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Sample records for oxygen inhibition takes

  1. Study of oxygen inhibition effect on radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Bin; Yang Xuemei; Zhao Pengji; Zeng Shuqing; Jiang Bo; Zhou Yong; Huang Wei; Zhou Youyi

    1995-01-01

    Michacl addition reaction product was used in the research of oxygen inhibition effect of radiation curing. The experimental results was measured by the content of gel and percentage of double bonds. It was proved that 9% of Michacl addition product could speed up 1.2 times of the radiation curing rate at 30 kGy of EB irradiation. This kind of formulation can withstand oxygen inhibition effect obviously, so it was the foundation of application for radiation curing in atmospheric condition

  2. Inhibition of fungal growth with extreme low oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1998-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of foods is effectively controlled by removal of oxygen from the package, especially if this is combined with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. However, great uncertainty exist on just how low the residual oxygen levels in the package must be especially when carbon dioxide lev...... food with low CO2 levels. Active packaging with oxygen absorbers may be considered for these products. The packaging solution must also reflect the micro flora of the product.......Fungal spoilage of foods is effectively controlled by removal of oxygen from the package, especially if this is combined with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. However, great uncertainty exist on just how low the residual oxygen levels in the package must be especially when carbon dioxide...... Penicillia and Aspergilli were also inhibited by oxygen levels less than 0.5%, but less than 0.01% was required to efficiently inhibit these fungi. Most resistant to very low oxygen levels was the Fusarium species.These results shows that very low oxygen levels are required to avoid fungal growth in package...

  3. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  4. Inhibition of nitrogenase by oxygen in marine cyanobacteria controls the global nitrogen and oxygen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman-Frank, I.; Chen, Y.-B.; Gerchman, Y.; Dismukes, G. C.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacterial N2-fixation supplies the vast majority of biologically accessible inorganic nitrogen to nutrient-poor aquatic ecosystems. The process, catalyzed by the heterodimeric protein complex, nitrogenase, is thought to predate that of oxygenic photosynthesis. Remarkably, while the enzyme plays such a critical role in Earth's biogeochemical cycles, the activity of nitrogenase in cyanobacteria is markedly inhibited in vivo at a post-translational level by the concentration of O2 in the contemporary atmosphere leading to metabolic and biogeochemical inefficiency in N2 fixation. We illustrate this crippling effect with data from Trichodesmium spp. an important contributor of "new nitrogen" to the world's subtropical and tropical oceans. The enzymatic inefficiency of nitrogenase imposes a major elemental taxation on diazotrophic cyanobacteria both in the costs of protein synthesis and for scarce trace elements, such as iron. This restriction has, in turn, led to a global limitation of fixed nitrogen in the contemporary oceans and provides a strong biological control on the upper bound of oxygen concentration in Earth's atmosphere.

  5. Global inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibits paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fidanboylu

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (Taxol® is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the aim of this study was to examine whether pharmacological inhibition of ROS could reverse established paclitaxel-induced pain or prevent the development of paclitaxel-induced pain. Using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced pain (intraperitoneal 2 mg/kg paclitaxel on days 0, 2, 4 & 6, the effects of a non-specific ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN and a superoxide selective scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL were compared. Systemic 100 mg/kg PBN administration markedly inhibited established paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g and 15 g stimulation and cold hypersensitivity to plantar acetone application. Daily systemic administration of 50 mg/kg PBN (days -1 to 13 completely prevented mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 4 g and 8 g stimulation and significantly attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 15 g. Systemic 100 mg/kg TEMPOL had no effect on established paclitaxel-induced mechanical or cold hypersensitivity. High dose (250 mg/kg systemic TEMPOL significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g & 15 g, but to a lesser extent than PBN. Daily systemic administration of 100 mg/kg TEMPOL (day -1 to 12 did not affect the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These data suggest that ROS play a causal role in the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced pain, but such effects cannot be attributed to superoxide radicals

  6. Functional lateralization of temporoparietal junction - imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiesteban, Idalmis; Banissy, Michael J; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Although neuroimaging studies have consistently identified the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) as a key brain region involved in social cognition, the literature is far from consistent with respect to lateralization of function. For example, during theory-of-mind tasks bilateral TPJ activation is found in some studies but only right hemisphere activation in others. Visual perspective-taking and imitation inhibition, which have been argued to recruit the same socio-cognitive processes as theory of mind, are associated with unilateral activation of either left TPJ (perspective taking) or right TPJ (imitation inhibition). The present study investigated the functional lateralization of TPJ involvement in the above three socio-cognitive abilities using transcranial direct current stimulation. Three groups of healthy adults received anodal stimulation over right TPJ, left TPJ or the occipital cortex prior to performing three tasks (imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind). In contrast to the extant neuroimaging literature, our results suggest bilateral TPJ involvement in imitation inhibition and visual perspective-taking, while no effect of anodal stimulation was observed on theory of mind. The discrepancy between these findings and those obtained using neuroimaging highlight the efficacy of neurostimulation as a complementary methodological tool in cognitive neuroscience. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension in the...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  8. Inhibition of total oxygen uptake by silica nanoparticles in activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibag, Mark [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byeong-Gyu [School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, 145, Anam-ro, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Changwon [Energy Lab, Environment Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan Hyung; Lee, Jae Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering and Program in Environmental Technology and Policy, Korea University, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Maeng, Sung Kyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jinwoo, E-mail: jinwoocho@sejong.edu [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Silica nanoparticles (SNP) inhibit total oxygen uptake in activated sludge. • Relatively smaller SNP are inhibitorier than larger SNP. • SNP alters C15:0, C16:0 and C18:0 in activated sludge fatty acid methyl ester profile. - Abstract: Nanoparticle toxicity to biological activities in activated sludge is largely unknown. Among the widely used nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles (SNP) have a limited number of studies associated with inhibition to the activated sludge process (ASP). We demonstrated SNP inhibition of activated sludge respiration through oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurement. Based on the percentage inhibition of total oxygen consumption (I{sub T}), we observed that smaller SNPs (12 nm, I{sub T} = 33 ± 3%; 151 nm, I{sub T} = 23 ± 2%) were stronger inhibitors than larger SNPs (442 and 683 nm, I{sub T} = 5 ± 1%). Transmission electron micrographs showed that some of the SNPs were adsorbed on and/or apparently embedded somewhere in the microbial cell membrane. Whether SNPs are directly associated with the inhibition of total oxygen uptake warrants further studies. However, it is clear that SNPs statistically significantly altered the composition of microbial membrane lipids, which was more clearly described by principal component analysis and weighted Euclidian distance (PCA-ED) of the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) data. This study suggests that SNPs potentially affect the biological activity in activated sludge through the inhibition of total oxygen uptake.

  9. Oxygen-induced inhibition of silicon-on-insulator dewetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiotto, S.; Leroy, F.; Cheynis, F.; Müller, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, CINaM UMR 7325, 13288 Marseille (France)

    2014-02-10

    We report that solid state dewetting of Si thin film on SiO{sub 2} can be reversibly inhibited by exposing the Si surface to a partial pressure of dioxygen (∼10{sup −7}Torr) at high temperature (∼1100K). Coupling in situ Low-Energy Electron Microscopy and ex situ atomic force microscopy we propose that the pinning of the contact line induced by the presence of small amounts of silicon oxide is the main physical process that inhibits the dewetting.

  10. Theoretical investigation of the energy spectra of the oxygen isoelectronic sequences taking into account relativistic corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanovich, P.O.; Shadzhyuvene, S.D.; Boruta, I.I.; Rudzikas, Z.B.

    1976-01-01

    A method for calculating energy spectra of atoms and ions having complex electron configurations is developed which takes into account relativistic corrections of the order of magnitude of the square of the structure constant. The corrections included are caused by the dependence of the electron mass on velocity; by orbit-orbit interaction; by contact interaction and by spin-orbit interaction. The method described is realized in the form of universal algorithms and programs which are written in the Fortran 4 in the BESM-6 version. Examples are given of calculating the ground ls 2 2s 2 2p 6 configuration and two excited ls 2 2s 2 2p 3 3s and ls 2 2s2p 5 ones of the isoelectronic oxygen series, both with and without taking into account the relativistic corrections. The value of the nuclear charge varies from Z=8 to Z=80. The contribution of relativistic corrections increases with Z. The effect of relativistic corrections on the distance between the centers of gravity of ground and excited configurations increases with Z. The comparison of the results obtained with experimental data is made

  11. Reactive oxygen species inhibit catalytic activity of peptidylarginine deiminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Bjørn, Mads Emil; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2017-01-01

    on calcium and reducing conditions. However, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to induce citrullination of histones in granulocytes. Here we examine the ability of H2O2 and leukocyte-derived ROS to regulate PAD activity using citrullination of fibrinogen as read-out. H2O2 at concentrations above...... from stimulated leukocytes was unaffected by exogenously added H2O2 at concentrations up to 1000 µM. The role of ROS in regulating PAD activity may play an important part in preventing hypercitrullination of proteins....

  12. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Enjun; Brosché, Mikael

    2014-06-04

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling.

  13. How many oxygen cylinders do you need to take on transport? A nomogram for cylinder size and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutman, D; Petros, A J

    2006-09-01

    When undertaking patient retrieval, it is important to take adequate supplies of oxygen to ensure patient safety. Oxygen can be delivered via a flowmeter into a facemask or used to drive pneumatic ventilators. Given the lack of space in the back of an ambulance or helicopter, the numbers of cylinders that can be taken is limited, hence the number needed to complete the journey must be carefully calculated prior to embarking. We have produced nomograms to predict how many oxygen cylinders will be consumed during a given journey when using either a flowmeter or a commonly used transport ventilator.

  14. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the electrochemical inhibition of barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolfo E. Perez-Roa; Marc A. Anderson; Dan Rittschof; Christopher G. Hunt; Daniel R. Noguera

    2009-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in electrochemical biofouling inhibition was investigated using a series of abiotic tests and settlement experiments with larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite, a cosmopolitan fouler. Larval settlement, a measure of biofouling potential, was reduced from 43% ± 14% to 5% ± 6% upon the application of...

  15. Global Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Inhibits Paclitaxel-Induced Painful Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Griffiths, Lisa A.; Flatters, Sarah J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol (R)) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS...

  16. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg 2+ ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn 2+ ); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg 2+ causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn 2+ release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn 2+ or Hg 2+ . Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg 2+ -induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg 2+ that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  17. Sulfide-inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at very low oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-09-15

    Our aim was to study the ability of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the rate of elimination of sulfide through the pathway linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operating under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide's inhibition of cellular respiration would occur faster under continuous sulfide exposure when the oxygen concentration is in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5-1×10(6) cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37 °C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73±0.05 μM, 3.1±0.2 μM, and 6.2±0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3;3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2]min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6 [15.5;28.1]min (coupled) and 35.9 [27.4;59.2]min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4]min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7]min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results confirm that the onset of inhibition of cell respiration by sulfide occurs earlier under a continuous exposure when approaching

  18. Neuroprotection of taurine against reactive oxygen species is associated with inhibiting NADPH oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhou; Gao, Li-Yan; Lin, Yu-Hui; Chang, Lei; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-04-15

    It is well established that taurine shows potent protection against glutamate-induced injury to neurons in stroke. The neuroprotection may result from multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidences suggest that NADPH oxidases (Nox), the primary source of superoxide induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, are involved in the process of oxidative stress. We found that 100μM NMDA induced oxidative stress by increasing the reactive oxygen species level, which contributed to the cell death, in vitro. Neuron cultures pretreated with 25mM taurine showed lower percentage of death cells and declined reactive oxygen species level. Moreover, taurine attenuated Nox2/Nox4 protein expression and enzyme activity and declined intracellular calcium intensity during NMDA-induced neuron injury. Additionally, taurine also showed neuroprotection against H2O2-induced injury, accompanying with Nox inhibition. So, we suppose that protection of taurine against reactive oxygen species during NMDA-induced neuron injury is associated with Nox inhibition, probably in a calcium-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Indomethacin lowers optic nerve oxygen tension and reduces the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibition and carbon dioxide breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T; Stefánsson, E

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important in blood flow regulation. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) breathing and carbonic anhydrase inhibition increase the oxygen tension in the retina and optic nerve. To study the mechanism of this effect and the role of cyclo-oxygenase in the regulation of optic nerve oxygen tension...... (ONPO(2)), the authors investigated how indomethacin affects ONPO(2) and the ONPO(2) increases caused by CO(2) breathing and carbonic anhydrase inhibition in the pig....

  20. Modelling of L-valine Repeated Fed-batch Fermentation Process Taking into Account the Dissolved Oxygen Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzanko Georgiev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with synthesis of dynamic unstructured model of variable volume fed-batch fermentation process with intensive droppings for L-valine production. The presented approach of the investigation includes the following main procedures: description of the process by generalized stoichiometric equations; preliminary data processing and calculation of specific rates for main kinetic variables; identification of the specific rates takes into account the dissolved oxygen tension; establishment and optimisation of dynamic model of the process; simulation researches. MATLAB is used as a research environment.

  1. Social Science Theories on Adolescent Risk-Taking: The Relevance of Behavioral Inhibition and Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Hans; T'Sjoen, Guy; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    The major social science theories on adolescent risk-taking--strain, social control, and differential association theories--have received substantial empirical support. The relationships between variables central to these theories and individual differences in temperament related to risk-taking, however, have not been adequately studied. In a…

  2. Risk-taking decisions in pathological gamblers is not a result of their impaired inhibition ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzman, Semion; Lidogoster, Helena; Aizer, Anat; Kotler, Moshe; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2011-06-30

    This work investigates whether inhibition impairments influence the decision making process in pathological gamblers (PGs). The PG (N=51) subjects performed the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT as the measure of the decision making process) and two tests of inhibition: the Stroop (interference inhibition), and the Go/NoGo (response inhibition), and were compared with demographically matched healthy subjects (N=57). Performance in the IGT block 1 and block 2 did not differ between the groups, but the differences between the PGs and healthy controls began to be significant in block 3, block 4 and block 5. PGs learned the IGT task more slowly than the healthy controls and had non-optimal outcomes (more disadvantageous choices). Impaired IGT performance in PGs was not related to an inhibition ability measured by the Stroop (interference response time) and the Go/NoGo (number of commission errors) parameters. Further controlled studies with neuroimaging techniques may help to clarify the particular brain mechanisms underlying the impaired decision making process in PGs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Renal oxygen content is increased in healthy subjects after angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Stein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The association between renal hypoxia and the development of renal injury is well established. However, no adequate method currently exists to non-invasively measure functional changes in renal oxygenation in normal and injured patients. METHOD: R2* quantification was performed using renal blood oxygen level-dependent properties. Five healthy normotensive women (50±5.3 years underwent magnetic resonance imaging in a 1.5T Signa Excite HDx scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI. A multiple fast gradient-echo sequence was used to acquire R2*/T2* images (sixteen echoes from 2.1 ms/slice to 49.6 ms/slice in a single breath hold per location. The images were post-processed to generate R2* maps for quantification. Data were recorded before and at 30 minutes after the oral administration of an angiotensin II-converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril, 25 mg. The results were compared using an ANOVA for repeated measurements (mean + standard deviation followed by the Tukey test. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01545479. RESULTS: A significant difference (p<0.001 in renal oxygenation (R2* was observed in the cortex and medulla before and after captopril administration: right kidney, cortex = 11.08 ± 0.56ms, medulla = 17.21 ± 1.47ms and cortex = 10.30 ± 0.44ms, medulla = 16.06 ± 1.74ms, respectively; and left kidney, cortex= 11.79 ± 1.85ms, medulla = 17.03 ± 0.88ms and cortex = 10.89 ± 0.91ms, medulla = 16.43 ± 1.49ms, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This result suggests that the technique efficiently measured alterations in renal blood oxygenation after angiotensin II-converting enzyme inhibition and that it may provide a new strategy for identifying the early stages of renal disease and perhaps new therapeutic targets.

  4. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Predicted consequences of diabetes and SGLT inhibition on transport and oxygen consumption along a rat nephron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes increases the reabsorption of Na+ (TNa) and glucose via the sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT2 in the early proximal tubule (S1-S2 segments) of the renal cortex. SGLT2 inhibitors enhance glucose excretion and lower hyperglycemia in diabetes. We aimed to investigate how diabetes and SGLT2 inhibition affect TNa and sodium transport-dependent oxygen consumption QO2active along the whole nephron. To do so, we developed a mathematical model of water and solute transport from the Bowman space to the papillary tip of a superficial nephron of the rat kidney. Model simulations indicate that, in the nondiabetic kidney, acute and chronic SGLT2 inhibition enhances active TNa in all nephron segments, thereby raising QO2active by 5–12% in the cortex and medulla. Diabetes increases overall TNa and QO2active by ∼50 and 100%, mainly because it enhances glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and transport load. In diabetes, acute and chronic SGLT2 inhibition lowers QO2active in the cortex by ∼30%, due to GFR reduction that lowers proximal tubule active TNa, but raises QO2active in the medulla by ∼7%. In the medulla specifically, chronic SGLT2 inhibition is predicted to increase QO2active by 26% in late proximal tubules (S3 segments), by 2% in medullary thick ascending limbs (mTAL), and by 9 and 21% in outer and inner medullary collecting ducts (OMCD and IMCD), respectively. Additional blockade of SGLT1 in S3 segments enhances glucose excretion, reduces QO2active by 33% in S3 segments, and raises QO2active by SGLT2 blockade in diabetes lowers cortical QO2active and raises medullary QO2active, particularly in S3 segments. PMID:26764207

  6. Induction of apoptosis by plumbagin through reactive oxygen species-mediated inhibition of topoisomerase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiak, Anna; Piosik, Jacek; Stasilojc, Grzegorz; Gwizdek-Wisniewska, Anna; Marczak, Lukasz; Stobiecki, Maciej; Bigda, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as key molecules, which can selectively modify proteins and therefore regulate cellular signalling including apoptosis. Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone exhibiting antitumor activity, is known to generate ROS and has been found to inhibit the activity of topoisomerase II (Topo II) through the stabilization of the Topo II-DNA cleavable complex. The objective of this research was to clarify the role of ROS and Topo II inhibition in the induction of apoptosis mediated by plumbagin. As determined by the comet assay, plumbagin induced DNA cleavage in HL-60 cells, whereas in a cell line with reduced Topo II activity-HL-60/MX2, the level of DNA damage was significantly decreased. The onset of DNA strand break formation in HL-60 cells was delayed in comparison with the generation of intracellular ROS. In HL-60/MX2 cells, ROS were generated at a similar rate, whereas a significant reduction in the level of DNA damage was detected. The pretreatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated plumbagin-induced DNA damage, pointing out to the involvement of ROS generation in cleavable complex formation. These results suggest that plumbagin-induced ROS does not directly damage DNA but requires the involvement of Topo II. Furthermore, experiments carried out using light spectroscopy indicated no direct interactions between plumbagin and DNA. The induction of apoptosis was significantly delayed in HL-60/MX2 cells indicating the involvement of Topo II inhibition in plumbagin-mediated apoptosis. Thus, these findings strongly suggest ROS-mediated inhibition of Topo II as an important mechanism contributing to the apoptosis-inducing properties of plumbagin

  7. Moscatilin Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion via Suppression of Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkarawut Kowitdamrong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, in which hydroxyl radical (OH∙ was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397 and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473, whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy.

  8. A Study Into the Effects of Inhibition and Emotion on Perspective-Taking in Younger and Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Druce, Megan

    2013-01-01

    A decline in Theory of Mind (ToM) perspective-taking abilities in old age is thought to result from an inability to inhibit the self-perspective. Such reduced inhibitory capacities in old age could also impact upon an attentional reorienting and selection processes thought to be required to successfully move from the self to the other perspective in a ToM task. We sought to investigate both of these hypotheses by administering modified versions of Samson et al.’s (2005) high and low inhibitio...

  9. Resveratrol protects primary cortical neuron cultures from transient oxygen-glucose deprivation by inhibiting MMP-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dakuan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaofan; Hu, Shijie; Zhang, Lei; Fei, Zhou

    2014-06-01

    It was recently shown that resveratrol exerts neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia in mice. The aim of the present study was to further confirm these effects in in vitro primary cortical neuron cultures with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and to investigate whether these effects are due to the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and of cell apoptosis. Neuronal primary cultures of cerebral cortex were prepared from BALB/c mice embryos (13-15 days). Cells from 14- to 16-day cultures were subjected to OGD for 3 h, followed by 21 h of reoxygenation to simulate transient ischemia. Different doses of resveratrol were added into the culture medium during the simulation of transient ischemia. The effect of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126 was studied by adding U0126 (5 µg/µl, 4 µl) into the culture medium during transient ischemia; as a control, we used treatment of cells with 50 µM of resveratrol. Cell viability was investigated using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The effects of resveratrol on the expression of MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while the levels of ERK, phosphorylated (p)-ERK, cleaved caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 were measured by western blotting. The results of the MTT assay showed that cell viability is significantly reduced by transient OGD. OGD induced cell apoptosis, the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 and ERK, inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of MMP-9, while these effects were reversed by treatment with resveratrol. The therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol was shown to be dose-dependent, with the most suitable dose range determined at 50-100 µM. Treatment with U0126 inhibited MMP-9 and Bax expression and caspase-3 activation, while it further promoted the

  10. Effect of Oxygen Inhibition Layer of Universal Adhesives on Enamel Bond Fatigue Durability and Interfacial Characteristics With Different Etching Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, H; Tsujimoto, A; Nojiri, K; Hirai, K; Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the oxygen inhibition layer of universal adhesive on enamel bond fatigue durability and interfacial characteristics with different etching modes. The three universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), Adhese Universal (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Lichtenstein), and G-Premio Bond (GC, Tokyo, Japan). The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength to enamel was determined in the presence and absence of the oxygen inhibition layer, with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The water contact angle was also measured in all groups using the sessile drop method. The enamel bonding specimens with an oxygen inhibition layer showed significantly higher (padhesive type and etching mode. Moreover, the water contact angles on the specimens with an oxygen inhibition layer were significantly lower (puniversal adhesives significantly increases the enamel bond fatigue durability and greatly changes interfacial characteristics, suggesting that the bond fatigue durability and interfacial characteristics of these adhesives strongly rely on its presence.

  11. UV-cured methacrylic-silica hybrids: Effect of oxygen inhibition on photo-curing kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Striani, R.; Frigione, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic behavior of novel photopolymerizable organic–inorganic hybrid system was studied as a function of the composition and of the atmosphere for reactions. • The UV-curing reaction of the hybrid mixture was found fast and complete. • The combined presence of thiol monomer and nanostructured silica allows to reduce the effect of inhibition of oxygen towards the radical photopolymerization. - Abstract: The kinetic behavior of innovative photopolymerizable UV-cured methacrylic–silica hybrid formulations, previously developed, was studied and compared to that of a reference control system. The organic–inorganic (O–I) hybrids proposed in this study are obtained from organic precursors with a high siloxane content mixed with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in such a way to produce co-continuous silica nano-domains dispersed within a cross-linked organic phase, as a result of the hydrolysis and condensation reactions. The kinetics of the radical photopolymerization mechanism induced by UV-radiations, in presence of a suitable photoinitiator, was studied by calorimetric, FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analyses, by varying the composition of the mixtures and the atmosphere for reactions. The well known effect of oxygen on the kinetic mechanism of the free radical photopolymerization of the methacrylic–siloxane based monomers was found to be strongly reduced in the hybrid system, especially when a proper thiol was used. The experimental calorimetric data were fitted using a simple kinetic model for radical photopolymerization reactions, obtaining a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model. From the comparison of the kinetic constants calculated for control and hybrid systems, it was possible to assess the effect of the composition, as well as of the atmosphere used during the photo-polymerization process, on the kinetic of photopolymerization reaction

  12. Cortical oxygenation suggests increased effort during cognitive inhibition in ecstasy polydrug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C A; Montgomery, Catharine

    2015-11-01

    It is understood that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) causes serotonin dysfunction and deficits in executive functioning. When investigating executive function, functional neuroimaging allows the physiological changes underlying these deficits to be investigated. The present study investigated behavioural and brain indices of inhibition in ecstasy-polydrug users. Twenty ecstasy-polydrug users and 20 drug-naïve participants completed an inhibitory control task (Random Letter Generation (RLG)) while prefrontal haemodynamic response was assessed using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). There were no group differences on background measures including sleep quality and mood state. There were also no behavioural differences between the two groups. However, ecstasy-polydrug users displayed significant increases in oxygenated haemoglobin (oxy-Hb) from baseline compared to controls at several voxels relating to areas of the inferior right medial prefrontal cortex, as well the right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Regression analysis revealed that recency of ecstasy use was a significant predictor of oxy-Hb increase at two voxels over the right hemisphere after controlling for alcohol and cannabis use indices. Ecstasy-polydrug users show increased neuronal activation in the prefrontal cortex compared to non-users. This is taken to be compensatory activation/recruitment of additional resources to attain similar performance levels on the task, which may be reversible with prolonged abstinence. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The formation of non-oxidic oxygen phases on Ru(0001). From the first stages of the oxygen take-up to oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blume, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis presented here was the investigation of the formation of non oxidic oxygen phases on the Ru(0001) surface. Smooth and defect rich surfaces were exposed to high oxygen pressures (up to 1 bar) at moderate temperatures (550 K). The characterisation was performed under UHV conditions using Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Scanning Photoemission Microscopy (SPEM), Thermal Energy Atomic Scattering (TEAS), Ultraviolett Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) and Low Energy Electron Diff raction (LEED) as well as In situ by the In Situ X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (In Situ XPS). The application of this Low Temperature preparation procedure (LT) leads to an Oxygen uptake up to 3 MLE of ''subsurface'' oxygen into a smooth Ru(0001) surface without the typical indications of oxidation (MLE: Monolayer Equivalent). The accumulation of oxygen beneath the surface starts immediatly after the completion of a full chemisorbed layer. Here, the local saturation of the adsorbed oxygen is the decisive step. Diff usion of oxygen directly through the chemisorbed layer only slightly contributes to the overall uptake. Oxygen is mostly accomodated in the vicinity of the surface via surface defects which has been shown on defect rich surfaces created by mild Ar+ sputtering. The maximum oxygen capacity is 10 Atoms/Defect. The uptake is thermally activated with an activation energy of 0.15 eV. The oxygen uptake causes a massive structural change of at least the top two ruthenium layers. Whereas the ruthenium atoms of the first layer are coordinated with up to four, those of the second layer are coordinated with up to two oxygen atoms. These binding condition are metastable and can be changed by annealing the surface. With reaching the desorption temperature two distinct desorption peaks are observed with TDS. For an accumulation of about 0.5 MLE of ''subsurface'' oxygen the desorption proceeds exclusively at the characteristic temperature of the chemisorbed layer at 1040

  14. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species generation: novel therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanyam, M; Koteswari, A Adaikala; Kumar, R Sampath; Monickaraj, S Finny; Maheswari, J Uma; Mohan, V

    2003-12-01

    There is evidence for increased levels of circulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in diabetics, as indirectly inferred by the findings of increased lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidant status. Direct measurements of intracellular generation of ROS using fluorescent dyes also demonstrate an association of oxidative stress with diabetes. Although phenolic compounds attenuate oxidative stress-related tissue damage, there are concerns over toxicity of synthetic phenolic antioxidants and this has considerably stimulated interest in investigating the role of natural phenolics in medicinal applications. Curcumin (the primary active principle in turmeric, Curcuma longa Linn.) has been claimed to represent a potential antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent with phytonutrient and bioprotective properties. However there are lack of molecular studies to demonstrate its cellular action and potential molecular targets. In this study the antioxidant effect of curcumin as a function of changes in cellular ROS generation was tested. Our results clearly demonstrate that curcumin abolished both phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA) and thapsigargin-induced ROS generation in cells from control and diabetic subjects. The pattern of these ROS inhibitory effects as a function of dose-dependency suggests that curcumin mechanistically interferes with protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium regulation. Simultaneous measurements of ROS and Ca2+ influx suggest that a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ may be a trigger for increased ROS generation. We suggest that the antioxidant and antiangeogenic actions of curcumin, as a mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+ entry and PKC activity, should be further exploited to develop suitable and novel drugs for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic complications.

  15. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Qing; Qin, Da-Nian; Wang, Fu-Xin; Ren, Jun; Li, Hong-Bao; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Qing; Miao, Yu-Wang; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jie; Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger (tempol) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and proinflammatory cytokines (PICs), and decreases the blood pressure and sympathetic activity in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Methods and results: Male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused intravenously with ANG II (10 ng/kg per min) or normal saline (NS) for 4 weeks. These rats were treated with bilateral PVN infusion of oxygen free radical scavenger tempol (TEMP, 20 μg/h) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). These ANG II-infused rats also had higher levels of gp91 phox (a subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the PVN than the control animals. Treatment with PVN infusion of TEMP attenuated the overexpression of gp91 phox , ACE and IL-1β within the PVN, and decreased sympathetic activity and MAP in ANG II-infused rats. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces elevated PICs and oxidative stress in the PVN, which contribute to the sympathoexcitation in hypertension. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in ANG II-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • The effect of chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide on hypertension was investigated. • ANG II infusion induced increased proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in PVN. • ANG II infusion resulted in oxidative stress, sympathoexcitation and hypertension. • Chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide attenuates RAS and cytokines in hypertension

  16. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Qing [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Qin, Da-Nian, E-mail: dnqin@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041 (China); Wang, Fu-Xin [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jiamusi University, Jiamusi 154002 (China); Ren, Jun [Center for Cardiovascular Research and Alternative Medicine, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Li, Hong-Bao; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Qing; Miao, Yu-Wang; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jie [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Zhu, Zhiming [Department of Hypertension and Endocrinology, Center for Hypertension and Metabolic Diseases, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Institute of Hypertension, Chongqing 400042 (China); Zhu, Guo-Qing [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Physiology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Kang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ykang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Aims: To explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger (tempol) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and proinflammatory cytokines (PICs), and decreases the blood pressure and sympathetic activity in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Methods and results: Male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused intravenously with ANG II (10 ng/kg per min) or normal saline (NS) for 4 weeks. These rats were treated with bilateral PVN infusion of oxygen free radical scavenger tempol (TEMP, 20 μg/h) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). These ANG II-infused rats also had higher levels of gp91{sup phox} (a subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the PVN than the control animals. Treatment with PVN infusion of TEMP attenuated the overexpression of gp91{sup phox}, ACE and IL-1β within the PVN, and decreased sympathetic activity and MAP in ANG II-infused rats. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces elevated PICs and oxidative stress in the PVN, which contribute to the sympathoexcitation in hypertension. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in ANG II-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • The effect of chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide on hypertension was investigated. • ANG II infusion induced increased proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in PVN. • ANG II infusion resulted in oxidative stress, sympathoexcitation and hypertension. • Chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide attenuates RAS and cytokines in hypertension.

  17. Factors influencing photo curing kinetics of novel UV-cured siloxane-modified acrylic coatings: Oxygen inhibition and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito Corcione, Carola; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The inhibition effect of oxygen on the kinetic behaviour of photopolymerizable siloxane acrylic formulations was analyzed by thermal analysis. ► The addition of a thiol in the mixtures allows to obtain higher conversion, to reduce the content of the UV initiator and to increase the T g . ► The data found in air were fitted as a function of the presence of the thiol monomer obtaining a good agreement. - Abstract: An experimental study was carried out for the development and characterization of innovative photopolymerizable siloxane-modified acrylic formulations for possible use as protective coatings of stone substrates. The kinetics of the radical photopolymerization mechanism induced by UV radiations in presence of a suitable photoinitiator was studied by a calorimetric analysis by varying the atmosphere (oxygen or nitrogen) and the composition of the mixtures, in particular of the UV photoinitiator. The reactivity, expressed in terms of both heat developed and rate of reaction, was generally found to decrease when the photopolymerization was carried out in air, due the inhibiting action of the oxygen towards the free radical polymerization. The addition of a proper thiol to the acrylic modified resin was found to reduce the adverse effect of oxygen on the kinetic reaction and on the degree of conversion. This result allowed to reduce the content of the photoinitiator and to increase the content of the siloxane in the acrylic based mixtures. The effect of the change of the composition of the formulations on the kinetic behaviour of the acrylic based resins was also analysed by calorimetric analysis. Calorimetric experimental data were fitted to a simple kinetic model for radical photopolymerization reactions. Finally, a proper relationship between the glass transition temperature and the total extent of reaction was applied to the experimental data. A good agreement between the experimental data and both the theoretical models was generally

  18. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  19. Indomethacin decreases optic nerve oxygen tension by a mechanism other than cyclo-oxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, M Hove; Pedersen, D Bach; Bang, K

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of several Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), on the preoptic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO2), as indomethacin previously has demonstrated a strong decreasing effect on ONPO2. We tested whether these NSAIDs, like indomethacin, also reduce the increasing effect...

  20. High-oxygen and high-carbon dioxide containing atmospheres inhibit growth of food associated moulds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwerf, S.W.; Kets, E.P.W.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the growth of three foodborne fungi and high-oxygen modified atmosphere. Methods and Results: Petri dishes were incubated in a series of connected flasks, which were placed in a climatized room and flushed continuously with

  1. Effect of systemic nitric oxide synthase inhibition on optic disc oxygen partial pressure in normoxia and in hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Ioannis K; Pournaras, Jean-Antoine C; Stangos, Alexandros N; Pournaras, Constantin J

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of systemic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition on optic disc oxygen partial pressure (PO(2)) in normoxia and hypercapnia. Intervascular optic disc PO(2) was measured in 12 anesthetized minipigs by using oxygen-sensitive microelectrodes placed 0.1), despite a 21% increase of mean arterial pressure. Optic disc PO(2) increase under hypercapnia was blunted after L-NAME injection (DeltaPO(2) = 0.6 +/- 1.1 mm Hg; 3%; P > 0.1), and this effect was reversible by L-arginine. Moreover, L-NAME reduced the response to carbogen by 29% (DeltaPO(2) = 9.1 +/- 4.4 mm Hg; 49%; P = 0.01 versus before L-NAME). The response to hyperoxia was not affected. Whereas systemic NOS inhibition did not affect optic disc PO(2) in normoxia, a blunting effect was noted on the CO(2)-induced optic disc PO(2) increase. Nitric oxide appears to mediate the hypercapnic optic disc PO(2) increase.

  2. Neuronal inhibition and excitation, and the dichotomic control of brain hemodynamic and oxygen responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Mathiesen, Claus; Schaefer, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    under most conditions correlate to excitation of inhibitory interneurons, but there are important exceptions to that rule as described in this paper. Thus, variations in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition contribute dynamically to the control of metabolic and hemodynamic responses...

  3. Competitive inhibition of a metal-free porphyrin oxygen-reduction catalyst by water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojánek, Antonín; Langmaier, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Samec, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 34 (2012), s. 4094-4096 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : metal -free porphyrin * competitive inhibition * liquid-liquid interfaces Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 6.378, year: 2012

  4. The In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and Inhibition of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species of Sweet Potato Leaf Polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongnan Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro antioxidant activity and inhibition of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS of the total and individual phenolic compounds from Yuzi No. 7 sweet potato leaves were investigated in this study. Sweet potato leaf polyphenols possessed significantly higher antioxidant activity than ascorbic acid, tea polyphenols, and grape seed polyphenols. Among the individual phenolic compounds, caffeic acid showed the highest antioxidant activity, followed by monocaffeoylquinic acids and dicaffeoylquinic acids, while 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid showed the lowest value. Sweet potato leaf polyphenols could significantly decrease the level of intracellular ROS in a dose-dependent manner. The order of the inhibiting effect of individual phenolic compounds on the intracellular ROS level was not in accordance with that of antioxidant activity, suggesting that there was no direct relationship between antioxidant activity and intracellular ROS-inhibiting effect. Sweet potato leaves could be a good source of biologically active polyphenols with multiple applications in the development of foods, health products, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics.

  5. The In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and Inhibition of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species of Sweet Potato Leaf Polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongnan; Mu, Bona; Song, Zhen; Ma, Zhimin

    2018-01-01

    The in vitro antioxidant activity and inhibition of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the total and individual phenolic compounds from Yuzi No. 7 sweet potato leaves were investigated in this study. Sweet potato leaf polyphenols possessed significantly higher antioxidant activity than ascorbic acid, tea polyphenols, and grape seed polyphenols. Among the individual phenolic compounds, caffeic acid showed the highest antioxidant activity, followed by monocaffeoylquinic acids and dicaffeoylquinic acids, while 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid showed the lowest value. Sweet potato leaf polyphenols could significantly decrease the level of intracellular ROS in a dose-dependent manner. The order of the inhibiting effect of individual phenolic compounds on the intracellular ROS level was not in accordance with that of antioxidant activity, suggesting that there was no direct relationship between antioxidant activity and intracellular ROS-inhibiting effect. Sweet potato leaves could be a good source of biologically active polyphenols with multiple applications in the development of foods, health products, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. PMID:29643978

  6. Anesthetic propofol reduces endotoxic inflammation by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-regulated Akt/IKKβ/NF-κB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsi Hsing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anesthetic propofol has immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the area of anti-inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces inflammation through toll-like receptor (TLR 4 signaling. We investigated the molecular actions of propofol against LPS/TLR4-induced inflammatory activation in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Non-cytotoxic levels of propofol reduced LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and NO as determined by western blotting and the Griess reaction, respectively. Propofol also reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-10 as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Western blot analysis showed propofol inhibited LPS-induced activation and phosphorylation of IKKβ (Ser180 and nuclear factor (NF-κB (Ser536; the subsequent nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 was also reduced. Additionally, propofol inhibited LPS-induced Akt activation and phosphorylation (Ser473 partly by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS generation; inter-regulation that ROS regulated Akt followed by NF-κB activation was found to be crucial for LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. An in vivo study using C57BL/6 mice also demonstrated the anti-inflammatory properties against LPS in peritoneal macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that propofol reduces LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages by inhibiting the interconnected ROS/Akt/IKKβ/NF-κB signaling pathways.

  7. Anesthetic Propofol Reduces Endotoxic Inflammation by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species-regulated Akt/IKKβ/NF-κB Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Ming-Chung; Choi, Pui-Ching; Huang, Wei-Ching; Kai, Jui-In; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Wang, Chi-Yun; Chang, Yu-Ping; Chen, Yu-Hong; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Anesthetic propofol has immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the area of anti-inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammation through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling. We investigated the molecular actions of propofol against LPS/TLR4-induced inflammatory activation in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Non-cytotoxic levels of propofol reduced LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO as determined by western blotting and the Griess reaction, respectively. Propofol also reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Western blot analysis showed propofol inhibited LPS-induced activation and phosphorylation of IKKβ (Ser180) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB (Ser536); the subsequent nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 was also reduced. Additionally, propofol inhibited LPS-induced Akt activation and phosphorylation (Ser473) partly by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation; inter-regulation that ROS regulated Akt followed by NF-κB activation was found to be crucial for LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. An in vivo study using C57BL/6 mice also demonstrated the anti-inflammatory properties against LPS in peritoneal macrophages. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that propofol reduces LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages by inhibiting the interconnected ROS/Akt/IKKβ/NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21408125

  8. Inhibition of the NorA multi-drug transporter by oxygenated monoterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coêlho, Mayara Ladeira; Ferreira, Josie Haydée Lima; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto; Kaatz, Glenn W; Barreto, Humberto Medeiros; de Carvalho Melo Cavalcante, Ana Amélia

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intrinsic antimicrobial activity of three monoterpenes nerol, dimethyl octanol and estragole, against bacteria and yeast strains, as well as, investigate if these compounds are able to inhibit the NorA efflux pump related to fluoroquinolone resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the monoterpenes against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans strains were determined by micro-dilution assay. MICs of the norfloxacin against a S. aureus strain overexpressing the NorA protein were determined in the absence or in the presence of the monoterpenes at subinhibitory concentrations, aiming to verify the ability of this compounds act as efflux pump inhibitors. The monoterpenes were inactive against S. aureus however the nerol was active against E. coli and C. albicans. The addition of the compounds to growth media at sub-inhibitory concentrations enhanced the activity of norfloxacin against S. aureus SA1199-B. This result shows that bioactives tested, especially the nerol, are able to inhibit NorA efflux pump indicating a potential use as adjuvants of norfloxacin for therapy of infections caused by multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavilala, Divya Teja [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); O’Bryhim, Bliss E. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Symons, R.C. Andrew [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ophthalmology Department, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Mukherji, Mridul, E-mail: mukherjim@umkc.edu [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  10. Nitrite accumulation from simultaneous free-ammonia and free-nitrous-acid inhibition and oxygen limitation in a continuous-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Chung, Jinwook; Rittmann, Bruce E; Bae, Wookeun

    2015-01-01

    To achieve nitrite accumulation for shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) in a biofilm process, we explored the simultaneous effects of oxygen limitation and free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition in the nitrifying biofilm. We used the multi-species nitrifying biofilm model (MSNBM) to identify conditions that should or should not lead to nitrite accumulation, and evaluated the effectiveness of those conditions with experiments in continuous flow biofilm reactors (CFBRs). CFBR experiments were organized into four sets with these expected outcomes based on the MSNBM as follows: (i) Control, giving full nitrification; (ii) oxygen limitation, giving modest long-term nitrite build up; (iii) FA inhibition, giving no long-term nitrite accumulation; and (iv) FA inhibition plus oxygen limitation, giving major long-term nitrite accumulation. Consistent with MSNBM predictions, the experimental results showed that nitrite accumulated in sets 2-4 in the short term, but long-term nitrite accumulation was maintained only in sets 2 and 4, which involved oxygen limitation. Furthermore, nitrite accumulation was substantially greater in set 4, which also included FA inhibition. However, FA inhibition (and accompanying FNA inhibition) alone in set 3 did not maintained long-term nitrite accumulation. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity batch tests confirmed that little NOB or only a small fraction of NOB were present in the biofilms for sets 4 and 2, respectively. The experimental data supported the previous modeling results that nitrite accumulation could be achieved with a lower ammonium concentration than had been required for a suspended-growth process. Additional findings were that the biofilm exposed to low dissolved oxygen (DO) limitation and FA inhibition was substantially denser and probably had a lower detachment rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise in humans: a PET study with nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide and prostanoids on microcirculation and oxygen uptake specifically in the active skeletal muscle by use of positron emission tomography (PET). Healthy males performed 3 five min bouts of light knee-extensor exercise. Skeletal...... muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake were measured at rest and during the exercise using PET with H(2)O(15) and (15)O(2) during: 1) control conditions; 2) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition by arterial infusion of L-NMMA and 3) combined NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by arterial infusion of L...

  12. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via reactive oxygen species generation and caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yating; Wei, Sixi; Wang, Jishi; Fang, Qin; Chai, Qixiang

    2014-07-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a potential cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, including watercress, has been reported to inhibit cancer cell growth by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis in various human cancer cell models. However, the role of PEITC in the inhibition of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell growth and its underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, PEITC was found to induce cell death through the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress and oxidative damage. Heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1), which participates in the development of numerous tumors and the sensitivity of these tumors to chemotherapeutic drugs, plays a protective role by modulating oxidative injury. Therefore, the present study assessed the inhibitory effect of PEITC on K562 cells and whether HO‑1 facilitated cell apoptosis and ROS generation. PEITC was found to suppress cell growth and cause apoptosis by promoting Fas and Fas ligand expression, increasing ROS generation and by the successive release of cytochrome c as well as the activation of caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. PEITC was also combined with the HO‑1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX and the inducer hemin to assess whether HO‑1 determines cell survival and ROS generation. The results of the present study suggest that PEITC may be a potential anti‑tumor compound for CML therapy, and that HO‑1 has a critical function in PEITC‑induced apoptosis and ROS generation.

  13. I Want to but I Won't: Pluralistic Ignorance Inhibits Intentions to Take Paternity Leave in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeru Miyajima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The number of male employees who take paternity leave in Japan has been low in past decades. However, the majority of male employees actually wish to take paternity leave if they were to have a child. Previous studies have demonstrated that the organizational climate in workplaces is the major determinant of male employees' use of family-friendly policies, because males are often stigmatized and fear receiving negative evaluation from others. While such normative pressure might be derived from prevailing social practices relevant to people's expectation of social roles (e.g., “Men make houses, women make homes”, these social practices are often perpetuated even after the majority of group members have ceased to support them. The perpetuation of this unpopular norm could be caused by the social psychological phenomenon of pluralistic ignorance. While researches have explored people's beliefs about gender roles from various perspectives, profound understanding of these beliefs regarding gender role norms, and the accuracy of others' beliefs remains to be attained. The current research examined the association between pluralistic ignorance and the perpetually low rates of taking paternity leave in Japan. Specifically, Study 1 (n = 299 examined Japanese male employees' (ages ranging from the 20 s to the 40 s attitudes toward paternity leave and to estimate attitudes of other men of the same age, as well as behavioral intentions (i.e., desire and willingness to take paternity leave if they had a child in the future. The results demonstrated that male employees overestimated other men's negative attitudes toward paternity leave. Moreover, those who had positive attitudes toward taking leave and attributed negative attitudes to others were less willing to take paternity leave than were those who had positive attitudes and believed others shared those attitudes, although there was no significant difference between their desires to take paternity

  14. I Want to but I Won't: Pluralistic Ignorance Inhibits Intentions to Take Paternity Leave in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Takeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The number of male employees who take paternity leave in Japan has been low in past decades. However, the majority of male employees actually wish to take paternity leave if they were to have a child. Previous studies have demonstrated that the organizational climate in workplaces is the major determinant of male employees' use of family-friendly policies, because males are often stigmatized and fear receiving negative evaluation from others. While such normative pressure might be derived from prevailing social practices relevant to people's expectation of social roles (e.g., "Men make houses, women make homes"), these social practices are often perpetuated even after the majority of group members have ceased to support them. The perpetuation of this unpopular norm could be caused by the social psychological phenomenon of pluralistic ignorance. While researches have explored people's beliefs about gender roles from various perspectives, profound understanding of these beliefs regarding gender role norms, and the accuracy of others' beliefs remains to be attained. The current research examined the association between pluralistic ignorance and the perpetually low rates of taking paternity leave in Japan. Specifically, Study 1 ( n = 299) examined Japanese male employees' (ages ranging from the 20 s to the 40 s) attitudes toward paternity leave and to estimate attitudes of other men of the same age, as well as behavioral intentions (i.e., desire and willingness) to take paternity leave if they had a child in the future. The results demonstrated that male employees overestimated other men's negative attitudes toward paternity leave. Moreover, those who had positive attitudes toward taking leave and attributed negative attitudes to others were less willing to take paternity leave than were those who had positive attitudes and believed others shared those attitudes, although there was no significant difference between their desires to take paternity leave. Study 2 ( n

  15. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C., E-mail: prabhat-goswami@uiowa.edu

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  16. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP. Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05. The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05. Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05. In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05. Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways.

  17. Cofilin Inhibition Restores Neuronal Cell Death in Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Model of Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madineni, Anusha; Alhadidi, Qasim; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-03-01

    Ischemia is a condition associated with decreased blood supply to the brain, eventually leading to death of neurons. It is associated with a diverse cascade of responses involving both degenerative and regenerative mechanisms. At the cellular level, the changes are initiated prominently in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Cofilin, a cytoskeletal actin severing protein, is known to be involved in the early stages of apoptotic cell death. Evidence supports its intervention in the progression of disease states like Alzheimer's and ischemic kidney disease. In the present study, we have hypothesized the possible involvement of cofilin in ischemia. Using PC12 cells and mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons, we investigated the potential role of cofilin in ischemia in two different in vitro ischemic models: chemical induced oxidative stress and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). The expression profile studies demonstrated a decrease in phosphocofilin levels in all models of ischemia, implying stress-induced cofilin activation. Furthermore, calcineurin and slingshot 1L (SSH) phosphatases were found to be the signaling mediators of the cofilin activation. In primary cultures of cortical neurons, cofilin was found to be significantly activated after 1 h of OGD. To delineate the role of activated cofilin in ischemia, we knocked down cofilin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and tested the impact of cofilin silencing on neuronal viability. Cofilin siRNA-treated neurons showed a significant reduction of cofilin levels in all treatment groups (control, OGD, and OGD/R). Additionally, cofilin siRNA-reduced cofilin mitochondrial translocation and caspase 3 cleavage, with a concomitant increase in neuronal viability. These results strongly support the active role of cofilin in ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration and apoptosis. We believe that targeting this protein mediator has a potential for therapeutic intervention in ischemic brain injury and stroke.

  18. Ursolic acid isolated from guava leaves inhibits inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    Psidium guajava (guava) leaves have been frequently used for the treatment of rheumatism, fever, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify major anti-inflammatory compounds from guava leaf extract. The methanol extract and its hexane-, dichloromethane-, ethylacetate-, n-butanol- and water-soluble phases derived from guava leaves were evaluated to determine their inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The methanol extract decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity at a concentration range of 0-100 μg/mL. The n-butanol soluble phase was the most potent among the five soluble phases. Four compounds were isolated by reversed-phase HPLC from the n-butanol soluble phase and identified to be avicularin, guaijaverin, leucocyanidin and ursolic acid by their NMR spectra. Among these compounds, ursolic acid inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxity at a concentration range of 1-10 µM, but the other three compounds had no effect. Ursolic acid also inhibited LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 production. A western blot analysis showed that ursolic acid decreased the LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase protein levels. In addition, ursolic acid suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results identified ursolic acid as a major anti-inflammatory compound in guava leaves.

  19. Taking aim at a moving target: designing drugs to inhibit drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafianos, Stefan G; Das, Kalyan; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2004-12-01

    HIV undergoes rapid genetic variation; this variation is caused primarily by the enormous number of viruses produced daily in an infected individual. Because of this variation, HIV presents a moving target for drug and vaccine development. The variation within individuals has led to the generation of diverse HIV-1 subtypes, which further complicates the development of effective drugs and vaccines. In general, it is more difficult to hit a moving target than a stationary target. Two broad strategies for hitting a moving target (in this case, HIV replication) are to understand the movement and to aim at the portions that move the least. In the case of anti-HIV drug development, the first option can be addressed by understanding the mechanism(s) of drug resistance and developing drugs that effectively inhibit mutant viruses. The second can be addressed by designing drugs that interact with portions of the viral machinery that are evolutionarily conserved, such as enzyme active sites.

  20. Cordyceps sinensis Oral Liquid Inhibits Damage Induced by Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying-Xin; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Ruan, Ming-Hua; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Jia-Chun; Chu, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. It has been demonstrated to have a variety of biological activities, and an extract of it has been demonstrated to possess a protective effect in occlusion-induced focal cerebral ischemia of the middle cerebral artery in rats. It could be explored as an agent for treatment of ischemic stroke, and the mechanisms need to be studied further. The study intended to investigate the protective effects of the Cordyceps sinensis oral liquid (CSOL) against damage induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in SH-SY5Y cells. DESIGN • The research team designed an in vitro study. The study occurred at the Naval Medical Research Institute in Shanghai, China. SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to CSOL in doses of 0.01, 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, and 1.00 mg/mL, creating 5 intervention groups. The OGD condition was induced by transfer of the cells from high-glucose Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) in a box gassed with air containing 5% CO2 to glucose-free DMEM in a box gassed with 94% N2, 5% CO2, and 1% O2. Like the cells for the interventions groups, the cells for a model group were cultured with high-glucose DMEM and were transferred to the OGD, but they received no dose of COSL. Cells in a control group were cultured with high-glucose DMEM, were not transferred to the OGD condition, and did not receive any dose of COSL. Cell viability was assayed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. The apoptosis and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were detected by flow cytometry, and the protein expression of caspase-3 was observed by western blot. After exposure to OGD, the cell viability of cells treated with 0.01, 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, and 1.00 mg/mL of CSOL increased in a dose-effect relationship. Compared with the cells in the model group, the treatment of CSOL at all the experimental concentrations significantly inhibited both the cell apoptosis

  1. Glycidamide inhibits progesterone production through reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis in R2C Rat Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingwei; Sun, Jianxia; Zou, Feiyan; Bai, Shun; Jiang, Xinwei; Jiao, Rui; Ou, Shiyi; Zhang, Hui; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; Bai, Weibin

    2017-10-01

    The food contaminant acrylamide (AA) is usually recognized as a probable human carcinogen. In addition, AA has also been found able to induce male infertility in animals. Interestingly, resent research work revealed that the toxic effect of AA on the ability of male reproduction in vivo may due to glycidamide (GA) which is the metabolite of AA. In this study, R2C Leydig cells was used to investigate the toxic effects of GA on progesterone production. GA caused dose-dependent inhibition on the cell growth, with IC 25 , IC 50, and IC 75 values found at 0.635, 0.872, and 1.198 mM, respectively. The results of single cell gel/Comet assay showed that GA significantly induced early-phase cell apoptosis, reduced progesterone production, as well as decreasing the protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) in R2C cells. Furthermore, GA induced overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), upregulated Bax expression, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and triggered mitochondria-mediated cell apoptosis. Consequently, the downstream effector caspase-3 was activated, resulting in Leydig cells apoptosis. Overall, our results showed that GA could damage R2C Leydig cells by the lesion of the ability of progesterone genesis and inducing cells apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) overexpression increases reactive oxygen species production and inhibits murine muscle satellite cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Shelley D E; Kennedy, Karen A M; Xie, Xiaojun; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Li, Shawn S C

    2014-01-11

    Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) has been associated with the maturation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing enzyme, dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1) in the adult thyroid. However, ROS have also been implicated in the development of several tissues. We found that activated muscle satellite cells and primary myoblasts isolated from mice express robust levels of DUOXA1 and that its levels are altered as cells differentiate. To determine whether DUOXA1 levels affect muscle differentiation, we used an adenoviral construct (pCMV5-DUOXA1-GFP) to drive constitutive overexpression of this protein in primary myoblasts. High levels of DUOXA1 throughout myogenesis resulted in enhanced H2O2 production, fusion defects, reduced expression of early (myogenin) and late (myosin heavy chain) markers of differentiation, and elevated levels of apoptosis compared to control cells infected with an empty adenoviral vector (pCMV5-GFP). DUOXA1 knockdown (using a DUOXA1 shRNA construct) resulted in enhanced differentiation compared to cells subjected to a control shRNA, and subjecting DUOXA1 overexpressing cells to siRNAs targeting DUOX1 or apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) rescued the phenotype. This study represents the first to demonstrate the importance of DUOXA1 in skeletal muscle myoblasts and that DUOXA1 overexpression in muscle stem cells induces apoptosis and inhibits differentiation through DUOX1 and ASK1.

  3. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris.

  4. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Neuroglobin overexpression inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Li, Yadan; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiaoying

    2013-08-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is an endogenous neuroprotective molecule against hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely undefined. Our recent study revealed that Ngb can bind to voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a regulator of mitochondria permeability transition (MPT). In this study we examined the role of Ngb in MPT pore (mPTP) opening following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and immunocytochemistry showed that the binding between Ngb and VDAC was increased after OGD compared to normoxia, indicating the OGD-enhanced Ngb-VDAC interaction. Ngb overexpression protected primary mouse cortical neurons from OGD-induced neuronal death, to an extent comparable to mPTP opening inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA) pretreatment. We further measured the role of Ngb in OGD-induced mPTP opening using Ngb overexpression and knockdown approaches in primary cultured neurons, and recombinant Ngb exposure to isolated mitochondria. Same as CsA pretreatment, Ngb overexpression significantly reduced OGD-induced mPTP opening markers including mitochondria swelling, mitochondrial NAD(+) release, and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release in primary cultured neurons. Recombinant Ngb incubation significantly reduced OGD-induced NAD(+) release and Cyt c release from isolated mitochondria. In contrast, Ngb knockdown significantly increased OGD-induced neuron death, and increased OGD-induced mitochondrial NAD(+) release and Cyt c release as well, and these outcomes could be rescued by CsA pretreatment. In summary, our results demonstrated that Ngb overexpression can inhibit OGD-induced mPTP opening in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons, which may be one of the molecular mechanisms of Ngb's neuroprotection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. BMI-1 Mediates Estrogen-Deficiency-Induced Bone Loss by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinbo; Wang, Qian; Yang, Renlei; Zhang, Jiaqi; Li, Xing; Zhou, Xichao; Miao, Dengshun

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that estrogen regulates bone homeostasis through regulatory effects on oxidative stress. However, it is unclear how estrogen deficiency triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Recent studies provide evidence that the B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (BMI-1) plays a critical role in protection against oxidative stress and that this gene is directly regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER) at the transcriptional level. In this study, ovariectomized mice were given drinking water with/without antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 1 mg/mL) supplementation, and compared with each other and with sham mice. Results showed that ovariectomy resulted in bone loss with increased osteoclast surface, increased ROS levels, T cell activation, and increased TNF and RANKL levels in serum and in CD4 T cells; NAC supplementation largely prevented these alterations. BMI-1 expression levels were dramatically downregulated in CD4 T cells from ovariectomized mice. We supplemented drinking water to BMI-1-deficient mice with/without NAC and compared them with each other and with wild-type (WT) mice. We found that BMI-1 deficiency mimicked alterations observed in ovariectomy whereas NAC supplementation reversed all alterations induced by BMI-1 deficiency. Because T cells are critical in mediating ovariectomy-induced bone loss, we further assessed whether BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes can protect against estrogen deficiency-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by inhibiting oxidative stress, T cell activation, and RANKL production. When WT and Eμ-BMI-1 transgenic mice with BMI-1 specifically overexpressed in lymphocytes were ovariectomized and compared with each other and with WT sham mice, we found that BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes clearly reversed all alterations induced by ovariectomy. Results from this study indicate that estrogen deficiency downregulates BMI-1 and subsequently increases ROS, T cell activation, and

  7. Oxygen-boosted immunogenic photodynamic therapy with gold nanocages@manganese dioxide to inhibit tumor growth and metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ruijing; Liu, Lanlan; He, Huamei; Chen, Zhikuan; Han, Zhiqun; Luo, Zhenyu; Wu, Zhihao; Zheng, Mingbin; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2018-09-01

    Metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC) is an aggressive disease among women worldwide, characterized by high mortality and poor prognosis despite systemic therapy with radiation and chemotherapies. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an important strategy to eliminate the primary tumor, however its therapeutic efficacy against metastases and recurrence is still limited. Here, we employed a template method to develop the core-shell gold nanocage@manganese dioxide (AuNC@MnO 2 , AM) nanoparticles as tumor microenvironment responsive oxygen producers and near-infrared (NIR)-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generators for oxygen-boosted immunogenic PDT against mTNBC. In this platform, MnO 2 shell degrades in acidic tumor microenvironment pH/H 2 O 2 conditions and generates massive oxygen to boost PDT effect of AM nanoparticles under laser irradiation. Fluorescence (FL)/photoacoustic (PA)/magnetic resonance (MR) multimodal imaging confirms the effective accumulation of AM nanoparticles with sufficient oxygenation in tumor site to ameliorate local hypoxia. Moreover, the oxygen-boosted PDT effect of AM not only destroys primary tumor effectively but also elicits immunogenic cell death (ICD) with damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) release, which subsequently induces DC maturation and effector cells activation, thereby robustly evoking systematic antitumor immune responses against mTNBC. Hence, this oxygen-boosted immunogenic PDT nanosystem offers a promising approach to ablate primary tumor and simultaneously prevent tumor metastases via immunogenic abscopal effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CR108, a novel vitamin K3 derivative induces apoptosis and breast tumor inhibition by reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chun-Ru [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Liao, Wei-Siang [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ya-Hui [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Murugan, Kaliyappan [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chinpiao, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China); Chao, Jui-I, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Vitamin K3 derivatives have been shown to exert anticancer activities. Here we show a novel vitamin K3 derivative (S)-2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutylthio)naphthalene-1,4-dione, which is named as CR108 that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction in human breast cancer. CR108 is more effective on the breast cancer cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. Moreover, CR108 induced apoptosis in both the non-HER-2-overexpressed MCF-7 and HER-2-overexpressed BT-474 breast cancer cells. CR108 caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c released from mitochondria to cytosol, and cleaved PARP proteins for apoptosis induction. CR108 markedly increased ROS levels in breast cancer cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general ROS scavenger, completely blocked the CR108-induced ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Interestingly, CR108 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but conversely inhibited the survivin protein expression. NAC treatment prevented the activation of p38 MAP kinase and rescued the survivin protein levels. SB202190, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, recovered the survivin protein levels and attenuated the cytotoxicity of CR108-treated cells. Furthermore, CR108 inhibited the xenografted human breast tumor growth in nude mice. Together, we demonstrate that CR108 is a novel vitamin K3 derivative that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction and associates with the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and the inhibition of survivin in the human breast cancer. - Highlights: • CR108 is more effective on the cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. • CR108 induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. • CR108 induces apoptosis by p38 kinase activation and survivin inhibition. • CR108 is a potent vitamin K3 analog that can develop for breast cancer therapy.

  9. CR108, a novel vitamin K3 derivative induces apoptosis and breast tumor inhibition by reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chun-Ru; Liao, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ya-Hui; Murugan, Kaliyappan; Chen, Chinpiao; Chao, Jui-I

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin K3 derivatives have been shown to exert anticancer activities. Here we show a novel vitamin K3 derivative (S)-2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutylthio)naphthalene-1,4-dione, which is named as CR108 that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction in human breast cancer. CR108 is more effective on the breast cancer cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. Moreover, CR108 induced apoptosis in both the non-HER-2-overexpressed MCF-7 and HER-2-overexpressed BT-474 breast cancer cells. CR108 caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c released from mitochondria to cytosol, and cleaved PARP proteins for apoptosis induction. CR108 markedly increased ROS levels in breast cancer cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general ROS scavenger, completely blocked the CR108-induced ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Interestingly, CR108 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but conversely inhibited the survivin protein expression. NAC treatment prevented the activation of p38 MAP kinase and rescued the survivin protein levels. SB202190, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, recovered the survivin protein levels and attenuated the cytotoxicity of CR108-treated cells. Furthermore, CR108 inhibited the xenografted human breast tumor growth in nude mice. Together, we demonstrate that CR108 is a novel vitamin K3 derivative that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction and associates with the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and the inhibition of survivin in the human breast cancer. - Highlights: • CR108 is more effective on the cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. • CR108 induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. • CR108 induces apoptosis by p38 kinase activation and survivin inhibition. • CR108 is a potent vitamin K3 analog that can develop for breast cancer therapy

  10. 5-lipoxygenase mediates docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine-induced reactive oxygen species production and inhibition of proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seok-Woo; Hah, J Hun; Oh, Sang-Mi; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Sung, Myung-Whun

    2016-07-13

    Endocannabinoids have recently drawn attention as promising anti-cancer agents. We previously observed that anandamide (AEA), one of the representative endocannabinoids, effectively inhibited the proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in a receptor-independent manner. In this study, using HNSCC cell lines, we examined the anti-cancer effects and the mechanisms of action of docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA) and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine (NALA), which are polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-based ethanolamides like AEA. DHEA and NALA were found to effectively inhibit HNSCC cell proliferation. These anti-proliferative effects seemed to be mediated in a cannabinoid receptor-independent manner, since the antagonist of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1), two endocannabinoid receptors, did not reverse the ability of DHEA and NALA to induce cell death. Instead, we observed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and a decrease of phosphorylated Akt as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment. Antioxidants efficiently reversed the inhibition of cell proliferation and the decrease of phosphorylated Akt induced by DHEA and NALA; inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which is expected to be involved in DHEA- and NALA-degradation pathway, also partially blocked the ability of DHEA and NALA to inhibit cell proliferation and phosphorylated Akt. Interestingly, ROS production as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment was decreased by inhibition of 5-LO. From these findings, we suggest that ROS production induced by the 5-LO pathway mediates the anti-cancer effects of DHEA and NALA on HNSCC cells. Finally, our findings suggest the possibility of a new cancer-specific therapeutic strategy, which utilizes 5-LO activity rather than inhibiting it.

  11. 5-lipoxygenase mediates docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine-induced reactive oxygen species production and inhibition of proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok-Woo; Hah, J. Hun; Oh, Sang-Mi; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Sung, Myung-Whun

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids have recently drawn attention as promising anti-cancer agents. We previously observed that anandamide (AEA), one of the representative endocannabinoids, effectively inhibited the proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in a receptor-independent manner. In this study, using HNSCC cell lines, we examined the anti-cancer effects and the mechanisms of action of docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA) and N-arachidonoyl-L-alanine (NALA), which are polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-based ethanolamides like AEA. DHEA and NALA were found to effectively inhibit HNSCC cell proliferation. These anti-proliferative effects seemed to be mediated in a cannabinoid receptor-independent manner, since the antagonist of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1), two endocannabinoid receptors, did not reverse the ability of DHEA and NALA to induce cell death. Instead, we observed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and a decrease of phosphorylated Akt as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment. Antioxidants efficiently reversed the inhibition of cell proliferation and the decrease of phosphorylated Akt induced by DHEA and NALA; inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which is expected to be involved in DHEA- and NALA-degradation pathway, also partially blocked the ability of DHEA and NALA to inhibit cell proliferation and phosphorylated Akt. Interestingly, ROS production as a result of DHEA and NALA treatment was decreased by inhibition of 5-LO. From these findings, we suggest that ROS production induced by the 5-LO pathway mediates the anti-cancer effects of DHEA and NALA on HNSCC cells. Finally, our findings suggest the possibility of a new cancer-specific therapeutic strategy, which utilizes 5-LO activity rather than inhibiting it. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2499-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  13. Oxygen glucose deprivation post-conditioning protects cortical neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury: role of HSP70 and inhibition of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Meng, Xian-li; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yong-li; Li, Yue-juan; Fan, Zhe-ming

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) post-conditioning (PostC) on neural cell apoptosis in OGD-PostC model and the protective effect on primary cortical neurons against OGD injury in vitro. Four-h OGD was induced by OGD by using a specialized and humidified chamber. To initiate OGD, culture medium was replaced with de-oxygenated and glucose-free extracellular solution-Locke's medium. After OGD treatment for 4 h, cells were then allowed to recover for 6 h or 20 h. Then lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to detect cell death, protein levels and apoptotic cells, respectively. For the PostC treatment, three cycles of 15-min OGD, followed by 15 min normal cultivation, were applied immediately after injurious 4-h OGD. Cells were then allowed to recover for 6 h or 20 h, and cell death was assessed by LDH release assay. Apoptotic cells were flow cytometrically evaluated after 4-h OGD, followed by re-oxygenation for 20 h (O4/R20). In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), Bcl-2 and Bax. The ratio of Bcl-2 expression was (0.44±0.08)% and (0.76±0.10)%, and that of Bax expression was (0.51±0.05)% and (0.39±0.04)%, and that of HSP70 was (0.42±0.031)% and (0.72±0.045)% respectively in OGD group and PostC group. After O4/R6, the rate of neuron death in PostC group and OGD groups was (28.96±3.03)% and (37.02±4.47)%, respectively. Therefore, the PostC treatment could up-regulate the expression of HSP70 and Bcl-2, but down-regulate Bax expression. As compared with OGD group, OGD-induced neuron death and apoptosis were significantly decreased in PostC group (Pneuron death. This neuro-protective effect is likely achieved by anti-apoptotic mechanisms and is associated with over-expression of HSP70.

  14. DELETION OR INHIBITION OF THE OXYGEN SENSOR PHD1 PROTECTS AGAINST ISCHEMIC STROKE VIA REPROGRAMMING OF NEURONAL METABOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaegebeur, Annelies; Segura, Inmaculada; Schmieder, Roberta; Verdegem, Dries; Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Dresselaers, Tom; Eelen, Guy; Ghosh, Debapriva; Schoors, Sandra; Janaki Raman, Sudha Rani; Cruys, Bert; Govaerts, Kristof; De Legher, Carla; Bouché, Ann; Schoonjans, Luc; Ramer, Matt S.; Hung, Gene; Bossaert, Goele; Cleveland, Don W.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Voets, Thomas; Lemmens, Robin; Bennett, C. Frank; Robberecht, Wim; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary The oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) regulate cellular metabolism, but their role in neuronal metabolism during stroke is unknown. Here we report that PHD1 deficiency provides neuroprotection in a murine model of permanent brain ischemia. This was not due to an increased collateral vessel network, nor to enhanced neurotrophin expression. Instead, PHD1−/− neurons were protected against oxygen-nutrient deprivation by reprogramming glucose metabolism. Indeed, PHD1−/− neurons enhanced glucose flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by diverting glucose from glycolysis. As a result, PHD1−/− neurons increased their redox buffering capacity to scavenge oxygen radicals in ischemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of PHD1-antisense oligonucleotides reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits following stroke. These data identify PHD1 as a novel regulator of neuronal metabolism and a potential therapeutic target in ischemic stroke. PMID:26774962

  15. Deletion or Inhibition of the Oxygen Sensor PHD1 Protects against Ischemic Stroke via Reprogramming of Neuronal Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaegebeur, Annelies; Segura, Inmaculada; Schmieder, Roberta; Verdegem, Dries; Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Dresselaers, Tom; Eelen, Guy; Ghosh, Debapriva; Davidson, Shawn M; Schoors, Sandra; Broekaert, Dorien; Cruys, Bert; Govaerts, Kristof; De Legher, Carla; Bouché, Ann; Schoonjans, Luc; Ramer, Matt S; Hung, Gene; Bossaert, Goele; Cleveland, Don W; Himmelreich, Uwe; Voets, Thomas; Lemmens, Robin; Bennett, C Frank; Robberecht, Wim; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Ghesquière, Bart; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-02-09

    The oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) regulate cellular metabolism, but their role in neuronal metabolism during stroke is unknown. Here we report that PHD1 deficiency provides neuroprotection in a murine model of permanent brain ischemia. This was not due to an increased collateral vessel network. Instead, PHD1(-/-) neurons were protected against oxygen-nutrient deprivation by reprogramming glucose metabolism. Indeed, PHD1(-/-) neurons enhanced glucose flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by diverting glucose away from glycolysis. As a result, PHD1(-/-) neurons increased their redox buffering capacity to scavenge oxygen radicals in ischemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of PHD1-antisense oligonucleotides reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits following stroke. These data identify PHD1 as a regulator of neuronal metabolism and a potential therapeutic target in ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Edaravone protects against oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration-induced apoptosis in spinal cord astrocytes by inhibiting integrated stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGSD/R induces apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes, possibly via caspase-12 and the integrated stress response, which involves protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4. We hypothesized that edaravone, a low molecular weight, lipophilic free radical scavenger, would reduce OGSD/R-induced apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes. To test this, we established primary cultures of rat astrocytes, and exposed them to 8 hours/6 hours of OGSD/R with or without edaravone (0.1, 1, 10, 100 μM treatment. We found that 100 μM of edaravone significantly suppressed astrocyte apoptosis and inhibited the release of reactive oxygen species. It also inhibited the activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced the expression of homologous CCAAT/enhancer binding protein, phosphorylated (p-PERK, p-eIF2α, and ATF4. These results point to a new use of an established drug in the prevention of OGSD/R-mediated spinal cord astrocyte apoptosis via the integrated stress response.

  18. Influence of atmospheric oxygen and ozone on ripening indices of normal (Rin) and ripening inhibited (rin) tomato cultivars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, Y.P.; Solberg, M.; Haard, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    Ethylene (10 ppm) dependent mediation of normal and mutant (rin) tomato fruit ripening was promoted by 100% oxygen, 3.7 pphm ozone, or their combination. All ripening indices studied (respiration, chlorophyll degradation, carotenoid accumulation, softening, and aroma development) were promoted by oxygen and/or ozone. Ozone also acted independent of ethylene in promoting chlorophyll degradation and aroma development in normal fruit, but did not appreciably affect these quality attributes in mutant fruit. Lycopene accumulation in normal and mutant fruit and aroma formation in normal fruit were promoted to a greater extent by ozone than were other ripening indices. Mutant (rin) fruit contained 27% of the lycopene that was present in normal (Rin) fruit after ripening in O/sub 2/ containing 10ppm ethylene and 3.7 pphm ozone, whereas they contained only 3% of the lycopene in normal fruit after ripening in air containing 10ppm ethylene.

  19. Inhibition of hypoxia-associated response and kynurenine production in response to hyperbaric oxygen as mechanisms involved in protection against experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Marcele F; Kayano, Ana Carolina A V; Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Dos-Santos, João Conrado K; Judice, Carla; Blanco, Yara C; Shryock, Nathaniel; Sercundes, Michelle K; Ortolan, Luana S; Francelin, Carolina; Leite, Juliana A; Oliveira, Rafaella; Elias, Rosa M; Câmara, Niels O S; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Albrecht, Letusa; Farias, Alessandro S; Vicente, Cristina P; Werneck, Claudio C; Giorgio, Selma; Verinaud, Liana; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Marinho, Claudio R F; Lalwani, Pritesh; Amino, Rogerio; Aliberti, Julio; Costa, Fabio T M

    2018-03-20

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a multifactorial syndrome involving an exacerbated proinflammatory status, endothelial cell activation, coagulopathy, hypoxia, and accumulation of leukocytes and parasites in the brain microvasculature. Despite significant improvements in malaria control, 15% of mortality is still observed in CM cases, and 25% of survivors develop neurologic sequelae for life-even after appropriate antimalarial therapy. A treatment that ameliorates CM clinical signs, resulting in complete healing, is urgently needed. Previously, we showed a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)-protective effect against experimental CM. Here, we provide molecular evidence that HBO targets brain endothelial cells by decreasing their activation and inhibits parasite and leukocyte accumulation, thus improving cerebral microcirculatory blood flow. HBO treatment increased the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor over hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), an oxygen-sensitive cytosolic receptor, along with decreased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression and kynurenine levels. Moreover, ablation of HIF-1α expression in endothelial cells in mice conferred protection against CM and improved survival. We propose that HBO should be pursued as an adjunctive therapy in CM patients to prolong survival and diminish deleterious proinflammatory reaction. Furthermore, our data support the use of HBO in therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes of non-CM disorders affecting the brain.-Bastos, M. F., Kayano, A. C. A. V., Silva-Filho, J. L., Dos-Santos, J. C. K., Judice, C., Blanco, Y. C., Shryock, N., Sercundes, M. K., Ortolan, L. S., Francelin, C., Leite, J. A., Oliveira, R., Elias, R. M., Câmara, N. O. S., Lopes, S. C. P., Albrecht, L., Farias, A. S., Vicente, C. P., Werneck, C. C., Giorgio, S., Verinaud, L., Epiphanio, S., Marinho, C. R. F., Lalwani, P., Amino, R., Aliberti, J., Costa, F. T. M. Inhibition of hypoxia-associated response and kynurenine production in response to hyperbaric oxygen

  20. CR108, a novel vitamin K3 derivative induces apoptosis and breast tumor inhibition by reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Ru; Liao, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ya-Hui; Murugan, Kaliyappan; Chen, Chinpiao; Chao, Jui-I

    2013-12-15

    Vitamin K3 derivatives have been shown to exert anticancer activities. Here we show a novel vitamin K3 derivative (S)-2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutylthio)naphthalene-1,4-dione, which is named as CR108 that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction in human breast cancer. CR108 is more effective on the breast cancer cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. Moreover, CR108 induced apoptosis in both the non-HER-2-overexpressed MCF-7 and HER-2-overexpressed BT-474 breast cancer cells. CR108 caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c released from mitochondria to cytosol, and cleaved PARP proteins for apoptosis induction. CR108 markedly increased ROS levels in breast cancer cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general ROS scavenger, completely blocked the CR108-induced ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Interestingly, CR108 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but conversely inhibited the survivin protein expression. NAC treatment prevented the activation of p38 MAP kinase and rescued the survivin protein levels. SB202190, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, recovered the survivin protein levels and attenuated the cytotoxicity of CR108-treated cells. Furthermore, CR108 inhibited the xenografted human breast tumor growth in nude mice. Together, we demonstrate that CR108 is a novel vitamin K3 derivative that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction and associates with the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and the inhibition of survivin in the human breast cancer. © 2013.

  1. Regulation of respiration and the oxygen diffusion barrier in soybean protect symbiotic nitrogen fixation from chilling-induced inhibition and shoots from premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Philippus D R; Kiddle, Guy; Pellny, Till K; Mokwala, Phatlane W; Jordaan, Anine; Strauss, Abram J; de Beer, Misha; Schlüter, Urte; Kunert, Karl J; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is sensitive to dark chilling (7 degrees C-15 degrees C)-induced inhibition in soybean (Glycine max). To characterize the mechanisms that cause the stress-induced loss of nodule function, we examined nodule structure, carbon-nitrogen interactions, and respiration in two soybean genotypes that differ in chilling sensitivity: PAN809 (PAN), which is chilling sensitive, and Highveld Top (HT), which is more chilling resistant. Nodule numbers were unaffected by dark chilling, as was the abundance of the nitrogenase and leghemoglobin proteins. However, dark chilling decreased nodule respiration rates, nitrogenase activities, and NifH and NifK mRNAs and increased nodule starch, sucrose, and glucose in both genotypes. Ureide and fructose contents decreased only in PAN nodules. While the chilling-induced decreases in nodule respiration persisted in PAN even after return to optimal temperatures, respiration started to recover in HT by the end of the chilling period. The area of the intercellular spaces in the nodule cortex and infected zone was greatly decreased in HT after three nights of chilling, an acclimatory response that was absent from PAN. These data show that HT nodules are able to regulate both respiration and the area of the intercellular spaces during chilling and in this way control the oxygen diffusion barrier, which is a key component of the nodule stress response. We conclude that chilling-induced loss of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in PAN is caused by the inhibition of respiration coupled to the failure to regulate the oxygen diffusion barrier effectively. The resultant limitations on nitrogen availability contribute to the greater chilling-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in PAN than in HT.

  2. Morin Inhibits Proliferation of SW480 Colorectal Cancer Cells by Inducing Apoptosis Mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Uncoupling of Warburg Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sithara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study under investigation focuses on in vitro antiproliferative efficacy of the flavonoid morin and the mechanisms by which it inhibits the growth of colon cancer using SW480 colon cancer cells with emphasis on Warburg effect. It was found that the cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by morin in a dose and time dependent manner. Morin induced apoptosis that was correlated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species formation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential of the cells. In addition, an increase in cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 8, cleaved caspase 9 and Bax as well as a decrease in Bcl 2 was observed, indicating morin is inducing both intrinsic as well as extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. This was further confirmed by using downstream caspase 3 inhibitor which indicated that caspase 3 inhibition reduces morin induced cell death. Moreover, the impact of morin on over all energy status when determined in terms of total cellular ATP level showed a decline with low level of glucose uptake and Glut1 expression. The results indicate that morin exerts antiproliferative activity by inducing apoptosis and by reducing Warburg effect in the evaluated cell lines and provide preliminary evidence for its anticancer activity.

  3. Propolis, a Constituent of Honey, Inhibits the Development of Sugar Cataracts and High-Glucose-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Shibata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study investigated the effects of oral propolis on the progression of galactose-induced sugar cataracts in rats and the in vitro effects of propolis on high-glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell death in cultured rat lens cells (RLECs. Methods. Galactose-fed rats and RLECs cultured in high glucose (55 mM medium were treated with propolis or vehicle control. Relative lens opacity was assessed by densitometry and changes in lens morphology by histochemical analysis. Intracellular ROS levels and cell viability were measured. Results. Oral administration of propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of cataract in 15% and 25% of galactose-fed rats, respectively. RLECs cultured with high glucose showed a significant increase in ROS expression with reduced cell viability. Treatment of these RLECs with 5 and 50 μg/mL propolis cultured significantly reduced ROS levels and increased cell viability, indicating that the antioxidant activity of propolis protected cells against ROS-induced damage. Conclusion. Propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of sugar cataract in rats and mitigated high-glucose-induced ROS production and cell death. These effects may be associated with the ability of propolis to inhibit hyperglycemia-evoked oxidative or osmotic stress-induced cellular insults.

  4. Cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits glutamate-induced Zn2+ signaling and neuronal cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting Ca2+-induced mitochondrial depolarization and formation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seon; Perveen, Shazia; Ha, Tae Joung; Kim, Seong Yun; Yoon, Shin Hee

    2015-05-05

    Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a member of the anthocyanin family, is a potent natural antioxidant. However, effects of C3G on glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase and neuronal cell death remain unknown. We studied the effects of C3G on glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase and cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons from embryonic day 17 maternal Sprague-Dawley rats using digital imaging methods for Zn(2+), Ca(2+), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and a MTT assay for cell survival. Treatment with glutamate (100 µM) for 7 min induces reproducible [Zn(2+)]i increase at 35 min interval in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The intracellular Zn(2+)-chelator TPEN markedly blocked glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase, but the extracellular Zn(2+) chelator CaEDTA did not affect glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase. C3G inhibited the glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i response in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 14.1 ± 1.1 µg/ml). C3G also significantly inhibited glutamate-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. Two antioxidants such as Trolox and DTT significantly inhibited the glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i response, but they did not affect the [Ca(2+)]i responses. C3G blocked glutamate-induced formation of ROS. Trolox and DTT also inhibited the formation of ROS. C3G significantly inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization. However, TPEN, Trolox and DTT did not affect the mitochondrial depolarization. C3G, Trolox and DTT attenuated glutamate-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, respectively. Taken together, all these results suggest that cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase through a release of Zn(2+) from intracellular sources in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial depolarization and formation of ROS, which is involved in neuroprotection against glutamate-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by Endonuclease G deficiency requires reactive oxygen radicals accumulation and is inhibitable by the micropeptide humanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Natividad; Cámara, Yolanda; Núñez, Estefanía; Beà, Aida; Barés, Gisel; Forné, Carles; Ruíz-Meana, Marisol; Girón, Cristina; Barba, Ignasi; García-Arumí, Elena; García-Dorado, David; Vázquez, Jesús; Martí, Ramon; Llovera, Marta; Sanchis, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    The endonuclease G gene (Endog), which codes for a mitochondrial nuclease, was identified as a determinant of cardiac hypertrophy. How ENDOG controls cardiomyocyte growth is still unknown. Thus, we aimed at finding the link between ENDOG activity and cardiomyocyte growth. Endog deficiency induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and abnormal growth in neonatal rodent cardiomyocytes, altering the AKT-GSK3β and Class-II histone deacethylases (HDAC) signal transduction pathways. These effects were blocked by ROS scavengers. Lack of ENDOG reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication independently of ROS accumulation. Because mtDNA encodes several subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, whose activity is an important source of cellular ROS, we investigated whether Endog deficiency compromised the expression and activity of the respiratory chain complexes but found no changes in these parameters nor in ATP content. MtDNA also codes for humanin, a micropeptide with possible metabolic functions. Nanomolar concentrations of synthetic humanin restored normal ROS levels and cell size in Endog-deficient cardiomyocytes. These results support the involvement of redox signaling in the control of cardiomyocyte growth by ENDOG and suggest a pathway relating mtDNA content to the regulation of cell growth probably involving humanin, which prevents reactive oxygen radicals accumulation and hypertrophy induced by Endog deficiency. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of PTEN inhibition on the regulation of Tau phosphorylation in rat cortical neuronal injury after oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Yurong; Xu, Yuxia; Pi, Guanghuan

    2016-01-01

    This report investigated the involvement of the PTEN pathway in the regulation of Tau phosphorylation using an oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) model with rat cortical neurons. Primary cortical neurons were used to establish the oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) model in vitro. These were randomly divided into control, OGD, bpV+OGD, As+OGD, Se+OGD and Mock treatment groups. The neuron viability was assessed by MTT, the cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL staining. The expression of Phospho-PTEN/PTEN, Phospho-Tau/Tau, Phospho-Akt/Akt and Phospho-GSK-3β/GSK-3β were detected by Western blotting. OGD induced Tau phosphorylation through PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation, together with a decrease in AKT activity. Pre-treatment with bpv, a potent PTEN inhibitor, and PTEN antisense nucleotides decreased PTEN and GSK-3β activity and caused alterations in Tau phosphorylation. Neuronal apoptosis was also reduced. The PTEN/Akt/GSK-3β/Tau pathway is involved in the regulation of neuronal injury, providing a novel route for protecting neurons following neonatal HI.

  7. The mechanism of Intralipid®-mediated cardioprotection complex IV inhibition by the active metabolite, palmitoylcarnitine, generates reactive oxygen species and activates reperfusion injury salvage kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing-How Lou

    Full Text Available Intralipid® administration at reperfusion elicits protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood.Sprague-Dawley rat hearts were exposed to 15 min of ischemia and 30 min of reperfusion in the absence or presence of Intralipid® 1% administered at the onset of reperfusion. In separate experiments, the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionyl-glycine was added either alone or with Intralipid®. Left ventricular work and activation of Akt, STAT3, and ERK1/2 were used to evaluate cardioprotection. ROS production was assessed by measuring the loss of aconitase activity and the release of hydrogen peroxide using Amplex Red. Electron transport chain complex activities and proton leak were measured by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized cardiac fibers. Titration experiments using the fatty acid intermediates of Intralipid® palmitoyl-, oleoyl- and linoleoylcarnitine served to determine concentration-dependent inhibition of complex IV activity and mitochondrial ROS release.Intralipid® enhanced postischemic recovery and activated Akt and Erk1/2, effects that were abolished by the ROS scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionylglycine. Palmitoylcarnitine and linoleoylcarnitine, but not oleoylcarnitine concentration-dependently inhibited complex IV. Only palmitoylcarnitine reached high tissue concentrations during early reperfusion and generated significant ROS by complex IV inhibition. Palmitoylcarnitine (1 µM, administered at reperfusion, also fully mimicked Intralipid®-mediated protection in an N-(2-mercaptopropionyl-glycine -dependent manner.Our data describe a new mechanism of postconditioning cardioprotection by the clinically available fat emulsion, Intralipid®. Protection is elicited by the fatty acid intermediate palmitoylcarnitine, and involves inhibition of complex IV, an increase in ROS production and activation of the RISK pathway.

  8. Ebselen induces reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated cytotoxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase being a target

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    Gajendra Kumar Azad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebselen is a synthetic, lipid-soluble seleno-organic compound. The high electrophilicity of ebselen enables it to react with multiple cysteine residues of various proteins. Despite extensive research on ebselen, its target molecules and mechanism of action remains less understood. We performed biochemical as well as in vivo experiments employing budding yeast as a model organism to understand the mode of action of ebselen. The growth curve analysis and FACS (florescence activated cell sorting assays revealed that ebselen exerts growth inhibitory effects on yeast cells by causing a delay in cell cycle progression. We observed that ebselen exposure causes an increase in intracellular ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, and that these effects were reversed by addition of antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH or N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. Interestingly, a significant increase in ROS levels was noticed in gdh3-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells. Furthermore, we showed that ebselen inhibits GDH function by interacting with its cysteine residues, leading to the formation of inactive hexameric GDH. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed protein targets of ebselen including CPR1, the yeast homolog of Cyclophilin A. Additionally, ebselen treatment leads to the inhibition of yeast sporulation. These results indicate a novel direct connection between ebselen and redox homeostasis.

  9. Ebselen induces reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cytotoxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase being a target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Mandal, Papita; Singh, Prabhat; Golla, Upendarrao; Baranwal, Shivani; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen is a synthetic, lipid-soluble seleno-organic compound. The high electrophilicity of ebselen enables it to react with multiple cysteine residues of various proteins. Despite extensive research on ebselen, its target molecules and mechanism of action remains less understood. We performed biochemical as well as in vivo experiments employing budding yeast as a model organism to understand the mode of action of ebselen. The growth curve analysis and FACS (florescence activated cell sorting) assays revealed that ebselen exerts growth inhibitory effects on yeast cells by causing a delay in cell cycle progression. We observed that ebselen exposure causes an increase in intracellular ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, and that these effects were reversed by addition of antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) or N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Interestingly, a significant increase in ROS levels was noticed in gdh3-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells. Furthermore, we showed that ebselen inhibits GDH function by interacting with its cysteine residues, leading to the formation of inactive hexameric GDH. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed protein targets of ebselen including CPR1, the yeast homolog of Cyclophilin A. Additionally, ebselen treatment leads to the inhibition of yeast sporulation. These results indicate a novel direct connection between ebselen and redox homeostasis.

  10. Menadione induces the formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH-mediated apoptosis and inhibits the FAK-mediated cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2014-09-01

    Menadione induces apoptosis in tumor cells. However, the mechanism of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells exposed to menadione is not clear. In addition, it is unclear whether menadione-induced apoptosis is mediated by the depletion of glutathione (GSH) contents that is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the effect of menadione on the invasion and migration of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells has not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of menadione exposure on apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell migration using the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3 and SK-OV-3. The results suggest that menadione may induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian carcinoma cell lines by activating the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The apoptotic effect of menadione appears to be mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of GSH. Menadione inhibited fetal-bovine-serum-induced cell adhesion and migration of OVCAR-3 cells, possibly through the suppression the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-dependent activation of cytoskeletal-associated components. Therefore, menadione might be beneficial in the treatment of epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma and combination therapy.

  11. Plant Natural Product Formononetin Protects Rat Cardiomyocyte H9c2 Cells against Oxygen Glucose Deprivation and Reoxygenation via Inhibiting ROS Formation and Promoting GSK-3β Phosphorylation

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    Yuanyuan Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP is a major cause of cell death in ischemia reperfusion injury. Based on our pilot experiments, plant natural product formononetin enhanced the survival of rat cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells during oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD and reoxygenation. For mechanistic studies, we focused on two major cellular factors, namely, reactive oxygen species (ROS and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β, in the regulation of mPTP opening. We found that formononetin suppressed the formation of ROS and superoxide in a concentration-dependent manner. Formononetin also rescued OGD/reoxygenation-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Further studies suggested that formononetin induced Akt activation and GSK-3β (Ser9 phosphorylation, thereby reducing GSK-3β activity towards mPTP opening. PI3K and PKC inhibitors abolished the effects of formononetin on mPTP opening and GSK-3β phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation experiments further revealed that formononetin increased the binding of phosphor-GSK-3β to adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT while it disrupted the complex of ANT with cyclophilin D. Moreover, immunofluorescence revealed that phospho-GSK-3β (Ser9 was mainly deposited in the space between mitochondria and cell nucleus. Collectively, these results indicated that formononetin protected cardiomyocytes from OGD/reoxygenation injury via inhibiting ROS formation and promoting GSK-3β phosphorylation.

  12. [Decursin reduces reactive oxygen species and inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in rat renal tubular epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiqiong; Li, Jianchun; Fan, Junming; Meng, Lifeng; Cao, Ling

    2017-10-01

    Objective To study the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of decursin on the apoptosis of rat renal tubular epithelial cells NRK-52E induced by cisplatin. Methods First, CCK-8 assay was used to detect the effects of 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, 100, 150, 200 μmol/L decursin and 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 μg/mL cispatin treatment for 24 hours on cell proliferation in NRK-52E cells via determining the half inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ). Then, NRK-52E cells were stimulated with 20 μg/mL cisplatin combined with 10, 50, 100 μmol/L decursin, and cell activity was detected by CCK-8 assay. The cells were divided into normal control group, 20 μg/mL cisplatin stimulation group, and 10, 50, 100 μmol/L decursin treated groups. Cell morphological changes was observed under inverted microscope, morphological changes of nucleus was detected by DAPI staining, cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, the level of intracellular ROS was detected by DCFH-DA staining, and the apoptosis marker proteins cleaved-caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP were examined by Western blot analysis. Results Compared with the normal control group, cisplatin significantly inhibited the activity of the cells, and IC 50 was about 20 μg/mL; compared with the model group, in the decursin pretreatment groups, the level of intracellular ROS decreased remarkably, the expressions of cleaved-casspase-3 and cleaved-PARP proteins were reduced, and cell apoptosis was depressed. Conclusion Decursin can decrease the intracellular ROS level and inhibit the apoptosis of NRK-52E cells induced by cisplatin.

  13. Piracetam ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of oxidative stress, excitatory amino acids release and P53/Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Hu, Min; Zha, Yun-hong; Li, Zi-cheng; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Ling-ling; Yu, Min; Qian, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that piracetam inhibited the decrease in amino acid content induced by chronic hypoperfusion, ameliorated the dysfunction of learning and memory in a hypoperfusion rat model, down-regulated P53, and BAX protein, facilitated the synaptic plasticity, and may be helpful in the treatment of vascular dementia. To explore the precise mechanism, the present study further evaluated effects of piracetam on Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary cortical cells. The addition of piracetam to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and lactate dehydrogenase release experiments. Piracetam also lowered the levels of malondialdehyde, nitrogen monoxidum, and xanthine oxidase which was increased in the OGD cells, and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which were decreased in the OGD cells. We also demonstrated that piracetam could decrease glutamate and aspartate release when cortical cells were subjected to OGD. Furthermore, Western blot study demonstrated that piracetam attenuated the increased expression of P53 and BAX protein in OGD cells. These observations demonstrated that piracetam reduced OGD-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting the oxidative stress and decreasing excitatory amino acids release and lowering P53/Bax protein expression in OGD cells.

  14. Inhibition of IgE-induced mast cell activation by ethyl tertiary-butyl ether, a bioethanol-derived fuel oxygenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Kouya; Yoshino, Shin

    2009-09-01

    The effect of ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE), which is widely used as a fuel oxygenate commonly produced from bioethanol, on immunoglobulin (Ig)E-dependent mast cell activation was investigated. The rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitised with monoclonal anti-ovalbumin IgE was challenged with ovalbumin in the presence or absence of ETBE, tert-butanol (TBA), which is the main metabolite of ETBE in humans, and ethanol. Degranulation of RBL2H3 was examined by the release of beta-hexosaminidase. To understand the mechanisms responsible for regulating mast cell function, the effects of ETBE, TBA and ethanol on the levels of intracellular calcium, phosphorylation of Akt (as a marker of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase) and global tyrosine phosphorylation were also measured as indicators of mast cell activation. In the presence of ETBE, TBA or ethanol, IgE-induced release of beta-hexosaminidase was decreased. These compounds also attenuated the IgE-mediated increase in the levels of intracellular Ca(2+), phosphorylation of Akt and global tyrosine phosphorylation in RBL2H3 cells. ETBE, TBA and ethanol inhibited mast cell degranulation by inhibiting the increase in intracellular calcium ion concentration and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein tyrosine kinase activation, suggesting that exposure to ETBE might affect immune responses, particularly in allergic diseases.

  15. PirB Overexpression Exacerbates Neuronal Apoptosis by Inhibiting TrkB and mTOR Phosphorylation After Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao-Hua; Deng, Bin; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Mi, Ya-Jing; Meng, Xiang-Zhong; Gou, Xing-Chun; Xu, Li-Xian

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have proven that paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) plays a crucial suppressant role in neurite outgrowth and neuronal plasticity after central nervous system injury. However, the role of PirB in neuronal survival after cerebral ischemic injury and its mechanisms remains unclear. In the present study, the role of PirB is investigated in the survival and apoptosis of cerebral cortical neurons in cultured primary after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury. The results have shown that rebarbative PirB exacerbates early neuron apoptosis and survival. PirB gene silencing remarkably decreases early apoptosis and promotes neuronal survival after OGD. The expression of bcl-2 markedly increased and the expression of bax significantly decreased in PirB RNAi-treated neurons, as compared with the control- and control RNAi-treated ones. Further, phosphorylated TrkB and mTOR levels are significantly downregulated in the damaged neurons. However, the PirB silencing markedly upregulates phosphorylated TrkB and mTOR levels in the neurons after the OGD. Taken together, the overexpression of PirB inhibits the neuronal survival through increased neuron apoptosis. Importantly, the inhibition of the phosphorylation of TrkB and mTOR may be one of its mechanisms.

  16. Soyasaponins can blunt inflammation by inhibiting the reactive oxygen species-mediated activation of PI3K/Akt/NF-kB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Longying; Chen, Jiading; Sun, Suxia; Mao, Limei; Chu, Xinwei; Deng, Hong; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-01-01

    We and others have recently shown that soyasaponins abundant in soybeans can decrease inflammation by suppressing the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB)-mediated inflammation. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which soyasaponins inhibit the NF-kB pathway have not been established. In this study in macrophages, soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of inflammatory marker prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to a similar extent as the NF-kB inhibitor (BAY117082). Soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) also suppressed the LPS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), another inflammatory marker, in a dose-dependent manner by inhibiting NF-kB activation. In defining the associated mechanisms, we found that soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) blunted the LPS-induced IKKα/β phosphorylation, IkB phosphorylation and degradation, and NF-kB p65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In studying the upstream targets of soyasaponins on the NF-kB pathway, we found that soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) suppressed the LPS-induced activation of PI3K/Akt similarly as the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, which alone blocked the LPS-induced activation of NF-kB. Additionally, soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) reduced the LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the same extent as the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which alone inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of Akt, IKKα/β, IkBα, and p65, transactivity of NF-kB, PGE2 production, and malondialdehyde production. Finally, our results show that soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) elevated SOD activity and the GSH/GSSG ratio. Together, these results show that soyasaponins (A1, A2 and I) can blunt inflammation by inhibiting the ROS-mediated activation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-kB pathway.

  17. Prostate tumor-induced angiogenesis is blocked by exosomes derived from menstrual stem cells through the inhibition of reactive oxygen species

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    Alcayaga-Miranda, Francisca; González, Paz L.; Lopez-Verrilli, Alejandra; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Aguila-Díaz, Carolina; Contreras, Luis; Khoury, Maroun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete exosomes that are capable of modifying the tumor environment through different mechanisms including changes in the cancer-cell secretome. This activity depends on their cargo content that is largely defined by their cellular origin. Endometrial cells are fine regulators of the angiogenic process during the menstrual cycle that includes an angiostatic condition that is associated with the end of the cycle. Hence, we studied the angiogenic activity of menstrual stem cells (MenSCs)-secreted exosomes on prostate PC3 tumor cells. Our results showed that exosomes induce a reduction in VEGF secretion and NF-κB activity. Lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in exosomes-treated cells was detected by the DCF method, suggesting that the inhibition of the intracellular ROS impacts both NF-κB and VEGF pathways. We confirmed using tubule formation and plug transplantation assays that MenSCs-exosomes suppress the secretion of pro-angiogenic factors by the PC3 cells in a ROS-dependent manner. The inhibition of the tumor angiogenesis and, consequently, the tumor growth was also confirmed using a xenograft mouse model. Additionally, the anti-tumoral effect was associated with a reduction of tumor hemoglobin content, vascular density and inhibition of VEGF and HIF-1α expression. Importantly, we demonstrate that the exosomes anti-angiogenic effect is specific to the menstrual cell source, as bone marrow MSCs-derived exosomes showed an opposite effect on the VEGF and bFGF expression in tumor cells. Altogether, our results indicate that MenSCs-derived exosomes acts as blockers of the tumor-induced angiogenesis and therefore could be suitable for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27286448

  18. Lycopene inhibits reactive oxygen species production in SK-Hep-1 cells and attenuates acetaminophen-induced liver injury in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; da Silva, Talita Prato; de Araujo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Araujo, Carolina Morais; da Silva, Rafaella Cecília; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Bezerra, Frank Silva; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the antioxidant potential of lycopene in different experimental liver models: in vitro, to evaluate the influence of lycopene on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production mediated by the PKC pathway and in vivo, to evaluate the protective effects of lycopene in an experimental model of hepatotoxicity. The in vitro study assessed the lycopene antioxidant potential by the quantification of ROS production in SK-Hep-1 cells unstimulated or stimulated by an activator of the PKC pathway. The role of NADPH oxidase was evaluated by measuring its inhibition potential using an inhibitor of this enzyme. In the in vivo study, male C57BL/6 mice received lycopene (10 or 100 mg/kg by oral gavage) and 1 h later, acetaminophen (APAP) (500 mg/kg) was administrated. Lycopene decreased ROS production in SK-Hep-1 cells through inhibition of NADPH oxidase, brought about in the PKC pathway. Lycopene improved hepatotoxicity acting as an antioxidant, reduced GSSG and regulated tGSH and CAT levels, reduced oxidative damage primarily by decreasing protein carbonylation, promoted the downregulation of MMP-2 and reduced areas of necrosis improving the general appearance of the lesion in C57BL/6 mice. Lycopene is a natural compound that was able to inhibit the production of ROS in vitro and mitigate the damage caused by APAP overdose in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acupuncture elicits neuroprotective effect by inhibiting NAPDH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xue-Rui; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Wen; Du, Si-Qi; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-10

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether NADPH oxidase, a major ROS-producing enzyme, was involved in the antioxidant effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment after cerebral ischaemia. The cognitive function, infract size, neuron cell loss, level of superoxide anion and expression of NADPH oxidase subunit in hippocampus of two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rats were determined after 2-week acupuncture. Furthermore, the cognitive function and production of O2(-) were determined in the presence and absence of NADPH oxidase agonist (TBCA) and antagonist (Apocynin). The effect of acupuncture on cognitive function after cerebral ischaemia in gp91phox-KO mice was evaluated by Morris water maze. Acupuncture reduced infarct size, attenuated overproduction of O2(-), and reversed consequential cognitive impairment and neuron cell loss in 2VO rats. The elevations of gp91phox and p47phox after 2VO were significantly decreased after acupuncture treatment. However, no differences of gp91phox mRNA were found among any experimental groups. Furthermore, these beneficial effects were reversed by TBCA, whereas apocynin mimicked the effect of acupuncture by improving cognitive function and decreasing O2(-) generation. Acupuncture failed to improve the memory impairment in gp91phox KO mice. Full function of the NADPH oxidase enzyme plays an important role in neuroprotective effects against cognitive impairment via inhibition of NAPDH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  20. Melatonin Inhibits Reactive Oxygen Species-Driven Proliferation, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, and Vasculogenic Mimicry in Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Hui-Li; Deng, Man-Jing; Wen, Xiu-Jie; Mo, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Fa-Ming; Zou, Chun-Li; Duan, Wei-Feng; Li, Lei; Nie, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Globally, oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancers. Melatonin elicits inhibitory effects on oral cancer; however, the biological function of melatonin and underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that melatonin impaired the proliferation and apoptosis resistance of oral cancer cells by inactivating ROS-dependent Akt signaling, involving in downregulation of cyclin D1, PCNA, and Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax. Melatonin inhibited the migration and invasion of oral cancer cells by repressing ROS-activated Akt signaling, implicating with the reduction of Snail and Vimentin and the enhancement of E-cadherin. Moreover, melatonin hampered vasculogenic mimicry of oral cancer cells through blockage of ROS-activated extracellular-regulated protein kinases (ERKs) and Akt pathways involving the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α . Consistently, melatonin retarded tumorigenesis of oral cancer in vivo . Overall, these findings indicated that melatonin exerts antisurvival, antimotility, and antiangiogenesis effects on oral cancer partly by suppressing ROS-reliant Akt or ERK signaling.

  1. Electromagnetic noise inhibits radiofrequency radiation-induced DNA damage and reactive oxygen species increase in human lens epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Wang, KaiJun; Ni, Shuang; Ye, PanPan; Yu, YiBo; Ye, Juan; Sun, LiXia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate whether superposing of electromagnetic noise could block or attenuate DNA damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase of cultured human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) induced by acute exposure to 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field (RF) of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). Methods An sXc-1800 RF exposure system was used to produce a GSM signal at 1.8 GHz (217 Hz amplitude-modulated) with the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 W/kg. After 2 h of intermittent exposure, the ROS level was assessed by the fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DNA damage to HLECs was examined by alkaline comet assay and the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation assay. Results After exposure to 1.8 GHz RF for 2 h, HLECs exhibited significant intracellular ROS increase in the 2, 3, and 4 W/kg groups. RF radiation at the SAR of 3 W/kg and 4 W/kg could induce significant DNA damage, examined by alkaline comet assay, which was used to detect mainly single strand breaks (SSBs), while no statistical difference in double strand breaks (DSBs), evaluated by γH2AX foci, was found between RF exposure (SAR: 3 and 4 W/kg) and sham exposure groups. When RF was superposed with 2 μT electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS increase and DNA damage. Conclusions DNA damage induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field for 2 h, which was mainly SSBs, may be associated with the increased ROS production. Electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS formation and DNA damage. PMID:18509546

  2. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P; Howe, Emily A; Loik, Nikita D; Kramer, Holger B; McCullagh, James S O; Schofield, Christopher J; Flashman, Emily

    2015-08-07

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3 or EGLN1-3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Km(app)(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Km(app)(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Taking antacids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heartburn - antacids; Reflux - antacids; GERD - antacids ... Antacids are a good treatment for heartburn that occurs once in a while. Take antacids about 1 hour after eating or when you have heartburn. If you are taking ...

  4. Inhibition of oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis of human adipose-derived stem cells by genetic modification with antiapoptotic protein bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ziwei; Shen, Liangyun; Lin, Yue; Wang, Shuqin; Zheng, Dongfeng; Tan, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have become a promising tool for a wide range of cell-based therapies. However, transplanted ADSCs do not survive well under ischemic conditions. In this study we aimed to inhibit oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced apoptosis of human ADSCs by genetic modification with antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. After isolation and culture, the phenotypes of human ADSCs at passage 3 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Then, genetic modification of ADSCs with Bcl-2 was carried out. Bcl-2 gene transfection was verified by Western blot analysis and multipotent differentiation properties were evaluated in Bcl-2-modified ADSCs (Bcl-2-ADSCs). Apoptosis was evaluated by a TUNEL assay under ischemic conditions induced by OGD. Apoptotic nuclei were also assessed and quantified by Hoechst staining. The cultured ADSCs expressed stem cell-associated markers CD29, CD34, CD44, and CD90, but not fibroblast marker HLA-DR or hematopoietic stem cell marker CD133. The Bcl-2 gene was transferred into ADSCs efficiently, and Bcl-2-ADSCs differentiated into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. In addition, Bcl-2 overexpression reduced the percentage of apoptotic Bcl-2-ADSCs by 38 % under OGD. Our results indicate that Bcl-2 overexpression through gene transfection inhibits apoptosis of ADSCs under ischemic conditions. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  5. MG132 as a proteasome inhibitor induces cell growth inhibition and cell death in A549 lung cancer cells via influencing reactive oxygen species and GSH level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Carbobenzoxy-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG132) as a proteasome inhibitor has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death through formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of MG132 on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in relation to cell growth, ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels. Treatment with MG132 inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC(50) of approximately 20 microM at 24 hours. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that 0.5 approximately 30 microM MG132 induced a G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle in A549 cells. Treatment with 10 or 30 microM MG132 also induced apoptosis, as evidenced by sub-G1 cells and annexin V staining cells. This was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; Delta psi m). The intracellular ROS levels including O(2) (*-) were strongly increased in 10 or 30 microM MG132-treated A549 cells but were down-regulated in 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132-treated cells. Furthermore, 10 or 30 microM MG132 increased mitochondrial O(2) (*- ) level but 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132 decreased that. In addition, 10 or 30 microM MG132 induced GSH depletion in A549 cells. In conclusion, MG132 inhibited the growth of human A549 cells via inducing the cell cycle arrest as well as triggering apoptosis, which was in part correlated with the changes of ROS and GSH levels. Our present data provide important information on the anti-growth mechanisms of MG132 in A549 lung cancer cells in relation to ROS and GSH.

  6. Attenuation of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inhibition of the rapid component of delayed rectifier potassium current by Isosteviol through scavenging reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chunxia; Chen, Yaoxu; Wu, Huanlin; Xu, Danping; Tan, Wen

    2017-12-01

    Isosteviol has been demonstrated to play a protective role during ischemia reperfusion (I/R) myocardial infarction. However, the underlying electrophysiological mechanisms of isosteviol are still unknown. Our previous study showed that the rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium channel (I Kr ) plays an important role in the prolongation of I/R-induced QT interval-related arrhythmia. This study aimed to investigate whether isosteviol could attenuate I/R-induced prolongation of the action potential duration (APD) along with inhibition of I Kr , and we aimed to clarify the electrophysiological mechanism of isosteviol to determine its cardioprotective effects in guinea pigs. We observed that the APD 90 were 298.5±41.6ms in control, 528.6±56.7ms during I/R, and reduced to 327.8±40.5ms after 10μmol/L of isosteviol treatment. The I Kr currents were 1.44±0.06 pA·pF -1 in the control group, 0.50±0.07pA·pF -1 during I/R, and recovered to 1.20±0.12pA·pF -1 after 10μmol/L of isoteviol treatment. Moreover, isosteviol reduced the over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during I/R. Importantly, isosteviol does not affect the I Kr and human ether-a-go-go-related gene currents of normal cardiomyocytes. It attenuated the I/R-induced inhibition of I Kr due to reduced over-production of ROS. Furthermore, isosteviol is safe and has no cardiotoxicity, and it might be beneficial for coronary reperfusion therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Meclofenamic Acid Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Apoptosis, Inhibits Excessive Autophagy, and Protects Hair Cell-Like HEI-OC1 Cells From Cisplatin-Induced Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans, and a significant number of cases is due to the ototoxicity of drugs such as cisplatin that cause hair cell (HC damage. Thus, there is great interest in finding agents and mechanisms that protect HCs from ototoxic drug damage. It has been proposed that epigenetic modifications are related to inner ear development and play a significant role in HC protection and HC regeneration; however, whether the m6A modification and the ethyl ester form of meclofenamic acid (MA2, which is a highly selective inhibitor of FTO (fatmass and obesity-associated enzyme, one of the primary human demethylases, can affect the process of HC apoptosis induced by ototoxic drugs remains largely unexplored. In this study, we took advantage of the HEI-OC1 cell line, which is a cochlear HC-like cell line, to investigate the role of epigenetic modifications in cisplatin-induced cell death. We found that cisplatin injury caused reactive oxygen species accumulation and increased apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells, and the cisplatin injury was reduced by co-treatment with MA2 compared to the cisplatin-only group. Further investigation showed that MA2 attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells. We next found that the cisplatin-induced upregulation of autophagy was significantly inhibited after MA2 treatment, indicating that MA2 inhibited the cisplatin-induced excessive autophagy. Our findings show that MA2 has a protective effect and improves the viability of HEI-OC1 cells after cisplatin treatment, and they provide new insights into potential therapeutic targets for the amelioration of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  8. Hydrogen-rich water inhibits glucose and α,β -dicarbonyl compound-induced reactive oxygen species production in the SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rat kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katakura Masanori

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS production induced by α,β-dicarbonyl compounds and advanced glycation end products causes renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Hydrogen-rich water (HRW increases the H2 level in blood and tissues, thus reducing oxidative stress in animals as well as humans. In this study, we investigated the effects of HRW on glucose- and α,β-dicarbonyl compound-induced ROS generation in vitro and in vivo. Methods Kidney homogenates from Wistar rats were incubated in vitro with glucose and α,β-dicarbonyl compounds containing HRW, following which ROS levels were measured. In vivo animal models of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats, were treated with HRW for 16 weeks, following which renal ROS production and plasma and renal α,β-dicarbonyl compound levels were measured by liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer. Results HRW inhibited glucose- and α,β-dicarbonyl compound-induced ROS production in kidney homogenates from Wistar rats in vitro. Furthermore, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats treated with HRW showed a 34% decrease in ROS production. Moreover, their renal glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone levels decreased by 81%, 77%, and 60%, respectively. Positive correlations were found between renal ROS levels and renal glyoxal (r = 0.659, p = 0.008 and methylglyoxal (r = 0.782, p = 0.001 levels. Conclusion These results indicate that HRW inhibits the production of α,β-dicarbonyl compounds and ROS in the kidneys of SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats. Therefore, it has therapeutic potential for renal dysfunction in patient with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  9. A novel small molecule, Rosline, inhibits growth and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in human lung cancer cells A549 through a reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yang; Jin, Wenling; Pan, Hui; Li, Haizhou; Zhao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Chemical screening using synthetic small molecule libraries has provided a huge amount of novel active molecules. It generates lead compound for drug development and brings focus on molecules for mechanistic investigations on many otherwise intangible biological processes. In this study, using non-small cell lung cancer cell A549 to screen against a structurally novel and diverse synthetic small molecule library of 2,400 compounds, we identified a molecule named rosline that has strong anti-proliferation activity on A549 cells with a 50% cell growth inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of 2.87 ± 0.39 µM. We showed that rosline treatment increased the number of Annexin V-positive staining cell, as well as G2/M arrest in their cell cycle progression. Further, we have demonstrated that rosline induces a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δφm ) and an increase of caspases 3/7 and 9 activities in A549 cells, although having no effect on the activity of caspase 8. Moreover, we found that rosline could induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibit the phosphorylation of signaling molecule Akt in A549 cells. Alternatively, an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated rosline's effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential, caspases 3/7 and 9 activities, cell viabilities and the phosphorylation of Akt. Our results demonstrated that ROS played an important role in the apoptosis of A549 cells induced by rosline. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  10. Taking Stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Sharan B.

    1993-01-01

    A complete theory of adult learning must take into consideration the learner, learning process, and context. Andragogy, self-directed learning, consciousness, critical theory, feminism, transformational learning, and situated cognition contribute to understanding of this complex phenomenon. (SK)

  11. γ-Oryzanol suppresses COX-2 expression by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated Erk1/2 and Egr-1 signaling in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soon Young; Kim, Heon-Woong; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Hwang, Yu-Jin; Choe, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Jung-Bong; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2017-09-16

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 produces prostanoids, which contribute to inflammatory responses. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a key transcription factor mediating COX-2 expression. γ-Oryzanol is an active component in rice bran oil, which inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated COX-2 expression by inhibiting NF-κB. However, the inhibition of COX-2 expression by γ-oryzanol independently of NF-κB is poorly understood. We found that LPS upregulated Egr-1 expression at the transcriptional level. Forced expression of Egr-1 trans-activated the Cox-2 promoter independently of NF-κB. In contrast, silencing of Egr-1 abrogated LPS-mediated COX-2 expression. LPS produced reactive oxygen species (ROS), which, in turn, induced Egr-1 expression via the Erk1/2 MAPK pathway. ROS scavenging activity of γ-oryzanol suppressed Egr-1 expression by inhibiting the Erk1/2 MAPK pathway. Our results suggest that γ-oryzanol inhibits LPS-mediated COX-2 expression by suppressing Erk1/2-mediated Egr-1 expression. This study supports that γ-oryzanol may be useful for ameliorating LPS-mediated inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ginsenoside Rb1 Attenuates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Cells via Protection of Mitochondria and Inhibition of AIF and Cytochrome c Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Ge

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of mitochondria in the protective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on cellular apoptosis caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation, in this study, MTT assay, TUNEL staining, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to examine the cellular viability, apoptosis, ROS level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the distribution of apoptosis inducing factor, cytochrome c, Bax and Bcl-2 in nucleus, mitochondria and cytoplasm. We found that pretreatment with GRb1 improved the cellular viability damaged by OGD. Moreover, GRb1 inhibited apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells induced by OGD. Further studies showed that the elevation of cellular reactive oxygen species levels and the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential caused by OGD were both counteracted by GRb1. Additionally, GRb1 not only suppressed the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor into nucleus and cytochrome c into cytoplasm, but also inhibited the increase of Bax within mitochondria and alleviated the decrease of mitochondrial Bcl-2. Our study indicates that the protection of GRb1 on OGD-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells is associated with its protection on mitochondrial function and inhibition of release of AIF and cytochrome c.

  13. The influence of ascorbic acid on the oxygen consumption and the heat production by the cells of wheat seedling roots with their mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibited at complexes I and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, L.K.; Rakhmatullina, D.F.; Ogorodnikova, T.I.; Alyabyev, A.J.; Minibayeva, F.V.; Loseva, N.L.; Mityashina, S.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of exogenous ascorbic acid (AsA) on oxidative phosphorylation was studied using wheat seedling roots. Treatment of them with AsA stimulated the rates of oxygen consumption and the heat production and caused a decrease of the respiratory coefficient. The increase in respiration was prevented by inhibitors of ascorbate oxidase, diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and of cytochrome oxidase, cyanide (KCN). Exogenous AsA sharply stimulated the rate of oxygen consumption of roots when complexes I and III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were inhibited by rotenone and antimycin A, respectively, while the rates of heat production did not change significantly. It is concluded that AsA is a potent energy substrate, which can be used in conditions of failing I and III complexes in the mitochondrial electron transport chain

  14. Oxygen regulation of nitrate uptake in denitrifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, D; Rowe, J J

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen had an immediate and reversible inhibitory effect on nitrate respiration by denitrifying cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Inhibition of nitrate utilization by oxygen appeared to be at the level of nitrate uptake, since nitrate reduction to nitrite in cell extracts was not affected by oxygen. The degree of oxygen inhibition was dependent on the concentration of oxygen, and increasing nitrate concentrations could not overcome the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of oxygen was maximal...

  15. Inhibition of microRNA-153 protects neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury in an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation cellular model by regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qiong; Gao, Jianbo; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Xueli; Zhou, Qiangqiang; Shi, Canxia; Yao, Meng; Chen, Xia

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as critical regulators in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury; however, their exact roles remain poorly understood. miR-153 is reported to be a neuron-related miRNA involved in neuroprotection. In this study, we aimed to investigate the precise role of miR-153 in regulating neuron survival during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) cellular model. We found that miR-153 was significantly upregulated in neurons subjected to OGD/R treatment. Inhibition of miR-153 significantly attenuated OGD/R-induced injury and oxidative stress in neurons. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was identified as a target gene of miR-153. Inhibition of miR-153 significantly promoted the expression of Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). However, silencing of Nrf2 significantly blocked the protective effects of miR-153 inhibition. Our study indicates that the inhibition of miR-153 protects neurons against OGD/R-induced injury by regulating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling and suggests a potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Increased in vivo mitochondrial oxygenation with right ventricular failure induced by pulmonary arterial hypertension: Mitochondrial inhibition as driver of cardiac failure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Balestra (Gianmarco); E.G. Mik (Egbert); O. Eerbeek (Otto); P. Specht (Patricia); W.J. van der Laarse (Willem J.); C.J. Zuurbier (Coert J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The leading cause of mortality due to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is failure of the cardiac right ventricle. It has long been hypothesized that during the development of chronic cardiac failure the heart becomes energy deprived, possibly due to shortage of oxygen at

  17. Altholactone Inhibits NF-κB and STAT3 Activation and Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer DU145 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwa Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Altholactone, a natural compound isolated from Goniothalamus spp., has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, but its molecular mechanisms are still not fully defined. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 play pivotal roles in the cell survival of many human tumors. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of action of altholactone against prostate cancer DU145 cells and to evaluate whether its effects are mediated by inhibition of NF-κB and STAT3 activity. Altholactone inhibited proliferation of DU145 cells and induced cell cycle arrest in S phase and triggered apoptosis. Reporter assays revealed that altholactone repressed p65- and TNF-α-enhanced NF-κB transcriptional activity and also inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-induced transcriptional activity of STAT3. Consistent with this, altholactone down-regulated phosphorylation of STAT3 and moreover, decreased constitutively active mutant of STAT3 (STAT3C-induced transcriptional activity. Altholactone treatment also results in down-regulation of STAT3 target genes such as survivin, and Bcl-2 followed by up regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. However, pre-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC significantly inhibited the activation of Bax and prevented down-regulation of STAT3 target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that altholactone induces DU145 cells death through inhibition of NF-κB and STAT3 activity.

  18. Oenothera paradoxa defatted seeds extract and its bioactive component penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose decreased production of reactive oxygen species and inhibited release of leukotriene B4, interleukin-8, elastase, and myeloperoxidase in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Anna K; Filipek, Agnieszka; Czerwińska, Monika; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2010-09-22

    In this study, we analyzed ex vivo the effect of an aqueous extract of Oenothera paradoxa defatted seeds on the formation of neutrophil-derived oxidants. For defining active compounds, we also tested lypophilic extract constituents such as gallic acid, (+)-catechin, ellagic acid, and penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose and a hydrophilic fraction containing polymeric procyanidins. The anti-inflammatory potential of the extract and compounds was tested by determining the release from activated neutrophils of elastase, myeloperoxidase, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), which are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The extract of O. paradoxa defatted seeds displays potent antioxidant effects against both 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-α13-acetate- and formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-induced reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils with IC50 values around 0.2 μg/mL. All types of polyphenolics present in the extract contributed to the extract antioxidant activity. According to their IC50 values, penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose was the more potent constituent of the extract. In cell-free assays, we demonstrated that this effect is partially due to the scavenging of O2- and H2O2 oxygen species. The extract and especially penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose significantly inhibit elastase, myeloperoxidase IL-8, and LTB4 release with an IC50 for penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose of 17±1, 15±1, 6.5±2.5, and around 20 μM, respectively. The inhibition of penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose on reactive oxygen species and especially on O2- production, myeloperoxidase, and chemoattractant release may reduce the interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocyte with the vascular endothelium and by that potentially diminish the risk of progression of atherosclerosis development.

  19. A novel compound DT-010 protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in zebrafish and H9c2 cells by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptotic and autophagic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fan; Zhou, Xinhua; Wang, Liang; Shan, Luchen; Li, Chuwen; Zhou, Hefeng; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui-Man

    2018-02-05

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an effective anti-cancer agent but limited by its cardiotoxicity, thus the search for pharmacological agents for enhancing anti-cancer activities and protecting against cardiotoxicity has been a subject of great interest. We have previously reported the synergistic anti-cancer effects of a novel compound DT-010. In the present study, we further investigated the cardioprotective effects of DT-010 in zebrafish embryos in vivo and the molecular underlying mechanisms in H9c2 cardiomyocytes in vitro. We showed that DT-010 prevented the Dox-induced morphological distortions in the zebrafish heart and the associated cardiac impairments, and especially improved ventricular functions. By using H9c2 cells model, we showed that DT-010 directly inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by Dox and protected cell death and cellular damage. We further observed that DT-010 protected against Dox-induced myocardiopathy via inhibiting downstream molecular pathways in response to oxidative stress, including reactive oxygen species-mediated MAPK signaling pathways ERK and JNK, and apoptotic pathways involving the activation of caspase 3, caspase 7, and PARP signaling. Recent studies also suggest the importance of alterations in cardiac autophagy in Dox cardiotoxicity. We further showed that DT-010 could inhibit the induction of autophagosomes formation by Dox via regulating the upstream Akt/AMPK/mTOR signaling. Since Dox-induced cardiotoxicity is multifactorial, our results suggest that multi-functional agent such as DT-010 might be an effective therapeutic agent for combating cardiotoxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents such as Dox. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CHROMATE INHIBITION OF THE LOCALIZED CORROSION OF ALUMINUM: MEASUREMENTS OF ELECTROCHEMICAL TRANSIENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SASAKI, K.; ISAACS, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the inhibition by chromate ions of the localized corrosion of aluminum by electrochemical transient measurements. In agreement with other work, the measurements demonstrated that chromate is a cathodic inhibitor for aluminum in open circuit. The reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium is assumed to take place on catalyzed sites of the surface. The resulting products inhibit oxygen reduction reactions at these sites, thereby retarding pitting corrosion

  1. Antiplatelet effect of phloroglucinol is related to inhibition of cyclooxygenase, reactive oxygen species, ERK/p38 signaling and thromboxane A2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Chan, Chiu-Po; Chou, Han-Yi; Chang, Bei-En; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Wang, Tong-Mei; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2012-01-01

    Platelet dysfunction is a major risk factor of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, stroke and myocardial infarction. Many antiplatelet agents are used for prevention and treatment of these diseases. In this study, phloroglucinol (2.5–25 μM) suppressed AA-induced platelet aggregation and thromboxane B 2 (TXB 2 ) production, but not U46619-induced platelet aggregation. Phloroglucinol (100–250 μM) showed little cytotoxicity to platelets. Phloroglucinol inhibited the COX-1 and COX-2 activities by 45–74% and 49–72% respectively at concentrations of 10–50 μM. At concentrations of 1 and 5 μM, phloroglucinol attenuated the AA-induced ROS production in platelets by 30% and 53%, with an IC 50 of 13.8 μM. Phloroglucinol also inhibited the PMA-stimulated ROS production in PMN. Preincubation of platelets by phloroglucinol (10–25 μM) markedly attenuated the AA-induced ERK and p38 phosphorylation. Intravenous administration of phloroglucinol (2.5 and 5 μmol/mouse) suppressed the ex vivo AA-induced platelet aggregation by 57–71%. Phloroglucinol administration also elevated the mice tail bleeding time. Moreover, phloroglucinol inhibited the IL-1β-induced PGE 2 production in pulp fibroblasts. These results indicate that antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory effects of phloroglucinol are related to inhibition of COX, ROS and TXA2 production as well as ERK/p38 phosphorylation in platelets. Phloroglucinol further suppress PMA-induced ROS production in PMN. The antiplatelet effect of phloroglucinol was confirmed by ex vivo study. Clinically, the consumption of phloroglucinol-containing food/natural products as nutritional supplement may be helpful to cardiovascular health. Phloroglucinol has potential pharmacological use. -- Highlights: ► Phloroglucinol suppressed AA-induced platelet aggregation and thromboxane production. ► Phloroglucinol inhibited COX activity and IL-1b-induced PGE2 production in fibroblast. ► Phloroglucinol declined platelet and

  2. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma cancer cells viability by ferromagnetic Mn doped CeO_2 monodisperse nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq; Iqbal, Javed; Haider Naqvi, M. Sajjad; Ahmad, Ishaq

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the Mn doping induced effects on structural, Raman, optical, magnetic and anticancer properties of CeO_2 nanoparticles prepared via soft chemical route. Structural and microstructural results infer that the synthesized nanoparticles have single phase cubic fluorite structure of CeO_2 and that Mn doping results in enhancement of the structural defects. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal the formation of monodisperse nanoparticles having average particle size ranging from 30 to 41 nm. The optical absorbance spectroscopy analysis discloses the band gap energy tailoring of CeO_2 nanoparticles via Mn doping. Room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) has been found in both as-prepared and Mn doped CeO_2 nanoparticles. This RTFM of the synthesized nanoparticles have been attributed to the Mn ions and surface defects such as oxygen vacancies. Finally, the influence of Mn dopant on the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation levels of CeO_2 nanoparticles in the presence of healthy and cancerous cells have been studied. It has been observed that the differential cytotoxicity of the synthesized nanoparticles is strongly correlated with level of ROS generation. - Highlights: • Mn doped CeO_2 nanoparticles with cubic fluorite structure were synthesized. • Mn dopant significantly tailored the band gap of CeO_2 nanoparticles. • The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. • The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles was reported for the first time. • The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited differential cytotoxicity.

  3. Paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species inhibit neutrophil apoptosis via a p38 MAPK/NF-κB-IL-6/TNF-α positive-feedback circuit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Paraquat (PQ, a widely used herbicide and potent reactive oxygen species (ROS inducer, can injure multiple tissues and organs, especially the lung. However, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. According to previous reports, neutrophil aggregation and excessive ROS production might play pivotal pathogenetic roles. In the present study, we found that PQ could prolong neutrophil lifespan and induce ROS generation in a concentration-independent manner. Activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK, and myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1 but not Akt signaling pathways were involved in this process, as well as increasing levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and IL-1β. Furthermore, the proinflammatory mediators IL-6 and TNF-α could in turn promote ROS generation, creating a vicious cycle. The existence of such a feedback loop is supported by our finding that neutrophil apoptosis is attenuated by PQ in a concentration-independent manner and could partially explain the clinical dilemma why oxygen therapy will exacerbate PQ induced tissue injury.

  4. Uptake rate of cationic mitochondrial inhibitor MKT-077 determines cellular oxygen consumption change in carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Chunta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Since tumor radiation response is oxygen-dependent, radiosensitivity can be enhanced by increasing tumor oxygenation. Theoretically, inhibiting cellular oxygen consumption is the most efficient way to increase oxygen levels. The cationic, rhodacyanine dye-analog MKT-077 inhibits mitochondrial respiration and could be an effective metabolic inhibitor. However, the relationship between cellular MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition is unknown. We hypothesized that rat and human mammary carcinoma cells would take up MKT-077, causing a decrease in oxygen metabolism related to drug uptake. METHODS: R3230Ac rat breast adenocarcinoma cells were exposed to MKT-077. Cellular MKT-077 concentration was quantified using spectroscopy, and oxygen consumption was measured using polarographic electrodes. MKT-077 uptake kinetics were modeled by accounting for uptake due to both the concentration and potential gradients across the plasma and mitochondrial membranes. These kinetic parameters were used to model the relationship between MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition. MKT-077-induced changes in oxygen consumption were also characterized in MDA-MB231 human breast carcinoma cells. RESULTS: Cells took up MKT-077 with a time constant of ∼1 hr, and modeling showed that over 90% of intracellular MKT-077 was bound or sequestered, likely by the mitochondria. The uptake resulted in a rapid decrease in oxygen consumption, with a time constant of ∼30 minutes. Surprisingly the change in oxygen consumption was proportional to uptake rate, not cellular concentration. MKT-077 proved a potent metabolic inhibitor, with dose-dependent decreases of 45-73% (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: MKT-077 caused an uptake rate-dependent decrease in cellular metabolism, suggesting potential efficacy for increasing tumor oxygen levels and radiosensitivity in vivo.

  5. Inhibition of HMGB1 reduces rat spinal cord astrocytic swelling and AQP4 expression after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation via TLR4 and NF-κB signaling in an IL-6-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Li, Man; Ma, Xun; Feng, Haoyu; Song, Junlai; Lv, Cong; He, Yajun

    2017-11-25

    Spinal cord astrocyte swelling is an important component to spinal cord edema and is associated with poor functional recovery as well as therapeutic resistance after spinal cord injury (SCI). High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a mediator of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system and plays a critical role after SCI. Given this, we sought to identify both the role and underlying mechanisms of HMGB1 in cellular swelling and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in cultured rat spinal cord astrocytes after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R). The post-natal day 1-2 Sprague-Dawley rat spinal cord astrocytes were cultured in vitro, and the OGD/R model was induced. We first investigated the effects of OGD/R on spinal cord astrocytic swelling and HMGB1 and AQP4 expression, as well as HMGB1 release. We then studied the effects of HMGB1 inhibition on cellular swelling, HMGB1 and AQP4 expression, and HMGB1 release. The roles of both toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in reducing cellular swelling resulting from HMGB1 inhibition in spinal cord astrocytes after OGD/R were studied. Intergroup data were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnett's test. The OGD/R increased spinal cord astrocytic swelling and HMGB1 and AQP4 expression, as well as HMGB1 release. Inhibition of HMGB1 using either HMGB1 shRNA or ethyl pyruvate resulted in reduced cellular volume, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling, and lysosome number and decreased upregulation of both HMGB1 and AQP4 in spinal cord astrocytes, as well as HMGB1 release. The HMGB1 effects on spinal cord astrocytic swelling and AQP4 upregulation after OGD/R were mediated-at least in part-via activation of TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), and NF-κB. These activation effects can be repressed by TLR4 inhibition using CLI-095 or C34, or by NF-κB inhibition using BAY 11

  6. Oxygen toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  7. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma cancer cells viability by ferromagnetic Mn doped CeO{sub 2} monodisperse nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology (LNT), Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal, Javed, E-mail: javed.saggu@iiu.edu.pk [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology (LNT), Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Haider Naqvi, M. Sajjad [Department of Biochemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishaq [Experimental Physics Labs, National Center for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-04-15

    Here we report the Mn doping induced effects on structural, Raman, optical, magnetic and anticancer properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared via soft chemical route. Structural and microstructural results infer that the synthesized nanoparticles have single phase cubic fluorite structure of CeO{sub 2} and that Mn doping results in enhancement of the structural defects. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal the formation of monodisperse nanoparticles having average particle size ranging from 30 to 41 nm. The optical absorbance spectroscopy analysis discloses the band gap energy tailoring of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles via Mn doping. Room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) has been found in both as-prepared and Mn doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. This RTFM of the synthesized nanoparticles have been attributed to the Mn ions and surface defects such as oxygen vacancies. Finally, the influence of Mn dopant on the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation levels of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles in the presence of healthy and cancerous cells have been studied. It has been observed that the differential cytotoxicity of the synthesized nanoparticles is strongly correlated with level of ROS generation. - Highlights: • Mn doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with cubic fluorite structure were synthesized. • Mn dopant significantly tailored the band gap of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. • The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles was reported for the first time. • The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited differential cytotoxicity.

  8. Reactive oxygen species-dependent HSP90 protein cleavage participates in arsenical As+3- and MMA+3-induced apoptosis through inhibition of telomerase activity via JNK activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, S.-C.; Yang, L.-Y.; Lin, H.-Y.; Wu, C.-Y.; Su, T.-H.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of six arsenic compounds including As +3 , MMA +3 , DMA +3 , As +5 , MMA +5 , and DMA +5 on the viability of NIH3T3 cells were examined. As +3 and MMA +3 , but not the others, exhibited significant cytotoxic effects in NIH3T3 cells through apoptosis induction. The apoptotic events such as DNA fragmentation and chromosome condensation induced by As +3 and MMA +3 were prevented by the addition of NAC and CAT, and induction of HO-1 gene expression in accordance with cleavage of the HSP90 protein, and suppression of telomerase activity were observed in NIH3T3 cells under As +3 and MMA +3 treatments. An increase in the intracellular peroxide level was examined in As +3 - and MMA +3 -treated NIH3T3 cells, and As +3 - and MMA +3 -induced apoptotic events were blocked by NAC, CAT, and DPI addition. HSP90 inhibitors, GA and RD, significantly attenuated the telomerase activity in NIH3T3 cells with an enhancement of As +3 - and MMA +3 -induced cytotoxicity. Suppression of JNKs significantly inhibited As +3 - and MMA +3 -induced apoptosis by blocking HSP90 protein cleavage and telomerase reduction in NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, Hb, SnPP, and dexferosamine showed no effect against As +3 - and MMA +3 -induced apoptosis, and overexpression of HO-1 protein or inhibition of HO-1 protein expression did not affect the apoptosis induced by As +3 or MMA +3 . These data provide the first evidence to indicate that apoptosis induced by As +3 and MMA +3 is mediated by an ROS-dependent degradation of HSP90 protein and reduction of telomerase via JNK activation, and HO-1 induction might not be involved

  9. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates-dependent programmed cell death in human malignant ex vivo glioma cells and inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor production by taurolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, Roksana; Kubota, Hisashi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Eugster, Hans-Pietro; Könü, Dilek; Möhler, Hanns; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Frei, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Taurolidine, a derivative of the amino acid taurin, was recently found to display a potent antineoplastic effect both in vitro and in vivo. The authors therefore initiated studies to assess the potential antineoplastic activity of taurolidine in human glioma cell lines and in ex vivo malignant cell cultures. They also studied the mechanisms that induce cell death and the impact of taurolidine on tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. Cytotoxicity and clonogenic assays were performed using crystal violet staining. In the cytotoxicity assay 100% of glioma cell lines (eight of eight) and 74% of ex vivo glioma cultures (14 of 19) demonstrated sensitivity to taurolidine, with a mean median effective concentration (EC50) of 51 +/- 28 microg/ml and 56 +/- 23 microg/ml, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited by taurolidine, with a mean EC50 of 7 +/- 3 microg/ml for the cell lines and a mean EC50 of 3.5 +/- 1.7 microg/ml for the ex vivo glioma cultures. On observing this high activity of taurolidine in both assays, the authors decided to evaluate its cell death mechanisms. Fragmentation of DNA, externalization of phosphatidylserine, activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential followed by a release of apoptosis-inducing factor, and typical apoptotic features were found after taurolidine treatment. Cell death was preceded by the generation of reactive O2 intermediates, which was abrogated by N-acetylcysteine but not by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Moreover, taurolidine also induced suppression of VEGF production on the protein and messenger RNA level, as shown by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Given all these findings, taurolidine may be a promising new agent in the treatment of malignant gliomas; it displays a combination of antineoplastic and antiangiogenic activities, inducing tumor cell

  10. Bamboo vinegar decreases inflammatory mediator expression and NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation and protein kinase C-α/δ activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Lung Ho

    Full Text Available Bamboo vinegar (BV, a natural liquid derived from the condensation produced during bamboo charcoal production, has been used in agriculture and as a food additive, but its application to immune modulation has not been reported. Here, we demonstrated that BV has anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. BV reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide levels in, and interleukin-6 secretion by, lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages without affecting tumor necrosis factor-α secretion and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. The mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of BV involved decreased reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C-α/δ activation. Furthermore, creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol was indentified as the major anti-inflammatory compound in BV. Impaired cytokine expression and NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome activation was seen in mice treated with creosol. These findings provide insights into how BV regulates inflammation and suggest that it may be a new source for the development of anti-inflammatory agents or a healthy supplement for preventing and ameliorating inflammation- and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases, including metabolic syndrome.

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastad, Jessica L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Green, William R., E-mail: William.R.Green@dartmouth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression. -- Highlights: •LP-BM5-expanded M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and TGF-β to suppress B cells. •When two major mechanisms of suppression were eliminated through knockouts, M-MDSCs maintained suppression. •M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice decreased proliferation of IL-10 producing regulatory B cells.

  12. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastad, Jessica L.; Green, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression. -- Highlights: •LP-BM5-expanded M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and TGF-β to suppress B cells. •When two major mechanisms of suppression were eliminated through knockouts, M-MDSCs maintained suppression. •M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice decreased proliferation of IL-10 producing regulatory B cells.

  13. [Protective effect of pretreatment of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. f. alba plasma against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury of cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Bo; Zuo, Huan; Liu, Li-Li; Niu, Jing-Zhong

    2012-02-25

    The present study was to investigate the effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. f. alba (SMA) pharmacological pretreatment on apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons from neonate rats under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultured hippocampal neurons were randomly divided into five groups (n = 6): normal plasma group, low dose SMA plasma (2.5%) group, middle dose SMA plasma (5%) group, high dose SMA plasma (10%) group and control group. The hippocampal neurons were cultured and treated with plasma from adult Wistar rats intragastrically administered with saline or aqueous extract of SMA. The apoptosis of neurons was induced by glucose-free Earle's solution containing 1 mmol/L Na2S2O4 and labeled by MTT and Annexin V/PI double staining. Moreover, protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by immunofluorescence. The results showed that few apoptotic cells were observed in control group, whereas the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in normal plasma group and low dose SMA plasma group. Both middle and high dose SMA plasma could protect cultured hippocampal neurons from apoptosis induced by OGD (P control, normal plasma and low dose SMA plasma groups, middle and high dose SMA plasma groups both showed significantly higher levels of Bcl-2 (P neurons by up-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulating the expression of Bax.

  14. Acute Consumption of Bordo Grape Juice and Wine Improves Serum Antioxidant Status in Healthy Individuals and Inhibits Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Neuron-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Cristiane; Franco, Fernanda Wouters; Machado, Eduarda da Rosa; Soquetta, Marcela Bromberger; Quatrin, Andréia; Ramos, Vitor de Miranda; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Sautter, Cláudia Kaehler; Penna, Neidi Garcia

    2018-01-01

    Few studies investigated the biological effects of American grape cultivars. We investigated the metabolic response after acute consumption of grape juice or wine from Bordo grapes ( Vitis labrusca ) in a placebo-controlled crossover study with fifteen healthy volunteers. Blood samples were collected 1 hour after the intake of 100 mL of water, juice, or wine to measure TBARS, ABTS, FRAP, glucose, and uric acid levels. To evaluate differences in cellular response, intracellular reactive species production (DCFH-DA) and metabolic mitochondrial viability (MTT) were assessed after exposure of human neuron-like cells (SH-SY5Y) to juice or wine. Glycemia was reduced after juice or wine consumption, whereas blood levels of uric acid were reduced after juice consumption but increased after wine consumption. Juice and wine consumption reduced plasma lipid peroxidation and increased plasma antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP assays). Furthermore, juice inhibited H 2 O 2 -induced intracellular production of reactive species (RS) and increased the viability of SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast, wine (dealcoholized) exhibited a per se effect by inducing the production of RS and reducing cell viability. These results indicate a positive impact of acute consumption of Bordo juice and wine on human oxidative status, whereas only juice had protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity.

  15. Caryophyllene oxide exhibits anti-cancer effects in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells via the inhibition of cell migration, generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor and apoptotic effects of caryophyllene oxide in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Cell viability of these cells was evaluated by MTT assay while as in vitro wound healing assay was used to study the effect of caryophyllene oxide on cell migration. Fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the changes in cell morphology once the cells undergo apoptosis. Caryophyllene oxide significantly led to cytotoxicity in MG-63 cells showing dose-dependent as well as time-dependent effects. Caryophyllene oxide led to an inhibition of wound closure significantly. At caryophyllene oxide doses of 20, 80 and 120 µM, the percentage of cell migration was shown to be 94.2, 67.1 and 14.8% respectively. With an increase in the caryophyllene oxide dose, the extent of apoptosis also increased characterized by cellular shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation.

  16. Acute Consumption of Bordo Grape Juice and Wine Improves Serum Antioxidant Status in Healthy Individuals and Inhibits Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Copetti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies investigated the biological effects of American grape cultivars. We investigated the metabolic response after acute consumption of grape juice or wine from Bordo grapes (Vitis labrusca in a placebo-controlled crossover study with fifteen healthy volunteers. Blood samples were collected 1 hour after the intake of 100 mL of water, juice, or wine to measure TBARS, ABTS, FRAP, glucose, and uric acid levels. To evaluate differences in cellular response, intracellular reactive species production (DCFH-DA and metabolic mitochondrial viability (MTT were assessed after exposure of human neuron-like cells (SH-SY5Y to juice or wine. Glycemia was reduced after juice or wine consumption, whereas blood levels of uric acid were reduced after juice consumption but increased after wine consumption. Juice and wine consumption reduced plasma lipid peroxidation and increased plasma antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP assays. Furthermore, juice inhibited H2O2-induced intracellular production of reactive species (RS and increased the viability of SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast, wine (dealcoholized exhibited a per se effect by inducing the production of RS and reducing cell viability. These results indicate a positive impact of acute consumption of Bordo juice and wine on human oxidative status, whereas only juice had protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity.

  17. Rescue of proinflammatory cytokine-inhibited chondrogenesis by the antiarthritic effect of melatonin in synovium mesenchymal stem cells via suppression of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Yong; Chen, Sijin; Tan, Zifang; Xiong, Ke; Li, Yan; Ye, Yun; Luo, Zong-Ping; He, Fan; Gong, Yihong

    2014-03-01

    Cartilage repair by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) often occurs in diseased joints in which the inflamed microenvironment impairs chondrogenic maturation and causes neocartilage degradation. In this environment, melatonin exerts an antioxidant effect by scavenging free radicals. This study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective effects of melatonin on human MSCs in a proinflammatory cytokine-induced arthritic environment. MSCs were induced toward chondrogenesis in the presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) with or without melatonin. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide, antioxidant enzymes, and cell viability were then assessed. Deposition of glycosaminoglycans and collagens was also determined by histological analysis. Gene expression of chondrogenic markers and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, the involvement of the melatonin receptor and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in chondrogenesis was investigated using pharmacologic inhibitors. The results showed that melatonin significantly reduced ROS accumulation and increased SOD expression. Both IL-1β and TNF-α had an inhibitory effect on the chondrogenesis of MSCs, but melatonin successfully restored the low expression of cartilage matrix and chondrogenic genes. Melatonin prevented cartilage degradation by downregulating MMPs. The addition of luzindole and SOD inhibitors abrogated the protective effect of melatonin associated with increased levels of ROS and MMPs. These results demonstrated that proinflammatory cytokines impair the chondrogenesis of MSCs, which was rescued by melatonin treatment. This chondroprotective effect was potentially correlated to decreased ROS, preserved SOD, and suppressed levels of MMPs. Thus, melatonin provides a new strategy for promoting cell-based cartilage regeneration in diseased or injured joints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  18. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their breathing to dangerously low levels. Will I need oxygen when I sleep? Usually if you use supplemental oxygen during the ... your health care provider tells you you only need to use oxygen for exercise or sleep. Even if you feel “fine” off of your ...

  19. The Maillard reaction of a shrimp by-product protein hydrolysate: chemical changes and inhibiting effects of reactive oxygen species in human HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fengchao; Wei, Binbin; Chen, Shengjun; Dong, Shiyuan; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying

    2015-06-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to improving the antioxidant activity of protein hydrolysates via the Maillard reaction, but little is known about the cellular antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) from protein hydrolysates. We first investigated chemical characterization and the cellular antioxidant activity of MRPs in a shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) by-product protein hydrolysate (SBH)-glucose system at 110 °C for up to 10 h of heating. Solutions of SBH and glucose were also heated alone as controls. The Maillard reaction greatly resulted in the increase of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and browning intensity, high molecular weight fraction, and reduction of the total amino acid in SBH with the heating time, which correlated well with the free radical scavenging activity of MRPs. MRPs had stronger inhibiting effects on oxidative stress of human HepG2 cells than the original SBH, and its cellular antioxidant activity strongly correlated with free radical scavenging activity, but less affected by the browning intensity and HMF level. The caramelization of glucose partially affected the HMF level and free radical scavenging activity of MRPs, but it was not related to the cellular antioxidant activity. The cellular antioxidant activity of MRPs for 5 h of heating time appeared to reach a maximum level, which was mainly due to carbonyl ammonia condensation reaction. In conclusion, the Maillard reaction is a potential method to increase the cellular antioxidant activity of a shrimp by-product protein hydrolysate, but the higher HMF levels and the lower amino acid content in MRPs should also be considered.

  20. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  1. Propofol Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Mast Cell-Dependent Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma by Inhibiting the Toll-like Receptor 4/Reactive Oxygen Species/Nuclear Factor κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yi; Meng, Jing-Xia; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xiao-Wen; Huang, Yu-Guang; Zhao, Jing

    2018-06-01

    Propofol, an intravenous anesthetic agent widely used in clinical practice, is the preferred anesthetic for asthmatic patients. This study was designed to determine the protective effect and underlying mechanisms of propofol on airway inflammation in a mast cell-dependent mouse model of allergic asthma. Mice were sensitized by ovalbumin (OVA) without alum and challenged with OVA three times. Propofol was given intraperitoneally 0.5 h prior to OVA challenge. The inflammatory cell count and production of cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were detected. The changes of lung histology and key molecules of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/reactive oxygen species (ROS)/NF-κB signaling pathway were also measured. The results showed that propofol significantly decreased the number of eosinophils and the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α in BALF. Furthermore, propofol significantly attenuated airway inflammation, as characterized by fewer infiltrating inflammatory cells and decreased mucus production and goblet cell hyperplasia. Meanwhile, the expression of TLR4, and its downstream signaling adaptor molecules--myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and NF-κB, were inhibited by propofol. The hydrogen peroxide and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde levels were decreased by propofol, and the superoxide dismutase activity was increased in propofol treatment group. These findings indicate that propofol may attenuate airway inflammation by inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/ROS/NF-κB signaling pathway in a mast cell-dependent mouse model of allergic asthma.

  2. Utilization of exogenous ethanol by pea seedlings in an oxygen-free environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.F.; Zemlyanukhin, A.A.; Salam, A.M.M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigated the metabolism of exogenous [2- 14 C]-ethanol in pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.) exposed to different gaseous media, viz.,air, helium, or CO 2 . The 14 C label from ethanol most actively entered amino acids (glutamic and aspartic acids, alanine, glycine, and serine) and organic acids (citrate, malate, succinate, and malonate). Conversion of ethanol to organic acids and separate amino acids (gamma-aminobutyric acid and valine) was intensified under conditions of oxygen stress. A high concentration of CO 2 stimulated transformations of ethanol into these two amino acids, but sharply inhibited overall entry of the label from exogenous ethanol into metabolites of the seedlings. Lengthening the time of exposure lowered this inhibition. Exogenous ethanol did not take part in stress accumulation of alanine in seedlings deprived of oxygen. It is concluded that ethanol participates actively in the metabolic response of pea plants to oxygen stress, and that CO 2 exerts strong modifying action on this response

  3. Gelidium elegans, an edible red seaweed, and hesperidin inhibit lipid accumulation and production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Seo, Min-Jung; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2014-11-01

    Gelidium elegans is an edible red alga native to the intertidal area of northeastern Asia. We investigated the effect of G. elegans extract and its main flavonoids, rutin and hesperidin, on lipid accumulation and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells. Our data show that G. elegans extract decreased lipid accumulation and ROS/RNS production in a dose-dependent manner. The extract also inhibited the mRNA expression of adipogenic transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, while enhancing the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases 1 and 2, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase compared with controls. In addition, lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production was significantly reduced in G. elegans extract-treated RAW264.7 cells. In analysis of the effects of G. elegans flavonoids on lipid accumulation and ROS/RNS production, only hesperidin showed an inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation and ROS production; rutin did not affect adipogenesis and ROS status. The antiadipogenic effect of hesperidin was evidenced by the downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, and fatty acid binding protein 4 gene expression. Collectively, our data suggest that G. elegans is a potential food source containing antiobesity and antioxidant constituents. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effect of oxygen on the thermomechanical behavior of tantalum thin films during the β-α phase transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knepper, Robert; Stevens, Blake; Baker, Shefford P.

    2006-01-01

    Tantalum thin films were prepared in the metastable β phase, and their thermomechanical behaviors were investigated in situ in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. Controlled levels of oxygen were incorporated into the films either during deposition, by surface oxidation after deposition, or during thermomechanical testing. The transformation from the β phase to the stable α phase takes place in conjunction with a distinct increase in tensile stress. The thermomechanical behavior is strongly affected by the amount of oxygen to which the film is exposed and the method of exposure. Increasing oxygen content inhibits the phase transformation, requiring higher temperatures to reach completion. It is shown that the phase transformation takes place by a nucleation and growth process that is limited by growth. Changes in the activation energy for the phase transformation due to solute drag are estimated as a function of oxygen content and the mechanisms behind the stress evolution are elucidated

  5. Taking warfarin (Coumadin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000292.htm Taking warfarin (Coumadin) To use the sharing features on this ... form a clot or have bleeding problems. Taking Warfarin It is important that you take warfarin exactly ...

  6. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).

  7. Qian Yang Yu Yin Granule-containing serum inhibits angiotensin II-induced proliferation, reactive oxygen species production, and inflammation in human mesangial cells via an NADPH oxidase 4-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kang; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Weimin; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Hongping; Fang, Zhuyuan

    2015-03-25

    Qian Yang Yu Yin Granule (QYYYG), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been indicated for renal damage in hypertension for decades in China, but little remains known regarding its underlying molecular mechanism. Therefore, we performed the current study in order to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of QYYYG in the treatment of hypertensive renal damage. We hypothesize that QYYYG relieves hypertensive renal injury through an angiotensin II (Ang II)-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAPDH)-oxidase (NOX)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathway. In this study, we investigated the effects of QYYYG-containing serum (QYGS) in human mesangial cells (HMCs) against Ang II-induced cell proliferation, ROS production, and inflammation through the seropharmacological method. We found that QYGS could inhibit cell proliferation in Ang II-treated HMCs. In addition, QYGS considerably suppressed production of ROS, decreased mRNA and protein expression of NAPDH-oxidase 4 (NOX4), p22 (phox) , and activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (GTP-Rac1); as well as counteracted the up-regulation of inflammatory markers including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, and interleukin 6 (IL-6). These effects were further confirmed in HMCs transfected with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NOX4. Taken together, these results suggest that a NOX4-dependent pathway plays an important role in regulating the inhibitory effect of QYGS. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of QYYYG and their role in the treatment of hypertensive nephropathy.

  8. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  9. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is essential for respiration in aquatic fauna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    more, thermal and salinity stratification inhibits ex- change of ... 2000) and larval densities (Harris and. Cyrus 1999) ...... dissolved oxygen and effects of short-term oxygen stress ... in the shrimp Crangon crangon exposed to hypoxia, anoxia.

  10. Critical appraisal of respirometric methods for metal inhibition on activated sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cokgor, E. Ubay; Ozdemir, S.; Karahan, O.; Insel, G.; Orhon, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the merit of oxygen uptake rate measurements for the assessment of metal inhibition on activated sludge. For this purpose, experiments are conducted to calculate EC 50 levels of nickel and hexavalent chromium using the ISO 8192 procedure, yielding results that are highly variable and difficult to correlate, depending on the type of substrate and the initial food to microorganism ratio. Similar experiments based on continuous respirometric measurements to give the entire oxygen uptake rate profile provide a much better insight on the impact of inhibition on different biochemical processes taking place in the reactor. The results indicate that percent reduction of the amount of dissolved oxygen utilized after an appropriate reaction time is a much better index for the assessment of the inhibitory effects

  11. Medical oxygen and air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyznicki, J M; Williams, M A; Deitchman, S D; Howe, J P

    2000-08-01

    This report responds to a resolution that asked the American Medical Association (AMA) to take action to improve airport and airline accommodations for passengers requiring medical oxygen. Information for the report was derived from a search of the MEDLINE database and references listed in pertinent articles, as well as through communications with experts in aerospace and emergency medicine. Based on this information, the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs determined that commercial air travel exposes passengers to altitude-related hypoxia and gas expansion, which may cause some passengers to experience significant symptoms and medical complications during flight. Medical guidelines are available to help physicians evaluate and counsel potential passengers who are at increased risk of inflight hypoxemia. Supplemental oxygen may be needed for some passengers to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation and prevent hypoxemic complications. For safety and security reasons, federal regulations prohibit travelers from using their own portable oxygen system onboard commercial aircraft. Many U.S. airlines supply medical oxygen for use during flight but policies and procedures vary. Oxygen-dependent passengers must make additional arrangements for the use of supplemental oxygen in airports. Uniform standards are needed to specify procedures and equipment for the use of medical oxygen in airports and aboard commercial aircraft. Revision of federal regulations should be considered to accommodate oxygen-dependent passengers and permit them to have an uninterrupted source of oxygen from departure to destination.

  12. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  13. Oxygen safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sure you have working smoke detectors and a working fire extinguisher in your home. If you move around the house with your oxygen, you may need more than one fire extinguisher in different locations. Smoking can be very dangerous. No one should smoke ...

  14. 5-AIQ inhibits H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species scavenging and Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway in H9c2 cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun-Seok; Kang, Jun Chul; Kang, Do-Hyun; Jang, Yong Chang [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk, 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Kyu Yang [Bio-Organic Science Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon, Chungnam, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun-Jong [Industrial Medicine Department, Chungju Hospital, Konkuk Medical School, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk, 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Seok [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Taegu Health College, Taegu 702-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bokyung [Department of Physiology, Konkuk Medical School, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk, 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Feng, Zhong-Ping [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5S 1A8 (Canada); Shin, Hwa-Sup, E-mail: hsshin@kku.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk, 380-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Poly(adenosine 5′-diphosphate ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear enzyme activated by DNA strand breaks and plays an important role in the tissue injury associated with ischemia and reperfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5-AIQ), a PARP inhibitor, against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. 5-AIQ pretreatment significantly protected against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death, as determined by the XTT assay, cell counting, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, and Western blot analysis of apoptosis-related proteins such as caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2. Upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase accompanied the protective effect of 5-AIQ on H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Our data also showed that 5-AIQ pretreatment protected H9c2 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by triggering activation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and that the protective effect of 5-AIQ was diminished by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 at a concentration that effectively abolished 5-AIQ-induced Akt and GSK-3β activation. In addition, inhibiting the Akt/GSK-3β pathway by LY294002 significantly attenuated the 5-AIQ-mediated decrease in cleaved caspase-3 and Bax activation and H9c2 cell apoptosis induction. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 5-AIQ prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells by reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species production, regulating apoptosis-related proteins, and activating the Akt/GSK-3β pathway. - Highlights: ► 5-AIQ, a PARP inhibitor, decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced H9c2 cell death and apoptosis. ► 5-AIQ upregulated antioxidant Mn-SOD and catalase, while decreasing ROS production. ► 5-AIQ decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced increase in cleaved caspase-3 and Bax and decrease in Bcl2. ► 5-AIQ activated Akt and GSK-3

  15. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of free oxygen in bio-gasification is a sparsely studied area, apart from the common argument of oxygen being toxic and inhibitory for anaerobic micro-cultures. Some studies have, however, revealed increased solubilisation of organic matter in the presence of some free oxygen in anaerobic digestion. This article analyses these counterbalancing phenomena with a mathematical modelling approach using the widely accepted biochemical model ADM 1. Aerobic oxidation of soluble carbon and inhibition of obligatory anaerobic organisms are modelled using standard saturation type kinetics. Biomass dependent first order hydrolysis kinetics is used to relate the increased hydrolysis rate with oxygen induced increase in biomass growth. The amended model, ADM 1-Ox (oxygen, has 25 state variables and 22 biochemical processes, presented in matrix form. The computer aided simulation tool AQUASIM 2.1 is used to simulate the developed model. Simulation predictions are evaluated against experimental data obtained using a laboratory batch test array comprising miniature anaerobic bio-reactors of 100 ml total volume each, operated under different initial air headspaces giving rise to the different oxygen loading conditions. The reactors were initially fed with a glucose solution and incubated at 35 Celsius, for 563 hours. Under the oxygen load conditions of 22, 44 and 88 mg/L, the ADM1-Ox model simulations predicted the experimental methane potentials quite adequately. Both the experimental data and the simulations suggest a linear reduction of methane potential with respect to the increase in oxygen load within this range.

  16. Oxygen therapy - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathe increased amounts of oxygen to get normal levels of oxygen in their blood. Oxygen therapy provides babies with the extra oxygen. Information Oxygen is a gas that the cells in your body need to work properly. The ...

  17. Oxygen diffusion and oxygen effect in tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, H.M.; Hehn, G.

    1979-06-01

    The diffusion of oxygen in tumor cords of bronchus carcinoma of the lung have been studied with refined computer methods for solving the diffusion equation in axis symmetric tumor structures. In this tumor configuration we may find three different regions consisting of euoxic cells, hypoxic tumor cells and necrotic parts. In the case of oxygen supply from a capillary inside a cylinder of tumor tissue with radius 200 μm or in a tumor cord of radius 300 μm with oxygen supply by capillaries outside, we get a relation of well oxygenated cells to hypoxic cells approximately as 1:8 or as 1:1.1 respectively. Of course most of the tumor cords observed in histological slices have smaller diameters, so that an average of approximately 20% hypoxic cells can be assumed. Based on the work of Ardenne, the diffusion of oxygen and glucose in a tumor of type DS-carcinosarcom has been investigated in both intact tumor and tumor treated with ionizing radiation. We can show that a strong reoxygenation effect takes place in that the well supplied regions may increase in some tumor configurations up to a factor of four by volume. The biological consequences of the oxygen pressure determined in tumor cells are discussed in detail. The investigation of oxygen diffusion in the intercapillary tumor region should give a quantitative physical basis for considering the oxygen effect with the aim to explain the advantages of neutron therapy against conventional radiotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Ocean Ridges and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The history of oxygen and the fluxes and feedbacks that lead to its evolution through time remain poorly constrained. It is not clear whether oxygen has had discrete steady state levels at different times in Earth's history, or whether oxygen evolution is more progressive, with trigger points that lead to discrete changes in markers such as mass independent sulfur isotopes. Whatever this history may have been, ocean ridges play an important and poorly recognized part in the overall mass balance of oxidants and reductants that contribute to electron mass balance and the oxygen budget. One example is the current steady state O2 in the atmosphere. The carbon isotope data suggest that the fraction of carbon has increased in the Phanerozoic, and CO2 outgassing followed by organic matter burial should continually supply more O2 to the surface reservoirs. Why is O2 not then increasing? A traditional answer to this question would relate to variations in the fraction of burial of organic matter, but this fraction appears to have been relatively high throughout the Phanerozoic. Furthermore, subduction of carbon in the 1/5 organic/carbonate proportions would contribute further to an increasingly oxidized surface. What is needed is a flux of oxidized material out of the system. One solution would be a modern oxidized flux to the mantle. The current outgassing flux of CO2 is ~3.4*1012 moles per year. If 20% of that becomes stored organic carbon, that is a flux of .68*1012 moles per year of reduced carbon. The current flux of oxidized iron in subducting ocean crust is ~2*1012 moles per year of O2 equivalents, based on the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in old ocean crust compared to fresh basalts at the ridge axis. This flux more than accounts for the incremental oxidizing power produced by modern life. It also suggests a possible feedback through oxygenation of the ocean. A reduced deep ocean would inhibit oxidation of ocean crust, in which case there would be no subduction flux of oxidized

  19. How to take statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergies. You are taking other medicines. You have diabetes. You have liver disease. You should not take statins if you ... with your provider about the possible risks for: Liver damage Severe ... High blood sugar, or type 2 diabetes Memory loss Confusion

  20. Note Taking and Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Judith L.; Harris, Mary B.

    1974-01-01

    To study the effect of note taking and opportunity for review on subsequent recall, 88 college students were randomly assigned to five treatment groups utilizing different note taking and review combinations. No treatment effects were found, although quality of notes was positively correlated with free recall an multiple-choice measures.…

  1. Effects of oxygen and catalyst on tetraphenylborate decomposition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that palladium catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Oxygen inhibits the reaction at low temperature (25 C), presumably by preventing activation of the catalyst. The present study investigated oxygen's inhibiting effectiveness at higher temperature (45 C) and catalyst concentrations

  2. Modulation of oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent metabolism of neutrophilic granulocytes by quantum points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskova, S N; Mikheeva, E R

    2011-08-01

    Inhibition of neutrophilic granulocyte metabolism under the effect of semiconductor quantum points was demonstrated. The status of the oxidative system was evaluated by the NBT test, nonoxidative status by the lysosomal cationic test. It was found that quantum points in a dose of 0.1 mg/ml irrespective of their core and composition of coating significantly inhibited oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent metabolism of neutrophilic granulocytes.

  3. 1. On note taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Alfred B J

    2005-02-01

    In this paper the author explores the theoretical and technical issues relating to taking notes of analytic sessions, using an introspective approach. The paper discusses the lack of a consistent approach to note taking amongst analysts and sets out to demonstrate that systematic note taking can be helpful to the analyst. The author describes his discovery that an initial phase where as much data was recorded as possible did not prove to be reliably helpful in clinical work and initially actively interfered with recall in subsequent sessions. The impact of the nature of the analytic session itself and the focus of the analyst's interest on recall is discussed. The author then describes how he modified his note taking technique to classify information from sessions into four categories which enabled the analyst to select which information to record in notes. The characteristics of memory and its constructive nature are discussed in relation to the problems that arise in making accurate notes of analytic sessions.

  4. Rapid inventory taking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, P.S.S.F.

    1980-01-01

    A data processing system designed to facilitate inventory taking is described. The process depends upon the earliest possible application of computer techniques and the elimination of manual operations. Data is recorded in optical character recognition (OCR) 'A' form and read by a hand held wand reader. Limited validation checks are applied before recording on mini-tape cassettes. 5 refs

  5. Simulating Price-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a price-takers' market simulation geared toward principles-level students. This simulation demonstrates that price-taking behavior is a natural result of the conditions that create perfect competition. In trials, there is a significant degree of price convergence in just three or four rounds. Students find this…

  6. Take Three: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting seasonal flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  7. Taking minutes of meetings

    CERN Document Server

    Gutmann, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    aking Minutes of Meetings guides you through the entire process behind minute taking: arranging the meeting; writing the agenda; creating the optimum environment; structuring the meeting and writing notes up accurately. The minute-taker is one of the most important and powerful people in a meeting and you can use this opportunity to develop your knowledge, broaden your horizons and build credibility within the organization. Taking Minutes of Meetings is an easy to read 'dip-in, dip-out' guide which shows you how to confidently arrange meetings and produce minutes. It provides hands-on advice about the sections of a meeting as well as tips on how to create an agenda, personal preparation, best practice advice on taking notes and how to improve your accuracy. Brand new chapters of this 4th edition include guidance on using technology to maximize effectiveness and practical help with taking minutes for a variety of different types of meetings. The creating success series of books... With over one million copi...

  8. Take action: influence diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Norma J

    2013-01-01

    Increased diversity brings strength to nursing and ANNA. Being a more diverse association will require all of us working together. There is an old proverb that says: "one hand cannot cover the sky; it takes many hands." ANNA needs every one of its members to be a part of the diversity initiative.

  9. Determination of oxygen in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, M. de la; Lapena, J.; Galindo, F.; Couchoud, M.; Celis, B. de; Lopez-Araquistain, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The behaviour is analysed of a device for 'in-line' sampling and vacuum distillation. With this procedure 95 results were obtained for the solubility of oxygen in liquid sodium at temperatures between 125 0 and 300 0 C. The correlation between the concentration of oxygen in a saturation state and the corresponding temperature is represented by: 1g C = 6,17 - 2398/T, where C expressed ppm of oxygen by weight and T is the saturation temperature in 0 K. Reference is also made to the first results obtained with the electrochemical oxygen meter and the system for taking and recording data. (author)

  10. Inhibition of photosynthesis by carbon monoxide and suspension of the carbon monoxide inhibition by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewitz, H S; Voelker, W

    1963-08-01

    The experimental subject was the autotroph Chlorella pyrenoidosa. It was found that growth conditions determine whether the alga is inhibited by carbon monoxide or not. Respiration and photosynthesis are inhibited by carbon monoxide if the cells have grown rapidly under high light intensities. The inhibition of respiration and photosynthesis found in such cells is completely reversible. The inhibition depends not only on carbon monoxide pressure, but also on the oxygen pressure prevailing at the same time. 5 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  11. Taking of history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    the smartest student. So the more familiar a student can become with these situations the better. Since september 2006, veterinary students at Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, have received training in the discipline of history taking, using innovative educational methods: Online......, the students won’t be intimidated by the situation, as they are already familiar with the ‘client’. The ‘client’/teacher must be able to perform as different types of clients to make the sessions more interesting, colourful and fun. During these Live Role sessions, the students will get help and good advice......Learning how to take a history is an extremely important discipline in the education of veterinary students. In our opinion the fact that this discipline is often neglected in traditional teaching is a big mistake. The mere thought of facing a real client can be almost paralysing to even...

  12. Take the "C" Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author recalls several of her experiences in which she successfully pulled her boats out of river holes by throwing herself to the water as a sea-anchor. She learned this trick from her senior guides at a spring training. Her guides told her, "When you're stuck in a hole, take the "C" train."" "Meaning?" The author asked her…

  13. Social Perspective Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    groups” and engage in less stereotype-driven fear and hostility resulting in reduced impulsive and aggressive behavior (Richardson, Green , & Lago...and the physical world. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. Batson, C. D. (1991). The altruism question: Towards a social-psychological answer...others. New York: The Guilford Press. Richardson, D. R., Green , L. R., & Lago, T. (1998). The relationship between perspective- taking and

  14. Perspective Taking in Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zappalà Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Workplaces are often described as places in which individuals are motivated by their self-interests and in which negative events like time pressure, anxiety, conflict with co-workers, miscomprehensions, difficulties in solving problems, not-transmitted or not-exchanged information that lead to mistakes, and in some cases to injuries, stress or control, are part of everyday life (Dormann & Zapf, 2002; Schabracq, Winnubst and Cooper, 2003. Such situations are often the result of the limited comprehension of needs, skills, or information available to colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, clients or providers. However, workplaces are also places in which employees take care of clients, support colleagues and subordinates (Rhoades & Eisenberger, 2002, are enthusiastic about their job (Bakker et al., 2008, are motivated by leaders that encourage employees to transcend their own self-interests for the good of the group or the organization and provide them with the confidence to perform beyond expectations (Bass, 1997. Thus positive relationships at work are becoming a new interdisciplinary domain of inquiry (Dutton & Ragins, 2006. Within this positive relationships framework, in this paper we focus on a positive component of workplaces, and particularly on an individual cognitive and emotional process that has an important role in the workplace because it facilitates interpersonal relations and communications: it is the perspective taking process. In order to describe perspective taking, we will refer to some empirical studies and particularly to the review published by Parker, Atkins and Axtell in 2008 on the International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

  15. Oxygen - A Four Billion Year History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    The air we breathe is twenty-one percent oxygen, an amount higher than on any other known world. While we may take our air for granted, Earth was not always an oxygenated planet. How did it become this way? Oxygen is the most current account of the history of atmospheric oxygen on Earth. Donald...... Canfield--one of the world's leading authorities on geochemistry, earth history, and the early oceans--covers this vast history, emphasizing its relationship to the evolution of life and the evolving chemistry of the Earth. With an accessible and colorful first-person narrative, he draws from a variety...... of fields, including geology, paleontology, geochemistry, biochemistry, animal physiology, and microbiology, to explain why our oxygenated Earth became the ideal place for life. Describing which processes, both biological and geological, act to control oxygen levels in the atmosphere, Canfield traces...

  16. Inhibiting the inevitable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    conservation is to ‘buy time’ for the object. Inhibitive conservation of plastics involves the removal or reduction of factors causing or accelerating degradation including light, oxygen, acids, relative humidity and acidic breakdown products. Specific approaches to conservation have been developed......Once plastics objects are registered in museum collections, the institution becomes responsible for their long term preservation, until the end of their useful lifetime. Plastics appear to deteriorate faster than other materials in museum collections and have a useful lifetime between 5 and 25...... years. Preventive or inhibitive conservation involves controlling the environments in which objects are placed during storage and display, with the aim of slowing the major deterioration reactions. Once in progress, degradation of plastics cannot be stopped or reversed, so the aim of preventive...

  17. Take nothing for granted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) natural gas supply, past, present and future, was presented. Reserves are considered as being more than adequate to meet supply requirements. In the long term, it is expected that there will be sufficient gas to fill all existing and currently planned pipelines serving the WCSB. Nevertheless, it does not pay to take anything for granted. One of the challenges facing the natural gas industry in an integrated North American market is to maintain a balance between deliverability and take-away capacity. Competition between fuels is also a factor that complicates matters. Measures taken by TransCanada Pipelines to prepare for the expected heightened competition were reviewed. Chief among them is the recent TransCanada/Nova merger which is expected to increase efficiency, decrease costs, provide a solid platform for continued growth, create customer-driven energy solutions and enable the new entity to successfully compete in an integrated North American market. The accord reached between CAPP, NOVA, SEPAC and TransCanada Pipelines and the status of the new Alberta tolls are further examples of measures taken by TransCanada Pipelines to prepare for all contingencies by leaving nothing to chance

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna A. Mahale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO 2 has been successfully used in several medical fields. The therapeutic effect is related to elevated partial oxygen pressure in the tissues. The pressure itself enhances oxygen solubility in the tissue fluids. HBO 2 has shown to affect angiogenesis, bone metabolism and bone turnover. Studies have been conducted to analyze the effects of HBO 2 therapy on periodontal disease. HBO 2 increases local oxygen distribution, especially at the base of the periodontal pocket, which inhibits the growth of anaerobic bacteria and allows the ischemic tissues to receive an adequate intake of oxygen sufficient for a rapid recovery of cell metabolism. It is increasingly being accepted as a beneficial adjunct to diverse clinical conditions. Nonhealing ulcers, chronic wounds and refractory osteomyelitis are a few conditions for which HBO therapy (HBOT has been extensively tried out. The dental surgeons have found a good ally in HBOT in managing dental condition.

  19. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  20. Taking Care of Your Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Taking Care of Your Hair KidsHealth / For Teens / Taking Care of Your Hair ... role in how healthy it looks. Caring for Hair How you take care of your hair depends ...

  1. Taking action against violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, K

    1996-05-01

    Significant increase in violent crimes in recent years forced Icelandic men to take action against violence. Television was seen as a major contributory factor in increasing violence. Surveys indicate that 10-15 years after television broadcasting commences in a particular society, the incidence of crime can be expected to double. While the majority of the individuals arrested for violent crimes are men, being male does not necessarily mean being violent. The Men's Committee of the Icelandic Equal Rights Council initiated a week-long information and education campaign under the theme "Men Against Violence". This campaign involved several events including an art exhibit, speeches on violence in families, treatment sought by those who are likely to resort to violence, booklet distribution among students in secondary schools, and a mass media campaign to raise public awareness on this pressing problem.

  2. Taking Design Games Seriously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Agger; Brandt, Eva; Mattelmäki, Tuuli

    2014-01-01

    Using design games at Participatory Design (PD) events is well acknowledged as a fruitful way of staging participation. As PD researchers, we have many such experiences, and we have argued that design games connect participants and promote equalizing power relations. However, in this paper, we...... will (self) critically re-connect and reflect on how people (humans) and materials (non-humans) continually participate and intertwine in various power relations in design game situations. The analysis is of detailed situated actions with one of our recent games, UrbanTransition. Core concepts mainly from...... Bruno Latour’s work on Actor-Network-Theory are applied. The aim is to take design games seriously by e.g. exploring how assemblages of humans and non-humans are intertwined in tacitly-but-tactically staging participation, and opening up for or hindering negotiations and decision-making, thus starting...

  3. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Rainer; Hauss, Helena; Buchholz, Friedrich; Melzner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2, and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply could fuel bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean considerably. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a down-regulation of ammonium excretion. We exposed calanoid copepods from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA; Undinula vulgaris and Pleuromamma abdominalis) and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP; Euphausia mucronata) and the ETNA (Euphausia gibboides) to different temperatures, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels to study their survival, respiration and excretion rates at these conditions. An increase in temperature by 10 °C led to an approximately 2-fold increase of the respiration and excretion rates of U. vulgaris (Q10, respiration = 1.4; Q10, NH4-excretion = 1.6), P. abdominalis (Q10, respiration = 2.0; Q10, NH4-excretion = 2.4) and

  4. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  5. Medicaid: taking stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, S M

    1993-01-01

    In the last few years, Medicaid has attracted more than casual attention, one reflection of which is the fact that JHPPL has published five papers on the program in its last few issues. This paper, a sixth, takes a broader view of the program than is typically the case. After a critique of the five recent articles, I discuss several questions raised by them and reach the following conclusions: First, the states do not invest enough in producing program data suitable for policy analysis and research. One lesson: Better data and analysis can help the states to avoid expensive mistakes. Second, those policy analyses that have been offered fail to give sufficient attention to the political dimension of policy. That is one reason why policy choices produce unexpected effects. Third, since Medicaid is a relatively small player in the vast medical care market, incentives adopted by Medicaid officials throughout the country rarely have the desired effects. Finally, as long as Medicaid remains the principal mechanism to provide access to health care for the poor, it must be made as efficient and effective as possible. Yet, for both political and economic reasons, Medicaid can never be what its original planners had hoped, the vehicle for providing the poor with reliable access to mainstream medical care.

  6. Taking the plunge

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 8 and 15 October, 58 people took the plunge and headed to the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva for their first taste of scuba diving at one of the CERN scuba club’s free trial dives. Club president Alberto Pace, left, taking a new recruit on his first dive. The CERN scuba club was making waves down at the Varembe swimming pool on Wednesday 15 October. Thirty-six people turned up to the club’s second free trial dive. "It was fantastic," said Jörg, one of the new recruits, after his first ever dive. "I’ve always wanted to try diving and this was a free lesson, so I thought I would come and have a go." Fourteen of the club’s fully qualified instructors were there to give one-on-one tuition. After a first dive in the normal pool the new divers moved into the deep pool. Some took to the water like fish, and at one point an impromptu game of aqua-Frisbee broke out, five metres below the surface. Richard Catherall, who organi...

  7. Sample-taking apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanov, Y I; Ismailov, R A; Orazov, A

    1980-10-07

    The invention refers to the equipment for testing water-bearing levels in loose rocks. Its purpose is to simultaneously remove with the rock sample a separate fluid sample from the assigned interval. The sample-taking apparatus contains a core lifter which can be submerged into the casting string with housing and front endpiece in the form of a rod with a piston which covers the cavity of the core lifter, as well as mechanism for fixing and moving the endpiece within the core lifter cavity. The device differs from the known similar devices because the upper part of the housing of the core lifter is equipped with a filter and mobile casting which covers the filter. In this case the casing is connected to the endpiece rod and the endpiece is installed with the possibility of movement which is limited with fixing in the upper position and in the extreme upper position it divides the core lifter cavity into two parts, filter settling tank and core-receiving cavity.

  8. Decision taking as a service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Decision taking can be performed as a service to other parties and it is amenable to outtasking rather than to outsourcing. Outtasking decision taking is compatible with selfsourcing of decision making activities carried out in preparation of decision taking. Decision taking as a service (DTaaS) is

  9. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  10. Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Nitric Oxide (NO) by Gelidium elegans Using Alternative Drying and Extraction Conditions in 3T3-L1 and RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2012-06-01

    Gelidium (G.) elegans is a red alga inhabiting intertidal areas of North East Asia. We examined anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of G. elegans, depending on drying and extraction conditions, by determining reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in 3T3-L1 and RAW 264.7 cells. Extraction yields of samples using hot air drying (HD) and far-infrared ray drying (FID) were significantly higher than those using natural air drying (ND). The 70% ethanol extracts showed the highest total phenol and flavonoid contents compared to other extracts (0, 30, and 50% ethanol) under tested drying conditions. The scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitrite correlated with total phenol or flavonoid content in the extracts. The greatest DPPH scavenging effect was observed in 70% ethanol extract from FID and HD conditions. The production of ROS and NO in 3T3-L1 and macrophage cells greatly decreased with the 70% ethanol extraction derived from FID. This study suggests that 70% ethanol extraction of G. elegans dried by FID is the most optimal condition to obtain efficiently antioxidant compounds of G. elegans.

  11. Oxygen - A Four Billion Year History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    of fields, including geology, paleontology, geochemistry, biochemistry, animal physiology, and microbiology, to explain why our oxygenated Earth became the ideal place for life. Describing which processes, both biological and geological, act to control oxygen levels in the atmosphere, Canfield traces...... guides readers through the various lines of scientific evidence, considers some of the wrong turns and dead ends along the way, and highlights the scientists and researchers who have made key discoveries in the field. Showing how Earth's atmosphere developed over time, Oxygen takes readers...

  12. Oxygen-Partial-Pressure Sensor for Aircraft Oxygen Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mark; Pettit, Donald

    2003-01-01

    A device that generates an alarm when the partial pressure of oxygen decreases to less than a preset level has been developed to help prevent hypoxia in a pilot or other crewmember of a military or other high-performance aircraft. Loss of oxygen partial pressure can be caused by poor fit of the mask or failure of a hose or other component of an oxygen distribution system. The deleterious physical and mental effects of hypoxia cause the loss of a military aircraft and crew every few years. The device is installed in the crewmember s oxygen mask and is powered via communication wiring already present in all such oxygen masks. The device (see figure) includes an electrochemical sensor, the output potential of which is proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen. The output of the sensor is amplified and fed to the input of a comparator circuit. A reference potential that corresponds to the amplified sensor output at the alarm oxygen-partial-pressure level is fed to the second input of the comparator. When the sensed partial pressure of oxygen falls below the minimum acceptable level, the output of the comparator goes from the low state (a few millivolts) to the high state (near the supply potential, which is typically 6.8 V for microphone power). The switching of the comparator output to the high state triggers a tactile alarm in the form of a vibration in the mask, generated by a small 1.3-Vdc pager motor spinning an eccentric mass at a rate between 8,000 and 10,000 rpm. The sensation of the mask vibrating against the crewmember s nose is very effective at alerting the crewmember, who may already be groggy from hypoxia and is immersed in an environment that is saturated with visual cues and sounds. Indeed, the sensation is one of rudeness, but such rudeness could be what is needed to stimulate the crewmember to take corrective action in a life-threatening situation.

  13. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene Mark; Contreras, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient measurements indicate that 30–50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ,0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact...... at non-detectable concentrations of O2, while anaerobic NO3 2 reduction was fully active up to at least 25 mmol L21 O2. Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O2 concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily...... controlled by the O2-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O2 on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH3 oxidation and NO3 2 reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O2 levels ,20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts...

  14. Taking Care of Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Taking Care of Your Skin KidsHealth / For Kids / Taking Care of Your Skin ... you're in. Why Be Nice to Your Skin? Like the heart, stomach, and brain, your skin ...

  15. Taking Care of Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Taking Care of Pressure Sores [Download this pamphlet: "Taking Care of Pressure Sores" - ( ... may not show up right away. Stages of pressure sores and how to care for them: STAGE ONE ...

  16. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  17. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  18. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...... of continental growth and volcanic outgassing, as well as biogeochemical processing of elements within the oceans. The author will seek to explore constraints on the history of oxygenation and understand which processes have regulated oxygen through this eon....

  19. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  20. Are macroinvertebrates in high altitude streams affected by oxygen deficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Dean; Rostgaard, S.; Vásconez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    1. The solubility of oxygen in water increases with decreasing temperature. This has led to a general perception of cold, high mountain streams as more oxygen rich than warmer lowland streams, and that macroinvertebrates inhabiting high altitude streams have had no need to adapt to critical oxygen...... conditions. However, this fails to take into account that oxygen solubility declines with decreasing atmospheric pressure, which may be of importance at high altitudes. 2. Based on samples of macroinvertebrate benthos and in situ measurements of respiratory oxygen demand of macroinvertebrates in small...... the mean weight-specific respiratory rate of macroinvertebrates declined by only 50%, from 400 to 3800 m. We suggest that this disproportionately large gap between availability and demand of oxygen at high altitudes may imply a potential oxygen deficiency for the fauna, and we discuss how oxygen deficiency...

  1. [Domiciliary oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kafi, S

    2010-09-01

    In Belgium, oxygen therapy is becoming more and more accessible. When oxygen is needed for short periods or for special indications as palliative care, an agreement between mutual insurance companies and pharmacists allows the practitioner the home installation of gazeous oxygen cylinder or of oxygen concentrator. When long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is indicated for patients with respiratory insufficiency, the pneumologist must first ask the INAMI the authorization to install one of the following modalities: oxygen concentrator with or without demand oxygen delivery cylinder and liquid oxygen. The goal of LTOT is to increase survival and quality of life. The principal and well accepted indication for LTOT is severe hypoxemia. The beneficial effects of oxygen therapy limited at night or on exertion are controversial. In order to increase patient's autonomy, oxygen can be prescribed for ambulation, respecting prescription's rules. At each step of oxygen therapy implementing (indication, choice of the device and follow-up) the patient under oxygen may benefit from a joint approach between the general practitioner and the chest specialist.

  2. Aircraft Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    An Oxygen Enriched Air System for the AV-8A Harrier (NADC-81198-60).” 70 Horch , T., et. al. “The F-16 Onboard Oxygen Generating System: Performance...Only and Safety Privileged). Horch , T., Miller, R., Bomar, J., Tedor, J., Holden, R., Ikels, K., & Lozano, P. (1983). The F-16 Onboard Oxygen

  3. Microsensor and transcriptomic signatures of oxygen depletion in biofilms associated with chronic wounds: Biofilms and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Garth A. [Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana; Ge Zhao, Alice [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle Washington; Usui, Marcia [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle Washington; Underwood, Robert A. [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle Washington; Nguyen, Hung [The Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman Washington; Beyenal, Haluk [The Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman Washington; deLancey Pulcini, Elinor [Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana; Agostinho Hunt, Alessandra [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 5180 Biomedical and Physical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan; Bernstein, Hans C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Chemical and Biological Signature Science, Richland Washington; Fleckman, Philip [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle Washington; Olerud, John [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle Washington; Williamson, Kerry S. [Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana; Franklin, Michael J. [Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana; Stewart, Philip S. [Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana

    2016-02-16

    Polymicrobial biofilms have been implicated in delayed wound healing, although the mechanisms by which biofilms impair wound healing are poorly understood. Many species of bacteria produce exotoxins and exoenzymes that may inhibit healing. In addition, oxygen consumption by biofilms may impede wound healing. In this study, we used oxygen microsensors to measure oxygen transects through in vitro-cultured biofilms, biofilms formed in vivo in a diabetic (db/db) mouse model, and ex vivo human chronic wound specimens. The results show that oxygen levels within both euthanized and live mouse wounds had steep gradients that reached minima ranging from 19 to 61% oxygen partial pressure, compared to atmospheric oxygen levels. The oxygen gradients in the mouse wounds were similar to those observed for clinical isolates cultured in vitro and for human ex vivo scabs. No oxygen gradients were observed for heat-killed scabs, suggesting that active metabolism by the viable bacteria contributed to the reduced oxygen partial pressure of the wounds. To characterize the metabolic activities of the bacteria in the mouse wounds, we performed transcriptomics analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms associated with the db/db mice wounds using Affymetrix microarrays. The results demonstrated that the bacteria expressed genes for metabolic activities associated with cell growth. Interestingly, the transcriptome results indicated that the bacteria within the wounds also experienced oxygen-limitation stress. Among the bacterial genes that were expressed in vivo were genes associated with the Anr-mediated hypoxia-stress response. Other bacterial stress response genes highly expressed in vivo were genes associated with stationary-phase growth, osmotic stress, and RpoH-mediated heat shock stress. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the metabolic activities of bacteria in biofilms act as oxygen sinks in chronic wounds and that the depletion of oxygen contributes to the

  4. Oxygen configurations in silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelikowsky, James R.; Chadi, D. J.; Binggeli, N.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a transition state for oxygen in silica. This state is produced by the insertion of an oxygen molecule into the Si-O-Si bond, i.e., it consists of producing a Si-O-O-O-Si bond. This state allows molecular oxygen diffusion in silica without breaking the molecular O 2 bond and it is energetically more stable than a peroxy configuration. This configuration may allow for exchange of molecular oxygen with the oxygen in the silica framework. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Nutrient measurements indicate that 30-50% of the total nitrogen (N loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs. This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ~0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O(2 on anammox, NH(3 oxidation and NO(3(- reduction in (15N-labeling experiments with varying O(2 concentrations (0-25 µmol L(-1 in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O(2 is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O(2 assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ~20 µmol L(-1. In contrast, NH(3 oxidation to NO(2(- and NO(3(- reduction to NO(2(- as the main NH(4(+ and NO(2(- sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O(2 concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH(3 oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O(2, while anaerobic NO(3(- reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L(-1 O(2. Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O(2 concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O(2-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O(2 on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH(3 oxidation and NO(3(- reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O(2 levels ~20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O(2 sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling.

  7. Take Charge. Take the Test. "You Know" PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 60 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).

  8. The inhibition mechanisms of quinones and phenols present in wood for the vinyl polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobashi, Kenzo; Yokota, Tokuo

    1977-01-01

    The inhibitory effects and mechanisms of the quinones and phenols present in wood for the vinyl polymerization initiated with γ-rays and other initiation systems were investigated. The results obtained are summarized as follows; (1) Although phenolic compounds like isotaxiresinol inhibit the γ-ray initiated polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) under the presence of air, they have no inhibitory effects in vacuo. On the other hand, o-benzoquinone and mansonones show strong inhibitory or retarding effects in vacuo. These facts indicate that oxygen may be important for the phenols to inhibit the vinyl polymerization. (2) It is shown qualitatively that there is a relationship between the strength of inhibitory action of quinones and their normal redox potentials. (3) PMMA produced under the presence of o-benzoquinone is found to include the fraction having extremely large chain length based on gel permeation chromatogram. (4) Based on the reaction products of orthoquinones and azobisisobutyronitrile, which was assumed as a model of polymer radicals, the inhibition reaction with polymer chain radical is concluded to take place upon the oxygen atoms of the quinones. (auth.)

  9. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  11. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  12. Note Taking for Geography Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneale, Pauline E.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses geography students' questions about why, when, and how to take notes. Outlines a step-by-step process for taking notes from written sources and from class lectures. Discusses what types of notes are appropriate for various types of sources. Suggests some ideas for making notes useful for individual learning styles. (DSK)

  13. Take Charge. Take the Test. "You Know" PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 60 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  14. The indium-oxygen system, ch. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillen, A.J. van

    1977-01-01

    This chapter is divided into three sections: 1) a survey of the literature concerning the indiumoxygen system, 2) the adsorption of oxygen at pure and partially oxidized indium surfaces in the temperature range 20-180degC, and 3) the oxidation of indium at temperatures above 180degC. The oxygen uptake is determined volumetrically and gravimetrically. The influence of the melting point is considered and the results are compared with data from the literature. The oxide layer is amorphous at lower temperatures but above 350degC, crystallisation of In 2 O 3 takes place

  15. Economic inequality increases risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, B Keith; Brown-Iannuzzi, Jazmin L; Hannay, Jason W

    2017-05-02

    Rising income inequality is a global trend. Increased income inequality has been associated with higher rates of crime, greater consumer debt, and poorer health outcomes. The mechanisms linking inequality to poor outcomes among individuals are poorly understood. This research tested a behavioral account linking inequality to individual decision making. In three experiments ( n = 811), we found that higher inequality in the outcomes of an economic game led participants to take greater risks to try to achieve higher outcomes. This effect of unequal distributions on risk taking was driven by upward social comparisons. Next, we estimated economic risk taking in daily life using large-scale data from internet searches. Risk taking was higher in states with greater income inequality, an effect driven by inequality at the upper end of the income distribution. Results suggest that inequality may promote poor outcomes, in part, by increasing risky behavior.

  16. Should You Take Dietary Supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Print this issue Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More ... Gut in Check Wise Choices Safe Use of Supplements Tell all of your health care providers about ...

  17. Conceptualizing Multicultural Perspective Taking Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rentsch, Joan R; Gunderson, Allison; Goodwin, Gerald F; Abbe, Allison

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability to take the perspective of individuals within the context of their culture enables Army leaders to understand other cultures at a level finer than that afforded by simply using global...

  18. Oxygen enrichment incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Guk; Yang, Hee Chul; Park, Geun Il; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2000-10-01

    Oxygen enriched combustion technology has recently been used in waste incineration. To apply the oxygen enrichment on alpha-bearing waste incineration, which is being developed, a state-of-an-art review has been performed. The use of oxygen or oxygen-enriched air instead of air in incineration would result in increase of combustion efficiency and capacity, and reduction of off-gas product. Especially, the off-gas could be reduced below a quarter, which might reduce off-gas treatment facilities, and also increase an efficiency of off-gas treatment. However, the use of oxygen might also lead to local overheating and high nitrogen oxides (NOx) formation. To overcome these problems, an application of low NOx oxy-fuel burner and recycling of a part of off-gas to combustion chamber have been suggested

  19. Oxygen enrichment incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Guk; Yang, Hee Chul; Park, Geun Il; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2000-10-01

    Oxygen enriched combustion technology has recently been used in waste incineration. To apply the oxygen enrichment on alpha-bearing waste incineration, which is being developed, a state-of-an-art review has been performed. The use of oxygen or oxygen-enriched air instead of air in incineration would result in increase of combustion efficiency and capacity, and reduction of off-gas product. Especially, the off-gas could be reduced below a quarter, which might reduce off-gas treatment facilities, and also increase an efficiency of off-gas treatment. However, the use of oxygen might also lead to local overheating and high nitrogen oxides (NOx) formation. To overcome these problems, an application of low NOx oxy-fuel burner and recycling of a part of off-gas to combustion chamber have been suggested.

  20. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (Mercuri et al 2000;. Brownlee 2001; Rosen .... Huang 1998) and a Ca2+-dependent endonuclease (Chen et al 1996). Many of .... Balasubramanyam M, Kimura M, Aviv A and Gardner J P 1993. Kinetics of ...

  1. Application of Nanofibrillated Cellulose on BOPP/LDPE Film as Oxygen Barrier and Antimicrobial Coating Based on Cold Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of nanofibrillated cellulose (NC films in packaging industry has been hindered by its lack of heat-sealing ability. Incorporation of NC films with the biaxially oriented polypropylene/low density polyethylene (BOPP/LDPE laminates can take advantage of each material and endow the films with novel functions for food packaging applications. In this study, a coating that consists of NC and nisin was applied onto a cold plasma treated BOPP/LDPE film to fabricate a novel active packaging with an improved oxygen barrier performance and an added antimicrobial effect. The results showed that cold plasma treatment improved the surface hydrophilicity of BOPP/LDPE films for better attachment of the coatings. NC coatings significantly enhanced oxygen barrier property of the BOPP/LDPE film, with an oxygen transmission rate as low as 24.02 cc/m2·day as compared to that of the non-coated one (67.03 cc/m2·day. The addition of nisin in the coating at a concentration of 5 mg/g caused no significant change in barrier properties but imparted the film excellent antimicrobial properties, with a growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes by 94%. All films exhibit satisfying mechanical properties and transparency, and this new film has the potential to be used as antimicrobial and oxygen barrier packaging.

  2. Reactive oxygen species in health and disease : Finding the right balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique

    2016-01-01

    When oxygen takes up an electron, reactive oxygen species are formed. These free radicals can react with important molecules in our body (DNA, proteins), just like iron rusts (oxidation). Too many reactive oxygen species, called oxidative stress, result in cellular damage causing either cell death

  3. Spin transport in oxygen adsorbed graphene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vipin

    2018-04-01

    The spin transport properties of pristine graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) have been most widely studied using theoretical and experimental tools. The possibilities of oxidation of fabricated graphene based nano electronic devices may change the device characteristics, which motivates to further explore the properties of graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs). Therefore, we present a systematic computational study on the spin polarized transport in surface oxidized GNR in antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin configuration using density functional theory combined with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. It is found that the conductance in oxidized GNRs is significantly suppressed in the valance band and the conduction band. A further reduction in the conductance profile is seen in presence of two oxygen atoms on the ribbon plane. This change in the conductance may be attributed to change in the surface topology of the ribbon basal plane due to presence of the oxygen adatoms, where the charge transfer take place between the ribbon basal plane and the oxygen atoms.

  4. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  5. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  6. Pathology of oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Autor, Anne Pomeroy

    1982-01-01

    This volume has been designed to provide those interested in oxygen toxicity with a working knowledge of advancement in the field with the intention that the topics described in each chapter will be immediately useful...

  7. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at Home Tell your local fire department, electric company, and telephone company that you use oxygen in your home. They ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  8. Pathology of oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Autor, Anne Pomeroy

    1982-01-01

    .... The book is divided into three general sections. The first and smallest section of the book explains the molecular and biochemical basis of our current understanding of oxygen radical toxicity as well as the means by which normal aerobic cells...

  9. Positron emission tomography takes lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)'s ability to detect functional abnormalities before they manifest anatomically is examined and some of its most common applications are outlined. It is emphasised that when PET facility and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's national cyclotron are established at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, the availability of short-lived tracers such as oxygen 15, nitrogen 13 and fluorine 18 would improve the specificity of tests(e.g. for brain tumors or cardiac viability) further. Construction of the cyclotron will start shortly and is due to be completed and operating by the end of 1991

  10. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  11. Ekstrakorporal oxygenering ved legionellapneumoni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uslu, Bülent; Steensen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    We present a case report with a 49-year-old woman with legionella pneumonia and fulminant respiratory failure. Despite maximal conventional respirator treatment with positive pressure ventilation, 100% oxygen and pharmacological treatment in an intensive care unit, further deterioration with hypo......We present a case report with a 49-year-old woman with legionella pneumonia and fulminant respiratory failure. Despite maximal conventional respirator treatment with positive pressure ventilation, 100% oxygen and pharmacological treatment in an intensive care unit, further deterioration...

  12. Intraportal islet oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszynski, Thomas M; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-05-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is a promising therapy for the treatment of diabetes. The large number of islets required to achieve insulin independence limit its cost-effectiveness and the number of patients who can be treated. It is believed that >50% of islets are lost in the immediate post-IT period. Poor oxygenation in the early post-IT period is recognized as a possible reason for islet loss and dysfunction but has not been extensively studied. Several key variables affect oxygenation in this setting, including (1) local oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)), (2) islet oxygen consumption, (3) islet size (diameter, D), and (4) presence or absence of thrombosis on the islet surface. We discuss implications of oxygen-limiting conditions on intraportal islet viability and function. Of the 4 key variables, the islet size appears to be the most important determinant of the anoxic and nonfunctional islet volume fractions. Similarly, the effect of thrombus formation on the islet surface may be substantial. At the University of Minnesota, average size distribution data from clinical alloislet preparations (n = 10) indicate that >150-µm D islets account for only ~30% of the total islet number, but >85% of the total islet volume. This suggests that improved oxygen supply to the islets may have a profound impact on islet survivability and function since most of the β-cell volume is within large islets which are most susceptible to oxygen-limiting conditions. The assumption that the liver is a suitable islet transplant site from the standpoint of oxygenation should be reconsidered. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Take-all or nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M.L.; Canning, G.; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in

  14. Take-all or nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M.L.; Canning, G.; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in Gaeumannomyces

  15. Take Charge of Your Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marshall A.

    2013-01-01

    Today's work world is full of uncertainty. Every day, people hear about another organization going out of business, downsizing, or rightsizing. To prepare for these uncertain times, one must take charge of their own career. This article presents some tips for surviving in today's world of work: (1) Be self-managing; (2) Know what you…

  16. Taking Care After A Concussion

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-17

    This podcast describes how to take care of yourself after a concussion, including proper recognition and response recommendations.  Created: 3/17/2010 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/17/2010.

  17. It takes a global village

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhof, Loes; DeWitt, Janine; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2014-01-01

    Connected through a screen, two classes that are an ocean apart take the same course and do the same assignments. Our course “ The Global Village” is a globally networked learning environment (Starke-Meyerring and Wilson, 2008) where students from two different universities work and learn together

  18. Four Takes on Tough Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebell, Michael A.; Odden, Allan; Rolle, Anthony; Guthrie, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Educational Leadership talks with four experts in the fields of education policy and finance about how schools can weather the current financial crisis. Michael A. Rebell focuses on the recession and students' rights; Allan Odden suggests five steps schools can take to improve in tough times; Anthony Rolle describes the tension between equity and…

  19. Taking Care of our Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    our Trails Obeying Environmental Laws Protecting Wildlife Environmental Sustainability Sustainability Protection » Trails Taking Care of our Trails Continued access and use of Los Alamos National Laboratory trails is contingent upon being good stewards of these federal lands. June 7, 2017 Hikers walk along the

  20. Singlet oxygen quenching by oxygen in tetraphenyl-porphyrin solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedic, Roman; Korinek, Miloslav; Molnar, Alexander; Svoboda, Antonin; Hala, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen infrared phosphorescence is a powerful tool for determination of quantum yields and kinetics of its photosensitization. This technique was employed to investigate in detail the previously observed effect of singlet oxygen quenching by oxygen. The question whether the singlet oxygen is quenched by oxygen in ground or in excited state was addressed by study of two complementary dependencies of singlet oxygen lifetimes: on dissolved oxygen concentration and on excitation intensity. Oxygen concentration dependence study of meso-tetra(4-sulphonato)phenylporphyrin (TPPS 4 ) phosphorescence kinetics showed linearity of the dependence of TPPS 4 triplet state rate-constant. Corresponding bimolecular quenching constant of (1.5±0.1)x10 9 l/mol s was obtained. On the other hand, rate constants of singlet oxygen depopulation exhibit nonlinear dependence on oxygen concentration. Comparison of zero oxygen concentration-extrapolated value of singlet oxygen lifetime of (6.5±0.4) μs to (3.7±0.1) μs observed under air-saturated conditions indicates importance of the effect of quenching of singlet oxygen by oxygen. Upward-sloping dependencies of singlet oxygen depopulation rate-constant on excitation intensity evidence that singlet oxygen is predominantly quenched by oxygen in excited singlet state

  1. When perspective taking increases taking: reactive egoism in social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Nicholas; Caruso, Eugene; Bazerman, Max H

    2006-11-01

    Group members often reason egocentrically, believing that they deserve more than their fair share of group resources. Leading people to consider other members' thoughts and perspectives can reduce these egocentric (self-centered) judgments such that people claim that it is fair for them to take less; however, the consideration of others' thoughts and perspectives actually increases egoistic (selfish) behavior such that people actually take more of available resources. A series of experiments demonstrates this pattern in competitive contexts in which considering others' perspectives activates egoistic theories of their likely behavior, leading people to counter by behaving more egoistically themselves. This reactive egoism is attenuated in cooperative contexts. Discussion focuses on the implications of reactive egoism in social interaction and on strategies for alleviating its potentially deleterious effects.

  2. Dependence of nitrite oxidation on nitrite and oxygen in low-oxygen seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Ji, Qixing; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2017-08-01

    Nitrite oxidation is an essential step in transformations of fixed nitrogen. The physiology of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) implies that the rates of nitrite oxidation should be controlled by concentration of their substrate, nitrite, and the terminal electron acceptor, oxygen. The sensitivities of nitrite oxidation to oxygen and nitrite concentrations were investigated using 15N tracer incubations in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific. Nitrite stimulated nitrite oxidation under low in situ nitrite conditions, following Michaelis-Menten kinetics, indicating that nitrite was the limiting substrate. The nitrite half-saturation constant (Ks = 0.254 ± 0.161 μM) was 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than in cultivated NOB, indicating higher affinity of marine NOB for nitrite. The highest rates of nitrite oxidation were measured in the oxygen depleted zone (ODZ), and were partially inhibited by additions of oxygen. This oxygen sensitivity suggests that ODZ specialist NOB, adapted to low-oxygen conditions, are responsible for apparently anaerobic nitrite oxidation.

  3. Osmotic phenomena in application for hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babchin, A; Levich, E; Melamed M D, Y; Sivashinsky, G

    2011-03-01

    plasma drops and the nitrogen concentration gradient becomes directed from blood to tissue. On the assumption of weak interaction between the inert nitrogen and the human tissue, normal osmosis for the nitrogen transport takes place. Thus, the directions of anomalous osmotic flow caused by the oxygen concentration gradient coincide with the directions of normal osmotic flow, caused by the nitrogen concentration gradient. This leads to the conclusion that the presence of nitrogen in the human body promotes the oxygen delivery under HBO conditions, rendering the overall success of the hyperbaric oxygen treatment procedure. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion inhibitor development for slightly sour environments with oxygen intrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylde, J.; Wang, H.; Li, J. [Clariant Oil Services North America, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study that examined the effect of oxygen on the inhibition of carbon steel in slightly sour corrosion, and the initiation and propagation of localized attack. Oxygen can enter sour water injection systems through the vapor space in storage tanks and process system. Oxygen aggravates the corrosion attack by participating in the cathodic reaction under full or partial diffusion control. Laboratory testing results were reported in this presentation along with the development of corrosion inhibitors for such a slightly sour system. Bubble testing cells were used with continuous H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture gas sparging and occasional oxygen intrusion of 2 to 4 hours during a week long test. Linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and weight loss corrosion coupons were used to quantify the corrosion attack. The findings were presented in terms of the magnitude of localized attacks at different oxygen concentrations and intrusion periods, with and without the presence of corrosion inhibitors. tabs., figs.

  5. Inhibition of urinary calculi -- a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia; Govani, Jayesh; Durrer, William; Reza, Layra; Pinales, Luis

    2008-10-01

    Although a considerable number of investigations have already been undertaken and many causes such as life habits, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors have been noted as sources that accelerate calculi depositions and aggregations, there are still plenty of unanswered questions regarding efficient inhibition and treatment mechanisms. Thus, in an attempt to acquire more insights, we propose here a detailed scientific study of kidney stone formation and growth inhibition based on a traditional medicine approach with Rotula Aquatica Lour (RAL) herbal extracts. A simplified single diffusion gel growth technique was used for synthesizing the samples for the present study. The unexpected Zn presence in the sample with RAL inhibitor, as revealed by XPS measurements, explains the inhibition process and the dramatic reflectance of the incident light observed in the infrared transmission studies. Raman data demonstrate potential binding of the inhibitor with the oxygen of the kidney stone. Photoluminescence results corroborate to provide additional evidence of Zn-related inhibition.

  6. Taking climate to the market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, S.

    1998-01-01

    Since the 1997 Kyoto Protocol set binding targets for greenhouse gas reductions, there has been a rapid increase in interest in emissions trading. This is based on the premise that reduction options may be cheaper in countries such as those of eastern Europe and the developing world, than in others such as the USA and Norway. As long as real emission reductions take place, and given that climate change is a global problem, setting up an emissions trading market should provide a much cheaper option than reductions applied solely at a national level. The real prospects for a viable market, what it will look like, and the deals already taking place are examined. (UK)

  7. Take Five for Customer Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Ax-Fultz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Businesses leverage excellent customer service to improve profitability. Although not profit-driven, libraries should leverage excellent customer service to achieve their unique missions. Evaluating and improving customer service practices will help a library determine if it is successfully serving its customers. The library should review three areas to improve customer service: the physical space of the library, how library employees work with library policies, and the communication skills of the library staff. By using the Take Five model, the library can make immediate, no-cost changes or plan for future improvements by taking just five minutes, every day, to assess specific areas. Over a few weeks or months, these small changes will result in better customer service.

  8. Closed Loop Control of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    were used for this study and were connected via a USB cable to allow communication. The ventilator was modified to allow closed loop control of oxygen...connected via a USB cable to allow communication. The ventilator was modified to allow closed loop control of oxygen based on the oxygen saturation...2017-4119, 28 Aug 2017. oximetry (SpO2) and intermittent arterial blood sampling for arterial oxygen tension (partial pressure of oxygen [PaO2]) and

  9. Oxygen Dependent Biocatalytic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard

    Enzyme catalysts have the potential to improve both the process economics and the environ-mental profile of many oxidation reactions especially in the fine- and specialty-chemical industry, due to their exquisite ability to perform stereo-, regio- and chemo-selective oxida-tions at ambient...... to aldehydes and ketones, oxyfunctionalization of C-H bonds, and epoxidation of C-C double bonds. Although oxygen dependent biocatalysis offers many possibilities, there are numerous chal-lenges to be overcome before an enzyme can be implemented in an industrial process. These challenges requires the combined...... far below their potential maximum catalytic rate at industrially relevant oxygen concentrations. Detailed knowledge of the en-zyme kinetics are therefore required in order to determine the best operating conditions and design oxygen supply to minimize processing costs. This is enabled...

  10. OXYGEN PRESSURE REGULATOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS THROUGH FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios KOSMARAS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen production centers produce oxygen in high pressure that needs to be defused. A regulator is designed and analyzed in the current paper for medical use in oxygen production centers. This study aims to design a new oxygen pressure regulator and perform an analysis using Finite Element Modeling in order to evaluate its working principle. In the design procedure,the main elements and the operating principles of a pressure regulator are taking into account. The regulator is designed and simulations take place in order to assessthe proposed design. Stress analysis results are presented for the main body of the regulator, as well as, flow analysis to determine some important flow characteristics in the inlet and outlet of the regulator.

  11. The interaction of impurity oxygen in silicon with vacancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, A.A.; Babayan, S.A.; Eritsyan, G.N.; Kholodar, G.A.; Melkonyan, R.A.; Vinetskij, V.L.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon specimens irradiated with 50 MeV electrons, containing along with isolated oxygen atoms more complicated oxy-quasi-molecules of SiOsub(n) (n=1,2,3,...) type are investigated. At isochronal and isothermal annealing in the temperature range 300-350 deg C, besides the reaction of vacancy capturing by oxygen atoms with formation of A-centres, there occur more complicated reactions with participation of vacancies, A-centres, oxygen containing quasi-molecules, and a variety of sinks. The kinetics of the processing taking place at irradiation and annealing was studied with respect to the measurement of IR absorption spectra in the region 1-16 μm. A model is suggested to describe the observed processes that differ qualitatively from those taking place in specimens containing completely dissociated oxygen [ru

  12. Oxygen therapy reduces postoperative tachycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausholm, K; Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Concomitant hypoxaemia and tachycardia in the postoperative period is unfavourable for the myocardium. Since hypoxaemia per se may be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperative tachycardia, we have studied the effect of oxygen therapy on tachycardia in 12 patients randomly allocated to blinded...... air or oxygen by facemask on the second or third day after major surgery. Inclusion criteria were arterial hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation 90 beat.min-1). Each patient responded similarly to oxygen therapy: an increase in arterial oxygen saturation and a decrease...... in heart rate (p oxygen has a positive effect on the cardiac oxygen delivery and demand balance....

  13. Redox signaling in acute oxygen sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Gao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute oxygen (O2 sensing is essential for individuals to survive under hypoxic conditions. The carotid body (CB is the main peripheral chemoreceptor, which contains excitable and O2-sensitive glomus cells with O2-regulated ion channels. Upon exposure to acute hypoxia, inhibition of K+ channels is the signal that triggers cell depolarization, transmitter release and activation of sensory fibers that stimulate the brainstem respiratory center to produce hyperventilation. The molecular mechanisms underlying O2 sensing by glomus cells have, however, remained elusive. Here we discuss recent data demonstrating that ablation of mitochondrial Ndufs2 gene selectively abolishes sensitivity of glomus cells to hypoxia, maintaining responsiveness to hypercapnia or hypoglycemia. These data suggest that reactive oxygen species and NADH generated in mitochondrial complex I during hypoxia are signaling molecules that modulate membrane K+ channels. We propose that the structural substrates for acute O2 sensing in CB glomus cells are “O2-sensing microdomains” formed by mitochondria and neighboring K+ channels in the plasma membrane. Keywords: Hypoxia, Acute oxygen sensing, Peripheral chemoreceptors, Carotid body, Adrenal medulla, Mitochondrial complex I, Reactive oxygen species (ROS, Pyridine nucleotides

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.; Hamilton-Farrell, M.R.; Kleij, A.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Background: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is the inhalation of 100% oxygen at a pressure of at least 1.5 atmospheres absolute (150 kPa). It uses oxygen as a drug by dissolving it in the plasma and delivering it to the tissues independent of hemoglobin. For a variety of organ systems, HBO is known to promote new vessel growth into areas with reduced oxygen tension due to poor vascularity, and therewith promotes wound healing and recovery of radiation-injured tissue. Furthermore, tumors may be sensitized to irradiation by raising intratumoral oxygen tensions. Methods: A network of hyperbaric facilities exists in Europe, and a number of clinical studies are ongoing. The intergovernmental framework COST B14 action 'Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy' started in 1999. The main goal of the Working Group Oncology is preparation and actual implementation of prospective study protocols in the field of HBO and radiation oncology in Europe. Results: In this paper a short overview on HBO is given and the following randomized clinical studies are presented: (a) reirradiation of recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after HBO sensitization; (b) role of HBO in enhancing radiosensitivity on glioblastoma multiforme; (c) osseointegration in irradiated patients; adjunctive HBO to prevent implant failures; (d) the role of HBO in the treatment of late irradiation sequelae in the pelvic region. The two radiosensitization protocols (a, b) allow a time interval between HBO and subsequent irradiation of 10-20 min. Conclusion: Recruitment of centers and patients is being strongly encouraged, detailed information is given on www.oxynet.org. (orig.)

  15. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  16. Anaerobic nitrogen turnover by sinking diatom aggregates at varying ambient oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-01-01

    nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular......In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host...

  17. OXYGEN MANAGEMENT DURING ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    MOENNE VARGAS, MARÍA ISABE

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen additions are a common practice in winemaking, as oxygen has a positive effect in fermentative kinetics, biomass synthesis and improvement of color, structure and :flavor in treated wines. However, most oxygen additions are carried out heuristically through pump-over operations solely on a know-how basis, which is difficult to manage in terms of the exact quantity of oxygen transferred to the fermenting must. It is important to estímate the amount of oxygen added because...

  18. Leg oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise is slowed by a marked reduction in oxygen delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter

    2013-01-01

    -extensor exercise (60±3 W) for 4 min in a control setting (CON) and with arterial infusion of L-NMMA and indomethacin in the working leg to reduce blood flow by inhibiting formation of nitric oxide and prostanoids (double blockade; DB). In DB leg blood flow (LBF) and oxygen delivery during the first minute...

  19. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  20. Home Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cold it can hurt your skin. Keep a fire extinguisher close by, and let your fire department know that you have oxygen in your ... any symptoms of illness. Medicare, Medicaid, and Commercial Insurance Certain insurance policies may pay for all your ...

  1. Central oxygen pipeline failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical intensive care unit (ICU), with two patients on full ventilation and ... uncertainty around the cause of the failure and the restoration, .... soon as its level also falls below three tons. Should ... (properly checked and closed prior to each anaesthetic). ... in use at the time of the central oxygen pipeline failure at Tygerberg.

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is not a novel therapy in the true sense of the ... Intention-to-treat analysis showed benefit for ECMO, with a relative risk ... no doubt that VV-ECMO is an advance in medical technology, and that.

  3. Oxygen Extraction from Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable. On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space. This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis (MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon, aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids, water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key

  4. Experimental studies on radiation effects under high pressure oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, E [Osaka Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1974-06-01

    The effect of oxygen tension on the radiosensitivity of tumor cells is well known, but its clinical application for radiotherapy is not yet established. Rabbits with V x 2 carcinoma in the maxilla were irradiated by /sup 60/Co under high pressure oxygen (experimental group), and compared with those treated in air (control group). For the purpose of examining the clinical effects of high pressure oxygen, an experiment was made in vivo. The following items were compared respectively: a) Tumor regression effect b) Tumor clearance rate c) Survival days d) Half size reduction time e) Inhibition of DNA synthesis in the tumor tissue. Results obtained were as follows: a) 56 per cent of animals showed tumor regression in the experimental group, whereas it occured 26 per cent in the control group. b) 53 per cent of animals showed tumor disappearance in the experimental group, while it was observed only in 13 per cent in the control group. c) Only 2 of 30 rabbits irradiated in air survived over 180 days, whereas 11 of 30 rabbits survived meanwhile in the group irradiated under high pressure oxygen. d) About 11 days were necessary to reduce the tumor size by half after irradiation in the group under high pressure oxygen, while it took 17 days in the group treated in normal air. e) DNA synthesis was inhibited more prominently in the group irradiated under high pressure oxygen in normal air.

  5. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, Johanna C.; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J.

    2010-01-01

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2 * -weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  6. Oxygen diffusion in monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Nakamura, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report measurements of oxygen diffusion in natural monazites under both dry, 1-atm conditions and hydrothermal conditions. For dry experiments, 18O-enriched CePO4 powder and monazite crystals were sealed in Ag-Pd capsules with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO) and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, where monazite grains were encapsulated with 18O-enriched water. Following the diffusion anneals, oxygen concentration profiles were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 18O(p,α)15N. Over the temperature range 850-1100 °C, the Arrhenius relation determined for dry diffusion experiments on monazite is given by: Under wet conditions at 100 MPa water pressure, over the temperature range 700-880 °C, oxygen diffusion can be described by the Arrhenius relationship: Oxygen diffusion under hydrothermal conditions has a significantly lower activation energy for diffusion than under dry conditions, as has been found the case for many other minerals, both silicate and nonsilicate. Given these differences in activation energies, the differences between dry and wet diffusion rates increase with lower temperatures; for example, at 600 °C, dry diffusion will be more than 4 orders of magnitude slower than diffusion under hydrothermal conditions. These disparate diffusivities will result in pronounced differences in the degree of retentivity of oxygen isotope signatures. For instance, under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust) and high lower-crustal temperatures (∼800 °C), monazite cores of 70-μm radii will preserve O isotope ratios for about 500,000 years; by comparison, they would be retained at this temperature under wet conditions for about 15,000 years.

  7. Effects of motexafin gadolinium on tumor oxygenation and cellular oxygen consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, E.T.; Liu, Y.; Rockwell, S.; Magda, D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Recent work in our laboratory showed that motexafin gadolinium (MGd, Xcytrin), a drug currently in Phase III clinical trials as an adjuvant to radiation therapy, modulates the oxygen tensions in EMT6 tumors. The median pO 2 increased from the control value of 1.5±0.4 mmHg to 7.4 ± 3.8 mmHg six hours after treatment with 40 μmol/kg MGd and the percentage of severely hypoxic readings in the tumors ( 7 plateau phase EMT6 cells in 3 mL Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium supplemented with 10% dialyzed fetal bovine serum, which contains no ascorbic acid. In the absence of ascorbic acid, 100 μM MGd did not alter the cellular oxygen consumption rate for EMT6 cells significantly. Marked inhibition of cellular oxygen consumption was observed when cells were incubated with 100 μM MGd in medium supplemented with equimolar ascorbic acid (a 31.5% decrease in consumption was observed after 6 hours of treatment). The 5% mannitol vehicle solution with equimolar ascorbic acid had no discernible effect on cellular oxygen consumption. Ascorbic acid may facilitate cellular uptake of MGd via the intermediate formation of a MGd-oxalate complex. These studies suggest that changes in cellular oxygen consumption could contribute to the changes in tumor oxygenation seen after administration of MGd. These experiments were supported by Pharmacyclics and training grant T32CA09085 from the NIH (E.T.D.). We thank Dr. Raymond Russell for allowing us to use his oxygen electrode apparatus

  8. Effect of oxygen on the photopolymerization of a mixture of two dimethacrylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramis, X. [Laboratori de Termodinamica, Departament de Maquines i Motors Termics, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Morancho, J.M. [Laboratori de Termodinamica, Departament de Maquines i Motors Termics, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: morancho@mmt.upc.edu; Cadenato, A.; Salla, J.M.; Fernandez-Francos, X. [Laboratori de Termodinamica, Departament de Maquines i Motors Termics, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-10-25

    In this work we study the influence of the presence of oxygen in the photocuring of a system obtained by mixing two dimethacrylates. Using an isoconversional method we have found the kinetic parameters with different atmospheres: nitrogen, air and oxygen. The inhibition effect of oxygen has been compensated by adding a greater proportion of initiator and increasing the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation. We have seen that the latter had more influence.

  9. Effect of oxygen on the photopolymerization of a mixture of two dimethacrylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramis, X.; Morancho, J.M.; Cadenato, A.; Salla, J.M.; Fernandez-Francos, X.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we study the influence of the presence of oxygen in the photocuring of a system obtained by mixing two dimethacrylates. Using an isoconversional method we have found the kinetic parameters with different atmospheres: nitrogen, air and oxygen. The inhibition effect of oxygen has been compensated by adding a greater proportion of initiator and increasing the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation. We have seen that the latter had more influence

  10. The art of history taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieger, N; Goldblatt, L

    1978-02-01

    The art of history taking involves the ability to recognize the interrelationship between the details of the medical history and the patient's personal history. For the oral surgeon, this provides important insights into how the patient has reacted to illness in the past as well as how he is most likely to react to current treatment. Specific problems have been reviewed as well as suggested interview techniques to guide the oral surgeon in his management of his patient's reactions. No one expects the doctor to be an iconoclast. He cannot be all things to all patients. He should recognize a problem, acknowledge it as a problem, and be flexible enough to deal with it or refer the patient to someone who can. This kind of understanding will enable the oral surgeon to fulfill his role with appreciation from his patients and an inner sense of professional and personal achievement.

  11. Take Control of PDFpen 5

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    After a whirlwind history and overview of PDF, you'll take a tour through PDFpen's tools and navigation. With those basics taken care of, you'll learn how to: Scan a document to PDF and make the text editable with OCRCombine pages from multiple files into a single PDFTurn a Web site into a multi-page PDFAdd or remove pages from a PDFAdd a hand-written signature to a PDFAdd page and URL links to a PDFMake a clickable table of contents for a PDFUse professional editing marks on a PDFEdit text within a PDF that was received in emailLeave comments on a PDF documentRemove sensitive or confidential

  12. Taking the Copenhagen Process apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cort, Pia

    that the Copenhagen Process has legitimately extended vocational education and training policy formation to include the EU and its new institutional settings established through the Open Method of Coordination. Furthermore, vocational education and training is being reconfigured within a neoliberal Lifelong Learning......The aim of this thesis is to analyse the EU vocational education and training policy process (The Copenhagen Process) from a critical perspective based on the policy analysis methodology, “What’s the Problem Represented to Be?” (WPR) developed by Professor Carol Bacchi. The main research question...... “How can the European vocational education and training policy process - the Copenhagen Process - be understood from a WPR perspective? “ is addressed in six articles which take apart the Copenhagen Process and deal with specific WPR questions and specific aspects of the Copenhagen Process...

  13. The Politics of Takings Clauses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Versteeg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2177-7055.2015v36n71p43 A long-standing consensus exists that the arbitrary or excessive expropriation of private property by a country hurts its economic growth. Although constitutions can play an important role in protecting private property, remarkably little is known about how they actually restrict the power of eminent domain and whether such restrictions are associated with reduced de facto expropriation risks. The main finding of this essay is that no observable relationship exists between de jure constitutional restrictions on the power of eminent domain and de facto expropriation risks. This finding suggests that the effectiveness of takings clauses might depend on the politics surrounding their adoption.

  14. Sampling vs. taking some - 59349

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois-Bongarcon, D.

    2012-01-01

    Collecting a sample is a delicate task that is Not naively equivalent to simply 'taking some of the material'. The question examined is: 'What is it exactly?' The problem of sampling in general, and for nuclear decontamination in particular, is properly defined. A theory is presented (Gy's Theory of Sampling, a.k.a. TOS) that brings all the answers and allows us to put them to work. The author draws form his lifelong experience in research, teaching and practical applications in this domain to emphasize the critical odds (i.e. risks) of not taking sampling explicitly into account when assessing grades and concentrations. The evolution of the acceptance of this theory in the nuclear industry is finally illustrated, and a hopeful glimpse into the future concludes the presentation. Equally interesting, however, besides what has already been achieved at the CEA along these years, is the realization of what could not be done with TOS, and therefore had to be treated in some other ways - e.g. using mapping tools (geostatistical). It is one the great side-advantages of using a consistent theory that it warns you, before it is too late, that what you are trying to do will not work: TOS, indeed, much like its Geo-statistics sister, besides preventing many a disaster, can provide pragmatic lessons in scientific humility that are best not being left ignored. In conclusion, there are great tools out there, such as TOS, that are well worth investing into, and that our community should be much more attuned to. (author)

  15. Density functional theory investigation of oxygen interaction with boron-doped graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang, E-mail: txliang@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [Advanced Material Laboratory, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of oxygen with boron-doped graphite. • Adsorption and diffusion of oxygen atoms on boron doped graphite surfaces are studied. • Recombination of oxygen is investigated by ER and LH mechanisms. • Low boron concentration facilitates O{sub 2} formation while high boron loading inhibits the recombination. • The presence of B−B bonds due to boron accumulation makes it impossible for oxygen recombination. - Abstract: Boron inserted as impurity by substitution of carbon atoms in graphite is known to change (improve or deteriorate) oxidation resistance of nuclear graphite, but the reason for both catalytic and inhibiting oxidation is still uncertain. As a first step, this work is more specially devoted to the adsorption and diffusion of oxygen atoms on the surface and related to the problem of oxygen retention on the pure and boron-containing graphite surfaces. Adsorption energies and energy barriers associated to the diffusion for molecular oxygen recombination are calculated in the density functional theory framework. The existence of boron modifies the electronic structure of the surface, which results in an increase of the adsorption energy for O. However, low boron loading makes it easier for the recombination into molecular oxygen. For high boron concentration, it induces a better O retention capability in graphite because the presence of B-B bonds decreases recombination of the adsorbed oxygen atoms. A possible explanation for both catalytic and inhibiting effects of boron in graphite is proposed.

  16. Strategy modulates spatial perspective-taking: evidence for dissociable disembodied and embodied routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Mark R.; Brazier, Mark; Edmonds, Caroline J.; Gronholm, Petra C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research provides evidence for a dissociable embodied route to spatial perspective-taking that is under strategic control. The present experiment investigated further the influence of strategy on spatial perspective-taking by assessing whether participants may also elect to employ a separable “disembodied” route loading on inhibitory control mechanisms. Participants (N = 92) undertook both the “own body transformation” (OBT) perspective-taking task, requiring speeded spatial judgments made from the perspective of an observed figure, and a control task measuring ability to inhibit spatially compatible responses in the absence of a figure. Perspective-taking performance was found to be related to performance on the response inhibition control task, in that participants who tended to take longer to adopt a new perspective also tended to show a greater elevation in response times when inhibiting spatially compatible responses. This relationship was restricted to those participants reporting that they adopted the perspective of another by reversing left and right whenever confronted with a front-view figure; it was absent in those participants who reported perspective-taking by mentally transforming their spatial orientation to align with that of the figure. Combined with previously published results, these findings complete a double dissociation between embodied and disembodied routes to spatial perspective-taking, implying that spatial perspective-taking is subject to modulation by strategy, and suggesting that embodied routes to perspective-taking may place minimal demands on domain general executive functions. PMID:23964229

  17. Study of inhibition on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Yiming

    2006-03-01

    It was studied that the effect factors of irradiation dose, preservation temperature, oxygen content and antioxidant on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork. A mechanism was explained on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork. The results showed that irradiation might aggravate lipid oxidation of pork and that decreased preservation temperature and oxygen content of the packaging, added antioxidant also could effectively inhibit lipid oxidation of irradiated pork. (authors)

  18. INHIBITION IN SPEAKING PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Humaera, Isna

    2015-01-01

    The most common problem encountered by the learner in the languageacquisition process is learner inhibition. Inhibition refers to a temperamentaltendency to display wariness, fearfulness, or restrain in response tounfamiliar people, objects, and situations. There are some factors that causeinhibition, such as lack of motivation, shyness, self-confidence, self-esteem,and language ego. There are also levels of inhibition, it refers to kinds ofinhibition and caused of inhibition itself. Teacher ...

  19. Origin of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard; Dupuy, Jacques; Guerin de Montgareuil, Pierre

    From the comparison of isotopic exchange kinetics between C 18 O 2 and the water of algae suspensions or aerial leaves subjected to alternating darkness and light, it becomes possible to calculate the isotopic abundance of the CO 2 involved in the photochemical process; this value has been compared to those of the intracellular water and of the evolved O 2 . Kinetics of the appearance of 18 O in the oxygen produced by algae suspended in enriched water are also presented [fr

  20. Changing beliefs and behavior through experience-taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Geoff F; Libby, Lisa K

    2012-07-01

    The present research introduces the concept of experience-taking-the imaginative process of spontaneously assuming the identity of a character in a narrative and simulating that character's thoughts, emotions, behaviors, goals, and traits as if they were one's own. Six studies investigated the degree to which particular psychological states and features of narratives cause individuals, without instruction, to engage in experience-taking and investigated how the merger between self and other that occurs during experience-taking produces changes in self-judgments, attitudes, and behavior that align with the character's. Results from Studies 1-3 showed that being in a reduced state of self-concept accessibility while reading a brief fictional work increased-and being in a heightened state of self-concept accessibility decreased-participants' levels of experience-taking and subsequent incorporation of a character's personality trait into their self-concepts. Study 4 revealed that a first-person narrative depicting an ingroup character elicited the highest levels of experience-taking and produced the greatest change in participants' behavior, compared with versions of the narrative written in 3rd-person voice and/or depicting an outgroup protagonist. The final 2 studies demonstrated that whereas revealing a character's outgroup membership as a homosexual or African American early in a narrative inhibited experience-taking, delaying the revelation of the character's outgroup identity until later in the story produced higher levels of experience-taking, lower levels of stereotype application in participants' evaluation of the character, and more favorable attitudes toward the character's group. The implications of these findings in relation to perspective-taking, self-other overlap, and prime-to-behavior effects are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Oxygen injection facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masamoto; Hirose, Yuki

    1998-01-01

    A compressor introduces air as a starting material and sends it to a dust removing device, a dehumidifying device and an adsorption/separation system disposed downstream. The facility of the present invention is disposed in the vicinity of an injection point and installed in a turbine building of a BWR type reactor having a pipeline of a feedwater system to be injected. The adsorbing/separation system comprises an adsorbing vessel and an automatic valve, and the adsorbing vessel is filled with an adsorbent for selectively adsorbing nitrogen. Zeolite is used as the adsorbent. Nitrogen in the air passing through the adsorbing vessel is adsorbed and removed under a pressurized condition, and a highly concentrated oxygen gas is formed. The direction of the steam of the adsorbed nitrogen is changed by an opening/closing switching operation of an automatic valve and released to the atmosphere (the pressure is released). Generated oxygen gas is stored under pressure in a tank, and injected to the pipeline of the feedwater system by an oxygen injection conduit by way of a flow rate control valve. In the adsorbing vessel, steps of adsorption, separation and storage under pressure are repeated successively. (I.N.)

  2. ITM oxygen for gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.A.; Foster, E.P. [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Gunardson, H.H. [Air Products Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    This paper described a newly developed air separation technology called Ionic Transport Membrane (ITM), which reduces the overall cost of the gasification process. The technology is well suited for advanced energy conversion processes such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) that require oxygen and use heavy carbonaceous feedstocks such as residual oils, bitumens, coke and coal. It is also well suited for traditional industrial applications for oxygen and distributed power. Air Products Canada Limited developed the ceramic membrane air separation technology that can reduce the cost of pure oxygen by more than 30 per cent. The separation technology achieves a capital cost reduction of 30 per cent and an energy reduction of 35 per cent over conventional cryogenic air separation. ITM is an electrochemical process that integrates well with the gasification process and an IGCC option for producing electricity from the waste heat generated from gasification. This paper described the integration of ITM technology with both the gasification and IGCC processes and showed the attractive economics of ITM. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  3. Take care of your mouse!

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2011-01-01

    “Stop --- Think --- Click" is the basic recommendation for securely browsing the Internet and for securely reading e-mails. Users who have followed this recommendation in the past were less likely to have their computer infected or their computing account compromised. We would like to thank all those who donated their mouse to the CERN Animal Shelter for Computer Mice (http://cern.ch/c-a-s). For those who still use a mouse, please stay vigilant and  alert: do not click on links whose origin you do not trust or which look like gibberish. Do not install untrusted software or plug-ins, since software from untrusted sources may infect or compromise your computer, or violate copyrights. Finally, take particular care with e-mails: Do not open unexpected or suspicious e-mails or attachments. Delete them if they do not concern you or if they appear strange. If in doubt, or if you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Computer.Security@cern.ch

  4. Taking SESAME to the classroom

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 High School Teacher Programme (HST) is well under way, and this year it has a distinct Middle Eastern flavour, with eight teachers from the region among the 54 taking part.   Established in the late 1990s, HST is a three-week residential programme in English designed to give teachers a taste of frontier research and promote the teaching of modern physics in high schools. Along with the more than 30 other teacher schools given in the native language of the participants, HST aims to help teachers bring modern physics to the classroom and motivate their students to study science at upper secondary school and university. As part of the HST programme, teachers form working groups to develop lessons based on CERN science. This year, however, with eight teachers coming from Israel, Palestine, Iran and Jordan, all of which are members of SESAME, the international laboratory for Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science Applications in the Middle East, one group is working on a dif...

  5. Procedure for taking physical inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This session is intended to apprise one of the various aspects of procedures and routines that Exxon Nuclear uses with respect to its nuclear materials physical inventory program. The presentation describes how plant physical inventories are planned and taken. The description includes the planning and preparation for taking the inventory, the clean-out procedures for converting in-process material to measurable items, the administrative procedures for establishing independent inventory teams and for inventorying each inventory area, the verification procedures used to include previously measured tamper-safed items in the inventory, and lastly, procedures used to reconcile the inventory and calculate MUF (materials unaccounted for). The purpose of the session is to enable participants to: (1) understand the planning and pre-inventorty procedures and their importance; (2) understand the need for and the required intensity of clean-out procedures; (3) understand how inventory teams are formed, and how the inventory is conducted; (4) understand the distinction between inventory previously measured tamper-safed items and other materials not so characterized; (5) understand the reconciliation procedures; and (6) calculate a MUF given the book and inventory results

  6. Theoretical basis of oxygen pressure control in liquid Pb-Bi using YSZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S. H.; Hwang, I. S.; Park, B. K.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a liquid Pb-Bi cooled reactor, it is necessary to solve the structural material corrosion problem caused by Pb-Bi. This experiment examine the fundamental behaviors to practically test the oxide film formation on the surface of structural material known as solution of corrosion inhibition in liquid Pb-Bi. The corrosion inhibition through oxide film formation is to prevent metals from dissolving into liquid Pb-Bi though not forming coolants slug resulted from oxidation. In this paper, we examined the oxygen pressure controllability using YSZ in cover gas, and theoretically derived the relationship between oxygen cover gas pressure and dissolved oxygen in liquid Pb-Bi

  7. Taking Europe To The Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    orbits surveying areas of the moon's surface rarely documented in previous missions. The data now being received back from Prospector strongly suggests the presence of the suspected volatiles (water ice?). Understandably the presence of billions-of-years-old frozen water in proximity to Euromoon's planned landing site would provide a tremendous boost for the implementation of the EuroMoon project now in its 10th month of study. The in-situ analysis of such rare substances will provide an invaluable scientific window back in time (the Moon is believed to have been formed over 3.5 billion years ago from elements of the earth's mantel). The water's constituent elements of hydrogen and oxygen have also the possibility of offering an essentially free supply of rocket propellant and oxygen for exploitation during future activities. EuroMoon is the only mission being studied that can investigate this ice in-situ, while the US satellite will remain in a orbit. The mission is particularly challenging because of the required landing precision (within 100 m2) in terrain varying between +6 km and -5 km in altitude. Achieving the required pinpoint touchdown capability would allow the future exploitation of other interesting sites. One such site is the 6 km-high Malapert Mountain, 120 km from the pole from which the Earth can always be seen thus allowing continuous communications with the home planet for any future outpost in the region. The 'Peak of Eternal Light' (described above) is in direct view of Malapert, the twin peaks offer the tantalising possibility of both of uninterrupted power and communications. Euromoon can be seen as be the initial step in founding the first extraterrestrial outpost, founding the infrastructure for a 'robotic village' controlled by a 'virtual community' of Earth-based operators using telescience. This would indeed mark the beginning of an expansion of the human domain beyond Earth without the risk or cost of manned space travel. This concept also

  8. Oxygen diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    1997-05-01

    Oxygen diffusion in natural, non-metamict zircon was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions at temperatures ranging from 765°C to 1500°C. Dry experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure by encapsulating polished zircon samples with a fine powder of 18O-enriched quartz and annealing the sealed capsules in air. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels (7-70 MPa) or a piston cylinder apparatus (400-1000 MPa) on zircon samples encapsulated with both 18O-enriched quartz and 18O water. Diffusive-uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all samples with a particle accelerator, using the 18O(p, α) 15N reaction. For dry experimental conditions at 1100-1500°C, the resulting oxygen diffusivities (24 in all) are well described by: D dry (m 2/s) = 1.33 × 10 -4exp(-53920/T) There is no suggestion of diffusive anisotropy. Under wet conditions at 925°C, oxygen diffusion shows little or no dependence upon P H 2O in the range 7-1000 MPa, and is insensitive to total pressure as well. The results of 27 wet experiments at 767-1160°C and 7-1000 MPa can be described a single Arrhenius relationship: D wet (m 2/s) = 5.5 × 10 -12exp(-25280/T) The insensitivity of oxygen diffusion to P H 2O means that applications to geologic problems can be pursued knowing only whether the system of interest was 'wet' (i.e., P H 2O > 7MPa ) or 'dry'. Under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust), zircons are extremely retentive of their oxygen isotopic signatures, to the extent that δ 18O would be perturbed at the center of a 200 μm zircon only during an extraordinarily hot and protracted event (e.g., 65 Ma at 900°C). Under wet conditions, δ 18O may or may not be retained in the central regions of individual crystals, cores or overgrowth rims, depending upon the specific thermal history of the system.

  9. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  10. Theory of oxygen isotope exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, M.W.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Transients for oxygen molecular mass numbers 32, 34 and 36 are derived which can be used for the interpretation of oxygen isotope exchange data based on measurement of concentrations of 16O2, 16O18O and 18O2 in the gas phase. Key parameters in the theory are the rate at which oxygen molecules are

  11. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  12. A distributed chemosensory circuit for oxygen preference in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy J Chang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has complex, naturally variable behavioral responses to environmental oxygen, food, and other animals. C. elegans detects oxygen through soluble guanylate cyclase homologs (sGCs and responds to it differently depending on the activity of the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1: npr-1(lf and naturally isolated npr-1(215F animals avoid high oxygen and aggregate in the presence of food; npr-1(215V animals do not. We show here that hyperoxia avoidance integrates food with npr-1 activity through neuromodulation of a distributed oxygen-sensing network. Hyperoxia avoidance is stimulated by sGC-expressing oxygen-sensing neurons, nociceptive neurons, and ADF sensory neurons. In npr-1(215V animals, the switch from weak aerotaxis on food to strong aerotaxis in its absence requires close regulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the ADF neurons; high levels of ADF serotonin promote hyperoxia avoidance. In npr-1(lf animals, food regulation is masked by increased activity of the oxygen-sensing neurons. Hyperoxia avoidance is also regulated by the neuronal TGF-beta homolog DAF-7, a secreted mediator of crowding and stress responses. DAF-7 inhibits serotonin synthesis in ADF, suggesting that ADF serotonin is a convergence point for regulation of hyperoxia avoidance. Coalitions of neurons that promote and repress hyperoxia avoidance generate a subtle and flexible response to environmental oxygen.

  13. Activation pathways taking place at molecular copper precatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, C.J.M.; Işık, F.; Verhoeven, T.W.G.M.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Hetterscheid, D.G.H.

    2017-01-01

    The activation processes of [CuII(bdmpza)2] in the water oxidation reaction were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Two different paths wherein CuO is formed were distinguished. [CuII(bdmpza)2] can be oxidized at high potentials to form CuO, which was observed by a slight

  14. Effect of selective blockade of oxygen consumption, glucose transport, and Ca2+ influx on thyroxine action in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of selective blockade of cellular glucose transporters, Ca2+ influx, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption on thyroxine (T4)-stimulated oxygen consumption and glucose uptake was examined in human mononuclear blood cells. Blockade of glucose transporters by cytochalasin B (1 x 10(-5) mol....../L) and of Ca2+ influx by alprenolol (1 x 10(-5) mol/L) and verapamil (4 x 10(-4) mol/L) inhibited T4-activated glucose uptaken and reduced T4-stimulated oxygen consumption by 20%. Uncoupling of mitochondrial oxygen consumption by azide (1 x 10(-3) mol/L) inhibited T4-stimulated oxygen consumption, but had...... no effect on glucose uptake. We conclude that T4-stimulated glucose uptake in human mononuclear blood cells is dependent on intact glucose transporters and Ca2+ influx, but not on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. However, oxygen consumption is, in part, dependent on intact glucose uptake....

  15. Predicting risk-taking behavior from prefrontal resting-state activity and personality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Studer

    Full Text Available Risk-taking is subject to considerable individual differences. In the current study, we tested whether resting-state activity in the prefrontal cortex and trait sensitivity to reward and punishment can help predict risk-taking behavior. Prefrontal activity at rest was assessed in seventy healthy volunteers using electroencephalography, and compared to their choice behavior on an economic risk-taking task. The Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale was used to measure participants' trait sensitivity to reward and punishment. Our results confirmed both prefrontal resting-state activity and personality traits as sources of individual differences in risk-taking behavior. Right-left asymmetry in prefrontal activity and scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale, reflecting trait sensitivity to punishment, were correlated with the level of risk-taking on the task. We further discovered that scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale modulated the relationship between asymmetry in prefrontal resting-state activity and risk-taking. The results of this study demonstrate that heterogeneity in risk-taking behavior can be traced back to differences in the basic physiology of decision-makers' brains, and suggest that baseline prefrontal activity and personality traits might interplay in guiding risk-taking behavior.

  16. Predicting Risk-Taking Behavior from Prefrontal Resting-State Activity and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Bettina; Pedroni, Andreas; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Risk-taking is subject to considerable individual differences. In the current study, we tested whether resting-state activity in the prefrontal cortex and trait sensitivity to reward and punishment can help predict risk-taking behavior. Prefrontal activity at rest was assessed in seventy healthy volunteers using electroencephalography, and compared to their choice behavior on an economic risk-taking task. The Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale was used to measure participants’ trait sensitivity to reward and punishment. Our results confirmed both prefrontal resting-state activity and personality traits as sources of individual differences in risk-taking behavior. Right-left asymmetry in prefrontal activity and scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale, reflecting trait sensitivity to punishment, were correlated with the level of risk-taking on the task. We further discovered that scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale modulated the relationship between asymmetry in prefrontal resting-state activity and risk-taking. The results of this study demonstrate that heterogeneity in risk-taking behavior can be traced back to differences in the basic physiology of decision-makers’ brains, and suggest that baseline prefrontal activity and personality traits might interplay in guiding risk-taking behavior. PMID:24116176

  17. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  18. Patient's perspectives on hyperbaric oxygen treatment of osteoradionecrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Anne; Forner, L.; Jansen, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication to radiation therapy for head and neck cancer with a prevalence of 5-7% among radiated patients. Treatment might include dental surgery and reconstruction of the jawbone as well as hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT). HBOT takes place in a closed...

  19. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  1. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  2. Sterilization by oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Adir Jose; Mansano, Ronaldo Domingues; Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus; Ruas, Ronaldo; Silva Zambon, Luis da; Silva, Monica Valero da; Verdonck, Patrick Bernard

    2004-07-31

    The use of polymeric medical devices has stimulated the development of new sterilization methods. The traditional techniques rely on ethylene oxide, but there are many questions concerning the carcinogenic properties of the ethylene oxide residues adsorbed on the materials after processing. Another common technique is the gamma irradiation process, but it is costly, its safe operation requires an isolated site and it also affects the bulk properties of the polymers. The use of a gas plasma is an elegant alternative sterilization technique. The plasma promotes an efficient inactivation of the micro-organisms, minimises the damage to the materials and presents very little danger for personnel and the environment. Pure oxygen reactive ion etching type of plasmas were applied to inactivate a biologic indicator, the Bacillus stearothermophilus, to confirm the efficiency of this process. The sterilization processes took a short time, in a few minutes the mortality was complete. In situ analysis of the micro-organisms' inactivating time was possible using emission spectrophotometry. The increase in the intensity of the 777.5 nm oxygen line shows the end of the oxidation of the biologic materials. The results were also observed and corroborated by scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Oxygen Switching of the Epitaxial Graphene-Metal Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Ulstrup, Søren; Lacovig, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    as on clean Ir(111), giving only a slightly higher oxygen coverage. Upon lifting, the C 1s signal shows a downshift in binding energy, due to the charge transfer to graphene from the oxygen-covered metal surface. Moreover, the characteristic spectral signatures of the graphenesubstrate interaction...... in the valence band are removed, and the spectrum of strongly hole-doped, quasi free-standing graphene with a single Dirac cone around the K point is observed. The oxygen can be deintercalated by annealing, and this process takes place at around T = 600 K, in a rather abrupt way. A small amount of carbon atoms...... demonstrate that oxygen intercalation is an efficient method for fully decoupling an extended layer of graphene from a metal substrate, such as Ir(111). They pave the way for the fundamental research on graphene, where extended, ordered layers of free-standing graphene are important and, due to the stability...

  4. The significance of oxygen during contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Eric B

    2014-12-01

    In order to establish the relevance of oxygen to contemporary contact lens practice, a review of the literature was conducted. The results indicate that there are a number of processes occurring in the normal healthy eye where oxygen is required and which are potentially affected by the presence of a contact lens. These activities appear to take place at all corneal levels, as well as at the limbus. Evidence from laboratory, clinical and modelling studies indicates that what constitutes normal oxygenation (normoxia) depends on, among other things, the physiological system under consideration, corneal location and the state of eye closure. This diversity is reflected in the wide range of minimum lens oxygen transmissibility (Dk/t) requirements that are present in a literature. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The oxygen in the track hypothesis: microdosimetric implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.F.; Burns, W.G.; May, R.

    1978-01-01

    We have applied diffusion kinetics to a simple competition between self-repair, self-fixation and reaction with oxygen to model the LET dependence of the OER in two cellular organisms, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydomonas reinhardii, using track yields of oxygen suggested by the experiments with metal ions, and obtain good agreement with the data of Alper and Bryant (1974). The calculations suggest that the reaction with track oxygen is almost complete before that with added oxygen begins, and they provide an order-of-magnitude estimate for the G value of initial lesions. We conclude that the dependence of OER on LET is not directly linked to microdosimetric considerations and that the processes which determine RBE take place before intra-track reactions

  6. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2005-09-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in

  7. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bacterial balance, it may cause stomach upsets, diarrhea, vaginal infections, or other problems. If you take antibiotics unnecessarily ... before taking antibiotics? Antibiotics often lead to a vaginal yeast infection. Because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the ...

  8. Oxygen effect and intracellular oxygen content (adaptation hypothesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmonenko, S P; Ehpshtejn, I M [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Tsentr

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data indicating that a radiomodifying action of hypoxia is dependent on the ''prehistory'' of the irradiated object are considered. This dependence manifests itself in a decreased protective action of acute hypoxia on the hypoxia-adapted objects. To explain this a hypothesis is proposed connecting a degree of cell radiosensitivity modification, determined by the oxygen effect, with the intracellular oxygen content. The latter, in accord with current ideas, is regulated by variations in the diffusion resistance to oxygen shown by the cytoplasmic membranes depending on the energy level of the cell and the degree of its oxygenation.

  9. Oxygen effect and intracellular oxygen content (adaptation hypothesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmonenko, S.P.; Ehpshtejn, I.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data indicating that a radiomodifying action of hypoxia is dependent on the ''prehistory'' of the irradiated object are considered. This dependence manifests itself in a decreased protective action of acute hypoxia on the hypoxia-adapted objects. To explain this a hypothesis is proposed connecting a degree of cell radiosensitivity modification, determined by the oxygen effect, with the intracellular oxygen content. The latter, in accord with current ideas, is regulated by variations in the diffusion resistance to oxygen shown by the cytoplasmic membranes depending on the energy level of the cell and the degree of its oxygenation

  10. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  11. Working group written presentation: Atomic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, L.J.; Visentine, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier Shuttle flight experiments have shown NASA and SDIO spacecraft designed for operation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) must take into consideration the highly oxidative characteristics of the ambient flight environment. Materials most adversely affected by atomic oxygen interactions include organic films, advanced (carbon-based) composites, thermal control coatings, organic-based paints, optical coatings, and thermal control blankets commonly used in spacecraft applications. Earlier results of NASA flight experiments have shown prolonged exposure of sensitive spacecraft materials to the LEO environment will result in degraded systems performance or, more importantly, lead to requirements for excessive on-orbit maintenance, with both conditions contributing significantly to increased mission costs and reduced mission objectives. Flight data obtained from previous Space Shuttle missions and results of the Solar Max recovery mission are limited in terms of atomic oxygen exposure and accuracy of fluence estimates. The results of laboratory studies to investigate the long-term (15 to 30 yrs) effects of AO exposure on spacecraft surfaces are only recently available, and qualitative correlations of laboratory results with flight results have been obtained for only a limited number of materials. The working group recommended the most promising ground-based laboratories now under development be made operational as soon as possible to study the full-life effects of atomic oxygen exposure on spacecraft systems

  12. Oxygen Reduction on Platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesselberger, Markus

    . The influence of the ion adsorption strength, which is observed in the “particle size studies” on the oxygen reduction rate on Pt/C catalysts, is further investigated under similar reaction conditions by infrared spectroscopy. The designed in situ electrochemical ATR-FTIR setup features a high level...... of instrument automation and online data treatment, and provides welldefined mass transport conditions enabling kinetic measurements. A modified electrochemical / spectroscopic interface is presented allowing the exclusive investigation of the Pt/C catalyst layer. Three types of potential dependent adsorption...... adsorption on Pt does not block the ORR directly. Instead, the onset of oxide formation with the concomitant conversion of the anion adsorbate layer is the decisive blocking mechanism....

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Dostert, Catherine; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    T cells are a central component of defenses against pathogens and tumors. Their effector functions are sustained by specific metabolic changes that occur upon activation, and these have been the focus of renewed interest. Energy production inevitably generates unwanted products, namely reactive...... and transcription factors, influencing the outcome of the T cell response. We discuss here how ROS can directly fine-tune metabolism and effector functions of T cells....... oxygen species (ROS), which have long been known to trigger cell death. However, there is now evidence that ROS also act as intracellular signaling molecules both in steady-state and upon antigen recognition. The levels and localization of ROS contribute to the redox modeling of effector proteins...

  14. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  15. Large arteriolar component of oxygen delivery implies a safe margin of oxygen supply to cerebral tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakadžić, Sava; Mandeville, Emiri T; Gagnon, Louis; Musacchia, Joseph J; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Yucel, Meryem A; Lefebvre, Joel; Lesage, Frédéric; Dale, Anders M; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Lo, Eng H; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A

    2014-12-08

    What is the organization of cerebral microvascular oxygenation and morphology that allows adequate tissue oxygenation at different activity levels? We address this question in the mouse cerebral cortex using microscopic imaging of intravascular O2 partial pressure and blood flow combined with numerical modelling. Here we show that parenchymal arterioles are responsible for 50% of the extracted O2 at baseline activity, and the majority of the remaining O2 exchange takes place within the first few capillary branches. Most capillaries release little O2 at baseline acting as an O2 reserve that is recruited during increased neuronal activity or decreased blood flow. Our results challenge the common perception that capillaries are the major site of O2 delivery to cerebral tissue. The understanding of oxygenation distribution along arterio-capillary paths may have profound implications for the interpretation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging and for evaluating microvascular O2 delivery capacity to support cerebral tissue in disease.

  16. Mitochondrial Respiration and Oxygen Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel S; Meitha, Karlia; Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of respiration and oxygen tension in plant organs allow a precise understanding of mitochondrial capacity and function within the context of cellular oxygen metabolism. Here we describe methods that can be routinely used for the isolation of intact mitochondria, and the determination of respiratory electron transport, together with techniques for in vivo determination of oxygen tension and measurement of respiration by both CO 2 production and O 2 consumption that enables calculation of the respiratory quotient [CO 2 ]/[O 2 ].

  17. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  18. Oxygen potentials of transuranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruyoshi Otobe; Mituso Akabori; Arai Yasuo; Kazuo Minato

    2008-01-01

    The oxygen potentials of pyrochlore-type Pu 2 Zr 2 O 7+y , fluorite-type (Pu 0.5 Zr 0.5 )O 2-x and AmO 2-x have been measured by the electromotive force (EMF) method with a zirconia solid-electrolyte. The oxygen potentials of these oxides were reviewed. The phase relations, microstructure, equilibrium state of these oxides were discussed, referring to the isothermal curve of the oxygen potentials. (authors)

  19. Integration of oxygen membranes for oxygen production in cement plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Søgaard, Martin; Hjuler, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes the integration of oxygen membranes in cement plants both from an energy, exergy and economic point of view. Different configurations for oxygen enrichment of the tertiary air for combustion in the pre-calciner and full oxy-fuel combustion in both pre-calciner and kiln...

  20. Limitations of potentiometric oxygen sensors operating at low oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders; Jacobsen, Torben; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical processes that limit the range of oxygen partial pressures in which potentiometric oxygen sensors can be used, were analysed using a theoretical and an experimental approach. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was performed on porous Pt/yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ......) electrodes between 10−6 and 0.2 bar and at temperatures between 500 and 950 °C. The flow of oxide ions and electron holes through a sensor cell, with a YSZ electrolyte, were calculated under similar conditions. The oxygen permeation of the sensor cell was insignificant at an oxygen partial pressure of 10......−6 bar for an inlet flow rate higher than 2 L h−1 between 600 and 800 °C. The polarisation resistance measured between 10−6 and 10−4 bar was found to be inversely proportional to the oxygen partial pressure, nearly temperature independent and inversely proportional to the inlet gas flow rate, which shows...

  1. Oxygen consumption by hydrazine in long sample lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Lisheng; Turner, Carl-W.

    2012-09-01

    In nuclear power plants secondary side system dissolved oxygen concentration is a strictly controlled chemistry parameter intended to minimize corrosion and fouling of steam cycle components. Low dissolved oxygen concentration is maintained by a combination of mechanical de-aeration and chemical reaction. The dissolved oxygen concentration in feedwater is monitored by sampling systems to ensure it remains within station specification during operation. The sample lines in a nuclear power plant's sampling system can be from 5 to nearly 200 meters in length, resulting in sample residence times between the take-off point to the analyzer from a few seconds to several minutes, depending on the flow rate and the length of the sample line. For many chemical parameters the residence time is of no concern. For measurements of dissolved oxygen and hydrazine in the secondary coolant, however, for residence times longer than one minute, it is uncertain whether the sample is representative of conditions in the secondary coolant, especially for samples taken from locations where the temperature is well over 100 deg. C. To address this concern, a series of tests were conducted under both warm-up and power operation conditions, respectively, to investigate the effect of temperature, residence time, sample line length, surface area, hydrazine-to-oxygen ratio, and the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and hydrazine on the consumption of oxygen by hydrazine. The test results revealed that dissolved oxygen measurements in CANDU plants are underestimated to various degrees, depending on the sampling system operating conditions. Two distinct types of behaviours are observed for the oxygen removal rate: 1) the percentage removal of dissolved oxygen is invariant with time during the tests, and increases with increasing residence time in the test section, when the reaction between hydrazine and oxygen is better described by a homogenous reaction mechanism, and 2) the percentage oxygen

  2. Oxygen therapy for cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anja S; Barloese, Mads Cj; Lund, Nunu Lt

    2017-01-01

    -controlled, crossover inpatient study, and 102 CH attacks were treated with 100% oxygen delivered by demand valve oxygen (DVO), O2ptimask or simple mask (15 liters/min) or placebo delivered by DVO for 15 minutes. Primary endpoint: Two-point decrease of pain on a five-point rating scale within 15 minutes. Results Only...

  3. Mars oxygen production system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  4. Environmental science: Oceans lose oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen is essential to most life in the ocean. An analysis shows that oxygen levels have declined by 2% in the global ocean over the past five decades, probably causing habitat loss for many fish and invertebrate species. See Letter p.335

  5. Misconceptions in Reporting Oxygen Saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toffaletti, John; Zijlstra, Willem G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We describe some misconceptions that have become common practice in reporting blood gas and cooximetry results. In 1980, oxygen saturation was incorrectly redefined in a report of a new instrument for analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) derivatives. Oxygen saturation (sO(2)) was redefined as the

  6. On the Go with Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for both the patient and the oxygen supply company. There are two types of concentrators: Stationary concentrators plug into an electrical ... stationary unit. If your oxygen needs change, the type of system can ... supply company should explain and demonstrate whatever system you choose. ...

  7. Behavior of oxygen impurities in tokamak. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharif, R N; Beket, A H [Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Aurhority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Impurity transport in tokamak plasma is a subject of great importance in present day tokamak experiments. The transport of oxygen as an impurity element in small tokamak was studied theoretically. The viscosity coefficient of oxygen has been calculated in different approximation 13 and 21 moment approximation, taking into consideration {chi}>>1,{chi}{omega}{sub c} {tau}. It was found that in 21 moment approximation additional terms added to the perturbation from equilibrium leads to increase in viscosity coefficients than in 13 moments approximation. 9 figs.

  8. Risk Perception and Risk-Taking Behaviour during Adolescence: The Influence of Personality and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, Renate L E P; Murphy, Laura; Lin, Ashleigh; Bartolomé, Sandra Para; Wood, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of personality characteristics and gender on adolescents' perception of risk and their risk-taking behaviour. Male and female participants (157 females: 116 males, aged 13-20) completed self-report measures on risk perception, risk-taking and personality. Male participants perceived behaviours as less risky, reportedly took more risks, were less sensitive to negative outcomes and less socially anxious than female participants. Path analysis identified a model in which age, behavioural inhibition and impulsiveness directly influenced risk perception, while age, social anxiety, impulsiveness, sensitivity to reward, behavioural inhibition and risk perception itself were directly or indirectly associated with risk-taking behaviour. Age and behavioural inhibition had direct relationships with social anxiety, and reward sensitivity was associated with impulsiveness. The model was representative for the whole sample and male and female groups separately. The observed relationship between age and social anxiety and the influence this may have on risk-taking behaviour could be key for reducing adolescent risk-taking behaviour. Even though adolescents may understand the riskiness of their behaviour and estimate their vulnerability to risk at a similar level to adults, factors such as anxiety regarding social situations, sensitivity to reward and impulsiveness may exert their influence and make these individuals prone to taking risks. If these associations are proven causal, these factors are, and will continue to be, important targets in prevention and intervention efforts.

  9. Risk Perception and Risk-Taking Behaviour during Adolescence: The Influence of Personality and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, Renate L. E. P.; Murphy, Laura; Lin, Ashleigh; Bartolomé, Sandra Para; Wood, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of personality characteristics and gender on adolescents’ perception of risk and their risk-taking behaviour. Male and female participants (157 females: 116 males, aged 13–20) completed self-report measures on risk perception, risk-taking and personality. Male participants perceived behaviours as less risky, reportedly took more risks, were less sensitive to negative outcomes and less socially anxious than female participants. Path analysis identified a model in which age, behavioural inhibition and impulsiveness directly influenced risk perception, while age, social anxiety, impulsiveness, sensitivity to reward, behavioural inhibition and risk perception itself were directly or indirectly associated with risk-taking behaviour. Age and behavioural inhibition had direct relationships with social anxiety, and reward sensitivity was associated with impulsiveness. The model was representative for the whole sample and male and female groups separately. The observed relationship between age and social anxiety and the influence this may have on risk-taking behaviour could be key for reducing adolescent risk-taking behaviour. Even though adolescents may understand the riskiness of their behaviour and estimate their vulnerability to risk at a similar level to adults, factors such as anxiety regarding social situations, sensitivity to reward and impulsiveness may exert their influence and make these individuals prone to taking risks. If these associations are proven causal, these factors are, and will continue to be, important targets in prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:27100081

  10. Revised data taking schedule with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals

  12. Genetic determinants of financial risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnen, Camelia M; Chiao, Joan Y

    2009-01-01

    Individuals vary in their willingness to take financial risks. Here we show that variants of two genes that regulate dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission and have been previously linked to emotional behavior, anxiety and addiction (5-HTTLPR and DRD4) are significant determinants of risk taking in investment decisions. We find that the 5-HTTLPR s/s allele carriers take 28% less risk than those carrying the s/l or l/l alleles of the gene. DRD4 7-repeat allele carriers take 25% more risk than individuals without the 7-repeat allele. These findings contribute to the emerging literature on the genetic determinants of economic behavior.

  13. Oxygen discharge and post-discharge kinetics experiments and modeling for the electric oxygen-iodine laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, A D; Zimmerman, J W; Woodard, B S; Carroll, D L; Verdeyen, J T; Lim, T C; Solomon, W C

    2007-07-26

    Laser oscillation at 1315 nm on the I(2P1/2)-->I(2P3/2) transition of atomic iodine has been obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(a1Delta) produced using a low-pressure oxygen/helium/nitric oxide discharge. In the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser (ElectricOIL) the discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds levels of complexity to the singlet oxygen generator (SOG) kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(a1Delta) generation system. The advanced model BLAZE-IV has been introduced to study the energy-transfer laser system dynamics and kinetics. Levels of singlet oxygen, oxygen atoms, and ozone are measured experimentally and compared with calculations. The new BLAZE-IV model is in reasonable agreement with O3, O atom, and gas temperature measurements but is under-predicting the increase in O2(a1Delta) concentration resulting from the presence of NO in the discharge and under-predicting the O2(b1Sigma) concentrations. A key conclusion is that the removal of oxygen atoms by NOX species leads to a significant increase in O2(a1Delta) concentrations downstream of the discharge in part via a recycling process; however, there are still some important processes related to the NOX discharge kinetics that are missing from the present modeling. Further, the removal of oxygen atoms dramatically inhibits the production of ozone in the downstream kinetics.

  14. Oxygen as a product of water radiolysis in high-LET tracks. II. Radiobiological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.F.; Burns, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to the possibility that molecular oxygen generated in the tracks of energetic heavy ions is responsible for the reduction in oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) observed for the loss of reproductive capacity caused by radiation in many cellular organisms. Yields of oxygen relationship of OER to LET for two organisms, Chlamydomonas reinhardii and Shigella flexneri, using a simple diffusion kinetic model for radiobiological action which takes account of the diffusion of oxygen after its formation. The results of these calculations show that the model accounts well for the shape of the OER vs. LET relationship

  15. 76 FR 73600 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Missile Launch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... years if NMFS finds, after notification and opportunity for public comment, that the taking will have a... taking. Regulations governing the taking of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), Pacific... a period not to exceed 1 year, take of pinnipeds, by harassment, incidental to missile launch...

  16. Oxygen: the two-faced elixir of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Chuck

    2008-02-01

    Take a moment and consider our planet without oxygen. Imagine the earth some 2.5 billion years ago when oxygen first appeared as a waste product of early anaerobes. Oxygen, as we know it today, is essential for life. Abundant and relatively inexpensive to manufacture, oxygen has widespread use in industry and healthcare. Anesthesia providers routinely administer oxygen in concentrations exceeding that in ambient air to ensure clinical safety and to offset the predictable sequelae associated with patient, drug-related, and procedural factors. Understanding the history of this unique element is critical in evaluating the often contentious body of contemporary research that has illuminated its efficacy (as elixir) and its attendant complications (its "two-faced" nature). Of particular interest is its role in free radical formation as etiogenic in developing complications. Oxygen is a mainstay in the perioperative management of patients, but its administration should be guided by thoughtful and rational goal-directed outcomes to maximize efficacy and minimize complications associated with its use.

  17. Advanced Oxygen Systems for Aircraft (Systemes d’Oxygene Avances)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Oxygen Generating System (NAOGS), SAM-TR-80-12, Brooks AFB TX 78235, 1980. 11. Horch TC, Miller RL, Bomar JB, Tedor JB, Holden RD, Ikels KG, and...sieve oxygen generation sys- tem. Data from Horch et al (15). cabin altitude. The minimum and maximum oxygen concen- tration lines depict the...an AV-8A Aircraft; Naval Air Test Center Report No. SY-136R-81, 1981. 15. Horch TC, Miller RL, Bomar JB Jr, Tedor JB, Holden RD, Ikels KG, and

  18. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    28. Alagoz, T., R. Buller, B. Anderson, K. Terrell , R...and oxygenation Ann . New Acad. Sci. 838 29–45 Chapman J D, Stobbe C C, Arnfield M R, Santus R, Lee J and McPhee M S 1991 Oxygen dependency of tumor

  19. Inhibition of lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism and hormonal regulation of lactation is explained and illustrated with a schematic representation. Circulating estrogen above a critical amount seems to be the inhibitory factor controlling lactation during pregnancy. Once delivery occurs, the level of estrogen falls, that of prolactin rises, and lactation begins. Nonsuckling can be used to inhibit lactation. Estrogens can also be used to inhibit lactation more quickly and with less pain. The reported association between estrogens and puerperal thromboembolism cannot be considered conclusive due to defects in the reporting studies. There is no reason not to use estrogens in lactation inhibition except for women over 35 who experienced a surgical delivery. Alternative therapy is available for these women. The recently-developed drug, brom-ergocryptine, may replace other methods of lactation inhibition.

  20. Bank governance, regulation, and risk taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laeven, L.; Levine, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper conducts the first empirical assessment of theories concerning risk taking by banks, their ownership structures, and national bank regulations. We focus on conflicts between bank managers and owners over risk, and we show that bank risk taking varies positively with the comparative power

  1. Take-off aerodynamics in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, M; Kivekäs, J; Komi, P V

    2001-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic forces on the force-time characteristics of the simulated ski jumping take-off was examined in a wind tunnel. Vertical and horizontal ground reaction forces were recorded with a force plate installed under the wind tunnel floor. The jumpers performed take-offs in non-wind conditions and in various wind conditions (21-33 m s(-1)). EMGs of the important take-off muscles were recorded from one jumper. The dramatic decrease in take-off time found in all jumpers can be considered as the result of the influence of aerodynamic lift. The loss in impulse due to the shorter force production time with the same take-off force is compensated with the increase in lift force, resulting in a higher vertical velocity (V(v)) than is expected from the conventional calculation of V(v) from the force impulse. The wind conditions emphasized the explosiveness of the ski jumping take-off. The aerodynamic lift and drag forces which characterize the aerodynamic quality of the initial take-off position (static in-run position) varied widely even between the examined elite ski jumpers. According to the computer simulation these differences can decisively affect jumping distance. The proper utilization of the prevailing aerodynamic forces before and during take-off is a very important prerequisite for achieving a good flight position.

  2. Arguments that take counterconsiderations into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, Jan Albert

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines arguments that take counterconsiderations into account, and it does so from a dialogical point of view. According to this account, a counterconsideration is part of a critical reaction from a real or imagined opponent, and an arguer may take it into account in his argument in at

  3. On the Duty of Not Taking Offence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Robin

    2005-01-01

    People take offence too easily and are encouraged to do so by, e.g., institutional harassment policies. "Offensive" is sometimes equated with "anything that offends someone", sometimes with a definitive list of specific behaviours. When is it justifiable to take offence? Distinctions need to be drawn: between offensive to the senses and to the…

  4. Giving Ourselves Permission to Take Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    What's a risk? It's when one doesn't know what will happen when she/he takes action. Risks can be little or big, calculated or stupid. Every new idea carries risks--and the challenge to face them and see what will happen. Nobody becomes smart, creative, self-confident, and respectful of others without taking risks--remaining open to possibilities…

  5. Power Take-Off Systems for WECs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetu, Amelie

    2017-01-01

    The power take-off (PTO) of a wave energy converter is defined as the mechanism with which the absorbed energy by the primary converter is transformed into useable electricity.......The power take-off (PTO) of a wave energy converter is defined as the mechanism with which the absorbed energy by the primary converter is transformed into useable electricity....

  6. Maribavir Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus Transcription through the EBV Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, Christopher B.; Sanders, Marcia K.; Law, Mankit; Wang, Fu-Zhang; Xiong, Jie; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2013-01-01

    Maribavir (MBV) inhibits Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication and the enzymatic activity of the viral protein kinase BGLF4. MBV also inhibits expression of multiple EBV transcripts during EBV lytic infection. Here we demonstrate, with the use of a BGLF4 knockout virus, that effects of MBV on transcription take place primarily through inhibition of BGLF4. MBV inhibits viral genome copy numbers and infectivity to levels similar to and exceeding levels produced by BGLF4 knockout virus. PMID:23449792

  7. Oxygen dependency of porfiromycin cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.S.; Rauth, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors determined the oxygen dependency of toxicity for the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) to investigate whether the toxicities of these agents increase in the range of oxygen tensions over which cells become increasingly radioresistant. In the present work the oxygen dependency of PM in CHO cells was determined by assaying survival as a function of time of exposure to 1.0 μg/ml PM under various known levels of oxygen. While PM demonstrated preferential hypoxic cell toxicity, aerobic cell survival was reduced ten-fold after five hours of exposure. Conversely, PM toxicity after a five hour hypoxic exposure to <0.001% oxygen appeared to be greater than that observed for similar MMC exposures, suggesting that PM may be more selective than MMC in killing hypoxic rather than aerobic cells. The authors are currently investigating this preferential toxicity in two human cell lines, one of which is resistant to these agents. At present, these observations suggest that PM may be more effective than MMC at destroying tumour cells in regions of intermediate and low oxygen tensions which may survive radiotherapy, though the range of oxygen tensions which mediate toxicity is similar for both agents

  8. Reclaimed wastewater quality enhancement by oxygen injection during transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, L E; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Sevilla, J; Marrero, M C; Hernández, A

    2011-01-01

    In-sewer treatments have been studied in sewer systems, but few have been carried out on reclaimed wastewater systems. A study of oxygen injection has been performed in a completely filled gravity pipe, 0.6 m in diameter and 62 km long, in cast iron with concrete inside coating, which is part of the reclaimed wastewater reuse scheme of Tenerife (Spain). A high pressure oxygen injection system was installed at 16.0 km from pipe inlet and a constant dosage of 30 mg/L O(2) has been injected during six months, under three different operational modes (low COD, 63 mg/L; high COD, 91 mg/L; and partially nitrified water). Oxygen has been consumed in nitrification and organic matter reduction. Generally, nitrification is clearly favored instead of the organic matter oxidation. Nitrification occurs, in general, with nitrite accumulation due to the presence of free ammonia above 1 mg/L. Denitrification is in all cases incomplete due to a limitation of easily biodegradable organic matter content, inhibiting the appearance of anaerobic conditions and sulfide generation. A notable reduction of organic matter parameters is achieved (TSS below 10 mg/L), which is significantly higher than that observed under the ordinary transport conditions without oxygen. This leads to a final cost reduction, and the oxygen injection system helps water reuse managers to maintain a final good water quality in the case of a treatment plant malfunction.

  9. A microfluidic cell culture array with various oxygen tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Chen, Ying-Hua; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-08-21

    Oxygen tension plays an important role in regulating various cellular functions in both normal physiology and disease states. Therefore, drug testing using conventional in vitro cell models under normoxia often possesses limited prediction capability. A traditional method of setting an oxygen tension in a liquid medium is by saturating it with a gas mixture at the desired level of oxygen, which requires bulky gas cylinders, sophisticated control, and tedious interconnections. Moreover, only a single oxygen tension can be tested at the same time. In this paper, we develop a microfluidic cell culture array platform capable of performing cell culture and drug testing under various oxygen tensions simultaneously. The device is fabricated using an elastomeric material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and the well-developed multi-layer soft lithography (MSL) technique. The prototype device has 4 × 4 wells, arranged in the same dimensions as a conventional 96-well plate, for cell culture. The oxygen tensions are controlled by spatially confined oxygen scavenging chemical reactions underneath the wells using microfluidics. The platform takes advantage of microfluidic phenomena while exhibiting the combinatorial diversities achieved by microarrays. Importantly, the platform is compatible with existing cell incubators and high-throughput instruments (liquid handling systems and plate readers) for cost-effective setup and straightforward operation. Utilizing the developed platform, we successfully perform drug testing using an anti-cancer drug, triapazamine (TPZ), on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549) under three oxygen tensions ranging from 1.4% to normoxia. The developed platform is promising to provide a more meaningful in vitro cell model for various biomedical applications while maintaining desired high throughput capabilities.

  10. Inhaled nitric oxide augments nitric oxide transport on sickle cell hemoglobin without affecting oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.; Shelhamer, James H.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Conway, Deirdre A.; Hrinczenko, Borys W.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Rodgers, Griffin P.; Ognibene, Frederick P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhalation has been reported to increase the oxygen affinity of sickle cell erythrocytes. Also, proposed allosteric mechanisms for hemoglobin, based on S-nitrosation of β-chain cysteine 93, raise the possibilty of altering the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease by inhibiting polymerization or by increasing NO delivery to the tissue. We studied the effects of a 2-hour treatment, using varying concentrations of inhaled NO. Oxygen affinity, as measured by P50, did not respo...

  11. Oxygen treatment of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anja S; Barloese, Mads C J; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to review the existing literature to document oxygen's therapeutic effect on cluster headache. METHOD: A PubMed search resulted in 28 hits, and from these and their references we found in total 11 relevant studies. We included six studies that investigated the efficacy......, but not a prophylactic effect. Despite the fact that only a few high-quality RCT studies are available, oxygen treatment is close to an ideal treatment because it is effective and safe. However, sufferers of cluster headache do not always have access to oxygen because of logistic and financial concerns....

  12. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- δ, YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , and the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2+4 (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible

  13. Oxygen permeation modelling of perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, Bart A.; van Hassel, B.A.; Kawada, Tatsuya; Sakai, Natsuko; Yokokawa, Harumi; Dokiya, Masayuki; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    1993-01-01

    A point defect model was used to describe the oxygen nonstoichiometry of the perovskites La0.75Sr0.25CrO3, La0.9Sr0.1FeO3, La0.9Sr0.1CoO3 and La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. Form the oxygen vacancy concentration predicte by the point defect model, the ionic conductivity

  14. Control of seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana by atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, A.; Crispi, M.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    Seed development is known to be inhibited completely when plants are grown in oxygen concentrations below 5.1 kPa, but apart from reports of decreased seed weight little is known about embryogenesis at subambient oxygen concentrations above this critical level. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown full term under continuous light in premixed atmospheres with oxygen partial pressures of 2.5, 5.1, 10.1, 16.2 and 21.3 kPa O2, 0.035 kPa CO2 and the balance nitrogen. Seeds were harvested for germination tests and microscopy when siliques had yellowed. Seed germination was depressed in O2 treatments below 16.2 kPa, and seeds from plants grown in 2.5 kPa O2 did not germinate at all. Fewer than 25% of the seeds from plants grown in 5.1 kPa oxygen germinated and most of the seedlings appeared abnormal. Light and scanning electron microscopic observation of non-germinated seeds showed that these embryos had stopped growing at different developmental stages depending upon the prevailing oxygen level. Embryos stopped growing at the heart-shaped to linear cotyledon stage in 5.1 kPa O2, at around the curled cotyledon stage in 10.1 kPa O2, and at the premature stage in 16.2 kPa O2. Globular and heart-shaped embryos were observed in sectioned seeds from plants grown in 2.5 kPa O2. Tissue degeneration caused by cell autolysis and changes in cell structure were observed in cotyledons and radicles. Transmission electron microscopy of mature seeds showed that storage substances, such as protein bodies, were reduced in subambient oxygen treatments. The results demonstrate control of embryo development by oxygen in Arabidopsis.

  15. The effect of temperature and oxygen content on coal burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Milenkova; A.G. Borrego; D. Alvarez; J. Xiberta; R. Menendez [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    In this study chars from six coals differing in rank and maceral composition have been prepared at 1100 and 1300{sup o}C in a drop tube reactor using four oxygen concentrations (0, 2.5, 10 and 21% oxygen). Char burnout, reactivity, morphology and optical texture have been considered in an attempt to understand the effect of temperature and oxygen concentration in relation to coal characteristics. Temperature has shown to have a different effect on conversion depending on coal rank. The high volatile coals showed similar conversions at 1100 and 1300{sup o}C at the various atmospheres tested, whereas higher rank coals showed higher conversions at 1300 than at 1100{sup o}C. The presence of oxygen in the reacting gas appears to have two opposite effects on coal combustion. On the one hand it prevents swelling and devolatilisation and on the other it enhances combustion. The burnout will depend on which process dominates. In addition, this effect appears to be temperature dependant and the inhibiting effect of oxygen on coal devolatilisation has shown to be higher at higher temperature, since at low temperature it only affects the lowest ranked coals. The presence of oxygen also affects the structure of carbonaceous material since the lower the oxygen concentration the higher the anisotropy development. The difference in temperature separating the two series of experiments (1000 and 1300{sup o}C) did not have a positive effect on the conversion of coals yielding highly porous chars whereas for coals yielding more dense structures higher conversions were achieved at higher temperatures. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions

  17. Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy or hydroxycobalamin attenuates surges in brain interstitial lactate and glucose; and hyperbaric oxygen improves respiratory status in cyanide-intoxicated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, P; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Hyldegaard, O

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide (CN) intoxication inhibits cellular oxidative metabolism and may result in brain damage. Hydroxycobalamin (OHCob) is one among other antidotes that may be used following intoxication with CN. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is recommended when supportive measures or antidotes fail. However...

  19. Take-off mechanics in hummingbirds (Trochilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W; Altshuler, Douglas L; Powers, Donald R

    2004-03-01

    Initiating flight is challenging, and considerable effort has focused on understanding the energetics and aerodynamics of take-off for both machines and animals. For animal flight, the available evidence suggests that birds maximize their initial flight velocity using leg thrust rather than wing flapping. The smallest birds, hummingbirds (Order Apodiformes), are unique in their ability to perform sustained hovering but have proportionally small hindlimbs that could hinder generation of high leg thrust. Understanding the take-off flight of hummingbirds can provide novel insight into the take-off mechanics that will be required for micro-air vehicles. During take-off by hummingbirds, we measured hindlimb forces on a perch mounted with strain gauges and filmed wingbeat kinematics with high-speed video. Whereas other birds obtain 80-90% of their initial flight velocity using leg thrust, the leg contribution in hummingbirds was 59% during autonomous take-off. Unlike other species, hummingbirds beat their wings several times as they thrust using their hindlimbs. In a phylogenetic context, our results show that reduced body and hindlimb size in hummingbirds limits their peak acceleration during leg thrust and, ultimately, their take-off velocity. Previously, the influence of motivational state on take-off flight performance has not been investigated for any one organism. We studied the full range of motivational states by testing performance as the birds took off: (1) to initiate flight autonomously, (2) to escape a startling stimulus or (3) to aggressively chase a conspecific away from a feeder. Motivation affected performance. Escape and aggressive take-off featured decreased hindlimb contribution (46% and 47%, respectively) and increased flight velocity. When escaping, hummingbirds foreshortened their body movement prior to onset of leg thrust and began beating their wings earlier and at higher frequency. Thus, hummingbirds are capable of modulating their leg and

  20. Oxygenates to hike gasoline price

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that cost of achieving required US gasoline formulations this winter in Environmental Protection Agency carbon monoxide (CO) nonattainment areas could reach 3-5 cents/gal, an Energy Information Administration analysis has found. EIA says new winter demand for gasoline blending oxygenates such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) or ethanol created by 190 amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) will exceed US oxygenate production by 140,000-220,000 b/d. The shortfall must be made up from inventory or imports. EIA estimates the cost of providing incremental oxygenate to meet expected gasoline blending demand likely will result in a price premium of about 20 cents/gal of MTBE equivalent over traditional gasoline blend octane value. That cost likely will be added to the price of oxygenated gasoline

  1. Tackling the take-or-pay problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Kim.

    1997-01-01

    Centrica, the gas sales, trading and services company previously part of British Gas plc, has renegotiated a number of its take-or-pay contracts with North Sea gas producers since the end of 1996. The contracts - a legacy of the British Gas monopoly era - had placed an increasing financial burden on the company as it was effectively forced to pay above-market prices for gas which it did not always want to take, while trying to remain competitive in a market where an ever growing number of independent gas suppliers were offering low-cost supplies. The author looks at how Centrica has tackled its take-or-pay problem. (author)

  2. 7-oxygenated Derivatives of Dehydroepiandrosterone and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sedláčková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 7-hydroxy/oxo derivatives of dehydroepiandrosterone are potential regulators of the local cortisol activity due to their competition in the cortisolcortisone balance mediated by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. 7-hydroxydehydroepiandrosterone is marketed as anti-obesity medication, though no clinical study aimed at the benefit of administering 7-oxygenated derivatives of dehydroepiandrosterone has appeared until now. We tried to show whether there exist differences in levels of circulating 7-hydroxy/oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives between lean and obese boys and girls. From a cohort of adolescents investigated within the frame of anti-obesity programme 10 obese boys and 10 obese girls were compared with age-matched lean boys and girls in their anthropometric data, and concentrations of both epimers of 7-hydroxydehydroepiandrosterone and 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone were determined by the RIA method. The basal levels of 7α-hydroxy-dehydroepiandrosterone were significantly higher in obese boys than in lean boys but not in girls. The association was found for anthropometric parameters and 7α-hydroxy-dehydroepiandrosterone, however again only in boys and not in girls. Higher levels of 7α-hydroxydehydroepiandrosterone its positive association with anthropometric data in obese boys may serve as a sign that, at least in boys, 7-oxygenated 5-ene-steroids may take part in regulating the hormonal signal for fat formation or distribution.

  3. Kinetics of liquid lithium reaction with oxygen-nitrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, T.K.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in order to characterize the kinetics of lithium chemical reaction with a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. Three mixed gas compositions were used; 80% N 2 and 20% O 2 , 90% N 2 and 10% O 2 , and 95% N 2 and 5% O 2 . The reaction rate was obtained as a function of lithium temperature and the oxygen fraction. Liquid lithium temperature varied from 400 to 1100 0 C. By varying the composition, the degree of inhibition of the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate due to the presence of oxygen was observed. The results indicate that the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate depended on both the fraction of oxygen present and lithium temperature. The lithium nitride layer formed from the reaction also had a significant inhibition effect on the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate while the lithium-oxygen reaction rate was not as greatly hindered. LITFIRE, a computer code which simulates temperature and pressure history in a containment building following lithium spills, was modified by including (1) an improved model for the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate and (2) a model for the lithium-CO 2 reaction. LITFIRE was used to simulate HEDL's LC-2 and LA-5 experiments, and the predicted temperatures and pressures were in a reasonable agreement. Furthermore, LITFIRE was applied to a prototypical fusion reactor containment in order to simulate the consequences of a lithium spill accident. The result indicated that if nitrogen was used as containment building gas during the accident, the consequences of the accident would be less severe than those with air. The pressure rise in the building was found to be reduced by 50% and the maximum temperature of the combustion zone was limited to 900 0 C instead of 1200 0 C in the case of air

  4. Mutations in Escherichia coli that effect sensitivity to oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, C.S.; Adler, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    Fifteen oxygen-sensitive (Oxy/sup s/) mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated after exposure to UV light. The mutants did not form macroscopic colonies when plated aerobically. They did form macroscopic colonies anaerobically. Oxygen, introduced during log phase, inhibited the growth of liquid cultures. The degree of inhibition was used to separate the mutants into three classes. Class I mutants did not grow after exposure to oxygen. Class II mutants were able to grow, but at a reduced rate and to a reduced final titer, when compared with the wild-type parent. Class III mutants formed filaments in response to oxygen. Genetic experiments indicated that the mutations map to six different chromosomal regions. The results of enzymatic assays indicated that 7 of the 10 class I mutants have low levels of catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and respiratory enzymes when compared with the wild-type parent. Mutations in five of the seven class I mutants which have the low enzyme activities mapped within the region 8 to 13.5 min. P1 transduction data indicated that mutations in three of these five mutants, Oxy/sup s/-6, Oxy/sup s/-14, and Oxy/sup s/-17, mapped to 8.4 min. The correlation of low enzyme levels and mapping data suggest that a single gene may regulate several enzymes in response to oxygen. The remaining three class I mutants had wild-type levels of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase, but decreased respiratory activity. The class II and III mutants had enzyme activities similar to those of the wild-type parent

  5. Oxygen Concentration Inside a Functioning Photosynthetic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A.; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic...

  6. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Seung Hyeok [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Experimental Animals, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K. [Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  7. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases

  8. Role of photophosphorylation in SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ inhibition of photosynthesis in isolated chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerovic, Z G; Kalezic, R; Plesnicar, M

    1982-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide inhibits noncyclic photophosphorylation in isolated envelope-free chloroplasts. This inhibition was shown to be reversible and competitive with phosphate, with an inhibitor constant of K/sub i/ = 0.8 mM. The same inhibition characteristics were observed when phosphoglycerate (PGA)- or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)- dependent oxygen evolution was examined in a reconstituted chloroplast system in the presence of SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/. Using an ATP-regenerating system (phosphocreatine-creatine kinase), it was demonstrated that the inhibition of PGA-dependent oxygen evolution is solely the result of inhibited photophosphorylation. It is concluded that at low SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ concentrations the inhibition of photophosphorylation is responsible for the inhibition of photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  10. Taking an idea to a research protocol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... Review Article: Taking an idea to a research protocol ... step is to identify the knowledge gap within the intended field of research by examining the background ... be found by writing a critical narrative review of the literature.

  11. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes means you have glucose ( ...

  12. Don't Take This with That!

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... DO NOT TAKE WITH GRAPEFRUIT” or has similar words, heed the warning. It can save you a ... Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance ...

  13. Risk-taking under progressive taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Bamberg, Günter

    1988-01-01

    Risk-taking under progressive taxation : 3 partial effects / Günter Bamberg ; Wolfram R. Richter. - In: Measurement in economics / ed. by Wolfgang Eichhorn. - Heidelberg : Physica-Verl., 1988. - S. 479-497

  14. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  15. Don't Take This with That!

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Special Features Don't take this with that! Share ... Drug Interactions: What You Should Know More in Special Features Page Last Updated: 12/17/2015 Note: ...

  16. Taking notes as an interactive process

    OpenAIRE

    Hornig, Wolfgang

    1984-01-01

    Taking notes as an interactive process : how to improve students´ notes / Hornig W. ; Nowak, J. - In: Nowak, Johann: Textverstehen und Textrekonstruktion in Vorlesungen. - Augsburg : HDZ, 1984. - S. 227-253. - (Augsburger Studien zur Hochschuldidaktik ; 12)

  17. Reflex bradycardia does not influence oxygen consumption during hypoxia in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Nina Kerting; McKenzie, David; Malte, H.

    2010-01-01

    the bradycardia on oxygen consumption (MO2), standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the critical oxygen partial pressure for regulation of SMR in hypoxia (Pcrit) in European eels Anguilla anguilla (mean ± SEM mass 528 ± 36 g; n = 14). Eels were instrumented with a Transonic flow probe around the ventral aorta......Most teleost fish reduce heart rate when exposed to acute hypoxia. This hypoxic bradycardia has been characterised for many fish species, but it remains uncertain whether this reflex contributes to the maintenance of oxygen uptake in hypoxia. Here we describe the effects of inhibiting...

  18. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  19. Note-taking Strategies and Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Haghverdi, Hamid; Biria, Reza; Karimi, Lotfollah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is two fold. That is, revealing the significance, underlying theory and findings concerning note-taking in the literature related and exploring, through a survey study, the Iranian professors‘ and students‘ attitudes towards the effect of teaching note-taking strategies on the students‘ academic achievement. To this end, many previous studies were reviewed and we knew that many scholars, conducting empirical studies, surveys and interviews, have highlighted ...

  20. Note Taking on Trial: A Legal Application of Note-Taking Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This article is about note taking, but it is not an exhaustive review of note-taking literature. Instead, it portrays the application of note-taking research to an unusual and important area of practice--the law. I was hired to serve as an expert witness on note taking in a legal case that hinged, in part, on the completeness and accuracy of…

  1. Taking Blame for Other People's Misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Jennifer; Madon, Stephanie; Curran, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Taking blame for another person's misconduct may occur at relatively high rates for less serious crimes. The authors examined individual differences and situational factors related to this phenomenon by surveying college students (n = 213) and men enrolled in substance abuse treatment programs (n = 42). Among college students, conscientiousness and delinquency predicted their likelihood of being in a situation in which it was possible to take the blame for another person's misconduct. Situational factors, including the relationship with the perpetrator, the seriousness of the offense, feelings of responsibility for the offense, and differential consequences between the offender and the blame taker, were associated with college students' decisions to take the blame. Among substance abuse treatment participants, individuals who took the blame for another person's misconduct were more extraverted, reported feeling more loyalty toward the true perpetrator, and indicated more incentives to take the blame than individuals who did not take the blame. Links between theories of helping behavior and situational factors that predict blame taking are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xia, Mengna

    2005-01-01

    The goals of the study in the first stage are 1) to develop a mathematic model by which we can derive tumor blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen from hemoglobin concentration during interventions, 2...

  3. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P ... +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset...

  4. 75 FR 28587 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Missile Launch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... granted for periods up to 5 years if NMFS finds, after notification and opportunity for public comment... such taking. Regulations governing the taking of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris... would authorize, for a period not to exceed 1 year, take of pinnipeds, by harassment, incidental to...

  5. 77 FR 66587 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Missile Launch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... years if NMFS finds, after notification and opportunity for public comment, that the taking will have a... taking. Regulations governing the taking of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), Pacific... specify ``annual'' LOAs; therefore, NMFS can only issue an LOA not to exceed a one-year period. Summary of...

  6. Effects of Cyanate and 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate on Sickling RELATIONSHIP TO OXYGENATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael; Bunn, H. Franklin; Halikas, George; Kan, Yuet Wai; Nathan, David G.

    1973-01-01

    Cyanate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) both influence the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. The studies presented here concern the effects of these compounds on the sickling phenomenon. The inhibitory effect of cyanate on sickling is largely due to the fact that it increases the percentage of oxyhemoglobin S at a given oxygen tension. In addition, cyanate inhibits sickling by a mechanism that is independent of oxygenation. In this paper, we have demonstrated that the viscosity of carbamylated sickle blood was lower than that of non-carbamylated controls at the same oxygen saturation. Furthermore, carbamylation resulted in an increase in the minimum concentration of deoxy-sickle hemoglobin required for gelation. Like cyanate, 2,3-DPG affected sickling of intact erythrocytes by two mechanisms. Since 2,3-DPG decreases the percentage of oxyhemoglobin S at a given oxygen tension, sickling is enhanced. In addition, 2,3-DPG had a direct effect. When the intracellular 2,3-DPG concentration was increased in vitro, a greater percentage of cells were sickled at a given oxygen saturation. Conversely, sickling was inhibited in cells in which 2,3-DPG was artificially lowered. These data indicate that the enhancement of sickling by 2,3-DPG is in part independent of its influence on oxygen affinity. PMID:4729047

  7. Spike propagation in driven chain networks with dominant global inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Wonil; Jin, Dezhe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Spike propagation in chain networks is usually studied in the synfire regime, in which successive groups of neurons are synaptically activated sequentially through the unidirectional excitatory connections. Here we study the dynamics of chain networks with dominant global feedback inhibition that prevents the synfire activity. Neural activity is driven by suprathreshold external inputs. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that spike propagation along the chain is a unique dynamical attractor in a wide parameter regime. The strong inhibition permits a robust winner-take-all propagation in the case of multiple chains competing via the inhibition.

  8. Oxygen Modulates Human Decidual Natural Killer Cell Surface Receptor Expression and Interactions with Trophoblasts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison E.; Goulwara, Sonu S.; Whitley, Guy S.; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells have been shown to both promote and inhibit trophoblast behavior important for decidual remodeling in pregnancy and have a distinct phenotype compared to peripheral blood NK cells. We investigated whether different levels of oxygen tension, mimicking the physiological conditions of the decidua in early pregnancy, altered cell surface receptor expression and activity of dNK cells and their interactions with trophoblast. dNK cells were isolated from terminated first-trimester pregnancies and cultured in oxygen tensions of 3%, 10%, and 21% for 24 h. Cell surface receptor expression was examined by flow cytometry, and the effects of secreted factors in conditioned medium (CM) on the trophoblast cell line SGHPL-4 were assessed in vitro. SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 10% were significantly more invasive (P cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 3% or 21%. After 24 h, a lower percentage of dNK cells expressed CD56 at 21% oxygen (P cells expressed NKG2D at 10% oxygen (P oxygen tensions, with large patient variation. This study demonstrates dNK cell phenotype and secreted factors are modulated by oxygen tension, which induces changes in trophoblast invasion and endovascular-like differentiation. Alterations in dNK cell surface receptor expression and secreted factors at different oxygen tensions may represent regulation of function within the decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25232021

  9. MODERN TAKE-OFF POWER DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čoh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Take-off power is one of the main biomotor abilities for predicting the results of many sport disciplines. It plays a particularly important role in motor situations when the take-off power is combined with the velocity of movement. The core aim of this study was to establish and analyse the fundamental kinematic, dynamic and electromyographic parameters which generate the results of selected take-off power tests. The experimental procedure involved two elite female triple jumpers. According to Bosco’s protocol the following tests were selected: squat jump, countermovement jump and drop jump – 25 cm. The following were analysed: jump height, take-off time, flight time, take-off velocity, maximum take-off force, angle velocity of the ankle, knee and hip joints, force impulse and duration of the eccentric and concen ric phases of take-off. The 3D-kinematic analysis of jumps was based on a system of nine SMART-e 600 video-cameras (BTS Bioengineering, with a 60 Hz frequency and a 768 x 576 pixel resolution. The kinematic parameters were processed using the BTS SMART Suite programme. Dynamic parameters were established by means of two separate force-plat forms, namely Kistler, Type 9286A. The analysis of the electromyographic activity (EMG of the following muscles: m. erector spinae, m. gluteus maximus, m. rectus femoris, m. vastus medialis, m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps femoris, m. tibialis anterior and m. gastrocnemius medialis was made using a 16-channel electromyograph (BTS Pocket EMG, MYOLAB. The research showed that the jump height (h as a criterion of explosive power was generated by: the velocity of take-off, flight time, force impulse in the concentric phase and optimal knee joint angle. The analysis of the EMG activation in vertical jumps showed the proximaldistal principle of muscle activation. In the first phase of the take-off action, the trunk extensors (m. erector spinae and hip extensors (m. gluteus maximus are activated. In the

  10. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al. [1989, ARAA, 27, 279], persists despite the addition of more O data and may betray the occurrence of a hiatus in star formation between the end of halo formation and

  11. A numerical two layer model for blood oxygenation in lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminatai, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the modelling of the simultaneous transport of O 2 and CO 2 in the pulmonary circulation described in our earlier studies, the blood has been treated as a homogeneous layer of haemoglobin solution. Since the size of the erythrocyte is not negligible in comparison with that of the capillary, the blood can no longer be considered as a homogeneous fluid and hence, It is worthwhile to consider the blood flow as a two-phase flow consisting of cells and plasma. In the present study, the heterogeneous nature of blood has been proposed by considering the axial train model for the flow [whitmore (1967)], in order to analyze the effect of cell free plasma layer on the process of blood oxygenation in pulmonary capillaries. The proposed model consists of a core of suspended erythrocytes surrounded by a cell free plasma layer near the wall. The coupled system of convective diffusion equaions together with the physiologically relevant boundary, entrance and interface conditions is solved numerically by a four-point semi-implicit scheme to gether with a fixed point iterative technique. The distance traversed by the blood before getting fully oxygenated is computed. It is shown that the core haematocrit and the thickness of the cell depleted layer affect the oxygenation process significantly. It is found that (i) oxygen takes longest and carbondioxide is the fastest to attain equilibraton, (ii) the blood is completely oxygenated within one-fifth part of its transit and (iii) the rate of oxygenation is smaller in case of homogeneous model than that in heterogenous model in the capillary. Finally, the effect of various physiological parameters on the rate of oxygenation has been examined

  12. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was < 3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be < rmax. Further, the ratio of desired harvest rate to 0.5 x rmax may be a useful metric for ascertaining the applicability of specific requirements of the National Environmental Protection Act.

  13. Oxygen sensitive polymeric nanocapsules for optical dissolved oxygen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhijuan; Cai, Chenxin; Guo, Fei; Ye, Changhuai; Luo, Yingwu; Ye, Shuming; Luo, Jianchao; Zhu, Fan; Jiang, Chunyue

    2018-04-01

    Immobilization of the oxygen-sensitive probes (OSPs) in the host matrix greatly impacts the performance and long-term usage of the optical dissolved oxygen (DO) sensors. In this work, fluorescent dyes, as the OSPs, were encapsulated with a crosslinked fluorinated polymer shell by interfacial confined reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer miniemulsion polymerization to fabricate oxygen sensitive polymeric nanocapsules (NCs). The location of fluorescent dyes and the fluorescent properties of the NCs were fully characterized by fourier transform infrared spectrometer, x-ray photoelectron spectrometer and fluorescent spectrum. Dye-encapsulated capacity can be precisely tuned from 0 to 1.3 wt% without self-quenching of the fluorescent dye. The crosslinked fluorinated polymer shell is not only extremely high gas permeability, but also prevents the fluorescent dyes from leakage in aqueous as well as in various organic solvents, such as ethanol, acetone and tetrahydrofuran (THF). An optical DO sensor based on the oxygen sensitive NCs was fabricated, showing high sensitivity, short response time, full reversibility, and long-term operational stability of online monitoring DO. The sensitivity of the optical DO sensor is 7.02 (the ratio of the response value in fully deoxygenated and saturated oxygenated water) in the range 0.96-14.16 mg l-1 and the response time is about 14.3 s. The sensor’s work curve was fit well using the modified Stern-Volmer equation by two-site model, and its response values are hardly affected by pH ranging from 2 to 12 and keep constant during continuous measurement for 3 months. It is believed that the oxygen sensitive polymeric NCs-based optical DO sensor could be particularly useful in long-term online DO monitoring in both aqueous and organic solvent systems.

  14. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  15. Quorum sensing inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, T.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    /receptor transcriptional regulator in some clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. The present review contains all reported compound types that are currently known to inhibit the QS transcriptional regulator in Gram-negative bacteria. These compounds are sub-divided into two main groups, one comprising structural...

  16. Cooperation for Better Inhibiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2015-06-18

    Cladosporin is an antimalarial drug that acts as an ATP-mimetic to selectively inhibit Plasmodium lysyl-tRNA synthetase. Using multiple crystal structures, Fang et al. (2015) reveal in this issue of Chemistry & Biology the fascinating mechanism responsible for cladosporin selectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxygenation measurements in head and neck cancers during hyperbaric oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, A.; Kuhnt, T.; Dunst, J.; Liedtke, H.; Krivokuca, A.; Bloching, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Tumor hypoxia has proven prognostic impact in head and neck cancers and is associated with poor response to radiotherapy. Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) offers an approach to overcome hypoxia. We have performed pO 2 measurements in selected patients with head and neck cancers under HBO to determine in how far changes in the oxygenation occur and whether a possible improvement of oxygenation parameters is maintained after HBO. Patients and Methods: Seven patients (five male, two female, age 51-63 years) with squamous cell cancers of the head and neck were investigated (six primaries, one local recurrence). The median pO 2 prior to HBO was determined with the Eppendorf histograph. Sites of measurement were enlarged cervical lymph nodes (n = 5), the primary tumor (n = 1) and local recurrence (n = 1). Patients then underwent HBO (100% O 2 at 240 kPa for 30 minutes) and the continuous changes in the oxygenation during HBO were determined with a Licox probe. Patients had HBO for 30 minutes (n = 6) to 40 minutes (n = 1). HBO was continued because the pO 2 had not reached a steady state after 30 minutes. After decompression, patients ventilated pure oxygen under normobaric conditions and the course of the pO 2 was further measured over about 15 minutes. Results: Prior to HBO, the median tumor pO 2 in the Eppendorf histography was 8.6 ± 5.4 mm Hg (range 3-19 mm Hg) and the pO 2 measured with the Licox probe was 17.3 ± 25.5 mm Hg (range 0-73 mm Hg). The pO 2 increased significantly during HBO to 550 ± 333 mm Hg (range 85-984 mm Hg, p = 0.018). All patients showed a marked increase irrespective of the oxygenation prior to HBO. The maximum pO 2 in the tumor was reached after 10-33 minutes (mean 17 minutes). After leaving the hyperbaric chamber, the pO 2 was 282 ± 196 mm Hg. All patients maintained an elevated pO 2 for further 5-25 minutes (138 ± 128 mm Hg, range 42-334 mm Hg, p = 0.028 vs the pO 2 prior to HBO). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygenation resulted in a

  18. Impurities of oxygen in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, V.M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic structure of oxygen complex defects in silicon, using molecular cluster model with saturation by watson sphere into the formalism of Xα multiple scattering method is studied. A systematic study of the simulation of perfect silicon crystal and an analysis of the increasing of atom number in the clusters are done to choose the suitable cluster for the calculations. The divacancy in three charge states (Si:V 2 + , Si:V 2 0 , Si:V 2 - ), of the oxygen pair (Si:O 2 ) and the oxygen-vacancy pair (Si:O.V) neighbours in the silicon lattice, is studied. Distortions for the symmetry were included in the Si:V 2 + and Si:O 2 systems. The behavior of defect levels related to the cluster size of Si:V 2 0 and Si:O 2 systems, the insulated oxygen impurity of silicon in interstitial position (Si:O i ), and the complexes involving four oxygen atoms are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  19. Perspective taking in children's narratives about jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Naomi J; Tenenbaum, Harriet R; Brooks, Patricia J; Harrison, Karine; Sines, Jennie

    2011-03-01

    This study explored relationships between perspective-taking, emotion understanding, and children's narrative abilities. Younger (23 5-/6-year-olds) and older (24 7-/8-year-olds) children generated fictional narratives, using a wordless picture book, about a frog experiencing jealousy. Children's emotion understanding was assessed through a standardized test of emotion comprehension and their ability to convey the jealousy theme of the story. Perspective-taking ability was assessed with respect to children's use of narrative evaluation (i.e., narrative coherence, mental state language, supplementary evaluative speech, use of subjective language, and placement of emotion expression). Older children scored higher than younger children on emotion comprehension and on understanding the story's complex emotional theme, including the ability to identify a rival. They were more advanced in perspective-taking abilities, and selectively used emotion expressions to highlight story episodes. Subjective perspective taking and narrative coherence were predictive of children's elaboration of the jealousy theme. Use of supplementary evaluative speech, in turn, was predictive of both subjective perspective taking and narrative coherence. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  20. The effect of culture on perspective taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shali; Keysar, Boaz

    2007-07-01

    People consider the mental states of other people to understand their actions. We evaluated whether such perspective taking is culture dependent. People in collectivistic cultures (e.g., China) are said to have interdependent selves, whereas people in individualistic cultures (e.g., the United States) are said to have independent selves. To evaluate the effect of culture, we asked Chinese and American pairs to play a communication game that required perspective taking. Eye-gaze measures demonstrated that the Chinese participants were more tuned into their partner's perspective than were the American participants. Moreover, Americans often completely failed to take the perspective of their partner, whereas Chinese almost never did. We conclude that cultural patterns of interdependence focus attention on the other, causing Chinese to be better perspective takers than Americans. Although members of both cultures are able to distinguish between their perspective and another person's perspective, cultural patterns afford Chinese the effective use of this ability to interpret other people's actions.

  1. Transformations and representations supporting spatial perspective taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alfred B.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2018-01-01

    Spatial perspective taking is the ability to reason about spatial relations relative to another’s viewpoint. Here, we propose a mechanistic hypothesis that relates mental representations of one’s viewpoint to the transformations used for spatial perspective taking. We test this hypothesis using a novel behavioral paradigm that assays patterns of response time and variation in those patterns across people. The results support the hypothesis that people maintain a schematic representation of the space around their body, update that representation to take another’s perspective, and thereby to reason about the space around their body. This is a powerful computational mechanism that can support imitation, coordination of behavior, and observational learning. PMID:29545731

  2. Subsidiary Initiative Taking in Multinational Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörrenbacher, Christoph; Gammelgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the political maneuvering that accompanies subsidiary initiative taking in multinational corporations. On the basis of an explorative empirical investigation of subsidiary initiative taking in the French subsidiaries of six German MNCs, the paper explores the activities...... that subsidiaries undertake to sell their initiatives, and the relationships among issue selling, subsidiary power and headquarters’ hierarchical power. The findings suggest that the use of issue-selling tactics is common when subsidiaries engage in initiative taking. In addition, the paper demonstrates that a low...... degree of issue selling is needed to obtain approval of an initiative in less asymmetrical headquarters–subsidiary power relationships (i.e. relationships in which subsidiaries are relatively powerful). In cases where power relationships are highly asymmetrical, issue selling is a necessity...

  3. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Yi-Hua [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R., E-mail: jricha3@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Baker, Angela A. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Mishin, Vladimir [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Department of Environmental Health Science, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40 mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. - Highlights: • Menadione redox cycles with cytochrome P450 reductase and generates reactive oxygen species. • Redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated parathion metabolism. • Short term administration of menadione inhibits parathion toxicity by inhibiting paraoxon formation.

  4. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Richardson, Jason R.; Baker, Angela A.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40 mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. - Highlights: • Menadione redox cycles with cytochrome P450 reductase and generates reactive oxygen species. • Redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated parathion metabolism. • Short term administration of menadione inhibits parathion toxicity by inhibiting paraoxon formation.

  5. HYPERBARIC OXYGENATION AND AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine D. Prather

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuing desire to improve performance, particularly at the national and international levels, has led to the use of ergogenic aids. Ergogenic aids are defined as 'a procedure or agent that provides the athlete with a competitive edge beyond that obtained via normal training methods'. Random drug testing has been implemented in an effort to minimize an athlete's ability to gain an unfair advantage. However, other means of improving performance have been tried. Blood doping has been used to enhance endurance performance by improving oxygen delivery to working muscles. As oxygen is carried in combination with the hemoglobin, it seems logical that increasing the number of red blood cells (RBC's in the body would increase the oxygen carrying capacity to the tissues and result in improved performance. The first experiments of removing and then reinfusing blood showed a significant improvement in performance time

  6. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oxygen Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen level, including blood oxygen saturation (sO2 and tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2, are crucial physiological parameters in life science. This paper reviews the importance of these two parameters and the detection methods for them, focusing on the application of photoacoustic imaging in this scenario. sO2 is traditionally detected with optical spectra-based methods, and has recently been proven uniquely efficient by using photoacoustic methods. pO2, on the other hand, is typically detected by PET, MRI, or pure optical approaches, yet with limited spatial resolution, imaging frame rate, or penetration depth. Great potential has also been demonstrated by employing photoacoustic imaging to overcome the existing limitations of the aforementioned techniques.

  7. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  8. Toxin detection using a tyrosinase-coupled oxygen electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, M H; Rechnitz, G A

    1993-02-15

    An enzyme-based "electrochemical canary" is described for the detection of cyanide. The sensing system imitates cyanide's site of toxicity in the mitochondria. The terminal sequence of electron transfer in aerobic respiration is mimicked by mediator coupling of tyrosinase catalysis to an electro-chemical system. An enzyme-coupled oxygen electrode is created which is sensitive to selective poisoning. Biocatalytic reduction of oxygen is promoted by electrochemically supplying tyrosinase with electrons. Thus, ferrocyanide is generated at a cathode and mediates the enzymatic reduction of oxygen to water. An enzyme-dependent reductive current can be monitored which is inhibited by cyanide in a concentration-dependent manner. Oxygen depletion in the reaction layer can be minimized by addressing enzyme activity using a potential pulsing routine. Enzyme activity is electrochemically initiated and terminated and the sensor becomes capable of continuous monitoring. Cyanide poisoning of the biological component is reversible, and it can be reused after rinsing. The resulting sensor detects cyanide based on its biological activity rather than its physical or chemical properties.

  9. Intracellular sodium hydrogen exchange inhibition and clinical myocardial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Robert M; Lasley, Robert D; Jessel, Andreas; Karmazyn, Morris

    2003-02-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying ischemia/reperfusion injury remain elusive, evidence supports the etiologic role of intracellular calcium overload and oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species. Activation of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE) is associated with intracellular calcium accumulation. Inhibition of the NHE-1 isoform may attenuate the consequences of this injury. Although there is strong preclinical and early clinical evidence that NHE inhibitors may be cardioprotective, definitive proof of this concept in humans awaits the results of ongoing clinical trials.

  10. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  11. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, R.; Hauss, H.; Buchholz, F.; Melzner, F.

    2015-10-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  12. Arguments that take Counterconsiderations into Account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Albert van Laar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines arguments that take counter- considerations into account, and it does so from a dialogical point of view. According to my account, a counterconsideration is part of a critical reaction from a real or imagined opponent, and an arguer may take it into account in his argument in at least six fully responsive ways. Conductive arguments (or: pro and con arguments, balance of con-siderations arguments will be characterized as one of these types. In this manner, the paper aims to show how conducive, and related kinds of argument can be understood dialogically.

  13. Kinetics of oxygen uncoupling of a copper based oxygen carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenting; Donat, Felix; Scott, S.A.; Dennis, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetics of a Cu-based oxygen carrier was determined using a TGA. • A diffusion model was applied to remove mass transfer effects from rate parameters. • Thermodynamics are separated from kinetics, usually difficult for the CLOU reaction. • The rate parameters correctly described the behaviour in a fluidised bed. • The rate parameters can be used to predict performance of large CLOU systems. - Abstract: Here, an oxygen carrier consisting of 60 wt% CuO supported on a mixture of Al_2O_3 and CaO (23 wt% and 17 wt% respectively) was synthesised by wet-mixing powdered CuO, Al(OH)_3 and Ca(OH)_2, followed by calcination at 1000 °C. Its suitability for chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) was investigated. After 25 repeated redox cycles in either a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) or a laboratory-scale fluidised bed, (with 5 vol% H_2 in N_2 as the fuel, and air as the oxidant) no significant change in either the oxygen uncoupling capacity or the overall oxygen availability of the carrier was found. In the TGA, it was found that the rate of oxygen release from the material was controlled by intrinsic chemical kinetics and external transfer of mass from the surface of the particles to the bulk gas. By modelling the various resistances, values of the rate constant for the decomposition were obtained. The activation energy of the reaction was found to be 59.7 kJ/mol (with a standard error of 5.6 kJ/mol) and the corresponding pre-exponential factor was 632 m"3/mol/s. The local rate of conversion within a particle was assumed to occur either (i) by homogeneous chemical reaction, or (ii) in uniform, non-porous grains, each reacting as a kinetically-controlled shrinking core. Upon cross validation against a batch fluidised bed experiment, the homogeneous reaction model was found to be more plausible. By accurately accounting for the various artefacts (e.g. mass transfer resistances) present in both TGA and fluidised bed experiments, it was

  14. Gasoline – ignition improver – oxygenate blends as fuels for advanced compression ignition combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, L.; Boot, M.D.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Mixing is inhibited both by the relatively low volatility of conventional diesel fuel and the short premixing time due to high fuel reactivity (i.e. cetane number (CN)). Consequently, in this research two promising oxygenates which can be produced from 2 nd generation biomass -ethanol from cellulose

  15. EPR oxygen imaging and hyperpolarized (13) C MRI of pyruvate metabolism as noninvasive biomarkers of tumor treatment response to a glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Yasui, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    The hypoxic nature of tumors results in treatment resistance and poor prognosis. To spare limited oxygen for more crucial pathways, hypoxic cancerous cells suppress mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and promote glycolysis for energy production. Thereby, inhibition of glycolysis has...... the potential to overcome treatment resistance of hypoxic tumors. Here, EPR imaging was used to evaluate oxygen dependent efficacy on hypoxia-sensitive drug. The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate blocks glycolysis pathway by inhibiting hypoxia inducible enzymes and enhanced cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate under...

  16. Biocontrol Agents for Take-all.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Weller, D.M.; Thomashow, L.S.; Cook, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. are described which are effective for the control of diseases caused by the soil-borne fungus, Gaeumannomyces graminis (Gg), such as take-all, in small grain crops or turf grass. The subject biocontrol strains have a unique genotype as shown by a characteristic banding

  17. Measuring excessive risk-taking in banking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podpiera, Jiří; Weill, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2010), s. 294-306 ISSN 0015-1920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : banking sector * risk-taking * portfolio Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.278, year: 2010 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1189_str_294_306_-_weill-podpiera.pdf

  18. Take-over performance in evasive manoeuvres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Gold, Christian; Radlmayr, Jonas; Hergeth, Sebastian; Bengler, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We investigated after effects of automation in take-over scenarios in a high-end moving-base driving simulator. Drivers performed evasive manoeuvres encountering a blocked lane in highway driving. We compared the performance of drivers 1) during manual driving, 2) after automated driving with

  19. Don't Take This with That!

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Special Features Don't take ... worth the squeeze…especially when combining grapefruit with medicines. While it can be part of a balanced ...

  20. Don't Take This with That!

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Special Features Don't take ... more than fifty prescription and over-the-counter drugs known to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ...

  1. Reconceptualizing Environmental Education: Taking Account of Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Justin; Teamey, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the pros and cons of integrating environmental education into the school curriculum. Focusing solely on environmental education's role in the school curriculum ignores a range of factors that affect its efficacy in the majority of the world. Suggests a conceptualization of environmental education that takes into account a range of…

  2. Reasons encouraging adolescents to take up smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Olga; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To understand adolescents' smoking behavior by analyzing retrospective self-ratings of the reasons encouraging them to take up smoking. Method: Participating in the study were 883 students (373 boys) of elementary and secondary schools in Kosice, Slovak Republic (74.9% of adolescents in the

  3. Liberalization, Bank Governance, and Risk Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Illueca (Manuel); L. Norden (Lars); G.F. Udell (Gregory)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe study the effects of the interplay between deregulation and governance on risk taking in the financial industry. We consider a large natural experiment in Spain where the removal of regulatory geographic constraints for savings banks led to a nationwide expansion of these banks during

  4. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  5. Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents / Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers What's in this article? The Caregiver's Dilemma Tips for Caregivers More Tips Getting Help ... there are moments when the sheer magnitude of what you're up against is so ... not alone. The Caregiver's Dilemma When you're the caregiver of a ...

  6. Picture THIS: Taking Human Impact Seriously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Patricia; Patrick, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    Unfortunately, middle school students often view human impact as an abstract idea over which they have no control and do not see themselves as contributing to the Earth's environmental decline. How better to uncover students' ideas concerning human impact in their local community than to have them take photographs. With this objective in mind, the…

  7. Patient assessment: effective consultation and history taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri

    This article explores patient consultation with specific reference to the Calgary-Cambridge consultation guide. It provides an overview of history taking and explores the patient's perspective during the consultation. The article also discusses the skills required to provide information effectively. In addition, the article addresses 'safety netting' and emphasises the interdependence of communication and consultation skills.

  8. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  9. Note taking, review, memory, and comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohay, Mark; Blakely, Daniel P; Tamplin, Andrea K; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2011-01-01

    In previous work assessing memory at various levels of representation, namely the surface form, textbase, and situation model levels, participants read texts but were otherwise not actively engaged with the texts. The current study tested the influence of active engagement with the material via note taking, along with the opportunity to review such notes, and the modality of presentation (text vs. spoken). The influence of these manipulations was assessed both immediately and 1 week later. In Experiment 1 participants read a text, whereas in Experiment 2 participants watched a video recording of the material being read as a lecture. For each experiment the opportunity to take notes was manipulated within participants, and the opportunity to review these notes before the test was manipulated between participants. Note taking improved performance at the situation model level in both experiments, although there was also some suggestion of benefit for the surface form. Thus, active engagement with material, such as note taking, appears to have the greatest benefit at the deeper levels of understanding.

  10. Don't Take This with That!

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Special Features Don't take this with that! Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ...

  11. Steps You Can Take to Prevent Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-02

    This podcast discusses the main steps people can take to reduce their risk of getting cancer.  Created: 2/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/2/2012.

  12. Transformative Pedagogy: Emergent Bilinguals and "Perspective Taking"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Mary Esther Soto

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes to the limited research on emergent bilinguals, perspective taking, and second language reading of informative text. The explicit integration of Freire's (1993) notion of conscientizacao, or consciousness-raising, with the constructs of empathy and embodiment (Gee, 2001; Hurtado, 1996) and with translanguaging (García, 2009)…

  13. Taking Math Anxiety out of Math Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Darla J.

    2007-01-01

    To take math anxiety out of math instruction, teachers need to first know how to easily diagnose it in their students and second, how to analyze causes. Results of a recent study revealed that while students believed that their math anxiety was largely related to a lack of mathematical understanding, they often blamed their teachers for causing…

  14. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  15. Note Taking in Multi-Media Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Kelly; Yao, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    We provide a preliminary exploration into the use of note taking when combined with video examples. Student volunteers were divided into three groups and asked to perform two problems. The first problem was explored in a classroom setting and the other problem was a novel problem. The students were asked to complete the two questions. Furthermore,…

  16. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  17. Medical students' note-taking in a medical biochemistry course: an initial exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Elizabeth H; McLaughlin, Calvin; Rucker, Lloyd

    2002-04-01

    Beginning medical students spend numerous hours every week attending basic science lectures and taking notes. Medical faculty often wonder whether they should give students pre-printed instructors' notes before lectures. Proponents of this strategy argue that provided notes enhance learning by facilitating the accurate transmission of information, while opponents counter that provided notes inhibit students' cognitive processing or even discourage students from attending lectures. Little if any research has directly addressed medical students' note-taking or the value of providing instructors' notes. The educational literature does suggest that taking lecture notes enhances university students' learning. University students perform best on post-lecture testing if they review a combination of provided notes and their own personal notes, particularly if the provided notes follow a 'skeletal' format that encourages active note-taking.

  18. The role of oxygen and water on molybdenum nanoclusters for electro catalytic ammonia production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G. Howalt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water often gives rise to oxygen adsorption on catalyst surfaces through decomposition of water and the adsorbed oxygen or hydroxide species often occupy important surfaces sites, resulting in a decrease or a total hindrance of other chemical reactions taking place at that site. In this study, we present theoretical investigations of the influence of oxygen adsorption and reduction on pure and nitrogen covered molybdenum nanocluster electro catalysts for electrochemical reduction of N2 to NH3 with the purpose of understanding oxygen and water poisoning of the catalyst. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free energy profile for electrochemical protonation of O and N2 species on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoclusters. The calculations show that the molybdenum nanocluster will preferentially bind oxygen over nitrogen and hydrogen at neutral bias, but under electrochemical reaction conditions needed for nitrogen reduction, oxygen adsorption is severely weakened and the adsorption energy is comparable to hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption. The potentials required to reduce oxygen off the surface are −0.72 V or lower for all oxygen coverages studied, and it is thus possible to (reactivate (partially oxidized nanoclusters for electrochemical ammonia production, e.g., using a dry proton conductor or an aqueous electrolyte. At lower oxygen coverages, nitrogen molecules can adsorb to the surface and electrochemical ammonia production via the associative mechanism is possible at potentials as low as −0.45 V to −0.7 V.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  20. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, S.; Hybel, A.-M.; Bjerg, P.L.; Albrechtsen, H.-J., E-mail: hana@env.dtu.dk

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen {sup 14}C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4–11 mg L{sup −1}) stimulated degradation (a 14–27% increase for mecoprop, 3–9% for dichlorprop and 15–20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L{sup −1}). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92–1.45 O{sub 2} g{sup -1} dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe{sup 2+}, S{sup 2−} and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. - Highlights: • Addition of different oxygen concentrations stimulated degradation of

  1. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, S.; Hybel, A.-M.; Bjerg, P.L.; Albrechtsen, H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen 14 C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4–11 mg L −1 ) stimulated degradation (a 14–27% increase for mecoprop, 3–9% for dichlorprop and 15–20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L −1 ). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92–1.45 O 2 g -1 dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe 2+ , S 2− and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. - Highlights: • Addition of different oxygen concentrations stimulated degradation of herbicides in anaerobic aquifer sediment

  2. Generation of Oxygen Free Radicals by Proflavine: Implication in Protein Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour K.M. Gatasheh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Proflavine, an acridine dye, is a known DNA intercalating agent. In the present study, we show that proflavine alone on photoillumination can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS. These proflavine-derived ROS cause damage to proteins, and this effect is enhanced when the divalent metal ion Cu (II is included in the reaction. Bathocuproine, a specific Cu (I sequestering agent, when present in the reaction mixture containing Cu (II, was found to inhibit the protein degradation, showing that Cu (I is an essential intermediate in the reaction. The effect of several scavengers of ROS such as superoxide dismutase, sodium azide, potassium iodide, and thiourea were examined on the protein damaging reaction. Potassium iodide was found to be the most effective in inhibiting protein damage followed by sodium azide and thiourea. Our results indicate the involvement of superoxide, singlet oxygen, triplet oxygen, and hydroxyl radicals in proflavine-induced damage to proteins.

  3. Optimized chondrogenesis of ATCD5 cells through sequential regulation of oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Fink, Trine; Ebbesen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    , chondrocyte-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) production was monitored. Furthermore, the transcription of collagen II, an early-phase marker, and collagen X, a marker of hypertrophic conversion, was followed by real-time RT-PCR. Low oxygen concentrations between 1 and 9% inhibited chondrogenic conversion......, as evidenced by reduced glycosaminoglycan deposition in the ECM in a manner proportional to the degree of hypoxia. Cells cultured at oxygen concentrations of 12 and 15% underwent a faster and higher degree of early-phase chondrogenesis when compared to control cells cultured at ambient air (21% O2......). For the hypertrophic conversion of the ATDC5 cells, all degrees of hypoxia inhibited collagen X expression in a dose-dependent manner. Short-term culturing of the ATDC5 cells for 6 to 8 days at 12% oxygen with subsequent culturing at 21% for the remainder of the experiment resulted in maximal production of major ECM...

  4. A New Approach for Biologically-Inhibiting Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.

    2007-01-01

    in nanometers. Due to the difference in potentials, the biologically-inhibiting material will act as a galvanic element in contact with an electrolyte. The electrochemical processes taking place at the metal surface seem to exhibit a catalytic oxidation character more than an oligomeric effect from the silver....

  5. Singlet Oxygen at the Laundromat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    1995-09-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen is an interesting molecule both visually and theoretically, since its red chemiluminescence can be analyzed by the application of simple molecular orbital theory. It can be produced from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide from either chlorine gas or hypochlorite ion from household bleach. Here we demostrate how to produce it using simple laundry cleansers.

  6. Recombinator of hydrogen and oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stejskal, J.; Klein, O.; Scholtz, G.; Schmidt, P.; Olaussson, A.

    1976-01-01

    Improvements are proposed for the well known reactors for the catalytic recombination of hydrogen and oxygen, which should permit this being used in contiuous operation in nuclear reactors (BWRs). The improvements concern the geometric arrangement of gas-inlet and -outlet pipes, the inclination of the axis of the catalyst container and the introduction of remote operation. (UWI) [de

  7. Oxygen depletion of bismuth molybdates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, L.K.; Howe, R.F.; Keulks, G.W.; Hall, W.K.

    1978-05-01

    Pure ..cap alpha..-phase bismuth molybdate (Bi/sub 2/Mo/sub 3/O/sub 12/), which is known to be weakly active for selective oxidation, and pure ..gamma..-phase bismuth molybdate (Bi/sub 2/MoO/sub 6/), which has good activity, were subjected to oxidation-reduction cycles with known amounts of hydrogen and oxygen, at 300/sup 0/-570/sup 0/C and with evacuation steps between treatments. The volume of oxygen consumed during reoxidation was equal to half the hydrogen consumed during the reduction on the ..cap alpha..-phase, which indicated that no hydrogen was retained during reduction. For the ..gamma..-phase, the oxygen consumption was greater than half of the hydrogen consumption and it increased with extent of reduction. The excess oxygen was apparently consumed by filling anion vacancies formed during outgassing subsequent to the reduction step. ESR spectroscopy and temperature-programed oxidation-reduction indicated that lattice oxide ions which bridge between bismuth and molybdenum layers of the koechlinite structure become more labile when the catalyst is in a partially reduced state, and that this effect is greater in the ..gamma..- than the ..cap alpha..-phase. Table and 15 references.

  8. Glow discharge in singlet oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, N.P.; Ionin, A.A.; Klimachev, Yu.M.; Sinitsyn, D.V.; Yuryshev, N.N.; Kochetov, I.V.; Napartovich, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Currently, there is no experimental data on the plasma balance in gas mixtures with a high content of singlet delta oxygen O 2 ( 1 Δ g ). These data can be obtained by studying the parameters of an electric discharge in singlet oxygen produced by a chemical generator. The O 2 ( 1 Δ g ) molecules significantly change the kinetics of electrons and negative ions in plasma. Hence, the discharge conditions at low and high O 2 ( 1 Δ g ) concentrations are very different. Here, the parameters of the positive column of a glow discharge in a gas flow from a chemical singlet-oxygen generator are studied. It is experimentally shown that, at an O 2 ( 1 Δ g ) concentration of 50% and at pressures of 1.5 and 2 torr, the electric field required to sustain the discharge is considerably lower than in the case when all of the oxygen molecules are in the ground state. A theoretical model of the glow discharge is proposed whose predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data

  9. Biotechnological sulphide removal with oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, C.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a new process for biotechnological sulphide removal from wastewater, in which it is attempted to convert sulphide into elemental sulphur by colourless sulphur bacteria. The toxicity, corrosive properties, unpleasant odor and high oxygen demand of sulphide

  10. Development of sensors for monitoring oxygen and free radicals in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Prachee

    Oxygen plays a critical role in the physiology of photosynthetic organisms, including bioenergetics, metabolism, development, and stress response. Oxygen levels affect photosynthesis, respiration, and alternative oxidase pathways. Likewise, the metabolic rate of spatially distinct plant cells (and therefore oxygen flux) is known to be affected by biotic stress (e.g., herbivory) and environmental stress (e.g., salt/nutrient stress). During aerobic metabolism, cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by product. Plants also produce ROS during adaptation to stress (e.g., abscisic acid (ABA) mediated stress responses). If stress conditions are prolonged, ROS levels surpass the capacity of detoxifying mechanisms within the cell, resulting in oxidative damage. While stress response pathways such as ABA-mediated mechanisms have been well characterized (e.g., water stress, inhibited shoot growth, synthesis of storage proteins in seeds), the connection between ROS production, oxygen metabolism and stress response remains unknown. In part, this is because details of oxygen transport at the interface of cell(s) and the surrounding microenvironment remains nebulous. The overall goal of this research was to develop oxygen and Free radical sensors for studying stress signaling in plants. Recent developments in nanomaterials and data acquisition systems were integrated to develop real-time, non-invasive oxygen and Free radical sensors. The availability of these sensors for plant physiologists is an exciting opportunity to probe the functional realm of cells and tissues in ways that were not previously possible.

  11. Reductive tetrachloroethene dehalogenation in the presence of oxygen by Sulfurospirillum multivorans: physiological studies and proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Jennifer; Goris, Tobias; Schiffmann, Christian L; Rubick, Raffael; Adrian, Lorenz; Schubert, Torsten; Diekert, Gabriele

    2018-01-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of organohalides is carried out by organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) in anoxic environments. The tetrachloroethene (PCE)-respiring Epsilonproteobacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans is one of few OHRB able to respire oxygen. Therefore, we investigated the organism's capacity to dehalogenate PCE in the presence of oxygen, which would broaden the applicability to use S. multivorans, unlike other commonly oxygen-sensitive OHRB, for bioremediation, e.g. at oxic/anoxic interphases. Additionally, this has an impact on our understanding of the global halogen cycle. Sulfurospirillum multivorans performs dehalogenation of PCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene at oxygen concentrations below 0.19 mg/L. The redox potential of the medium electrochemically adjusted up to +400 mV had no influence on reductive dehalogenation by S. multivorans in our experiments, suggesting that higher levels of oxygen impair PCE dechlorination by inhibiting or inactivating involved enzymes. The PCE reductive dehalogenase remained active in cell extracts of S. multivorans exposed to 0.37 mg/L oxygen for more than 96 h. Analysis of the proteome revealed that superoxide reductase and cytochrome peroxidase amounts increased with 5% oxygen in the gas phase, while the response to atmospheric oxygen concentrations involved catalase and hydrogen peroxide reductase. Taken together, our results demonstrate that reductive dehalogenation by OHRB is not limited to anoxic conditions. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Yu

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2 can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy.

  13. Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Oxidation during UVA Radiation Alters the Dynamic of Genomic DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Graindorge

    Full Text Available UVA radiation (320-400 nm is a major environmental agent that can exert its deleterious action on living organisms through absorption of the UVA photons by endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers. This leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as singlet oxygen (1O2 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, which in turn can modify reversibly or irreversibly biomolecules, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. We have previously reported that UVA-induced ROS strongly inhibit DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner, but independently of the cell cycle checkpoints activation. Here, we report that the production of 1O2 by UVA radiation leads to a transient inhibition of replication fork velocity, a transient decrease in the dNTP pool, a quickly reversible GSH-dependent oxidation of the RRM1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and sustained inhibition of origin firing. The time of recovery post irradiation for each of these events can last from few minutes (reduction of oxidized RRM1 to several hours (replication fork velocity and origin firing. The quenching of 1O2 by sodium azide prevents the delay of DNA replication, the decrease in the dNTP pool and the oxidation of RRM1, while inhibition of Chk1 does not prevent the inhibition of origin firing. Although the molecular mechanism remains elusive, our data demonstrate that the dynamic of replication is altered by UVA photosensitization of vitamins via the production of singlet oxygen.

  14. Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Oxidation during UVA Radiation Alters the Dynamic of Genomic DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, Dany; Martineau, Sylvain; Machon, Christelle; Arnoux, Philippe; Guitton, Jérôme; Francesconi, Stefania; Frochot, Céline; Sage, Evelyne; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    UVA radiation (320–400 nm) is a major environmental agent that can exert its deleterious action on living organisms through absorption of the UVA photons by endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers. This leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which in turn can modify reversibly or irreversibly biomolecules, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. We have previously reported that UVA-induced ROS strongly inhibit DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner, but independently of the cell cycle checkpoints activation. Here, we report that the production of 1O2 by UVA radiation leads to a transient inhibition of replication fork velocity, a transient decrease in the dNTP pool, a quickly reversible GSH-dependent oxidation of the RRM1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and sustained inhibition of origin firing. The time of recovery post irradiation for each of these events can last from few minutes (reduction of oxidized RRM1) to several hours (replication fork velocity and origin firing). The quenching of 1O2 by sodium azide prevents the delay of DNA replication, the decrease in the dNTP pool and the oxidation of RRM1, while inhibition of Chk1 does not prevent the inhibition of origin firing. Although the molecular mechanism remains elusive, our data demonstrate that the dynamic of replication is altered by UVA photosensitization of vitamins via the production of singlet oxygen. PMID:26485711

  15. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  16. Nitrogen transformation of reclaimed wastewater in a pipeline by oxygen injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, L E; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Sevilla, J; Marrero, M C; Hernández, A

    2009-06-01

    A study of oxygen injection was performed in a completely filled gravity pipe, which is part of the South Tenerife reclaimed wastewater reuse scheme (Spain), in order to inhibit the appearance of anaerobic conditions by a nitrification-denitrification process. The pipe was 0.6 m in diameter and 62 km long and made of cast iron with a concrete inner coating, A high-pressure oxygen injection system was installed at 16 km from the pipe inlet, where severe anaerobic conditions appear. Experiments on oxygen injection were carried out with three different concentrations (7, 15 and 30 mg l(-1) O2). In all experiments, oxygen dissolved properly after injection, and no gas escapes were detected during water transportation. Most oxygen was consumed in the nitrification process, due to the low COD/NH4-N ratio, leading to a maximum production of oxidized nitrogen compounds of 7.5 mg l(-1) NO(x)-N with the 30 mg l(-1) O2 dose. Nitrification occured with nitrite accumulation, attributed to the presence of free ammonia within the range 1.2-1.4 mg l(-). Once the oxygen had been consumed, an apparent half-order denitrification took place, with limitation of biodegradable organic matter. The anoxic conditions led to a complete inhibition of sulphide generation.

  17. Diffusion of oxygen in cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Simon, Jean-Marc; Paulin, Christian; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-04

    This work reports measurements of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in raw cork. Kinetics of oxygen transfer through cork is studied at 298 K thanks to a homemade manometric device composed of two gas compartments separated by a cork wafer sample. The first compartment contains oxygen, whereas the second one is kept under dynamic vacuum. The pressure decrease in the first compartment is recorded as a function of time. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) is obtained by applying Fick's law to transient state using a numerical method based on finite differences. An analytical model derived from Fick's law applied to steady state is also proposed. Results given by these two methods are in close agreement with each other. The harmonic average of the effective diffusion coefficients obtained from the distribution of 15 cork wafers of 3 mm thickness is 1.1 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) with a large distribution over four decades. The statistical analysis of the Gaussian distribution obtained on a 3 mm cork wafer is extrapolated to a 48 mm cork wafer, which length corresponds to a full cork stopper. In this case, the probability density distribution gives a mean value of D(eff) equal to 1.6 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). This result shows that it is possible to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient of oxygen through cork from short time (few days) measurements performed on a thin cork wafer, whereas months are required to obtain the diffusion coefficient for a full cork stopper. Permeability and oxygen transfer rate are also calculated for comparison with data from other studies.

  18. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-06

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 11205 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Construction and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Construction and Operation of a Liquefied Natural Gas Deepwater Port in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... request from Port Dolphin Energy LLC (Port Dolphin) for authorization for the take, by Level B harassment...

  20. 77 FR 9628 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals: Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Navy's Mission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... revised LOA that is valid for two years, to take marine mammals by harassment incidental to the U.S. Navy... 3395). The application requested authorization, for a period of two years, to take, by harassment..., 2011 within the required timeframes and it is posted on NMFS Web site: http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr...

  1. 78 FR 33357 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... confidence in these values is unknown. Table 3--Marine Mammal Density Estimates Density Species (animals/km\\2... unintentional taking of marine animals occurring incidental to the shock testing which involved large explosives... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting...

  2. Towards Resolution of the Confusion among the Concepts "Empathy,""Role-Taking,""Perspective Taking," and "Decentering."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Mark V.

    The variety of terms used to describe the process of self-other differentiation in communication--empathy, role taking, decentering, and perspective taking are but a few--tend to undermine efforts to establish a consistent framework for research in this area. A review of these terms suggests that decentering is the broadest of the concepts,…

  3. Take Charge. Take the Test. "Look Out For Yourself" PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 60 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).

  4. 77 FR 17033 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals: Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Navy's Training...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... take marine mammals by harassment incidental to its training activities at the Gulf of Mexico (GOMEX... Importing Marine Mammals: Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Navy's Training Activities at the Gulf of Mexico Range Complex AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  5. Fast thought speed induces risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jesse J; Pronin, Emily

    2012-04-01

    In two experiments, we tested for a causal link between thought speed and risk taking. In Experiment 1, we manipulated thought speed by presenting neutral-content text at either a fast or a slow pace and having participants read the text aloud. In Experiment 2, we manipulated thought speed by presenting fast-, medium-, or slow-paced movie clips that contained similar content. Participants who were induced to think more quickly took more risks with actual money in Experiment 1 and reported greater intentions to engage in real-world risky behaviors, such as unprotected sex and illegal drug use, in Experiment 2. These experiments provide evidence that faster thinking induces greater risk taking.

  6. The Cultural Boundaries of Perspective-Taking: When and Why Perspective-Taking Reduces Stereotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cynthia S; Lee, Margaret; Ku, Gillian; Leung, Angela K-Y

    2018-06-01

    Research conducted in Western cultures indicates that perspective-taking is an effective social strategy for reducing stereotyping. The current article explores whether and why the effects of perspective-taking on stereotyping differ across cultures. Studies 1 and 2 established that perspective-taking reduces stereotyping in Western but not in East Asian cultures. Using a socioecological framework, Studies 2 and 3 found that relational mobility, that is, the extent to which individuals' social environments provide them opportunities to choose new relationships and terminate old ones, explained our effect: Perspective-taking was negatively associated with stereotyping in relationally mobile (Western) but not in relationally stable (East Asian) environments. Finally, Study 4 examined the proximal psychological mechanism underlying the socioecological effect: Individuals in relationally mobile environments are more motivated to develop new relationships than those in relationally stable environments. Subsequently, when this motivation is high, perspective-taking increases self-target group overlap, which then decreases stereotyping.

  7. Delegated Portfolio Management and Risk Taking Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    José Luiz Barros Fernandes; Juan Ignacio Peña; Benjamin Miranda Tabak

    2009-01-01

    Standard models of moral hazard predict a negative relationship between risk and incentives; however empirical studies on mutual funds present mixed results. In this paper, we propose a behavioral principal-agent model in the context of professional managers, focusing on active and passive investment strategies. Using this general framework, we evaluate how incentives affect the risk taking behavior of managers, using the standard moral hazard model as a special case; and solve the previous c...

  8. Urban Adolescents and Sexual Risk Taking

    OpenAIRE

    Hiršl-Hećej, V.; Štulhofer, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper analyzes socio-cultural and psychosocial factors affecting sexual activities and related risk-taking behaviors in Croatian high-school students. It attempts to determine the correlates of sexual activity, early sexual initiation, the number of sexual partners, and the use of contraceptives and condoms. Due to the gender-specific trajectories of sexual socialization and initiation, all the analyses were carried out separately for female and male students. The results p...

  9. Take part in the Poster Forum

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Control Week will run from 17 to 23 May 2008. For the first time, the IT-CO group will be organising a "poster forum" on the theme of process control, which will be held in the main hall of Building 500 in Meyrin, near Restaurant No. 1 (see Bulletin No. 16/2008). If you wish to take part, there is still time to send your posters to Mathias Dutour or Stefan Lueders.

  10. Oxygen Deficit: The Bio-energetic Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABHAY KUMAR PANDEY

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scarcity of oxygen in humans arises via three modes. The environment may have low oxygen to breath. There can be disease in respiratory system causing hindrance to uptake of oxygen from environment and the circulatory system may be sluggish to supply to body parts that starve for oxygen. Thirdly the chemico-cellular components of blood which carry oxygen may be lowered or defective. In reference to body cells several limiting sites and mechanisms affect the amount of oxygen delivered to them, and these are under regulatory control of several functional and metabolic systems.

  11. The oxygen effect and cellular adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshcherikova, V.V.; Vajnson, A.A.; Yarmonenko, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    The radiomodifying effect of oxygen was shown to depend on the level of cellular oxygenation prior to irradiation. Acute hypoxia created at the time of irradiation protects previously normally oxygenated cells with DMF approximately 1.4 times larger than that of cells cultured for 24 hours under conditions of mild hypoxia. It is suggested that a decrease in the radioprotective effect of acute hypoxia on chronically hypoxic cells is correlated with an appreciable decrease in the rate of oxygen consumption by these cells, due to which the oxygen concentration near the intracellular targets in chronically hypoxic cells may be higher than in normal cells under conditions of poor oxygenation

  12. Central venous oxygenation: when physiology explains apparent discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squara, Pierre

    2014-11-10

    Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) >70% or mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) >65% is recommended for both septic and non-septic patients. Although it is the task of experts to suggest clear and simple guidelines, there is a risk of reducing critical care to these simple recommendations. This article reviews the basic physiological and pathological features as well as the metrological issues that provide clear evidence that SvO2 and ScvO2 are adaptative variables with large inter-patient variability. This variability is exemplified in a modeled population of 1,000 standard ICU patients and in a real population of 100 patients including 15,860 measurements. In these populations, it can be seen how optimizing one to three of the four S(c)vO2 components homogenized the patients and yields a clear dependency with the fourth one. This explains the discordant results observed in large studies where cardiac output was increased up to predetermined S(c)vO2 thresholds following arterial oxygen hemoglobin saturation, total body oxygen consumption needs and hemoglobin optimization. Although a systematic S(c)vO2 goal-oriented protocol can be statistically profitable before ICU admission, appropriate intensive care mandates determination of the best compromise between S(c)vO2 and its four components, taking into account the specific constraints of each individual patient.

  13. Zirconium oxide based ceramic solid electrolytes for oxygen detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caproni, Erica

    2007-01-01

    Taking advantage of the high thermal shock resistance of zirconia-magnesia ceramics and the high oxide ion conductivity of zirconia-yttria ceramics, composites of these ceramics were prepared by mixing, pressing and sintering different relative concentrations of ZrO 2 : 8.6 mol% MgO and ZrO 2 : 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 solid electrolytes. Microstructural analysis of the composites was carried out by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The thermal behavior was studied by dilatometric analysis. The electrical behavior was evaluated by the impedance spectroscopy technique. An experimental setup was designed for measurement the electrical signal generated as a function of the amount of oxygen at high temperatures. The main results show that these composites are partially stabilized (monoclinic, cubic and tetragonal) and the thermal behavior is similar to that of ZrO 2 : 8.6 mol% MgO materials used in disposable high temperature oxygen sensors. Moreover, the results of analysis of impedance spectroscopy show that the electrical conductivity of zirconia:magnesia is improved with zirconia-yttria addition and that the electrical signal depends on the amount of oxygen at 1000 deg C, showing that the ceramic composites can be used in oxygen sensors. (author)

  14. Oxygen redistribution in (UCe)Osub(2-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedeney, Philippe.

    1983-01-01

    Redistribution of oxygen has been investigated in (Usub(0,7)Cesub(0,3))Osub(2-x) mixed oxide subjected to a temperature gradient in laboratory experiments, in order to apply the results to the nuclear fuel (UPu)Osub(2-x). Cylindrical sintered oxide specimens were exposed to temperature up to 1300 0 C with a longitudinal thermal gradient of about 400 0 C/cm. The most interesting feature of the experimental set-up is a solid-state electrochemical gauge (ThO 2 - Y 2 O 3 ), placed in the cold part of the sample which allows a continuous measurement of the oxygen activity. The experiments showed a fast oxygen migration down the thermal gradient. The calculations performed with a model based on solid-state thermodiffusion are in good agreement with experimental results. The heat of transport Q measured for bare samples reaches (7.2+-0.5)-kcal/mole. When the sample is coated with a tight fitting metallic cladding, an extra term Qe has to be added to the heat of transport Qe. This was interpreted as an electrotransport phenomena. On the same basis, calculations applied to radial oxygen redistribution in (UPu)Osub(2-x) seem to be adequate at least during the first stage of irradiation, taking Q=(20+-5)kcal/mole [fr

  15. The transport of oxygen isotopes in hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibbin, R.; Absar, A.; Blattner, P.

    1986-01-01

    As groundwater passes through porous rocks, exchange of oxygen between the fluid and the solid matrix causes a change in the oxygen isotope concentrations in both water and rock. If the rate at which the exchange takes place can be estimated (as a function of the isotope concentrations and temperature) then the time taken for a rock/water system to come to equilibrium with respect to isotope concentration might be calculated. In this paper, the equation for isotope transport is derived using conservation laws, and a simple equation to describe the rate of isotope exchange is proposed. These are combined with the equations for fluid flow in a porous medium, to produce a general set of equations describing isotope transport in a hydrothermal system. These equations are solved numerically, using typical parameters, for the one-dimensional case. Oxygen isotope data from the basement rocks underlying Kawerau geothermal field are modelled. The results indicate that the time taken for exchange of 18 O to present-day values is less than the postulated age of hydrothermal alteration in that field. This suggests that, although controlled by similar parameters, oxygen isotope exchange, in felsic rocks at least, is much faster than hydrothermal alteration. This conclusion is consistent with the petrographic observations from the Kawerau system as well as other geothermal fields

  16. Advanced chemical oxygen iodine lasers for novel beam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kenan; Zhao, Tianliang; Huai, Ying; Jin, Yuqi

    2018-03-01

    Chemical oxygen iodine laser, or COIL, is an impressive type of chemical laser that emits high power beam with good atmospheric transmissivity. Chemical oxygen iodine lasers with continuous-wave plane wave output are well-developed and are widely adopted in directed energy systems in the past several decades. Approaches of generating novel output beam based on chemical oxygen iodine lasers are explored in the current study. Since sophisticated physical processes including supersonic flowing of gaseous active media, chemical reacting of various species, optical power amplification, as well as thermal deformation and vibration of mirrors take place in the operation of COIL, a multi-disciplinary model is developed for tracing the interacting mechanisms and evaluating the performance of the proposed laser architectures. Pulsed output mode with repetition rate as high as hundreds of kHz, pulsed output mode with low repetition rate and high pulse energy, as well as novel beam with vector or vortex feature can be obtained. The results suggest potential approaches for expanding the applicability of chemical oxygen iodine lasers.

  17. Oxygen diffusion in fish embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenbarg, S.

    2002-01-01

    All vertebrate embryos pass through a developmental period of remarkably low morphological variability. This period has been called phylotypic period. During the phylotypic period, organogenesis takes place, including blood vessel development. Before the phylotypic

  18. Ferulenol specifically inhibits succinate ubiquinone reductase at the level of the ubiquinone cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahouel, Mesbah; Zini, Roland; Zellagui, Ammar; Rhouati, Salah; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Morin, Didier

    2007-01-01

    The natural compound ferulenol, a sesquiterpene prenylated coumarin derivative, was purified from Ferula vesceritensis and its mitochondrial effects were studied. Ferulenol caused inhibition of oxidative phoshorylation. At low concentrations, ferulenol inhibited ATP synthesis by inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocase without limitation of mitochondrial respiration. At higher concentrations, ferulenol inhibited oxygen consumption. Ferulenol caused specific inhibition of succinate ubiquinone reductase without altering succinate dehydrogenase activity of the complex II. This inhibition results from a limitation of electron transfers initiated by the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol in the ubiquinone cycle. This original mechanism of action makes ferulenol a useful tool to study the physiological role and the mechanism of electron transfer in the complex II. In addition, these data provide an additional mechanism by which ferulenol may alter cell function and demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction is an important determinant in Ferula plant toxicity

  19. Ammonium inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, H.; Burris, R.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1989-06-01

    The effect of oxygen, ammonium ion, and amino acids on nitrogenase activity in the root-associated N{sub 2}-fixing bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae was investigated in comparison with Azospirillum spp. and Rhodospirillum rubrum. H. seropedicae is microaerophilic, and its optimal dissolved oxygen level is from 0.04 to 0.2 kPa for dinitrogen fixation but higher when it is supplied with fixed nitrogen. No nitrogenase activity was detected when the dissolved O{sub 2} level corresponded to 4.0 kPa. Ammonium, a product of the nitrogenase reaction, reversible inhibited nitrogenase activity when added to derepressed cell cultures. However, the inhibition of nitrogenase activity was only partial even with concentrations of ammonium chloride as high as 20 mM. Amides such as glutamine and asparagine partially inhibited nitrogenase activity, but glutamate did not. Nitrogenase in crude extracts prepared from ammonium-inhibited cells showed activity as high as in extracts from N{sub 2}-fixing cells. The pattern of the dinitrogenase and the dinitrogenase reductase revealed by the immunoblotting technique did not change upon ammonium chloride treatment of cells in vivo. No homologous sequences were detected with the draT-draG probe from Azospirillum lipoferum. There is no clear evidence that ADP-ribosylation of the dinitrogenase reductase is involved in the ammonium inhibition of H. seropedicae. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone decreased the intracellular ATP concentration and inhibited the nitrogenase activity of whole cells. The ATP pool was significantly disturbed when cultures were treated with ammonium in vivo.

  20. Effect of oxygen on decomposition of nitrous oxide over various metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satsuma, Atsushi; Maeshima, Hajime; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2001-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of oxygen on decomposition of nitrous oxide over various metal oxide catalysts was investigated. The activity of nitrous oxide decomposition significantly decreased over CuO, Co 3 O 4 , NiO, Fe 2 O 3 , SnO 2 , In 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 by reversible adsorption of oxygen onto the active sites. On the contrary to this, there was no or small change in the activity of TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , MgO, La 2 O 3 and CaO. A good correlation was observed between the degree of inhibition and the heat of formation of metal oxides. On the basis of kinetic model, the reduction of catalytic activity in the presence of oxygen was rationalized with the strength of oxygen adsorption on the metal oxide surface. (author)

  1. The antileishmanial activity of novel oxygenated chalcones and their mechanism of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, L; Chen, M; Blom, J

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that licochalcone A, an oxygenated chalcone, has antileishmanial and antimalarial activities, and alters the ultrastructure and function of the mitochondria of Leishmania spp. parasites. The present study was designed to investigate the antileishmanial activity...... resulted in a significant reduction of parasite load in the liver and the spleen compared with untreated control animals. The oxygenated chalcones also inhibited the respiration of the parasite and the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases. Electron microscopic studies illustrated that they altered...... the ultrastructure of the mitochondria of L. major promastigote. The data clearly indicate that this group of oxygenated chalcones has a strong antileishmanial activity and might be developed into a new antileishmanial drug. The antileishmanial activity of oxygenated chalcones might be the result of interference...

  2. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  3. Oxygen-hydrogen recombination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shuichiro; Takejima, Masaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid reduction in the performance of catalyst used for an oxygen-hydrogen recombiner in the off gas processing system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: A thermometer is provided for the detection of temperature in an oxygen-hydrogen recombiner. A cooling pipe is provided in the recombiner and cooling medium is introduced externally. The cooling medium may be water or air. In accordance with the detection value from the thermometer, ON-OFF control is carried out for a valve to control the flow rate of the cooling medium thereby rendering the temperature in the recombiner to a predetermined value. This can prevent the catalyst from being exposed to high temperature and avoid the reduction in the performance of the catalyst. (Ikeda, J.)

  4. Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fan (Inventor); Pearton, Stephen John (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) capable of performing as a CO.sub.2 or O.sub.2 sensor is disclosed, hi one implementation, a polymer solar cell can be connected to the HEMT for use in an infrared detection system. In a second implementation, a selective recognition layer can be provided on a gate region of the HEMT. For carbon dioxide sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, PEI/starch. For oxygen sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, indium zinc oxide (IZO). In one application, the HEMTs can be used for the detection of carbon dioxide and oxygen in exhaled breath or blood.

  5. Measurement of forearm oxygen consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    1988-01-01

    The classical forearm technique widely used for studies of skeletal muscle metabolism requires arterial cannulation. To avoid arterial puncture it is becoming more common to arterialize blood from a contralateral hand vein by local heating. This modification and the classical method have produced...... blood flow and decreases skeletal muscle blood flow. This facilitates mixing of superficial blood with deep venous blood. Contralateral heating increased deep venous oxygen saturation and abolished the pronounced glucose-induced increase in oxygen consumption observed in the control experiments after...... contradictory results regarding the contribution of skeletal muscle to glucose-induced thermogenesis. The effect on forearm circulation and the metabolism of heating the contralateral hand was examined before and after an oral glucose load. The results suggest that contralateral heating increases subcutaneous...

  6. Oxygen transfer in slurry bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Y; Moo-Young, M

    1991-04-25

    The oxygen transfer in bioreactors with slurries having a yield stress was investigated. The volumetric mass transfer coefficients in a 40-L bubble column with simulated fermentation broths, the Theological properties of which were represented by the Casson model, were measured. Experimental data were compared with a theoretical correlation developed on the basis of a combination of Higbie's penetration theory and Kolmogoroff's theory of isotropic turbulence. Comparisons between the proposed correlation and data for the simulated broths show good agreement. The mass transfer data for actual mycelial fermentation broths reported previously by the authors were re-examined. Their Theological data was correlated by the Bingham plastic model. The oxygen transfer rate data in the mycelial fermentation broths fit the predictions of the proposed theoretical correlation.

  7. Proanthocyanidins in seed coat tegmen and endospermic cap inhibit seed germination in Sapium sebiferum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faheem Afzal; Ni, Jun; Chen, Jing; Wang, Qiaojian; Liu, Wenbo; Chen, Xue; Tang, Caiguo; Fu, Songling; Wu, Lifang

    2018-01-01

    Sapium sebiferum , an ornamental and bio-energetic plant, is propagated by seed. Its seed coat contains germination inhibitors and takes a long time to stratify for germination. In this study, we discovered that the S. sebiferum seed coat (especially the tegmen) and endospermic cap (ESC) contained high levels of proanthocyanidins (PAs). Seed coat and ESC removal induced seed germination, whereas exogenous application with seed coat extract (SCE) or PAs significantly inhibited this process, suggesting that PAs in the seed coat played a major role in regulating seed germination in S. sebiferum . We further investigated how SCE affected the expression of the seed-germination-related genes. The results showed that treatment with SCE upregulated the transcription level of the dormancy-related gene, gibberellins (GAs) suppressing genes, abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and signalling genes. SCE decreased the transcript levels of ABA catabolic genes, GAs biosynthesis genes, reactive oxygen species genes and nitrates-signalling genes. Exogenous application of nordihydroguaiaretic acid, gibberellic acid, hydrogen peroxide and potassium nitrate recovered seed germination in seed-coat-extract supplemented medium. In this study, we highlighted the role of PAs, and their interactions with the other germination regulators, in the regulation of seed dormancy in S. sebiferum .

  8. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous nucleation of ice within aqueous solution droplets and their subsequent crystallisation is thought to play a significant role in upper tropospheric ice cloud formation. It is normally assumed that homogeneous nucleation will take place at a threshold supersaturation, irrespective of the identity of the solute, and that rapid growth of ice particles will follow immediately after nucleation. However, it is shown here through laboratory experiments that droplets may not readily freeze in the very cold tropical tropopause layer (TTL, typical temperatures of 186–200 K. In these experiments ice crystal growth in citric acid solution droplets did not occur when ice nucleated below 197±6 K. Citric acid, 2-hydroxypropane-1,2,3-tricarboxyllic acid, is a molecule with similar functionality to oxygenated organic compounds which are ubiquitous in atmospheric aerosol. It is therefore thought to be a sensible proxy for atmospheric organic material. Evidence is presented that suggests citric acid solution droplets become ultra-viscous and form glassy solids under atmospherically relevant conditions. Diffusion of liquid water molecules to ice nuclei is expected to be very slow in ultra-viscous solution droplets and nucleation is negligible in glassy droplets; this most likely provides an explanation for the experimentally observed inhibition of ice crystallisation. The implications of ultra-viscous and glassy solution droplets for ice cloud formation and supersaturations in the TTL are discussed.

  9. Proanthocyanidins in seed coat tegmen and endospermic cap inhibit seed germination in Sapium sebiferum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Afzal Shah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sapium sebiferum, an ornamental and bio-energetic plant, is propagated by seed. Its seed coat contains germination inhibitors and takes a long time to stratify for germination. In this study, we discovered that the S. sebiferum seed coat (especially the tegmen and endospermic cap (ESC contained high levels of proanthocyanidins (PAs. Seed coat and ESC removal induced seed germination, whereas exogenous application with seed coat extract (SCE or PAs significantly inhibited this process, suggesting that PAs in the seed coat played a major role in regulating seed germination in S. sebiferum. We further investigated how SCE affected the expression of the seed-germination-related genes. The results showed that treatment with SCE upregulated the transcription level of the dormancy-related gene, gibberellins (GAs suppressing genes, abscisic acid (ABA biosynthesis and signalling genes. SCE decreased the transcript levels of ABA catabolic genes, GAs biosynthesis genes, reactive oxygen species genes and nitrates-signalling genes. Exogenous application of nordihydroguaiaretic acid, gibberellic acid, hydrogen peroxide and potassium nitrate recovered seed germination in seed-coat-extract supplemented medium. In this study, we highlighted the role of PAs, and their interactions with the other germination regulators, in the regulation of seed dormancy in S. sebiferum.

  10. Critical appraisal on the role of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in lithium-oxygen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodge, Andrew W.; Lacey, Matthew J.; Fitt, Matthew; Garcia-Araez, Nuria; Owen, John R.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a detailed characterization of the reduction of oxygen in pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids for application to lithium-oxygen batteries. It is found that, in the absence of Li + , all electron transfer kinetics are fast, and therefore, the reactions are limited by the mass transport rate. Reversible reduction of O 2 to O 2 • − and O 2 • − to O 2 2− take place at E 0 = 2.1 V and 0.8 V vs. Li + /Li, respectively. In the presence of Li + , O 2 is reduced to LiO 2 first and then to Li 2 O 2 . The solubility product constant of Li 2 O 2 is found to be around 10 −51 , corroborating the hypothesis that electrode passivation by Li 2 O 2 deposition is an important issue that limits the capacity delivered by lithium-oxygen batteries. Enhancing the rate of Li 2 O 2 formation by using different electrode materials would probably lead to faster electrode passivation and hence smaller charge due to oxygen reduction (smaller capacity of the battery). On the contrary, soluble redox catalysts can not only increase the reaction rate of Li 2 O 2 formation but also avoid electrode passivation since the fast diffusion of the soluble redox catalyst would displace the formation of Li 2 O 2 at a sufficient distance from the electrode surface

  11. Oxygen abundances in halo stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Michael S.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Ruan, Kui

    1991-12-01

    The present study determines the oxygen abundance for a sample of metal-poor G dwarfs by analysis of OH lines between 3080 and 3200 A and the permitted high-excitation far-red O I triple. The oxygen abundances determined from the low-excitation OH lines are up to 0.55 dex lower than those measured from the high-excitation O I lines. The abundances for the far-red O I triplet lines agree with those rederived from Abia and Rebolo (1989), and the abundances from the OH lines in dwarfs and giants are in agreement with the rederived O abundances of Barbuy (1988) and others from the forbidden resonance O I line. Because the chi = 0.1.7 eV OH lines are formed in the same layers as the majority of Fe, Ti, and other neutral metal lines used for abundance analyses, it is argued that the OH lines and the forbidden O I line yield the true oxygen abundances relative to the metals.

  12. In-Situ Resource Utilization: Oxygen Production

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The leading option for extracting oxygen from the Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide is to use a solid oxide electrolyzer, which removes one oxygen atom from the CO2...

  13. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The system of non-linear differential equations was solved numerically using Runge-kutta. Nystroms method. ... artery occlusion. Keywords: Mathematical modeling, Intraretinal oxygen pressure, Retinal capillaries, Oxygen ..... Mass transfer,.

  14. Oxygen-Methane Thruster, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orion Propulsion, Inc. proposes to develop an Oxygen and Methane RCS Thruster to advance the technology of alternate fuels. A successful Oxygen/CH4 RCS Thruster will...

  15. Ketose induced respiratory inhibition in isolated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, P; Carrascosa, J M; Núñez de Castro, I

    1987-06-01

    The addition of 10 mM fructose or 10 mM tagatose to a suspension of hepatocytes caused respiratory inhibition, whereas no change in oxygen uptake was observed following the addition of glucose. However, incubations in the presence of fructose showed a high, aerobic glycolytic activity. Tagatose is phosphorylated to tagatose 1-phosphate but is not further metabolized by cell free liver extract. Moreover, the addition of fructose to glucagon treated cells also caused the Crabtree-like effect. The concentration of adenine nucleotides and inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments during incubation (time 30 min) was determined by the digitonin fractionation procedure. In the presence of 10 mM fructose or tagatose, the total adenine nucleotide pools decreased by 40%; however, glucose produced no change. The addition of ketoses diminished the asymmetric distribution of extramitochondrial (ATP/ADP)e ratio and intramitochondrial (ATP/ADP)i ratio. At the same time the total mitochondrial Pi fell from 17 mM to 6-7 mM. The mitochondrial membrane potential (-161 mV) in the presence of fructose showed no changes during the 30 min experimental period. An increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio was observed. These results suggest that in hepatocytes the inhibition of respiration is not necessarily linked with the enhanced aerobic glycolysis, by competition for common substrates.

  16. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium during cell culture: Defects and improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; He, Yunlin; Zhou, Yanzhao; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    In vitro cell culture has provided a useful model to study the effects of oxygen on cellular behavior. However, it remains unknown whether the in vitro operations themselves affect the medium oxygen levels and the living states of cells. In addition, a prevailing controversy is whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is induced by continuous hypoxia or reoxygenation. In this study, we have measured the effects of different types of cell culture containers and the oxygen environment where medium replacement takes place on the actual oxygen tension in the medium. We found that the deviations of oxygen concentrations in the medium are much greater in 25-cm(2) flasks than in 24-well plates and 35-mm dishes. The dissolved oxygen concentrations in the medium were increased after medium replacement in normoxia, but remained unchanged in glove boxes in which the oxygen tension remained at a low level (11.4, 5.7, and 0.5% O2 ). We also found that medium replacement in normoxia increased the number of ROS-positive cells and reduced the cell viability; meanwhile, medium replacement in a glove box did not produce the above effects. Therefore, we conclude that the use of 25-cm(2) flasks should be avoided and demonstrate that continuous hypoxia does not produce ROS, whereas the reoxygenation that occurs during the harvesting of cells leads to ROS and induces cell death. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. Sympathetic vasoconstriction takes an unexpected pannexin detour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schak Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction plays an important role in the control of blood pressure and the distribution of blood flow. In this issue of Science Signaling, Billaud et al. show that sympathetic vasoconstriction occurs through a complex scheme involving the activation of large-pore pannexin 1...... channels and the subsequent release of adenosine triphosphate that promotes contraction in an autocrine and paracrine manner. This elaborate mechanism may function as a point of intercept for other signaling pathways-for example, in relation to the phenomenon "functional sympatholysis," in which exercise...... abrogates sympathetic vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle. Because pannexin 1 channels are inhibited by nitric oxide, they may function as a switch to turn off adrenergic signaling in skeletal muscle during exercise....

  18. Oxygen - a limiting factor for brain recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hadanny, Amir; Efrati, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Effective brain metabolism is highly dependent on a narrow therapeutic window of oxygen. In major insults to the brain (e.g., intracerebral hemorrhage), a slight decrease in oxygen supply, as occurs in a hypobaric environment at high altitude, has devastating effects on the injured brain tissue. Conversely, increasing brain oxygenation, by the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can improve brain metabolism and its dependent regenerative processes.

  19. Last piece of ATLAS takes the plunge

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Friday 29 February the second small wheel was lowered 100 metres underground into the ATLAS cavern in front of a captivated audience. Although called the "small wheels" they are small in name only - each wheel is 9.3 metres in diameter and weighs 100 tonnes including the massive shielding elements. This piece completes ATLAS’ muon spectrometer, which has the ability to accurately track particles to the width of a human hair. The first piece of ATLAS was installed in 2003 and, five years later, this small wheel is the final large piece of the detector to take the subterranean voyage to its final resting place.

  20. Give and Take in Dictator Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelen, Alexander W.; Nielsen, Ulrik Haagen; Sørensen, Erik Ø.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that participants in the dictator game are less willing to give money to the other participant when their choice set also includes the option to take money. We examine whether this effect is due to the choice set providing a signal about entitlements in a setting where...... entitlements initially may be considered unclear. We find that the share of positive transfers depends on the choice set even when there is no uncertainty about entitlements, and that this choice-set effect is robust across a heterogenous group of participants recruited from the general adult population...