoglobin (Hb) is a basic reaction for study of a cooperativity and allosteric homotropic and heterotropic interactions in proteins. In tetrameric hemoglobin the certain sites in the α 1 β 2 -interface have the precise geometry and chemical reactivity to bind 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, protons, chloride and hence shift the equilibrium away from the oxyconformation, thereby favoring O 2 release. Post-translational modifications of the major hemoglobin fraction Hb A 1 with sugar moiety in the Hb central cavity leads to differences in geometry of the effectors binding region providing a useful experimental tool to study the long range relationship in the tetramer molecule. Here we present the results of the nongeminate biomolecular association of Hb and O 2 obtained by nanosecond laser flash-photolysis. All measurements were carried out in 50 mM potassium-phosphate buffer pH 7.4 with the following samples Hb A 1 , HbA 1c , HbA 1b , and HbA 1 in the presence of the tenfold excess of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP). Our results show that oxygen recombination kinetics are characterized by two processes with different decay times and Hb-form-dependent contributions. This process can be described by the following expression: A(t)=A 1 exp(-t/τ 1 )+A 2 exp(-t/τ 2 ), where A(t) is a normalized number of the deoxy-Hb molecules. The short-live component has a lifetime τ 1 , which is Hb-type dependent and changes in the intervals 30-60 μs, the second component has a lifetime τ 2 around 100 μs, and also is sample-dependent value. A(t=0) is proportional to apparent quantum yields of the photodissociation and determines by geminate stages of oxygen binding to Fe from the protein matrix areas. These results show that post-translational modifications of the major hemoglobin component HbA 1 have influence on hemoglobin transport function via the long range relationship in the tetramer molecule

  7. Influence of dissolved oxygen on the nitrification kinetics in a circulating bed biofilm reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, R.; Melo, L.F. [University of Minho, Braga (Portugal). Dept. Bioengineering; Lazarova, V.; Manem, J. [Centre of International Research for Water and Environment (CIRSEE), Lyonnaise des Eaux, Le Pecq (France)

    1998-12-01

    The influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on the nitrification kinetics was studied in the circulating bed reactor (CBR). The study was partly performed at laboratory scale with synthetic water, and partly at pilot scale with secondary effluent as feed water. The nitrification kinetics of the laboratory CBR as a function of the oxygen concentration can be described according to the half order and zero order rate equations of the diffusion-reaction model applied to porous catalysts. When oxygen was the rate limiting substrate, the nitrification rate was close to a half order function of the oxygen concentration. The average oxygen diffusion coefficient estimated by fitting the diffusion-reaction model to the experimental results was around 66% of the respective value in water. The experimental results showed that either the ammonia or the oxygen concentration could be limiting for the nitrification kinetics. The latter occurred for an oxygen to ammonia concentration ratio below 1.5-2 gO{sub 2}/gN-NH{sub 4}{sup +} for both laboratory and pilot scale reactors. The volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k{sub L}a) determined in the laboratory scale reactor was 0.017 s{sup -1} for a superficial air velocity of 0.02 m s{sup -1}, and the one determined in the pilot scale reactor was 0.040 s{sup -1} for a superficial air velocity of 0.031 m s{sup -1}. The k{sub L}a for the pilot scale reactor did not change significantly after biofilm development, compared to the value measured without biofilm. (orig.) With 7 figs., 5 tabs., 24 refs.

  8. Kinetic and reaction pathways of methanol oxidation on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.W.; McCready, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol oxidation kinetics were measured on Pt wires in a flow reactor at pressures between 30 and 130 Pa. The kinetics were measured as a function of oxygen-to-methanol equivalence ratio phi and wire temperature. In methanol-lean feeds (phi 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were the only products; in methanol-rich feeds (phi > 1), CO, H 2 , H 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were observed. Experiments with 18 O 2 showed that the principal methanol oxidation pathway does not involve C-O bond dissociation. However, the 18 O 2 experiments, together with other features of the methanol oxidation data, also provided evidence for a minor oxidation pathway (accounting for less than 1% of the product CO 2 ) which proceeds through a carbon intermediate. A mathematical model is presented which describes the principal CH 3 OH oxidation pathway as a series reaction involving adsorbed H 2 CO and CO intermediates. Consistent with experimental results, the model predicts that inhibition by adsorbed CO should be weaker for CH 3 OH and H 2 CO oxidation than for CO oxidation. 34 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  9. Reactions of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium - a critical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamentals of solvation chemistry are presented with appropriate components formulated. Methods of investigation and kinetics of the reactions are described. The hydrogen equilibrium pressure and saturation solubilities are described. The chemical equilibrium between O and H in solution is presented with detailed tabulation of the saturation solutions of oxygen, hydrogen and hydroxide in liquid sodium. Agreements and differences with the literature are presented

  10. Vibrationally Excited Carbon Monoxide Produced via a Chemical Reaction Between Carbon Vapor and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Elijah R.; Eckert, Zakari; Frederickson, Kraig; Rich, Bill; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the vibrational distribution function of carbon monoxide produced via a reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen has shown a total population inversion on vibrational levels 4-7. Carbon vapor, produced using an arc discharge to sublimate graphite, is mixed with an argon oxygen flow. The excited carbon monoxide is vibrationally populated up to level v=14, at low temperatures, T=400-450 K, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr, with total population inversions between v=4-7. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of the reaction enthalpy. Kinetic modeling of the flow reactor, including state specific vibrational processes, was performed to infer the vibrational distribution of the products of the reaction. The results show viability of developing of a new chemical CO laser from the reaction of carbon vapor and oxygen.

  11. Performance of the periodic pulse technique--4. Periodic pulse reaction kinetics of oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, T.; Ii, M.; Murakami, Y.

    1980-07-01

    The periodic pulse method was used to study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde (IBA) by following the formation rates of methacrolein (MA), carbon monoxide and dioxide (CO/sub x/), and other products (P) as a function of pulse widths and reactant partial pressures at 350/sup 0/C over a 2:3 antimony oxide/molybdenum trioxide catalyst. The results were consistent with a mechanism according to which IBA reacts with oxygen retained by the catalyst to form MA, causing reduction of the catalyst. The IBA also adsorbed on the surface as an oxygenated species which either reacted with gas-phase oxygen to form CO/sub x/ or desorbed as an oxygenated P. The reduced catalyst surface was reoxidized by oxygen adsorption. Implications of catalyst tailoring for increased MA yields by improving the redox mechanism and inhibiting the surface reactions, are discussed.

  12. The reaction kinetics of lithium salt with water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balooch, M.; Dinh, L.N.; Calef, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of lithium salt (LiH and/or LiD) with water vapor in the partial pressure range of 10 -5 -2657 Pa has been investigated. The reaction probability of water with LiH cleaved in an ultra high vacuum environment was obtained using the modulated molecular beam technique. This probability was 0.11 and independent of LiH surface temperature, suggesting a negligible activation energy for the reaction in agreement with quantum chemical calculations. The value gradually reduced, however, to 0.007 as the surface concentration of oxygen containing product approached full coverage. As the film grew beyond a monolayer, the phase lag of hydrogen product increased from 0 deg. C to 20 deg. C and the reaction probability reduced further until it approached our detection limit (∼10 -4 ). This phase lag was attributed to a diffusion-limited process in this regime. For micrometer thick hydroxide films grown in high moisture concentration environment on LiD and LiH, the reaction probability reduced to ∼4x10 -7 and was independent of exposure time. In this regime of thick hydroxide films (LiOH and/or LiOD), microcracks generated in the films to release stress provided easier pathways for moisture to reach the interface. A modified microscope, capable of both atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation, was also employed to investigate the surface morphology of hydroxide monohydrate (LiOH · H 2 O and/or LiOD · H 2 O) grown on hydroxide at high water vapor partial pressures and the kinetics of this growth

  13. Kinetics of gaseous uranium hexafluoride reaction with hydrogen chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezubchenko, A.N.; Ilyukhin, A.I.; Merzlyakov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetics of decrease of concentration of gaseous uranium hexafluoride in reaction with hydrogen chloride at temperatures close to room ones, was investigated by the method of IR spectroscopy. It was established that the process represented the first order reaction by both UF 6 and HCl. Activation energy of the reaction was determined: 7.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol. Specific feature of reaction kinetics was noted: inversely proportional dependence of effective constant on UF 6 initial pressure. 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Kinetic mechanism for modeling of electrochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, Petr; Hrdlička, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2012-04-01

    We propose a kinetic mechanism of electrochemical interactions. We assume fast formation and recombination of electron donors D- and acceptors A+ on electrode surfaces. These mediators are continuously formed in the electrode matter by thermal fluctuations. The mediators D- and A+, chemically equivalent to the electrode metal, enter electrochemical interactions on the electrode surfaces. Electrochemical dynamics and current-voltage characteristics of a selected electrochemical system are studied. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with those given by the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics. The proposed model can be used to study fast electrochemical processes in microsystems and nanosystems that are often out of the thermal equilibrium. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism operates only with the surface concentrations of chemical reactants and local electric potentials, which facilitates the study of electrochemical systems with indefinable bulk.

  15. OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS IN SPORT, EXERCISE AND MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Poole

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the book is to discuss the principal determinants of oxygen uptake dynamics which is essential to developing exercise performance and improving quality of life for patients, especially those with cardio-respiratory diseases. A broad review of the current knowledge about this relatively less studied field is provided by this book. Incidentally, it updates the reader about how a person can use his/her aerobic energy system more effectively in order to fatigue gradually and be able to endure more physical activity. It also discusses the effects of exercise training in speeding up oxygen uptake kinetics, and the effects of ageing and a selection of conditions in slowing oxygen dynamics and declining exercise capacity.

  16. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF REACTION OF ACIDIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of two phenoxazine dyes namely Nile blue (7-amino-3-diethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, NB+) and Meldola\\'s blue (3- dimethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, MB+) with acidic chlorite and hypochlorous acid have been investigated using a UV-visible and a ...

  17. Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Reaction from Catalytic and Kinetic Perspectives

    KAUST Repository

    Hisatomi, Takashi

    2014-10-16

    Abstract: Some particulate semiconductors loaded with nanoparticulate catalysts exhibit photocatalytic activity for the water-splitting reaction. The photocatalysis is distinct from the thermal catalysis because photocatalysis involves photophysical processes in particulate semiconductors. This review article presents a brief introduction to photocatalysis, followed by kinetic aspects of the photocatalytic water-splitting reaction.Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Deuterium secondary isotope kinetic effects in imine formation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L. do; Rossi, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects, K D /K H , for reaction mechanisms is studied. The reaction of pH function to m-bromobenzaldehyde, semicarbazide nucleophile, methoxy-amine and hydroxylamine are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  19. Unravelling the Maillard reaction network by multiresponse kinetic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.

    2003-01-01

    The Maillard reaction is an important reaction in food industry. It is responsible for the formation of colour and aroma, as well as toxic compounds as the recent discovered acrylamide. The knowledge of kinetic parameters, such as rate constants and activation energy, is necessary to predict its

  20. Discussion of the Investigation Method on the Reaction Kinetics of Metallurgical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruiling; Wu, Keng; Zhang, Jiazhi; Zhao, Yong

    Reaction kinetics of metallurgical physical chemistry which was successfully applied in metallurgy (as ferrous metallurgy, non-ferrous metallurgy) became an important theoretical foundation for subject system of traditional metallurgy. Not only the research methods were very perfect, but also the independent structures and systems of it had been formed. One of the important tasks of metallurgical reaction engineering was the simulation of metallurgical process. And then, the mechanism of reaction process and the conversion time points of different control links should be obtained accurately. Therefore, the research methods and results of reaction kinetics in metallurgical physical chemistry were not very suitable for metallurgical reaction engineering. In order to provide the definite conditions of transmission, reaction kinetics parameters and the conversion time points of different control links for solving the transmission and reaction equations in metallurgical reaction engineering, a new method for researching kinetics mechanisms in metallurgical reaction engineering was proposed, which was named stepwise attempt method. Then the comparison of results between the two methods and the further development of stepwise attempt method were discussed in this paper. As a new research method for reaction kinetics in metallurgical reaction engineering, stepwise attempt method could not only satisfy the development of metallurgical reaction engineering, but also provide necessary guarantees for establishing its independent subject system.

  1. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  2. Explaining the atypical reaction profiles of heme enzymes with a novel mechanistic hypothesis and kinetic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelath Murali Manoj

    Full Text Available Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP, uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the "steady state kinetics" of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of "the product of interest" in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of "substrate concentration at maximum observed rate". The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes.

  3. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, V.; McAdam, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    Under the influence of tritium β-radiation, 1,4-dioxan undergoes hydrogen exchange with the solvent water. The inhibition of the reaction by known electron scavengers (Ag + , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , H 3 + O) and also by species with high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals but negligible reactivity towards solvated electrons (N 3 - , Br - , SCN - ) has been examined in detail. γ-irradiation similarly induces hydrogen exchange. The action of scavengers is interpreted as requiring the involvement of two separately scavengeable primary radiolysis products in the sequence of reactions leading to exchange. The presence of electron scavengers, even at high concentration, does not totally inhibit the exchange, and a secondary exchange route, involving a low vacancy state of inhibitor cations, is considered responsible for the 'unscavengeable' portion of the reaction, by providing an alternative exchange route. Analogies are drawn between the exchange reaction and other radiation-induced reactions that are thought to involve spur processes. Some implication of radiation-chemical studies in water-alcohol mixtures are indicated. (author)

  4. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourisse, D.

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [fr

  5. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-11-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  6. A Kinetic Study of the Diels-Alder Reaction. An Experiment Illustrating Simple Second-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Michael G.; Dills, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment for teaching the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. Provides background information about first- and second-order reactions, experimental procedures of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and dimethyl fumarate, and the experimental results. (YP)

  7. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  8. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma Ribera, R., E-mail: r.colomaribera@utwente.nl; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  9. Kinetics of oxygen adsorption on ZnS nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Reza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized through a one-step precipitation process. Effect of time and temperature on the formation reaction was investigated. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, ultraviolet (UV visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL spectrophotometry. Based on XRD and UV-Vis data, the particles produced at 70 °C had a mean particle size of about 5 nm. Increasing time and temperature of the synthesis reaction resulted in photoluminescence intensification. PL spectroscopy helped understanding the adsorption kinetics of oxygen on ZnS nanoparticles during the precipitation synthesis process. Fabrication of ZnS structures with appropriate oxygen adsorption capacity was suggested as a means of PL emission intensity control.

  10. Kinetics of the exchange of oxygen between carbon dioxide and carbonate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, C.K.; Silverman, D.N.

    1975-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the exchange of oxygen between carbon dioxide and carbonate ion in alkaline, aqueous solutions is presented. The exchange was observed by placing 18 O-labeled carbonate, not enriched in 13 C, into solution with 13 C-enriched carbonate, not enriched in 18 O. The rate of depletion of 18 O from the 12 C-containing species and the rate of appearance of 18 O in the 13 C-containing species was measured by mass spectrometry. From these data, the second-order rate constant for the reaction between carbon dioxide and carbonate which results in the exchange of oxygen at 25 0 is 114 +- 11 M -1 sec -1 . It is emphasized that this exchange of oxygen between species of CO 2 in solution must be recognized in studies using 18 O labels to determine the fate of CO 2 in biochemical and physiological processes. (auth)

  11. Kinetics of chemical reactions initiated by hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1977-01-01

    Modern ideas about kinetics of chemical reactions of hot atoms are generalized. The main points of the phenomenological theories (''kinetic theory'' of Wolfgang-Estrup hot reactions and the theory of ''reactions integral probability'' of Porter) are given. Physico-chemical models of elastic and non-elastic collisions are considered which are used in solving Boltzmann integro-differential equations and stochastic equations in the Porter theory. The principal formulas are given describing probabilities or yields of chemical reactions, initiated with hot atoms, depending on the distribution functions of hot particles with respect to energy. Briefly described are the techniques and the results of applying the phenomenological theories for interpretation of the experimental data obtained during nuclear reactions with hot atoms, photochemical investigations, etc. 96 references are given

  12. Kinetic concepts of thermally stimulated reactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazovkin, Sergey

    Historical analysis suggests that the basic kinetic concepts of reactions in solids were inherited from homogeneous kinetics. These concepts rest upon the assumption of a single-step reaction that disagrees with the multiple-step nature of solid-state processes. The inadequate concepts inspire such unjustified anticipations of kinetic analysis as evaluating constant activation energy and/or deriving a single-step reaction mechanism for the overall process. A more adequate concept is that of the effective activation energy, which may vary with temperature and extent of conversion. The adequacy of this concept is illustrated by literature data as well as by experimental data on the thermal dehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate and thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate, ammonium nitrate and 1,3,5,7- tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine.

  13. Kinetic investigation of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by means of the kinetic isotope method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, F; Dermietzel, J [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung

    1978-09-01

    The application of the kinetic isotope method to heterogeneous catalytic processes is possible for surface compounds by using the steady-state relation. However, the characterization of intermediate products becomes ambiguous if sorption rates are of the same order of magnitude as surface reactions rates. The isotopic exchange reaction renders possible the estimation of sorption rates.

  14. Formation and Migration of Oxygen Vacancies in SrCoO3 and their effect on Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan A.

    2016-07-18

    Perovskite SrCoO3 is a potentially useful material for promoting the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, with high activities predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for closely related doped perovskite materials. However, complete stoichiometric oxidation is very difficult to realize experimentally – in almost all cases there are significant fractions of oxygen vacancies present. Here, using first principles calculations we study oxygen vacancies in perovskite SrCoO3 from thermodynamic, electronic and kinetic points of view. We find that an oxygen vacancy donates two electrons to neighboring Co sites in the form of localized charge. The formation energy of a single vacancy is very low and estimated to be 1.26 eV in the dilute limit. We find that a vacancy is quite mobile with a migration energy of ~0.5 eV. Moreover, we predict that oxygen vacancies exhibit a tendency towards clustering which is in accordance with the material’s ability to form a variety of oxygen-deficient structures. These vacancies have a profound effect on the material’s ability to facilitate OER, increasing the overpotential from ~0.3 V for the perfect material to ~0.7 for defective surfaces. A moderate compressive biaxial strain (2%) is predicted here to increase the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy by ca. 30%, thus reducing the concentration of surface vacancies and thereby preserving the OER activity of the material.

  15. Formation and Migration of Oxygen Vacancies in SrCoO3 and their effect on Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan A.; Tan, Xin; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Smith, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite SrCoO3 is a potentially useful material for promoting the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, with high activities predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for closely related doped perovskite materials. However, complete stoichiometric oxidation is very difficult to realize experimentally – in almost all cases there are significant fractions of oxygen vacancies present. Here, using first principles calculations we study oxygen vacancies in perovskite SrCoO3 from thermodynamic, electronic and kinetic points of view. We find that an oxygen vacancy donates two electrons to neighboring Co sites in the form of localized charge. The formation energy of a single vacancy is very low and estimated to be 1.26 eV in the dilute limit. We find that a vacancy is quite mobile with a migration energy of ~0.5 eV. Moreover, we predict that oxygen vacancies exhibit a tendency towards clustering which is in accordance with the material’s ability to form a variety of oxygen-deficient structures. These vacancies have a profound effect on the material’s ability to facilitate OER, increasing the overpotential from ~0.3 V for the perfect material to ~0.7 for defective surfaces. A moderate compressive biaxial strain (2%) is predicted here to increase the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy by ca. 30%, thus reducing the concentration of surface vacancies and thereby preserving the OER activity of the material.

  16. Glycerol acetals, kinetic study of the reaction between glycerol and formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agirre, I.; Garcia, I.; Requies, J.; Barrio, V.L.; Gueemez, M.B.; Cambra, J.F.; Arias, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    The acetalization reaction between glycerol and formaldehyde using Amberlyst 47 acidic ion exchange resin was studied. These acetals can be obtained from renewable sources (bioalcohols and bioalcohol derived aldehydes) and seem to be good candidates for different applications such as oxygenated diesel additives. A preliminary kinetic study was performed in a batch stirred tank reactor studying the influence of different process parameters like temperature, feed composition and the stirring speed. A pseudo homogenous kinetic model able to explain the reaction mechanism was adjusted. Thus, the corresponding order of reaction was determined. Amberlyst 47 acidic ion exchange resin showed a fairly good behavior allowing 100% of selectivity towards acetals formation. However, the studied acetalization reaction showed high thermodynamic limitations achieving glycerol conversions around 50% using a stoichiometric feed ratio at 353 K. The product is a mixture of two isomers (1,3-Dioxan-5-ol and 1,3-dioxolane-4-methanol) and the conversion of 1,3-dioxolane-4-methanol into 1,3-Dioxan-5-ol was also observed. -- Highlights: → The reaction between glycerol and acetaldehyde shows thermodynamic limitations. → Amberlyst 47 ion exchange resins show 100% of selectivity. → A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model is able to predict the reaction progress. → Isomerization reactions were observed from dioxalanes to dioxanes.

  17. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  18. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    Heterogeneously catalyzed selective oxidation reactions have attracted a lot of attention in recent time. The first part of the present thesis provides an overview over heterogeneous copper and silver catalysts for selective oxidations in the liquid phase and compared the performance and catalytic...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a catalyst...... revealed that all catalysts were more active in combination with ceria nanoparticles and that under the tested reaction conditions silver was equally or even more efficient than the gold catalysts. Calcination at 900 °C of silver on silica prepared by impregnation afforded a catalyst which was used...

  19. Reaction of oxygen with the respiratory chain in cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, B

    1965-09-01

    This paper considers the way in which the oxygen reaction described by Dr. Nicholls and the ADP control reactions described by Dr. Racker could cooperate to establish a purposeful metabolic control phenomenon in vivo. This has required an examination of the kinetic properties of the respiratory chain with particular reference to methods for determinations of oxygen affinity (K(m)). The constant parameter for tissue respiration is k(1), the velocity constant for the reaction of oxygen with cytochrome oxidase. Not only is this quantity a constant for a particular tissue or mitochondria; it appears to vary little over a wide range of biological material, and for practical purposes a value of 5 x 10(7) at 25 degrees close to our original value (20) is found to apply with adequate accuracy for calculation of K(m) for mammalia. The quantity which will depend upon the tissue and its metabolic state is the value of K(m) itself, and K(m) may be as large as 0.5 microM and may fall to 0.05 microM or less in resting, controlled, or inhibited states. The control characteristic for ADP may depend upon the electron flux due to the cytochrome chain (40); less ADP is required to activate the slower electron transport at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. The affinity constants for ADP control appear to be less dependent upon substrate supplied to the system. The balance of ADP and oxygen control in vivo is amply demonstrated experimentally and is dependent on the oxygen concentration as follows. In the presence of excess oxygen, control may be due to the ADP or phosphate (or substrate), and the kinetics of oxygen utilization will be independent of the oxygen concentration. As the oxygen concentration is diminished, hemoglobin becomes disoxygenated, deep gradients of oxygen concentration develop in the tissue, and eventually cytochrome oxidase becomes partially and then completely reduced. DPN at this point will become reduced and the electron flow diminished. The rate

  20. Photoinduced intramolecular substitution reaction of aryl halide with carbonyl oxygen of amide group

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Y T; Kim, M S; Kwon, J H

    2002-01-01

    Photoreaction of N-(o-halophenyl)acetamide in basic acetonitrile produces an intramolecular substituted product, 2-methylbenzoxazole in addition to reduced product, acetanilide, whereas photoreaction of N-(o-halobenzyl)acetamide affords a reduced product, N-benzylacetamide only. On the basis of preparative reaction, kinetics, and UV/vis absorption behavior, an electrophilic aromatic substitution of aryl halide with oxygen of its amide bond are proposed.

  1. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry. [Production by sputtering; reaction with butenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O(/sup 3/P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated. (DLC)

  2. Photoinduced intramolecular substitution reaction of aryl halide with carbonyl oxygen of amide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Tae; Song, Myong Geun; Kim, Moon Sub; Kwon, Jeong Hee [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    Photoreaction of N-(o-halophenyl)acetamide in basic acetonitrile produces an intramolecular substituted product, 2-methylbenzoxazole in addition to reduced product, acetanilide, whereas photoreaction of N-(o-halobenzyl)acetamide affords a reduced product, N-benzylacetamide only. On the basis of preparative reaction, kinetics, and UV/vis absorption behavior, an electrophilic aromatic substitution of aryl halide with oxygen of its amide bond are proposed.

  3. Photoinduced intramolecular substitution reaction of aryl halide with carbonyl oxygen of amide group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tae; Song, Myong Geun; Kim, Moon Sub; Kwon, Jeong Hee

    2002-01-01

    Photoreaction of N-(o-halophenyl)acetamide in basic acetonitrile produces an intramolecular substituted product, 2-methylbenzoxazole in addition to reduced product, acetanilide, whereas photoreaction of N-(o-halobenzyl)acetamide affords a reduced product, N-benzylacetamide only. On the basis of preparative reaction, kinetics, and UV/vis absorption behavior, an electrophilic aromatic substitution of aryl halide with oxygen of its amide bond are proposed

  4. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  5. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  6. Ametryn degradation by aqueous chlorine: Kinetics and reaction influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bin; Gao Naiyun; Cheng Hefa; Hu Chenyan; Xia Shengji; Sun Xiaofeng; Wang Xuejiao; Yang Shaogui

    2009-01-01

    The chemical oxidation of the herbicide ametryn was investigated by aqueous chlorination between pH 4 and 10 at a temperature of 25 deg. C. Ametryn was found to react very rapidly with aqueous chlorine. The reaction kinetics can be well described by a second-order kinetic model. The apparent second-order rate constants are greater than 5 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 under acidic and neutral conditions. The reaction proceeds much more slowly under alkaline conditions. The predominant reactions were found to be the reactions of HOCl with neutral ametryn and the charged ametryn, with rate constants equal to 7.22 x 10 2 and 1.58 x 10 3 M -1 s -1 , respectively. The ametryn degradation rate increases with addition of bromide and decreases with addition of ammonia during the chlorination process. Based on elementary chemical reactions, a kinetic model of ametryn degradation by chlorination in the presence of bromide or ammonia ion was also developed. By employing this model, we estimate that the rate constants for the reactions of HOBr with neutral ametryn and charged ametryn were 9.07 x 10 3 and 3.54 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 , respectively. These values are 10- to 10 3 -fold higher than those of HOCl, suggesting that the presence of bromine species during chlorination could significantly accelerate ametryn degradation.

  7. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  8. Diagnostic Appraisal of Grade 12 Students' Understanding of Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics, a topic which has not been extensively explored in the chemistry education literature at this level. A 3-tier diagnostic instrument with 11 questions was developed--this format is of very recent origin and has been the subject of only a handful of studies. The findings…

  9. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  10. Energetics and kinetics of ferrocyanide and nitrate/nitrite reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1950's, radiocesium scavenging at the Hanford site resulted in radioactive waste sludges containing ferrocyanide, nitrate, and nitrite. These waters are a concern since certain mixtures of ferrocyanide and nitrate and/or nitrite are known to explode when heated. The authors have used differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, isothermal calorimetry and gravimetry, and accelerating rate calorimetry to measure the thermal behavior, the reaction enthalpies, and selected kinetic parameters for reactions between sodium nickel ferrocyanide, the suspected ferrocyanide form in Hanford wastes, and nitrate and/or nitrite. These studies indicate that the oxidation proceeds via multiple steps, the initial reaction begins near 200 degrees C, the initial step has a high activation energy (>200 kJ/mole-K), succeeding reaction steps have activation energies ranging from 90 to 160 kJ/mole-K, and that the oxidation yields about 50% of the theoretical heat of reaction for the most energetic reaction

  11. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  12. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  13. Deduction of kinetic mechanism in multisubstrate enzyme reactions from tritium isotope effects. Application to dopamine beta-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinman, J.P.; Humphries, H.; Voet, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Primary tritium isotope effects have been measured for the hydroxylation of [2-3H] dopamine catalyzed by dopamine beta-hydroxylase. Experimental values vary from 8.8 +/- 1.4 at 0.02 mM oxygen to 4.1 +/- 0.6 at 1.0 mM oxygen. It is shown that the observed dependence of the isotope effect on oxygen concentration provides unequivocal evidence for a kinetically significant dissociation of both dopamine and oxygen from enzyme, ternary complex. This approach, which is applicable to any multisubstrate enzyme characterized by detectable kinetic isotope effects, provides an alternate to classical methods for the elucidation of kinetic order in enzyme-catalyzed reactions

  14. The oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt Part I. Reaction order experiments and impedance measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobussen, A.G.C.; Willems, H.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Broers, G.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    It was found that the oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt in concentrated KOH solutions can be described differently for low and high overpotentials. In the overpotential range from 150 to 280 mV, the reaction has a Tafel slope of approximately 40 mV and a reaction order with respect to the KOH

  15. Reaction kinetics, reaction products and compressive strength of ternary activators activated slag designed by Taguchi method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.L.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the reaction kinetics, the reaction products and the compressive strength of slag activated by ternary activators, namely waterglass, sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate. Nine mixtures are designed by the Taguchi method considering the factors of sodium carbonate content

  16. Critical appraisal on the role of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in lithium-oxygen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodge, Andrew W.; Lacey, Matthew J.; Fitt, Matthew; Garcia-Araez, Nuria; Owen, John R.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a detailed characterization of the reduction of oxygen in pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids for application to lithium-oxygen batteries. It is found that, in the absence of Li + , all electron transfer kinetics are fast, and therefore, the reactions are limited by the mass transport rate. Reversible reduction of O 2 to O 2 • − and O 2 • − to O 2 2− take place at E 0 = 2.1 V and 0.8 V vs. Li + /Li, respectively. In the presence of Li + , O 2 is reduced to LiO 2 first and then to Li 2 O 2 . The solubility product constant of Li 2 O 2 is found to be around 10 −51 , corroborating the hypothesis that electrode passivation by Li 2 O 2 deposition is an important issue that limits the capacity delivered by lithium-oxygen batteries. Enhancing the rate of Li 2 O 2 formation by using different electrode materials would probably lead to faster electrode passivation and hence smaller charge due to oxygen reduction (smaller capacity of the battery). On the contrary, soluble redox catalysts can not only increase the reaction rate of Li 2 O 2 formation but also avoid electrode passivation since the fast diffusion of the soluble redox catalyst would displace the formation of Li 2 O 2 at a sufficient distance from the electrode surface

  17. Reaction kinetics for preparation of silica film with Stoeber method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Mengying; Jiang Xiaodong; Liu Miao; Luo Xuan; Tang Yongjian; Cao Linhong

    2013-01-01

    A new formula was proposed to investigate the relationship between reaction time and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) conversion rate for preparation of silica sol with Stöber method, by studying the reaction kinetics of TEOS hydrolytic process. An appropriate conversion rate was then determined and used to calculate the theoretical optimal reaction time. Meanwhile, silica sols were prepared by sol-gel process using TEOS as precursor and ammonia as catalyst. It was found that the reaction time decreases with an increasing amount of ammonia and water. The values of experimental optimal reaction time were obtained, and agree with the theoretical results (the errors are within 5%), which shows good applicability of our formula. (authors)

  18. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  19. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  20. Removal of copper by oxygenated pyrolytic tire char: kinetics and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Augustine; Balasubramanian, Rajashekhar

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics of copper ion (Cu(II)) removal from aqueous solution by pyrolytic tire char was modeled using five different conventional models. A modification to these models was also developed through a modified equation that accounts for precipitation. Conventional first- and second-order reaction models did not fit the copper sorption kinetics well, indicating a lack of simple rate-order dependency on solute concentration. Instead, a reversible first-order rate reaction showed the best fit to the data, indicating a dependence on surface functional groups. Due to the varying solution pH during the sorption process, modified external and internal mass transfer models were employed. Results showed that the sorption of copper onto oxygenated chars was limited by external mass transfer and internal resistance with and without the modification. However, the modification of the sorption process produced very different results for unoxygenated chars, which showed neither internal nor external limitation to sorption. Instead, its slow sorption rate indicates a lack of surface functional groups. The sorption of Cu(II) by oxygenated and unoxygenated chars was also found to occur via three and two distinct stages, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotopic exchange between CO2 and H2O and labelling kinetics of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard

    1971-01-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide with water has been studied by measuring the rate of oxygen exchange between C 18 O 2 and H 2 16 O. The mathematical treatment of the kinetics allows to determine with accuracy the diffusion flow between the gas and the liquid phase, in the same way as the CO 2 hydration rate. The velocity constant of this last process, whose value gives the in situ enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase, has been established in the case of chloroplast and Euglena suspensions and of aerial leaves. The study of the isotopic exchange between C 18 O 2 and a vegetable submitted to alternations of dark and light has allowed to calculate the isotopic abundance of the metabolized CO 2 whose value has been compared to that of the intracellular water and that of photosynthetic oxygen. In addition, a new method using 13 C 18 O 2 gives the means to measure with accuracy eventual isotopic effects. The labelling kinetics of the oxygen evolved by Euglena suspensions whose water has been enriched with 18 O have been established at different temperatures. (author) [fr

  2. Factors influencing photo curing kinetics of novel UV-cured siloxane-modified acrylic coatings: Oxygen inhibition and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito Corcione, Carola; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The inhibition effect of oxygen on the kinetic behaviour of photopolymerizable siloxane acrylic formulations was analyzed by thermal analysis. ► The addition of a thiol in the mixtures allows to obtain higher conversion, to reduce the content of the UV initiator and to increase the T g . ► The data found in air were fitted as a function of the presence of the thiol monomer obtaining a good agreement. - Abstract: An experimental study was carried out for the development and characterization of innovative photopolymerizable siloxane-modified acrylic formulations for possible use as protective coatings of stone substrates. The kinetics of the radical photopolymerization mechanism induced by UV radiations in presence of a suitable photoinitiator was studied by a calorimetric analysis by varying the atmosphere (oxygen or nitrogen) and the composition of the mixtures, in particular of the UV photoinitiator. The reactivity, expressed in terms of both heat developed and rate of reaction, was generally found to decrease when the photopolymerization was carried out in air, due the inhibiting action of the oxygen towards the free radical polymerization. The addition of a proper thiol to the acrylic modified resin was found to reduce the adverse effect of oxygen on the kinetic reaction and on the degree of conversion. This result allowed to reduce the content of the photoinitiator and to increase the content of the siloxane in the acrylic based mixtures. The effect of the change of the composition of the formulations on the kinetic behaviour of the acrylic based resins was also analysed by calorimetric analysis. Calorimetric experimental data were fitted to a simple kinetic model for radical photopolymerization reactions. Finally, a proper relationship between the glass transition temperature and the total extent of reaction was applied to the experimental data. A good agreement between the experimental data and both the theoretical models was generally

  3. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2016-01-25

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER kinetics were investigated. For electrocatalysis, a NiFeOx catalyst was hydrothermally decorated on Ni foam. In 1 M KOH solution, the NiFeOx electrocatalyst achieved 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 260 mV. The same catalyst was decorated on the surface of Ta3N5 photocatalyst powder. The reaction was conducted in the presence of 0.1 M Na2S2O8 as a strong electron scavenger, thus likely leading to the OER being kinetically relevant. When compared with the bare Ta3N5, NiFeOx/Ta3N5 demonstrated a 5-fold improvement in photocatalytic activity in the OER under visible light irradiation, achieving a quantum efficiency of 24 % at 480 nm. Under the conditions investigated, a strong correlation between the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performances was identified: an improvement in electrocatalysis corresponded with an improvement in photocatalysis without altering the identity of the materials. The rate change at different pH was likely associated with electrocatalytic kinetics that accordingly influenced the photocatalytic rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates with respective to the reaction temperature resulted in an apparent activation energy of 25 kJ mol-1 in electrocatalysis, whereas that in photocatalysis was 16 kJ mol-1. The origin of the difference in these activation energy values is likely attributed to the possible effects of temperature on the individual thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reaction process. The work described herein demonstrates a method of “transferring the knowledge of electrocatalysis to photocatalysis” as a strong tool to rationally and quantitatively understand the complex reaction schemes involved in photocatalytic reactions.

  4. Singlet oxygen reactions with flavonoids. A theoretical-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Javier; Günther, Germán; Zanocco, Antonio L; Lemp, Else

    2012-01-01

    Detection of singlet oxygen emission, λ(max) = 1270 nm, following laser excitation and steady-state methods were employed to measure the total reaction rate constant, k(T), and the reactive reaction rate constant, k(r), for the reaction between singlet oxygen and several flavonoids. Values of k(T) determined in deuterated water, ranging from 2.4×10(7) M(-1) s(-1) to 13.4×10(7) M(-1) s(-1), for rutin and morin, respectively, and the values measured for k(r), ranging from 2.8×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 65.7×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for kaempferol and morin, respectively, being epicatechin and catechin chemically unreactive. These results indicate that all the studied flavonoids are good quenchers of singlet oxygen and could be valuable antioxidants in systems under oxidative stress, in particular if a flavonoid-rich diet was previously consumed. Analysis of the dependence of rate constant values with molecular structure in terms of global descriptors and condensed Fukui functions, resulting from electronic structure calculations, supports the formation of a charge transfer exciplex in all studied reactions. The fraction of exciplex giving reaction products evolves through a hydroperoxide and/or an endoperoxide intermediate produced by singlet oxygen attack on the double bond of the ring C of the flavonoid.

  5. Singlet Oxygen Reactions with Flavonoids. A Theoretical – Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Javier; Günther, Germán; Zanocco, Antonio L.; Lemp, Else

    2012-01-01

    Detection of singlet oxygen emission, λmax = 1270 nm, following laser excitation and steady-state methods were employed to measure the total reaction rate constant, kT, and the reactive reaction rate constant, kr, for the reaction between singlet oxygen and several flavonoids. Values of kT determined in deuterated water, ranging from 2.4×107 M−1s−1 to 13.4×107 M−1s−1, for rutin and morin, respectively, and the values measured for kr, ranging from 2.8×105 M−1s−1 to 65.7×105 M−1s−1 for kaempferol and morin, respectively, being epicatechin and catechin chemically unreactive. These results indicate that all the studied flavonoids are good quenchers of singlet oxygen and could be valuable antioxidants in systems under oxidative stress, in particular if a flavonoid-rich diet was previously consumed. Analysis of the dependence of rate constant values with molecular structure in terms of global descriptors and condensed Fukui functions, resulting from electronic structure calculations, supports the formation of a charge transfer exciplex in all studied reactions. The fraction of exciplex giving reaction products evolves through a hydroperoxide and/or an endoperoxide intermediate produced by singlet oxygen attack on the double bond of the ring C of the flavonoid. PMID:22802966

  6. Singlet oxygen reactions with flavonoids. A theoretical-experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Morales

    Full Text Available Detection of singlet oxygen emission, λ(max = 1270 nm, following laser excitation and steady-state methods were employed to measure the total reaction rate constant, k(T, and the reactive reaction rate constant, k(r, for the reaction between singlet oxygen and several flavonoids. Values of k(T determined in deuterated water, ranging from 2.4×10(7 M(-1 s(-1 to 13.4×10(7 M(-1 s(-1, for rutin and morin, respectively, and the values measured for k(r, ranging from 2.8×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 to 65.7×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 for kaempferol and morin, respectively, being epicatechin and catechin chemically unreactive. These results indicate that all the studied flavonoids are good quenchers of singlet oxygen and could be valuable antioxidants in systems under oxidative stress, in particular if a flavonoid-rich diet was previously consumed. Analysis of the dependence of rate constant values with molecular structure in terms of global descriptors and condensed Fukui functions, resulting from electronic structure calculations, supports the formation of a charge transfer exciplex in all studied reactions. The fraction of exciplex giving reaction products evolves through a hydroperoxide and/or an endoperoxide intermediate produced by singlet oxygen attack on the double bond of the ring C of the flavonoid.

  7. Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1983-01-14

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

  8. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

    1983-01-01

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

  9. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. III. Kinetic approach to the product distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, Ben

    1972-01-01

    Based on a previously reported, integral reaction-scheme for the homogeneous oxidation of -glucose and -fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions, a kinetic model covering the product distribution has been developed. The model consists of a repeated set of reactions with constant rate

  10. The redox reaction kinetics of Sinai ore for chemical looping combustion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksepko, Ewelina; Babiński, Piotr; Nalbandian, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Redox reaction kinetics of Fe-Mn-rich Sinai ore was determined by TGA. • The most suitable model for reduction was D3, while R3 for oxidation. • Activation energies 35.3 and 16.70 kJ/mole were determined for reduction and oxidation. • Repetitive redox reactions favor the formation of spinel phases in Sinai ore. • Multiple redox cycles induce formation of extensive porosity of the particles. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to study the use of Sinai ore, a Fe–Mn-based ore from Egypt, as a low-cost oxygen carrier (OC) in Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC). The Sinai ore was selected because it possesses relatively high amounts of iron and manganese oxides. Furthermore, those oxides have low cost, very favorable environmental and thermodynamic properties for the CLC process. The performance of the Sinai ore as an OC in CLC was compared to that of ilmenite (Norway Tellnes mine), the most extensively studied naturally occurring Fe-based mineral. The kinetics of the reduction and oxidation reactions with the two minerals were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Experiments were conducted under isothermal conditions, with multiple redox cycles, at temperatures between 750 and 950 °C. For the reduction and oxidation reactions, different concentrations of CH_4 (10–25 vol.%) and O_2 (5–20 vol.%) were applied, respectively. The kinetic parameters, such as the activation energy (E_a), pre-exponential factor (A_0), and reaction order (n), were determined for the redox reactions. Furthermore, models of the redox reactions were selected by means of a model-fitting method. For the Sinai ore, the D3 model (3-dimensional diffusion) was suitable for modeling reduction reaction kinetics. The calculated E_a was 35.3 kJ/mole, and the reaction order was determined to be approximately 0.76. The best fit for the oxidation reaction was obtained for the R3 model (shrinking core). The oxidation (regeneration) reaction E_a was equal to 16

  11. Kinetic aspects of the embedded clusters: Reaction - Rate Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despa, F.; Apostol, M.

    1995-07-01

    The main stages of the cluster growth process are reviewed using Reaction - Rate Theory. The precipitation stage is shown as a relaxation of the solute towards a cluster state characterized by a higher stability. The kinetic of the late stage of phase separation, the coarsening process, is analyzed by an off-centre diffusion mechanism. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental ones. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs

  12. Isothermal reaction calorimetry as a tool for kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zogg, Andreas; Stoessel, Francis; Fischer, Ulrich; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Reaction calorimetry has found widespread application for thermal and kinetic analysis of chemical reactions in the context of thermal process safety as well as process development. This paper reviews the most important reaction calorimetric principles (heat-flow, heat-balance, power-compensation, and Peltier principle) and their applications in commercial or scientific devices. The discussion focuses on the different dynamic behavior of the main calorimetric principles during an isothermal reaction measurement. Examples of available reaction calorimeters are further compared considering their detection limit, time constant as well as temperature range. In a second part, different evaluation methods for the isothermally measured calorimetric data are reviewed and discussed. The methods will be compared, focusing especially on the fact that reaction calorimetric data always contains additional informations not directly related to the actual chemical reaction such as heat of mixing, heat of phase-transfer/change processes or simple measurement errors. Depending on the evaluation method applied such disturbances have a significant influence on the calculated reaction enthalpies or rate constants

  13. Bayesian experts in exploring reaction kinetics of transcription circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryo; Saito, Masaya M; Nagao, Hiromichi; Higuchi, Tomoyuki

    2010-09-15

    Biochemical reactions in cells are made of several types of biological circuits. In current systems biology, making differential equation (DE) models simulatable in silico has been an appealing, general approach to uncover a complex world of biochemical reaction dynamics. Despite of a need for simulation-aided studies, our research field has yet provided no clear answers: how to specify kinetic values in models that are difficult to measure from experimental/theoretical analyses on biochemical kinetics. We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian approach to this problem. The key idea lies in the development of a Dirichlet process (DP) prior distribution, called Bayesian experts, which reflects substantive knowledge on reaction mechanisms inherent in given models and experimentally observable kinetic evidences to the subsequent parameter search. The DP prior identifies significant local regions of unknown parameter space before proceeding to the posterior analyses. This article reports that a Bayesian expert-inducing stochastic search can effectively explore unknown parameters of in silico transcription circuits such that solutions of DEs reproduce transcriptomic time course profiles. A sample source code is available at the URL http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/lisdas/.

  14. Beyond the volcano limitations in electrocatalysis - oxygen evolution reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halck, Niels Bendtsen; Petrykin, Valery; Krtil, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen evolution catalysis is restricted by the interdependence of adsorption energies of the reaction intermediates and the surface reactivity. The interdependence reduces the number of degrees of freedom available for catalyst optimization. Here it is demonstrated that this limitation can be re...

  15. Kinetics of FeII-polyaminocarboxylate oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica M.; Farley, Kevin J.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2018-03-01

    Complexation of iron by naturally-occurring and synthetic organic ligands has a large effect on iron oxidation and reduction rates which in turn affect the aqueous geochemistry of many other chemical constituents. In this study, the kinetics of FeII oxidation in the presence of the polyaminocarboxylate synthetic chelating agents ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trimethylenediamine-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (TMDTA) was investigated over the pH range 5.50-8.53. Batch oxidation experiments in the presence of molecular oxygen were conducted using a 2:1 M concentration ratio of polyaminocarboxylate (ligand, L) to FeII. The experimental data resembled first order kinetics for the oxidation of FeII-L to FeIII-L and observed rate constants at pH 6.0 were comparable to rate constants for the oxidation of inorganic FeII. Similar to other structurally-similar FeII-polyaminocarboxylate complexes, oxidation rates of FeII-EGTA and FeII-TMDTA decrease with increasing pH, which is the opposite trend for the oxidation of FeII complexed with inorganic ligands. However, the oxidation rates of FeII complexed with EGTA and TMDTA were considerably lower (4-5 orders of magnitude) than FeII complexed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The distinguishing feature of the slower-reacting complexes is that they have a longer backbone between diamine functional groups. An analytical equilibrium model was developed to determine the contributions of the species FeIIL2- and FeII(H)L- to the overall oxidation rate of FeII-L. Application of this model indicated that the protonated FeII(H)L species are more than three orders of magnitude more reactive than FeIIL2-. These rate constants were used in a coupled kinetic equilibrium numerical model where the ligand to iron ratio (TOTL:TOTFe) and pH were varied to evaluate the effect on the FeII oxidation rate. Overall, increasing TOTL:TOTFe for EGTA and TMDTA enhances FeII oxidation rates at lower pH and inhibits FeII oxidation

  16. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  17. The reactions of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.

    1981-01-01

    Results so far available as to the reactions and chemical equilibrium of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium have been analyzed critically. The enthalpy values of the reactions have been discussed and supplemented on the basis of corresponding BORN-HABER cycles. The concentration and temperature functions of the hydrogen equilibrium pressure were deduced from experimental results. In relation to the solubility data the solid phases coexisting with liquid sodium in the ternary system Na-O-H have been discussed. The reaction of oxygen with hydrogen in diluted solution in liquid sodium has been investigated in more detail. Interaction coefficients, and the temperature functions of the free energy of formation and the equilibrium constant have been determined. (orig.)

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment in radiation reactions; Hyperbar oksygenbehandling ved straalereaksjoner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aanderud, Leif; Thorsen, Einar; Bratteboe, Guttorm; Forland, Martha; Kristensen, Gunnar

    2000-07-01

    Background: A national hyperbaric centre was established in 1994 at Haukeland Hospital with responsibility of all hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment in Norway. In hypoxic tissues with symptomatic radiation reactions, hyperbaric oxygen induces the formation of collagen and angiogenesis resulting in permanently improved local microcirculation. Material and method: 234 patients received elective HBO treatment at Haukeland Hospital in 12997 with total of 4048 treatments. All 47 patients treated for radiation reactions in the pelvic area in 1997 received a questionnaire 3-15 months after HBO therapy, 81% reported. Results: Rectal bleeding and haematuria were reported as much improved in 61% and 55% respectively, while bladder incontinence was much improved in 46%. Interpretation: this treatment modality may be an alternative in symptomatic radiation reactions at the urinary bladder and the bowel when conventional treatment has given unsatisfactory results.

  19. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with thiyl and alkoxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzeba, I.; Mihaljevic, B.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Plant derived resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) possesses a broad spectrum of biological activities, one of them are very well known its antioxidative properties. Our work aims to provide kinetic data with regard to the reactivity of resveratrol with uninvestigated short-lived bioradicals, identified as mediators in oxidative lipid degradation processes. Radicals of our interest are alkoxyl radicals, well known propagators of the chain free radical reactions in lipids, and thiyl radicals which protect lipids from their degradation pathway, but at the same time cause the isomerization of the double bonds. In order to investigate these reactions of resveratrol laser flash photolysis was used. On the basis of competitive kinetics the rate constants were determined under pseudo-first order conditions in acetonitrile solutions at room temperature. Thiyl radicals were generated indirectly in solution containing 1-octadecanthiol and photosensitive benzophenone in acetonitrile using the light pulses at 347 nm from ruby laser. Tert-butoxyl radicals were generated directly by peroxide bond cleavage from di-tert-butyl peroxide in acetonitrile by light pulses of Nd:YAG at 355 nm, and ruby at 347 nm. Obtained rate constants for the reactions of resveratrol and radicals generated by laser flash photolysis will be summarized and compared with rare literature data for the rate constants of investigated reactions of resveratrol and other radicals generated by pulse radiolysis.

  20. COMPARISON OF OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS AND OXYGEN DEFICIT IN SEVERELY OVERWEIGHT AND NORMAL WEIGHT ADOLESCENT FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Loftin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in oxygen uptake kinetics and oxygen deficit existed between normal weight and severely overweight adolescent girls. Subjects included 10 normal weight and 8 severely overweight girls. The participants performed a leg cycling VO2 peak test and a constant load leg cycling test at 80% of the ventilatory threshold (T-vent. In the constant workload test O2 kinetics as indicated by Phase I (VO2 L at 20 sec and Phase II time constants (t were determined. Also, the O2 deficit (VO2 L was measured. As expected significant differences were noted in body composition and VO2 peak relative to mass with normal weight body mass averaging 55.3 ± 7.0 kg, severely overweight 90.5 ± 18.0 kg, % fat normal weight 27.3 ± 3.9%, severely overweight 49.7 ± 4.9% and VO2 peak (ml·kg-1·min-1 normal weight 32.0 ± 2.7 and severely overweight 22.0 ± 5.3. VO2 peak (l·min-1 and T-vent (%VO2 max were similar between groups. Results revealed similar O2 kinetic responses between groups; phase I kinetics normal weight 0.72 ± 0.15 L; severely overweight 0.75 ± 0.13L, phase II (t normal weight 41.5 ± 21.3 sec; severely overweight 33.9 ± 22.7 sec. However, the O2 deficit was significantly higher in the severely overweight (0.75 ± 0.15L when compared to the normal weight group (0.34 ± 0.13L. Correlations ranged from r = -0.15 to 0.51 between VO2 peak (L·min-1 or fat weight and phase I, t and O2 deficit. These data generally support previous research concerning the independence of O2 uptake response and body size

  1. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  2. Determination of kinetic parameters of heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Tsai, Fuan-Nan

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed for a heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction which involves film diffusion, surface chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion. The exchange equation to predict the exchange fraction as a function of time for the spherical particles immersed in a solution of finite volume has been derived. The relations between the exchange fraction and dimensionless time are plotted with xi(=ak sub(f)/KD sub(e)), xi 1 (=K 1 a 2 /D sub(e)) and final fractional uptake as parameters. From the values of the kinetic parameters xi and xi 1 , the relative importance of each limiting step is discussed. Experimental results of the isotopic exchange reaction of calcium ion in both system CaCO 3 (s)/Ca 2+ (aq) and system calcium type resin Dowex 50W-X8/Ca 2+ (aq) are coincident with the theoretical equation proposed in this study. (auth.)

  3. KINETICS OF CATHODIC REDUCTION OF OXYGEN ON NI-CR-MO-W ALLOY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NA

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloys (C-group alloys) are well known as materials with very high Corrosion resistance in very aggressive environments, an asset that has motivated the selection of Alloy 22 as a waste package material in the Yucca Mountain Project for the long-term geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes. The aim of this project is to elucidate the corrosion performance of Alloy 22 under aggressive conditions and to provide a conceptual understanding and parameter data base that could act as a basis for modeling the corrosion performance of waste packages under Yucca Mountain conditions. A key issue in any corrosion process is whether or not the kinetics of the cathodic reactions involved can support a damaging rate of anodic metal (alloy) dissolution. Under Yucca Mountain conditions the primary oxidant available to drive corrosion (most likely in the form of crevice, or under-deposit, corrosion) will be oxygen. Here, we present results on the kinetics of oxygen reduction at the Alloy 22/solution interface

  4. Kinetics of irreversible thermal decomposition of dissociating nitrogen dioxide with nitrogen oxide or oxygen additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvozdev, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of NO or O 2 admixtures on kinetics of the irreversible thermal decomposition of nitrogen dioxide at temperatures 460-520 deg C and pressures 4-7 MPa has been studied. It follows from experimental data that the rate of N 2 O 4 formation reduces with the increase of partial pressure of oxygen or decrease of partial pressure of nitrogen oxide. The same regularity is seen for the rate of nitrogen formation. The rate constants of N 2 O formation in dissociating nitrogen tetroxide with oxygen or nitrogen oxide additions agree satisfactorily with previously published results, obtained in stoichiometric mixtures. The appreciable discrepancy at 520 deg C is bind with considerable degree of nitrogen oxide transformation which constitutes approximately 14%. It is determined that the kinetics of formation of the products of irreversible N 2 O and N 2 decomposition in stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric 2NO 2 ↔ 2NO+O 2 mixtures is described by identical 3NO → N 2 O+NO 2 and N 2 O+NO → N 2 +NO 2 reactions

  5. Kinetic study of the reaction of uranium with various carbon-containing gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, G.

    1963-09-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction U + CO 2 and U + CO has been performed by a thermogravimetric method on a spherical uranium powder, in temperature ranges respectively from 460 to 690 deg. C and from 570 to 850 deg. C. The reaction with carbon dioxide leads to uranium dioxide. A carbon deposition takes place at the same time. The global reactions is the result of two reactions: U + 2 CO 2 → UO 2 + 2 CO U + CO 2 → UO 2 + C The reaction with carbon monoxide leads to a mixture of dioxide UO 2 , dicarbide UC 2 and free carbon. The main reaction can be written. U + CO → 1/2 UO 2 + 1/2 UC 2 The free carbon results of the disproportionation of the carbon monoxide. A remarkable separation of the two phases UO 2 and UC 2 can be observed. A mechanism accounting for the phenomenon has been proposed. The two reactions U + CO 2 and U + CO begin with a long germination period, after which, the reaction velocity seems to be limited in both cases by the ionic diffusion of oxygen through the uranium dioxide. (author) [fr

  6. Training-induced acceleration of oxygen uptake kinetics in skeletal muscle: the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, J A; Korzeniewski, B; Grassi, B

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that the oxygen uptake kinetics during rest-to-work transition (V(O2) on-kinetics) in trained subjects is significantly faster than in untrained individuals. It was recently postulated that the main system variable that determines the transition time (t(1/2)) of the V(O2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscle, at a given moderate ATP usage/work intensity, and under the assumption that creatine kinase reaction works near thermodynamic equilibrium, is the absolute (in mM) decrease in [PCr] during rest-to-work transition. Therefore we postulate that the training-induced acceleration of the V(O2) on-kinetics is a marker of an improvement of absolute metabolic stability in skeletal muscles. The most frequently postulated factor responsible for enhancement of muscle metabolic stability is the training-induced increase in mitochondrial proteins. However, the mechanism proposed by Gollnick and Saltin (1982) can improve absolute metabolic stability only if training leads to a decrease in resting [ADP(free)]. This effect is not observed in many examples of training causing an acceleration of the V(O2) on-kinetics, especially in early stages of training. Additionally, this mechanism cannot account for the significant training-induced increase in the relative (expressed in % or as multiples of the resting values) metabolic stability at low work intensities, condition in which oxidative phosphorylation is not saturated with [ADP(free)]. Finally, it was reported that in the early stage of training, acceleration in the V(O2) on-kinetics and enhancement of muscle metabolic stability may precede adaptive responses in mitochondrial enzymes activities or mitochondria content. We postulate that the training-induced acceleration in the V(O2) on-kinetics and the improvement of the metabolite stability during moderate intensity exercise in the early stage of training is mostly caused by an intensification of the "parallel activation" of ATP consumption and ATP supply pathways

  7. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  8. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  9. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  10. Thermodynamic criteria for estimating the kinetic parameters of catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrichev, I. I.; Zhensa, A. V.; Kol'tsova, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic parameters are estimated using two criteria in addition to the traditional criterion that considers the consistency between experimental and modeled conversion data: thermodynamic consistency and the consistency with entropy production (i.e., the absolute rate of the change in entropy due to exchange with the environment is consistent with the rate of entropy production in the steady state). A special procedure is developed and executed on a computer to achieve the thermodynamic consistency of a set of kinetic parameters with respect to both the standard entropy of a reaction and the standard enthalpy of a reaction. A problem of multi-criterion optimization, reduced to a single-criterion problem by summing weighted values of the three criteria listed above, is solved. Using the reaction of NO reduction with CO on a platinum catalyst as an example, it is shown that the set of parameters proposed by D.B. Mantri and P. Aghalayam gives much worse agreement with experimental values than the set obtained on the basis of three criteria: the sum of the squares of deviations for conversion, the thermodynamic consistency, and the consistency with entropy production.

  11. Kinetics of the gas-phase tritium oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failor, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Homogeneous gas-phase kinetics of tritium oxidation (2T 2 + O 2 →2T 2 O) have been studied with a model that accounts explicitly for radiolysis of the major species and the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of ionic, excited-state, and neutral species. Results from model calculations are given for 10 -4 -1.0 mol% T 2 in O 2 (298 K, 1 atm). As the reaction evolves three different mechanisms control T 2 O production, each with a different overall rate expression and a different order with respect to the T 2 concentration. The effects of self-radiolysis of pure T 2 on the tritium oxidation reaction were calculated. Tritium atoms, the primary product of T 2 self-radiolysis, altered the oxidation mechanism only during the first few seconds following the initiation of the T 2 -O 2 reaction. Ozone, an important intermediate in T 2 oxidation, was monitored in-situ by U.V. absorption spectroscopy for 0.01-1.0 mol% T 2 an 1 atm O 2 . The shape of the experimental ozone time profile agreed with the model predictions. As predicted, the measured initial rate of ozone production varied linearly with initial T 2 concentration ([T 2 ] 0.6 o ), but at an initial rate one-third the predicted value. The steady-state ozone concentration ([O 3 ]ss) was predicted to be dependent on [T 2 ] 0.3 o , but the measured value was [T 2 ] 0.6 o , resulting in four times higher [O 3 ]ss than predicted for a 1.0% T 2 -O 2 mixture. Adding H 2 to the T 2 -O 2 mixture, to provide insight into the differences between the radiolytic and chemical behavior of the tritium, produced a greater decrease in [O 3 ]ss than predicted. Adjusting the reaction cell surface-to-volume ratio showed implications of minor surface removal of ozone

  12. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  13. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  14. HTP kinetics studies on isolated elementary combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontijn, A.; Adusei, G.Y.; Hranisavlevic, J.; Bajaj, P.N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goals of this project are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions, (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made mainly by using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. While continuing rate coefficient measurements, further aspects of kinetics research are being explored. Thus, starting from the data obtained, a method for predicting the temperature dependence of rate coefficients of oxygen-atom olefin experiment and confirms the underlying mechanistic assumptions. Mechanistic information of another sort, i.e. by product analysis, has recently become accessible with the inauguration of our heated flow tube mass spectrometer facility; early results are reported here. HTP experiments designed to lead to measurements of product channels by resonance fluorescence have started.

  15. Benchmarking the Stability of Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Rasmus; Paoli, Elisa Antares; Knudsen, Brian Peter

    2014-01-01

    Because of the rising need for energy storage, potentially facilitated by electrolyzers, improvements to the catalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) become increasingly relevant. Standardized protocols have been developed for determining critical figures of merit, such as the electrochem......Because of the rising need for energy storage, potentially facilitated by electrolyzers, improvements to the catalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) become increasingly relevant. Standardized protocols have been developed for determining critical figures of merit...... coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). We show that a meaningful estimation of the stability cannot be achieved based on purely electrochemical tests. On the catalysts tested, the anodic dissolution current was four orders of magnitude lower than the total current. We propose that even if long......-term testing cannot be replaced, a useful evaluation of the stability can be achieved with short-term tests by using EQCM or ICP–MS....

  16. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  17. KINETIC MODELS STUDY OF HYDRODESULPHURIZATION VACUUM DISTILLATE REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulMunem A. Karim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    This study deals with  kinetics of hydrodesulphurization (HDS reaction of vacuum gas oil (611-833 K which was distillated from Kirkuk crude oil and which was obtained by blending the fractions, light vacuum gas oil (611 - 650 K, medium vacuum gas oil (650-690 K, heavy vacuum gas oil (690-727 K and very heavy vacuum gas oil (727-833 K.   The vacuum gas oil was hydrotreated on a commercial cobalt-molybdenum alumina catalyst presulfied at specified conditions in a laboratory trickle bed reactor. The reaction temperature range (583-643 K,liquid hourly space velocity range (1.5-3.75 h-1 and hydrogen pressure was kept constant at 3.5 MPa with hydrogen to oil ratio about 250 lt/lt.           The conversion results for desulphurization reaction appeared to obey the second order reaction. According to this model, the rate constants for desulphurization reaction were determined. Finally, the apparent activation energy (Ea, enthalpy of activation ( H* and entropy ( S* were calculated based on the values of rate constant (k2 and were equal 80.3792 KJ/mole, 75.2974 KJ/mole and 197.493 J/mole, respectively.

  18. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Osmium Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in the Absence and Presence of Aqueous Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Borja-Arco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmium electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR were prepared by microwave irradiation of Os3(CO12 at different experimental conditions. The materials obtained were structurally characterized by FT-IR, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Their chemical compositions were obtained by EDS. The electrocatalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction were evaluated by rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.5 mol L-1 H2SO4, in the absence and presence of aqueous methanol. The kinetic parameters, such as Tafel slope, exchange current density, and charge transfer coefficient are reported.

  19. O2(a1Δ) vibrational kinetics in oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Heaven, M. C.; Azyazov, V. N.; Mebel, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Kinetics of vibrationally-excited singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ,ν) in gas mixture O3/N2/CO2 was studied using a pulse laser technique. Molecules O2(a1Δ,ν) were produced by laser photolysis of ozone at 266 nm. The O3 molecules number density was followed using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. It was found that an upper bound for the rate constant of chemical reaction O2(a1Δ,ν)+ O3 is about 10-15 cm3/s. The rate constants of O2(a1Δ,ν= 1, 2 and 3) quenching by CO2 are presented.

  20. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm-2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW-1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  1. A study of butyl acetate synthesis. 4-reaction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at studying liquid-phase acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm =0.76 Bar,using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431 as catalyst. The effect of the absence of internal and external mass transport on catalyst particles was established in the research conditions used here. A set of assays to determine the effect of catalyst load (0.5%, 1%, 2% w/w temperature (73°C, 80°C, 87°C and molar ratio (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 acid/alcohol on reaction rate was carried out and both LHHW and pseudo-homogeneous kinetic expressions were obtained, these being in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Kinetics of the reactions of hydrated electrons with metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsse, J.

    1983-01-01

    The reactivity of the hydrated electron towards metal complexes is considered. Experiments are described involving metal EDTA and similar complexes. The metal ions studied are mainly Ni 2+ , Co 2+ and Cu 2+ . Rates of the reactions of the complexes with e - (aq) were measured using the pulse radiolysis technique. It is shown that the reactions of e - (aq) with the copper complexes display unusually small kinetic salt effects. The results suggest long-range electron transfer by tunneling. A tunneling model is presented and the experimental results are discussed in terms of this model. Results of approximate molecular orbital calculations of some redox potentials are given, for EDTA chelates as well as for series of hexacyano and hexaquo complexes. Finally, equilibrium constants for the formation of ternary complexes are reported. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  3. Numerical Model of Dephosphorization Reaction Kinetics in Top Blown Converter Coupled with Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Wang, Minghui

    2017-07-01

    A 3D transient numerical model of dephosphorization kinetics coupled with flow field in a top blown converter was built. Through the model the dephosphorization reaction rate influenced by the oxygen jets and the steel flow were simulated. The results show that the dephosphorization rate at the droplet metal-slag interface is two orders of magnitude faster than that at bath metal-slag interface. When the lance oxygen pressure increases from 0.7 to 0.8 MPa, the dephosphorization rate increases notably and the end content of P has a decrease of 19 %. However, when the pressure continues rising to 0.9 MPa, the dephosphorization rate has no significant increase. In addition, the lance height shows a nearly linear relation to the end P content of steel, that the lower the height, the faster the dephosphorization rate.

  4. Aspartate aminotransferase: the kinetic barriers facing the covalent intermediates on the reaction pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, J.F.; Julin, D.A.; McLeish, M.; Wiesinger, H.

    1986-01-01

    The intermediates, aldimine (A), quinonoid (Q) and ketimine (K), along the transaminase reaction coordinate were probed by isotope transfer and solvent exchange kinetics. Less than 0.003% of 3 H is transferred from C/sub α/[ 3 H]-aspartate to pyridoxamine phosphate in the cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase (cAATase) reaction implying either that Q does not exist as a kinetically competent intermediate or that there is a rapid exchange of isotope with solvent. The ratio of the rate constants for C/sub α/ hydrogen exchange vs keto acid product formation (k/sub exge//k/sub prod/) are 2.5 and 0.5 for the reactions of cAATase with C/sub α/ [ 2 H]-aspartate and mitochondrial (m) AATase with C/sub α/[ 2 H]-glutamate respectively. The latter reaction was also probed from the α-keto-glutarate side with carbonyl 0-18 enriched keto acid. This experiment gave k/sub exge//k/sub prod/ = 1.0 for oxygen-18 exchange in α-ketoglutarate versus amino acid formation. The two exchange experiments with mAATase are interpreted in terms of a model in which the rate constant for diffusion of water from the active site is comparable with those for product forming steps

  5. Intrinsic reaction kinetics of coal char combustion by direct measurement of ignition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ryang-Gyoon; Jeon, Chung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A wire heating reactor that can use a synchronized experimental method was developed to obtain the intrinsic kinetics of large coal char particles ranging in size from 0.4 to 1 mm. This synchronization system consists of three parts: a thermocouple wire for both heating and direct measurement of the particle temperature, a photodetector sensor for determining ignition/burnout points by measuring the intensity of luminous emission from burning particles, and a high-speed camera–long-distance microscope for observing and recording the movement of luminous zone directly. Coal char ignition was found to begin at a spot on the particle's external surface and then moved across the entire particle. Moreover, the ignition point determined according to the minimum of dT/dt is a spot point and not a full growth point. The ignition temperature of the spot point rises as the particle diameter increases. A spot ignition model, which describes the ignition in terms of the internal conduction and external/internal oxygen diffusion, was then developed to evaluate the intrinsic kinetics and predict the ignition temperature of the coal char. Internal conduction was found to be important in large coal char particles because its effect becomes greater than that of oxygen diffusion as the particle diameter increases. In addition, the intrinsic kinetics of coal char obtained from the spot ignition model for two types of coal does not differ significantly from the results of previous investigators. -- Highlights: • A novel technique was used to measure the coal char particle temperature. • The ignition point determined from a dT/dt minimum is a spot ignition point. • A spot ignition model was suggested to analyze the intrinsic reaction kinetics of coal char. • Internal conduction has to be considered in order to evaluate the intrinsic kinetics for larger particle (above 1 mm)

  6. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Galagali, Nikhil

    2015-02-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model structure. Most existing applications of Bayesian model selection methods to chemical kinetics have been limited to comparisons among a small set of models, however. The significant computational cost of evaluating posterior model probabilities renders traditional Bayesian methods infeasible when the model space becomes large. We present a new framework for tractable Bayesian model inference and uncertainty quantification using a large number of systematically generated model hypotheses. The approach involves imposing point-mass mixture priors over rate constants and exploring the resulting posterior distribution using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The posterior samples are used to identify plausible models, to quantify rate constant uncertainties, and to extract key diagnostic information about model structure-such as the reactions and operating pathways most strongly supported by the data. We provide numerical demonstrations of the proposed framework by inferring kinetic models for catalytic steam and dry reforming of methane using available experimental data.

  7. Investigations on the kinetics of the oxygen reduction in high temperature fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erning, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    Lanthan-Strontium-Manganite perowskites are the most widespread materials in use for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The electrode reaction taking place, i.e. the reduction of oxygen supplied by air, was investigated by electrochemical means to obtain further knowledge about the electrode processes. The high activation energy of this reaction (200 kJ/mol), preventing lower operation temperatures of the SOFC, was the starting point for the investigation. Quasi steady state current voltage measurements and impedance spectroscopy were performed in a three electrode configuration. The electrodes were of circular shape with a diameter of 10 mm. The preparation was made by screen printing as well as wet powder spraying onto plates made of Yttria-stabilized zirconia. Perowskite powders of varying chemical and stoichiometric composition were used. To obtain higher power densities and, more important, lower apparent activation energies, catalytic layers were added at the interface electrode/electrolyte. Additionally, a less complex system, a model electrode/electrolyte setup made from single-crystal YSZ as electrolyte and gold in liquid and solid state as electrode was developed to create a better defined system. This setup was used to investigate the behaviour of the electrode/electrolyte interface. Reliable, reproducible results could be obtained using either setup. The experimental conditions i.e. oxygen partial pressure, temperature and overpotential were varied in order to determine the kinetic properties of the electrodes. Apparent activation energies, pre-exponential factors, apparent charge-transfer coefficients and electrochemical orders of reaction were calculated from the current-voltage data in order to propose possible reaction steps. (orig.)

  8. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  9. The Nanoconfined Free Radical Polymerization: Reaction Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haoyu; Simon, Sindee

    The reaction kinetics and thermodynamics of nanoconfined free radical polymerizations are investigated for methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethyl methacrylate (EMA) monomers using differential scanning calorimetry. Controlled pore glass is used as the confinement medium with pore diameters as small as 7.5 nm; the influence of both hydrophobic (silanized such that trimethylsilyl groups cover the surface) and hydrophilic (native silanol) surfaces is investigated. Propagation rates increase when monomers are reacted in the hydrophilic pores presumably due to the specific interactions between the carbonyl and silanol groups; however, the more flexible EMA monomer shows weaker effects. On the other hand, initial rates of polymerization in hydrophobic pores are unchanged from the bulk. In both pores, the onset of autoacceleration occurs earlier due to the reduced diffusivity of confined chains, which may be compensated at high temperatures. In addition to changes in kinetics, the reaction thermodynamics can be affected under nanoconfinement. Specifically, the ceiling temperature (Tc) is shifted to lower temperatures in nanopores, with pore surface chemistry showing no significant effects; the equilibrium conversion is also reduced at high temperatures below Tc. These observations are attributed to a larger negative change in entropy on propagation for the confined system, with the MMA system again showing greater effects. Funding from ACS PRF is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  11. Oxygen discharge and post-discharge kinetics experiments and modeling for the electric oxygen-iodine laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, A D; Zimmerman, J W; Woodard, B S; Carroll, D L; Verdeyen, J T; Lim, T C; Solomon, W C

    2007-07-26

    Laser oscillation at 1315 nm on the I(2P1/2)-->I(2P3/2) transition of atomic iodine has been obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(a1Delta) produced using a low-pressure oxygen/helium/nitric oxide discharge. In the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser (ElectricOIL) the discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds levels of complexity to the singlet oxygen generator (SOG) kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(a1Delta) generation system. The advanced model BLAZE-IV has been introduced to study the energy-transfer laser system dynamics and kinetics. Levels of singlet oxygen, oxygen atoms, and ozone are measured experimentally and compared with calculations. The new BLAZE-IV model is in reasonable agreement with O3, O atom, and gas temperature measurements but is under-predicting the increase in O2(a1Delta) concentration resulting from the presence of NO in the discharge and under-predicting the O2(b1Sigma) concentrations. A key conclusion is that the removal of oxygen atoms by NOX species leads to a significant increase in O2(a1Delta) concentrations downstream of the discharge in part via a recycling process; however, there are still some important processes related to the NOX discharge kinetics that are missing from the present modeling. Further, the removal of oxygen atoms dramatically inhibits the production of ozone in the downstream kinetics.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Oxygen Surface Exchange on La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-delta Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Mosleh, Majid; Søgaard, Martin; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties as well as oxygen exchange kinetics were examined on mixed ionic and electronic conducting (La0.6Sr0.4)0.99FeO3− (LSF64) thin films deposited on MgO single crystals. It is found that thin films and bulk material have the same oxygen stoichiometry for a given temperature and oxygen partial pressure [i.e., the incorporation reaction has the same reaction enthalpy (H0=−105 KJ/mol) and entropy (S0=−75.5 J/mol/K) as found for bulk material]. The thin film shows smaller...

  13. The Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols: Reaction Development, Scope, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ebner, Davidâ C.

    2009-12-07

    The first palladium-catalyzed enantioselective oxidation of secondary alcohols has been developed, utilizing the readily available diamine (-)-sparteine as a chiral ligand and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Mechanistic insights regarding the role of the base and hydrogen-bond donors have resulted in several improvements to the original system. Namely, addition of cesium carbonate and tert-butyl alcohol greatly enhances reaction rates, promoting rapid resolutions. The use of chloroform as solvent allows the use of ambient air as the terminal oxidant at 23 degrees C, resulting in enhanced catalyst selectivity. These improved reaction conditions have permitted the successful kinetic resolution of benzylic, allylic, and cyclopropyl secondary alcohols to high enantiomeric excess with good-to-excellent selectivity factors. This catalyst system has also been applied to the desymmetrization of meso-diols, providing high yields of enantioenriched hydroxyketones.

  14. The Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols: Reaction Development, Scope, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ebner, Davidâ C.; Bagdanoff, Jeffreyâ T.; Ferreira, Ericâ M.; McFadden, Ryanâ M.; Caspi, Danielâ D.; Trend, Raissaâ M.; Stoltz, Brianâ M.

    2009-01-01

    The first palladium-catalyzed enantioselective oxidation of secondary alcohols has been developed, utilizing the readily available diamine (-)-sparteine as a chiral ligand and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Mechanistic insights regarding the role of the base and hydrogen-bond donors have resulted in several improvements to the original system. Namely, addition of cesium carbonate and tert-butyl alcohol greatly enhances reaction rates, promoting rapid resolutions. The use of chloroform as solvent allows the use of ambient air as the terminal oxidant at 23 degrees C, resulting in enhanced catalyst selectivity. These improved reaction conditions have permitted the successful kinetic resolution of benzylic, allylic, and cyclopropyl secondary alcohols to high enantiomeric excess with good-to-excellent selectivity factors. This catalyst system has also been applied to the desymmetrization of meso-diols, providing high yields of enantioenriched hydroxyketones.

  15. Fast kinetics of the oxygen effect in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.E.; Maughan, R.L.; Michael, B.D.

    1978-01-01

    A technique using a fast gas transfer with a single pulse of electrons (the gas-explosion technique) has been used to investigate the time-dependence of the dose-modifying action of oxygen in irradiated V79 Chinese hamster cells. Oxygen did not significantly alter the shapes of the survival curves. The dose-modifying factor between the fully oxic and fully hypoxic (oxygen at 9000 ms) curve was 2.6. The dose-modifying factor for the survival curve drawn for oxygen contact at 0.3 ms after irradiation was 1.5 relative to the hypoxic curve. The duration of the post-effect (oxygen contact after irradiation) indicated that oxygen-dependent damage has a lifetime extending into the ms time-range. In the pre-effect time region (oxygen contact before irradiation) 1 to 2 ms oxygen contact was required to achieve the full sensitization. The results are discussed with reference to the diffusion time for oxygen to reach the sensitive site within the cell. (U.K.)

  16. Spectator Ions ARE Important! A Kinetic Study of the Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Cohen, Skyler

    2010-01-01

    Surprisingly, spectator ions are responsible for unexpected kinetics in the biphasic copper(II)-aluminum displacement reaction, with the rate of reaction dependent on the identity of the otherwise ignored spectator ions. Application of a published kinetic analysis developed for a reaction between a rotating Al disk and a Cu(II) ion solution to the…

  17. Kinetics of reactions of aquacobalamin with aspartic and glutamic acids and their amides in water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, T. T. T.; Sal'nikov, D. S.; Dereven'kov, I. A.; Makarov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    The kinetics of aquacobalamin reaction with aspartic and glutamic acids, and with their amides in water solutions, is studied via spectrophotometry. The kinetic and activation parameters of the process are determined. It is shown that the reaction product is cobalamin-amino acid complex. The data are compared to results on the reaction between aquacobalamin and primary amines.

  18. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobbs Gary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the

  19. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-08-16

    Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give better estimates of

  20. Investigations of Pd-Cu electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media with RDE method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouda-Onana, F.; Bah, S.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been studied extensively with different platinum bi-metallic alloys such as Pt-Fe, Pt-Ni, Pt-Co. However, palladium-based bi-metallic alloys are being considered as a substitute for platinum in electrocatalysts. This paper reported on a study that investigated the ORR on bi-metallic Pd-Cu electrocatalyst. Different contents in Cu were analyzed and an optimal Cu composition leading to the highest ORR activity was found. A mechanism of the ORR kinetics for this catalyst was introduced based on the value of the Tafel slope. A smooth increase in surface area up to 50 per cent Cu was observed to a constant value of 23 cm{sup 2}. Such behaviour was due to the high dispersion of Pd as Cu increased and segregated. A volcano-shape was found between the kinetic current, activation energy and the Cu composition. The maximum exchange current density and the lowest activation energy were found for Pd50Cu50, which corresponded to the highest surface area. All Pd-Cu alloys presented a higher kinetic current than Pd alone. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  1. Structure, activity, and stability of platinum alloys as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    In this thesis I present our work on theoretical modelling of platinum alloys as catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). The losses associated with the kinetics of the ORR is the main bottleneck in low-temperature fuel cells for transport applications, and more active catalysts...... are essential for wide-spread use of this technology. platinum alloys have shown great promise as more active catalysts, which are still stable under reaction conditions. We have investigated these systems on multiple scales, using either Density Functional Theory (DFT) or Effective Medium Theory (EMT......), depending on the length and time scales involved. Using DFT, we show how diffusion barriers in transition metal alloys in the L12 structure depend on the alloying energy, supporting the assumption that an intrinsically more stable alloy is also more stable towards diffusion-related degradation...

  2. Rate constants for the reactions of free radicals with oxygen in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, B.; Ingold, K.U.; Scaiano, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of the rections of several free radicals with oxygen have been examined in solution at 300 K using laser flash photolysis techniques. The reactions of resonance-stabilized radicals are only slightly slower than those of nonstabilized radicals: for example, for tert-butyl (in cyclohexane), 4.93 x 10 9 ; benzyl, 2.36 x 10 9 (in cyclohexane); cyclohexadienyl (in benzene), 1.64 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The reaction of butyl-tin (n-Bu 3 Sn.) radicals is unusually fast (7.5 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 ), a fact that has been tentatively attributed to a relaxation of spin selection rules due to heavy atom effects. 1 table

  3. Fe/Ni-N-CNFs electrochemical catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction/oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhuang [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Mian [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Fan, Liquan; Han, Jianan [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiong, Yueping, E-mail: ypxiong@hit.edu.cn [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Novel Fe/Ni-N-CNFs electrocatalysts are prepared by electrospinning technique. • The Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst exhibits the excellent ORR and OER catalytic activity. • Synergy of Fe/Ni alloy is responsible for the excellent catalytic performance. - Abstract: The novel of iron, nickel and nitrogen doped carbon nanofibers (Fe/Ni-N-CNFs) as bifunctional electrocatalysts are prepared by electrospinning technique. In alkaline media, the Fe/Ni-N-CNFs catalysts (especially for Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs) exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performances of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR)/oxygen evolution reaction (OER). For ORR catalytic activity, Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst offers a higher onset potential of 0.903 V, a similar four-electron reaction pathway, and excellent stability. For OER catalytic activity, Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst possesses a lower onset potential of 1.528 V and a smaller charge transfer resistance of 48.14 Ω. The unparalleled catalytic activity of ORR and OER for the Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs is attributed to the 3D porous cross-linked microstructures of carbon nanofibers with Fe/Ni alloy, N dopant, and abundant M-N{sub x} and NiOOH as catalytic active sites. Thus, Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst can be acted as one of the efficient and inexpensive catalysts of metal-air batteries.

  4. Automated Determination of Oxygen-Dependent Enzyme Kinetics in a Tube-in-Tube Flow Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringborg, Rolf H; Toftgaard Pedersen, Asbjørn; Woodley, John M

    2017-09-08

    Enzyme-mediated oxidation is of particular interest to synthetic organic chemists. However, the implementation of such systems demands knowledge of enzyme kinetics. Conventionally collecting kinetic data for biocatalytic oxidations is fraught with difficulties such as low oxygen solubility in water and limited oxygen supply. Here, we present a novel method for the collection of such kinetic data using a pressurized tube-in-tube reactor, operated in the low-dispersed flow regime to generate time-series data, with minimal material consumption. Experimental development and validation of the instrument revealed not only the high degree of accuracy of the kinetic data obtained, but also the necessity of making measurements in this way to enable the accurate evaluation of high K MO enzyme systems. For the first time, this paves the way to integrate kinetic data into the protein engineering cycle.

  5. Optical emissions from oxygen atom reactions with adsorbates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, David B.; Fraser, Mark E.; Gauthier-Beals, Mitzi; Holtzclaw, Karl W.; Malonson, Mark; Gelb, Alan H.

    1992-12-01

    Although most optical materials are inert to the ambient low earth orbit environment, high velocity oxygen atoms will react with adsorbates to produce optical emissions from the ultraviolet into the infrared. The adsorbates arise from chemical releases or outgassing from the spacecraft itself. We have been investigating kinetic and spectral aspects of these phenomenon by direct observation of the 0.2 to 13 micrometers chemiluminescence from the interaction of a fast atomic oxygen beam with a continuously dosed surface. The dosing gases include fuels, combustion products and outgassed species such as unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), NO, H2O and CO. The surface studied include gold and magnesium fluoride. In order to relate the results to actual spacecraft conditions these phenomena have been explored as a function of O atom velocity, dosant flux and substrate temperature. UDMH dosed surfaces exhibit spectra typical (wavelength and intensity) of carbonaceous surfaces. The primary emitters are CO, CO2, and OH. H2O dosed surfaces are dominated by OH and /or H2O emission while CO dosed surfaces are dominated by CO and CO2 emissions. The nitric oxide dosed surface produces a glow from 0.4 to 5.4 micrometers due to NO2* continuum emission. The emission was observed to increase by a factor of two upon cooling the surface from 20 degree(s)C to -35 degree(s)C.

  6. Amorphous metallic alloys for oxygen reduction reaction in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Huerta, R.; Guerra-Martinez, I.; Lopez, J.S. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Mexico City (Mexico). Lab. de Electroquimica; Pierna, A.R. [Basque Country Univ., San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Solorza-Feria, O. [Inst. Politenico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-15

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) represent an important, environmentally clean energy source. This has motivated extensive research on the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of novel and stable oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for the direct four-electron transfer process to water formation. Studies have shown that amorphous alloyed compounds can be used as electrode materials in electrochemical energy conversion devices. Their use in PEMFCs can optimize the electrocatalyst loading in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this study, amorphous metallic PtSn, PtRu and PtRuSn alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling and used as cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulphuric acid and in a single PEM fuel cell. Two different powder morphologies were observed before and after the chemical activation in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution at 25 degrees C. The kinetics of the ORR on the amorphous catalysts were investigated. The study showed that the amorphous metallic PtSn electrocatalyst was the most active of the 3 electrodes for the cathodic reaction. Fuel cell experiments were conducted at various temperatures at 30 psi for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and at 34 psi for oxygen (O{sub 2}). MEAs made of Nafion 115 and amorphous metallic PtSn dispersed on carbon powder in a PEMFC had a power density of 156 mW per cm{sup 2} at 0.43V and 80 degrees C. 12 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  7. The Reduction Reaction of Dissolved Oxygen in Water by Hydrazine over Platinum Catalyst Supported on Activated Carbon Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K.K.; Moon, J.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    The reduction reaction of dissolved oxygen (DO) by hydrazine was investigated on activated carbon fiber (ACF) and Pt/ACF catalysts using a batch reactor with an external circulating loop. The ACF itself showed catalytic activity and this was further improved by supporting platinum on ACF. The catalytic role platinum is ascribed to its acceleration of hydrazine decomposition, based on electric potential and current measurements as well as the kinetic study. (author). 15 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Synthetic Control of Kinetic Reaction Pathway and Cationic Ordering in High-Ni Layered Oxide Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dawei [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Kou, Ronghui [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Ren, Yang [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Sun, Cheng-Jun [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhao, Hu [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Zhang, Ming-Jian [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Li, Yan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Huq, Ashifia [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Ko, J. Y. Peter [The Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Pan, Feng [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Sun, Yang-Kook [Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 South Korea; Yang, Yong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Bai, Jianming [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Wang, Feng [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA

    2017-08-25

    Nickel-rich layered transition metal oxides, LiNi1-x(MnCo)(x)O-2 (1-x >= 0.5), are appealing candidates for cathodes in next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for electric vehicles and other large-scale applications, due to their high capacity and low cost. However, synthetic control of the structural ordering in such a complex quaternary system has been a great challenge, especially in the presence of high Ni content. Herein, synthesis reactions for preparing layered LiNi0.7Mn0.15Co0.15O2 (NMC71515) by solid-state methods are investigated through a combination of time-resolved in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy measurements. The real-time observation reveals a strong temperature dependence of the kinetics of cationic ordering in NMC71515 as a result of thermal-driven oxidation of transition metals and lithium/oxygen loss that concomitantly occur during heat treatment. Through synthetic control of the kinetic reaction pathway, a layered NMC71515 with low cationic disordering and a high reversible capacity is prepared in air. The findings may help to pave the way for designing high-Ni layered oxide cathodes for LIBs.

  9. Iteration scheme for implicit calculations of kinetic and equilibrium chemical reactions in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described. Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow. 10 refs., 2 figs

  10. Kinetic modeling of electron transfer reactions in photosystem I complexes of various structures with substituted quinone acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovsky, Georgy E; Petrova, Anastasia A; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Semenov, Alexey Yu

    2017-09-01

    The reduction kinetics of the photo-oxidized primary electron donor P 700 in photosystem I (PS I) complexes from cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were analyzed within the kinetic model, which considers electron transfer (ET) reactions between P 700 , secondary quinone acceptor A 1 , iron-sulfur clusters and external electron donor and acceptors - methylviologen (MV), 2,3-dichloro-naphthoquinone (Cl 2 NQ) and oxygen. PS I complexes containing various quinones in the A 1 -binding site (phylloquinone PhQ, plastoquinone-9 PQ and Cl 2 NQ) as well as F X -core complexes, depleted of terminal iron-sulfur F A /F B clusters, were studied. The acceleration of charge recombination in F X -core complexes by PhQ/PQ substitution indicates that backward ET from the iron-sulfur clusters involves quinone in the A 1 -binding site. The kinetic parameters of ET reactions were obtained by global fitting of the P 700 + reduction with the kinetic model. The free energy gap ΔG 0 between F X and F A /F B clusters was estimated as -130 meV. The driving force of ET from A 1 to F X was determined as -50 and -220 meV for PhQ in the A and B cofactor branches, respectively. For PQ in A 1A -site, this reaction was found to be endergonic (ΔG 0  = +75 meV). The interaction of PS I with external acceptors was quantitatively described in terms of Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The second-order rate constants of ET from F A /F B , F X and Cl 2 NQ in the A 1 -site of PS I to external acceptors were estimated. The side production of superoxide radical in the A 1 -site by oxygen reduction via the Mehler reaction might comprise ≥0.3% of the total electron flow in PS I.

  11. Exertional oxygen uptake kinetics: a stamen of stamina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, Brian J; Rossiter, H B; Ward, S A

    2002-04-01

    The fundamental pulmonary O(2) uptake (.VO(2)) response to moderate, constant-load exercise can be characterized as (d.VO(2)/dt)(tau)+Delta.VO(2) (t)=Delta.VO(2SS) where Delta.VO(2SS) is the steady-state response, and tau is the time constant, with the .VO(2) kinetics reflecting intramuscular O(2) uptake (.QO(2)) kinetics, to within 10%. The role of phosphocreatine (PCr) turnover in .QO(2) control can be explored using (31)P-MR spectroscopy, simultaneously with .VO(2). Although tau.VO(2) and tauPCr vary widely among subjects (approx. 20-65 s), they are not significantly different from each other, either at the on- or off-transient. A caveat to interpreting the "well-fit" exponential is that numerous units of similar Delta.VO(2SS) but with a wide tau distribution can also yield a .VO(2) response with an apparent single tau. This tau is, significantly, inversely correlated with lactate threshold and .VO(2max)(but is poorly predictive; a frail stamen, therefore), consistent with tau not characterizing a compartment with uniform kinetics. At higher intensities, the fundamental kinetics become supplemented with a slowly-developing phase, setting .VO(2)on a trajectory towards maximum .VO(2). This slow component is also demonstrable in Delta[PCr]: the decreased efficiency thereby reflecting a predominantly high phosphate-cost of force production rather than a high O(2)-cost of phosphate production. We also propose that the O(2)-deficit for the slow-component is more likely to reflect shifting Delta.VO(2SS) rather than a single one with a single tau.

  12. Oxygen reduction reaction of Pt–In alloy: Combined theoretical and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pašti, Igor A.; Gavrilov, Nemanja M.; Baljozović, Miloš; Mitrić, Miodrag; Mentus, Slavko V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Upon DFT prediction of improved electrocatalytic activity of Pt–In alloys toward ORR, the alloy Pt-10 at% In was synthesized on glassy carbon disc, simultaneously with pure Pt reference catalyst. Improved catalytic activity of the alloy was evidenced by voltammetry on RDE in 0.1 mol dm −3 KOH solution. -- Highlights: •The adsorption of O atoms on Pt–In alloys model surfaces was investigated by DFT. •The improvement of catalytic activity toward ORR was predicted by DFT. •Pt-10 at% In alloy was synthesized on glassy carbon disk surface. •By voltammetry on RDE improvement of activity toward ORR was evidenced. -- Abstract: By means of the density functional theory (DFT) calculations, using the adsorption energy of oxygen on single crystal surfaces as criterion, it was predicted that the alloying of Pt with In should improve kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To prove this, the Pt–In alloy having nominal composition Pt 9 In was synthesized by heating H 2 PtCl 6 –InCl 3 mixture in hydrogen stream. The XRD characterization confirmed that Pt–In alloy was formed. The electrochemical measurements by rotating disk technique in alkaline 0.1 mol dm −3 KOH solution evidenced faster ORR kinetics for factor 2.6 relative to the one on pure platinum. This offers the possibility of searching for new ORR electrocatalysts by alloying platinum with p-elements

  13. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  14. Rate kernel theory for pseudo-first-order kinetics of diffusion-influenced reactions and application to fluorescence quenching kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mino

    2007-06-07

    Theoretical foundation of rate kernel equation approaches for diffusion-influenced chemical reactions is presented and applied to explain the kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions. A many-body master equation is constructed by introducing stochastic terms, which characterize the rates of chemical reactions, into the many-body Smoluchowski equation. A Langevin-type of memory equation for the density fields of reactants evolving under the influence of time-independent perturbation is derived. This equation should be useful in predicting the time evolution of reactant concentrations approaching the steady state attained by the perturbation as well as the steady-state concentrations. The dynamics of fluctuation occurring in equilibrium state can be predicted by the memory equation by turning the perturbation off and consequently may be useful in obtaining the linear response to a time-dependent perturbation. It is found that unimolecular decay processes including the time-independent perturbation can be incorporated into bimolecular reaction kinetics as a Laplace transform variable. As a result, a theory for bimolecular reactions along with the unimolecular process turned off is sufficient to predict overall reaction kinetics including the effects of unimolecular reactions and perturbation. As the present formulation is applied to steady-state kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions, the exact relation between fluorophore concentrations and the intensity of excitation light is derived.

  15. Selective oxidation of methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside with oxygen over supported platinum: Kinetic modeling in the presence of deactivation by overoxidation of the catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vleeming, J.H.; Kuster, B.F.M.; Marin, G.B. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1997-09-01

    The selective oxidation of alcohols and carbohydrates with molecular oxygen in aqueous media is an industrial and environmental attractive process. A kinetic model is presented, which describes the platinum-catalyzed selective oxidation of methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside to sodium methyl {alpha}-D-glucuronate with molecular oxygen in the presence of deactivation by overoxidation. Overoxidation is completely reversible and most adequately described by a reversible transformation of oxygen adatoms into inactive subsurface oxygen. A clear distinction is made between the rapid establishment of the steady-state degree of coverage by the reaction intermediates at the platinum surface and the much slower reversible process of overoxidation. This clear distinction is reflected in the rate equation, which can be written as the product of an initial rate and a deactivation function. The deactivation function is given as a function of the degree of coverage by inactive subsurface oxygen. The rate-determining step in the selective oxidation consists of the reaction between dissociatively chemisorbed oxygen and physisorbed methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside. The corresponding standard activation entropy and enthalpy amount to respectively {minus}111 {+-} 12 J/mol K and 51 {+-} 4 kJ/mol. The standard reaction entropy for the transformation of oxygen atoms into subsurface oxygen amounts to {minus}35 {+-} 16 J/mol K and the standard reaction enthalpy to {minus}36 {+-} 15 kJ/mol.

  16. Kinetics of the Reaction of CO2 with Aqueous Potassium Salt of Taurine and Glycine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, P.S.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.; Feron, P.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between CO2 and aqueous potassium salts of taurine and glycine was measured at 295 K in a stirred-cell reactor with a flat gas–liquid interface. For aqueous potassium taurate solutions, the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was measured at 285 and 305 K. Unlike

  17. Kinetics of the reaction of CO2 with aqueous potassium salt of taurine and glycine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar Paramasivam Senthil, P.S.; Hogendoorn, Kees; Versteeg, Geert; Feron, P.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between CO2 and aqueous potassium salts of taurine and glycine was measured at 295 K in a stirred-cell reactor with a flat gas-liquid interface. For aqueous potassium taurate solutions, the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was measured at 285 and 305 K. Unlike

  18. The reaction kinetics of amino radicals with sulfur dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Yide; Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Application of the laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence method to the reaction NH2+SO2 in argon bath gas yields pressure-dependent, third-order kinetics which may be summarized as k = (1.49 ± 0.15) × 10-31 (T/298 K)-0.83cm6 molecule-2 s-1 over 292-555K, where the uncertainty is the 95......% confidence interval and includes possible systematic errors. The quenching of vibrationally excited NH2 is consistent with a high-pressure limit for NH2+SO2 of (1.62 ± 0.25) × 10-11cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the temperature range 295-505K, where again the 95% confidence interval is shown. Ab initio analysis...... yields a H2N-SO2 dissociation enthalpy of 73.5 kJ mol-1, and comparison with RRKM theory and the exponential down model for energy transfer yields down = 350 cm-1 for Ar at room temperature....

  19. Kinetics of the Electric Discharge Pumped Oxygen-Iodine Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    of the sustainer pulse is tailored to keep the discharge stable. In January 2007, OSU demonstrated a peak laser power of 0.28 W, using a pulser...controlled avalanche ionization, Applied Physics Letters, 22, p. 670, (1973). (57) Hill. A.E., The next generation of controlled avalanche discharge ...pressure oxygen pulsed discharge . Simple and quick method for temperature determination, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys. 32, pp. 246-250, (1998). (71

  20. Mechanistic rationalization of unusual sigmoidal kinetic profiles in the Machetti-De Sarlo cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Matthew P; Blackmond, Donna G

    2015-02-18

    Unusual sigmoidal kinetic profiles in the Machetti-De Sarlo base-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of acrylamide to N-methylnitroacetamide are rationalized by detailed in situ kinetic analysis. A dual role is uncovered in which a substrate acts as a precursor to catalyze its own reaction. Such kinetic studies provide a general protocol for distinguishing among different mechanistic origins of induction periods in complex organic reactions.

  1. Development of Singlet Oxygen Luminescence Kinetics during the Photodynamic Inactivation of Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bornhütter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show the feasibility of photodynamic inactivation of green algae as a vital step towards an effective photodynamic suppression of biofilms by using functionalized surfaces. The investigation of the intrinsic mechanisms of photodynamic inactivation in green algae represents the next step in order to determine optimization parameters. The observation of singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics proved to be a very effective approach towards understanding mechanisms on a cellular level. In this study, the first two-dimensional measurement of singlet oxygen kinetics in phototrophic microorganisms on surfaces during photodynamic inactivation is presented. We established a system of reproducible algae samples on surfaces, incubated with two different cationic, antimicrobial potent photosensitizers. Fluorescence microscopy images indicate that one photosensitizer localizes inside the green algae while the other accumulates along the outer algae cell wall. A newly developed setup allows for the measurement of singlet oxygen luminescence on the green algae sample surfaces over several days. The kinetics of the singlet oxygen luminescence of both photosensitizers show different developments and a distinct change over time, corresponding with the differences in their localization as well as their photosensitization potential. While the complexity of the signal reveals a challenge for the future, this study incontrovertibly marks a crucial, inevitable step in the investigation of photodynamic inactivation of biofilms: it shows the feasibility of using the singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics to investigate photodynamic effects on surfaces and thus opens a field for numerous investigations.

  2. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of oxygen delivery, dietary nitrate, intensified training and prior exercise on oxygen uptake kinetics and performance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller

    benefits from supplementing with nitrate to improve exercise efficiency and performance in endurance trained subjects. Furthermore it appears difficult to improve VO2 kinetics with intensified training in trained athletes; however intense exercise can amplify the VO2 response during subsequent high......In response to an increase in the metabolic demand the oxygen uptake (VO2) increases in an exponential fashion in exercising muscles and stabilizes after 1-2 min eventually reaching a plateau or steady state where the energy demand is matched by the l vel of VO2. VO2 kinetics describes the distinct...... phases of the VO2 response at the onset of exercise. Fast VO2 kinetics are considered to be beneficial in intense endurance sports with competitions lasting ~2-8 min, whereas low VO2 at steady state (high efficiency) is considered beneficial especially in events of longer duration. To improve...

  4. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  5. Enhanced kinetics of hole transfer and electrocatalysis during photocatalytic oxygen evolution by cocatalyst tuning

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela; Wang, Hai; Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Flanagan, Sean; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Qureshi, Muhammad; Mics, Zoltan; Sautet, Philippe; Le Bahers, Tangui; Canovas, Enrique; Bonn, Mischa; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Understanding photophysical and electrocatalytic processes during photocatalysis in a powder suspension system is crucial for developing efficient solar energy conversion systems. We report a substantial enhancement by a factor of 3 in photocatalytic effi-ciency for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by adding trace amounts (~0.05 wt%) of noble metals (Rh or Ru) to a 2 wt% cobalt oxide-modified Ta3N5 photocatalyst particulate. The optimized system exhibited high quantum efficiencies (QEs) of up to 28 and 8.4% at 500 and 600 nm in 0.1 M Na2S2O8 at pH 14. By isolating the electrochemical components to generate doped cobalt oxide electrodes, the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt oxide when doped with Ru or Rh was improved compared with cobalt oxide, as evidenced by the onset shift for electrochemical OER. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that the ef-fects of a second metal addition perturbs the electronic structure and redox properties in such a way that both hole transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic rates improve. Time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) measurement provides evidence of long-lived electron populations (>1 ns; with mobilities μe ~0.1-3 cm2 V-1 s-1), which are not perturbed by the addition of CoOx-related phases. Furthermore, we find that Ta3N5 phases alone suffer ultrafast hole trapping (within 10 ps); the CoOx and M-CoOx decorations most likely induce a kinetic competition between hole transfer toward the CoOx-related phases and trapping in the Ta3N5 phase, which is consistent with the improved OER rates. The present work not only provides a novel way to improve electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performance but also gives additional tools and insight to understand the characteristics of photocatalysts that can be used in a suspension system.

  6. Enhanced kinetics of hole transfer and electrocatalysis during photocatalytic oxygen evolution by cocatalyst tuning

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2016-05-23

    Understanding photophysical and electrocatalytic processes during photocatalysis in a powder suspension system is crucial for developing efficient solar energy conversion systems. We report a substantial enhancement by a factor of 3 in photocatalytic effi-ciency for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by adding trace amounts (~0.05 wt%) of noble metals (Rh or Ru) to a 2 wt% cobalt oxide-modified Ta3N5 photocatalyst particulate. The optimized system exhibited high quantum efficiencies (QEs) of up to 28 and 8.4% at 500 and 600 nm in 0.1 M Na2S2O8 at pH 14. By isolating the electrochemical components to generate doped cobalt oxide electrodes, the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt oxide when doped with Ru or Rh was improved compared with cobalt oxide, as evidenced by the onset shift for electrochemical OER. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that the ef-fects of a second metal addition perturbs the electronic structure and redox properties in such a way that both hole transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic rates improve. Time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) measurement provides evidence of long-lived electron populations (>1 ns; with mobilities μe ~0.1-3 cm2 V-1 s-1), which are not perturbed by the addition of CoOx-related phases. Furthermore, we find that Ta3N5 phases alone suffer ultrafast hole trapping (within 10 ps); the CoOx and M-CoOx decorations most likely induce a kinetic competition between hole transfer toward the CoOx-related phases and trapping in the Ta3N5 phase, which is consistent with the improved OER rates. The present work not only provides a novel way to improve electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performance but also gives additional tools and insight to understand the characteristics of photocatalysts that can be used in a suspension system.

  7. Synergistically enhanced activity of nitrogen-doped carbon dots/graphene composites for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zhao, Qingshan; Liu, Jingyan; Ma, Xiao; Rao, Yuan; Shao, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongtao; Wu, Wenting; Ning, Hui; Wu, Mingbo

    2017-11-01

    With rapid dissociative adsorption of oxygen, nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be efficient alternative catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Herein, we developed a mild hydrothermal strategy to construct nitrogen-doped carbon dots/graphene (NCDs-NG) composites towards ORR. Carbon dots (CDs) were derived from petroleum coke via acid oxidation while graphene oxide (GO) was obtained from graphite by modified Hummer's method. Graphene was employed as a conductive substrate to disperse CDs during hydrothermal reducing reaction while ammonia was utilized as N source to dope both graphene and CDs. The synergistic effects, i.e. CDs as pillars for graphene and catalytic sites for ORR, the high conductivity of graphene, the quick O2 adsorption on doped pyridinic nitrogen endow the NCDs-NG composites with enhanced ORR catalytic performance in alkaline electrolyte. The onset potential of -95 mV and kinetic current density of 12.7 mA cm-2 at -0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) can be compared to those of the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst. The electron transfer number is about 3.9, revealing a four-electron pathway for ORR. The optimal NCDs-NG catalyst shows superior durability and methanol tolerance than 20 wt% Pt/C. This work demonstrates a feasible and effective strategy to prepare metal-free efficient ORR electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications.

  8. Influence of Prolonged Spaceflight on Heart Rate and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, U.; Moore, A.; Drescher, U.

    2013-02-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, physical training is used to minimize cardiovascular deconditioning. Measurement of the kinetics of cardiorespiratory parameters, in particular the kinetic analysis of heart rate, respiratory and muscular oxygen uptake, provides useful information with regard to the efficiency and regulation of the cardiorespiratory system. Practically, oxygen uptake kinetics can only be measured at the lung site (V’O2 resp). The dynamics of V’O2 resp, however, is not identical with the dynamics at the site of interest: skeletal muscle. Eight Astronauts were tested pre- and post-flight using pseudo random binary workload changes between 30 and 80 W. Their kinetic responses of heart rate, respiratory as well as muscular V’O2 kinetics were estimated by using time-series analysis. Statistical analysis revealed that the kinetic responses of respiratory as well as muscular V’O2 kinetics are slowed post-flight than pre-flight. Heart rate seems not to be influenced following flight. The influence of other factors (e. g. astronauts’ exercise training) may impact these parameters and is an area for future studies.

  9. Kinetic calorimetry in the study of the mechanism of low-temperature chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkalov, I. M.; Kiryukhin, D. P.

    schemes are described [1-5]. However, despite the high working characteristics of modern calorimeters (Perkin-Elmer, Du Pont, LKB, etc.), all of them have one principal disadvantage: a cell with a sample is placed in them at room temperature. In cryochemical investigation, when the sample has metastable formations, the loading is made `from nitrogen to nitrogen', i.e. the sample prepared at 77 K should be loaded into a calorimeter at 77 K. Besides, the existing installations do not allow measurements at the temperatures Cryochemistry and Radiation Chemistry at the Institute of Chemical Physics in Chernogolovka has created original calorimetric techniques which allow: (1) the carrying out phase analysis and the determination of the main thermodynamic characteristic of individual substances and complicated systems in the temperature range 5 300 K. Sample loading can be conducted at 77 K that allows us to study the systems containing: tetrafiuoroethylene, hexafluoropropylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, nitrogen, methane, hydrogen, oxygen, ozone, formaldehyde and many other gaseous substances; (2) the study of the dynamics of chemical reactions and to measure the main kinetic parameters of the processes-the elementary rate constants and the activation energies. The experiment can be conducted both under direct action of radiation and UV light and in the post-effect mode [5,6].

  10. Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Nanocarbon: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics via in Situ Experimental Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Yan, Pengqiang; Su, Dang Sheng

    2018-03-20

    Sustainable and environmentally benign catalytic processes are vital for the future to supply the world population with clean energy and industrial products. The replacement of conventional metal or metal oxide catalysts with earth abundant and renewable nonmetallic materials has attracted considerable research interests in the field of catalysis and material science. The stable and efficient catalytic performance of nanocarbon materials was discovered at the end of last century, and these materials are considered as potential alternatives for conventional metal-based catalysts. With its rapid development in the past 20 years, the research field of carbon catalysis has been experiencing a smooth transition from the discovery of novel nanocarbon materials or related new reaction systems to the atomistic-level mechanistic understanding on the catalytic process and the subsequent rational design of the practical catalytic reaction systems. In this Account, we summarize the recent progress in the kinetic and mechanistic studies on nanocarbon catalyzed alkane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions. The paper attempts to extract general concepts and basic regularities for carbon catalytic process directing us on the way for rational design of novel efficient metal-free catalysts. The nature of the active sites for ODH reactions has been revealed through microcalorimetric analysis, ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement, and in situ chemical titration strategies. The detailed kinetic analysis and in situ catalyst structure characterization suggests that carbon catalyzed ODH reactions involve the redox cycles of the ketonic carbonyl-hydroxyl pairs, and the key physicochemical parameters (activation energy, reaction order, and rate/equilibrium constants, etc.) of the carbon catalytic systems are proposed and compared with conventional transition metal oxide catalysts. The proposal of the intrinsic catalytic activity (TOF) provides the

  11. Interactions of nitrite with catalase: Enzyme activity and reaction kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2017-06-01

    Catalase, a heme enzyme, which catalyzes decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, is one of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defense system of the cell. Nitrite, used as a food preservative has long been regarded as a harmful compound due to its ability to form carcinogenic nitrosamines. Recently, much evidence has been presented that nitrite plays a protective role as a nitric oxide donor under hypoxic conditions. In this work the effect of nitrite on the catalytic reactions of catalase was studied. Catalase was inhibited by nitrite, and this process was pH-dependent. IC 50 values varied from about 1μM at pH5.0 to about 150μM of nitrite at pH7.4. The presence of chloride significantly enhanced nitrite-induced catalase inhibition, in agreement with earlier observations. The kinetics of the reactions of nitrite with ferric catalase, its redox intermediate, Compound I, and catalase inactive form, Compound II, was also studied. Possible mechanisms of nitrite-induced catalase inhibition are analyzed and the biological consequences of the reactions of catalase with nitrite are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of chemical reaction kinetics of depredating organic pollutants from secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plant in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Jiang, Dengling; Yang, Yong; Cao, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Four subsurface constructed wetlands were built to treat the secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Tangshan, China. The chemical pollutant indexes of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were analyzed to evaluate the removal efficiency of organic pollutants from the secondary effluent of the wastewater treatment plant. In all cases, the subsurface constructed wetlands were efficient in treating organic pollutants. Under the same hydraulic loading condition, the horizontal flow wetlands exhibited better efficiency of COD removal than vertical flow wetlands: the removal rates in horizontal flow wetlands could be maintained at 68.4 ± 2.42% to 92.2 ± 1.61%, compared with 63.8 ± 1.19% to 85.0 ± 1.25% in the vertical flow wetlands. Meanwhile, the chemical reaction kinetics of organic pollutants was analyzed, and the results showed that the degradation courses of the four subsurface wetlands all corresponded with the first order reaction kinetics to a large extent.

  13. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2010-11-04

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Ahn, Sung-Jin; la O’ , Gerardo Jose; Leonard, Donovan N.; Borisevich, Albina; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly; Kim, Young Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M. partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M. species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions

  16. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  17. Thermochemical conversion of biomass in smouldering combustion across scales: The roles of heterogeneous kinetics, oxygen and transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinyan; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass in smouldering combustion is investigated here by combining experiments and modeling at two scales: matter (1mg) and bench (100g) scales. Emphasis is put on the effect of oxygen (0-33vol.%) and oxidation reactions because these are poorly studied in the literature in comparison to pyrolysis. The results are obtained for peat as a representative biomass for which there is high-quality experimental data published previously. Three kinetic schemes are explored, including various steps of drying, pyrolysis and oxidation. The kinetic parameters are found using the Kissinger-Genetic Algorithm method, and then implemented in a one-dimensional model of heat and mass transfer. The predictions are validated with thermogravimetric and bench-scale experiments and then analyzed to unravel the role of heterogeneous reaction. This is the first time that the influence of oxygen on biomass smouldering is explained in terms of both chemistry and transport phenomena across scales. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating the effect of potassium on cellulose pyrolysis reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendewicz, Anna; Evans, Robert; Dutta, Abhijit; Sykes, Robert; Carpenter, Daniel; Braun, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes modifications to an existing cellulose pyrolysis mechanism in order to include the effect of potassium on product yields and composition. The changes in activation energies and pre-exponential factors due to potassium were evaluated based on the experimental data collected from pyrolysis of cellulose samples treated with different levels of potassium (0–1% mass fraction). The experiments were performed in a pyrolysis reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the collected data revealed that cellulose pyrolysis products could be divided into two groups: anhydrosugars and other fragmentation products (hydroxyacetaldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, acetyl compounds). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to extract the time resolved concentration score profiles of principal components. Kinetic tests revealed that potassium apparently inhibits the formation of anhydrosugars and catalyzes char formation. Therefore, the oil yield predicted at 500 ° C decreased from 87.9% from cellulose to 54.0% from cellulose with 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment. The decrease in oil yield was accompanied by increased yield of char and gases produced via a catalyzed dehydration reaction. The predicted char and gas yield from cellulose were 3.7% and 8.4%, respectively. Introducing 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment resulted in an increase of char yield to 12.1% and gas yield to 33.9%. The validation of the cellulose pyrolysis mechanism with experimental data from a fluidized-bed reactor, after this correction for potassium, showed good agreement with our results, with differences in product yields of up to 5%

  19. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  20. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, S. G. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burshtein, A. I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  1. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics

  2. EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC NITROGEN AND OXYGEN-ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS BETWEEN DISSOLVED AND GASEOUS N2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    INOUE, HY; MOOK, WG

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the equilibrium as well as kinetic stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionations between aqueous dissolved and gaseous N2O. The equilibrium fractionations, defined as the ratio of the isotopic abundance ratios (15R and 18R, respectively) of gaseous and

  3. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Hua [School of Urban Rail Transportation, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Zhihu [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China); Xu, Yanhui, E-mail: xuyanhui@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  4. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela; Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Qureshi, Muhammad; Dhawale, Dattatray Sadashiv; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER

  5. Kinetics of reactions of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksakov, V.A.; Ershova, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr, Mo, W) reaction with hydroxylamine was studied. On the basis of kinetic data it was ascertained that as a result of the reaction CO oxidation to CO 2 and intramolecular transfer of amine formed to the central atom of metal occur. Mechanisms of M(CO) 6 reactions with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide are compared

  6. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Galagali, Nikhil; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model

  7. Influence of the temperature and oxygen exposure in red Port wine: A kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Barros, António S; Silva Ferreira, António César; Silva, Artur M S

    2015-09-01

    Although phenolics are recognized to be related with health benefits by limiting lipid oxidation, in wine, they are the primary substrates for oxidation resulting in the quinone by-products with the participation of transition metal ions. Nevertheless, high quality Port wines require a period of aging in either bottle or barrels. During this time, a modification of sensory properties of wines such as the decrease of astringency or the stabilization of color is recognized to phenolic compounds, mainly attributed to anthocyanins and derived pigments. The present work aims to illustrate the oxidation of red Port wine based on its phenolic composition by the effect of both thermal and oxygen exposures. A kinetic approach toanthocyanins degradation was also achieved. For this purpose a forced red Port wine aging protocol was performed at four different storage temperatures, respectively, 20, 30, 35 and 40°C, and two adjusted oxygen saturation levels, no oxygen addition (treatment I), and oxygen addition (treatment II). Three hydroxycinnamic esters, three hydroxycinnamic acids, three hydroxybenzoic acids, two flavan-3-ols, and six anthocyanins were quantitated weekly during 63days, along with oxygen consumption. The most relevant phenolic oxidation markers were anthocyanins and catechin-type flavonoids, which had the highest decreases during the thermal and oxidative red Port wine process. Both temperature and oxygen treatments affected the rate of phenolic degradation. In addition, temperature seems to influence mostly the phenolics kinetic degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinetic of the Oxygen Control System (OCS) for stagnant lead-bismuth systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefhalm, C.H.; Knebel, J.U.; Mack, K.J.

    2001-09-01

    Within the framework of the HGF strategy fund project 99/16 ''Thermalhydraulic and Material Specific Investigations into the Realization of an accelerator driven system (ADS) to Transmute Minor Actinides'' at the institute for nuclear and energy technology (IKET) investigations on the cooling of thermally high-loaded surfaces with liquid lead bismuth (Pb-Bi) are carried out. To operate a Pb-Bi loop safety, for example in order to cool a spallation target or a blanket of an accelerator driven system (ADS), the control of the oxygen concentration within the liquid metal is an inalienable prerequisite to prevent or minimize corrosion at the structure material. In this report the kinetic behaviour of the oxygen control system (OCS), which was developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, is examined. The OCS controls the chemical potential of oxygen in the liquid metal by regulating the oxygen content in the gas phase which flows over the free surface of the liquid metal. In this work the experimental facility KOCOS (kinetics of oxygen control system) in the karlsruhe lead laboratory (KALLA) was built. A physical diffusion model was utilised and extended to describe the exchange of oxygen between the gas and the liquid metal. The theoretical calculations are in very good agreement to the experimental findings. The OCS allows to control reversibly the oxygen concentration in the liquid metal. According to the observed kinetics of the process one can extrapolate that the control of large volumes, as they are necessary to operate an ADS demonstrator, is possible. Therefore, further experiments in liquid metal loop systems are suggested. (orig.)

  9. Electrodeposition of Pd based binary catalysts on Carbon paper via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) continue to extensive attention as potential power sources for portable and stationary applications. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) involving the four electron transfer remains a challenge for DAFCs due to its...

  10. Kinetics of oxygen exchange between bisulfite ion and water as studied by oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times of oxygen-17 have been measured in aqueous sodium bisulfite solutions in the pH range from 2.5 to 5 as a function of temperature, pH, and S(IV) concentration, at an ionic strength of 1.0 m. The rate law for oxygen exchange between bisulfite ion and water was obtained from an analysis of the data, and is consistent with oxygen exchange occurring via the reaction SO 2 + H 2 O right reversible H + + SHO 3 - . The value of k/sub -1/ is in agreement with relaxation measurements. Direct spectroscopic evidence was found for the existence of two isomers of bisulfite ion: one with the proton bonded to the sulfur (HSO 3 - ) and the other with the proton bonded to an oxygen (SO 3 H - ). (The symbol SHO 3 - in the above chemical equation refers to both isomeric forms of bisulfite ion.) The relative amounts of the two isomers were determined as a function of temperature, and the rate and mechanism of oxygen exchange between the two was investigated. One of the two isomers, presumably SO 3 H - , exchanges oxygens with water much more rapidly than does the other. A two-pulse sequence was developed which greatly diminished the solvent peak in the NMR spectrum

  11. Student Research in Rocket and Plume-Reaction Kinetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fontijn, Arthur

    1998-01-01

    Semi-empirical configuration interaction (SECI) theory has been extended to predict activation barriers for combustion reactions of boron group halide oxidation reactions, Good agreement with experiments has been obtained...

  12. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  13. The oxygen-conserving potential of the diving response: A kinetic-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalat, Guillaume; Coquart, Jeremy; Castres, Ingrid; Joulia, Fabrice; Sirost, Olivier; Clua, Eric; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the oxygen-conserving potential of the human diving response by comparing trained breath-hold divers (BHDs) to non-divers (NDs) during simulated dynamic breath-holding (BH). Changes in haemodynamics [heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO)] and peripheral muscle oxygenation [oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO 2 ]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HHb]), total haemoglobin ([tHb]), tissue saturation index (TSI)] and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) were continuously recorded during simulated dynamic BH. BHDs showed a breaking point in HR kinetics at mid-BH immediately preceding a more pronounced drop in HR (-0.86 bpm.% -1 ) while HR kinetics in NDs steadily decreased throughout BH (-0.47 bpm.% -1 ). By contrast, SV remained unchanged during BH in both groups (all P > 0.05). Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) results (mean ± SD) expressed as percentage changes from the initial values showed a lower [HHb] increase for BHDs than for NDs at the cessation of BH (+24.0 ± 10.1 vs. +39.2 ± 9.6%, respectively; P kinetic-based approach we used provides further credence to the concept of an "oxygen-conserving breaking point" in the human diving response.

  14. Kinetic Monte Carlo studies of the reaction kinetics of crystal defects that diffuse one-dimensionally with occasional transverse migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Trinkaus, H.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    2007-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the various species of mobile defects in irradiated materials are crucially dependent on the dimensionality of their migration. Sink strengths for one-dimensionally (1D) gliding interstitial loops undergoing occasional direction changes have been described analytically...

  15. Iron-Induced Activation of Ordered Mesoporous Nickel Cobalt Oxide Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Öztürk, Secil; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Tüysüz, Harun

    2017-06-28

    Herein, ordered mesoporous nickel cobalt oxides prepared by the nanocasting route are reported as highly active oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts. By using the ordered mesoporous structure as a model system and afterward elevating the optimal catalysts composition, it is shown that, with a simple electrochemical activation step, the performance of nickel cobalt oxide can be significantly enhanced. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that charge transfer resistance increases for Co 3 O 4 spinel after an activation process, while this value drops for NiO and especially for CoNi mixed oxide significantly, which confirms the improvement of oxygen evolution kinetics. The catalyst with the optimal composition (Co/Ni 4/1) reaches a current density of 10 mA/cm 2 with an overpotential of a mere 336 mV and a Tafel slope of 36 mV/dec, outperforming benchmarked and other reported Ni/Co-based OER electrocatalysts. The catalyst also demonstrates outstanding durability for 14 h and maintained the ordered mesoporous structure. The cyclic voltammograms along with the electrochemical measurements in Fe-free KOH electrolyte suggest that the activity boost is attributed to the generation of surface Ni(OH) 2 species that incorporate Fe impurities from the electrolyte. The incorporation of Fe into the structure is also confirmed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  16. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-01-01

    the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized

  17. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  18. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  19. A kinetic study on non-catalytic reactions in hydroprocessing Boscan crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Marafi; E. Kam; A. Stanislaus [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center

    2008-08-15

    Non-catalytic hydrothermal cracking reactions are known to associate with catalytic hydrocracking reactions. In a recent study on hydroprocessing of Boscan crude over a specific catalyst system containing three distinct catalysts, it was found that hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallation (HDM) reactions continued even when the catalyst is severely deactivated. Since the reactor was packed with considerable amount of inert material besides the three catalysts, it will be advantage to determine if the inert materials can also facilitate hydroprocessing reactions. A series of kinetic experiments for the inert particles was undertaken under different space velocity and temperature conditions. The extent of catalytic and non-catalytic hydroprocessing reactions was assessed. Through statistical analysis, the initial reaction rate constant, reaction order and activation energy for various hydroprocessing reactions were then determined. The absolute average deviations (AAD) of the kinetics values obtained for inert materials are less than 10%. 25 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Kinetics and mechanisms of iron redox reactions in silicate melts: The effects of temperature and alkali cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V.; Pinet, O. [CEA VALRHO, SCDV/LEBV, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Magnien, V.; Neuville, D. R.; Roux, J.; Richet, P. [IPGP, CNRS, Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, F-75252 Paris 05, (France); Cormier, L. [Univ Paris 06, IMPMC, F-75015 Paris, (France); Hazemann, J. L. [CNRS, Inst Neel, F-38043 Grenoble, (France); De Ligny, D. [Univ Lyon 1, LMLC, CNRS, UMR 5620, F-69622 Villeurbanne, (France); Pascarelli, S. [European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, F-38043 Grenoble, (France); Vickridge, I. [Univ Paris 06, INSP, F-75015 Paris, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics and the mechanisms of iron redox reactions in molten Fe-bearing pyroxene compositions have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) experiments at the iron K-edge. The former experiments have been made only near the glass transition whereas the latter have also been performed from about 1300 to 2100 K. The same kinetics are observed with both techniques. They are described by characteristic times that depend primarily on temperature and not on the initial redox state. At high temperatures, where both kinds of reactions could be investigated, these times are similar for oxidation and reduction. From these characteristic times we have calculated as a function of temperature and composition a parameter termed effective redox diffusivity. For a given melt, the diffusivities follow two distinct Arrhenius laws, which indicate that the mechanisms of the redox reaction are not the same near the glass transition and at high temperatures. As is now well established, diffusion of divalent cations is the dominant mechanism at low temperatures but the enhanced kinetics observed for alkali-bearing melts indicate that Li{sup +} and Na{sup +} also participate in ionic transport. At super-liquidus temperatures, in contrast, diffusion of oxygen represents the dominant mechanism. (authors)

  1. Reactions driving conformational movements (molecular motors) in gels: conformational and structural chemical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-01-18

    In this perspective the empirical kinetics of conducting polymers exchanging anions and solvent during electrochemical reactions to get dense reactive gels is reviewed. The reaction drives conformational movements of the chains (molecular motors), exchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte and structural (relaxation, swelling, shrinking and compaction) gel changes. Reaction-driven structural changes are identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The empirical reaction activation energy (E a ), the reaction coefficient (k) and the reaction orders (α and β) change as a function of the conformational energy variation during the reaction. This conformational energy becomes an empirical magnitude. E a , k, α and β include and provide quantitative conformational and structural information. The chemical kinetics becomes structural chemical kinetics (SCK) for reactions driving conformational movements of the reactants. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation model describes empirical results and some results from the literature for biochemical reactions. In parallel the development of an emerging technological world of soft, wet, multifunctional and biomimetic tools and anthropomorphic robots driven by reactions of the constitutive material, as in biological organs, can be now envisaged being theoretically supported by the kinetic model.

  2. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics of La2-xSrxNiO 4+delta Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Bo

    In the development of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC), mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIEC) have drawn big interests due to their both ionic and electronic species transport which can enlarge the 3-dimension of the cathode network. This thesis presents an investigation of MIEC of Ruddlesden-popper (RP) phases like K2NiF4 type La2NiO4+delta (LNO)-based oxides which have interesting transport, catalytic properties and suitable thermal expansion coefficients. The motivation of this present work is to further understand the fundamental of the effect of Sr doing on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) kinetics of LNO cathode. Porous symmetrical cells of La2-xSrxNiO4+delta (0≤x≤0.4) were fabricated and characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in different PO2 from temperature range of 600˜800°C. The spectra were analyzed based on the impedance model introduced by Adler et al. The rate determining steps (RDS) for ORR were proposed and the responsible reasons were discussed. The overall polarization resistances of doped samples increase with Sr level. Surface oxygen exchange and bulk ionic diffusion co-control the ORR kinetics. With high Sr content (x=0.3, 0.4), oxygen ion transfer resistance between nickelate/electrolyte is observed. However for porous symmetrical cells it is hard to associate the resistance from EIS directly to each ORR elementary processes because of the difficulty in describing the microstructure of the porous electrode. The dense electrode configuration was adopted in this thesis. By using the dense electrode, the surface area, the thickness of electrode, the interface between electrode and electrolyte and lastly the 3PB are theoretically well-defined. Through this method, there is a good chance to distinguish the contribution of surface exchange from other processes. Dense and thin electrode layers in thickness of ˜40 mum are fabricated by using a novel spray modified pressing method. Negligible

  3. Cell respiration under hypoxia: facts and artefacts in mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandurra, Francesca M; Gnaiger, Erich

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen supply to tissues is limiting, mitochondrial respiration and ATP production are compromised. To assess the bioenergetic consequences under normoxia and hypoxia, quantitative evaluation of mitochondrial oxygen kinetics is required. Using high-resolution respirometry, the "apparent K (m)" for oxygen or p (50) of respiration in 32D cells was determined at 0.05 +/- 0.01 kPa (0.4 mmHg, 0.5 microM, 0.25% air saturation). Close agreement with p (50) of isolated mitochondria indicates that intracellular gradients are small in small cells at routine activity. At intracellular p (O2) respiration is limited by >2% with a p (50) of 0.05 kPa. Over-estimation of p (50) at 0.4 kPa (3 mmHg) would imply significant (>17%) oxygen limitation of respiration under intracellular normoxia. Based on a critical review, we conclude that p (50) ranges from 0.01 to 0.10 kPa in mitochondria and small cells in the absence of inhibitors of cytochrome c oxidase, whereas experimental artefacts explain the controversial >200-fold range of p (50) in the literature on mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

  4. Dissociation kinetics of iodine in oxygen-containing electrical discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.I.; Klopovskii, K.S.; Rakhimova, T.V.; Samorodov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the kinetics of gaseous media containing oxygen and iodine molecules have been stimulated to a substantial degree by the search for ways of improving iodine-oxygen lasers and by the need for information on loss processes for atmospheric ozone. Results are presented from an experimental study and numerical simulations of the kinetics of the dissociation of iodine in self-sustained volume discharges in high-pressure O 2 :Ar:I 2 mixtures. It is shown that the well-studied mechanism for dissociation based on excitation of iodine molecules in successive collisions with singlet oxygen and excited iodine atoms is supplanted by a substantially different mechanism involving the creation and loss of 10 radicals when the densities of atomic oxygen and ozone are high enough. It is also shown that iodine fractions as low as ∼10 -3 in the mixture lead to rapid loss of ozone molecules while less than 18% of the discharge energy is expended in the production of singlet oxygen

  5. Kinetic study of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate crystals using microscopy and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Shuiquan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zondag, Herbert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Energy research Center of the Netherlands – ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Steenhoven, Anton van [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rindt, Camilo, E-mail: c.c.m.rindt@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Highlights: • Kinetics of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O single crystals were modeled based on elementary processes. • Kinetics of nucleation and nuclei growth were studied by using optical microscopy. • A novel experiment was designed to visualize the reaction front into crystal bulk. • Fractional conversion was calculated and compared with TGA-experiments. - Abstract: Simulation of gas–solid reactions occurring in industrial processes requires a robust kinetic model to be applicable in a wide range of complicated reaction conditions. However, in literature it is often seen that even the same reaction under specific controlled conditions is interpreted with different kinetic models. In the present work, a phenomenological model based on nucleation and nuclei growth processes is presented to study the kinetics of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate single crystals. The two elementary processes of the reaction, nucleation and nuclei growth, are characterized and quantified as a function of temperature by using optical microscopy experiments. The in-situ measured characteristics of the dehydration reaction provided confirmatory evidence that the rate of nucleation obeys an exponential law and the rate of nuclei growth is approximately constant. With knowledge acquired from the optical observations as inputs of the kinetic model, the fractional conversion of the dehydration reaction was calculated and compared with experimental results from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A satisfactory comparison was found both in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. It is demonstrated that this knowledge-based model has a great potential to represent the gas–solid reaction kinetics in a wide range of process conditions regarding temperature, pressure and particle geometry.

  6. Factors determining the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2004-01-01

    Using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously [Korzeniewski and Mazat (1996) Biochem. J. 319, 143-148; Korzeniewski and Zoladz (2001) Biophys. Chem. 92, 17-34], we analyse the effect of several factors on the oxygen-uptake kinetics, especially on the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) and half-transition time t(1/2), at the onset of exercise in skeletal muscles. Computer simulations demonstrate that an increase in the total creatine pool [PCr+/-Cr] (where Cr stands for c...

  7. Boosting the Performance of the Nickel Anode in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction by Simple Electrochemical Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2017-03-27

    The development of cost-effective and active water-splitting electrocatalysts that work at mild pH is an essential step towards the realization of sustainable energy and material circulation in our society. Its success requires a drastic improvement in the kinetics of the anodic half-reaction of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which determines the overall system efficiency to a large extent. A simple electrochemical protocol has been developed to activate Ni electrodes, by which a stable NiOOH phase was formed, which could weakly bind to alkali-metal cations. The electrochemically activated (ECA) Ni electrode reached a current of 10 mA at <1.40 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) at practical operation temperatures (>75 °C) and a mild pH of ca. 10 with excellent stability (>24 h), greatly surpassing that of the state-of-the-art NiFeOx electrodes under analogous conditions. Water electrolysis was demonstrated with ECA-Ni and NiMo, which required an iR-free overall voltage of only 1.44 V to reach 10 mA cmgeo(-2) .

  8. Boosting the performance of the nickel anode in the oxygen evolution reaction by simple electrochemical activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Ng, Marcus Tze-Kiat; Takanabe, Kazuhiro [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (KAUST), KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC) and Physical Sciences and Engineering Div. PSE, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-04-24

    The development of cost-effective and active water-splitting electrocatalysts that work at mild pH is an essential step towards the realization of sustainable energy and material circulation in our society. Its success requires a drastic improvement in the kinetics of the anodic half-reaction of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which determines the overall system efficiency to a large extent. A simple electrochemical protocol has been developed to activate Ni electrodes, by which a stable NiOOH phase was formed, which could weakly bind to alkali-metal cations. The electrochemically activated (ECA) Ni electrode reached a current of 10 mA at <1.40 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) at practical operation temperatures (>75 C) and a mild pH of ca. 10 with excellent stability (>24 h), greatly surpassing that of the state-of-the-art NiFeO{sub x} electrodes under analogous conditions. Water electrolysis was demonstrated with ECA-Ni and NiMo, which required an iR-free overall voltage of only 1.44 V to reach 10 mA cm{sub geo}{sup -2}. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. PTFE effect on the electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction in membraneless microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Edoardo; Grattieri, Matteo; Faggianelli, Alessio; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Influence of PTFE in the external Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) of open-air cathodes applied to membraneless microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is investigated in this work. Electrochemical measurements on cathodes with different PTFE contents (200%, 100%, 80% and 60%) were carried out to characterize cathodic oxygen reduction reaction, to study the reaction kinetics. It is demonstrated that ORR is not under diffusion-limiting conditions in the tested systems. Based on cyclic voltammetry, an increase of the cathodic electrochemical active area took place with the decrease of PTFE content. This was not directly related to MFC productivity, but to the cathode wettability and the biocathode development. Low electrodic interface resistances (from 1 to 1.5 Ω at the start, to near 0.1 Ω at day 61) indicated a negligible ohmic drop. A decrease of the Tafel slopes from 120 to 80 mV during productive periods of MFCs followed the biological activity in the whole MFC system. A high PTFE content in the cathode showed a detrimental effect on the MFC productivity, acting as an inhibitor of ORR electrocatalysis in the triple contact zone.

  10. Singlet oxygen: photosensitized generation, detection and reaction with organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K; Mohan, Hari; Bajaj, P N; Sapre, A V; Mittal, J P; Mukherjee, T [Radiation and Photochemistry Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2006-10-15

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) is an excited state of molecular oxygen, having antiparallel spin in the same {pi} antibonding orbital. The study of singlet oxygen production and reactivity has emerged as a rich and diverse area, with implication in diverse fields, such as synthetic chemistry, polymer chemistry, photodynamic therapy, etc. There are several known methods to produce singlet oxygen, and also various techniques employed to detect it. Out of these, photosensitization method is the most popular one. In this article, photosensitized production of singlet oxygen from triplet oxygen and photosensitizers in presence of light, and its detection by the infrared luminescence at 1270 nm have been presented. Further, some results using different types of photosensitizers, effect of solvent on singlet oxygen quantum yields and lifetime have been discussed. The quenching rate constants of singlet oxygen have been determined with different types of organic molecules such as derivatives of thiourea and its analogues, hydroxy indoles and antioxidants and the results have been presented. (author)

  11. Singlet oxygen: photosensitized generation, detection and reaction with organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.; Hari Mohan; Bajaj, P.N.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P.; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-10-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is an excited state of molecular oxygen, having antiparallel spin in the same π antibonding orbital. The study of singlet oxygen production and reactivity has emerged as a rich and diverse area, with implication in diverse fields, such as synthetic chemistry, polymer chemistry, photodynamic therapy, etc. There are several known methods to produce singlet oxygen, and also various techniques employed to detect it. Out of these, photosensitization method is the most popular one. In this article, photosensitized production of singlet oxygen from triplet oxygen and photosensitizers in presence of light, and its detection by the infrared luminescence at 1270 nm have been presented. Further, some results using different types of photosensitizers, effect of solvent on singlet oxygen quantum yields and lifetime have been discussed. The quenching rate constants of singlet oxygen have been determined with different types of organic molecules such as derivatives of thiourea and its analogues, hydroxy indoles and antioxidants and the results have been presented. (author)

  12. Strontium-free rare earth perovskite ferrites with fast oxygen exchange kinetics: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christian; Bucher, Edith; Windischbacher, Andreas; Boese, A. Daniel; Sitte, Werner

    2018-03-01

    The Sr-free mixed ionic electronic conducting perovskites La0.8Ca0.2FeO3-δ (LCF82) and Pr0.8Ca0.2FeO3-δ (PCF82) were synthesized via a glycine-nitrate process. Crystal structure, phase purity, and lattice constants were determined by XRD and Rietveld analysis. The oxygen exchange kinetics and the electronic conductivity were obtained from in-situ dc-conductivity relaxation experiments at 600-800 °C and 1×10-3≤pO2/bar≤0.1. Both LCF82 and PCF82 show exceptionally fast chemical surface exchange coefficients and chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen. The oxygen nonstochiometry of LCF82 and PCF82 was determined by precision thermogravimetry. A point defect model was used to calculate the thermodynamic factors of oxygen and to estimate self-diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on the crystal structure, oxygen vacancy formation as well as oxygen migration energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. Due to their favourable properties both LCF82 and PCF82 are of interest for applications in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes, solid oxide electrolyser cell anodes, oxygen separation membranes, catalysts, or electrochemical sensors.

  13. The electrode kinetics of the evolution and dissolution of oxygen at the urania-zirconia interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwal, S.P.S.; Bevan, D.J.M.; Bockris, J.O'M.

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the potential of urania-yttria fluorite-type solid solutions as electrodes for high-temperature electrolysis of steam, oxygen evolution and dissolution reactions have been studied at the (Usub(0.7)Ysub(0.3))Osub (2+x)/YSZ interface. A current-interruption technique was used to separate overpotential and resistive potential drop. In oxygen and air the overpotential-current curves obey the Tafel law, suggesting that a charge-transfer process is rate determining. Activation energies of 120 kJ mole -1 and 165 kJ mole -1 were obtained for the cathodic reaction in oxygen and air respectively. The capacitance obtained from galvanostatic transients varied with potential, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure. The average value of n, the number of electrons involved in the overall charge-transfer reaction, was determined to be 4.01 from reversible potential measurements. The overpotential losses are small for porous electrodes at high psub(O 2 ). A mechanism for the oxygen transfer reaction has been proposed and its limitations discussed. (author)

  14. Microsecond reaction kinetics and catalytic mechanism of bacterial cytochrome oxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulus, A.

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental biochemical research is of crucial importance for a complete and detailed
    understanding of what drives enzyme activity and how enzyme kinetic properties are
    optimized towards survival of the host organism. When cells fail to produce a fully functional
    enzyme, the organism’s

  15. Use of Competition Kinetics with Fast Reactions of Grignard Reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    2000-01-01

    small.This is concluded from experiments in which results obtained by competition kinetics are compared with results obtained directly by flow stream procedures. A clearer picture of the reactivity ratios is obtained when the highly reactive reagent is highly diluted with its competitor. A fast reagent...

  16. The effects of one-dimensional glide on the reaction kinetics of interstitial clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Golubov, S.I.

    2000-01-01

    is therefore 'mixed 1D/3D migration' along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments, The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation....... Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the analytical rate theory. The functional dependence of the sink strength on the size...

  17. Kinetic isotope effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of tritium-labelled D-galactosamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Korsakova, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary, secondary and intramolecular kinetic isotopic effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of D-galactosamine labelled by tritium in position 6, were measured. When comparing values of the effects with previously obtained results for similar reaction D-[6- 3 H]galactose, it was ascertained that the presence of aminogroup in galactopyranosyl mainly affects kinetics of substrate-ferment complex formation stage. The possibility to use kinetic isotope effects for increase in molar activity of D-galactosamine, labelled by tritium in position 6, is shown

  18. A Theoretical Analysis of the Reaction Between Ethyl and Molecular Oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, James A; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Robertson, Struan H

    2000-01-01

    Using a combination of electronic-structure theory, variational transition-state theory, and solutions to the time-dependent master equation, we have studied the kinetics of the reaction between ethyl...

  19. Features of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions with phase transformations on catalyst surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, A D; Krylov, O V

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of 41 bibliographic references to experiments on the adsorption of various gases (e.g., carbon monoxide, formic acid, ammonia, and oxygen) on metals (e.g., nickel, molybdenum, and platinum) and oxides covers observations of two-dimensional phases during adsorption; the kinetics of adsorption and catalysis associated with two-dimensional phase transitions; and several approximate models for describing the kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis which account for two-dimensional phase transformations on catalyst surfaces.

  20. Measuring oxygen surface exchange kinetics on mixed-conducting composites by electrical conductivity relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Bobing; Wang, Yunlong; Zhu, Zhuoying; Xia, Changrong; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen release kinetics of mixed-conducting Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6 d–Sm0.2Ce0.8O2 d (SFM–SDC) dualphase composites has been investigated, at 750 C, as a function of the SDC phase volume fraction using electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) under reducing atmospheres, extending our previous work on

  1. Kinetic modelling of reactions in heated disaccharide-casein systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, C.M.J.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The reactions occurring in disaccharide-casein reaction mixtures during heating at 120 degreesC and pH 6.8 were studied. The existence of two main degradation routes were established: (1) Isomerisation of the aldose sugars lactose and maltose in their ketose isomers lactulose and maltulose,

  2. Transport Properties of a Kinetic Model for Chemical Reactions without Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation for chemical reactions without energy barrier is considered here with the aim of evaluating the reaction rate and characterizing the transport coefficient of shear viscosity for the reactive system. The Chapman-Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to compute the chemical reaction effects, in a flow regime for which the reaction process is close to the final equilibrium state. Some numerical results are provided illustrating that the considered chemical reaction without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the reaction rate and on the transport coefficient of shear viscosity.

  3. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-07-01

    Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF.

  4. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  5. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  6. SABIO-RK: A data warehouse for biochemical reactions and their kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebs Olga

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology is an emerging field that aims at obtaining a system-level understanding of biological processes. The modelling and simulation of networks of biochemical reactions have great and promising application potential but require reliable kinetic data. In order to support the systems biology community with such data we have developed SABIO-RK (System for the Analysis of Biochemical Pathways - Reaction Kinetics, a curated database with information about biochemical reactions and their kinetic properties, which allows researchers to obtain and compare kinetic data and to integrate them into models of biochemical networks. SABIO-RK is freely available for academic use at http://sabio.villa-bosch.de/SABIORK/.

  7. Kinetics of subdiffusion-assisted reactions: non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shushin, A I

    2005-01-01

    Anomalous specific features of the kinetics of subdiffusion-assisted bimolecular reactions (time-dependence, dependence on parameters of systems, etc) are analysed in detail with the use of the non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation (SLE), which has been recently derived within the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) approach. In the CTRW approach, subdiffusive motion of particles is modelled by jumps whose onset probability distribution function is of a long-tailed form. The non-Markovian SLE allows for rigorous describing of some peculiarities of these reactions; for example, very slow long-time behaviour of the kinetics, non-analytical dependence of the reaction rate on the reactivity of particles, strong manifestation of fluctuation kinetics showing itself in very slowly decreasing behaviour of the kinetics at very long times, etc

  8. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K_C_A_T and K_C_A_T/K_M values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H_2O_2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H_2O_2 concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL"−"1 SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL"−"1 was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K_C_A_T) and catalytic efficiency (K_C_A_T/K_M) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  9. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  10. Investigations of oxygen reduction reactions in non-aqueous electrolytes and the lithium-air battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Laoire, Cormac Micheal

    Unlocking the true energy capabilities of the lithium metal negative electrode in a lithium battery has until now been limited by the low capacity intercalation and conversion reactions at the positive electrodes. This is overcome by removing these electrodes and allowing lithium to react directly with oxygen in the atmosphere forming the Li-air battery. Chapter 2 discusses the intimate role of electrolyte, in particular the role of ion conducting salts on the mechanism and kinetics of oxygen reduction in non-aqueous electrolytes designed for such applications and in determining the reversibility of the electrode reactions. Such fundamental understanding of this high energy density battery is crucial to harnessing its full energy potential. The kinetics and mechanisms of O2 reduction in solutions of hexafluorophosphate salts of the general formula X+ PF6-, where, X = tetra butyl ammonium (TBA), K, Na and Li, in acetonitrile have been studied on glassy carbon electrodes using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques. Our results show that cation choice strongly influences the reduction mechanism of O2. Electrochemical data supports the view that alkali metal oxides formed via electrochemical and chemical reactions passivate the electrode surface inhibiting the kinetics and reversibility of the processes. The O2 reduction mechanisms in the presence of the different cations have been supplemented by kinetic parameters determined from detailed analyses of the CV and RDE data. The organic solvent present in the Li+-conducting electrolyte has a major role on the reversibility of each of the O2 reduction products as found from the work discussed in the next chapter. A fundamental study of the influence of solvents on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in a variety of non-aqueous electrolytes was conducted in chapter 4. In this work special attention was paid to elucidate the mechanism of the oxygen electrode processes in the rechargeable Li

  11. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled and ballistically-controlled reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of diffusion-controlled two-species annihilation, A+B → O and single-species ballistically-controlled annihilation, A+A → O are investigated. For two-species annihilation, we describe the basic mechanism that leads to the formation of a coarsening mosaic of A- and B-domains. The implications of this picture on the distribution of reactants is discussed. For ballistic annihilation, dimensional analysis shows that the concentration and rms velocity decay as c∼t -α and v∼t -β , respectively, with α+β = 1 in any spatial dimension. Analysis of the Boltzmann equation for the evolution of the velocity distribution yields accurate predictions for the kinetics. New phenomena associated with discrete initial velocity distributions and with mixed ballistic and diffusive reactant motion are also discussed. (author)

  12. On the Mathematical Structure of Balanced Chemical Reaction Networks Governed by Mass Action Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, Arjan van der; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the interplay between graph theory, dynamics, and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics. For reaction networks possessing a thermodynamic equilibrium we derive a compact formulation exhibiting at the

  13. Kinetics of the Coupled Gas-Iron Reactions Involving Silicon and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetic study of coupled gas-iron reactions at 15600 has been carried out for the system involving liquid iron containing carbon and silicon and a gas phase consisting carbon monoxide, silicon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The coupled reactions are: (1) 200(g) = CO2 + C. (2) SiO (g) + CO (g) = Si ¸ CO (g). (3) SiO (g) + ...

  14. Microsecond time-scale kinetics of transient biochemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitic, S.; Strampraad, M.J.F.; Hagen, W.R.; de Vries, S.

    2017-01-01

    To afford mechanistic studies in enzyme kinetics and protein folding in the microsecond time domain we have developed a continuous-flow microsecond time-scale mixing instrument with an unprecedented dead-time of 3.8 ± 0.3 μs. The instrument employs a micro-mixer with a mixing time of 2.7 μs

  15. Investigation of the relevant kinetic processes in the initial stage of a double-arcing instability in oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, B.; Prevosto, L.; Chamorro, J. C.; Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H.

    2018-05-01

    A numerical investigation of the kinetic processes in the initial (nanosecond range) stage of the double-arcing instability was developed. The plasma-sheath boundary region of an oxygen-operated cutting torch was considered. The energy balance and chemistry processes in the discharge were described. It is shown that the double-arcing instability is a sudden transition from a diffuse (glow-like) discharge to a constricted (arc-like) discharge in the plasma-sheath boundary region arising from a field-emission instability. A critical electric field value of ˜107 V/m was found at the cathodic part of the nozzle wall under the conditions considered. The field-emission instability drives in turn a fast electronic-to-translational energy relaxation mechanism, giving rise to a very fast gas heating rate of at least ˜109 K/s, mainly due to reactions of preliminary dissociation of oxygen molecules via the highly excited electronic state O2(B3Σu-) populated by electron impact. It is expected that this fast oxygen heating rate further stimulates the discharge contraction through the thermal instability mechanism.

  16. Using ground reaction force to predict knee kinetic asymmetry following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, B; Butler, R J; Garrett, W E; Queen, R M

    2014-12-01

    Asymmetries in sagittal plane knee kinetics have been identified as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury. Clinical tools are needed to identify the asymmetries. This study examined the relationships between knee kinetic asymmetries and ground reaction force (GRF) asymmetries during athletic tasks in adolescent patients following ACL reconstruction (ACL-R). Kinematic and GRF data were collected during a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task for 23 patients. Asymmetry indices between the surgical and non-surgical limbs were calculated for GRF and knee kinetic variables. For the stop-jump task, knee kinetics asymmetry indices were correlated with all GRF asymmetry indices (P kinetic asymmetry indices were correlated with the peak propulsion vertical GRF and vertical GRF impulse asymmetry indices (P kinetic asymmetries and therefore may assist in optimizing rehabilitation outcomes and minimizing re-injury rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Temperature dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on Ru{sub x}Se{sub y}/C catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveratto, D.; Racz, A.; Savinova, E.R.; Stimming, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics E19, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The temperature dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on carbon-supported Ru{sub x}Se{sub y} catalysts is studied using a rotating disc electrode in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the temperature interval from 25 C to 65 C. When the absolute value of the overpotential is below ca. 0.65 V, the reaction is limited by a one-electron charge transfer step, where the transfer coefficient is independent of the temperature and equal to 0.44. The apparent activation enthalpy at zero overpotential is 0.49 eV and the pre-exponential factor is independent of the temperature. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bioactivation via S-Oxygenation of Anti-Tubercular Agent Ethionamide by Peracetic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Logan, Isabelle E; Eskew, Matthew W; Omondi, Benard; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-10-11

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of the important antitubercular agent, ethionamide, ETA (2-ethylthioisonicotinamide), by peracetic acid (PAA) have been studied. It is effectively a biphasic reaction with an initial rapid first phase of the reaction which is over in about 5 s and a second slower phase of the reaction which can run up to an hour. The first phase involves the addition of a single oxygen atom to ethionamide to form the S-oxide. The second phase involves further oxidation of the S-oxide to desulfurization of ETA to give 2-ethylisonicotinamide. In contrast to the stability of most organosulfur compounds, the S-oxide of ETA is relatively stable and can be isolated. In conditions of excess ETA, the stoichiometry of the reaction was strictly 1:1: CH 3 CO 3 H + Et(C 5 H 4 )C(═S)NH 2 → CH 3 CO 2 H + Et(C 5 H 4 )C(═NH)SOH. In this oxidation, it was apparent that only the sulfur center was the reactive site. Though ETA was ultimately desulfurized, only the S-oxide was stable. Electrospray ionization (ESI) spectral analysis did not detect any substantial formation of the sulfinic and sulfonic acids. This suggests that cleavage of the carbon-sulfur bond occurs at the sulfenic acid stage, resulting in the formation of an unstable sulfur species that can react further to form more stable sulfur species. In this oxidation, no sulfate formation was observed. ESI spectral analysis data showed a final sulfur species in the form of a dimeric sulfur monoxide species, H 3 S 2 O 2 . We derived a bimolecular rate constant for the formation of the S-oxide of (3.08 ± 0.72) × 10 2 M -1 s -1 . Oxidation of the S-oxide further to give 2-ethylisonicotinamide gave zero order kinetics.

  19. Complex Reaction Kinetics in Chemistry: A Unified Picture Suggested by Mechanics in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Agliari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex biochemical pathways can be reduced to chains of elementary reactions, which can be described in terms of chemical kinetics. Among the elementary reactions so far extensively investigated, we recall the Michaelis-Menten and the Hill positive-cooperative kinetics, which apply to molecular binding and are characterized by the absence and the presence, respectively, of cooperative interactions between binding sites. However, there is evidence of reactions displaying a more complex pattern: these follow the positive-cooperative scenario at small substrate concentration, yet negative-cooperative effects emerge as the substrate concentration is increased. Here, we analyze the formal analogy between the mathematical backbone of (classical reaction kinetics in Chemistry and that of (classical mechanics in Physics. We first show that standard cooperative kinetics can be framed in terms of classical mechanics, where the emerging phenomenology can be obtained by applying the principle of least action of classical mechanics. Further, since the saturation function plays in Chemistry the same role played by velocity in Physics, we show that a relativistic scaffold naturally accounts for the kinetics of the above-mentioned complex reactions. The proposed formalism yields to a unique, consistent picture for cooperative-like reactions and to a stronger mathematical control.

  20. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  1. Mechanistic interpretation of glass reaction: Input to kinetic model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Bradley, J.P.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-05-01

    Actinide-doped SRL 165 type glass was reacted in J-13 groundwater at 90 degree C for times up to 278 days. The reaction was characterized by both solution and solid analyses. The glass was seen to react nonstoichiometrically with preferred leaching of alkali metals and boron. High resolution electron microscopy revealed the formation of a complex layer structure which became separated from the underlying glass as the reaction progressed. The formation of the layer and its effect on continued glass reaction are discussed with respect to the current model for glass reaction used in the EQ3/6 computer simulation. It is concluded that the layer formed after 278 days is not protective and may eventually become fractured and generate particulates that may be transported by liquid water. 5 refs., 5 figs. , 3 tabs

  2. Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Reaction from Catalytic and Kinetic Perspectives

    KAUST Repository

    Hisatomi, Takashi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Some particulate semiconductors loaded with nanoparticulate catalysts exhibit photocatalytic activity for the water-splitting reaction. The photocatalysis is distinct from the thermal catalysis because photocatalysis involves photophysical

  3. KEMOD: A mixed chemical kinetic and equilibrium model of aqueous and solid phase geochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, G.T.; Iskra, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the development of a mixed chemical Kinetic and Equilibrium MODel in which every chemical species can be treated either as a equilibrium-controlled or as a kinetically controlled reaction. The reaction processes include aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction, and acid/base reactions. Further development and modification of KEMOD can be made in: (1) inclusion of species switching solution algorithms, (2) incorporation of the effect of temperature and pressure on equilibrium and rate constants, and (3) extension to high ionic strength

  4. Kinetics based reaction optimization of enzyme catalysed reduction of formaldehyde to methanol with synchronous cofactor regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marpani, Fauziah Binti; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    regeneration of the reducing equivalents during reaction is required. Herein, we report the optimization of the enzymatic conversion of formaldehyde (CHOH) to CH3 OH by alcohol dehydrogenase, the final step of the enzymatic redox reaction of CO2 to CH3 OH, with kinetically synchronous enzymatic cofactor...... regeneration using either glucose dehydrogenase (System I) or xylose dehydrogenase (System II). A mathematical model of the enzyme kinetics was employed to identify the best reaction set-up for attaining optimal cofactor recycling rate and enzyme utilization efficiency. Targeted process optimization...... experiments were conducted to verify the kinetically modelled results. Repetitive reaction cycles were shown to enhance the yield of CH3 OH, increase the total turnover number (TTN) and the biocatalytic productivity rate (BPR) value for both system I and II whilst minimizing the exposure of the enzymes...

  5. Kinetics and optimization on discoloration of dyeing wastewater by schorl-catalyzed fenton-like reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Huan-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics and optimization on the discoloration of an active commercial dye, Argazol Blue BFBR (ABB by heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction catalyzed by natural schorl were investigated in this study. Kinetic investigations revealed that the first-order kinetic model was more favorable to describe the discoloration of ABB at different reaction conditions than the second-order and Behnajady-Modirshahla-Ghanbery models. The relationship between the reaction rate constant k and reaction temperature T followed the Arrhenius equation, with the apparent activation energy Ea of 51.31kJ•mol-1. The central composite design under the response surface methodology was employed for the experimental design and optimization of the ABB discoloration process. The significance of a second order polynomial model for predicting the optimal values of ABB discoloration was evaluated by the analysis of variance and 3D response surface plots for the interactions between two variables were constructed. Then, the optimum conditions were determined.

  6. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-04-26

    With the increasing production of natural gas as a result of the advancement in the technology, methane conversion to more valuable products has become a must. One of the most attractive processes which allow the utilization of the world’s most abundant hydrocarbon is the oxidative coupling. The main advantage of this process is the ability of converting methane into higher paraffins and olefins (primarily C2) in a direct way using a single reactor. Nevertheless, low C2+ yields have prevented the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized in improving the catalysts’ performance. The reaction involves the formation of methyl radicals that undergo gas-phase radical reactions. CH4 activation is believed to be done the surface oxygen species. However, recent studies showed that, in addition to the surface oxygen mediated pathway, an OH radical mediated pathway have a large contribution on the CH4 activation. The experiments of Li/MgO, Sr/La2O3 and NaWO4/SiO2 catalysts revealed variation of behavior in activity and selectivity. In addition, water effect analysis showed that Li/MgO deactivate at the presence of water due to sintering phenomena and the loss of active sites. On the other hand, negative effect on the C2 yield and CH4 conversion rate was observed with Sr/La2O3 with increasing the water partial pressure. Na2WO4/SiO2 showed a positive behavior with water in terms of CH4 conversion and C2 yield. In addition, the increment in CH4 conversion rate was found to be proportional with PO2 ¼ PH2O ½ which is consistent with the formation of OH radicals and the OH-mediated pathway. Experiments of using ring-dye laser, which is used to detect OH in combustion experiments, were tried in order to detect OH radicals in the gas-phase of the catalyst. Nevertheless

  7. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  8. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of Cr2O3 in oxygen from 1000 to 1300 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at a pressure of 0.115 Torr for temperatures from 1000 to 1300 C. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique, and these rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporization reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data using boundary-layer theory.

  9. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of chromium (III) oxide in oxygen from 1270 to 1570 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at 0.115 torr for temperatures from 1270 to 1570 K. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique. These rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporation reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data by using boundary layer theory.

  10. Ab initio chemical kinetics for the HCCO + OH reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Tam V.-T.; Raghunath, P.; Le, Xuan T.; Huynh, Lam K.; Nam, Pham-Cam; Lin, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism for the reaction of HCCO and OH has been investigated at different high-levels of theory. The reaction was found to occur on singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces with multiple accessible paths. Rate constants predicted by variational RRKM/ME calculations show that the reaction on both surfaces occurs primarily by barrierless OH attack at both C atoms producing excited intermediates which fragment to produce predominantly CO and 1,3HCOH with kS = 3.12 × 10-8T-0.59exp[-73.0/T] and kT = 6.29 × 10-11T0.13exp[108/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at T = 300-2000 K, independent of pressure at P < 76 000 Torr.

  11. The role of chain carriers in fusion reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Krenciglowa, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    The role of chain carriers as contributors to multiplicative closed cycles in advanced fusion fuels is examined. Emphasis is placed on rate processes which can be used to characterize critical/supercritical/subcritical tendencies of arbitrary closed fusion cycles. Temporal trajectories for the chain carriers which describe both increasing and decreasing multiplicative processes have been found to exist and identified according to their fusion fuel cycle characteristics. Practical criteria to ensure the attainment of steady-state fusion reaction processes have been formulated in terms of fusion reaction rate relationships. (author)

  12. A study of butyl acetate synthesis. 4-reaction kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño; Fernando Leiva Lenis; Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso; Gerardo Rodríguez Niño; Luis María Carballo Suárez

    2006-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying liquid-phase acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm =0.76 Bar),using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431) as catalyst. The effect of the absence of internal and external mass transport on catalyst particles was established in the research conditions used here. A set of assays to determine the effect of catalyst load (0.5%, 1%, 2% w/w) temperature (73°C, 80°C, 87°C) and molar ratio (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 acid/alcohol) on reaction rate was carrie...

  13. High temperature mechanisms and kinetics of SiC oxidation under low partial pressures of oxygen: application to the fuel cladding of gas fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hun, N.

    2011-01-01

    Gas Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the different Generation IV concepts under investigation for energy production. SiC/SiC composites are candidates of primary interest for a GFR fuel cladding use, thanks to good corrosion resistance among other properties. The mechanisms and kinetics of SiC oxidation under operating conditions have to be identified and quantified as the corrosion can decrease the mechanical properties of the composite. An experimental device has been developed to study the oxidation of silicon carbide under high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure. The results pointed out that not only parabolic oxidation, but also interfacial reactions and volatilization occur under such conditions. After determining the kinetics of each mechanism, as functions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature, the data are used for the modeling of the composites oxidation. The model will be used to predict the lifetime of the composite in operating conditions. (author) [fr

  14. Kinetics of the decomposition reaction of phosphorite concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Run

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apatite is the raw material, which is mainly used in phosphate fertilizer, and part are used in yellow phosphorus, red phosphorus, and phosphoric acid in the industry. With the decrease of the high grade phosphorite lump, the agglomeration process is necessary for the phosphorite concentrate after beneficiation process. The decomposition behavior and the phase transformation are of vital importance for the agglomeration process of phosphorite. In this study, the thermal kinetic analysis method was used to study the kinetics of the decomposition of phosphorite concentrate. The phosphorite concentrate was heated under various heating rate, and the phases in the sample heated were examined by the X-ray diffraction method. It was found that the main phases in the phosphorite are fluorapatiteCa5(PO43F, quartz SiO2,and dolomite CaMg(CO32.The endothermic DSC peak corresponding to the mass loss caused by the decomposition of dolomite covers from 600°C to 850°C. The activation energy of the decomposition of dolomite, which increases with the increase in the extent of conversion, is about 71.6~123.6kJ/mol. The mechanism equation for the decomposition of dolomite agrees with the Valensi equation and G-B equation.

  15. Effect of cathode porosity on the Lithium-air cell oxygen reduction reaction – A rotating ring-disk electrode investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeongwook; Sankarasubramanian, Shrihari; Singh, Nikhilendra; Mizuno, Fuminori; Takechi, Kensuke; Prakash, Jai

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the practical air cathode in a Lithium-air cell, which is conventionally composed of porous carbon with or without catalysts supported on it, was investigated. The mechanism and kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was studied on a porous carbon electrode in an oxygen saturated solution of 0.1 M Lithium bis-trifluoromethanesulfonimide (LiTFSI) in Dimethoxyethane (DME) using cyclic voltammetery (CV) and the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) technique. The oxygen reduction and evolution reactions were found to occur at similar potentials to those observed on a smooth, planar glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The effect of porosity and the resultant increase in surface area were readily observed in the increase in the transient time required for the intermediates to reach the ring and the much larger disk currents (compared to smooth, planar GC) recorded respectively. The RRDE data was analyzed using a kinetic model previously developed by us and the rate constants for the elementary reactions were calculated. The rates constant for the electrochemical reactions were found to be similar in magnitude to the rate constants calculated for smooth GC disks. The porosity of the electrode was found to decrease the rate of desorption of the intermediate and the product and delay their diffusion by shifting it from a Fickian regime in the electrolyte bulk to the Knudsen regime in the film pores. Thus, it is shown that the effect of the electrode porosity on the kinetics of the ORR is physical rather than electrochemical.

  16. Kinetics Analysis of Synthesis Reaction of Struvite With Air-Flow Continous Vertical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edahwati, L.; Sutiyono, S.; Muryanto, S.; Jamari, J.; Bayuseno, dan A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Kinetics reaction is a knowledge about a rate of chemical reaction. The differential of the reaction rate can be determined from the reactant material or the formed material. The reaction mechanism of a reactor may include a stage of reaction occurring sequentially during the process of converting the reactants into products. In the determination of reaction kinetics, the order of reaction and the rate constant reaction must be recognized. This study was carried out using air as a stirrer as a medium in the vertical reactor for crystallization of struvite. Stirring is one of the important aspects in struvite crystallization process. Struvite crystals or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrates (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) is commonly formed in reversible reactions and can be generated as an orthorhombic crystal. Air is selected as a stirrer on the existing flow pattern in the reactor determining the reaction kinetics of the crystal from the solution. The experimental study was conducted by mixing an equimolar solution of 0.03 M NH4OH, MgCl2 and H3PO4 with a ratio of 1: 1: 1. The crystallization process of the mixed solution was observed in an inside reactor at the flow rate ranges of 16-38 ml/min and the temperature of 30°C was selected in the study. The air inlet rate was kept constant at 0.25 liters/min. The pH solution was adjusted to be 8, 9 and 10 by dropping wisely of 1 N KOH solution. The crystallization kinetics was examined until the steady state of the reaction was reached. The precipitates were filtered and dried at a temperature for subsequent material characterization, including Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and XRD (X-Ray diffraction) method. The results show that higher flow rate leads to less mass of struvite.

  17. The kinetics of substitution reaction of oxydiacetate and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molar ratio 1:1 and the ternary complex Cu(R)B were recorded to confirm that ... tion, the values of the rate constants were determined. Figure 2. .... Table 4. The free enthalpy of activation values for the substitution reaction of CuODA with bipy.

  18. Reaction mechanism of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons by the crossed molecular beams method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Baseman, R.J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  19. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  20. Computational screening of doped αMnO2 catalystsfor the oxygen evolution reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Hansen, Heine Anton; Vegge, Tejs

    2018-01-01

    Minimizing energy and materials costs for driving the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is paramount for the commercialization of water electrolysis cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Using density functional theory calculations, we analyze the structural stability, catalytic activity...

  1. Kinetics of thermal decomposition and kinetics of substitution reaction of nano uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Zeinali, A.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 12 (2014), s. 718-729 ISSN 0538-8066 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranyl * Schiff base * kinetics * anticancer activity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.517, year: 2014

  2. Temperature sensitivity of the oxygenation reaction of stripped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -operativity (n) at all three experimental temperatures compared to L. capensis. The heat of oxygenation (",H) between 8"C (pH 7,63) and. 23"C (pH 7,49) calculated for L capensis haemoglobin (-56,3 kJ.mol ') exceeded that of C. gariepinus ...

  3. OXYGEN 18 EXCHANGE REACTIONS OF ALDEHYDES AND KETONES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrn, Marianne; Calvin, Melvin

    1965-12-01

    Using infra-red spectroscopy, the equilibrium exchange times have been determined for a series of ketones, aromatic aldehydes, and {beta}-ketoesters reacting with oxygen 18 enriched water. These exchange times have been evaluated in terms of steric and electronic considerations, and applied to a discussion of the exchange times of chlorophylls a and b and chlorophyll derivatives.

  4. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  5. Study of kinetics and mechanism of diazo compound reactions using nuclear chemical polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gragerov, I.P.; Levit, A.F.; Kiprianova, L.A.; Buchachenko, A.L.; Sterleva, T.G.

    1975-01-01

    It has been established that at the rate-determining steps of the radical reactions in which aniline interacts with isoamyl nitrite and substituted diazo salts interact with sodium methylate, tertiary fatty amines, or phosphinic acid, no transfer of a single electron occurs. The processes of single electron transfer do not seem to play a decisive role in the kinetics of most transformations of diazo compounds. Chemical nuclear polarization is shown to be suitable for kinetic studies of fast radical processes

  6. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, Y.

    1955-06-01

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [fr

  7. An investigation of the general regularity of size dependence of reaction kinetics of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Zixiang; Duan, Huijuan; Xue, Yongqiang; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    In the processes of preparation and application of nanomaterials, the chemical reactions of nanoparticles are often involved, and the size of nanoparticles has dramatic influence on the reaction kinetics. Nevertheless, there are many conflicts on regularities of size dependence of reaction kinetic parameters, and these conflicts have not been explained so far. In this paper, taking the reaction of nano-ZnO (average diameter is from 20.96 to 53.31 nm) with acrylic acid solution as a system, the influence regularities of the particle size on the kinetic parameters were researched. The regularities were consistent with that in most literatures, but inconsistent with that in a few of literatures, the reasons for the conflicts were interpreted. The reasons can be attributed to two factors: one is improper data processing for fewer data points, and the other is the difference between solid particles and porous particles. A general regularity of the size dependence of reaction kinetics for solid particles was obtained. The regularity shows that with the size of nanoparticles decreasing, the rate constant and the reaction order increase, while the apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor decrease; and the relationships of the logarithm of rate constant, the logarithm of pre-exponential factor, and the apparent activation energy to the reciprocal of the particle size are linear, respectively

  8. Quantitative analysis of oxygen depth distribution by means of deuteron reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyumin, A.N.; Eremin, V.K.; Konnikov, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Experimentally are investigated and realized possibilities for using the reaction for quantitative determination of the depth profiles of the oxygen distribution in HTSC structures in layers up to 10 4 A. It is concluded that in the near-surface layers when profiling the oxygen content is achieved the spatial resolution of 150 A

  9. Optimization and kinetic studies of sea mango (Cerbera odollam) oil for biodiesel production via supercritical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Gaik Tin; Ooi, San Nee; Tan, Kok Tat; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sea mango oil as feedstock for biodiesel via non-catalytic supercritical reaction. • Extracted sea mango oil with high FFA could produce high yield of FAME. • Employment of Response Surface Methodology for optimization of FAME. • Kinetic study for reversible transesterification and esterification reactions. - Abstract: Sea mango (Cerbera odollam) oil, which is rich in free fatty acids, was utilized to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) via supercritical transesterification reaction. Sea mango oil was extracted from seeds and was subsequently reacted with methanol in a batch-type supercritical reactor. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis was used to optimize important parameters, including reaction temperature, reaction time and the molar ratio of methanol to oil. The optimum conditions were found as 380 °C, 40 min and 45:1 mol/mol, respectively, to achieve 78% biodiesel content. The first kinetic modelling of FAME production from sea mango oil incorporating reversible transesterification and reversible esterification was verified simultaneously. The kinetic parameters, including reaction rate constants, k, the pre-exponential constant, A, and the activation energy, Ea, for transesterification and esterification were determined using an ordinary differential equation (ODE45) solver. The highest activation energy of 40 kJ/mol and the lowest reaction rate constant of 2.50 × 10 −5 dm 3 /mol s verified that the first stepwise reaction of TG to produce DG was the rate-limiting step

  10. Multiresponse kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation in a heated glucose/wheat flour system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-11-15

    The study describes the kinetics of the formation and degradation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in glucose/wheat flour system heated under low moisture conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, individual free amino acids, lysine and arginine residues, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl concentrations were determined to form a multiresponse kinetic model for isomerisation and degradation reactions of glucose. Degradation of Amadori product mainly produced 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 3-deoxyglucosone proceeded directly from glucose and also Amadori product degradation. Glyoxal formation was predominant from glucosone while methylglyoxal and diacetyl originated from 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from fructose was found to be a key step. Multi-response kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation simultaneously indicated quantitatively predominant parallel and consecutive pathways and rate limiting steps by estimating the reaction rate constants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetic parameters of hydroprocessing reactions in a flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raychaudhuri, U.; Banerjee, T.S.; Ghar, R.N. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India))

    1994-01-01

    The change in distillation properties of a blend of light and heavy distillates over a commercial hydrotreating catalyst was studied using a small packed bed reactor. The results were interpreted assuming a pseudo-component model that took into account the physical and chemical complexity of the system. A first order series-parallel reaction mechanism was found to be valid for the operating conditions involved. Pore diffusion effects were also taken into consideration. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benchmarking heterogeneous electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Charles C L; Jung, Suho; Peters, Jonas C; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2013-11-13

    Objective evaluation of the activity of electrocatalysts for water oxidation is of fundamental importance for the development of promising energy conversion technologies including integrated solar water-splitting devices, water electrolyzers, and Li-air batteries. However, current methods employed to evaluate oxygen-evolving catalysts are not standardized, making it difficult to compare the activity and stability of these materials. We report a protocol for evaluating the activity, stability, and Faradaic efficiency of electrodeposited oxygen-evolving electrocatalysts. In particular, we focus on methods for determining electrochemically active surface area and measuring electrocatalytic activity and stability under conditions relevant to an integrated solar water-splitting device. Our primary figure of merit is the overpotential required to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) per geometric area, approximately the current density expected for a 10% efficient solar-to-fuels conversion device. Utilizing the aforementioned surface area measurements, one can determine electrocatalyst turnover frequencies. The reported protocol was used to examine the oxygen-evolution activity of the following systems in acidic and alkaline solutions: CoO(x), CoPi, CoFeO(x), NiO(x), NiCeO(x), NiCoO(x), NiCuO(x), NiFeO(x), and NiLaO(x). The oxygen-evolving activity of an electrodeposited IrO(x) catalyst was also investigated for comparison. Two general observations are made from comparing the catalytic performance of the OER catalysts investigated: (1) in alkaline solution, every non-noble metal system achieved 10 mA cm(-2) current densities at similar operating overpotentials between 0.35 and 0.43 V, and (2) every system but IrO(x) was unstable under oxidative conditions in acidic solutions.

  14. Oxygen dependency of neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix differs from abiotic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizing microorganisms are found in many natural environments. It has been hypothesized that, at low oxygen concentrations, microbial iron oxidation is favored over abiotic oxidation. Here, we compare the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation to oxidation in the presence of

  15. Factors determining the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2004-05-01

    Using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously [Korzeniewski and Mazat (1996) Biochem. J. 319, 143-148; Korzeniewski and Zoladz (2001) Biophys. Chem. 92, 17-34], we analyse the effect of several factors on the oxygen-uptake kinetics, especially on the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) and half-transition time t(1/2), at the onset of exercise in skeletal muscles. Computer simulations demonstrate that an increase in the total creatine pool [PCr+/-Cr] (where Cr stands for creatine and PCr for phosphocreatine) and in glycolytic ATP supply lengthen the half-transition time, whereas increase in mitochondrial content, in parallel activation of ATP supply and ATP usage, in oxygen concentration, in proton leak, in resting energy demand, in resting cytosolic pH and in initial alkalization decrease this parameter. Theoretical studies show that a decrease in the activity of creatine kinase (CK) [displacement of this enzyme from equilibrium during on-transient (rest-to-work transition)] accelerates the first stage of the VO2 on-transient, but slows down the second stage of this transient. It is also demonstrated that a prior exercise terminated a few minutes before the principal exercise shortens the transition time. Finally, it is shown that at a given ATP demand, and under conditions where CK works near the thermodynamic equilibrium, the half-transition time of VO2 kinetics is determined by the amount of PCr that has to be transformed into Cr during rest-to-work transition; therefore any factor that diminishes the difference in [PCr] between rest and work at a given energy demand will accelerate the VO2 on-kinetics. Our conclusions agree with the general idea formulated originally by Easterby [(1981) Biochem. J. 199, 155-161] that changes in metabolite concentrations determine the transition times between different steady states in metabolic systems.

  16. 1D to 3D diffusion-reaction kinetics of defects in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Heinisch, H.L.; Barashev, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Microstructural features evolving in crystalline solids from diffusion-reaction kinetics of mobile components depend crucially on the dimension of the underlying diffusion process which is commonly assumed to be three-dimensional (3D). In metals, irradiation-induced displacement cascades produce...... clusters of self-interstitials performing 1D diffusion. Changes between equivalent 1D diffusion paths and transversal diffusion result in diffusion-reaction kinetics between one and three dimensions. An analytical approach suggests a single-variable function (master curve) interpolating between the 1D...

  17. Configuration of a pulse radiolysis system for the study of gas-phase reactions and kinetic investigations of the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methyl and ethyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerstroem, K.

    1993-01-01

    The work that is presented in this thesis deals with the assembling and testing of a pulse radiolysis system for kinetic studies of gas-phase reactions as well as with the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methyl and ethyl radicals. These radicals are very important as these are formed at an early stage in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The two studied reactions are key reactions in those processes. (6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  18. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  19. Effect of pH and Water Structure on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briega-Martos, Valentín; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at different pH values has been studied at platinum single crystal electrodes using the hanging meniscus rotating disk electrode (HMRDE) configuration. The use of NaF/HClO 4 mixtures allows investigating the reaction up to pH = 6 in solutions with enough buffering capacity and in the absence of anion specific adsorption. The analysis of the currents shows that the kinetic current density measured at 0.85 V for the Pt(111) electrode follows a volcano curve with the maximum located around pH = 9. This maximum activity for pH = 9 can be related to the effects of the electrode charge and/or water structure in the ORR. On the other hand, the catalytic activity for the other basal planes shows a monotonic behavior with a small dependence of the activity with pH. For stepped surfaces with (111) terraces, the behavior with pH changes gets closer to that of the Pt(111) surface as the terrace length increases. Additionally, the ORR curves show a dependence of the limiting diffusion current with pH. It is observed that the limiting current density diminishes as the pH increases in a potential region where hydrogen peroxide is readily reduced. These results suggest the existence of a bifurcation point in the mechanism previous to peroxide formation, in which OOH • is proposed as the bifurcation intermediate. The reduction of OOH • requires proton addition and would be more difficult at neutral pH values, justifying the diminution of the limiting currents.

  20. Influence of Micropore and Mesoporous in Activated Carbon Air-cathode Catalysts on Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Microbial Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Kexun; Ge, Baochao; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Ziqi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, carbon samples with different micropore and mesoporous structures are prepared as air-cathode catalyst layer to explore the role of pore structure on oxygen reduction reaction. The results of linear sweep voltammetry and power density show that the commercially-produced activated carbon (CAC) has the best electrochemical performance, and carbon samples with only micropore or mesoporous show lower performance than CAC. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis confirm that CAC has highest surface area (1616 m 2 g −1 ) and a certain amount of micropore and mesoporous. According to Tafel plot and rotating disk electrode, CAC behaves the highest kinetic activity and electron transfer number, leading to the improvement of oxygen reduction reaction. The air permeability test proves that mesoporous structure enhance oxygen permeation. Carbon materials are also analyzed by In situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and H 2 temperature programmed reduction, which indicate that micropore provide active sites for catalysis. In a word, micropore and mesoporous together would improve the electrochemical performance of carbon materials.

  1. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ? 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched cont...

  2. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of Bromate-Bromide Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Côrtes Carlos Eduardo S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bromate-bromide reaction was investigated in an acidity range not studied yet. The reaction was followed at the Br2/Br3- isosbestic point (lambda = 446 nm. It was observed a first-order behavior for bromate and bromide ions and a second-order behavior for H+ ion that results in the rate law nu = k[BrO3-][Br- ][H+]². This rate law suggests a mechanism involving two successive protonation of bromate followed by the interaction of the intermediate species H2BrO3+ with bromide. These results disagree with the obtained by other authors who observed a second-order behavior for the bromide and first-order for H+, and have proposed intermediate species like H2Br2O3 and HBr2O3-. The second-order for [H+] observed in the range 0.005 <= [H+] <= 2.77 mol L-1 sets down that the pKa of bromic acid, HBrO3, must be lower than -0.5 (T = 25 °C, different from all other values for this pKa proposed in the literature.

  3. Self-triggering reaction kinetics between nitrates and aluminium powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demichela, Micaela

    2007-01-01

    During the night between the 19 and 20 September 2003, a loud explosion occurred at about 3 km from the town of Carignano that was clearly heard at a distance of some tens of kilometres. The explosion almost completely destroyed most of the laboratories of the Panzera Company that were used for the production of fireworks. The results of the research activities that were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) on the same raw materials that made up the pyrotechnical mixture that exploded are reported in this paper. This activity was carried out to identify the dynamics of the accident. It proved possible to verify how the event was produced because of a slow exothermic reaction which, after about 8 h, caused the self-triggering of 120 kg of finished product. The detonation can therefore be put down to a runaway reaction in the solid phase, whose primogenial causes can be attributed to a still craftsman type production system, not conformed to the rigorous controls and inspections as those required by a safety management system for major risk plants, as the Panzera Company was

  4. Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation into Higher Hydrocarbons and Oxygenates: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Bounds and Progress with Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo

    2017-03-22

    Under specific scenarios, the catalytic hydrogenation of CO 2 with renewable hydrogen is considered a suitable route for the chemical recycling of this environmentally harmful and chemically refractory molecule into added-value energy carriers and chemicals. The hydrogenation of CO 2 into C 1 products, such as methane and methanol, can be achieved with high selectivities towards the corresponding hydrogenation product. More challenging, however, is the selective production of high (C 2+ ) hydrocarbons and oxygenates. These products are desired as energy vectors, owing to their higher volumetric energy density and compatibility with the current fuel infrastructure than C 1 compounds, and as entry platform chemicals for existing value chains. The major challenge is the optimal integration of catalytic functionalities for both reductive and chain-growth steps. This Minireview summarizes the progress achieved towards the hydrogenation of CO 2 to C 2+ hydrocarbons and oxygenates, covering both solid and molecular catalysts and processes in the gas and liquid phases. Mechanistic aspects are discussed with emphasis on intrinsic kinetic limitations, in some cases inevitably linked to thermodynamic bounds through the concomitant reverse water-gas-shift reaction, which should be considered in the development of advanced catalysts and processes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Comparative study on ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by application of tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes 131 I and 82 Br were used to trace the ion-isotopic exchange reactions using industrial grade ion exchange resins Amberlite IRA-400. The experiments were performed to understand the effect of temperature and concentration of ionic solution on kinetics of exchange reactions. Both the exchange reactions were greatly influenced by rise in temperature, which result in higher percentage of ions exchanged. For bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions, the calculated values of specific reaction rate/min -1 , and amount of ions exchanged/mmol were obtained higher than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reactions under identical experimental conditions. The observed variation in the results for two ion-isotopic exchange reactions was due to the difference in the ionic size of bromide and iodide ions. (orig.)

  6. Communications: Elementary oxygen electrode reactions in the aprotic Li-air battery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Blomquist, Jakob; Datta, Soumendu

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the electrochemical reactions at the oxygen electrode of an aprotic Li-air battery. Using density functional theory to estimate the free energy of intermediates during the discharge and charge of the battery, we introduce a reaction free energy diagram and identify possible origins...

  7. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  8. A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study between tetrahydrozoline and naphazoline toward photogenerated reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Susana; García, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the vitamin B2 (riboflavin [Rf])-sensitized photo-oxidation of the imidazoline derivates (IDs) naphazoline (NPZ) and tetrahydrozoline (THZ) were investigated in aqueous solution. The process appears as important on biomedical grounds, considering that the vitamin is endogenously present in humans, and IDs are active components of ocular medicaments of topical application. Under aerobic visible light irradiation, a complex picture of competitive interactions between sensitizer, substrates and dissolved oxygen takes place: the singlet and triplet ((3)Rf*) excited states of Rf are quenched by the IDs: with IDs concentrations ca. 5.0 mM and 0.02 mM Rf, (3)Rf* is quenched by IDs, in a competitive fashion with dissolved ground state oxygen. Additionally, the reactive oxygen species: O(2)((1)Delta(g)), O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2), generated from (3)Rf* and Rf(*-), were detected with the employment of time-resolved methods or specific scavengers. Oxygen uptake experiments indicate that, for NPZ, only H(2)O(2) was involved in the photo-oxidation. In the case of THZ, O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2) were detected, whereas only HO(*) was unambiguously identified as THZ oxidative agents. Upon direct UV light irradiation NPZ and THZ generate O(2)((1)Delta(g)), with quantum yields of 0.2 (literature value, employed as a reference) and 0.08, respectively, in acetonitrile.

  9. Factors Controlling the Redox Activity of Oxygen in Perovskites: From Theory to Application for Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzhen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Triggering the redox reaction of oxygens has become essential for the development of (electro catalytic properties of transition metal oxides, especially for perovskite materials that have been envisaged for a variety of applications such as the oxygen evolution or reduction reactions (OER and ORR, respectively, CO or hydrocarbons oxidation, NO reduction and others. While the formation of ligand hole for perovskites is well-known for solid state physicists and/or chemists and has been widely studied for the understanding of important electronic properties such as superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, magnetoresistance, ferroelectrics, redox properties etc., oxygen electrocatalysis in aqueous media at low temperature barely scratches the surface of the concept of oxygen ions oxidation. In this review, we briefly explain the electronic structure of perovskite materials and go through a few important parameters such as the ionization potential, Madelung potential, and charge transfer energy that govern the oxidation of oxygen ions. We then describe the surface reactivity that can be induced by the redox activity of the oxygen network and the formation of highly reactive surface oxygen species before describing their participation in catalytic reactions and providing mechanistic insights and strategies for designing new (electro catalysts. Finally, we give a brief overview of the different techniques that can be employed to detect the formation of such transient oxygen species.

  10. The effect of temperature and pressure on the oxygen reduction reactions in polyelectrolyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdcroft, S.; Abdou, M.S.; Beattie, P.; Basura, V. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The effect of temperature and pressure on the oxygen reduction reaction in polyelectrolyte membranes was described. Polyelectrolytes chosen for the experiment differed in composition, weight and flexibility of the polymer chains. The study was conducted in a solid state electrochemical cell at temperatures between 30 and 95 degrees C and in the pressure range of 1 to 5 atm. The solubility of oxygen in these membranes was found to follow Henry`s Law, while the diffusion coefficient decreased with pressure. The effect of temperature on the solubility of oxygen and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the membranes was similar to that observed in solution electrolytes. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Conductometric Studies Of Kinetics Of Ionic Reaction Between Ag And Cl- In Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezwan Miah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present report conductometric studies on the kinetic of formation of AgCl by ionic reaction between Ag and Clamp61485 in aqueous solution have been presented. The order of the mentioned reaction was determined by a new conductometric approach using half-life method. The obtained result showed that the reaction follows a second-order kinetics. The second-order rate constant of the reaction was obtained conductometrically using different initial concentrations of the reactants in the range of 2.5-5.0 mM. The average value of the rate constant was obtained as 20.648 L molamp614851 samp614851 at 25 amp61616C.

  12. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  13. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with tert-butoxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Džeba, Iva; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Mihaljević, Branka

    2012-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of t-butoxyl radicals with resveratrol was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The rate constant was determined by measuring the phenoxyl radical formation rate at 390 nm as function of resveratrol concentration in acetonitrile. The rate constant was determined to be 6.5×10 8 M −1 s −1 . This high value indicates the high reactivity consistent with the strong antioxidant activity of resveratrol. - Highlights: ► tert-butoxyl radicals were generated directly using laser flash photolysis. ► Rate constant was determined by the phenoxyl radical formation rate in acetonitrile. ► Rate constant was determined to be 6.5×10 8 M −1 s −1 .

  14. Evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic stability of P-type transparent conducting oxide, SrCu2O2 under various oxygen partial pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Takayuki; Yanagawa, Atsumi; Hashimoto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ▶ Thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of SrCu 2 O 2 under various P(O 2 ) was estimated. ▶ The reaction rate for decomposition decreased with decreasing temperature and P(O 2 ). ▶ The activation energy for decomposition of SrCu 2 O 2 was estimated to be 66 kJ/mol. ▶ SrCu 2 O 2 showed less stability than those of other transparent p-type semiconductors. - Abstract: Kinetic stability of transparent p-type conducting oxide, SrCu 2 O 2 , has been evaluated by using X-ray diffraction measurement and thermogravimetry. It was revealed that SrCu 2 O 2 decomposed to mixture of CuO and Sr 14 Cu 24 O 41 in air at temperatures above 300 °C. The decomposition reaction rate can be successfully explained by kinetic model assuming first-order chemical reaction. The rate constant can be suppressed with decreasing temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The activation energy for decomposition reaction of SrCu 2 O 2 calculated from Arrhenius plot was 66 kJ/mol, which was lower than those of other transparent p-type semiconductors such as CuAlO 2 and CuGaO 2 . The low decomposition temperature and activation energy for decomposition indicate that chemical stability of SrCu 2 O 2 is far lower than those of other p-type conducting oxides.

  15. Importance of the support and the grade of Pt in the oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriquez M, O.; Fernandez V, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The technology of the fuel cells type Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM), needs to define clearly the influence of the different involved parameters, this is made in general using methods of electrochemical impedance, in which the involved reactions can be presupposed. Another form of making is identifying experimentally the influence of the different parameters. In this work the obtained results are reported with for the oxygen reduction reaction using as electro catalyst platinum analytical grade and fuel cell grade and like support graphite and vulcan. It was found that as much the support as the particle size modify the over potential for the oxygen reduction reaction (Orr). (Author)

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Ponomarev, DA; Nielsen, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene (C6H5I) in 20-700 Torr of N-2, air, or O-2 diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds with a rate constant k(Cl + QH(5)I) = (3.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) to give...

  17. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Teshima, Norio; Maqsood, Syed Raashid; Akhoon, Showket Ahmad; Peerzada, Ghulam Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III) redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated...

  18. Kinetic modeling and fitting software for interconnected reaction schemes: VisKin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Andrews, Jared N; Pedersen, Steen E

    2007-02-15

    Reaction kinetics for complex, highly interconnected kinetic schemes are modeled using analytical solutions to a system of ordinary differential equations. The algorithm employs standard linear algebra methods that are implemented using MatLab functions in a Visual Basic interface. A graphical user interface for simple entry of reaction schemes facilitates comparison of a variety of reaction schemes. To ensure microscopic balance, graph theory algorithms are used to determine violations of thermodynamic cycle constraints. Analytical solutions based on linear differential equations result in fast comparisons of first order kinetic rates and amplitudes as a function of changing ligand concentrations. For analysis of higher order kinetics, we also implemented a solution using numerical integration. To determine rate constants from experimental data, fitting algorithms that adjust rate constants to fit the model to imported data were implemented using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm or using Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno methods. We have included the ability to carry out global fitting of data sets obtained at varying ligand concentrations. These tools are combined in a single package, which we have dubbed VisKin, to guide and analyze kinetic experiments. The software is available online for use on PCs.

  19. Kinetics of Single-Enzyme Reactions on Vesicles: Role of Substrate Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2015-03-01

    Enzymatic reactions occurring in vivo on lipid membranes can be influenced by various factors including macromolecular crowding in general and substrate aggregation in particular. In academic studies, the role of these factors can experimentally be clarified by tracking single-enzyme kinetics occurring on individual lipid vesicles. To extend the conceptual basis for such experiments, we analyze herein the corresponding kinetics mathematically with emphasis on the role of substrate aggregation. In general, the aggregation may occur on different length scales. Small aggregates may e.g. contain a few proteins or peptides while large aggregates may be mesoscopic as in the case of lipid domains which can be formed in the membranes composed of different lipids. We present a kinetic model describing comprehensively the effect of aggregation of the former type on the dependence of the reaction rate on substrate membrane concentration. The results obtained with physically reasonable parameters indicate that the aggregation-related deviations from the conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics may be appreciable. Special Issue Comments: This theoretical article is focused on single-enzyme reactions occurring in parallel with substrate aggregation on individual vesicles. This subject is related to a few Special Issue articles concerning enzyme dynamics6,7 and function8 and mathematical aspects of stochastic kinetics.9

  20. Molecular Beam Chemistry: Reactions of Oxygen Atoms with Halogen Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-15

    nonlinear one has s = 3, r = 1, and n = 3/2. In the "loose" complex the bending modes go over to free rotation of the product diatomit molecule; thus s...contains no adjustable parameters. All observable properties *l of the reaction may be predicted including product velocity and angular dis- tributions...example, P. R. Bevington, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences (McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1969). 65. Equation (3) is strictly

  1. Kinetic studies on the reaction between dicyanocobinamide and hypochlorous acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiman Maitra

    Full Text Available Hypochlorous acid (HOCl is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO, which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl from dicyanocobinamide ((CN2-Cbi. Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl(CN-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM(-1 s(-1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands.

  2. Kinetics of oxygen reduction in perovskite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells: A combined modeling and experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miara, Lincoln James

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have the potential to replace conventional stationary power generation technologies; however, there are major obstacles to commercialization, the most problematic of which is poor cathode performance. Commercialization of SOFCs will follow when the mechanisms occurring at the cathode are more thoroughly understood and adapted for market use. The catalytic reduction of oxygen occurring in SOFC cathodes consists of many elementary steps such as gas phase diffusion, chemical and/or electrochemical reactions which lead to the adsorption and dissociation of molecular oxygen onto the cathode surface, mass transport of oxygen species along the surface and/or through the bulk of the cathode, and full reduction and incorporation of the oxygen at the cathode/electrolyte two or three phase boundary. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is the main technique used to identify the occurrence of these different processes, but when this technique is used without an explicit model describing the kinetics it is difficult to unravel the interdependence of each of these processes. The purpose of this dissertation is to identify the heterogeneous reactions occurring at the cathode of an SOFC by combining experimental EIS results with mathematical models describing the time dependent behavior of the system. This analysis is performed on two different systems. In the first case, experimental EIS results from patterned half cells composed of Ca-doped lanthanum manganite (LCM)| yttria-doped ZrO2 (YSZ) are modeled to investigate the temperature and partial pressure of oxygen, pO2, dependence of oxygen adsorption/dissociation onto the LCM surface, surface diffusion of atomic oxygen, and electrochemical reduction and incorporation of the oxygen into the electrolyte in the vicinity of the triple phase boundary (TPB). This model determines the time-independent state-space equations from which the Faradaic admittance transfer function is obtained. The

  3. Modelling and simulation of a transketolase mediated reaction: Sensitivity analysis of kinetic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayar, N.A.; Chen, B.H.; Lye, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have used a proposed mathematical model, describing the carbon-carbon bond format ion reaction between beta-hydroxypyruvate and glycolaldehyde to synthesise L-erythrulose, catalysed by the enzyme transketolase, for the analysis of the sensitivity of the process to its kinetic...

  4. Flow chemistry kinetic studies reveal reaction conditions for ready access to unsymmetrical trehalose analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitul K; Davis, Benjamin G

    2010-10-07

    Monofunctionalization of trehalose, a widely-found symmetric plant disaccharide, was studied in a microreactor to give valuable kinetic insights that have allowed improvements in desymmetrization yields and the development of a reaction sequence for large scale monofunctionalizations that allow access to probes of trehalose's biological function.

  5. Kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of dehydration of fructose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grin', S.A.; Tsimbaliev, S.R.; Gel'fand, S.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic isotopic effect in the reaction of fructose dehydration into 5- hydroxymethylfurfural was determined. The results suggest hydrogen participation in the limiting stage of the process. The assumption that proton addition to 4, 5, 6 -trihydroxy - 2- on - hexal is the limiting stage is made

  6. Variable elimination in chemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, C.

    2012-01-01

    We consider chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics. The steady states of such a system are solutions to a system of polynomial equations. Even for small systems the task of finding the solutions is daunting. We develop an algebraic framework and procedure for linear elimination...

  7. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  8. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  9. Toward a Kinetic Model for Acrylamide Formation in a Glucose-Asparagine Reaction System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Ruck, A.L.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a glucose-asparagine reaction system is pro-posed. Equimolar solutions (0.2 M) of glucose and asparagine were heated at different tempera-tures (120-200 C) at pH 6.8. Besides the reactants, acrylamide, fructose, and melanoidins were quantified after

  10. The renneting of milk : a kinetic study of the enzymic and aggregation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooydonk, van A.C.M.

    1987-01-01

    The rennet-induced clotting of milk was studied under various conditions. The kinetics of the enzymic and aggregation reactions was analysed separately and, where possible, related to the physico-chemical properties of the casein micelle and its environment.

    The effects of important

  11. Determining Li+-Coupled Redox Targeting Reaction Kinetics of Battery Materials with Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ruiting; Ghilane, Jalal; Phuah, Kia Chai; Pham Truong, Thuan Nguyen; Adams, Stefan; Randriamahazaka, Hyacinthe; Wang, Qing

    2018-02-01

    The redox targeting reaction of Li + -storage materials with redox mediators is the key process in redox flow lithium batteries, a promising technology for next-generation large-scale energy storage. The kinetics of the Li + -coupled heterogeneous charge transfer between the energy storage material and redox mediator dictates the performance of the device, while as a new type of charge transfer process it has been rarely studied. Here, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was employed for the first time to determine the interfacial charge transfer kinetics of LiFePO 4 /FePO 4 upon delithiation and lithiation by a pair of redox shuttle molecules FcBr 2 + and Fc. The effective rate constant k eff was determined to be around 3.70-6.57 × 10 -3 cm/s for the two-way pseudo-first-order reactions, which feature a linear dependence on the composition of LiFePO 4 , validating the kinetic process of interfacial charge transfer rather than bulk solid diffusion. In addition, in conjunction with chronoamperometry measurement, the SECM study disproves the conventional "shrinking-core" model for the delithiation of LiFePO 4 and presents an intriguing way of probing the phase boundary propagations induced by interfacial redox reactions. This study demonstrates a reliable method for the kinetics of redox targeting reactions, and the results provide useful guidance for the optimization of redox targeting systems for large-scale energy storage.

  12. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Francine [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Klein, Michael [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Sheikhi, Reza [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  13. Gas phase polymerization of propylene. Reaction kinetics and molecular weight distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, G.B.; Weickert, G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase polymerizations have been executed at different temperatures, pressures, and hydrogen concentrations using Me2Si[Ind]2ZrCl2 / methylaluminoxane / SiO2(Pennsylvania Quarts) as a catalyst. The reaction rate curves have been described by a kinetic model, which takes into account the initially

  14. Singlet Oxygen and Free Radical Reactions of Retinoids and Carotenoids—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, T. George

    2018-01-01

    We report on studies of reactions of singlet oxygen with carotenoids and retinoids and a range of free radical studies on carotenoids and retinoids with emphasis on recent work, dietary carotenoids and the role of oxygen in biological processes. Many previous reviews are cited and updated together with new data not previously reviewed. The review does not deal with computational studies but the emphasis is on laboratory-based results. We contrast the ease of study of both singlet oxygen and polyene radical cations compared to neutral radicals. Of particular interest is the switch from anti- to pro-oxidant behavior of a carotenoid with change of oxygen concentration: results for lycopene in a cellular model system show total protection of the human cells studied at zero oxygen concentration, but zero protection at 100% oxygen concentration. PMID:29301252

  15. Kinetic investigation of the chlorine reduction reaction on electrochemically oxidised ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, M.; Karlsen, C.; Borresen, B.; Tunold, R.

    2006-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of the electroreduction of chlorine on electrooxidised ruthenium has been investigated with focus on the effect of solution pH. Current/potential curves for the reduction process in solutions with constant chloride concentration of 1.0 mol dm -3 and varying H + concentration have been obtained with the use of the rotating disk electrode technique (RDE). It was found that the chlorine reduction rate is highly inhibited in solutions with high H + concentrations and that it can be satisfactorily described by the Erenburg mechanism, previously suggested for the chlorine evolution on RuO 2 and RTO. The expression of the kinetic current as a function of chlorine and H + concentration was obtained by solving the elementary rate equations of the kinetic mechanism. The kinetic constants obtained from the correlation of the kinetic current expression to the experimental data were used to simulate the dependence of the surface coverages and elementary reaction rates on overpotential

  16. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling

  17. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-05

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  19. Mechanochemical synthesis of Co and Ni decorated with chemically deposited Pt as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Rojas, E.; Cabañas-Moreno, J.G.; Pérez-Robles, J.F.; Solorza-Feria, O.

    2016-01-01

    High energy milling in combination with galvanic displacement were used for the preparation of bimetallic nanocatalysts. Co and Ni monometallic powders milled for 30 and 20 h, respectively were both produced in air atmosphere and used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) compounds. Nanosized monometallic powders were physically supported on Vulcan carbon, and covered with 20 wt%Pt through a Galvanic Displacement Reaction (GDR) to produce Co-20Pt/C and Ni-20Pt/C electrocatalysts. XRD was used for phase identification on milled powders and for demonstrating structural transformations of Co powders during milling. Results on unmilled metallic Co powder show a predominant HCP structure modifying to a FCC structure after milling. Ni powders maintain their same FCC structure. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectometry (EDX) was used for chemical composition analysis on milled powders at several milling times. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) show the formation of heterogeneous particle with ∼10 nm in size for both electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and steady state Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO_4. The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the cathodic reaction. - Highlights: • Monometallic powders of Co, and Ni were used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) electrocatalysts. • Nanosized monometallic powders were decorated with Pt by a Galvanic Displacement Reaction. • The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the ORR reaction.

  20. Mechanochemical synthesis of Co and Ni decorated with chemically deposited Pt as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Rojas, E.; Cabañas-Moreno, J.G. [Programa de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Pérez-Robles, J.F. [Programa de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales, CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000 Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, 76230, Queretaro (Mexico); Solorza-Feria, O., E-mail: osolorza@cinvestav.mx [Programa de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Depto. Química, CINVESTAV-IPN, 07360, México City (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    High energy milling in combination with galvanic displacement were used for the preparation of bimetallic nanocatalysts. Co and Ni monometallic powders milled for 30 and 20 h, respectively were both produced in air atmosphere and used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) compounds. Nanosized monometallic powders were physically supported on Vulcan carbon, and covered with 20 wt%Pt through a Galvanic Displacement Reaction (GDR) to produce Co-20Pt/C and Ni-20Pt/C electrocatalysts. XRD was used for phase identification on milled powders and for demonstrating structural transformations of Co powders during milling. Results on unmilled metallic Co powder show a predominant HCP structure modifying to a FCC structure after milling. Ni powders maintain their same FCC structure. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectometry (EDX) was used for chemical composition analysis on milled powders at several milling times. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) show the formation of heterogeneous particle with ∼10 nm in size for both electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and steady state Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4}. The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the cathodic reaction. - Highlights: • Monometallic powders of Co, and Ni were used as precursors for the preparation of M-Pt (M = Co,Ni) electrocatalysts. • Nanosized monometallic powders were decorated with Pt by a Galvanic Displacement Reaction. • The kinetic parameters on Co-20Pt/C conducted to the highest mass activity for the ORR reaction.

  1. The Effect of Non-equilibrium Kinetics on Oxygen Chemistry in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naduvalath, Balakrishnan

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that in photon-dominated regions, oxygen chemistry is initiated by the O+H2 yields OH+H reaction. The reaction has an energy barrier of about 0.4 eV with ground state reactants and it is slow at low temperatures. There is strong experimental evidence that vibrational excitation of the H2 molecule increases the reactivity significantly. We present extensive quantum calculations of cross sections and rate coefficients for the O+H2(v) reaction for v = 0 - 3 of the H2 molecule and show that the vibrational excitation of the molecule has a significant effect on reactivity, especially at low temperatures.

  2. Reaction kinetics of hydrazine neutralization in steam generator wet lay-up solution: Identifying optimal degradation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildermans, Kim; Lecocq, Raphael; Girasa, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    During a nuclear power plant outage, hydrazine is used as an oxygen scavenger in the steam generator lay-up solution. However, due to the carcinogenic effects of hydrazine, more stringent discharge limits are or will be imposed in the environmental permits. Hydrazine discharge could even be prohibited. Consequently, hydrazine alternatives or hydrazine degradation before discharge is needed. This paper presents the laboratory tests performed to characterize the reaction kinetics of hydrazine neutralization using bleach or hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed with either copper sulfate (CuSO 4 ) or potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 ). The tests are performed on two standard steam generator lay-up solutions based on different pH control agents: ammonia or ethanolamine. Different neutralization conditions are tested by varying temperature, oxidant addition, and catalyst concentration, among others, in order to identify the optimal parameters for hydrazine neutralization in a steam generator wet lay-up solution. (authors)

  3. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  4. A kinetic study of the reaction of water vapor and carbon dioxide on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santon, J.P.

    1964-09-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction of water vapour and carbon dioxide with uranium has been performed by thermogravimetric methods at temperatures between 160 and 410 deg G in the first case, 350 and 1050 deg C in the second: Three sorts of uranium specimens were used: uranium powder, thin evaporated films, and small spheres obtained from a plasma furnace. The experimental results led in the case of water vapour, to a linear rate of reaction controlled by diffusion at the lower temperatures, and by a surface reaction at the upper ones. In the case of carbon dioxide, a parabolic law has been found, controlled by diffusional processes. (author) [fr

  5. Kinetics of heterogeneous chemical reactions: a theoretical model for the accumulation of pesticides in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S H; Sahai, R; Eyring, H

    1971-04-01

    A theoretical model for the accumulation of pesticides in soil has been proposed and discussed from the viewpoint of heterogeneous reaction kinetics with a basic aim to understand the complex nature of soil processes relating to the environmental pollution. In the bulk of soil, the pesticide disappears by diffusion and a chemical reaction; the rate processes considered on the surface of soil are diffusion, chemical reaction, vaporization, and regular pesticide application. The differential equations involved have been solved analytically by the Laplace-transform method.

  6. Surface coverage of Pt atoms on PtCo nanoparticles and catalytic kinetics for oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Rongzhong, E-mail: rongzhong.jiang@us.army.mi [Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 (United States); Rong, Charles; Chu, Deryn [Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The surface coverage of Pt atoms on PtCo nanoparticles and its effect on catalytic kinetics for oxygen reduction were investigated. The PtCo nanoparticles with different surface coverage of Pt atoms were synthesized with various methods, including normal chemical method, microemulsion synthesis, and ultrasound-assisted microemulsion. A model of Pt atoms filling into a spherical nanoparticle was proposed to explain the relationship of surface metal atoms and nanoparticle size. The catalytic activity of the PtCo nano-particles is highly dependent on the synthetic methods, even if they have the same chemical composition. The PtCo nano-particles synthesized with ultrasound-assisted microemulsion showed the highest activity, which is attributed to an increase of active surface coverage of Pt atoms on the metal nanoparticles. The rate of oxygen reduction at 0.5 V (vs. SCE) catalyzed by the PtCo synthesized with ultrasound-assisted micro-emulsion was about four times higher than that of the PtCo synthesized with normal chemical method. As demonstrated with rotating-ring disk electrode measurement, the PtCo nano-particles can catalyze oxygen 4-electron reduction to water without intermediate H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detected.

  7. Kinetics of the Br2-CH3CHO Photochemical Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Shackelford, C. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was employed in conjunction with laser flash photolysis of Br2 to study the kinetics of the two elementary steps in the photochemical chain reaction nBr2 + nCH3CHO + hv yields nCH3CBrO + nHBr. In the temperature range 255-400 K, the rate coefficient for the reaction Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) + CH3CHO yields CH3CO + HBr is given by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 6)(T) = (1.51 +/- 0.20) x 10(exp -11) exp(-(364 +/- 41)/T)cu cm/(molecule.s). At 298 K, the reaction CH3CO + Br2 yields CH3CBrO + Br proceeds at a near gas kinetic rate, k(sub 7)(298 K) = (1.08 +/- 0.38) x 10(exp -10)cu cm/(molecule.s).

  8. Reactions of oxygen containing structures in coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodek, W.; Kirschstein, J.; Van Heek, K.-H. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-03-01

    In coal pyrolysis O-containing structures such as ether bridges and phenolic groups play an important role. Their reactions were studied by non-isothermal pyrolysis of a high volatile bituminous coal and some model polymers with gas chromatographic detection of the gaseous pyrolysis products. The coal was separated into the maceral groups vitrinite, exinite and inertinite, which showed markedly different pyrolysis behaviour. The formation of CO, methane and benzene was measured versus temperature. By comparison with polyphenyleneoxide and phenol-formaldehyde resins, it was found that the main volatilization, during which most of the tar is evolved, is initiated by cleavage of alkyl-aryl-ethers. Rearrangements of the primarily formed radicals lead to the formation of CO and methane at higher temperatures. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. High Performance Electrocatalytic Reaction of Hydrogen and Oxygen on Ruthenium Nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Ruquan; Liu, Yuanyue; Peng, Zhiwei; Wang, Tuo; Jalilov, Almaz S.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Wei, Su-Huai; Tour, James M.

    2017-01-18

    The development of catalytic materials for the hydrogen oxidation, hydrogen evolution, oxygen reduction or oxygen evolution reactions with high reaction rates and low overpotentials are key goals for the development of renewable energy. We report here Ru(0) nanoclusters supported on nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance multifunctional catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), showing activities similar to that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution. For HER performance in alkaline media, sample Ru/NG-750 reaches 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 8 mV with a Tafel slope of 30 mV dec-1. The high HER performance in alkaline solution is advantageous because most catalysts for ORR and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) also prefer alkaline solution environment whereas degrade in acidic electrolytes. For ORR performance, Ru/NG effectively catalyzes the conversion of O2 into OH- via a 4e process at a current density comparable to that of Pt/C. The unusual catalytic activities of Ru(0) nanoclusters reported here are important discoveries for the advancement of renewable energy conversion reactions.

  10. Confining Domains Lead to Reaction Bursts: Reaction Kinetics in the Plasma Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Ziya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Confinement of molecules in specific small volumes and areas within a cell is likely to be a general strategy that is developed during evolution for regulating the interactions and functions of biomolecules. The cellular plasma membrane, which is the outermost membrane that surrounds the entire cell, was considered to be a continuous two-dimensional liquid, but it is becoming clear that it consists of numerous nano-meso-scale domains with various lifetimes, such as raft domains and cytoskeleton-induced compartments, and membrane molecules are dynamically trapped in these domains. In this article, we give a theoretical account on the effects of molecular confinement on reversible bimolecular reactions in a partitioned surface such as the plasma membrane. By performing simulations based on a lattice-based model of diffusion and reaction, we found that in the presence of membrane partitioning, bimolecular reactions that occur in each compartment proceed in bursts during which the reaction rate is sharply and briefly increased even though the asymptotic reaction rate remains the same. We characterized the time between reaction bursts and the burst amplitude as a function of the model parameters, and discussed the biological significance of the reaction bursts in the presence of strong inhibitor activity. PMID:22479350

  11. Confining domains lead to reaction bursts: reaction kinetics in the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Kalay

    Full Text Available Confinement of molecules in specific small volumes and areas within a cell is likely to be a general strategy that is developed during evolution for regulating the interactions and functions of biomolecules. The cellular plasma membrane, which is the outermost membrane that surrounds the entire cell, was considered to be a continuous two-dimensional liquid, but it is becoming clear that it consists of numerous nano-meso-scale domains with various lifetimes, such as raft domains and cytoskeleton-induced compartments, and membrane molecules are dynamically trapped in these domains. In this article, we give a theoretical account on the effects of molecular confinement on reversible bimolecular reactions in a partitioned surface such as the plasma membrane. By performing simulations based on a lattice-based model of diffusion and reaction, we found that in the presence of membrane partitioning, bimolecular reactions that occur in each compartment proceed in bursts during which the reaction rate is sharply and briefly increased even though the asymptotic reaction rate remains the same. We characterized the time between reaction bursts and the burst amplitude as a function of the model parameters, and discussed the biological significance of the reaction bursts in the presence of strong inhibitor activity.

  12. Hydrolysis of Surfactants Containing Ester Bonds: Modulation of Reaction Kinetics and Important Aspects of Surfactant Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Dan; Stjerndahl, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-assembly on the hydrolysis kinetics of surfactants that contain ester bonds are discussed. A number of examples on how reaction rates and apparent reaction orders can be modulated by changes in the conditions, including an instance of apparent zero-order kinetics, are presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the examples on…

  13. Using a Multi-Tier Diagnostic Test to Explore the Nature of Students' Alternative Conceptions on Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2018-01-01

    This study focused on grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics. A 4-tier diagnostic instrument was developed for this purpose and administered to 137 students in the main study. Findings showed that reaction kinetics is a difficult topic for these students, with a total of 25 alternative conceptions (ACs) being uncovered. Except for…

  14. Oxygen Uptake Kinetics Is Slower in Swimming Than Arm Cranking and Cycling during Heavy Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Borrani, Fabio; Rodríguez, Ferran A.; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen uptake (V·O2) kinetics has been reported to be influenced by the activity mode. However, only few studies have compared V·O2 kinetics between activities in the same subjects in which they were equally trained. Therefore, this study compared the V·O2 kinetics response to swimming, arm cranking, and cycling within the same group of subjects within the heavy exercise intensity domain. Ten trained male triathletes (age 23.2 ± 4.5 years; height 180.8 ± 8.3 cm; weight 72.3 ± 6.6 kg) completed an incremental test to exhaustion and a 6-min heavy constant-load test in the three exercise modes in random order. Gas exchange was measured by a breath-by-breath analyzer and the on-transient V·O2 kinetics was modeled using bi-exponential functions. V·O2peak was higher in cycling (65.6 ± 4.0 ml·kg−1·min−1) than in arm cranking or swimming (48.7 ± 8.0 and 53.0 ± 6.7 ml·kg−1·min−1; P kinetics were slower in swimming (τ1 = 31.7 ± 6.2 s) than in arm cranking (19.3 ± 4.2 s; P = 0.001) and cycling (12.4 ± 3.7 s; P = 0.001). The amplitude of the primary component was lower in both arm cranking and swimming (21.9 ± 4.7 and 28.4 ± 5.1 ml·kg−1·min−1) compared with cycling (39.4 ± 4.1 ml·kg−1·min−1; P = 0.001). Although the gain of the primary component was higher in arm cranking compared with cycling (15.3 ± 4.2 and 10.7 ± 1.3 ml·min−1·W−1; P = 0.02), the slow component amplitude, in both absolute and relative terms, did not differ between exercise modes. The slower V·O2 kinetics during heavy-intensity swimming is exercise-mode dependent. Besides differences in muscle mass and greater type II muscle fibers recruitment, the horizontal position adopted and the involvement of trunk and lower-body stabilizing muscles could be additional mechanisms that explain the differences between exercise modalities. PMID:28919863

  15. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  16. Kinetics based reaction optimization of enzyme catalyzed reduction of formaldehyde to methanol with synchronous cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marpani, Fauziah; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Pinelo, Manuel; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-12-01

    Enzymatic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to methanol (CH 3 OH) can be accomplished using a designed set-up of three oxidoreductases utilizing reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADH) as cofactor for the reducing equivalents electron supply. For this enzyme system to function efficiently a balanced regeneration of the reducing equivalents during reaction is required. Herein, we report the optimization of the enzymatic conversion of formaldehyde (CHOH) to CH 3 OH by alcohol dehydrogenase, the final step of the enzymatic redox reaction of CO 2 to CH 3 OH, with kinetically synchronous enzymatic cofactor regeneration using either glucose dehydrogenase (System I) or xylose dehydrogenase (System II). A mathematical model of the enzyme kinetics was employed to identify the best reaction set-up for attaining optimal cofactor recycling rate and enzyme utilization efficiency. Targeted process optimization experiments were conducted to verify the kinetically modeled results. Repetitive reaction cycles were shown to enhance the yield of CH 3 OH, increase the total turnover number (TTN) and the biocatalytic productivity rate (BPR) value for both system I and II whilst minimizing the exposure of the enzymes to high concentrations of CHOH. System II was found to be superior to System I with a yield of 8 mM CH 3 OH, a TTN of 160 and BPR of 24 μmol CH 3 OH/U · h during 6 hr of reaction. The study demonstrates that an optimal reaction set-up could be designed from rational kinetics modeling to maximize the yield of CH 3 OH, whilst simultaneously optimizing cofactor recycling and enzyme utilization efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes in Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Jens F.; Banks, Scott W.; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Dufour, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Predictive kinetic reaction model applicable to any lignocellulosic feedstock. • Calculates pyrolysis yields and product composition as function of reactor conditions. • Detailed modelling of product composition (33 model compounds for the bio-oil). • Good agreement with literature regarding yield curves and product composition. • Successful validation with pyrolysis experiments in bench scale fast pyrolysis rig. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes. The model is based on the three main building blocks of lignocellulosic biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin and can be readily implemented in Aspen Plus and easily adapted to other process simulation software packages. It uses a set of 149 individual reactions that represent the volatilization, decomposition and recomposition processes of biomass pyrolysis. A linear regression algorithm accounts for the secondary pyrolysis reactions, thus allowing the calculation of slow and intermediate pyrolysis reactions. The bio-oil is modelled with a high level of detail, using up to 33 model compounds, which allows for a comprehensive estimation of the properties of the bio-oil and the prediction of further upgrading reactions. After showing good agreement with existing literature data, our own pyrolysis experiments are reported for validating the reaction model. A beech wood feedstock is subjected to pyrolysis under well-defined conditions at different temperatures and the product yields and compositions are determined. Reproducing the experimental pyrolysis runs with the simulation model, a high coincidence is found for the obtained fraction yields (bio-oil, char and gas), for the water content and for the elemental composition of the pyrolysis products. The kinetic reaction model is found to be suited for predicting pyrolysis yields and product composition for any lignocellulosic biomass feedstock under typical pyrolysis conditions

  18. Kinetic and mechanism formation reaction of complex compound Cu with di-n-buthildithiocarbamate (dbdtc) ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryani, S.; Kurniawan, C.; Kasmui

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of complex compound is one field of research which intensively studied. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes find wide-ranging applications in nanomaterial and metal separation science, and have potential use as chemotherapeutic, pesticides, and as additives to lubricants. However, the information about is reaction kinetic and mechanism are very much lacking. The research and analyzes results show that reaction synthesis ligand DBDTC and complex compounds Cu-DBDTC. Optimum reaction condition of formation of complex compounds Cu with DBDTC at pH=3, [DBDTC] = 4.10-3 M, and the time of reaction 5 minutes. Based the analysis varian reaction of complex compounds at pH 3 and 4, diffrence significance at the other pH: 5; 5,5; 6; 6,5 ; 7; and 8. The various of mole with reactants comosition difference sigbificance, those the time reaction for 5 and 6 minutes diffrence by significance with the other time, it is 3,4,8, and 10 minutes. The great product to at condition pH 6, the time optimum at 5 minutes and molar ratio of logam: ligand = 1:2. The reaction kinetic equation of complex compound Cu with chelathing ligand DBDTC is V=0.917106 [Cu2+]0.87921 [DBDTC]2.03021. Based on the kinetic data, and formed complex compounds estimation, the mechanism explaining by 2 stages. In the first stage formation of [Cu(DBDTC)], and then [Cu(DBDTC)2] with the last structure geomethry planar rectangle. The result of this research will be more useful if an effort is being done in reaction mechanism by chemical computation method for obtain intermediate, and for constant “k” in same stage, k1.k2. and compound complex constanta (β).

  19. Oxygen reduction kinetics and transport properties of (Ba,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3-δ solid oxide fuel cell cathode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Merkle, Rotraut; Baumann, Frank S.; Maier, Joachim; Fleig, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The oxygen reduction at the surface of cathode materials is crucial for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), but a detailed understanding of the mechanism is not available yet. (Ba x Sr 1-x )(Co 1-y Fe y )O 3-δ shows strongly improved oxygen reduction rates compared to previously applied perovskite cathode materials. In this work, surface rate constants as well as bulk transport properties are studied. (Ba x Sr 1-x )(Co 1-y Fe y )O 3-δ with 0≤x≤0.5, 0.2≤y≤1 was synthesized by the Pechini method. Oxygen stoichoimetry was obtained from thermo-gravimetric analysis, confirming that Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 Co 0.8 Fe 0.2 O 3-δ has an exceptionally low oxygen content which is generally smaller than 2.5. Dense thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and patterned into circular microelectrodes by photolithography. The surface resistance R s , which dominate the overall electrode resistance, were measured by impedance spectroscopy on individual microelectrodes at different T, pO 2 and applied electrical bias. PLD technique greatly helps to study the oxygen reduction kinetics since only measurements on dense thin films allow to record absolute R s values without interference from morphology effects. These R s values were found to be much lower than those for (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O 3-δ . The variation of the surface reaction rates with A-site and B-site composition was studied and correlations with bulk materials properties such as oxygen nonstoichiometry, ionic mobility or oxidation enthalpy were examined. Plausible reaction mechanisms as well as possible reasons for the high absolute surface reaction rates will be discussed

  20. Optimization of the Pd-Fe-Mo Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeayeon; Jang, Jeongseok; Lee, Jin Goo; Jeon, Ok Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Hwang, Ho Jung; Shul, Yong Gun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd-Mo-Fe catalysts show high catalytic activity and stability for oxygen-reduction reactions in acid media. • The optimum compositions were 7.5:1.5:1.0 for Pd-Fe-Mo, and the optimum temperatures were 500 °C. • The Pd-Fe-Mo catalysts were successfully applied to the PEMFC cathode, showing ∼500 mA cm −1 at 0.6 V. • The lattice constant was strongly related to the activity and stability of the catalysts for oxygen-reduction reactions. - Abstract: Highly active and durable non-platinum catalysts for oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) have been developed for energy conversion devices such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this study, Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst is reported as a non-platinum catalyst for ORR. The atomic ratio and annealing temperatures are controlled on the catalysts to understand interplay between their physical and chemical properties and electrochemical activities. The Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst optimized with 7.5:1.5:1.0 of the atomic ratio and 500 °C of the annealing temperature shows 32.18 mA mg −1 PGM (PGM: platinum group metal) of the kinetic current density at 0.9 V for ORR, which is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The current density is degraded to 6.20 mA mg −1 PGM after 3000 cycling of cyclic voltammetry, but it is greatly enhanced value compared to other non-platinum catalysts. In actual application to PEMFCs, the 20% Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst supported on carbons exhibits a high performance of 506 mA cm −2 at 0.6 V. The results suggest that the Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst can be a good candidate for non-platinum ORR catalysts.

  1. Kinetic study of the annealing reactions in Cu-Ni-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoso, E.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal aging of a Cu-45Ni-4Fe, Cu-34Ni-11Fe and Cu-33Ni-22Fe alloys tempered from 1173 K have been studied from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and microhardness measurements. The analysis of DSC curves, from room temperature to 950 K, shows the presence of one exothermic reaction associated to the formation of FeNi 3 phase nucleating from a modulate structure, and one endothermic peak attributed to dissolution of this phase. Kinetic parameters were obtained using the usual Avrami-Erofeev equation, modified Kissinger method and integrated kinetic functions. Microhardness measurements confirmed the formation and dissolution of the FeNi 3 phase. (Author)

  2. Magneli phase Ti4O7 electrode for oxygen reduction reaction and its implication for zinc-air rechargeable batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoxia; Zhu, Aaron Li; Qu Wei; Wang Haijiang; Hui, Rob; Zhang Lei; Zhang Jiujun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, Magneli phase Ti 4 O 7 was successfully synthesized using a TiO 2 reduction method, and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrode coated with this Ti 4 O 7 material showed activities for both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). For the ORR, several parameters, including overall electron transfer number, kinetic constants, electron transfer coefficient, and percentage H 2 O 2 production, were obtained using the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) technique and the Koutecky-Levich theory. The overall electron transfer number was found to be between 2.3 and 2.9 in 1, 4, and 6 M KOH electrolytes, suggesting that the ORR process on the Ti 4 O 7 electrode was a mixed process of 2- and 4-electron transfer pathways. Electrochemical durability tests, carried out in highly concentrated KOH electrolyte, confirmed that this Ti 4 O 7 is a stable electrode material, suggesting that it should be a feasible candidate for the air-cathodes of zinc-air batteries. To understand the stability of this material, Raman and XPS spectra were also collected for the Ti 4 O 7 samples before and after the stability tests. The results and analysis revealed that a thin layer of TiO 2 formed on the Ti 4 O 7 surface, which may have prevented further oxidation into the bulk of the Ti 4 O 7 electrode.

  3. O-, N-Atoms-Coordinated Mn Cofactors within a Graphene Framework as Bioinspired Oxygen Reduction Reaction Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Mao, Kaitian; Gao, Shiqi; Huang, Hao; Xia, Guoliang; Lin, Zhiyu; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Changlai; Wang, Hui; Chen, Qianwang

    2018-05-28

    Manganese (Mn) is generally regarded as not being sufficiently active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared to other transition metals such as Fe and Co. However, in biology, manganese-containing enzymes can catalyze oxygen-evolving reactions efficiently with a relative low onset potential. Here, atomically dispersed O and N atoms coordinated Mn active sites are incorporated within graphene frameworks to emulate both the structure and function of Mn cofactors in heme-copper oxidases superfamily. Unlike previous single-metal catalysts with general M-N-C structures, here, it is proved that a coordinated O atom can also play a significant role in tuning the intrinsic catalytic activities of transition metals. The biomimetic electrocatalyst exhibits superior performance for the ORR and zinc-air batteries under alkaline conditions, which is even better than that of commercial Pt/C. The excellent performance can be ascribed to the abundant atomically dispersed Mn cofactors in the graphene frameworks, confirmed by various characterization methods. Theoretical calculations reveal that the intrinsic catalytic activity of metal Mn can be significantly improved via changing local geometry of nearest coordinated O and N atoms. Especially, graphene frameworks containing the Mn-N 3 O 1 cofactor demonstrate the fastest ORR kinetics due to the tuning of the d electronic states to a reasonable state. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. From melamine sponge towards 3D sulfur-doping carbon nitride as metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Li, Bin; Li, Songmei; Liu, Jianhua

    2017-07-01

    Development of new and efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for replacing Pt to improve the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance to emerging renewable energy technologies such as metal-air batteries and polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Herein, 3D sulfur-doping carbon nitride (S-CN) as a novel metal-free ORR electrocatalyst was synthesized by exploiting commercial melamine sponge as raw material. The sulfur atoms were doping on CN networks uniformly through numerous S-C bonds which can provide additional active sites. And it was found that the S-CN exhibited high catalytic activity for ORR in term of more positive onset potential, higher electron transfer number and higher cathodic density. This work provides a novel choice of metal-free ORR electrocatalysts and highlights the importance of sulfur-doping CN in metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  5. Pt monolayer shell on hollow Pd core electrocatalysts: Scale up synthesis, structure, and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukmirovic Miomir B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on synthesis, characterization and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR kinetics of Pt monolayer shell on Pd(hollow, or Pd-Au(hollow core electrocatalysts. Comparison between the ORR catalytic activity of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores and those of Pt solid and Pt hollow nanoparticles has been obtained using the rotating disk electrode technique. Hollow nanoparticles were made using Ni or Cu nanoparticles as sacrificial templates. The Pt ORR specific and mass activities of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores were found considerably higher than those of the electrocatalysts with the solid cores. We attribute this enhanced Pt activity to the smooth surface morphology and hollow-induced lattice contraction, in addition to the mass-saving geometry of hollow particles.

  6. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions over illuminated and nonilluminated TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange between H 2 , gaseous H 2 O, and the surface hydroxyls of TiO 2 , and oxygen isotope exchange between O 2 , CO 2 , CO, H 2 O vapor, and the hydroxyls over TiO 3 were studied at room temperature in the dark and under illumination. Hydrogen isotope exchange between H 2 O and the hydroxyls occurred rapidly in the dark, but the exchange involving H 2 did not occur at all even under illumination. Oxygen isotope exchange among H 2 O vapor, CO 2 , and the hydroxyls easily took place in the dark, but the exchange involving O 2 required band-gap illumination. Dioxygen isotope equilibration was much faster than the other photoexchange reactions. Although the oxygen exchange between O 2 and illuminated TiO 2 has been considered to involve lattice-oxygen exchange, the present experiments revealed that the hydroxyls of TiO 2 mainly participate in the exchange reaction. The oxygen exchange between O 2 and H 2 O vapor was strongly inhibited by H 2 O vapor itself probably because oxygen adsorption was retarded by adsorbed water. Oxygen in CO was not exchanged with the other substrates under any conditions tested

  7. Why Do Lithium-Oxygen Batteries Fail: Parasitic Chemical Reactions and Their Synergistic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiahui; Dong, Qi; Cheng, Qingmei; Wang, Dunwei

    2016-09-12

    As an electrochemical energy-storage technology with the highest theoretical capacity, lithium-oxygen batteries face critical challenges in terms of poor stabilities and low charge/discharge round-trip efficiencies. It is generally recognized that these issues are connected to the parasitic chemical reactions at the anode, electrolyte, and cathode. While the detailed mechanisms of these reactions have been studied separately, the possible synergistic effects between these reactions remain poorly understood. To fill in the knowledge gap, this Minireview examines literature reports on the parasitic chemical reactions and finds the reactive oxygen species a key chemical mediator that participates in or facilitates nearly all parasitic chemical reactions. Given the ubiquitous presence of oxygen in all test cells, this finding is important. It offers new insights into how to stabilize various components of lithium-oxygen batteries for high-performance operations and how to eventually materialize the full potentials of this promising technology. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. Gymnasium-based unsupervised exercise maintains benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained following supervised training in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macananey, Oscar; O'Shea, Donal; Warmington, Stuart A; Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel

    2012-08-01

    Supervised exercise (SE) in patients with type 2 diabetes improves oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. Maintenance of these improvements, however, has not been examined when supervision is removed. We explored if potential improvements in oxygen uptake kinetics following a 12-week SE that combined aerobic and resistance training were maintained after a subsequent 12-week unsupervised exercise (UE). The involvement of cardiac output (CO) in these improvements was also tested. Nineteen volunteers with type 2 diabetes were recruited. Oxygen uptake kinetics and CO (inert gas rebreathing) responses to constant-load cycling at 50% ventilatory threshold (V(T)), 80% V(T), and mid-point between V(T) and peak workload (50% Δ) were examined at baseline (on 2 occasions) and following each 12-week training period. Participants decided to exercise at a local gymnasium during the UE. Thirteen subjects completed all the interventions. The time constant of phase 2 of oxygen uptake was significantly faster (p exercise maintained benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained during a supervised exercise in subjects with diabetes, and these benefits were associated with a faster dynamic response of heart rate after training.

  9. Kinetics of ion/molecule reactions in Xe++acteone system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradov, P.S.; Misharin, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    A reaction of Xe+ ion with acetone and subsequent transformations of the product ions at a buffer gas pressure (He) of 1.1 Torr were studied by the flow reactor technique mass spectrometry. A kinetic scheme describing the evolution of the ionic composition has been determined. The rate constants of the key reactions involved in the scheme have been evaluated. A channel of the production of acetone cation in A state in a charge transfer reaction was observed. A production of slowly reacting isomer of the acetone cation in secondary reactions was detected. Its product in the reaction with acetone is the 'nonprotonated dimer'. The kinetics of the production of ternary ions - ( CH 3 CO + CH 3 COCH 3 )(m/e=101), CH 3 COCH 3 H + (m/e=59) as well as the production of ions of the fourth generation ( CH 3 CO + (CH 3 COCH 3 ) 2 ) (m/e=159) and (CH 3 COCH 3 ) 2 H + was observed. CH 3 CO + ion (m/e=43) was found as the main reaction product. The main pathways scheme of ionic transformations is shown. (nevyjel)

  10. Strain-induced structural changes and chemical reactions. 1: Thermomechanical and kinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitas, V.I.; Nesterenko, V.F.; Meyers, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Strain-induced chemical reactions were observed recently (Nesterenko et al) in experiments in the shear band in both Ti-Si and Nb-Si mixtures. Reactions can start in the solid state or after melting of at least one component. One of the aims is to find theoretically whether there are possible macroscopic mechanisms of mechanical intensification of the above and other chemical reactions due to plastic shear in the solid state. Continuum thermodynamical theory of structural changes with an athermal kinetics, which includes martensitic phase transformations, plastic strain-induced chemical reactions and polymorphic transformations, is developed at finite strains. The theory includes kinematics, criterion of structural change and extremum principle for determination of all unknown variable parameters for the case with neglected elastic strains. Thermodynamically consistent kinetic theory of thermally activated structural changes is suggested. The concept of the effective temperature is introduced which takes into account that temperature can vary significantly (on 1,000 K) during the chemical reactions under consideration. The theory will be applied in Part 2 of the paper for the description of chemical reactions in the shear band

  11. Synthesis and electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction of gold-nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    Oyunbileg G; Batnyagt G; Enkhsaruul B; T Takeguchi

    2018-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a characteristic reaction which determines the performance of fuel cells which convert a chemical energy into an electrical energy. Aims of this study are to synthesize Au-based nanostars (AuNSs) and determine their preliminary electro-catalytic activities towards ORR by a rotating-disk electrode method in alkaline electrolyte. The images obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses confirm the ...

  12. Kinetics of free radical decay reactions in lactic acid homo and copolymers irradiated to sterilization dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantoglu, O.; Ozbey, T.; Gueven, O.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of free radical decay reactions of poly(L-Lactic acid), poly(DL-Lactic acid) and random copolymer of lactic and glycolic acid have been investigated for decays taking place in air and in vacuum. The change in ESR lines of γ-irradiated polymers have been followed over a long time period. The decay has been found to follow neither simple first-order nor second-order kinetics. Various kinetic approaches including composite first or second-order mechanisms and diffusion-controlled first or second-order equations were determined to be also unsatisfactory. The decay of radicals in bulk irradiated lactic acid homo and copolymers was found to be best described when the second-order non-classical equation with time dependent rate constant approach was used. (Author)

  13. Spillover Phenomena and Its Striking Impacts in Electrocatalysis for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrode Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios D. Papakonstantinou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The core subject of the present paper represents the interrelated spillover (effusion phenomena both of the primary oxide and the H-adatoms, their theory and practice, causes, appearances and consequences, and evidences of existence, their specific properties, and their alterpolar equilibria and kinetic behavior, structural, and resulting catalytic, and double layer charging features. The aim is to introduce electron conductive and d-d interactive individual and composite (mixed valence hypo-d-oxide compounds, of increased altervalent capacity, or their suboxides (Magnéli phases, as the interactive catalytic supports and therefrom provide (i the strong metal-support interaction (SMSI catalytic effect and (ii dynamic spillover interactive transfer of primary oxides (M-OH and free effusional H-adatoms for further electrode reactions and thereby advance the overall electrocatalytic activity. Since hypo-d-oxides feature the exchange membrane properties, the higher the altervalent capacity, the higher the spillover effect. In fact, altervalent hypo-d-oxides impose spontaneous dissociative adsorption of water molecules and then spontaneously pronounced membrane spillover transferring properties instantaneously resulting with corresponding bronze type (Pt/HxWO3 under cathodic and/or its hydrated state (Pt/W(OH6, responsible for Pt-OH effusion, under anodic polarization, this way establishing instantaneous reversibly revertible alterpolar bronze features (Pt/H0.35WO3⇔ Pt/W(OH6 and substantially advanced electrocatalytic properties of these composite interactive electrocatalysts. Such nanostructured-type electrocatalysts, even of mixed-valence hypo-d-oxide structures (Pt/H0.35WO3/TiO2/C, Pt/HxNbO3/TiO2/C, have for the first time been synthesized by the sol-gel methods and shown rather high stability, electron conductivity, and nonexchanged initial pure monobronze spillover and catalytic properties. Such a unique electrocatalytic system, as the

  14. Oxygen consumption through metabolism and photodynamic reactions in cells cultured on microbeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunck, T.; Poulet, P.

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen consumption by cultured cells, through metabolism and photosensitization reactions, has been calculated theoretically. From this result, we have derived the partial oxygen pressure P O 2 in the perfusion medium flowing across sensitized cultured cells during photodynamic experiments. The P O 2 variations in the perfusate during light irradiation are related to the rate of oxygen consumption through photoreactions, and to the number of cells killed per mole of oxygen consumed through metabolic processes. After irradiation, the reduced metabolic oxygen consumption yields information on the cell death rate, and on the photodynamic cell killing efficiency. The aim of this paper is to present an experimental set-up and the corresponding theoretical model that allows us to control the photodynamic efficiency for a given cell-sensitizer pair, under well defined and controlled conditions of irradiation and oxygen supply. To demonstrate the usefulness of the methodology described, CHO cells cultured on microbeads were sensitized with pheophorbide a and irradiated with different light fluence rates. The results obtained, i.e. oxygen consumption of about 0.1 μMs -1 m -3 under a light fluence rate of 1 W m -2 , 10 5 cells killed per mole of oxygen consumed and a decay rate of about 1 h -1 of living cells after irradiation, are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions and with previously published data. (author)

  15. Deviation from the kinetic law of mass action for reactions induced by binary encounters in liquid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktorov, Alexander B; Kipriyanov, Alexey A

    2007-01-01

    In considering the irreversible chemical reaction A+B→ C+B in liquid solutions two many-particle approaches to the derivation of binary non-Markovian kinetic equations are compared: simple superposition decoupling and a method of extracting 'pair' channels from three-particle correlation evolution. It is shown that both methods provide an almost identical description of this reaction. However, in studies of reversible reactions in liquid solutions only the channel extraction method gives a correct physically clear description of the reaction though it consists of a sequence of steps: the development of integral encounter theory (IET), effective pairs approximation (EPA), modified encounter theory (MET), and the final regular form (RF) of kinetic equations. It is shown that the rate equations often encountered in the literature correspond to the independence of transient channels of 'scattering' in the bimolecular reversible reaction (A+B -B), while the independent transient channel of 'decay' in the reversible reactionA+B -C is defined solely by time integral convolution. In the general case transient channels in non-Markovian theory are not independent, and their interference manifests itself as a non-Markovian inhomogeneous source in binary non-Markovian kinetic equations in regular form. Based on the derived equations new universal kinetics (independent of models) of chemical equilibrium attainment have been obtained. It is shown that these kinetics can differ essentially from the kinetics corresponding to the kinetic law of mass action of formal chemical kinetics

  16. Heterogeneous photocatalysis of real textile wastewater: evaluation of reaction kinetics and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Chittaranjan; Gupta, Ashok K; Pillai, Indu M Sasidharan

    2012-01-01

    Real textile wastewater collected from the cotton dyeing bath of a fabric dyeing and finishing plant was subjected to heterogeneous photocatalysis using Ag(+) doped TiO(2) under UV irradiation in a batch reactor. The photocatalysts were characterized by FESEM, XRD, EDS, FTIR, DRS and BET analyses. The kinetics of the reaction was also evaluated. Colour removal was more than 88%, 94% and 99%, respectively for undiluted, 2 times diluted and 5 times diluted wastewater with Ag(+) doped TiO(2) (2.5 g/L) after UV irradiation for 360 minutes. The COD removal for undiluted, 2 times diluted and 5 times diluted wastewater was 47%, 70% and 92%, respectively under similar conditions. The reaction followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood pseudo first order kinetic model and the data fitted well to polynomial regression analysis.

  17. Reaction kinetics and modeling of photoinitiated cationic polymerization of an alicyclic based diglycidyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikrishna, R.; Ponrathnam, S.; Tambe, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Photocationic polymerization of alicyclic based diglycidyl ether was carried out. • Kinetic parameters were influenced by gelation and diffusional restrictions. • Applicability of autocatalytic model was established by nonlinear regression. • System showed higher activation energy than cycloaliphatic and aromatic diepoxides. -- Abstract: Photoinitiated cationic polymerization of cycloaliphatic diepoxides had received tremendous attention, while studies with lesser polymerizable diglycidyl ethers are comparatively less reported. The present work deals with the photoinitiated cationic polymerization of cyclohexane dimethanol diglycidyl ether followed by estimation of kinetic parameters. The effects of concentration of photoinitiator and temperature on curing performance were studied using photo differential scanning calorimeter or photo DSC with polychromatic radiation. It was observed that the rate of polymerization as well as ultimate conversion increased with increasing concentration of photoinitiator and temperature. The influences of gelation as well as diffusional restrictions have remarkable effect on cure performance. The kinetic parameters as per autocatalytic kinetic model were studied by Levenberg–Marquardt nonlinear regression method instead of conventional linear method for obtaining more accurate values of apparent rate constant. It was observed that the model fits with data from initial stages to almost towards the end of the reaction. The activation energy was found to be higher than the values reported for more reactive cycloaliphatic diepoxides. The value of pre-exponential factor increased with increase in activation energy showing influence of gelation at early stages of reaction

  18. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Patrick J. [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olesik, John W., E-mail: olesik.2@osu.edu [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH{sub 3}F with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS.

  19. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartling, Stephan; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-01-01

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology

  20. Kinetics of the reaction between H· and superheated water probed with muonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcorn, C. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada); Brodovitch, J.-C. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Ghandi, K.; Kennedy, A. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada); Percival, P.W. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Smith, M. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Safe operation of a supercritical water cooled reactor requires knowledge of the reaction kinetics of transient species formed by the radiolysis of water in the temperature range 300-650{sup o}C. By using a light isotope of the H·atom, it is possible to study its chemistry in water over this range of temperatures. Arguably, the most important reaction to study is that of the H·atom with the bulk solvent. This reaction could provide an in situ source of H{sub 2} gas, which is added to CANDU reactors to suppress oxidative corrosion. The work described here concerns studies of the reaction of muonium with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O at temperatures up to 450{sup o}C.

  1. Kinetics of the reaction between H· and superheated water probed with muonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, C.; Brodovitch, J.-C.; Ghandi, K.; Kennedy, A.; Percival, P.W.; Smith, M.

    2011-01-01

    Safe operation of a supercritical water cooled reactor requires knowledge of the reaction kinetics of transient species formed by the radiolysis of water in the temperature range 300-650"oC. By using a light isotope of the H·atom, it is possible to study its chemistry in water over this range of temperatures. Arguably, the most important reaction to study is that of the H·atom with the bulk solvent. This reaction could provide an in situ source of H_2 gas, which is added to CANDU reactors to suppress oxidative corrosion. The work described here concerns studies of the reaction of muonium with H_2O and D_2O at temperatures up to 450"oC.

  2. Hydrolysis reaction of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. A kinetic and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge Marcelo; Jorge, Nelly Lidia; Grand, André; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    The degradation of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in aqueous solution is an hydrolysis reaction. Two products are identified: 2,4-dichlorophenol and glycolic acid. Reaction is investigated as a function of pH and temperature, and it is first-order kinetics and pH-dependent. Reaction is modeled in gas phase, where a proton catalyses the reaction. Critical points of PES are calculated at B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p), and aug-cc-pvqz//6-311++G(3df,2p) levels plus ZPE at 6-311++G(3df,2p) level. The activation barrier is 21.2 kcal/mol. Theoretical results agree with the experimental results. A second mechanism related with a Cl2Phsbnd Osbnd CH2sbnd COOH⋯H2O complex is found, but with a rate limiting step of 38.4 kcal/mol.

  3. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  4. Kinetics of the reaction of CH3O2 radicals with NO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallington, T.J.; Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, K.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of the gas-phase reaction of CH3O2 radicals with NO2 were studied at 295 K in 0.5-14 arm of SF6 diluent using pulse radiolysis combined with time-resolved UV-VIS spectroscopy. Rate data were obtained by following the loss of CH3O2 using a monitoring wavelength of 260 nm. The results...

  5. Preclusion of switch behavior in reaction networks with mass-action kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, C.

    2012-01-01

    We study networks taken with mass-action kinetics and provide a Jacobian criterion that applies to an arbitrary network to preclude the existence of multiple positive steady states within any stoichiometric class for any choice of rate constants. We are concerned with the characterization...... precludes the existence of degenerate steady states. Further, we relate injectivity of a network to that of the network obtained by adding outflow, or degradation, reactions for all species....

  6. The kinetics of the reduction reaction of plutonium(IV) with N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanxin Chen; Honbing Tang; Jinping Liu; Hui He

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of reduction reactions between N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) and plutonium(IV) in nitric acid solution have been studied spectrophotometrically. The kinetic equation of the reaction is determined to be -d[Pu(IV)]/dt = k 0 [Pu(IV)][DMHAN] 1.18 /[H + ] 2.22 at the beginning, where, the rate constant of the reaction (k 0 ) is 10.5 ± 1.8(mol/L) 1.04 s -1 at 14.5 deg C. By regressing of the time-concentration curve of the reaction, The complete rate equation is calculated as -d[Pu(IV)] / dt = k[Pu(IV)] 2 [DMHAN] 1.18 /[H + ] 2.22 / 8.12[Pu(III)]+95.9[Pu(IV)] with the reaction constant k about 1,000(mol/L) 1.04 s -1 at 14.5 deg C and an ionic strength (μ) of 4.0 mol/L. (author)

  7. Reactions of plutonium and uranium with water: Kinetics and potential hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    The chemistry and kinetics of reactions between water and the metals and hydrides of plutonium and uranium are described in an effort to consolidate information for assessing potential hazards associated with handling and storage. New experimental results and data from literature sources are presented. Kinetic dependencies on pH, salt concentration, temperature and other parameters are reviewed. Corrosion reactions of the metals in near-neutral solutions produce a fine hydridic powder plus hydrogen. The corrosion rate for plutonium in sea water is a thousand-fold faster than for the metal in distilled water and more than a thousand-fold faster than for uranium in sea water. Reaction rates for immersed hydrides of plutonium and uranium are comparable and slower than the corrosion rates for the respective metals. However, uranium trihydride is reported to react violently if a quantity greater than twenty-five grams is rapidly immersed in water. The possibility of a similar autothermic reaction for large quantities of plutonium hydride cannot be excluded. In addition to producing hydrogen, corrosion reactions convert the massive metals into material forms that are readily suspended in water and that are aerosolizable and potentially pyrophoric when dry. Potential hazards associated with criticality, environmental dispersal, spontaneous ignition and explosive gas mixtures are outlined

  8. Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Pt Overlayers Deposited onto a Gold Film: Ligand, Strain, and Ensemble Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Yu-Jia; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We study the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the catalytic process occurring at the cathode in fuel cells, on Pt layers prepared by electrodeposition onto an Au substrate. Using a nominal Pt layer by layer deposition method previously proposed, imperfect layers of Pt on Au are obtained. The ORR...

  9. The oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on Pt(111) from density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Skulason, Egill; Siahrostami, Samira

    2010-01-01

    We study the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism on a Pt(1 1 1) surface using density functional theory calculations We find that at low overpotentials the surface is covered with a half dissociated water layer We estimate the barrier for proton transfer to this surface and the barrier...

  10. Density functional studies of functionalized graphitic materials with late transition metals for oxygen reduction reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallejo, Federico Calle; Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Low-temperature fuel cells are appealing alternatives to the conventional internal combustion engines for transportation applications. However, in order for them to be commercially viable, effective, stable and low-cost electrocatalysts are needed for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) at the ca...

  11. Efficient oxygen reduction reaction using ruthenium tetrakis(diaquaplatinum)octacarboxyphthalocyanine catalyst supported on MWCNT platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maxakato, NW

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available -1 Electroanalysis 2011, 23, No. 2, 325 ? 329 Efficient Oxygen Reduction Reaction Using Ruthenium Tetrakis(diaquaplatinum)Octacarboxyphthalocyanine Catalyst Supported on MWCNT Platform Nobanathi W. Maxakato,a Solomon A. Mamuru,a Kenneth I. Ozoemena*a, b a...

  12. Ruthenium supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabena, LF

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available between 0 and 10 wt.%. The activity of the prepared nanocatalysts toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was characterized using the rotating disk electrode and voltammetry techniques. The ORR activity was higher at lower concentrations of Ru on N...

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartnig, C.B.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of solvent reorganization in the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction, i.e. O2+e-¿O2-, modeled as taking place in the outer Helmholtz plane. The first electron transfer step is usually considered the rate-determining step from many

  14. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Yan; Tong, Xi-Li; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Han, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ying-Yong; Jin, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Yong; Guo, Xiang-Yun

    2012-02-11

    Cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) were prepared by reducing copper acetate supported on graphite oxide using diethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent. The Cu(2)O/RGO composite exhibits excellent catalytic activity and remarkable tolerance to methanol and CO in the oxygen reduction reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  15. An experimental and kinetic investigation of premixed furan/oxygen/argon flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenyu; Yuan, Tao; Fournet, Rene; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Zhang, Kuiwen; Qi, Fei

    2011-04-01

    The detailed chemical structures of three low-pressure (35 Torr) premixed laminar furan/oxygen/argon flames with equivalence ratios of 1.4, 1.8 and 2.2 have been investigated by using tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry. About 40 combustion species including hydrocarbons and oxygenated intermediates have been identified by measurements of photoionization efficiency spectra. Mole fraction profiles of the flame species including reactants, intermediates and products have been determined by scanning burner position with some selected photon energies near ionization thresholds. Flame temperatures have been measured by a Pt-6%Rh/Pt-30%Rh thermocouple. A new mechanism involving 206 species and 1368 reactions has been proposed whose predictions are in reasonable agreement with measured species profiles for the three investigated flames. Rate-of-production and sensitivity analyses have been performed to track the key reaction paths governing furan consumption for different equivalence ratios. Both experimental and modeling results indicate that few aromatics could be formed in these flames. Furthermore, the current model has been validated against previous pyrolysis results of the literature obtained behind shock waves and the agreement is reasonable as well.

  16. Electroenzymatic Reactions With Oxygen on Laccase-Modified Electrodes in Anhydrous (Pure) Organic Solvent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarapolov, A.; Shleev, S.; Zaitseva, E.

    2007-01-01

    in two different ways: (i) by studying the electroreduction of oxygen in anhydrous DMSO via a direct electron transfer mechanism without proton donors and (ii) by doing the same experiments in the presence of laccase substrates, which display in pure organic solvents both the properties of electron......The electroenzymatic reactions of Trametes hirsuta laccase in the pure organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been investigated within the framework for potential use as a catalytic reaction scheme for oxygen reduction. The bioelectrochemical characteristics of laccase were investigated...... donors as well as the properties of weak acids. The results obtained with laccase in anhydrous DMSO were compared with those obtained previously in aqueous buffer. It was shown that in the absence of proton donors under oxygenated conditions, formation of superoxide anion radicals is prevented at bare...

  17. Electrocatalytic behavior of thin Co-Te-O films in oxygen evolution and reduction reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashkova, V.; Kitova, S.; Vitanov, T.

    2007-01-01

    Co-Te-O catalytic films, obtain by vacuum co-evaporation of Co and TeO 2 are investigated as electrocatalysts for oxygen reactions in alkaline media. Bifunctional gas-diffusion oxygen electrodes (gde) are prepared by direct deposition of catalyst films on gas-diffusion membranes (gdm) consisting of hydrophobized carbon blacks or hydrophobized 'Ebonex' (suboxides of titanium dioxide). Thus obtained electrodes with different atomic ratio R Co/Te of the catalyst, treated at different temperatures were electrochemically tested by means of cyclic voltammetry and steady-state voltammetry. It is shown that the electrodes exhibit high catalytic activity toward oxygen evolution and reduction reaction despite very low catalyst loading of about 0.05-0.5 mg cm -2

  18. SABIO-RK: an updated resource for manually curated biochemical reaction kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Maja; Weidemann, Andreas; Kania, Renate; Müller, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract SABIO-RK (http://sabiork.h-its.org/) is a manually curated database containing data about biochemical reactions and their reaction kinetics. The data are primarily extracted from scientific literature and stored in a relational database. The content comprises both naturally occurring and alternatively measured biochemical reactions and is not restricted to any organism class. The data are made available to the public by a web-based search interface and by web services for programmatic access. In this update we describe major improvements and extensions of SABIO-RK since our last publication in the database issue of Nucleic Acid Research (2012). (i) The website has been completely revised and (ii) allows now also free text search for kinetics data. (iii) Additional interlinkages with other databases in our field have been established; this enables users to gain directly comprehensive knowledge about the properties of enzymes and kinetics beyond SABIO-RK. (iv) Vice versa, direct access to SABIO-RK data has been implemented in several systems biology tools and workflows. (v) On request of our experimental users, the data can be exported now additionally in spreadsheet formats. (vi) The newly established SABIO-RK Curation Service allows to respond to specific data requirements. PMID:29092055

  19. Bacillus anthracis o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase: reaction kinetics and a novel inhibitor mimicking its reaction intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Suk, Dae-Hwan; Cai, Feng; Crich, David; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2008-11-25

    o-Succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.26) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of o-succinylbenzoate (OSB) and CoA to form OSB-CoA, the fourth step of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus anthracis. Gene knockout studies have highlighted this enzyme as a potential target for the discovery of new antibiotics. Here we report the first studies on the kinetic mechanism of B. anthracis OSB-CoA synthetase, classifying it as an ordered bi uni uni bi ping-pong mechanism. Through a series of pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetic studies in conjunction with direct binding studies, it is demonstrated that CoA, the last substrate to bind, strongly activates the first half-reaction after the first round of turnover. The activation of the first half-reaction is most likely achieved by CoA stabilizing conformations of the enzyme in the "F" form, which slowly isomerize back to the E form. Thus, the kinetic mechanism of OSB-CoA synthetase may be more accurately described as an ordered bi uni uni bi iso ping-pong mechanism. The substrate specificity of OSB-CoA synthetase was probed using a series of OSB analogues with alterations in the carboxylate groups. OSB-CoA shows a strong preference for OSB over all of the analogues tested as none were active except 4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-oxobutyric acid which exhibited a 100-fold decrease in k(cat)/K(m). On the basis of an understanding of OSB-CoA synthetase's kinetic mechanism and substrate specificity, a reaction intermediate analogue of OSB-AMP, 5'-O-{N-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-oxobutyl}adenosine sulfonamide (TFMP-butyl-AMS), was designed and synthesized. This inhibitor was found to be an uncompetitive inhibitor to CoA and a mixed-type inhibitor to ATP and OSB with low micromolar inhibition constants. Collectively, these results should serve as an important forerunner to more detailed and extensive inhibitor design studies aimed at developing lead compounds against the OSB-CoA synthetase

  20. Bacillus anthracis o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase: reaction kinetics and a novel inhibitor mimicking its reaction intermediate †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Suk, Dae-Hwan; Cai, Feng; Crich, David; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    O-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.26) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of o-succinylbenzoate (OSB) and CoA to form OSB-CoA, the fourth step of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus anthracis. Gene knockout studies have highlighted this enzyme as a potential target for the discovery of new antibiotics. Here we report the first studies on the kinetic mechanism of B. anthracis OSB-CoA synthetase, classifying it as an ordered Bi Uni Uni Bi ping-pong mechanism. Through a series of pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetic studies in conjunction with direct-binding studies, it is demonstrated that CoA, the last substrate to bind, strongly activates the first half-reaction after the first round of turnover. The activation of the first-half reaction is most likely achieved by CoA stabilizing conformations of the enzyme in the ‘F’ form, which slowly isomerize back to the E form. Thus, the kinetic mechanism of OSB-CoA synthetase may be more accurately described as an ordered Bi Uni Uni Bi Iso ping-pong mechanism. The substrate specificity of OSB-CoA synthetase was probed using a series of OSB analogs with alterations in the carboxylate groups. OSB-CoA shows a strong preference for OSB over all of the analogs tested as none were active except 4-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-oxobutyric acid which exhibited a 100-fold decrease in kcat/Km. Based on an understanding of OSB-CoA synthetase’s kinetic mechanism and substrate specificity, a reaction intermediate analog of OSB-AMP, 5’-O-(N-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-oxobutyl) adenosine sulfonamide (TFMP-butyl-AMS), was designed and synthesized. This inhibitor was found to be an uncompetitive inhibitor to CoA and a mixed-type inhibitor to ATP and OSB with low micromolar inhibition constants. Collectively, these results should serve as an important forerunner to more detailed and extensive inhibitor design studies aimed at developing lead compounds against the OSB-CoA synthetase class of

  1. Influence of oxygen uptake kinetics on physical performance in youth soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncaster, Greg; Marwood, Simon; Iga, John; Unnithan, Viswanath

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relationship between oxygen uptake kinetics (VO2 kinetics) and physical measures associated with soccer match play, within a group of highly trained youth soccer players. Seventeen highly trained youth soccer players (age: 13.3 ± 0.4 year, self-assessed Tanner stage: 3 ± 1) volunteered for the study. Players initially completed an incremental treadmill protocol to exhaustion, to establish gaseous exchange threshold (GET) and VO2max (59.1 ± 5.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1)). On subsequent visits, players completed a step transition protocol from rest-moderate-intensity exercise, followed by an immediate transition, and from moderate- to severe-intensity exercise (moderate: 95 % GET, severe: 60 %∆), during which VO2 kinetics were determined. Physical soccer-based performance was assessed using a maximal Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) and via GPS-derived measures of physical soccer performance during soccer match play, three 2 × 20 min, 11 v 11 matches, to gain measures of physical performance during soccer match play. Partial correlations revealed significant inverse relationships between the unloaded-to-moderate transition time constant (tau) and: Yo-Yo IR1 performance (r = -0.58, P = 0.02) and GPS variables [total distance (TD): r = -0.64, P = 0.007, high-speed running (HSR): r = -0.64, P = 0.008 and high-speed running efforts (HSReff): r = -0.66, P = 0.005]. Measures of VO2 kinetics are related to physical measures associated with soccer match play and could potentially be used to distinguish between those of superior physical performance, within a group of highly trained youth soccer players.

  2. Study of kinetics of reaction of lithium deuteride powder with O2, CO2 and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gan; Lu Guangda; Jing Wenyong; Qin Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of reaction of lithium deuteride powder with O 2 , CO 2 and water vapor is studied. The experimental results show that lithium deuteride reacts with O 2 and CO 2 at very small reaction rate but with water vapor at comparatively larger rate at room temperature (≅28 degree C). The reaction process with water vapor could be described using the unreacted shrinking core model. The second-order kinetics is appropriate for the chemical reaction on the surface of lithium deuteride and reaction rate constant is 0.281 kPa -1 ·min -1

  3. Reaction kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokcen, Dincer; Bae, Sang-Eun; Brankovic, Stanko R.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers is presented. The model system was Pt submonolayer deposition on Au(1 1 1) via red-ox replacement of Pb and Cu UPD monolayers on Au(1 1 1). The kinetics of a single replacement reaction was studied using the formalism of the comprehensive analytical model developed to fit the open circuit potential transients from deposition experiments. The practical reaction kinetics parameters like reaction half life, reaction order and reaction rate constant are determined and discussed with their relevance to design and control of deposition experiments. The effects of transport limitation and the role of the anions/electrolyte on deposition kinetics are investigated and their significance to design of effective deposition process is discussed.

  4. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  5. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  6. Kinetic study of the reaction of uranium with various carbon-containing gases; Etude cinetique de la reaction sur l'uranium de differents gaz carbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feron, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-09-15

    The kinetic study of the reaction U + CO{sub 2} and U + CO has been performed by a thermogravimetric method on a spherical uranium powder, in temperature ranges respectively from 460 to 690 deg. C and from 570 to 850 deg. C. The reaction with carbon dioxide leads to uranium dioxide. A carbon deposition takes place at the same time. The global reactions is the result of two reactions: U + 2 CO{sub 2} {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 CO U + CO{sub 2} {yields} UO{sub 2} + C The reaction with carbon monoxide leads to a mixture of dioxide UO{sub 2}, dicarbide UC{sub 2} and free carbon. The main reaction can be written. U + CO {yields} 1/2 UO{sub 2} + 1/2 UC{sub 2} The free carbon results of the disproportionation of the carbon monoxide. A remarkable separation of the two phases UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2} can be observed. A mechanism accounting for the phenomenon has been proposed. The two reactions U + CO{sub 2} and U + CO begin with a long germination period, after which, the reaction velocity seems to be limited in both cases by the ionic diffusion of oxygen through the uranium dioxide. (author) [French] L'etude cinetique des reactions U sol + CO{sub 2} gaz et U sol + CO gaz a ete effectuee par thermogravirnetrie sur une poudre d'uranium a grains spheriques, les domaines de temperature etudies s'etendant respectivement de 460 a 690 deg. C et de 570 a 850 deg. C. L'action du dioxyde de carbone conduit au dioxyde d'uranium UO{sub 2}; il se produit en meme temps un depot de carbone. La reaction globale resulte des deux reactions: U + 2 CO{sub 2} {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 CO U + CO{sub 2} {yields} UO{sub 2} + C Le mono-oxyde de carbone conduit a un melange de dioxyde UO{sub 2}, de dicarbure UC{sub 2} et de carbone libre. La reaction principale s'ecrit: U + CO {yields} 1/2 UO{sub 2} + 1/2 UC{sub 2} Le carbone libre provient de la dismutation du mono-oxyde de carbone. On observe une separation remarquable des deux phases UO{sub 2} et UC{sub 2}; un mecanisme rendant compte de ce phenomene a

  7. Laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel: the thermodynamics of the oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J; Kaplan, A F H [Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Luleaa University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleaa (Sweden); Petring, D [Fraunhofer-Institute for Laser Technology (ILT), Steinbachstrasse 15, Aachen (Germany); Kumar, R V [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Al-Mashikhi, S O; Voisey, K T [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jpowell@laserexp.co.uk

    2009-01-07

    In a considerable proportion of the published work on the subject of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel, the details of the oxidation reaction are overlooked or confused. For example, it is not uncommon for the oxidized material to be attributed with the physical characteristics of iron rather than iron oxide. Also, the fact that the oxidation reaction cannot take place above a certain temperature limit is usually overlooked. This paper presents, for the first time, an in-depth analysis of the Iron to FeO oxidation reaction in the context of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel. The paper concludes by presenting a number of guidelines for future theoretical models.

  8. Laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel: the thermodynamics of the oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J; Kaplan, A F H; Petring, D; Kumar, R V; Al-Mashikhi, S O; Voisey, K T

    2009-01-01

    In a considerable proportion of the published work on the subject of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel, the details of the oxidation reaction are overlooked or confused. For example, it is not uncommon for the oxidized material to be attributed with the physical characteristics of iron rather than iron oxide. Also, the fact that the oxidation reaction cannot take place above a certain temperature limit is usually overlooked. This paper presents, for the first time, an in-depth analysis of the Iron to FeO oxidation reaction in the context of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel. The paper concludes by presenting a number of guidelines for future theoretical models.

  9. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  10. Quantification of atmospheric oxygen levels during the Paleoproterozoic using paleosol compositions and iron oxidation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Sreenivas, Bulusu; Sharma, Subrata Das; Sugimori, Hirokazu

    2011-07-01

    The increase in atmospheric oxygen during the Precambrian is a key to understand the co-evolution of life and environment and has remained as a debatable topic. Among various proxies for the estimation of atmospheric oxygen levels, paleosols, ancient weathering profiles, can provide a quantitative pattern of atmospheric oxygen increase during the Precambrian period of Earth history. We have re-evaluated the chemical compositions of paleosols, and presented a new method of applying Fe 2+ oxidation kinetics to the Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ concentrations in paleosols to decipher the quantitative partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen ( P) between 2.5 and 2.0 Ga. We first estimated the compaction factor ( CF, the fraction of original thickness) using the immobile elements such as Ti, Al and Zr on equal volume basis, which was then used to calculate retention fractions ( M R), a mass ratio of paleosol to parent rock, of redox-sensitive elements. The CF and Fe R values were evaluated for factors such as homogeneity of immobile elements, erosion, and formation time of weathering. Fe R increased gradually within the time window of ˜2.5-2.1 Ga and remained close to 1.0 since ˜2.1 Ga onwards. Mn R also increased gradually similar to Fe R but at a slower rate and near complete retention was observed ˜1.85 Ga, suggesting an almost continuous increase in the oxidation of Fe 2+ and Mn 2+ in paleosols ranging in age between ˜2.5 and 1.9 Ga. We have modeled P variations during the Paleoproterozoic by applying Fe 2+ oxidation kinetics to the Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ concentrations in paleosols, which enabled us to derive an Fe 2+ oxidation term referred to as ψ. Possible changes in temperature and P during this time window and their effects on resulting models of P evolution have been also considered. We assumed four cases for the calculations of P variations between 2.5 and 2.0 Ga: no change in either temperature or P, long-term change in only P, long-term changes in both temperature and P

  11. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  12. Fundamental understanding of oxygen reduction and reaction behavior and developing high performance and stable hetero-structured cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-11-14

    New unique hetero-structured cathode has been developed in this project. La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as a surface catalyst with interstitial oxygen defects was introduced onto the state-of-the-art (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode to enhance the surface-limited ORR kinetics on SOFC cathode. Furthermore, the hetero-structured cathode surface maintains high activity under electrode polarization with much less negative effects from surface cation segregation of Sr, which is known to cause degradation issues for conventional LSCF and LSC cathodes, thus improving the cathode long-term stability. The interface chemistry distribution and oxygen transport properties have been studied to prove the enhancement of power out and stability of LNO-infiltrated LSCF cathode. The further investigation demonstrates that CeO2 & La2-xNiO4+δ (x=0-0.2) co-infiltration is a simple and cost-effective method to improve both performance and stability of LSCF cathode by limiting nano-particles growth/delamination and further improve the surface stability. For the first time, a physical model is proposed to illustrate how unique interstitial species on hetero-structured cathode surface work to regulate the exchange rate of the incorporation reaction. Meanwhile, fundamental investigation of the surface oxygen exchange and bulk oxygen transport properties under over-potential conditions across cathode materials have been carried out in this project, which were discussed and compared to the Nernst equation that is generally applied to treat any oxide electrodes under equilibrium.

  13. Electrocatalysts of platinum, cobalt and nickel prepared by mechanical alloying for the oxygen reduction reaction in H2SO4 0.5M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Vargas G, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Metallic powders of Pt, Co and Nickel were processed by mechanical alloyed and electrocatalysts were synthesized for the oxygen reduction reaction, applicable in fuel cells. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using X-ray Diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloyed powders formed agglomerates that consist of crystalline particles of nano metric size. Its were obtained polarization curves by the Electrode of Rotational Disk technique in a solution of H 2 SO 4 0.5 M, used as electrolyte, to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of mechanically alloyed powders. Tafel graphics were built to determine the kinetic parameters of each electro catalyst. The PtCoNi alloy exhibited the biggest electrocatalytic activity, with the smallest over potential for the oxygen reduction reaction. (Author)

  14. Growth kinetics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays in clean oxygen-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Jung Bin; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Chernov, Alexander A; Noy, Aleksandr

    2011-12-27

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important technological system, as well as a fascinating system for studying basic principles of nanomaterials synthesis; yet despite continuing efforts for the past decade many important questions about this process remain largely unexplained. We present a series of parametric ethylene chemical vapor deposition growth studies in a "hot-wall" reactor using ultrapure process gases that reveal the fundamental kinetics of the CNT growth. Our data show that the growth rate is proportional to the concentration of the carbon feedstock and monotonically decreases with the concentration of hydrogen gas and that the most important parameter determining the rate of the CNT growth is the production rate of active carbon precursor in the gas phase reaction. The growth termination times obtained with the purified gas mixtures were strikingly insensitive to variations in both hydrogen and ethylene pressures ruling out the carbon encapsulation of the catalyst as the main process termination cause.

  15. Adverse reactions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy - case description of a generalised seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobelska Kinga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a safe treatment, provided fulfilling certain rules of patient qualifications to treatment, as well as supervision over the course of therapy by qualified medical staff. Side effects reported in the literature are rare, and are usually mild and transient. Professional medical staff allows minimising the adverse events occurrence. The scale of complications is unknown, especially in Polish hyperbaric center. Careful analysis could be used to develop prevention procedures for patients of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric Oxygen Centre and Wound Treatment in Bydgoszcz during 28 months performed hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in case of 423 patients. During this period, adverse events occurred occasionally. 17 cases have been reported. Authors described study case 77 year-old patient who was admitted due to non-healing wound-left lower abdomen (state after radiotherapy. During the fourth session, on decompression phase patient have had a generalized seizure (tonic-clonic. The decompression was stopped, the oxygen supply was disconnected but only after the drug administration seizures terminated. The most likely causative agent of the adverse reactions of the patient treated with HBOT was the oxygen toxic effect on the brain tissue. However, analyzing the circumstances of the seizure termination: phase of decompression at the pressure 2ATA and lack of oxygen disconnection response, it cannot be excluded other causes of this complication.

  16. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers: transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Giselle M; Kremer, Gilberto M; Marques, Wilson Jr; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solutions of the Boltzmann equations are determined through an expansion in Sonine polynomials up to the first order, using the Chapman–Enskog method, in a chemical regime for which the reaction process is close to its final equilibrium state. The non-equilibrium deviations are explicitly calculated for what concerns the thermal–diffusion ratio and coefficients of shear viscosity, diffusion and thermal conductivity. The theoretical and formal analysis developed in the present paper is complemented with some numerical simulations performed for different concentrations of reactants and products of the reaction as well as for both exothermic and endothermic chemical processes. The results reveal that chemical reactions without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the transport properties of the mixture. Oppositely to the case of reactions with activation energy, the coefficients of shear viscosity and thermal conductivity become larger than those of an inert mixture when the reactions are exothermic. An application of the non-barrier model and its detailed transport picture are included in this paper, in order to investigate the dynamics of the local perturbations on the constituent number densities, and velocity and temperature of the whole mixture, induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations. It is shown that for the longitudinal disturbances there exist two hydrodynamic sound modes, one purely diffusive hydrodynamic mode and one kinetic mode

  17. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers: transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Marques, Wilson, Jr.; Jacinta Soares, Ana

    2011-03-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solutions of the Boltzmann equations are determined through an expansion in Sonine polynomials up to the first order, using the Chapman-Enskog method, in a chemical regime for which the reaction process is close to its final equilibrium state. The non-equilibrium deviations are explicitly calculated for what concerns the thermal-diffusion ratio and coefficients of shear viscosity, diffusion and thermal conductivity. The theoretical and formal analysis developed in the present paper is complemented with some numerical simulations performed for different concentrations of reactants and products of the reaction as well as for both exothermic and endothermic chemical processes. The results reveal that chemical reactions without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the transport properties of the mixture. Oppositely to the case of reactions with activation energy, the coefficients of shear viscosity and thermal conductivity become larger than those of an inert mixture when the reactions are exothermic. An application of the non-barrier model and its detailed transport picture are included in this paper, in order to investigate the dynamics of the local perturbations on the constituent number densities, and velocity and temperature of the whole mixture, induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations. It is shown that for the longitudinal disturbances there exist two hydrodynamic sound modes, one purely diffusive hydrodynamic mode and one kinetic mode.

  18. A Kinetic Study of the Gas-Phase Reaction of OH with Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukov, Mikhail G.; Dellinger, Barry; Knyazev, Vadim D.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental, temperature-dependent kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical with molecular bromine (reaction 1) has been performed using a pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed-laser-induced fluorescence technique over a wide temperature range of 297 – 766 K, and at pressures between 6.68 and 40.29 kPa of helium. The experimental rate coefficients for reaction 1 demonstrate no correlation with pressure and exhibit a negative temperature dependence with a slight negative curvature in the Arrhenius plot. A non-linear least-squares fit with two floating parameters of the temperature dependent k1(T) data set using an equation of the form k1(T) = ATn yields the recommended expression k1(T) = 1.85×10−9T − 0.66 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 for the temperature dependence of the reaction 1 rate coefficient. The potential energy surface (PES) of reaction 1 was investigated using quantum chemistry methods. The reaction proceeds through formation of a weakly bound OH···Br2 complex and a PES saddle point with an energy below that of the reactants. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient was modeled using the RRKM method on the basis of the calculated PES. PMID:16854030

  19. The influence of different space-related physiological variations on exercise capacity determined by oxygen uptake kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, J.

    Oxygen uptake kinetics, following defined variations of work load changes allow to estimate the contribution of aerob and anaerob energy supply which is the base for determining work capacity. Under the aspect of long duration missions with application of adequate dosed countermeasures, a reliable estimate of the astronaut's work capacity is important to adjust the necessary inflight training. Since the kinetics of oxygen uptake originate in the working muscle group itself, while measurements are performed at the mouth, various influences within the oxygen transport system might disturb the determinations. There are not only detraining effects but also well-known other influences, such as blood- and fluid shifts induced by weightlessness. They might have an impact on the circulatory system. Some of these factors have been simulated by immersion, blood donation, and changing of the body position.

  20. Kinetics of barium sulphate reaction crystallization in crystallizers with internal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Koralewska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic calculation results describing the observed nucleation and growth rates of barium sulphate crystals precipitated in an integrated reaction-crystallization process in a barium sulphate-ammonium chloride-water system are presented and analyzed. The scope of experiments included two continuous model DTM-type crystallizers (Draft Tube Magma with internal circulation of the suspension forced by a liquid jet-pump device responsible for stable and intensive enough ascending/descending flow of BaSO4 crystal magma in a mixing chamber. For comparison purposes the experimental data corresponding to a continuous DT (Draft Tube crystallizer with propeller agitator are presented and discussed. The various types of laboratory crystallizers used were fed with concentrated water solution of barium chloride (of 10 or 24 mass % and - in a stoichiometric proportion - crystalline ammonium sulphate, assuming isothermal (348 K and hydrodynamic (average residence time of suspension in a crystallizer: 900 s process conditions. The observed nucleation and growth rates of barium sulphate crystals were estimated on the basis of crystal size distributions (CSDs using convenient calculation scheme derived for an MSMPR (Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal model approach. Considering the experimental population density distribution courses, a size-dependent growth (SDG phenomenon was taken into account in the kinetic calculations. Five SDG kinetic models recommended in the accessible literature were used for kinetic parameter values estimation. It was proved statistically, that Rojkowski’s two SDG models (hyperbolic and exponential best suit for our own experimental data description. The experimental data presented can be practically applied for improving the constructions of liquid jet-pump DTM crystallizers recommended for reaction crystallization of sparingly soluble inorganic salts (especially for high concentrations of reaction substrates in the modern

  1. Searching out the hydrogen absorption/desorption limiting reaction factors: Strategies allowing to increase kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeaiter, Ali, E-mail: ali.zeaiter@femto-st.fr; Chapelle, David; Nardin, Philippe

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A macro scale thermodynamic model that simulates the response of a FeTi-X hydride tank is performed, and validated experimentally. • A sensibility study to identify the most influent input variables that can changes very largely the reaction rate. - Abstract: Hydrogen gas has become one of the most promising energy carriers. Main breakthrough concerns hydrogen solid storage, specially based on intermetallic material use. Regarding the raw material abundance and cost, the AB type alloy FeTi is an auspicious candidate to store hydrogen. Its absorption/desorption kinetics is a basic hindrance to common use, compared with more usual hydrides. First, discussions based on literature help us identifying the successive steps leading to metal hydriding, and allow to introduce the physical parameters which drive or limit the reaction. This analysis leads us to suggest strategies in order to increase absorption/desorption kinetics. Attention is then paid to a thermofluidodynamic model, allowing to describe a macroscopic solid storage reactor. Thus, we can achieve a simulation which describes the overall reaction inside the hydrogen reactor and, by varying the sub-mentioned parameters (thermal conductivity, the powder granularity, environment heat exchange…), we attempt to hierarchy the reaction limiting factors. These simulations are correlated to absorption/desorption experiments for which pressure, temperature and hydrogen flow are recorded.

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the reaction between biological catecholamines and chlorinated methylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimić, Dušan S.; Milenković, Dejan A.; Marković, Jasmina M. Dimitrić; Marković, Zoran S.

    2018-05-01

    The antiradical potency of catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, L-DOPA), metabolites of dopamine (homovanillic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and catechol towards substituted methylperoxy radicals is investigated. The thermodynamic parameters, together with the kinetic approach, are used to determine the most probable mechanism of action. The natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules are utilised to explain the highest reactivity of trichloromethylperoxy radical. The preferred mechanism is dependent both on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters . The number of chlorine atoms on radical, the presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bond and number of hydroxy groups attached to the aromatic ring significantly influence the mechanism. The results suggest that sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) is the most probable for reaction with methylperoxy and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) for reaction with trichloromethylperoxy radicals, with a gradual transition between SPLET and HAT for other two radicals. Due to the significant deprotonation of molecules containing the carboxyl group, the respective anions are also investigated. The HAT and SPLET mechanisms are highly competitive in reaction with MP radical, while the dominant mechanism towards chlorinated radicals is HAT. The reactions in methanol and benzene are also discussed.

  3. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.

    2013-01-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ 0 =ℏω 0 /k B T where ω 0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ 0 0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the

  4. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); Odinokov, A. V. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow (Russian Federation); Titov, S. V. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 3-1/12, Building 6, Obuha pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the

  5. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Changhua [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); College of Chemistry and Biology, Beihua University, Jilin 132013 (China); Zhang, Xintong, E-mail: xtzhang@nenu.edu.cn [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Liu, Yichun [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in photocatalysis process is focused. • Multi-electron transfer ORR is reviewed. • This review provides a guide to access to enhanced photocatalysis via multi-electron transfer. - Abstract: Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  6. OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS DURING INCREMENTAL- AND DECREMENTAL-RAMP CYCLE ERGOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadıl Özyener

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2 response to incremental-ramp cycle ergometry typically demonstrates lagged-linear first-order kinetics with a slope of ~10-11 ml·min-1·W-1, both above and below the lactate threshold (ӨL, i.e. there is no discernible VO2 slow component (or "excess" VO2 above ӨL. We were interested in determining whether a reverse ramp profile would yield the same response dynamics. Ten healthy males performed a maximum incremental -ramp (15-30 W·min-1, depending on fitness. On another day, the work rate (WR was increased abruptly to the incremental maximum and then decremented at the same rate of 15-30 W.min-1 (step-decremental ramp. Five subjects also performed a sub-maximal ramp-decremental test from 90% of ӨL. VO2 was determined breath-by-breath from continuous monitoring of respired volumes (turbine and gas concentrations (mass spectrometer. The incremental-ramp VO2-WR slope was 10.3 ± 0.7 ml·min-1·W-1, whereas that of the descending limb of the decremental ramp was 14.2 ± 1.1 ml·min-1·W-1 (p < 0.005. The sub-maximal decremental-ramp slope, however, was only 9. 8 ± 0.9 ml·min-1·W-1: not significantly different from that of the incremental-ramp. This suggests that the VO2 response in the supra-ӨL domain of incremental-ramp exercise manifest not actual, but pseudo, first-order kinetics

  7. Kinetics of highly vibrationally excited O2(X) molecules in inductively-coupled oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annušová, Adriana; Marinov, Daniil; Booth, Jean-Paul; Sirse, Nishant; Lino da Silva, Mário; Lopez, Bruno; Guerra, Vasco

    2018-04-01

    The high degree of vibrational excitation of O2 ground state molecules recently observed in inductively coupled plasma discharges is investigated experimentally in more detail and interpreted using a detailed self-consistent 0D global kinetic model for oxygen plasmas. Additional experimental results are presented and used to validate the model. The vibrational kinetics considers vibrational levels up to v = 41 and accounts for electron impact excitation and de-excitation (e-V), vibration-to-translation relaxation (V-T) in collisions with O2 molecules and O atoms, vibration-to-vibration energy exchanges (V-V), excitation of electronically excited states, dissociative electron attachment, and electron impact dissociation. Measurements were performed at pressures of 10–80 mTorr (1.33 and 10.67 Pa) and radio frequency (13.56 MHz) powers up to 500 W. The simulation results are compared with the absolute densities in each O2 vibrational level obtained by high sensitivity absorption spectroscopy measurements of the Schumann–Runge bands for O2(X, v = 4–18), O(3 P) atom density measurements by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) calibrated against Xe, and laser photodetachment measurements of the O‑ negative ions. The highly excited O2(X, v) distribution exhibits a shape similar to a Treanor-Gordiets distribution, but its origin lies in electron impact e-V collisions and not in V-V up-pumping, in contrast to what happens in all other molecular gases known to date. The relaxation of vibrational quanta is mainly due to V-T energy-transfer collisions with O atoms and to electron impact dissociation of vibrationally excited molecules, e+O2(X, v)→O(3P)+O(3P).

  8. Locomotor muscle fatigue does not alter oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hopker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The slow component (VO2sc that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre fatigue condition or rest for 33 minutes (control condition according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-second maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min-1. Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and VO2max determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue (P = 0.03, the VO2sc was not significantly different between the pre fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min-1 and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min-1 condition (P = 0.50. Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions (P = 0.48 but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition (P < 0.01 suggesting higher muscle recruitment. These results demonstrate experimentally that locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the VO2 kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the VO2sc is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  9. Locomotor Muscle Fatigue Does Not Alter Oxygen Uptake Kinetics during High-Intensity Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopker, James G; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Azzalin, Andrea; Carpenter, Roger; Marcora, Samuele M

    2016-01-01

    The [Formula: see text] slow component ([Formula: see text]) that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre-fatigue condition) or rest for 33 min (control condition) according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-s maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min -1 . Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE) were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and [Formula: see text] determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue ( P = 0.03), the [Formula: see text] was not significantly different between the pre-fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min -1 ) and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min -1 ) condition ( P = 0.50). Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions ( P = 0.48) but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition ( P locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the [Formula: see text] kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the [Formula: see text] is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  10. Reaction kinetics in open reactors and serial transfers between closed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis, Alex; Lacoste, David; Gaspard, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics of reaction networks are extended to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and serial transfers. On the basis of their stoichiometry matrix, the conservation laws and the cycles of the network are determined for both dynamics. It is shown that the CSTR and serial transfer dynamics are equivalent in the limit where the time interval between the transfers tends to zero proportionally to the ratio of the fractions of fresh to transferred solutions. These results are illustrated with a finite cross-catalytic reaction network and an infinite reaction network describing mass exchange between polymers. Serial transfer dynamics is typically used in molecular evolution experiments in the context of research on the origins of life. The present study is shedding a new light on the role played by serial transfer parameters in these experiments.

  11. Non-equilibrium reactive flux: A unified framework for slow and fast reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2017-10-21

    The flux formulation of reaction rate theory is recast in terms of the expectation value of the reactive flux with an initial condition that corresponds to a non-equilibrium, factorized reactant density. In the common case of slow reactive processes, the non-equilibrium expression reaches the plateau regime only slightly slower than the equilibrium flux form. When the reactants are described by a single quantum state, as in the case of electron transfer reactions, the factorized reactant density describes the true initial condition of the reactive process. In such cases, the time integral of the non-equilibrium flux expression yields the reactant population as a function of time, allowing characterization of the dynamics in cases where there is no clear separation of time scales and thus a plateau regime cannot be identified. The non-equilibrium flux offers a unified approach to the kinetics of slow and fast chemical reactions and is ideally suited to mixed quantum-classical methods.

  12. Formation of C-C and C-O bonds and oxygen removal in reactions of alkanediols, alkanols, and alkanals on copper catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sad, María E; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-12-21

    This study reports evidence for catalytic deoxygenation of alkanols, alkanals, and alkanediols on dispersed Cu clusters with minimal use of external H(2) and with the concurrent formation of new C-C and C-O bonds. These catalysts selectively remove O-atoms from these oxygenates as CO or CO(2) through decarbonylation or decarboxylation routes, respectively, that use C-atoms present within reactants or as H(2)O using H(2) added or formed in situ from CO/H(2)O mixtures via water-gas shift. Cu catalysts fully convert 1,3-propanediol to equilibrated propanol-propanal intermediates that subsequently form larger oxygenates via aldol-type condensation and esterification routes without detectable involvement of the oxide supports. Propanal-propanol-H(2) equilibration is mediated by their chemisorption and interconversion at surfaces via C-H and O-H activation and propoxide intermediates. The kinetic effects of H(2), propanal, and propanol pressures on turnover rates, taken together with measured selectivities and the established chemical events for base-catalyzed condensation and esterification reactions, indicate that both reactions involve kinetically relevant bimolecular steps in which propoxide species, acting as the base, abstract the α-hydrogen in adsorbed propanal (condensation) or attack the electrophilic C-atom at its carbonyl group (esterification). These weakly held basic alkoxides render Cu surfaces able to mediate C-C and C-O formation reactions typically catalyzed by basic sites inherent in the catalyst, instead of provided by coadsorbed organic moieties. Turnover rates for condensation and esterification reactions decrease with increasing Cu dispersion, because low-coordination corner and edge atoms prevalent on small clusters stabilize adsorbed intermediates and increase the activation barriers for the bimolecular kinetically relevant steps required for both reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Investigation of a Pt-Fe/C catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Luna, A. M.; Bonesi, A.; Triaca, W. E.; Blasi, A. Di; Stassi, A.; Baglio, V.; Antonucci, V.; Arico, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Three cathode catalysts (60% Pt/C, 30% Pt/C and 60% Pt-Fe/C), with a particle size of about 2-3 nm, were prepared to investigate the effect of ethanol cross-over on cathode surfaces. All samples were studied in terms of structure and morphology by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. Their electrocatalytic behavior in terms of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated and compared using a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The tolerance of cathode catalysts in the presence of ethanol was evaluated. The Pt-Fe/C catalyst showed both higher ORR activity and tolerance to ethanol cross-over than Pt/C catalysts. Moreover, the more promising catalysts were tested in 5 cm 2 DEFC single cells at 60 and 80 o C. An improvement in single cell performance was observed in the presence of the Pt-Fe catalyst, due to an enhancement in the oxygen reduction kinetics. The maximum power density was 53 mW cm -2 at 2 bar rel. cathode pressure and 80 o C.

  14. Experimental study of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals: kinetics and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braure, Tristan; Bedjanian, Yuri; Romanias, Manolis N; Morin, Julien; Riffault, Véronique; Tomas, Alexandre; Coddeville, Patrice

    2014-10-09

    The kinetics of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals has been studied using a low-pressure flow tube reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + C10H16 → products (1), OD + C10H16 → products (2). The rate constants of the title reactions were determined using four different approaches: either monitoring the kinetics of OH (OD) radicals or limonene consumption in excess of limonene or of the radicals, respectively (absolute method), and by the relative rate method using either the reaction OH (OD) + Br2 or OH (OD) + DMDS (dimethyl disulfide) as the reference one and following HOBr (DOBr) formation or DMDS and limonene consumption, respectively. As a result of the absolute and relative measurements, the overall rate coefficients, k1 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) exp((515 ± 50)/T) and k2 = (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(-11) exp((575 ± 60)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), were determined at a pressure of 1 Torr of helium over the temperature ranges 220-360 and 233-353 K, respectively. k1 was found to be pressure independent over the range 0.5-5 Torr. There are two possible pathways for the reaction between OH (OD) and limonene: addition of the radical to one of the limonene double bonds (reactions 1a and 2a ) and abstraction of a hydrogen atom (reactions 1b and 2b ), resulting in the formation of H2O (HOD). Measurements of the HOD yield as a function of temperature led to the following branching ratio of the H atom abstraction channel: k2b/k2 = (0.07 ± 0.03) × exp((460 ± 140)/T) for T = (253-355) K.

  15. A fast-start pacing strategy speeds pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics and improves supramaximal running performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Turnes

    Full Text Available The focus of the present study was to investigate the effects of a fast-start pacing strategy on running performance and pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2 kinetics at the upper boundary of the severe-intensity domain. Eleven active male participants (28±10 years, 70±5 kg, 176±6 cm, 57±4 mL/kg/min visited the laboratory for a series of tests that were performed until exhaustion: 1 an incremental test; 2 three laboratory test sessions performed at 95, 100 and 110% of the maximal aerobic speed; 3 two to four constant speed tests for the determination of the highest constant speed (HS that still allowed achieving maximal oxygen uptake; and 4 an exercise based on the HS using a higher initial speed followed by a subsequent decrease. To predict equalized performance values for the constant pace, the relationship between time and distance/speed through log-log modelling was used. When a fast-start was utilized, subjects were able to cover a greater distance in a performance of similar duration in comparison with a constant-pace performance (constant pace: 670 m±22%; fast-start: 683 m±22%; P = 0.029; subjects also demonstrated a higher exercise tolerance at a similar average speed when compared with constant-pace performance (constant pace: 114 s±30%; fast-start: 125 s±26%; P = 0.037. Moreover, the mean VO2 response time was reduced after a fast start (constant pace: 22.2 s±28%; fast-start: 19.3 s±29%; P = 0.025. In conclusion, middle-distance running performances with a duration of 2-3 min are improved and VO2 response time is faster when a fast-start is adopted.

  16. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  17. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  18. Unravelling the kinetics of the formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction of fructose and asparagine by multiresponse modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a fructose–asparagine reaction system at initial pH 5.5 is proposed, based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. The formation of acetic acid and formic acid from the degradation of fructose and its isomer glucose was included in

  19. Highly efficient oxidation of amines to imines by singlet oxygen and its application in Ugi-type reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gaoxi; Chen, Jian; Huang, Jie-Sheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2009-10-15

    A variety of secondary benzylic amines were oxidized to imines in 90% to >99% yields by singlet oxygen generated from oxygen and a porphyrin photosensitizer. On the basis of these reactions, a protocol was developed for oxidative Ugi-type reactions with singlet oxygen as the oxidant. This protocol has been used to synthesize C1- and N-functionalized benzylic amines in up to 96% yields.

  20. Irradiation of cells by single and double pulses of high intensity radiation: oxygen sensitization and diffusion kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epp, E.R.; Ling, C.C.; Weiss, H.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses advances made on both experimental and theoretical approaches involving single and double pulses of high intensity ionizing radiation delivered to cultured bacterial and mammalian cells where the effect of oxygen is concerned. Information gained on the lifetime of oxygen-sensitive species suspected to be produced in critical molecules in irradiated cells and perhaps intimately related to the still unknown mechanisms of oxygen sensitization is described. The diffusion characteristics of oxygen at the cellular level obtained from experimental data are discussed. Current knowledge on intracellular radiolytic oxygen depletion is also presented. Future work on the use of high intensity pulsed radiation as a tool in cellular radiobiological research is outlined. It is expected that obtaining knowledge of the time available for damaged molecules to enter into chemical reactions may lead to insights into the mechanisms of radiation injury in cells, such as those involved in the oxygen effect. (Auth.)

  1. Numerical simulation of kinetic demixing and decomposition in a LaCoO3-δ oxygen membrane under an oxygen potential gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ta, Na; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Lijun

    2018-01-01

    A composition- and temperature-dependent mobility database of all ionic species in the LaCoO3-δ phase was developed and combined with a La-Co-O thermodynamic database to simulate kinetic demixing and partial decomposition in LaCoO3-δ oxygen membranes operated under a 0.0001/0.21 bar oxygen partial...... pressure difference at 1073 K for 1 year. Formation of La2O3, Co3O4 and CoO phases across the membrane is predicted. The kinetic demixing process can be divided into two stages, namely, establishment of the oxygen potential gradient (fast) and demixing of the cations (slow); the former is controlled...... by the mobility of oxygen ions, and the latter is determined by the higher mobility of Co ions as compared to the La ion in the ABO3-type perovskite. A drift motion of both oxide surfaces towards the high PO2 side occurs with the movement of cations....

  2. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser induced fluorescence technique has been employed to determine absolute rate coefficients for the reaction OH + CH3CN (1) and its isotopic variants, OH + CD3CN (2), OD + CH3CN (3), and OD + CD3CN (4). Reactions 1 and 2 were studied as a function of pressure and temperature in N2, N2/O2, and He buffer gases. In the absence of O2 all four reactions displayed well-behaved kinetics with exponential OH decays and pseudo-first rate constants which were proportional to substrate concentration. Data obtained in N2 over the range 50-700 Torr at 298 K are consistent with k(sub 1), showing a small pressure dependence. The Arrhenius expression obtained by averaging data at all pressures in k(sub 1)(T) = (1.1(sup +0.5)/(sub -0.3)) x 10(exp -12) exp[(-1130 +/- 90)/T] cu cm /(molecule s). The kinetics of reaction 2 are found to be pressure dependent with k(sub 2) (298 K) increasing from (1.21 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -14) to (2.16 +/- 0.11) x 10(exp -14) cm(exp 3)/ (molecule s) over the pressure range 50-700 Torr of N2 at 298 K. Data at pressures greater than 600 Torr give k(sub 2)(T) = (9.4((sup +13.4)(sub -5.0))) x 10(exp -13) exp[(-1180 +/- 250)/T] cu cm/(molecule s). The rates of reactions 3 and 4 are found to be independent of pressure over the range 50-700 Torr of N2 with 298 K rate coefficient given by k(sub 3) =(3.18 +/- 0.40) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s) and k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/-0.28) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s). In the presence of O2 each reaction shows complex (non-pseudo-first-order) kinetic behavior and/or an apparent decrease in the observed rate constant with increasing [O2], indicating the presence of significant OH or OD regeneration. Observation of regeneration of OH in (2) and OD in (3) is indicative of a reaction channel which proceeds via addition followed by reaction of the adduct, or one of its decomposition products, with O2. The observed OH and OD decay profiles have been modeled by using a simple mechanistic

  4. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Response of Microbial Reactions to High CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qusheng; Kirk, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Geological carbon sequestration captures CO 2 from industrial sources and stores the CO 2 in subsurface reservoirs, a viable strategy for mitigating global climate change. In assessing the environmental impact of the strategy, a key question is how microbial reactions respond to the elevated CO 2 concentration. This study uses biogeochemical modeling to explore the influence of CO 2 on the thermodynamics and kinetics of common microbial reactions in subsurface environments, including syntrophic oxidation, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The results show that increasing CO 2 levels decreases groundwater pH and modulates chemical speciation of weak acids in groundwater, which in turn affect microbial reactions in different ways and to different extents. Specifically, a thermodynamic analysis shows that increasing CO 2 partial pressure lowers the energy available from syntrophic oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis, but raises the available energy of microbial iron reduction, hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Kinetic modeling suggests that high CO 2 has the potential of inhibiting microbial sulfate reduction while promoting iron reduction. These results are consistent with the observations of previous laboratory and field studies, and highlight the complexity in microbiological responses to elevated CO 2 abundance, and the potential power of biogeochemical modeling in evaluating and quantifying these responses.

  5. Oxidation of β-lactam antibiotics by peracetic acid: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Zhou, Xinyan; Du, Penghui; Zhang, Tuqiao; Cai, Meiquan; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2017-10-15

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfection oxidant used in many industries including wastewater treatment. β-Lactams, a group of widely prescribed antibiotics, are frequently detected in wastewater effluents and surface waters. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven β-lactams (cefalexin (CFX), cefadroxil (CFR), cefapirin (CFP), cephalothin (CFT), ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX) and penicillin G (PG)) toward PAA were investigated to elucidate the behavior of β-lactams during PAA oxidation processes. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and is much faster at pH 5 and 7 than at pH 9 due to speciation of PAA. Reactivity to PAA follows the order of CFR ∼ CFX > AMP ∼ AMX > CFT ∼ CFP ∼ PG and is related to β-lactam's nucleophilicity. The thioether sulfur of β-lactams is attacked by PAA to generate sulfoxide products. Presence of the phenylglycinyl amino group on β-lactams can significantly influence electron distribution and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) location and energy in ways that enhance the reactivity to PAA. Reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to accurately model the decay of β-lactams by PAA in surface water matrix and only slightly overestimate the decay in wastewater matrix. Results of this study indicate that the oxidative transformation of β-lactams by PAA can be expected under appropriate wastewater treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. THEORETICAL RESEARCH ON THE MULTI-CHANNEL REACTION MECHANISM AND KINETICS OF HNCS WITH OH-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jie Hou

    Full Text Available We presented a theoretical study on the detailed reaction mechanism and kinetics of the HNCS molecule with the OH-. The barrierless minimum energy path and the most favorable entrance channel have been determined by study the thermodynamic and kinetic characters of the channel with low energy barrier. The B3LYP/6-311++G** method was employed for all the geometrical optimizations and a multi-level extrapolation method based on the G3 energies was employed for further energy refinements. In addition, the analysis of the combining interaction between hydroxide ion and HNCS was performed by natural bond orbitals (NBO analysis. The calculation results indicated that the reaction of OH- with HNCS had four channels, and the channel of H-atom in HNCS direct extraction to OH- (OH-+HNCS→IM1→TS3→IM4→P2(SCN- +H2O in singlet state was the main channel with the low potential energy and high equilibrium constant and reaction rate constant. SCN- and H2O were main products.

  7. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic response of microbial reactions to high CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qusheng Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Geological carbon sequestration captures CO2 from industrial sources and stores the CO2 in subsurface reservoirs, a viable strategy for mitigating global climate change. In assessing the environmental impact of the strategy, a key question is how microbial reactions respond to the elevated CO2 concentration. This study uses biogeochemical modeling to explore the influence of CO2 on the thermodynamics and kinetics of common microbial reactions in subsurface environments, including syntrophic oxidation, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The results show that increasing CO2 levels decreases groundwater pH and modulates chemical speciation of weak acids in groundwater, which in turn affect microbial reactions in different ways and to different extents. Specifically, a thermodynamic analysis shows that increasing CO2 partial pressure lowers the energy available from syntrophic oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis, but raises the available energy of microbial iron reduction, hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Kinetic modeling suggests that high CO2 has the potential of inhibiting microbial sulfate reduction while promoting iron reduction. These results are consistent with the observations of previous laboratory and field studies, and highlight the complexity in microbiological responses to elevated CO2 abundance, and the potential power of biogeochemical modeling in evaluating and quantifying these responses.

  9. Kinetics of the reactions of bromine atoms with a series of aliphatic aldehydes at 298 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, I.; Imrik, K.; Dobe, S.; Berces, T. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Budapest (Hungary). Koezponti Kemiai Kutato Intezete

    1998-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) with selected aldehydes, i.e. ethanal (1), propanal (2), 2-methyl-propanal (3), 2.2-dimethyl-propanal (4) and trichloroacetaldehyde (5) were studied at 298{+-}2 K. Rate constants for overall reactions were measured using the fast flow technique with resonance fluorescence detection of Br. Complementary determinations were carried out by the laser flash photolysis method. The following rate constants were obtained in the kinetic measurements ({+-}2{sigma}): k{sub 1}=(2.1{+-}0.2) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 2}=(4.3{+-}0.4) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 3}=(6.3{+-}1.4) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 4}=(8.5{+-}0.8) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 5}{<=}1 x 10{sup 9}, all in cm{sup 3}mol{sup -1}s{sup -1} units. The probable mechanism for the reactions of bromine atoms with aliphatic aldehydes has been discussed. (orig.)

  10. Comparison between the Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity of Pd5Ce and Pt5Ce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Zheng, Jian; Rizzi, Gian Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A set of electrochemical and X-ray spectroscopy measurements have been used conjointly with density functional theory (DFT) simulations to study the activity and stability of Pd5Ce for the oxygen reduction reaction. A polycrystalline Pd5Ce rod has been selected as a model catalyst to test if resu......-Pd5Ce is more facile, requires less atom rearrangement, than transformation from Pt5Ce to Pt3Ce, which might explain the kinetic stability of Pt5Ce at low temperatures....

  11. Heart Rate and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Type 2 Diabetes Patients - A Pilot Study on the Influence of Cardiovascular Medication on Regulatory Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, Jessica; Drescher, Uwe; Baum, Klaus; Brinkmann, Christian; Schiffer, Thorsten; Latsch, Joachim; Brixius, Klara; Hoffmann, Uwe

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether there are differences in heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in type 2 diabetes patients, considering their cardiovascular medication. It was hypothesized that cardiovascular medication would affect heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics and that this could be detected using a standardized exercise test. 18 subjects were tested for maximal oxygen uptake. Kinetics were measured in a single test session with standardized, randomized moderate-intensity work rate changes. Time series analysis was used to estimate kinetics. Greater maxima in cross-correlation functions indicate faster kinetics. 6 patients did not take any cardiovascular medication, 6 subjects took peripherally acting medication and 6 patients were treated with centrally acting medication. Maximum oxygen uptake was not significantly different between groups. Significant main effects were identified regarding differences in muscular oxygen uptake kinetics and heart rate kinetics. Muscular oxygen uptake kinetics were significantly faster than heart rate kinetics in the group with no cardiovascular medication (maximum in cross-correlation function of muscular oxygen uptake vs. heart rate; 0.32±0.08 vs. 0.25±0.06; p=0.001) and in the group taking peripherally acting medication (0.34±0.05 vs. 0.28±0.05; p=0.009) but not in the patients taking centrally acting medication (0.28±0.05 vs. 0.30±0.07; n.s.). It can be concluded that regulatory processes for the achievement of a similar maximal oxygen uptake are different between the groups. The used standardized test provided plausible results for heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in a single measurement session in this patient group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Electro catalyst of platinum prepared by CVD for the oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Vargas G, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work it is reported the preparation and characterization of platinum films obtained by the technique of chemical vapor deposition at low pressure, better well-known as LPCVD for their initials in English (Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition). The technique has several industrial applications and in this work it is explored their possible use to prepare applicable electrocatalysts in fuel cells. The films were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS and they were proven for to determine their acting in the Oxygen reduction reaction (Orr) in sulfuric acid 0.5 M, the results show that the material presents good activity for the reaction in study. (Author)

  13. Two-dimensional boron: Lightest catalyst for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mir, Showkat H. [Centre for Nano Science, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar 382030 (India); Chakraborty, Sudip, E-mail: sudiphys@gmail.com, E-mail: prakash.jha@cug.ac.in; Wärnå, John [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75120 (Sweden); Jha, Prakash C., E-mail: sudiphys@gmail.com, E-mail: prakash.jha@cug.ac.in [School of Applied Material Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar 382030 (India); Soni, Himadri [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Jha, Prafulla K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India); Ahuja, Rajeev [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75120 (Sweden); Department of Materials and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-08-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been envisaged on a two-dimensional (2D) boron sheet through electronic structure calculations based on a density functional theory framework. To date, boron sheets are the lightest 2D material and, therefore, exploring the catalytic activity of such a monolayer system would be quite intuitive both from fundamental and application perspectives. We have functionalized the boron sheet (BS) with different elemental dopants like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur, and lithium and determined the adsorption energy for each case while hydrogen and oxygen are on top of the doping site of the boron sheet. The free energy calculated from the individual adsorption energy for each functionalized BS subsequently guides us to predict which case of functionalization serves better for the HER or the OER.

  14. Understanding the Oxygen Reduction Reaction on a Y/Pt(111) Single Crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrikkeholm, Elisabeth Therese; Johansson, Tobias Peter; Malacrida, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) hold promise as a zero-emission source of power, particularly suitable for automotive vehicles. However, the high loading of Pt required to catalyse the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the PEMFC cathode, prevents the commercialisation of this tec......Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) hold promise as a zero-emission source of power, particularly suitable for automotive vehicles. However, the high loading of Pt required to catalyse the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the PEMFC cathode, prevents the commercialisation...... using electrochemical measurements, low energy electron diffraction, ion scattering spectroscopy, angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption of CO, and synchrotron based X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface sensitive X-ray diffraction. These measurements were...

  15. Pt Catalyst Supported within TiO2 Mesoporous Films for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Dekang; Zhang, Bingyan; Bai, Jie; Zhang, Yibo; Wittstock, Gunther; Wang, Mingkui; Shen, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, dispersed Pt nanoparticles into mesoporous TiO 2 thin films are fabricated by a facile electrochemical deposition method as electro-catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. The mesoporous TiO 2 thin films coated on the fluorine-doped tin oxide glass by screen printing allow a facile transport of reactants and products. The structural properties of the resulted Pt/TiO 2 electrode are evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry measurements are performed to study the electrochemical properties of the Pt/TiO 2 electrode. Further study demonstrates the stability of the Pt catalyst supported within TiO 2 mesoporous films for the oxygen reduction reaction

  16. Pressure-dependent kinetics of initial reactions in iso-octane pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, HongBo; Gong, ChunMing; Li, ZeRong; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-05-07

    This study focuses on the studies of the main pressure-dependent reaction types of iso-octane (iso-C8H18) pyrolysis, including initial C-C bond fission of iso-octane, isomerization, and β-scission reactions of the alkyl radicals produced by the C-C bond fission of iso-octane. For the C-C bond fission of iso-octane, the minimum energy potentials are calculated at the CASPT2(2e,2o)/6-31+G(d,p)//CAS(2e,2o)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. For the isomerization and the β-scission reactions of the alkyl radicals, the optimization of the geometries and the vibrational frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products are performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level, and their single point energies are calculated by using the composite CBS-QB3 method. Variable reaction coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) is used for the high-pressure limit rate constant calculation and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/master equation (RRKM/ME) is used to calculate the pressure-dependent rate constants of these channels with pressure varying from 0.01-100 atm. The rate constants obtained in this work are in good agreement with those available from literatures. We have updated the rate constants and thermodynamic parameters for species involved in these reactions into a current chemical kinetic mechanism and also have improved the concentration profiles of main products such as C3H6 and C4H6 in the shock tube pyrolysis of iso-octane. The results of this study provide insight into the pyrolysis of iso-octane and will be helpful in the future development of branched paraffin kinetic mechanisms.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-nichel oxides for the oxygen formation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this work the compounds of cobalt and nickel oxides and the mixtures of cobalt-nickel were prepared which were characterized and evaluated as electrocatalysts in the oxygen release reaction in alkaline media. The compounds were synthesised by the sol-gel method: heated at 400 and 500 Centigrade. The compounds characterization was realized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy. As the Co 3 O 4 and the Ni O as the mixtures Ni O/Co 3 O 4 were obtained as a porous material with a small particle size, characteristics which are presented by cause of the low temperature of synthesis. The electrocatalytic evaluation for the synthesised compounds for the oxygen release reaction was realized by cyclic volt amperometry in a 0.5M KOH solution. The oxides mixtures presented a well electrocatalytic activity to be used in the electrochemical release of oxygen. The current density and the electrochemically active area, in all the cases of mixtures is very higher to the Co 3 O 4 and Ni O ones. Observing with greater clearness the synergic effects, in the obtained mixture at 400 C. The oxides mixtures heated at 400 C were stables for the oxygen formation reaction. Therefore it is be able to say that the Ni O/Co 3 O 4 mixture counts on a great reactive area: electrocatalytic characteristic desirable to be a material used as anode in the electrolysis of water, which increases the oxygen release in the anode and so the hydrogen release in the cathode. (Author)

  18. Oxygen kinetics and mechanism at electrocatalysts on the base of palladium-iron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasevich, M.R.; Zhutaeva, G.V.; Bogdanovskaya, V.A.; Radina, M.V.; Ehrenburg, M.R.; Chalykh, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Binary nanodispersed carbon XC72 supported PdFe catalysts with different atomic palladium-to-iron ratios are synthesized and studied in oxygen reduction reaction in acid solution at 60 o C. The Pd:Fe ratio was well controlled by the initial concentrations of Pd and Fe in the precursor solutions. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optimum Pd:Fe ratio for this reaction was determined to be 3:1. The comparison of activities of the catalysts with component ratios equaled 3:1 and 10:1 is shown that the activities are differed from each other by 10-15 times in advantage of catalyst with lesser content of palladium. This phenomenon can be related to the different particle size of both catalysts and different distribution of particles by size discovered by TEM method. The achievement of maximum activity near the ratio of Pd:Fe = 3:1 is due to as effect of alloy-forming and the influence of binary system component ratio and synthesis conditions on dispersity degree of metallic phase nanoparticles. Under optimal conditions of precursor mixture high-temperature pyrolysis, iron produces the stabilizing effect palladium. It gives rise to obtaining the uniform and finely divided (7-8 nm) metallic particles

  19. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  20. Effect of ionic strength on the kinetics of ionic and micellar reactions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, M.H.; Kozak, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic forces on the rate of reaction between ions in aqueous solutions of intermediate ionic strength is studied in this paper. We consider the kinetics of reactions involving simple ionic species (1--1 and 2--2 electrolyte systems) as well as kinetic processes mediated by the presence of micellar ions (or other charged organizates). In the regime of ionic strength considered, dielectric saturation of the solvent in the vicinity of the reacting ions must be taken into account and this is done by introducing several models to describe the recovery of the solvent from saturation to its continuum dielectric behavior. To explore the effects of ion size, charge number, and ionic strength on the overall rate constant for the process considered, we couple the traditional theory of ionic reactions in aqueous solution with calculations of the electrostatic potential obtained via solution of the nonlinear Poisson--Boltzmann equation. The great flexibility of the nonlinear Poisson--Boltzmann theory allows us to explore quantitatively the influence of each of these effects, and our simulations show that the short-range properties of the electrostatic potential affect primarily kinetically controlled processes (to varying degrees, depending on the ionic system considered) whereas the down-range properties of the potential play a (somewhat) greater role in influencing diffusion-controlled processes. A detailed examination is made of ionic strength effects over a broad range of ionic concentrations. In the regime of low ionic strength, the limiting slope and intercept of the curve describing the dependence of log k/sub D/ on I/sup 1/2//(1+I/sup 1/2/) may differ considerably from the usual Debye--Hueckel limiting relations, depending on the particular model chosen to describe local saturation effects