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Sample records for oxidizing enzymes elucidating

  1. Elucidation of the electrochromic mechanism of nanostructured iron oxides films

    Garcia-Lobato, M.A.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Castro-Roman, M. [Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute, Cinvestav Campus Saltillo, Carr. Saltillo-Monterrey Km. 13, Ramos Arizpe, Coah. 25900 (Mexico); Perry, Dale L. [Mail Stop 70A1150, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zarate, R.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Escobar-Alarcon, L. (Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    Nanostructured hematite thin films were electrochemically cycled in an aqueous solution of LiOH. Through optical, structural, morphological, and magnetic measurements, the coloration mechanism of electrochromic iron oxide thin films was elucidated. The conditions for double or single electrochromic behavior are given in this work. During the electrochemical cycling, it was found that topotactic transformations of hexagonal crystal structures are favored; i.e. {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe(OH){sub 2} and subsequently to {delta}-FeOOH. These topotactic redox reactions are responsible for color changes of iron oxide films. (author)

  2. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  3. Enzymic oxidation of carbon monoxide. II

    Yagi, T

    1959-01-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the oxidation of carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide was obtained in a cell free state from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The enzyme activity was assayed manometrically by measuring the rate of gas uptake under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide in the presence of benzyl-viologen as an oxidant. The optimum pH range was 7 to 8. The activity was slightly suppressed by illumination. The enzyme was more stable than hydrogenase or formate dehydrogenase against the heat treatment, suggesting that it is a different entity from these enzymes. In the absence of an added oxidant, the enzyme preparation produced hydrogen gas under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. The phenomenon can be explained assuming the reductive decomposition of water. 17 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Assaying Oxidative Coupling Activity of CYP450 Enzymes.

    Agarwal, Vinayak

    2018-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes are ubiquitous catalysts in natural product biosynthetic schemes where they catalyze numerous different transformations using radical intermediates. In this protocol, we describe procedures to assay the activity of a marine bacterial CYP450 enzyme Bmp7 which catalyzes the oxidative radical coupling of polyhalogenated aromatic substrates. The broad substrate tolerance of Bmp7, together with rearrangements of the aryl radical intermediates leads to a large number of products to be generated by the enzymatic action of Bmp7. The complexity of the product pool generated by Bmp7 thus presents an analytical challenge for structural elucidation. To address this challenge, we describe mass spectrometry-based procedures to provide structural insights into aryl crosslinked products generated by Bmp7, which can complement subsequent spectroscopic experiments. Using the procedures described here, for the first time, we show that Bmp7 can efficiently accept polychlorinated aryl substrates, in addition to the physiological polybrominated substrates for the biosynthesis of polyhalogenated marine natural products. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Elucidating the structural basis for differing enzyme inhibitor potency by cryo-EM.

    Rawson, Shaun; Bisson, Claudine; Hurdiss, Daniel L; Fazal, Asif; McPhillie, Martin J; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E; Baker, Patrick J; Rice, David W; Muench, Stephen P

    2018-02-20

    Histidine biosynthesis is an essential process in plants and microorganisms, making it an attractive target for the development of herbicides and antibacterial agents. Imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (IGPD), a key enzyme within this pathway, has been biochemically characterized in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( Sc_ IGPD) and Arabidopsis thaliana ( At_ IGPD). The plant enzyme, having been the focus of in-depth structural analysis as part of an inhibitor development program, has revealed details about the reaction mechanism of IGPD, whereas the yeast enzyme has proven intractable to crystallography studies. The structure-activity relationship of potent triazole-phosphonate inhibitors of IGPD has been determined in both homologs, revealing that the lead inhibitor (C348) is an order of magnitude more potent against Sc_ IGPD than At_ IGPD; however, the molecular basis of this difference has not been established. Here we have used single-particle electron microscopy (EM) to study structural differences between the At and Sc_ IGPD homologs, which could influence the difference in inhibitor potency. The resulting EM maps at ∼3 Å are sufficient to de novo build the protein structure and identify the inhibitor binding site, which has been validated against the crystal structure of the At_ IGPD/C348 complex. The structure of Sc _IGPD reveals that a 24-amino acid insertion forms an extended loop region on the enzyme surface that lies adjacent to the active site, forming interactions with the substrate/inhibitor binding loop that may influence inhibitor potency. Overall, this study provides insights into the IGPD family and demonstrates the power of using an EM approach to study inhibitor binding. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  6. A fluorescence assay for elucidating the substrate specificities of deubiquitinating enzymes

    Yin, Si-Tao; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Song, Ai-Xin; Hong, Fa-Shui; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► A deubiquitinating enzyme has its unique substrate specificity for deubiquitination. ► We have established an activity assay for ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases. ► This assay can be applicable to other deubiquitinating enzymes. -- Abstract: Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are a representative family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which specifically cleave ubiquitin (Ub) chains or extensions. Here we present a convenient method for characterizing the substrate specificities of various UCHs by fluorescently mutated Ub-fusion proteins (Ub F45W -Xaa) and di-ubiquitin chains (Ub F45W -diUb). After removal of the intact substrate by Ni 2+ -NTA affinity, the enzymatic activities of UCHs were quantitatively determined by recording fluorescence of the Ub F45W product. The results show that three UCHs, i.e. UCH-L1, UCH-L3 and UCH37/UCH-L5, are distinct in their substrate specificities for the Ub-fusions and diUb chains. This assay method may also be applied to study the enzymatic activities and substrate specificities of other DUBs.

  7. Thymidine kinase 2 enzyme kinetics elucidate the mechanism of thymidine-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    Sun, Ren; Wang, Liya

    2014-10-07

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein, synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently translocated into the mitochondrial matrix, where it catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine (dT) and deoxycytidine (dC). The kinetics of dT phosphorylation exhibits negative cooperativity, but dC phosphorylation follows hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The two substrates compete with each other in that dT is a competitive inhibitor of dC phosphorylation, while dC acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of dT phosphorylation. In addition, TK2 is feedback inhibited by dTTP and dCTP. TK2 also phosphorylates a number of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapy and thus plays an important role in mitochondrial toxicities caused by nucleoside analogues. Deficiency in TK2 activity due to genetic alterations causes devastating mitochondrial diseases, which are characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion or multiple deletions in the affected tissues. Severe TK2 deficiency is associated with early-onset fatal mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, while less severe deficiencies result in late-onset phenotypes. In this review, studies of the enzyme kinetic behavior of TK2 enzyme variants are used to explain the mechanism of mtDNA depletion caused by TK2 mutations, thymidine overload due to thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, and mitochondrial toxicity caused by antiviral thymidine analogues.

  8. Early bichemical markers of effects: Enzyme induction, oncogene activation and markers of oxidative damage

    Poulsen, Henrik E.; Loft, Steffen

    1995-01-01

    Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein......Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein...

  9. Ferulic Acid Orchestrates Anti-Oxidative Properties of Danggui Buxue Tang, an Ancient Herbal Decoction: Elucidation by Chemical Knock-Out Approach.

    Amy G W Gong

    Full Text Available Ferulic acid, a phenolic acid derived mainly from a Chinese herb Angelica Sinensis Radix (ASR, was reported to reduce the formation of free radicals. Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT, a herbal decoction composing of Astragali Radix (AR and ASR, has been utilized for more than 800 years in China having known anti-oxidative property. Ferulic acid is a major active ingredient in DBT; however, the role of ferulic acid within the herbal mixture has not been resolved. In order to elucidate the function of ferulic acid within this herbal decoction, a ferulic acid-depleted herbal decoction was created and named as DBTΔfa. The anti-oxidative properties of chemically modified DBT decoction were systemically compared in cultured H9C2 rat cardiomyoblast cell line. The application of DBT and DBTΔfa into the cultures showed functions in (i decreasing the reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, detected by laser confocal; (ii increasing of the activation of Akt; (iii increasing the transcriptional activity of anti-oxidant response element (ARE; and (iv increasing the expressions of anti-oxidant enzymes, i.e. NQO1 and GCLM. In all scenario, the aforementioned anti-oxidative properties of DBTΔfa in H9C2 cells were significantly reduced, as compared to authentic DBT. Thus, ferulic acid could be an indispensable chemical in DBT to orchestrate multi-components of DBT as to achieve maximal anti-oxidative functions.

  10. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  11. 99Tc and Re incorporated into metal oxide polyoxometalates: oxidation state stability elucidated by electrochemistry and theory.

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P; Mbomekalle, Israel M; Aparicio, Pablo A; Romo, Susanna; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M; Francesconi, Lynn C

    2012-08-20

    The radioactive element technetium-99 ((99)Tc, half-life = 2.1 × 10(5) years, β(-) of 253 keV), is a major byproduct of (235)U fission in the nuclear fuel cycle. (99)Tc is also found in radioactive waste tanks and in the environment at National Lab sites and fuel reprocessing centers. Separation and storage of the long-lived (99)Tc in an appropriate and stable waste-form is an important issue that needs to be addressed. Considering metal oxide solid-state materials as potential storage matrixes for Tc, we are examining the redox speciation of Tc on the molecular level using polyoxometalates (POMs) as models. In this study we investigate the electrochemistry of Tc complexes of the monovacant Wells-Dawson isomers, α(1)-P(2)W(17)O(61)(10-) (α1) and α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61)(10-) (α2) to identify features of metal oxide materials that can stabilize the immobile Tc(IV) oxidation state accessed from the synthesized Tc(V)O species and to interrogate other possible oxidation states available to Tc within these materials. The experimental results are consistent with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Electrochemistry of K(7-n)H(n)[Tc(V)O(α(1)-P(2)W(17)O(61))] (Tc(V)O-α1), K(7-n)H(n)[Tc(V)O(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))] (Tc(V)O-α2) and their rhenium analogues as a function of pH show that the Tc-containing derivatives are always more readily reduced than their Re analogues. Both Tc and Re are reduced more readily in the lacunary α1 site as compared to the α2 site. The DFT calculations elucidate that the highest oxidation state attainable for Re is VII while, under the same electrochemistry conditions, the highest oxidation state for Tc is VI. The M(V)→ M(IV) reduction processes for Tc(V)O-α1 are not pH dependent or only slightly pH dependent suggesting that protonation does not accompany reduction of this species unlike the M(V)O-α2 (M = (99)Tc, Re) and Re(V)O-α1 where M(V/IV) reduction process must occur hand in hand with protonation of the terminal M═O to

  12. Scaling of oxidative and glycolytic enzymes in mammals.

    Emmett, B; Hochachka, P W

    1981-09-01

    The catalytic activities of several oxidative and glycolytic enzymes were determined in the gastrocnemius muscle of 10 mammalian species differing in body weight by nearly 6 orders of magnitude. When expressed in terms of units gm-1, the activities of enzymes functioning in oxidative metabolism (citrate synthase, beta-hydroxybutyrylCoA dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase) decrease as body weight increases. Log-log plots (activity gm-1 vs body mass) yield straight lines with negative slopes that are less than the allometric exponent (-0.25) typically observed for basal metabolic rates. Since the amount of power a muscle can generate depends upon the catalytic potential of its enzyme machinery (the higher the catalytic potential the higher the maximum rate of energy generation), these data predict that the scope for aerobic activity in large mammals should be greater than in small mammals if nothing else becomes limiting, a result in fact recently obtained by Taylor et al. (Respir. Physiol., 1981). In contrast to the scaling of oxidative enzymes, the activities of enzymes functioning in anaerobic glycogenolysis (glycogen phosphorylase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase) increase as body size increases. Log-log plots (activity gm-1 vs body mass) display a positive slope indicating that the larger the animal the higher the glycolytic potential of its skeletal muscles. This unexpected result may indicate higher relative power costs for burst type locomotion in larger mammals, which is in fact observed in within-species studies of man. However, the scaling of anaerobic muscle power has not been closely assessed in between-species comparisons of mammals varying greatly in body size.

  13. The family of berberine bridge enzyme-like enzymes: A treasure-trove of oxidative reactions.

    Daniel, Bastian; Konrad, Barbara; Toplak, Marina; Lahham, Majd; Messenlehner, Julia; Winkler, Andreas; Macheroux, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Biological oxidations form the basis of life on earth by utilizing organic compounds as electron donors to drive the generation of metabolic energy carriers, such as ATP. Oxidative reactions are also important for the biosynthesis of complex compounds, i.e. natural products such as alkaloids that provide vital benefits for organisms in all kingdoms of life. The vitamin B 2 -derived cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) enable an astonishingly diverse array of oxidative reactions that is based on the versatility of the redox-active isoalloxazine ring. The family of FAD-linked oxidases can be divided into subgroups depending on specific sequence features in an otherwise very similar structural context. The sub-family of berberine bridge enzyme (BBE)-like enzymes has recently attracted a lot of attention due to the challenging chemistry catalyzed by its members and the unique and unusual bi-covalent attachment of the FAD cofactor. This family is the focus of the present review highlighting recent advancements into the structural and functional aspects of members from bacteria, fungi and plants. In view of the unprecedented reaction catalyzed by the family's namesake, BBE from the California poppy, recent studies have provided further insights into nature's treasure chest of oxidative reactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of the missing links in prokaryotic pentose oxidation pathways: evidence for enzyme recruitment.

    Brouns, Stan J J; Walther, Jasper; Snijders, Ambrosius P L; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Willemen, Hanneke L D M; Worm, Petra; de Vos, Marjon G J; Andersson, Anders; Lundgren, Magnus; Mazon, Hortense F M; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Nilsson, Peter; Salmon, Laurent; de Vos, Willem M; Wright, Phillip C; Bernander, Rolf; van der Oost, John

    2006-09-15

    The pentose metabolism of Archaea is largely unknown. Here, we have employed an integrated genomics approach including DNA microarray and proteomics analyses to elucidate the catabolic pathway for D-arabinose in Sulfolobus solfataricus. During growth on this sugar, a small set of genes appeared to be differentially expressed compared with growth on D-glucose. These genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified and biochemically studied. This showed that D-arabinose is oxidized to 2-oxoglutarate by the consecutive action of a number of previously uncharacterized enzymes, including a D-arabinose dehydrogenase, a D-arabinonate dehydratase, a novel 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinonate dehydratase, and a 2,5-dioxopentanoate dehydrogenase. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed a palindromic sequence upstream of the TATA box, which is likely to be involved in their concerted transcriptional control. Integration of the obtained biochemical data with genomic context analysis strongly suggests the occurrence of pentose oxidation pathways in both Archaea and Bacteria, and predicts the involvement of additional enzyme components. Moreover, it revealed striking genetic similarities between the catabolic pathways for pentoses, hexaric acids, and hydroxyproline degradation, which support the theory of metabolic pathway genesis by enzyme recruitment.

  15. Oxidation-reduction enzymes of myocardium under ionizing radiation effect

    Uteshev, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Tissue respiration proceses under radiation effect were investigated which allowed one to reveal slight biochemical disturbances in a cell which make up the base of functional changes of different organs and tissues and to get to know the essence of tissue respiration processes. An attempt to explain significant value of oxidation enzyme system radiosensitivity in the course of cell respiration process altogether is made when studying the state of separate links of oxidation-reduction chain. It is shown that at early periods of radiation injury activity of catalase, dehydrogenases (isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, malic, succinic acids) is suppressed, concentration of a number of cytochromes is reduced and general ferrum content is increased which is connected with conformation changes of ultrastructure of mitochondrial membranes

  16. Influence of zinc oxide during different stages of sulfur vulcanization. Elucidated by model compound studies

    Heideman, G.; Datta, Rabin; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; van Baarle, B.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of zinc oxide (ZnO) as an activator for the sulfur vulcanization of rubbers enhances the vulcanization efficiency and vulcanizate properties and reduces the vulcanization time. The first part of this article deals with the reduction and optimization of the amount of ZnO. Two different

  17. Possibilities and scope of the double isotope effect method in the elucidation of mechanisms of enzyme catalyzed reactions

    Schmidt, H L; Medina, R [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Chemie und Biochemie

    1991-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects on enzyme catalyzed reactions are indicative for the first irreversible in a sequence of individual steps. Hints on the relative velocities of other steps can only be obtained from the partitioning factor R and its dependence on external reaction conditions. In general, the experimental data needed are obtained from isotope abundance measurements in a defined position of the substrate or product as a function of turnover. This method does not reveal events dealing with neighbour atoms or preceding the main isotope sensitive step. In the method presented here, the analytical measurement is extended to the second atom involved in a bond fission of formation (Double Isotope Effect Method). It is shown that the additional results obtained support the identification of the main isotopically sensitive step and its relative contribution to the overall reaction rate, the identification of other kinetically significant steps and the differentiation between stepwise and concerted reaction mechanisms. The method and its advantages are demonstrated on reactions comprising C-N-bond splitting (urease and arginase reaction), C-C-bound fission (reactions catalyzed by pyruvate-dehydrogenase, pyruvate-formiate-lyase and lactate-oxidase), C-O-bound formation (ribulose-bisphosphate-oxygenase reaction), and N-O-bond fission (nitrate- and nitrite-reductase reactions). (orig.).

  18. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of

  19. Parameters for measurement of oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus: applicability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for clinical evaluation.

    Noiri, Eisei; Tsukahara, Hirokazu

    2005-05-01

    Investigations of the mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of diabetes have recently confronted the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemic conditions induces nonenzymatic glycation of protein via the so-called Maillard reaction, resulting in Schiff-base products and Amadori products that engender ROS production. These processes initiate and exacerbate micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetes. Increased oxidative stress is induced by excessive ROS production and inadequate antioxidant defenses. Recently, oxidative stress status markers have been associated directly with the severity and prognosis of diabetes. To examine oxidative stress, reliable and high-throughput methods are needed to examine large numbers of clinical samples. The emerging availability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for oxidative stress status markers allows its application to assessment of various pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes. This review outlines the recent achievements of ELISA application for clinical studies elucidating oxidative stress. It introduces the potential applicability of ELISA for investigating oxidative stress in diabetes.

  20. Enzyme

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  1. Myeloperoxidase enzyme levels and oxidative stress in bipolar ...

    USER

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... Patients with BD had significantly higher mean hsCRP levels than healthy controls. However .... MPO is a critical component of the oxidative activity of ..... nervous system vulnerability to oxidative stres (Sorce and. Krause ...

  2. Effects of bonny light crude oil on anti-oxidative enzymes and total ...

    Effects of bonny light crude oil on anti-oxidative enzymes and total proteins in Wistar rats. Christian E Odo, Okwesili FC Nwodo, Parker E Joshua, Chibuike S Ubani, Okon E Etim, Okechukwu PC Ugwu ...

  3. Cell age dependent variations in oxidative protective enzymes

    Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Activity levels of antioxidant enzymes were correlated before and after heavy-ion exposures with cellular radiosensitivity. In preliminary feasibility experiments with human T-1 cells relatively high antioxidant enzyme levels were shown in the unirradiated G 1 phase prior to the normal DNA synthetic phase. Endogenous cellular levels of three antioxidant enzymes were measured at various times in the unirradiated human T-1 cell division cycle. The enzymes measured were: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX). Unlike the case in Chinese hamster V79 cells the early data with the synchronized human cell show that in very early G 1 phase (e.g., approximately 1.5 hours after mitotic selection) there are significant peaks in the levels (U/mg cell protein) of both CAT and SOD. Both enzymes show increases as the unirradiated cells progressed from mitosis into G 1 phase while the levels of GSHPX measured in duplicate samples were somewhat more variable than was the case for the other two enzymes. Studies were made in collaboration with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute

  4. Effect of oxidative enzymes on bulk rheological properties of wheat flour doughs

    Dunnewind, B.; Vliet, T. van; Orsel, R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of enzymes such as peroxidases or glucose oxidase instead of chemical oxidants is a very interesting option for improving breadmaking performance of doughs. In this study the effect of such enzymes on bulk rheological properties of dough was quantified and their influence on the polymer

  5. Effect of Oxidative Enzymes on Bulk Rheological Properties of Wheat Flour Doughs

    Dunnewind, B.; Vliet, van T.; Orsel, R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of enzymes such as peroxidases or glucose oxidase instead of chemical oxidants is a very interesting option for improving breadmaking performance of doughs. In this study the effect of such enzymes on bulk rheological properties of dough was quantified and their influence on the polymer

  6. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion.

    Lawton, Thomas J; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-08-03

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16-13 s(-1), these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock.

  7. Effect of enzyme and oxidative treatments on the properties of coarse wool and mohair

    Barkhuysen, FA

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available and the current study focused on the effect of enzymes, either alone or in combination with an oxidative (chlorine) treatment, on the softness and other properties of the fibres. It was found that an enzyme treatment reduced the feltability of wool. Furthermore...

  8. Enzyme phylogenies as markers for the oxidation state of the environment: the case of respiratory arsenate reductase and related enzymes.

    Duval, Simon; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara

    2008-07-16

    Phylogenies of certain bioenergetic enzymes have proved to be useful tools for deducing evolutionary ancestry of bioenergetic pathways and their relationship to geochemical parameters of the environment. Our previous phylogenetic analysis of arsenite oxidase, the molybdopterin enzyme responsible for the biological oxidation of arsenite to arsenate, indicated its probable emergence prior to the Archaea/Bacteria split more than 3 billion years ago, in line with the geochemical fact that arsenite was present in biological habitats on the early Earth. Respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr), another molybdopterin enzyme involved in microbial arsenic metabolism, serves as terminal oxidase, and is thus situated at the opposite end of bioenergetic electron transfer chains as compared to arsenite oxidase. The evolutionary history of the Arr-enzyme has not been studied in detail so far. We performed a genomic search of genes related to arrA coding for the molybdopterin subunit. The multiple alignment of the retrieved sequences served to reconstruct a neighbor-joining phylogeny of Arr and closely related enzymes. Our analysis confirmed the previously proposed proximity of Arr to the cluster of polysulfide/thiosulfate reductases but also unravels a hitherto unrecognized clade even more closely related to Arr. The obtained phylogeny strongly suggests that Arr originated after the Bacteria/Archaea divergence in the domain Bacteria, and was subsequently laterally distributed within this domain. It further more indicates that, as a result of accumulation of arsenate in the environment, an enzyme related to polysulfide reductase and not to arsenite oxidase has evolved into Arr. These findings are paleogeochemically rationalized by the fact that the accumulation of arsenate over arsenite required the increase in oxidation state of the environment brought about by oxygenic photosynthesis.

  9. Oligomerization and hydroxylation of green tea catechins by oxidative enzymes

    Verloop, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Black teas are known for their characteristic brown colour, bitter taste and astringent mouth feel. These sensory characteristics are mainly influenced by the phenolic oxidation products present in black tea. The oxidation of phenolics from green tea leaves during black tea manufacturing is an

  10. Stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloyl groups can promote gelation of sugar beet pectin (SBP). It is uncertain how the enzyme kinetics of this cross-linking reaction are affected in emulsion systems and whether the gelation affects emulsion stability. In this study, SBP (2.5% w...... larger average particle sizes than the emulsions in which the SBP was homogenized into the emulsion system during emulsion preparation (referred as Mix B). Mix B type emulsions were stable. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP helped stabilize the emulsions in Mix A. The kinetics of the enzyme...... catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP was evaluated by small angle oscillatory measurements for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (EC 1.11.1.7) and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2) catalysis, respectively. HRP catalyzed gelation rates, determined from the slopes of the increase of elastic modulus (G0) with time, were higher...

  11. Dehalogenase: The Follow-Up Enzyme After Mustard Oxidation

    Elashvili, Ilya; DeFrank, Joseph J

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) has been used as a chemical warfare agent since 1917. Currently fielded M258A1 and M280 decontamination kits and prospective oxidative decontaminants convert HD to HD sulfoxide (HDSO...

  12. Modeling nitrous oxide production and reduction in soil through explicit representation of denitrification enzyme kinetics.

    Zheng, Jianqiu; Doskey, Paul V

    2015-02-17

    An enzyme-explicit denitrification model with representations for pre- and de novo synthesized enzymes was developed to improve predictions of nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulations in soil and emissions from the surface. The metabolic model of denitrification is based on dual-substrate utilization and Monod growth kinetics. Enzyme synthesis/activation was incorporated into each sequential reduction step of denitrification to regulate dynamics of the denitrifier population and the active enzyme pool, which controlled the rate function. Parameterizations were developed from observations of the dynamics of N2O production and reduction in soil incubation experiments. The model successfully reproduced the dynamics of N2O and N2 accumulation in the incubations and revealed an important regulatory effect of denitrification enzyme kinetics on the accumulation of denitrification products. Pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes contributed 20, 13, 43, and 62% of N2O that accumulated in 48 h incubations of soil collected from depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-25 cm, respectively. An enzyme activity function (E) was defined to estimate the relative concentration of active enzymes and variation in response to environmental conditions. The value of E allows for activities of pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes to be differentiated from de novo synthesized enzymes. Incorporating explicit representations of denitrification enzyme kinetics into biogeochemical models is a promising approach for accurately simulating dynamics of the production and reduction of N2O in soils.

  13. Photobiomodulation Therapy Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Lung Tissue after Formaldehyde Exposure: Role of Oxidant/Antioxidant Enzymes

    Rodrigo Silva Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is ubiquitous pollutant that induces oxidative stress in the lung. Several lung diseases have been associated with oxidative stress and their control is necessary. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT has been highlighted as a promissory treatment, but its mechanisms need to be better investigated. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of PBMT on the oxidative stress generated by FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were submitted to FA exposure of 1% or vehicle (3 days and treated or not with PBMT (1 and 5 h after each FA exposure. Rats treated only with laser were used as control. Twenty-four hours after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the effects of PBMT on the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide, oxidative burst, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, S-transferase enzyme activities, the gene expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, superoxide dismutase, the catalase enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1. PBMT reduced the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide and increased oxidative burst in the lung cells. A decreased level of oxidant enzymes was observed which were concomitantly related to an increased level of antioxidants. This study provides new information about the antioxidant mechanisms of PBMT in the lung and might constitute an important tool for lung disease treatment.

  14. Fe-O stable isotope pairs elucidate a high-temperature origin of Chilean iron oxide-apatite deposits

    Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Gajos, Norbert; Bindeman, Ilya; Barra, Fernando; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2016-03-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ore deposits occur globally and can host millions to billions of tons of Fe in addition to economic reserves of other metals such as rare earth elements, which are critical for the expected growth of technology and renewable energy resources. In this study, we pair the stable Fe and O isotope compositions of magnetite samples from several IOA deposits to constrain the source reservoir of these elements in IOAs. Since magnetite constitutes up to 90 modal% of many IOAs, identifying the source of Fe and O within the magnetite may elucidate high-temperature and/or lower-temperature processes responsible for their formation. Here, we focus on the world-class Los Colorados IOA in the Chilean iron belt (CIB), and present data for magnetite from other Fe oxide deposits in the CIB (El Laco, Mariela). We also report Fe and O isotopic values for other IOA deposits, including Mineville, New York (USA) and the type locale, Kiruna (Sweden). The ranges of Fe isotopic composition (δ56Fe, 56Fe/54Fe relative to IRMM-14) of magnetite from the Chilean deposits are: Los Colorados, δ56Fe (±2σ) = 0.08 ± 0.03‰ to 0.24 ± 0.08‰; El Laco, δ56Fe = 0.20 ± 0.03‰ to 0.53 ± 0.03‰; Mariela, δ56Fe = 0.13 ± 0.03‰. The O isotopic composition (δ18O, 18O/16O relative to VSMOW) of the same Chilean magnetite samples are: Los Colorados, δ18O (±2σ) = 1.92 ± 0.08‰ to 3.17 ± 0.03‰; El Laco, δ18O = 4.00 ± 0.10‰ to 4.34 ± 0.10‰; Mariela, δ18O = (1.48 ± 0.04‰). The δ18O and δ56Fe values for Kiruna magnetite yield an average of 1.76 ± 0.25‰ and 0.16 ± 0.07‰, respectively. The Fe and O isotope data from the Chilean IOAs fit unequivocally within the range of magnetite formed by high-temperature magmatic or magmatic-hydrothermal processes (i.e., δ56Fe 0.06-0.49‰ and δ18O = 1.0-4.5‰), consistent with a high-temperature origin for Chilean IOA deposits. Additionally, minimum formation temperatures calculated by using the measured Δ18O

  15. Immobilization of leachable toxic soil pollutants by using oxidative enzymes

    Shannon, M.J.R.; Bartha, R.

    1988-01-01

    Screening of leachable toxic chemicals in a horseradish peroxidase-H 2 O 2 immobilization system established that immobilization was promising for most phenolic pollutants but not for benzoic acid, 2,6-dinitrocresol, or dibutyl phthalate. The treatment did not mobilize inherently nonmobile pollutants such as anilines and benzo[a]pyrene. In a separate study, an extracellular laccase in the culture filtrate of Geotrichum candidum was selected from five fungal enzymes evaluated as a cost-effective substitute for horseradish peroxidase. This enzyme was used in demonstrating the immobilization and subsequent fate of 14 C-labeled 4-methylphenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol in soil columns. When applied to Lakewood sand, 98.1% of 4-methylpheno was leached through with distilled water. Two days after immobilization treatment with the G. candidum culture filtrate, only 9.1% of the added 4-methylphenol was leached with the same volume of water. Of the more refractory test pollutant 2,4-dichlorophenol, 91.6% had leached at time zero and 48.5% had leached 1 day after the immobilization treatment. However, 2 weeks after immobilization, only 12.0% of the 2,4-dichlorophenol was leached compared with 61.7% from the control column that received no immobilization treatment. No remobilization of the bound pollutants was detected during 3- and 4-week incubation periods

  16. Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Tolar, Bradley B; Herrmann, Jonathan; Bargar, John R; van den Bedem, Henry; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Francis, Christopher A

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the molecular ecology and environmental determinants of ammonia-oxidizing organisms is critical to understanding and predicting the global nitrogen (N) and carbon cycles, but an incomplete biochemical picture hinders in vitro studies of N-cycling enzymes. Although an integrative structural and dynamic characterization at the atomic scale would advance our understanding of function tremendously, structural knowledge of key N-cycling enzymes from ecologically relevant ammonia oxidizers is unfortunately extremely limited. Here, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for examining the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing organisms, particularly uncultivated Thaumarchaeota, through (meta)genome-driven structural biology of the enzymes ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and nitrite reductase (NirK). © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Graphene oxide immobilized enzymes show high thermal and solvent stability

    Hermanová, S.; Zarevúcka, Marie; Bouša, D.; Pumera, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 13 (2015), s. 5852-5858 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09001S Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551203 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : graphene oxide * lipase * immobilization Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.760, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/nr/c5nr00438a

  18. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in tradi...

  19. Some reactions of oxidizing radicals with enzymes in aqueous solution

    Cundall, R.B.; Bisby, R.H.; Hoe, S.T.; Sims, H.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    A range of oxidizing radicals including some inorganic radical anions and the superoxide radical, can be generated by radiolysis of aqueous solutions. These radicals are more selective in their reactions with amino acids than the hydroxyl radical. Factors controlling the apparent reactivity of radical anions with proteins, such as free radical equilibria and ion-binding, are described. The superoxide radical inactivates papain by reaction with the cysteine residue. This reaction has been studied in solutions subjected to radiations of varying linear energy transfer. (Auth.)

  20. Serum prolidase enzyme activity in obese subjects and its relationship with oxidative stress markers.

    Aslan, Mehmet; Duzenli, Ufuk; Esen, Ramazan; Soyoral, Yasemin Usul

    2017-10-01

    The relationship between increased serum enzyme activity of prolidase and increased rate of collagen turnover in the arterial wall has been asserted in previous studies. Collagen reflects much of the strength to the connective tissue involved in the arterial wall. Atherosclerosis is very common vessel disease and oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the etiopathogenesis. Our objective was to examine the serum enzyme activity of prolidase and its possible relationships with oxidative stress parameters in obese subjects. Our present study was conducted 27 obese subjects and 26 age-matched healthy control subjects. The serum enzyme activity of prolidase in all study population was evaluated spectrophotometrically. Oxidative stress levels in obese subjects were analyzed with total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) as well as oxidative stress index (OSI). Obese subjects have higher serum TOS and OSI indicators as well as prolidase activity than those in control subjects (for all; pstress levels in obese subjects. The significantly correlation between increased oxidative stress and increased prolidase activity may play a pivotal role in etiopathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases in obese subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The catalytic cycle of nitrous oxide reductase - The enzyme that catalyzes the last step of denitrification.

    Carreira, Cíntia; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel

    2017-12-01

    The reduction of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide requires a catalyst to overcome the large activation energy barrier of this reaction. Its biological decomposition to the inert dinitrogen can be accomplished by denitrifiers through nitrous oxide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the last step of the denitrification, a pathway of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrous oxide reductase is a multicopper enzyme containing a mixed valence CuA center that can accept electrons from small electron shuttle proteins, triggering electron flow to the catalytic sulfide-bridged tetranuclear copper "CuZ center". This enzyme has been isolated with its catalytic center in two forms, CuZ*(4Cu1S) and CuZ(4Cu2S), proven to be spectroscopic and structurally different. In the last decades, it has been a challenge to characterize the properties of this complex enzyme, due to the different oxidation states observed for each of its centers and the heterogeneity of its preparations. The substrate binding site in those two "CuZ center" forms and which is the active form of the enzyme is still a matter of debate. However, in the last years the application of different spectroscopies, together with theoretical calculations have been useful in answering these questions and in identifying intermediate species of the catalytic cycle. An overview of the spectroscopic, kinetics and structural properties of the two forms of the catalytic "CuZ center" is given here, together with the current knowledge on nitrous oxide reduction mechanism by nitrous oxide reductase and its intermediate species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential expression of genes encoding anti-oxidant enzymes in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata (Gould) selected for disease resistance.

    Green, Timothy J; Dixon, Tom J; Devic, Emilie; Adlard, Robert D; Barnes, Andrew C

    2009-05-01

    Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) selectively bred for disease resistance (R) and wild-caught control oysters (W) were exposed to a field infection of disseminating neoplasia. Cumulative mortality of W oysters (31.7%) was significantly greater than R oysters (0.0%) over the 118 days of the experiment. In an attempt to understand the biochemical and molecular pathways involved in disease resistance, differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between R and W S. glomerata hemocytes were identified using the PCR technique, suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH). Sequencing of 300 clones from two SSH libraries revealed 183 distinct sequences of which 113 shared high similarity to sequences in the public databases. Putative function could be assigned to 64 of the sequences. Expression of nine ESTs homologous to genes previously shown to be involved in bivalve immunity was further studied using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The base-line expression of an extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) and a small heat shock protein (sHsP) were significantly increased, whilst peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) and interferon inhibiting cytokine factor (IK) were significantly decreased in R oysters. From these results it was hypothesised that R oysters would be able to generate the anti-parasitic compound, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) faster and to higher concentrations during respiratory burst due to the differential expression of genes for the two anti-oxidant enzymes of ecSOD and Prx6. To investigate this hypothesis, protein extracts from hemolymph were analysed for oxidative burst enzyme activity. Analysis of the cell free hemolymph proteins separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) failed to detect true superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity by assaying dismutation of superoxide anion in zymograms. However, the ecSOD enzyme appears to generate hydrogen peroxide, presumably via another process, which is yet to be elucidated. This

  3. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah, E-mail: sitinurfadzilah077@ppinang.uitm.edu.my [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Faculty of Pharmacy, University Teknologi Mara (Malaysia); Lang, Matti A., E-mail: m.lang@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Abu-Bakar, A' edah, E-mail: a.abubakar@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  4. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A.; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  5. Nitric oxide synthase during early embryonic development in silkworm Bombyx mori: Gene expression, enzyme activity, and tissue distribution.

    Kitta, Ryo; Kuwamoto, Marina; Yamahama, Yumi; Mase, Keisuke; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism for embryonic diapause or the breakdown of diapause in Bombyx mori, we biochemically analyzed nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the embryogenesis of B. mori. The gene expression and enzyme activity of B. mori NOS (BmNOS) were examined in diapause, non-diapause, and HCl-treated diapause eggs. In the case of HCl-treated diapause eggs, the gene expression and enzyme activity of BmNOS were induced by HCl treatment. However, in the case of diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryogenesis, changes in the BmNOS activity and gene expressions did not coincide except 48-60 h after oviposition in diapause eggs. The results imply that changes in BmNOS activity during the embryogenesis of diapause and non-diapause eggs are regulated not only at the level of transcription but also post-transcription. The distribution and localization of BmNOS were also investigated with an immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against the universal NOS; the localization of BmNOS was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of yolk cells in diapause eggs and HCl-treated diapause eggs. These data suggest that BmNOS has an important role in the early embryonic development of the B. mori. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  6. Effect of different nutrient supply and other growth factors on the activity of the oxidizing enzymes in plants

    Amberger, A

    1960-01-01

    Among the plants studied were french beans and peas; the oxidizing enzymes examined were ascorbic acid oxidase, cytochrome oxidase, phenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase. Increasing the K dosage reduced enzyme activity and raised dry matter contents until at a very high dosage this action was reversed. Both N and P increased enzyme activity and yields. With B high enzyme activity and low dry matter content were both associated with deficiency and toxicity levels. Increasing the Fe dosage led to a rise in both dry matter content and enzyme activity, whereas F depressed yields and raised enzyme activity. Lack of water increased respiration. Light inhibited all enzyme activity.

  7. Antioxidant enzymes in Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval): Are they enhanced to protect gut tissues during oxidative stress?

    Krishnan, Natraj; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2006), s. 11-20 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/05/0151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : antioxidant enzyme * oxidative stress * allelochemicals Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.019, year: 2006

  8. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin: Kinetics and rheology

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet pectin (SBP) is a marginally utilized co-processing product from sugar production from sugar beets. In this study, the kinetics of oxidative gelation of SBP, taking place via enzyme catalyzed cross-linking of ferulic acid moieties (FA), was studied using small angle oscillatory...

  9. Lipase enzymes on graphene oxide support for high-efficiency biocatalysis

    Hermanová, S.; Zarevúcka, Marie; Bouša, D.; Mikulics, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, Dec (2016), s. 200-208 ISSN 2352-9407 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09001S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : biocatalysis * graphene oxide * enzyme * acylglycerols Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  10. Star block-copolymers: Enzyme-inspired catalysts for oxidation of alcohols in water

    Mugemana, Clement

    2014-01-01

    A number of fluorous amphiphilic star block-copolymers containing a tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine motif have been prepared. These polymers assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water, and their mode of assembly could be controlled by changing the composition of the polymer. The polymers were used for enzyme-inspired catalysis of alcohol oxidation. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  11. Effects of a Brussels sprouts extract on oxidative DNA damage and metabolising enzymes in rat liver

    Sørensen, Mette; Jensen, B.R.; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2001-01-01

    and catalase activity was also assessed in the kidneys. In order to examine a possible effect of the Brussels sprouts related to oxidative stress, we measured oxidative DNA damage in terms of 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and lipid peroxidation in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA) formation...... on MDA levels were found. The present results support the data obtained in several studies that consumption of cruciferous vegetables is capable of inducing various phase II enzyme systems. However, the observed increase in oxidative DNA damage raises the question of whether greatly increased ingestion...

  12. Serum Antioxidative Enzymes Levels and Oxidative Stress Products in Age-Related Cataract Patients

    Dong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the products of oxidative stress in patients with age-related cataracts and compare the findings with those in healthy control subjects. Method. Sixty patients with age-related cataract and sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were included in this study. Serum samples were obtained to detect the antioxidative enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and oxidation degradation products of malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, conjugated diene (CD, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyl (PC, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Results. Serum SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in cataract group were significantly decreased as compared to the control subjects (P<0.05. The levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and CD in cataract patients were significantly higher than those in the control subjects (P<0.05, P<0.01. Cataract patients had higher levels of 8-OHdG, AOPP, and PC with respect to the comparative group of normal subjects (P<0.01. And there was no statistical significance in concentration of antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products in patients with different subtype cataract. Conclusions. Oxidative stress is an important risk factor in the development of age-related cataract, and augmentation of the antioxidant defence systems may be of benefit to prevent or delay cataractogenesis.

  13. Assessing protein oxidation by inorganic nanoparticles with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    Sun, Wenjie; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2013-03-01

    Growth in the nanotechnology industry is leading to increased production of engineered nanoparticles (NPs). This has given rise to concerns about the potential adverse and toxic effects to biological system and the environment. An important mechanism of NP toxicity is oxidative stress caused by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or via direct oxidation of biomolecules. In this study, a protein oxidation assay was developed as an indicator of biomolecule oxidation by NPs. The oxidation of the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the protein carbonyl derivatives formed from protein oxidation. The results showed that some NPs such as Cu(0), CuO, Mn(2)O(3), and Fe(0) caused oxidation of BSA; whereas, many of the other NPs tested were not reactive or very slowly reactive with BSA. The mechanisms involved in the oxidation of BSA protein by the reactive NPs could be attributed to the combined effects of ROS-dependent and direct protein oxidation mechanisms. The ELISA assay is a promising method for the assessment of protein oxidation by NPs, which can provide insights on NP toxicity mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  15. Screening of Enzyme Biomarker for Nanotoxicity of Zinc Oxide in OREOCHROMIS MOSSAMBICUS

    Subramanian, Periasamy; Bupesh, Giridharan

    2011-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) on fish models. Oreochromis mossambicus was orally administered with ZnO NPs (50-100 nm) once and its effects at five different concentrations (60 ppm-100 ppm) were observed for 12 days. Enzymatic assays were performed at every three days interval in the vital tissues of liver, gill, muscle and kidney. The defense enzymes, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S transferase (GST) exerted a dose dependent elevation up to 6 days. This hike then declines in higher concentrations and extended duration. Whereas the tissue damaging enzymes, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) exhibited a dose and duration dependent increase until the end of the experiment. Among these enzymes, the antioxidant enzymes response to ZnO NP toxicity on fish showed notable continuous induction. This study demonstrates that antioxidant enzymes responses in O. mossambicus could be used as a biomarker for the early detection of nanotoxicity.

  16. Elucidating the mechanism of Cr(VI) formation upon the interaction with metal oxides during coal oxy-fuel combustion.

    Chen, Juan; Jiao, Facun; Zhang, Lian; Yao, Hong; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-15

    The thermodynamics underpinning the interaction of Cr-bearing species with basic metal oxides, i.e. K2O, Fe2O3, MgO and CaO, during the air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal have been examined. The synchrotron-based X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used for Cr speciation. For the oxides tested, Cr(VI) formation is dominated by the reduction potential of the metals. The oxides of Ca(2+) with high reduction potential favored the oxidation of Cr(III), same for K(+). The other two basic metals, Fe2O3 and MgO with lower reduction potentials reacted with Cr(III) to form the corresponding chromites at the temperatures above 600°C. Coal combustion experiments in drop-tube furnace have confirmed the rapid capture of Cr vapors, either trivalent or hexavalent, by CaO into solid ash. The existence of HCl in flue gas favored the vaporization of Cr as CrO2Cl2, which was in turn captured by CaO into chromate. Both Fe2O3 and MgO exhibited less capability on scavenging the Cr(VI) vapor. Particularly, MgO alone exhibited a low capability for capturing the vaporized Cr(III) vapors. However, its co-existence with CaO in the furnace inhibited the Cr(VI) formation. This is beneficial for minimizing the toxicity of Cr in the coal combustion-derived fly ash. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitochondrial enzymes and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores as targets of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Gibson, Gary E; Huang, Hsueh-Meei

    2004-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative stress accompanies age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Specific mechanisms by which oxidative stress leads to neurodegeneration are unknown. Two targets of oxidative stress that are known to change in neurodegenerative diseases are the mitochondrial enzyme alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. KGDHC activities are diminished in all common neurodegenerative diseases and the changes are particularly well documented in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A second change that occurs in cells from AD patients is an exaggerated endoplasmic reticulum calcium store [i.e., bombesin-releasable calcium stores (BRCS)]. H(2)O(2), a general oxidant, changes both variables in the same direction as occurs in disease. Other oxidants selectively alter these variables. Various antioxidants were used to help define the critical oxidant species that modifies these responses. All of the antioxidants diminish the oxidant-induced carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (cDCF) detectable reactive oxygen species (ROS), but have diverse actions on these cellular processes. For example, alpha-keto-beta-methyl-n-valeric acid (KMV) diminishes the H(2)O(2) effects on BRCS, while trolox and DMSO exaggerate the response. Acute trolox treatment does not alter H(2)O(2)-induced changes in KGDHC, whereas chronic treatment with trolox increases KGDHC almost threefold. The results suggest that KGDHC and BRCS provide targets by which oxidative stress may induce neurodegeneration and a useful tool for selecting antioxidants for reversing age-related neurodegeneration.

  18. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloylated pectic polysaccharides from sugar beet

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz

    beet pulp as a potential starting material for production of pectin derived products which could help maintain the competitiveness of the sugar beet based industry. The overall objective of this study has been focusing on understanding the kinetics of enzyme catalyzed oxidative crosslinking......-linked by HRP catalysis in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to form ferulic acid dehydrodimers (diFAs). The composition of the substrate was analyzed by HPAEC, HPLC and MALDI-TOF, confirming the structural make up of the arabinan-oligosaccharide (Arabinose: 2.9- 3.4 mmol?g-1 DM; FA: 2.5-7.0 mg?g-1 DM......, identically composed, oil-in-water emulsion systems to study the effect of different methods of emulsion preparation on the emulsion stability in the presence of SBP and the kinetics of enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP. The result shows that the different methods of emulsion preparation affect...

  19. Enzyme-inspired functional surfactant for aerobic oxidation of activated alcohols to aldehydes in water

    Chen, Batian

    2015-02-06

    We describe an enzyme-inspired catalytic system based on a rationally designed multifunctional amphiphile. The resulting micelles feature metal-binding sites and stable free radical moieties as well as fluorous pockets that attract and preconcentrate molecular oxygen. In the presence of copper ions, the micelles effect chemoselective aerobic alcohol oxidation under ambient conditions in water, a transformation that is challenging to achieve nonenzymatically.

  20. Enzyme-inspired functional surfactant for aerobic oxidation of activated alcohols to aldehydes in water

    Chen, Batian; Bukhriakov, Konstantin; Sougrat, Rachid; Rodionov, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    We describe an enzyme-inspired catalytic system based on a rationally designed multifunctional amphiphile. The resulting micelles feature metal-binding sites and stable free radical moieties as well as fluorous pockets that attract and preconcentrate molecular oxygen. In the presence of copper ions, the micelles effect chemoselective aerobic alcohol oxidation under ambient conditions in water, a transformation that is challenging to achieve nonenzymatically.

  1. Thymosin beta 4 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by targeting anti-oxidative enzymes and anti-apoptotic genes.

    Chuanyu Wei

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. The mechanism by which Tβ4 modulates cardiac protection under oxidative stress is not known. The purpose of this study is to dissect the cardioprotective mechanism of Tβ4 on H(2O(2 induced cardiac damage.Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes with or without Tβ4 pretreatment were exposed to H(2O(2 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in neonatal cardiomyocytes and effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced cardiac damage was evaluated.Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in cardiomyocytes. Tβ4 pretreatment also resulted in an increase in the expression of antiapoptotic proteins and reduction of Bax/BCl(2 ratio in the cardiomyocytes. Pretreatment with Tβ4 resulted in stimulating the expression of antioxidant enzymes copper/zinc SOD and catalase in cardiomyocytes at both transcription and translation levels. Tβ4 treatment resulted in the increased expression of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Silencing of Cu/Zn SOD and catalase gene resulted in apoptotic cell death in the cardiomyocytes which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4.This is the first report that demonstrates the effect of Tβ4 on cardiomyocytes and its capability to selectively upregulate anti-oxidative enzymes, anti-inflammatory genes, and antiapoptotic enzymes in the neonatal cardiomyocytes thus preventing cell death thereby protecting the myocardium. Tβ4 treatment resulted in decreased oxidative stress and inflammation in the myocardium under oxidative stress.

  2. Enzyme oxidation of plant galactomannans yielding biomaterials with novel properties and applications, including as delivery systems.

    Galante, Yves M; Merlini, Luca; Silvetti, Tiziana; Campia, Paola; Rossi, Bianca; Viani, Fiorenza; Brasca, Milena

    2018-06-01

    New biomaterials from renewable sources and the development of "functionalized biopolymers" are fields of growing industrial interest. Plant polysaccharides represent a valid alternative to traditional synthetic polymers, which are obtained from monomers of fossil, non-renewable origin. Several polysaccharides, either in their natural or chemically/biochemically modified forms, are currently employed in the biomedical, food and feed, and industrial fields, including packaging. Sustainable biochemical reactions, such as enzyme modifications of polysaccharides, open further possibilities for new product and process innovation. In the present review, we summarize the recent progress on enzyme oxidation of galactomannans (GM) from few leguminous plants (performed either with galactose oxidase or laccase) and we focus on the versatile and easily accessible laccase/TEMPO oxidative reaction. The latter causes a steep viscosity increase of GM water solutions and a transition of the gels from a viscous to an elastic form, due to formation of emiacetalic bonds and thus of internal cross-linking of the polymers. Following lyophilization of these hydrogels, stable aerogels can be obtained, which were shown to have good potential as delivery systems (DS) of actives. The active molecules tested and herewith described are polymyxin B, an antibiotic; nisin, an antimicrobial peptide; the enzymes lysozyme, protease and lipase; the mixture of the industrial microbiocides 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (CIT) and 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (MIT). The advantages of such aerogel systems and the possibilities they open for future developments, including as DS, are described.

  3. Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation of 17β-Estradiol Using Immobilized Laccase from Trametes versicolor

    Cardinal-Watkins, Chantale; Nicell, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    Many natural and synthetic estrogens are amenable to oxidation through the catalytic action of oxidative enzymes such as the fungal laccase Trametes versicolor. This study focused on characterizing the conversion of estradiol (E2) using laccase that had been immobilized by covalent bonding onto silica beads contained in a bench-scale continuous-flow packed bed reactor. Conversion of E2 accomplished in the reactor declined when the temperature of the system was changed from room temperature to just above freezing at pH 5 as a result of a reduced rate of reaction rather than inactivation of the enzyme. Similarly, conversion increased when the system was brought to warmer temperatures. E2 conversion increased when the pH of the influent to the immobilized laccase reactor was changed from pH 7 to pH 5, but longer-term experiments showed that the enzyme is more stable at pH 7. Results also showed that the immobilized laccase maintained its activity when treating a constant supply of aqueous E2 at a low mean residence time over a 12-hour period and when treating a constant supply of aqueous E2 at a high mean residence time over a period of 9 days. PMID:21869925

  4. Oxidative stress and the antioxidant enzyme system in the developing brain

    So-Yeon Shim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants are vulnerable to the oxidative stress due to the production of large amounts of free radicals, antioxidant system insufficiency, and immature oligodendroglial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a pivotal role in the development of periventricular leukomalacia. The three most common ROS are superoxide (O2&#8226;-, hydroxyl radical (OH&#8226;, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Under normal physiological conditions, a balance is maintained between the production of ROS and the capacity of the antioxidant enzyme system. However, if this balance breaks down, ROS can exert toxic effects. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase are considered the classical antioxidant enzymes. A recently discovered antioxidant enzyme family, peroxiredoxin (Prdx, is also an important scavenger of free radicals. Prdx1 expression is induced at birth, whereas Prdx2 is constitutively expressed, and Prdx6 expression is consistent with the classical antioxidant enzymes. Several antioxidant substances have been studied as potential therapeutic agents; however, further preclinical and clinical studies are required before allowing clinical application.

  5. An exceptionally potent inducer of cytoprotective enzymes: elucidation of the structural features that determine inducer potency and reactivity with Keap1.

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Talalay, Paul; Sharkey, John; Zhang, Ying; Holtzclaw, W David; Wang, Xiu Jun; David, Emilie; Schiavoni, Katherine H; Finlayson, Stewart; Mierke, Dale F; Honda, Tadashi

    2010-10-29

    The Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway controls a network of cytoprotective genes that defend against the damaging effects of oxidative and electrophilic stress, and inflammation. Induction of this pathway is a highly effective strategy in combating the risk of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases, including atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. An acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone) bearing two highly electrophilic Michael acceptors is an extremely potent inducer in cells and in vivo. We demonstrate spectroscopically that both cyano enone functions of the tricyclic molecule react with cysteine residues of Keap1 and activate transcription of cytoprotective genes. Novel monocyclic cyano enones, representing fragments of rings A and C of the tricyclic compound, reveal that the contribution to inducer potency of the ring C Michael acceptor is much greater than that of ring A, and that potency is further enhanced by spatial proximity of an acetylenic function. Critically, the simultaneous presence of two cyano enone functions in rings A and C within a rigid three-ring system results in exceptionally high inducer potency. Detailed understanding of the structural elements that contribute to the reactivity with the protein sensor Keap1 and to high potency of induction is essential for the development of specific and selective lead compounds as clinically relevant chemoprotective agents.

  6. Role of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in the pathogenesis of oral cancer.

    Patel, Jayendrakumar B; Shah, Franky D; Shukla, Shilin N; Shah, Pankaj M; Patel, Prabhudas S

    2009-01-01

    Oral cancer is the leading malignancy in India. Nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes play an important role in etiology of oral cancer. Therefore, the present study evaluates nitric oxide and antioxidant enzyme levels in healthy individual without tobacco habits (NHT, N=30) and healthy individuals with tobacco habits (WHT, n=90), patients with oral precancers (OPC, n=15) and oral cancer patients (n=126). Blood samples were collected from the subjects. NO2 + NO3 (nitrite+nitrate), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase levels were estimated using highly specific spectrophotometeric methods. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS statistical software version 10. Mean plasma NO2 + NO3 levels were elevated in patients with OPC and oral cancer patients as compared to the controls. Mean activities of erythrocyte SOD and catalase were higher in WHT than NHT. Erythrocyte SOD and catalase levels were higher in WHT and patients with OPC as compared to NHT. The erythrocyte SOD and catalase activities were lower in oral cancer patients than patients with OPC. The erythrocyte SOD activity was higher in advanced oral cancer than the early disease. Erythrocyte catalase activity was lower in poorly differentiated tumors than well and moderately differentiated tumors. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that alterations in plasma NO2 + NO3 levels were negatively associated with changes in erythrocyte SOD activities. The data revealed that the alterations in antioxidant activities were associated with production of nitric oxide in oral cancer, which may have significant role in oral carcinogenesis.

  7. Styrene Oxide Isomerase of Rhodococcus opacus 1CP, a Highly Stable and Considerably Active Enzyme

    Gröning, Janosch A. D.; Tischler, Dirk; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Schlömann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Styrene oxide isomerase (SOI) is involved in peripheral styrene catabolism of bacteria and converts styrene oxide to phenylacetaldehyde. Here, we report on the identification, enrichment, and biochemical characterization of a novel representative from the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. The enzyme, which is strongly induced during growth on styrene, was shown to be membrane integrated, and a convenient procedure was developed to highly enrich the protein in active form from the wild-type host. A specific activity of about 370 U mg−1 represents the highest activity reported for this enzyme class so far. This, in combination with a wide pH and temperature tolerance, the independence from cofactors, and the ability to convert a spectrum of substituted styrene oxides, makes a biocatalytic application imaginable. First, semipreparative conversions were performed from which up to 760 μmol of the pure phenylacetaldehyde could be obtained from 130 U of enriched SOI. Product concentrations of up to 76 mM were achieved. However, due to the high chemical reactivity of the aldehyde function, SOI was shown to be the subject of an irreversible product inhibition. A half-life of 15 min was determined at a phenylacetaldehyde concentration of about 55 mM, indicating substantial limitations of applicability and the need to modify the process. PMID:22504818

  8. Mitochondrial oxidative enzyme activity in individual fibre types in hypo- and hyperthyroid rat skeletal muscles.

    Johnson, M A; Turnbull, D M

    1984-04-01

    Quantitative cytochemical and biochemical techniques have been used in combination to study the response of mitochondrial oxidative enzymes in individual muscle fibre types to hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Hypothyroidism resulted in decreased activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), L-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (L-GPDH), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (D-HBDH) in all fibre types of both slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) muscles. In hyperthyroidism, only L-GPDH activity increased in e.d.l. but more marked increases were seen in soleus muscles, which also showed increased SDH activity. In addition to these alterations in the enzyme activity in individual fibre types the metabolic profile of the muscle is further modified by the hormone-induced interconversion of slow- to fast-twitch fibres and vice versa.

  9. Immunological detection of enzymes for sulfate reduction in anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia.

    Milucka, Jana; Widdel, Friedrich; Shima, Seigo

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) at marine gas seeps is performed by archaeal-bacterial consortia that have so far not been cultivated in axenic binary or pure cultures. Knowledge about possible biochemical reactions in AOM consortia is based on metagenomic retrieval of genes related to those in archaeal methanogenesis and bacterial sulfate reduction, and identification of a few catabolic enzymes in protein extracts. Whereas the possible enzyme for methane activation (a variant of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, Mcr) was shown to be harboured by the archaea, enzymes for sulfate activation and reduction have not been localized so far. We adopted a novel approach of fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin (0.3-0.5 μm) cryosections to localize two enzymes of the SR pathway, adenylyl : sulfate transferase (Sat; ATP sulfurylase) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) in microbial consortia from Black Sea methane seeps. Both Sat and Dsr were exclusively found in an abundant microbial morphotype (c. 50% of all cells), which was tentatively identified as Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus-related bacteria. These results show that ANME-2 archaea in the Black Sea AOM consortia did not express bacterial enzymes of the canonical sulfate reduction pathway and thus, in contrast to previous suggestions, most likely cannot perform canonical sulfate reduction. Moreover, our results show that fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin cryosections which to our knowledge has been so far only applied on cell tissues, is a powerful tool for intracellular protein detection in natural microbial associations. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Temporal variations in the gene expression levels of cyanobacterial anti-oxidant enzymes through geological history: implications for biological evolution during the Great Oxidation Event

    Harada, M.; Furukawa, R.; Yokobori, S. I.; Tajika, E.; Yamagishi, A.

    2016-12-01

    A significant rise in atmospheric O2 levels during the GOE (Great Oxidation Event), ca. 2.45-2.0 Ga, must have caused a great stress to biosphere, enforcing life to adapt to oxic conditions. Cyanobacteria, oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that had been responsible for the GOE, are at the same time one of the organisms that would have been greatly affected by the rise of O2 level in the surface environments. Knowledge on the evolution of cyanobacteria is not only important to elucidate the cause of the GOE, but also helps us to better understand the adaptive evolution of life in response to the GOE. Here we performed phylogenetic analysis of an anti-oxidant enzyme Fe-SOD (iron superoxide dismutase) of cyanobacteria, to assess the adaptive evolution of life under the GOE. The rise of O2 level must have increased the level of toxic reactive oxygen species in cyanobacterial cells, thus forced them to change activities or the gene expression levels of Fe-SOD. In the present study, we focus on the change in the gene expression levels of the enzyme, which can be estimated from the promoter sequences of the gene. Promoters are DNA sequences found upstream of protein encoding regions, where RNA polymerase binds and initiates transcription. "Strong" promoters that efficiently interact with RNA polymerase induce high rates of transcription, leading to high levels of gene expression. Thus, from the temporal changes in the promoter sequences, we can estimate the variations in the gene expression levels during the geological time. Promoter sequences of Fe-SOD at each ancestral node of cyanobacteria were predicted from phylogenetic analysis, and the ancestral promoter sequences were compared to the promoters of known highly expressed genes. The similarity was low at the time of the emergence of cyanobacteria; however, increased at the branching nodes diverged 2.4 billon years ago. This roughly coincided with the onset of the GOE, implying that the transition from low to high gene

  11. The effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) on oxidative stress response enzymes of the macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce bioactive secondary metabolites such as hepatotoxins, cytotoxins and neurotoxins. The newly recognized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid found in the majority of cyanobacterial genera tested. Evidence that exists for implication of BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. Uptake and accumulation of free BMAA by various non-symbiotic organisms, including aquatic macrophytes, has been documented but to date limited evidence of ecotoxicology exists. We therefore investigated the effect of BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of the macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum. Markers for oxidative stress in this study are the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. We found that BMAA had an inhibitory effect on all the oxidative stress response enzymes tested in plants exposed to BMAA. However enzymes not related to oxidative stress response were not affected by BMAA in in vitro experiments. Binding studies in the presence of BMAA showed reduced enzyme specific activity over time compared to the control. This study shows that BMAA causes oxidative stress indirectly as it inhibits antioxidant enzymes required to combat reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells. Further investigations are required to fully understand the inhibitory effect of BMAA on these enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Yui, Daishi; Nishida, Yoichiro; Nishina, Tomoko; Mogushi, Kaoru; Tajiri, Mio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ajioka, Itsuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Murayama, Shigeo; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa -/-) mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa -/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3); Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa -/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD. PMID:26637123

  13. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme.

    Daishi Yui

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/- mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3; Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD.

  14. Catalytic oxidation of concentrated orange oil phase by synthetic metallic complexes biomimetic to MMO enzyme.

    Fernandes, Ilizandra A; Esmelindro, Maria Carolina; Corazza, Marcos L; Franceschi, Elton; Treichel, Helen; de Oliveira, Debora; Frizzo, Caren D; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the catalytic oxidation of the concentrated orange oil phase using the complexes [Fe(III)(BMPP)Cl(micro-O)Fe(III)Cl(3)], [Cu(II)(BTMEA)(2)Cl]Cl and [Co(II)(BMPP)]Cl(2) biomimetic to methane monooxygenase enzyme as catalysts and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The reaction products of oil oxidation, mainly nootkatone, were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A screening of catalysts was performed through a full 2(3) experimental design, varying the temperature from 30 to 70 degrees C, the catalyst concentration from 7.0 x 10(-4) to 1.5 x 10(-3) mol L(-1) and the oxidant/substrate molar ratio from 1:1 to 3:1. The results of reaction kinetics employing the most promising catalysts showed that conversions to nootkatone of up to 8% were achieved after 16 h at 70 degrees C. The results obtained in this study in terms of nootkatone production should be considered encouraging, since a real, industrially collected, raw material, instead of pure valencene, was employed in the reaction experiments, with a final content about ten times that present in the original concentrated oil.

  15. Nitric oxide mitigates salt stress by regulating levels of osmolytes and antioxidant enzymes in chickpea

    Parvaiz eAhmad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was designed to evaluate whether external application of nitric oxide (NO in the form of its donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP could mitigate the deleterious effects of NaCl stress on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. plants. SNAP (50 μM was applied to chickpea plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions (50 and 100 mM NaCl. Salt stress negatively affected growth and biomass yield, leaf relative water content (LRWC and chlorophyll content of chickpea plants. High salinity increased electrolyte leakage, carotenoid content and the levels of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, soluble proteins and soluble sugars, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA, as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, and glutathione reductase (GR in chickpea plants. Expression of the representative SOD, CAT and APX genes examined was also up-regulated in chickpea plants by salt stress. On the other hand, exogenous application of NO to salinized plants enhanced the growth parameters, LRWC, photosynthetic pigment production and levels of osmolytes, as well as the activities of examined antioxidant enzymes which is correlated with up-regulation of the examined SOD, CAT and APX genes, in comparison with plants treated with NaCl only. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage, H2O2 and MDA contents showed decline in salt-stressed plants supplemented with NO as compared with those in NaCl-treated plants alone. Thus, the exogenous application of NO protected chickpea plants against salt-induced oxidative damage by enhancing the biosynthesis of antioxidant enzymes, thereby improving plant growth under saline stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NO has capability to mitigate the adverse effects of high salinity on chickpea plants by improving LRWC, photosynthetic pigment biosyntheses, osmolyte accumulation and antioxidative defense system.

  16. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by upregulating antioxidant enzymes

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the upregulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-Isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited five-fold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both mRNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by AhR and Nrf2 proteins were upregulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126 which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants. PMID:24378064

  17. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative reactions play an important role in decomposing soil organic matter fractions that resist hydrolytic degradation, and fundamentally affect the cycling of recalcitrant soil carbon across ecosystems. Microbial extracellular oxidative enzymes (e.g. lignin peroxidases and laccases) have been assumed to provide a dominant role in catalyzing soil organic matter oxidation, while other potential oxidative mechanisms remain poorly explored. Here, we show that abiotic reactions mediated by the oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) could explain high potential oxidation rates in humid tropical forest soils, which often contain high concentrations of Fe(II) and experience rapid redox fluctuations between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. These abiotic reactions could provide an additional mechanism to explain high rates of decomposition in these ecosystems, despite frequent oxygen deficits. We sampled humid tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico, USA from various topographic positions, ranging from well-drained ridges to riparian valleys that experience broad fluctuations in redox potential. We measured oxidative activity by adding the model humic compound L-DOPA to soil slurries, followed by colorimetric measurements of the supernatant solution over time. Dilute hydrogen peroxide was added to a subset of slurries to measure peroxidative activity. We found that oxidative and peroxidative activity correlated positively with soil Fe(II) concentrations, counter to prevailing theory that low redox potential should suppress oxidative enzymes. Boiling or autoclaving sub-samples of soil slurries to denature any enzymes present typically increased peroxidative activity and did not eliminate oxidative activity, further suggesting the importance of an abiotic mechanism. We found substantial differences in the oxidation products of the L-DOPA substrate generated by our soil slurries in comparison with oxidation products generated by a purified enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase

  18. Hepatic Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Enzyme Suppressed by Type 1 Allergy-Produced Nitric Oxide.

    Tanino, Tadatoshi; Bando, Toru; Komada, Akira; Nojiri, Yukie; Okada, Yuna; Ueda, Yukari; Sakurai, Eiichi

    2017-11-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are major mammalian non-cytochrome P450 oxidative enzymes. T helper 2 cell-activated allergic diseases produce excess levels of nitric oxide (NO) that modify the functions of proteins. However, it remains unclear whether allergy-induced NO affects the pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized by FMOs. This study investigated alterations of hepatic microsomal FMO1 and FMO3 activities in type 1 allergic mice and further examined the interaction of FMO1 and FMO3 with allergy-induced NO. Imipramine (IMP; FMO1 substrate) N- oxidation activity was not altered in allergic mice with high serum NO and immunoglobulin E levels. At 7 days after primary sensitization (PS7) or secondary sensitization (SS7), benzydamine (BDZ; FMO1 and FMO3 substrate) N- oxygenation was significantly decreased to 70% of individual controls. The expression levels of FMO1 and FMO3 proteins were not significantly changed in the sensitized mice. Hepatic inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA level increased 5-fold and 15-fold in PS7 and SS7 mice, respectively, and hepatic tumor necrosis factor- α levels were greatly enhanced. When a selective iNOS inhibitor was injected into allergic mice, serum NO levels and BDZ N- oxygenation activity returned to control levels. NO directly suppressed BDZ N- oxygenation, which was probably related to FMO3-dependent metabolism in comparison with IMP N- oxidation. In hepatic microsomes from PS7 and SS7 mice, the suppression of BDZ N- oxygenation was restored by ascorbate. Therefore, type 1 allergic mice had differentially suppressed FMO3-dependent BDZ N- oxygenation. The suppression of FMO3 metabolism related to reversible S- nitrosyl modifications of iNOS-derived NO. NO is expected to alter FMO3-metabolic capacity-limited drug pharmacokinetics in humans. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Oxidative stress enzyme and histopathological lesions in Colossoma macropomum (pisces, ariidae) for environmental impact assessment

    Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Dantas, Janaina Gomes; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    This study used oxidative stress enzyme (Glutathione S-Transferase and Catalase), histopathological lesions (Branchial lesions) and biometric data in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in an Environmental Protection Area at São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations (A1 = contaminated area and A2 = reference site) within the protected area on four occasions. The activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in C. macropomum was compared with biometric data and histopathological lesions. Results have shown that biometric data decreased significantly in fish (p<0.05) at the contaminated site. The activity of CAT was higher in fish specifically caught in A1. A significant difference was observed in the GST activity in the liver of C. macropomum when comparing fish from the contaminated site and those from the reference site (p<0.05).

  20. Oxidative stress in cancer and fibrosis: Opportunity for therapeutic intervention with antioxidant compounds, enzymes, and nanoparticles

    Jingga Morry

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, mainly contributed by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has been implicated in pathogenesis of several diseases. We review two primary examples; fibrosis and cancer. In fibrosis, ROS promote activation and proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, activating TGF-β pathway in an autocrine manner. In cancer, ROS account for its genomic instability, resistance to apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Importantly, ROS trigger cancer cell invasion through invadopodia formation as well as extravasation into a distant metastasis site. Use of antioxidant supplements, enzymes, and inhibitors for ROS-generating NADPH oxidases (NOX is a logical therapeutic intervention for fibrosis and cancer. We review such attempts, progress, and challenges. Lastly, we review how nanoparticles with inherent antioxidant activity can also be a promising therapeutic option, considering their additional feature as a delivery platform for drugs, genes, and imaging agents.

  1. Effects of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles on Antioxidant Enzyme Activities and on Tissue Accumulation of Oreochromis niloticus.

    Tunçsoy, Mustafa; Duran, Servet; Ay, Özcan; Cicik, Bedii; Erdem, Cahit

    2017-09-01

    Accumulation of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) in gill, liver and muscle tissues of Oreochromis niloticus and its effects on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in gill and liver tissues were studied after exposing the fish to 20 µg/L Cu over 15 days. Copper levels and enzyme activities in tissues were determined using spectrophotometric (ICP-AES and UV) techniques respectively. No mortality was observed during the experiments. Copper levels increased in gill and liver tissues of O. niloticus compared to control when exposed to CuO NPs whereas exposure to metal had no effect on muscle level at the end of the exposure period. Highest accumulation of copper was observed in liver while no accumulation was detected in muscle tissue. SOD, CAT activities decreased and GPx activity increased in gill and liver tissues when exposed to CuO NPs.

  2. Unravelling the Interactions between Hydrolytic and Oxidative Enzymes in Degradation of Lignocellulosic Biomass by Sporothrix carnis under Various Fermentation Conditions

    Olusola A. Ogunyewo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the action of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass remains unclear; hence, it is crucial to investigate enzymatic interactions involved in the process. In this study, degradation of corn cob by Sporothrix carnis and involvement of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation were investigated over 240 h cultivation period. About 60% degradation of corn cob was achieved by S. carnis at the end of fermentation. The yields of hydrolytic enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were higher than oxidative enzymes, laccase and peroxidase, over 144 h fermentation period. Maximum yields of cellulase (854.4 U/mg and xylanase (789.6 U/mg were at 96 and 144 h, respectively. Laccase and peroxidase were produced cooperatively with maximum yields of 489.06 U/mg and 585.39 U/mg at 144 h. Drastic decline in production of cellulase at 144 h (242.01 U/mg and xylanase at 192 h (192.2 U/mg indicates that they play initial roles in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass while laccase and peroxidase play later roles. Optimal degradation of corn cob (76.6% and production of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes were achieved with 2.5% inoculum at pH 6.0. Results suggest synergy in interactions between the hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes which can be optimized for improved biodegradation.

  3. A dual enzyme functionalized nanostructured thulium oxide based interface for biomedical application

    Singh, Jay; Roychoudhury, Appan; Srivastava, Manish; Solanki, Pratima R.; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Seung Hee; Malhotra, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present results of the studies related to fabrication of a rare earth metal oxide based efficient biosensor using an interface based on hydrothermally prepared nanostructured thulium oxide (n-Tm2O3). A colloidal solution of prepared nanorods has been electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate. The n-Tm2O3 nanorods are found to provide improved sensing characteristics to the electrode interface in terms of electroactive surface area, diffusion coefficient, charge transfer rate constant and electron transfer kinetics. The structural and morphological studies of n-Tm2O3 nanorods have been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. This interfacial platform has been used for fabrication of a total cholesterol biosensor by immobilizing cholesterol esterase (ChEt) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) onto a Tm2O3 nanostructured surface. The results of response studies of the fabricated ChEt-ChOx/n-Tm2O3/ITO bioelectrode show a broad linear range of 8-400 mg dL-1, detection limit of 19.78 mg (dL cm-2)-1, and high sensitivity of 0.9245 μA (mg per dL cm-2)-1 with a response time of 40 s. Further, this bioelectrode has been utilized for estimation of total cholesterol with negligible interference (3%) from analytes present in human serum samples. The utilization of this n-Tm2O3 modified electrode for enzyme-based biosensor analysis offers an efficient strategy and a novel interface for application of the rare earth metal oxide materials in the field of electrochemical sensors and bioelectronic devices.In this paper, we present results of the studies related to fabrication of a rare earth metal oxide based efficient biosensor using an interface based on hydrothermally prepared nanostructured thulium oxide (n-Tm2O3). A colloidal solution of prepared

  4. A simple assay method for omega-oxidation of lauric acid by hepatic enzymes

    Giera, D.D.; van Lier, R.B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Routine assessment of hepatic ω-oxidation of fatty acids in toxicology studies requires a simpler method of enzymatic analysis than HPLC or TLC. A method depending upon selective solvent separation of 14 C-lauric acid and 14 C-11/12-hydroxy lauric acid was developed. Following enzymatic incubation and addition of 15% methanol to the acidified incubation mixtures, partitioning with an alkane solvent such as iso-octane, cyclohexane, or n-hexane separated the lauric acid substrate and ω-hydroxylated products into two immiscible phases. Approximately 98% of the substrate partitioned into the organic phase, and approximately 83% of the hydroxylated products partitioned into the aqueous phase. Subsequent quantitation of the enzymatic activity required only liquid scintillation counting of the aqueous phase. Hepatic homogenates from male rats treated with 0.01, 0.05, 0.125, and 0.25% clofibrate in the diet for 7 days had enzyme levels 1.3, 6.1, 11.1, and 15.9 times control values, respectively, when assayed by conventional TLC methods, and 1.3, 5.3, 12.3, and 15.3 times control values when assayed by the solvent extraction method. The data indicate that the selective solvent partitioning yields comparable precision and sensitivity to the more conventional TLC method when studying induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes

  5. A highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor for catechol using conducting polymer reduced graphene oxide-metal oxide enzyme modified electrode.

    Sethuraman, V; Muthuraja, P; Anandha Raj, J; Manisankar, P

    2016-10-15

    The fabrication, characterization and analytical performances were investigated for a catechol biosensor, based on the PEDOT-rGO-Fe2O3-PPO composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The graphene oxide (GO) doped conducting polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was prepared through electrochemical polymerization by potential cycling. Reduction of PEDOT-GO was carried out by amperometric method. Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol by hydrothermal method. The mixture of Fe2O3, PPO and glutaraldehyde was casted on the PEDOT-rGO electrode. The surface morphology of the modified electrodes was studied by FE-SEM and AFM. Cyclic voltammetric studies of catechol on the enzyme modified electrode revealed higher reduction peak current. Determination of catechol was carried out successfully by Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) technique. The fabricated biosensor investigated shows a maximum current response at pH 6.5. The catechol biosensor exhibited wide sensing linear range from 4×10(-8) to 6.20×10(-5)M, lower detection limit of 7×10(-9)M, current maxima (Imax) of 92.55µA and Michaelis-Menten (Km) constant of 30.48µM. The activation energy (Ea) of enzyme electrode is 35.93KJmol(-1) at 50°C. There is no interference from d-glucose and l-glutamic acid, ascorbic acid and o-nitrophenol. The PEDOT-rGO-Fe2O3-PPO biosensor was stable for at least 75 days when stored in a buffer at about 4°C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Unusual Growth Phase and Oxygen Tension Regulation of Oxidative Stress Protection Enzymes, Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase, in the Phytopathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Chamnongpol, S.; Mongkolsuk, S.; Vattanaviboon, P.; Fuangthong, M.

    1995-01-01

    The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase play major roles in protecting phytopathogenic bacteria from oxidative stress. In Xanthomonas species, these enzymes are regulated by both growth phase and oxygen tension. The highest enzyme levels were detected within 1 h of growth. Continued growth resulted in a decline of both enzyme activities. High oxygen tension was an inducing signal for both enzyme activities. An 80,000-Da monofunctional catalase and a manganese superoxide dismutase were t...

  7. Role of Myeloperoxidase Oxidants in the Modulation of Cellular Lysosomal Enzyme Function

    Ismael, Fahd O; Barrett, Tessa J; Sheipouri, Diba

    2016-01-01

    with the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effect of HOCl, HOSCN and LDL pre-treated with these oxidants on the function of lysosomal enzymes responsible for protein catabolism and lipid hydrolysis in murine macrophage-like J774A.1 cells. In each case, the cells were exposed to HOCl...... or HOSCN or LDL pre-treated with these oxidants. Lysosomal cathepsin (B, L and D) and acid lipase activities were quantified, with cathepsin and LAMP-1 protein levels determined by Western blotting. Exposure of J774A.1 cells to HOCl or HOSCN resulted in a significant decrease in the activity of the Cys......-dependent cathepsins B and L, but not the Asp-dependent cathepsin D. Cathepsins B and L were also inhibited in macrophages exposed to HOSCN-modified, and to a lesser extent, HOCl-modified LDL. No change was seen in cathepsin D activity or the expression of the cathepsin proteins or lysosomal marker protein LAMP-1...

  8. Why does the Y326I mutant of monoamine oxidase B decompose an endogenous amphetamine at a slower rate than the wild type enzyme? Reaction step elucidated by multiscale molecular simulations.

    Pregeljc, Domen; Jug, Urška; Mavri, Janez; Stare, Jernej

    2018-02-07

    This work investigates the Y326I point mutation effect on the kinetics of oxidative deamination of phenylethylamine (PEA) catalyzed by the monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) enzyme. PEA is a neuromodulator capable of affecting the plasticity of the brain and is responsible for the mood enhancing effect caused by physical exercise. Due to a similar functionality, PEA is often regarded as an endogenous amphetamine. The rate limiting step of the deamination was simulated at the multiscale level, employing the Empirical Valence Bond approach for the quantum treatment of the involved valence states, whereas the environment (solvated protein) was represented with a classical force field. A comparison of the reaction free energy profiles delivered by simulation of the reaction in the wild type MAO B and its Y326I mutant yields an increase in the barrier by 1.06 kcal mol -1 upon mutation, corresponding to a roughly 6-fold decrease in the reaction rate. This is in excellent agreement with the experimental kinetic studies. Inspection of simulation trajectories reveals possible sources of the point mutation effect, namely vanishing favorable electrostatic interactions between PEA and a Tyr326 side chain and an increased amount of water molecules at the active site due to the replacement of tyrosine by a less spacious isoleucine residue, thereby increasing the dielectric shielding of the catalytic environment provided by the enzyme.

  9. A Model of Oxidative Stress Management: Moderation of Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes in SOD1-Null Drosophila melanogaster

    Bernard, Kristine E.; Parkes, Tony L.; Merritt, Thomas J. S.

    2011-01-01

    The response to oxidative stress involves numerous genes and mutations in these genes often manifest in pleiotropic ways that presumably reflect perturbations in ROS-mediated physiology. The Drosophila melanogaster SOD1-null allele (cSODn108) is proposed to result in oxidative stress by preventing superoxide breakdown. In SOD1-null flies, oxidative stress management is thought to be reliant on the glutathione-dependent antioxidants that utilize NADPH to cycle between reduced and oxidized form. Previous studies suggest that SOD1-null Drosophila rely on lipid catabolism for energy rather than carbohydrate metabolism. We tested these connections by comparing the activity of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, lipid and triglyceride concentration, and steady state NADPH:NADP+ in SOD1-null and control transgenic rescue flies. We find a negative shift in the activity of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes in SOD1-nulls and the NADP+-reducing enzymes were found to have significantly lower activity than the other enzymes assayed. Little evidence for the catabolism of lipids as preferential energy source was found, as the concentration of lipids and triglycerides were not significantly lower in SOD1-nulls compared with controls. Using a starvation assay to impact lipids and triglycerides, we found that lipids were indeed depleted in both genotypes when under starvation stress, suggesting that oxidative damage was not preventing the catabolism of lipids in SOD1-null flies. Remarkably, SOD1-nulls were also found to be relatively resistant to starvation. Age profiles of enzyme activity, triglyceride and lipid concentration indicates that the trends observed are consistent over the average lifespan of the SOD1-nulls. Based on our results, we propose a model of physiological response in which organisms under oxidative stress limit the production of ROS through the down-regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in order to moderate the products exiting the electron transport chain. PMID

  10. Effects of curcumin on angiotensin-converting enzyme gene expression, oxidative stress and anti-oxidant status in thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Fazal, Yumna; Fatima, Syeda Nuzhat; Shahid, Syed Muhammad; Mahboob, Tabassum

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the protective effects of curcumin on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene expression, oxidative stress and anti-oxidant status in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Total 32 albino Wistar rats (male, 200-250 g) were divided into six groups (n=8). Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: received TAA (200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.); i.p.) for 12 weeks; Group 3: received curcumin (75 mg/kg b.w.) for 24 weeks; Group 4: received TAA (200 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) for 12 weeks+curcumin (75 mg/kg b.w.) for 12 weeks. A significantly higher ACE gene expression was observed in TAA-induced groups as compared with control, indicating more synthesis of ACE proteins. Treatment with curcumin suppressed ACE expression in TAA liver and reversed the toxicity produced. TAA treatment results in higher lipid peroxidation and lower GSH, SOD and CAT than the normal, and this produces oxidative stress in the liver. Cirrhotic conditions were confirmed by serum enzymes (ALT, AST and ALP) as well as histopathological observations. Curcumin treatment reduced oxidative stress in animals by scavenging reactive oxygen species, protecting the anti-oxidant enzymes from being denatured and reducing the oxidative stress marker lipid peroxidation. Curcumin treatment restores hepatocytes, damaged by TAA, and protects liver tissue approaching cirrhosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Effect of trichloroethylene (TCE) toxicity on the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane and oxidative stress in kidney and other rat tissues.

    Khan, Sheeba; Priyamvada, Shubha; Khan, Sara A; Khan, Wasim; Farooq, Neelam; Khan, Farah; Yusufi, A N K

    2009-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial solvent, is a major environmental contaminant. Histopathological examinations revealed that TCE caused liver and kidney toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, biochemical mechanism and tissue response to toxic insult are not completely elucidated. We hypothesized that TCE induces oxidative stress to various rat tissues and alters their metabolic functions. Male Wistar rats were given TCE (1000 mg/kg/day) in corn oil orally for 25 d. Blood and tissues were collected and analyzed for various biochemical and enzymatic parameters. TCE administration increased blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, cholesterol and alkaline phosphatase but decreased serum glucose, inorganic phosphate and phospholipids indicating kidney and liver toxicity. Activity of hexokinase, lactate dehydrogenase increased in the intestine and liver whereas decreased in renal tissues. Malate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase decreased in all tissues whereas increased in medulla. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased but NADP-malic enzyme decreased in all tissues except in medulla. The activity of BBM enzymes decreased but renal Na/Pi transport increased. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities variably declined whereas lipid peroxidation significantly enhanced in all tissues. The present results indicate that TCE caused severe damage to kidney, intestine, liver and brain; altered carbohydrate metabolism and suppressed antioxidant defense system.

  12. Nocardia iowensis sp. nov., an organism rich in biocatalytically important enzymes and nitric oxide synthase

    Lamm, Andrew S.; Khare, Arshdeep; Conville, Patricia; Lau, Peter C. K.; Bergeron, Hélène; Rosazza, John P. N.

    2009-01-01

    Nocardia strain NRRL 5646, isolated from a garden soil sample in Osceola, Iowa, USA, was initially of interest as an antibiotic producer. It contained biocatalytically important enzymes and represented the first described nitric oxide synthase enzyme system in bacteria. The present polyphasic taxonomic study was undertaken to differentiate strain NRRL 5646T from related species of the genus Nocardia. Chemotaxonomic analyses included determinations of the fatty acid methyl ester profile (C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C18 : 0 10-methyl as major components), quinone [cyclo MK-8(H4) as the major component], polar lipid (diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside as major components) and mycolic acid. These results supported its placement within the genus Nocardia. Biochemical testing and 16S rRNA, 65-kDa heat-shock protein (hsp65) and preprotein translocase (secA1) gene sequence analyses differentiated strain NRRL 5646T from recognized Nocardia species. Previous studies have demonstrated that other genetic sequences (carboxylic acid reductase, Nocardia phosphopantetheinyl transferase and GTP cyclohydrolase I) from strain NRRL 5646T can also be used to substantiate its uniqueness. The level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain NRRL 5646T and the type strains of Nocardia tenerifensis and Nocardia brasiliensis was 98.8 %. However, strain NRRL 5646T could be clearly distinguished from these Nocardia species based on DNA–DNA hybridization data. Consequently, strain NRRL 5646T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia iowensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRRL 5646T (=UI 122540T=NRRL B-24671T=DSM 45197T). PMID:19622667

  13. Effect of turmeric and curcumin on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Suryanarayana, Palla; Satyanarayana, Alleboena; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Kumar, Putcha Uday; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2007-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that complications related to diabetes are associated with increased oxidative stress. Curcumin, an active principle of turmeric, has several biological properties, including antioxidant activity. The protective effect of curcumin and turmeric on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced oxidative stress in various tissues of rats was studied. Three-month-old Wistar-NIN rats were made diabetic by injecting STZ (35 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally and fed either only the AIN-93 diet or the AIN-93 diet containing 0.002% or 0.01% curcumin or 0.5% turmeric for a period of eight weeks. After eight weeks the levels of oxidative stress parameters and activity of antioxidant enzymes were determined in various tissues. STZ-induced hyperglycemia resulted in increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls in red blood cells and other tissues and altered antioxidant enzyme activities. Interestingly, feeding curcumin and turmeric to the diabetic rats controlled oxidative stress by inhibiting the increase in TBARS and protein carbonyls and reversing altered antioxidant enzyme activities without altering the hyperglycemic state in most of the tissues. Turmeric and curcumin appear to be beneficial in preventing diabetes-induced oxidative stress in rats despite unaltered hyperglycemic status.

  14. Markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity in older men and women with differing physical activity.

    Rowiński, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Hübner-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Kędziora, Józef

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity and physical activity in older men and women. The present study included 481 participants (233 men and 248 women) in the age group 65-69 years (127 men and 125 women) and in the age group 90 years and over (106 men and 123 women). The classification of respondents by physical activity was based on answers to the question if, in the past 12 months, they engaged in any pastimes which require physical activity. The systemic oxidative stress status was assessed by measuring plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyl concentration as well as erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activity, i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR). The concentration of plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyls (CP) was lower in groups of younger men and women compared to the respective older groups. In all examined groups, physical activity resulted in decrease of these oxidative stress markers and simultaneously caused adaptive increase in the erythrocyte SOD activity. Additionally, in active younger men CAT, GPx, and GR activities were higher than in sedentary ones. In conclusion, oxidative stress increase is age-related, but physical activity can reduce oxidative stress markers and induce adaptive increase in the erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, especially SOD, even in old and very old men and women. © 2013.

  15. Hydrolysis of solubilized hemicellulose derived from wet-oxidized wheat straw by a mixture of commercial fungal enzyme preparations

    Skammelsen Schmidt, Anette; Thomsen, Alle Belinda; Woidemann, Anders [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Tenkanen, Maija [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1998-04-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wet-oxidized wheat straw was investigated for quantification purposes. An optimal hydrolysis depends on factors such as composition of the applied enzyme mixture and the hydrolysis conditions (enzyme loading, hydrolysis time, pH-value, and temperature). A concentrated enzyme mixture was used in this study prepared at VTT Biotechnology and Food Research, Finland, by mixing four commercial enzyme preparations. No distinctive pH-value and temperature optima were identified after a prolonged incubation of 24 hours. By reducing the hydrolysis time to 2 hours a temperature optimum was found at 50 deg. C, where a pH-value higher than 5.2 resulted in reduced activity. An enzyme-substrate-volume-ratio of 0.042, a pH-value of 5.0, and a temperature of 50 deg. C were chosen as the best hydrolysis conditions due to an improved monosaccharide yield. The hydrolysis time was chosen to be 24 hours to ensure equilibrium and total quantification. Even under the best hydrolysis conditions, the overall sugar yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis was only 85% of that of the optimal acid hydrolysis. The glucose yield were approximately the same for the two types of hydrolyses, probably due to the high cellulase activity in the VTT-enzyme mixture. For xylose and arabinose the enzymatic hydrolysis yielded only 80% of that of the acid hydrolysis. As the pentoses existed mainly as complex polymers their degradation required many different enzymes, some of which might be missing from the VTT-enzyme mixture. Furthermore, the removal of side-choins from the xylan backbone during the wet-oxidation pretreatment process might enable the hemicellulosic polymers to interact and precipitate, hence, reducing the enzymatic digestibility of the hemicellulose. (au) 8 tabs., 10 ills., 65 refs.

  16. Evaluation of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in congenital urea cycle enzyme defects.

    Nagasaka, Hironori; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Yorifuji, Tohru; Miida, Takashi; Murayama, Kei; Tsuruoka, Tomoko; Takatani, Tomozumi; Kanazawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Takayanagi, Masaki

    2009-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from arginine and O(2) by nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Citrulline, which is formed as a by-product of the NOS reaction, can be recycled to arginine by the 2 enzymes acting in the urea cycle: argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). Although the complete urea cycle is expressed only in the liver, ASS and ASL are expressed in other organs including the kidney and vascular endothelium. To examine possible alterations of the NO pathway in urea cycle defects, we measured plasma concentrations of arginine and citrulline and serum concentrations of nitrite/nitrate (NOx(-), stable NO metabolites) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous NOS inhibitor) in patients with congenital urea cycle disorders of 3 types: ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, ASS deficiency, and ASL deficiency. All were receiving oral arginine replacement at the time of this study. The same parameters were also measured in healthy subjects, who participated as controls. The OTC-deficient patients had significantly high NOx(-) and nonsignificantly high ADMA concentrations. Their NOx(-) was significantly positively correlated with arginine. The ASS-deficient patients had significantly low NOx(-) and significantly high ADMA concentrations. The ASL-deficient patients had normal NOx(-) and nonsignificantly high ADMA concentrations. In ASS-deficient and ASL-deficient patients, the NOx(-) was significantly inversely correlated with citrulline. These results suggest that NO synthesis is enhanced in OTC-deficient patients while receiving arginine but that NO synthesis remains low in ASS-deficient patients despite receiving arginine. They also suggest that endogenous NO synthesis is negatively affected by citrulline and ADMA in ASS-deficient and ASL-deficient patients. Although the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood, we infer that the NO pathway might play a role in the pathophysiology related to congenital urea cycle

  17. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  18. Oxidations of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic aliphatic amines by horseradish peroxidase: the indole ring binds to the enzyme and mediates electron-transfer amine oxidation.

    Ling, Ke-Qing; Li, Wen-Shan; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2008-01-23

    Although oxidations of aromatic amines by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are well-known, typical aliphatic amines are not substrates of HRP. In this study, the reactions of N-benzyl and N-methyl cyclic amines with HRP were found to be slow, but reactions of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines were 2-3 orders of magnitude faster. Analyses of pH-rate profiles revealed a dominant contribution to reaction by the amine-free base forms, the only species found to bind to the enzyme. A metabolic study on a family of congeneric N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines indicated competition between amine and indole oxidation pathways. Amine oxidation dominated for the seven- and eight-membered azacycles, where ring size supports the change in hybridization from sp3 to sp2 that occurs upon one-electron amine nitrogen oxidation, whereas only indole oxidation was observed for the six-membered ring congener. Optical difference spectroscopic binding data and computational docking simulations suggest that all the arylalkylamine substrates bind to the enzyme through their aromatic termini with similar binding modes and binding affinities. Kinetic saturation was observed for a particularly soluble substrate, consistent with an obligatory role of an enzyme-substrate complexation preceding electron transfer. The significant rate enhancements seen for the indoleethylamine substrates suggest the ability of the bound indole ring to mediate what amounts to medium long-range electron-transfer oxidation of the tertiary amine center by the HRP oxidants. This is the first systematic investigation to document aliphatic amine oxidation by HRP at rates consistent with normal metabolic turnover, and the demonstration that this is facilitated by an auxiliary electron-rich aromatic ring.

  19. Degradation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid and Perfluoroctane Sulfonate by Enzyme Catalyzed Oxidative Humification Reactions

    Huang, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are alkyl based chemicals having multiple or all hydrogens replaced by fluorine atoms, and thus exhibit high thermal and chemical stability and other unusual characteristics. PFASs have been widely used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer products, and tend to be environmentally persistent. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are two representative PFASs that have drawn particular attention because of their ubiquitous presence in the environment, resistance to degradation and toxicity to animals. This study examined the decomposition of PFOA and PFOS in enzyme catalyzed oxidative humification reactions (ECOHR), a class of reactions that are ubiquitous in the environment involved in natural organic humification. Reaction rates and influential factors were examined, and high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify possible products. Fluorides and partially fluorinated compounds were identified as likely products from PFOA and PFOS degradation, which were possibly formed via a combination of free radical decomposition, rearrangements and coupling processes. The findings suggest that PFOA and PFOS may be transformed during humification, and ECOHR can potentially be used for the remediation of these chemicals.

  20. 2005 annual report of MEXT specially promoted research, 'Development of the 4D Space Access Neutron Spectrometer (4SEASONS) and elucidation of the Mechanism of Oxide High-Tc superconductivity'

    Arai, Masatoshi; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Nakajima, Kenji; Shamoto, Shin'ichi; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Aizawa, Kazuya; Asaoka, Hidehito; Kodama, Katsuaki; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Imai, Yoshinori; Yokoo, Tetsuya; Ino, Takashi; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Fujita, Masaki; Ohoyama, Kenji; Hiraka, Haruhiro

    2006-11-01

    A research project entitled 'Development of the 4D Space Access Neutron Spectrometer (4SEASONS) and Elucidation of the Mechanism of Oxide High-T c Superconductivity' has started in 2005 (repr. by M. Arai). It is supported by MEXT, Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research and is going to last until fiscal 2009. The goal of the project is to elucidate the mechanism of oxide high-T c superconductivity by neutron scattering technique. For this purpose, we will develop an inelastic neutron scattering instrument 4SEASONS (4d SpacE AccesS neutrON Spectrometer) for the spallation neutron source in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The instrument will have 100 times higher performance than existing world-class instruments, and will enable detailed observation of anomalous magnetic excitations and phonons in a four-dimensional momentum-energy space. This report summarizes the progress in the research project in fiscal 2005. (author)

  1. Effect of high-intensity intermittent swimming training on fatty acid oxidation enzyme activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    Terada, Shin; Tabata, Izumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2004-02-01

    We previously reported that high-intensity exercise training significantly increased citrate synthase (CS) activity, a marker of oxidative enzyme, in rat skeletal muscle to a level equaling that attained after low-intensity prolonged exercise training (Terada et al., J Appl Physiol 90: 2019-2024, 2001). Since mitochondrial oxidative enzymes and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) enzymes are often increased simultaneously, we assessed the effect of high-intensity intermittent swimming training on FAO enzyme activity in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (3 to 4 weeks old) were assigned to a 10-day period of high-intensity intermittent exercise training (HIT), low-intensity prolonged exercise training (LIT), or sedentary control conditions. In the HIT group, the rats repeated fourteen 20 s swimming sessions with a weight equivalent to 14-16% of their body weight. Between the exercise sessions, a 10 s pause was allowed. Rats in the LIT group swam 6 h/day in two 3 h sessions separated by 45 min of rest. CS activity in the triceps muscle of rats in the HIT and LIT groups was significantly higher than that in the control rats by 36 and 39%, respectively. Furthermore, 3-beta hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity, an important enzyme in the FAO pathway in skeletal muscle, was higher in the two training groups than in the control rats (HIT: 100%, LIT: 88%). No significant difference in HAD activity was observed between the two training groups. In conclusion, the present investigation demonstrated that high-intensity intermittent swimming training elevated FAO enzyme activity in rat skeletal muscle to a level similar to that attained after 6 h of low-intensity prolonged swimming exercise training.

  2. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates

    Raheleh Ghanbari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8% after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH (56.00% and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC (59.00% methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions.

  3. Identification of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Sphingobacterium sp. T2 as a Novel Bacterial Enzyme for Lignin Oxidation.

    Rashid, Goran M M; Taylor, Charles R; Liu, Yangqingxue; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Rea, Dean; Fülöp, Vilmos; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-10-16

    The valorization of aromatic heteropolymer lignin is an important unsolved problem in the development of a biomass-based biorefinery, for which novel high-activity biocatalysts are needed. Sequencing of the genomic DNA of lignin-degrading bacterial strain Sphingobacterium sp. T2 revealed no matches to known lignin-degrading genes. Proteomic matches for two manganese superoxide dismutase proteins were found in partially purified extracellular fractions. Recombinant MnSOD1 and MnSOD2 were both found to show high activity for oxidation of Organosolv and Kraft lignin, and lignin model compounds, generating multiple oxidation products. Structure determination revealed that the products result from aryl-Cα and Cα-Cβ bond oxidative cleavage and O-demethylation. The crystal structure of MnSOD1 was determined to 1.35 Å resolution, revealing a typical MnSOD homodimer harboring a five-coordinate trigonal bipyramidal Mn(II) center ligated by three His, one Asp, and a water/hydroxide in each active site. We propose that the lignin oxidation reactivity of these enzymes is due to the production of a hydroxyl radical, a highly reactive oxidant. This is the first demonstration that MnSOD is a microbial lignin-oxidizing enzyme.

  4. Combining Solvent Isotope Effects with Substrate Isotope Effects in Mechanistic Studies of Alcohol and Amine Oxidation by Enzymes*

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin-and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. PMID:25448013

  5. Ageing of enteric neurons: oxidative stress, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes

    Korsak Kris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing is associated with gastrointestinal dysfunction, which can have a major impact on quality of life of the elderly. A number of changes in the innervation of the gut during ageing have been reported, including neuronal loss and degenerative changes. Evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS are elevated in ageing enteric neurons, but that neurotrophic factors may reduce generation of neuronal ROS. Two such factors, glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 have also been found to protect enteric neurons against oxidative stress induced cell death of enteric ganglion cells in vitro. We have investigated the possible roles of neurotrophic factors further, by examining their expression in the gut during ageing, and by analysing their effects on antioxidant enzyme production in cultures of enteric ganglion cells. Results Analysis of the expression of GDNF and its receptors c-Ret and GFR α − 1 in rat gut by RT-PCR showed that expression continues throughout life and into ageing, in both ad libitum(AL and calorically-restricted (CR animals. Levels of expression of GDNF and GFR α − 1 were elevated in 24 month AL animals compared to 24 month CR animals, and to 24 CR and 6 month control animals respectively. The related factor Neurturin and its receptor GFR α − 2 were also expressed throughout life, the levels of the GFR – α-2(b isoform were reduced in 24 m AL animals. Immunolabelling showed that c-Ret and GFR α − 1 proteins were expressed by myenteric neurons in ageing animals. GDNF, but not NT-3, was found to increase expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase by cultured enteric ganglion cells. Conclusions The neurotrophic factors GDNF and neurturin and their receptors continue to be expressed in the ageing gut. Changes in the levels of expression of GDNF , GFR α-1 and GFR α-2(b isoform occurred in 24 m AL animals. GDNF, but not

  6. Enzyme-polyelectrolyte multilayer assemblies on reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors for biosensing applications.

    Piccinini, Esteban; Bliem, Christina; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Battaglini, Fernando; Azzaroni, Omar; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2017-06-15

    We present the construction of layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyethylenimine and urease onto reduced-graphene-oxide based field-effect transistors (rGO FETs) for the detection of urea. This versatile biosensor platform simultaneously exploits the pH dependency of liquid-gated graphene-based transistors and the change in the local pH produced by the catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The use of an interdigitated microchannel resulted in transistors displaying low noise, high pH sensitivity (20.3µA/pH) and transconductance values up to 800 µS. The modification of rGO FETs with a weak polyelectrolyte improved the pH response because of its transducing properties by electrostatic gating effects. In the presence of urea, the urease-modified rGO FETs showed a shift in the Dirac point due to the change in the local pH close to the graphene surface. Markedly, these devices operated at very low voltages (less than 500mV) and were able to monitor urea in the range of 1-1000µm, with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 1µm, fast response and good long-term stability. The urea-response of the transistors was enhanced by increasing the number of bilayers due to the increment of the enzyme surface coverage onto the channel. Moreover, quantification of the heavy metal Cu 2+ (with a LOD down to 10nM) was performed in aqueous solution by taking advantage of the urease specific inhibition. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of certain oxidative enzymes, catalase, and beta-glucosidase on virulence of Cephalosporium maydis.

    Abd-Elrazik, A; Darweish, F A; Rushdi, M H

    1978-01-01

    Isolates of Cephalosporium maydis varied in their pathogenicity to D.C. 67 maize cultivar from highly to weakly pathogenic. Highly pathogenic isolates showed lower activity of polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, cytochrome oxidase, and beta-glucosidase enzymes and higher activity of catalase and dehydrogenase than weakly pathogenic isolates. Enzymes production by the tested isolates increased as the culture age increased; except in case of catalase enzyme, the reverse action was detected. The role of these enzymes in the virulence of C. maydis is suggested and discussed.

  8. Trace Metal Requirements for Microbial Enzymes Involved in the Production and Consumption of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are heavily influenced by microbiological activity. Microbial enzymes involved in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases often contain metal cofactors. While extensive research has examined the influence of Fe bioavailability on microbial CO2 cycling, fewer studies have explored metal requirements for microbial production and consumption of the second- and third-most abundant greenhouse gases, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we review the current state of biochemical, physiological, and environmental research on transition metal requirements for microbial CH4 and N2O cycling. Methanogenic archaea require large amounts of Fe, Ni, and Co (and some Mo/W and Zn). Low bioavailability of Fe, Ni, and Co limits methanogenesis in pure and mixed cultures and environmental studies. Anaerobic methane oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) likely occurs via reverse methanogenesis since ANME possess most of the enzymes in the methanogenic pathway. Aerobic CH4 oxidation uses Cu or Fe for the first step depending on Cu availability, and additional Fe, Cu, and Mo for later steps. N2O production via classical anaerobic denitrification is primarily Fe-based, whereas aerobic pathways (nitrifier denitrification and archaeal ammonia oxidation) require Cu in addition to, or possibly in place of, Fe. Genes encoding the Cu-containing N2O reductase, the only known enzyme capable of microbial N2O conversion to N2, have only been found in classical denitrifiers. Accumulation of N2O due to low Cu has been observed in pure cultures and a lake ecosystem, but not in marine systems. Future research is needed on metalloenzymes involved in the production of N2O by enrichment cultures of ammonia oxidizing archaea, biological mechanisms for scavenging scarce metals, and possible links between metal bioavailability and greenhouse gas fluxes in anaerobic environments where metals may be limiting due to sulfide

  9. Ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes produced by solid state fermentation.

    Szabo, Orsolya Erzsebet; Csiszar, Emilia; Toth, Karolina; Szakacs, George; Koczka, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic and hydrolytic enzymes were produced with six selected fungi on flax substrate by solid state fermentation (SSF). The extracellular enzyme production of the organisms in two SSF media was evaluated by measuring the soluble protein concentration and the filter paper, endoxylanase, 1,4-β-d-glucosidase, 1,4-β-d-endoglucanase, polygalacturonase, lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase activities of the clear culture solutions produced by conventional extraction from the SSF materials. The SSF material of the best enzyme producer (Trichoderma virens TUB F-498) was further investigated to enhance the enzyme recovery by low frequency ultrasound treatment. Performance of both the original and ultrasound macerated crude enzyme mixtures was evaluated in degradation of the colored lignin-containing and waxy materials of raw linen fabric. Results proved that sonication (at 40%, 60% and 80% amplitudes, for 60min) did not result in reduction in the filter paper, lignin peroxidase and laccase activities of the crude enzyme solution, but has a significant positive effect on the efficiency of enzyme extraction from the SSF material. Depending on the parameters of sonication, the enzyme activities in the extracts obtained can be increased up to 129-413% of the original activities measured in the control extracts recovered by a common magnetic stirrer. Sonication also has an effect on both the enzymatic removal of the lignin-containing color materials and hydrophobic surface layer from the raw linen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring Intracellular Enzyme Concentrations: Assessing the Effect of Oxidative Stress on the Amount of Glyoxalase I

    Miranda, Hugo Vicente; Ferreira, Antonio E. N.; Quintas, Alexandre; Cordeiro, Carlos; Freire, Ana Ponces

    2008-01-01

    Enzymology is one of the fundamental areas of biochemistry and involves the study of the structure, kinetics, and regulation of enzyme activity. Research in this area is often conducted with purified enzymes and extrapolated to "in vivo" conditions. The specificity constant, k[subscript S], is the ratio between k[subscript cat] (the catalytic…

  11. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from 125 I-PEG-catalase or 125 I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species

  12. Dicranostiga leptopodu (Maxim.) Fedde extracts attenuated CCl4-induced acute liver damage in mice through increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activity to improve mitochondrial function.

    Tang, Deping; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jinzhou; Mao, Aihong; Liao, Shiqi; Wang, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Dicranostiga Leptodu (Maxim.) fedde (DLF), a poppy plant, has been reported have many benefits and medicinal properties, including free radicals scavenging and detoxifying. However, the protective effect of DLF extracts against carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced damage in mice liver has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrated that DLF extracts attenuated CCl 4 -induced liver damage in mice through increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activity to improve mitochondrial function. In this study, the mice liver damage evoked by CCl 4 was marked by morphology changes, significant rise in lipid peroxidation, as well as alterations of mitochondrial respiratory function. Interestingly, pretreatment with DLF extracts attenuated CCl 4 -induced morphological damage and increasing of lipid peroxidation in mice liver. Additionally, DLF extracts improved mitochondrial function by preventing the disruption of respiratory chain and suppression of mitochondrial Na + K + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase activity. Furthermore, administration with DLF extracts elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels and maintained the balance of redox status. This results showed that toxic protection effect of DLF extracts on mice liver is mediated by improving mitochondrial respiratory function and keeping the balance of redox status, which suggesting that DLF extracts could be used as potential toxic protection agent for the liver against hepatotoxic agent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. The substrate oxidation mechanism of pyranose 2-oxidase and other related enzymes in the glucose-methanol-choline superfamily.

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes in the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily catalyze the oxidation of an alcohol moiety to the corresponding aldehyde. In this review, the current understanding of the sugar oxidation mechanism in the reaction of pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) is highlighted and compared with that of other enzymes in the GMC family for which structural and mechanistic information is available, including glucose oxidase, choline oxidase, cholesterol oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, aryl-alcohol oxidase, and pyridoxine 4-oxidase. Other enzymes in the family that have been newly discovered or for which less information is available are also discussed. A large primary kinetic isotope effect was observed for the flavin reduction when 2-d-D-glucose was used as a substrate, but no solvent kinetic isotope effect was detected for the flavin reduction step. The reaction of P2O is consistent with a hydride transfer mechanism in which there is stepwise formation of d-glucose alkoxide prior to the hydride transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis of P2O and pH-dependence studies indicated that His548 is a catalytic base that facilitates the deprotonation of C2-OH in D-glucose. This finding agrees with the current mechanistic model for aryl-alcohol oxidase, glucose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, methanol oxidase, and pyridoxine 4-oxidase, but is different from that of cholesterol oxidase and choline oxidase. Although all of the GMC enzymes share similar structural folding and use the hydride transfer mechanism for flavin reduction, they appear to have subtle differences in the fine-tuned details of how they catalyze substrate oxidation. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  14. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry

    Muhlisin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat.

  15. Elucidation of the regio- and chemoselectivity of enzymatic allylic oxidations with Pleurotus sapidus – conversion of selected spirocyclic terpenoids and computational analysis

    Verena Weidmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Allylic oxidations of olefins to enones allow the efficient synthesis of value-added products from simple olefinic precursors like terpenes or terpenoids. Biocatalytic variants have a large potential for industrial applications, particularly in the pharmaceutical and food industry. Herein we report efficient biocatalytic allylic oxidations of spirocyclic terpenoids by a lyophilisate of the edible fungus Pleurotus sapidus. This ‘’mushroom catalysis’’ is operationally simple and allows the conversion of various unsaturated spirocyclic terpenoids. A number of new spirocyclic enones have thus been obtained with good regio- and chemoselectivity and chiral separation protocols for enantiomeric mixtures have been developed. The oxidations follow a radical mechanism and the regioselectivity of the reaction is mainly determined by bond-dissociation energies of the available allylic CH-bonds and steric accessibility of the oxidation site.

  16. Pyrosequencing Reveals Soil Enzyme Activities and Bacterial Communities Impacted by Graphene and Its Oxides.

    Rong, Yan; Wang, Yi; Guan, Yina; Ma, Jiangtao; Cai, Zhiqiang; Yang, Guanghua; Zhao, Xiyue

    2017-10-25

    Graphene (GN) and graphene oxides (GOs) are novel carbon nanomaterial; they have been attracting much attention because of their excellent properties and are widely applied in many areas, including energy, electronics, biomedicine, environmental science, etc. With industrial production and consumption of GN/GO, they will inevitably enter the soil and water environments. GN/GO may directly cause certain harm to microorganisms and lead to ecological and environmental risks. GOs are GN derivatives with abundant oxygen-containing functional groups in their graphitic backbone. The structure and chemistry of GN show obvious differences compared to those of GO, which lead to the different environmental behaviors. In this study, four different types of soil (S1-S4) were employed to investigate the effect of GN and GO on soil enzymatic activity, microbial population, and bacterial community through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The results showed that soil enzyme activity (invertase, protease, catalase, and urease) and microbial population (bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi) changed after GN/GO release into soils. Soil microbial community species are more rich, and the diversity also increases after GO/GN application. The phylum of Proteobacteria increased at 90 days after treatment (DAT) after GN/GO application. The phylum of Chloroflexi occurred after GN application at 90 DAT in S1 soil and reached 4.6%. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in S2, S3, and S4 soils; it ranged from 43.6 to 71.4% in S2 soil, from 45.6 to 73.7% in S3 soil, and from 38.1 to 56.7% in S4 soil. The most abundant genera were Bacillus (37.5-47.0%) and Lactococcus (28.0-39.0%) in S1 soil, Lysobacter and Flavobacterium in S2 soil, Pedobacter in S3 soil, and Massilia in S4 soil. The effect of GN and GO on the soil microbial community is time-dependent, and there are no significant differences between the samples at 10 and 90 DAT.

  17. Increased Oxidative Stress and Imbalance in Antioxidant Enzymes in the Brains of Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Luciane B. Ceretta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM is associated with pathological changes in the central nervous system (SNC as well as alterations in oxidative stress. Thus, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the animal model of diabetes induced by alloxan on memory and oxidative stress. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by using a single injection of alloxan (150 mg/kg, and fifteen days after induction, the rats memory was evaluated through the use of the object recognition task. The oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT were measured in the rat brain. The results showed that diabetic rats did not have alterations in their recognition memory. However, the results did show that diabetic rats had increases in the levels of superoxide in the prefrontal cortex, and in thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS production in the prefrontal cortex and in the amygdala in submitochondrial particles. Also, there was an increase in protein oxidation in the hippocampus and striatum, and in TBARS oxidation in the striatum and amygdala. The SOD activity was decreased in diabetic rats in the striatum and amygdala. However, the CAT activity was increased in the hippocampus taken from diabetic rats. In conclusion, our findings illustrate that the animal model of diabetes induced by alloxan did not cause alterations in the animals’ recognition memory, but it produced oxidants and an imbalance between SOD and CAT activities, which could contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetes.

  18. Elucidation of oxidation and degradation products of oxygen containing fuel components by combined use of a stable isotopic tracer and mass spectrometry.

    Frauscher, Marcella; Besser, Charlotte; Allmaier, Günter; Dörr, Nicole

    2017-11-15

    In order to reveal the degradation products of oxygen-containing fuel components, in particular fatty acid methyl esters, a novel approach was developed to characterize the oxidation behaviour. Combination of artificial alteration under pressurized oxygen atmosphere, a stable isotopic tracer, and gas chromatography electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) was used to obtain detailed information on the formation of oxidation products of (9Z), (12Z)-octadecadienoic acid methyl ester (C18:2 ME). Thereby, biodiesel simulating model compound C18:2 ME was oxidized in a rotating pressurized vessel standardized for lubricant oxidation tests (RPVOT), i.e., artificially altered, under 16 O 2 as well as 18 O 2 atmosphere. Identification of the formed degradation products, mainly carboxylic acids of various chain lengths, alcohols, ketones, and esters, was performed by means of GC-EI-MS. Comparison of mass spectra of compounds under both atmospheres revealed not only the degree of oxidation and the origin of oxygen atoms, but also the sites of oxidative attack and bond cleavage. Hence, the developed and outlined strategy based on a gas-phase stable isotopic tracer and mass spectrometry provides insight into the degradation of oxygen-containing fuels and fuel components by means of the accurate differentiation of oxygen origin in a degradation product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress parameters and enzyme activity in tissues of Cape river crab (Potamanautes perlatus) following exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)

    Walters, Chavon R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available of oxidative stress was studied in the gills and hepatopancreas of the Cape River crab Potamonautes perlatus. Responses were assessed through activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the nonenzymatic...

  20. Familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia caused by a defect in the SCHAD enzyme of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

    Molven, Anders; Matre, Guri E.; Duran, Marinus; Wanders, Ronald J.; Rishaug, Unni; Njølstad, Pål R.; Jellum, Egil; Søvik, Oddmund

    2004-01-01

    Inappropriately elevated insulin secretion is the hallmark of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI), also denoted congenital hyperinsulinism. Causal mutations have been uncovered in genes coding for the beta-cell's ATP-sensitive potassium channel and the metabolic enzymes

  1. Nanodiamonds as pH-switchable oxidation and reduction catalysts with enzyme-like activities for immunoassay and antioxidant applications.

    Chen, T M; Tian, X M; Huang, L; Xiao, J; Yang, G W

    2017-10-19

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) have recently become a focus of interest from the viewpoints of both science and technology. Their intriguing properties make them suitable as biologically active substrates, in biosensor applications as well as diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical imaging probes. Here, we demonstrate that NDs, as oxidation and reduction catalysts, possess intrinsic enzyme mimetic properties of oxidase, peroxidase and catalase, and these behaviors can be switched by modulating the pH value. NDs not only catalyze the reduction of oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) at acidic pH, but also catalyze the dismutation decomposition of H 2 O 2 to produce O 2 at alkaline pH. It was proposed that the molecular mechanism of their peroxidase-like activity is electron-transfer acceleration, the source of which is likely derived from oxygen containing functional groups on their surface. Based on the color reaction, a nanodiamond-based enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was established for the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG). Surprisingly, NDs display an excellent antioxidant activity due to the protective effect against H 2 O 2 -induced cellular oxidative damage. These findings make NDs a promising enzyme mimetic candidate and expand their applications in biocatalysis, bioassays and nano-biomedicine.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups and serum levels of anti-oxidant enzymes in patients with osteoarthritis

    Fernandez-Moreno Mercedes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress play a main role in the initiation and progression of the OA disease and leads to the degeneration of mitochondria. To prevent this, the chondrocytes possess a well-coordinated enzymatic antioxidant system. Besides, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups are associated with the OA disease. Thus, the main goal of this work is to assess the incidence of the mtDNA haplogroups on serum levels of two of the main antioxidant enzymes, Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (Mn-SOD or SOD2 and catalase, and to test the suitability of these two proteins for potential OA-related biomarkers. Methods We analyzed the serum levels of SOD2 and catalase in 73 OA patients and 77 healthy controls carrying the haplogroups J, U and H, by ELISA assay. Knee and hip radiographs were classified according to Kellgren and Lawrence (K/L scoring from Grade 0 to Grade IV. Appropriate statistical analyses were performed to test the effects of clinical variables, including gender, body mass index (BMI, age, smoking status, diagnosis, haplogroups and radiologic K/L grade on serum levels of these enzymes. Results Serum levels of SOD2 appeared statistically increased in OA patients when compared with healthy controls (p Conclusions The increased levels of SOD2 in OA patients indicate an increased oxidative stress OA-related, therefore this antioxidant enzyme could be a suitable candidate biomarker for diagnosis of OA. Mitochondrial haplogroups significantly correlates with serum levels of catalase

  3. Identification of the missing links in prokaryotic pentose oxidation pathways: evidence for enzyme recruitment

    Brouns, S.J.J.; Walther, J.; Snijders, A.P.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Willemen, H.L.D.M.; Worm, P.; Vos, de M.G.; Andersson, A.; Lundgren, M.; Mazon, H.F.; Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Nilsson, P.; Salmon, L.; Vos, de W.M.; Wright, P.C.; Bernander, R.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The pentose metabolism of Archaea is largely unknown. Here, we have employed an integrated genomics approach including DNA microarray and proteomics analyses to elucidate the catabolic pathway for D-arabinose in Sulfolobus solfataricus. During growth on this sugar, a small set of genes appeared to

  4. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A.M.; Olthuis, Wouter; Kengen, Servé W.M.; Zuilhof, Han; Franssen, Maurice C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three different oxidases are covalently attached to alkene based SAMs on PtOx. • Attached enzymes remain active and their activity is assessed by chronoamperometry. • Functionalized PtOx allows electron mediator free chronoamperometry measurements. • The thus formed enzyme electrodes are useful as biosensors for glucose and lactate. • Immobilization of human HAOX foresees in vivo lactate monitoring in humans. - Abstract: Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH_2-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  5. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A.M. [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Olthuis, Wouter [BIOS Lab on a Chip Group, MESA+ and MIRA Institutes, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Kengen, Servé W.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, 6703HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Zuilhof, Han, E-mail: han.zuilhof@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 22254 (Saudi Arabia); Franssen, Maurice C.R., E-mail: maurice.franssen@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Three different oxidases are covalently attached to alkene based SAMs on PtOx. • Attached enzymes remain active and their activity is assessed by chronoamperometry. • Functionalized PtOx allows electron mediator free chronoamperometry measurements. • The thus formed enzyme electrodes are useful as biosensors for glucose and lactate. • Immobilization of human HAOX foresees in vivo lactate monitoring in humans. - Abstract: Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH{sub 2}-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  6. Oxidative drug metabolizing enzymes in North Sea dab (Limanda limanda). Biological effects of pollutants

    Vobach, M.; Kellermann, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Increasing environmental pollution is regarded as an anthropogenic stress factor in general. As a consequence, this may have several detrimental impacts on organisms, including aquatic species. The ability of organisms to tolerate stress from chemical pollutants depends on the availability of a variety of protection mechanisms. One important mechanism to protect cells from lipophilic xenobiotics is based on enzymes or enzyme systems converting the chemicals into more polar metabolites which can be excreted

  7. Oxidative cyclization of prodigiosin by an alkylglycerol monooxygenase-like enzyme

    de Rond, Tristan; Stow, Parker; Eigl, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Prodiginines, which are tripyrrole alkaloids displaying a wide array of bioactivities, occur as linear and cyclic congeners. Identification of an unclustered biosynthetic gene led to the discovery of the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the regiospecific C–H activation and cyclization of prodigi...... of prodigiosin to cycloprodigiosin in Pseudoalteromonas rubra. This enzyme is related to alkylglycerol monooxygenase and unrelated to RedG, the Rieske oxygenase that produces cyclized prodiginines in Streptomyces, implying convergent evolution....

  8. Computational studies of radiation and oxidative damage to DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    Pinak, M. [Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the time evolution of the recognition processes and to construct a model of the specific DNA-repair enzyme' complexes. MD simulations of the following molecules were performed: DNA dodecamer with thymine dimer (TD), DNA 30-mer with thymine glycol (TG), and respective specific repair enzymes T4 Endonuclease V and Endonuclease III. Both DNA lesions are experimentally suggested to be mutagenic and carcinogenic unless properly recognized and repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of TD, there is detected a strong kink around the TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed a different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-9 kcal/mol', in contrast to the nearly neutral value of the native thymine site. These two factors - structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seem to be important for proper recognition of a TD damaged site and for formation of DNA-enzyme complex. Formation of this complex is the onset of the repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA the structural characteristics of the TG were calculated (charges, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.). The formed TG was used to replace the native thymine and then submitted to the simulation in the system with a repair enzyme with Endonuclease III for the purpose of the study of the formation of the DNA-enzyme complex. (author)

  9. Oxidative stress and redox state-regulating enzymes have prognostic relevance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Peroja Pekka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress and redox-regulating enzymes may have roles both in lymphomagenesis and resistance to lymphoma therapy. Previous studies from the pre-rituximab era suggest that antioxidant enzyme expression is related to prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, although these results cannot be extrapolated to patient populations undergoing modern treatment modalities. In this study we assessed expression of the oxidative stress markers 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and nitrotyrosine and the antioxidant enzymes thioredoxin (Trx, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL via immunohistochemistry in 106 patients with DLBCL. All patients were treated with CHOP-like therapy combined with rituximab. Immunostaining results were correlated with progression-free survival, disease-specific survival and traditional prognostic factors of DLBCL. Results Strong 8-OHdG immunostaining intensity was associated with extranodal involvement (p = 0.00002, a high International Prognostic Index (p = 0.002 and strong Trx (p = 0.011 and GCL (p = 0.0003 expression. Strong Trx staining intensity was associated with poor progression-free survival (p = 0.046 and poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.015. Strong GCL immunostaining intensity predicted poor progression-free survival (p = 0.049. Patients with either strong Trx or strong nitrotyrosine expression showed significantly poorer progression-free survival (p = 0.003 and disease-specific survival (p = 0.031 compared with the other patients. Conclusions The redox state-regulating enzymes GCL and Trx are promising markers in the evaluation of DLBCL prognosis in the era of modern immunochemotherapy.

  10. High-pressure synthesis and single-crystal structure elucidation of the indium oxide-borate In{sub 4}O{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Ortner, Teresa S.; Vitzthum, Daniela; Heymann, Gunter; Huppertz, Hubert [Department of General, Inorganic and Theoretical Chemistry, Centre of Chemistry and Biomedicine (CCB), Leopold-Franzens-University Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-12-29

    The indium oxide-borate In{sub 4}O{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions at 12.5 GPa/1420 K using a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. Single-crystal X-ray structure elucidation showed edge-sharing OIn{sub 4} tetrahedra and B{sub 2}O{sub 7} units building up the oxide-borate. It crystallizes with Z = 8 in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n (no. 14) with a = 1016.54(3), b = 964.55(3), c = 1382.66(4) pm, and β = 109.7(1) . The compound was also characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. A comparative genomic analysis of the oxidative enzymes potentially involved in lignin degradation by Agaricus bisporus

    Harshavardhan Doddapaneni; Venkataramanan Subramanian; Bolei Fu; Dan Cullen

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative enzymatic machinery for degradation of organic substrates in Agaricus bisporus (Ab) is at the core of the carbon recycling mechanisms in this fungus. To date, 156 genes have been tentatively identified as part of this oxidative enzymatic machinery, which includes 26 peroxidase encoding genes, nine copper radical oxidase [including three...

  12. Wiring of Glucose Oxidizing Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzymes by Methylene Blue-Modified Third Generation Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers Attached to Spectroscopic Graphite Electrodes

    Castaing, Victor; Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    , characterized by the heterogeneous ET rate constant of 7.1 0.1 s1; they can be used for electronic wiring of glucose-oxidizing FAD-containing enzymes, such as hexose oxidase (HOX), and further bioelectrocatalysis of glucose oxidation, starting, at pH 7, from -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Thus, dendrimer...

  13. Oxidative Copper-Enzymes are the Key for Unlocking Recalcitrant Biopolymers

    Johansen, Katja Salomon

    as the electron donating cofactor for the enzyme. The discovery of LPMOs and the understanding that they constitute the “first wave of attack” by microbial organisms on the most recalcitrant natural polysaccharides, highlights the need to reflect on the specific roles of LPMOs in biology. Many good and relevant...

  14. Nitric oxide-related species-induced protein oxidation: reversible, irreversible, and protective effects on enzyme function of papain.

    Väänänen, Antti J; Kankuri, Esko; Rauhala, Pekka

    2005-04-15

    Protein oxidation, irreversible modification, and inactivation may play key roles in various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, we studied the effects of the potentially in vivo occurring nitric oxide-related species on two different markers of protein oxidation: protein carbonyl generation on bovine serum albumine (BSA) and loss of activity of a cysteine-dependent protease, papain, in vitro by using Angeli's salt, papanonoate, SIN-1, and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) as donors of nitroxyl, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, and nitrosonium ions, respectively. Angeli's salt, SIN-1, and papanonoate (0-1000 microM) all generated a concentration-dependent increase in carbonyl formation on BSA (107, 60, and 45%, respectively). GSNO did not affect carbonyl formation. Papain was inhibited by Angeli's salt, SIN-1, papanonoate, and GSNO with IC50 values of 0.62, 2.3, 54, and 80 microM, respectively. Angeli's salt (3.16 microM)-induced papain inactivation was only partially reversible, while the effects of GSNO (316 microM) and papanonoate (316 microM) were reversible upon addition of excess DTT. The Angeli's salt-mediated DTT-irreversible inhibition of papain was prevented by GSNO or papanonoate pretreatment, hypothetically through mixed disulfide formation or S-nitrosylation of the catalytically critical thiol group of papain. These results, for the first time, compare the generation of carbonyls in proteins by Angeli's salt, papanonoate, and SIN-1. Furthermore, these results suggest that S-nitrosothiols may have a novel function in protecting critical thiols from irreversible oxidative damage.

  15. Aging increases oxidative stress and renal expression of oxidant and antioxidant enzymes that are associated with an increased trend in systolic blood pressure.

    Gomes, Pedro; Simão, Sónia; Silva, Elisabete; Pinto, Vanda; Amaral, João S; Afonso, Joana; Serrão, Maria Paula; Pinho, Maria João; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the effects of aging on oxidative stress markers and expression of major oxidant and antioxidant enzymes associate with impairment of renal function and increases in blood pressure. To explore this, we determined age-associated changes in lipid peroxidation (urinary malondialdehyde), plasma and urinary hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, as well as renal H(2)O(2) production, and the expression of oxidant and antioxidant enzymes in young (13 weeks) and old (52 weeks) male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Urinary lipid peroxidation levels and H(2)O(2) production by the renal cortex and medulla of old rats were higher than their young counterparts. This was accompanied by overexpression of NADPH oxidase components Nox4 and p22(phox) in the renal cortex of old rats. Similarly, expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms 2 and 3 and catalase were increased in the renal cortex from old rats. Renal function parameters (creatinine clearance and fractional excretion of sodium), diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were not affected by aging, although slight increases in systolic blood pressure were observed during this 52-week period. It is concluded that overexpression of renal Nox4 and p22(phox) and the increases in renal H(2)O(2) levels in aged WKY does not associate with renal functional impairment or marked increases in blood pressure. It is hypothesized that lack of oxidative stress-associated effects in aged WKY rats may result from increases in antioxidant defenses that counteract the damaging effects of H(2)O(2).

  16. Epoxidation of the methamphetamine pyrolysis product, trans-phenylpropene, to trans-phenylpropylene oxide by CYP enzymes and stereoselective glutathione adduct formation

    Sanga, Madhu; Younis, Islam R.; Tirumalai, Padma S.; Bland, Tina M.; Banaszewska, Monica; Konat, Gregory W.; Tracy, Timothy S.; Gannett, Peter M.; Callery, Patrick S.

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic products of smoked methamphetamine hydrochloride are well established. Among the various degradation products formed, trans-phenylpropene (trans-β-methylstyrene) is structurally similar to styrene analogues known to be bioactivated by CYP enzymes. In human liver microsomes, trans-phenylpropene was converted to the epoxide trans-phenylpropylene oxide (trans-2-methyl-3-phenyloxirane) and cinnamyl alcohol. Incubation of trans-phenylpropene with microsomes in the presence of enzyme-specific P450 enzyme inhibitors indicated the involvement of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 enzymes. Both (R,R)-phenylpropylene oxide and (S,S)-phenylpropylene oxide were formed in human liver microsomal preparations. Enantiomers of trans-phenylpropylene oxide were stereoselectively and regioselectively conjugated in a Phase II drug metabolism reaction catalyzed by human liver cytosolic enzymes consisting of conjugation with glutathione. The structure of the phenylpropylene oxide-glutathione adduct is consistent with nucleophilic ring-opening by attack at the benzylic carbon. Exposure of cultured C6 glial cells to (S,S)-phenylpropylene oxide produced a cytotoxic response in a concentration-dependent manner based on cell degeneration and death

  17. Lifestyle predictors of oxidant and antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant capacity in healthy women: a cross-sectional study.

    Mahasneh, Amjad A; Zhang, Yali; Zhao, Hua; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify demographic and modifiable lifestyle factors that may be related to endogenous oxidant and antioxidant activity measured in blood specimens from putatively healthy women recruited at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, NY, USA). Total glutathione (TGSH), catalase (CAT), CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured in 124 healthy women, and associations with epidemiological factors were tested using general linear models. There were significant differences in oxidant and antioxidant enzyme activities according to lifestyle factors, after adjusting for duration of blood storage and season of blood draw. Compared to women who consumed ≤2.8 servings of fruits and vegetables daily, those consuming >5.3 servings had on average 31 % lower MPO activity (p-trend = 0.02), as a marker of oxidative stress, 16 % higher antioxidant GPx activity (p-trend = 0.08), and 9 % higher TAC (p-trend = 0.05). Obese women (body mass index, BMI ≥ 30) in contrast showed 17 % lower antioxidant GPx activity, 44 % higher MPO activity (p-trend = 0.03), and 10 % higher TAC (p-trend = 0.03) compared to women with normal BMI lifestyle factors and, therefore, may be potentially modifiable, with implications for risk reduction of chronic conditions related to oxidative stress.

  18. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of damaged macromolecules, including irreversibly oxidized proteins, is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing. Failure of protein homesotasis is a major contributor to the age-related accumulation of damaged proteins. In skeletal muscle, tissue maintenance and regeneration...... phenotype. In addition, these findings highlight the molecular mechanisms implicated in satellite cells dysfunction during ageing, paving the road for future therapeutic interventions aimed at preventing oxidative modifications of proteins and/or stimulating their elimination....

  19. Metal oxide nanosensors using polymeric membranes, enzymes and antibody receptors as ion and molecular recognition elements.

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-05-16

    The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors) of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices.

  20. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    Magnus Willander

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices.

  1. Functional network analysis of obese and lean Göttingen minipigs elucidates changes in oxidative and inflammatory networks in obese pigs

    Boonen, Harrie C. M.; Moesgaard, Sophia G.; Birck, Malene M.

    2014-01-01

    animals mainly for known physical traits. On the other hand, functional network analysis revealed new co-segregations, particularly in the domain of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in the obese animals that were not present in the lean. Functional networks of lean or obese minipigs could......The Göttingen minipig model of obesity is used in pre-clinical research to predict clinical outcome of new treatments for metabolic diseases. However, treatment effects often remain unnoticed when using single parameter statistical comparisons due to the small numbers of animals giving rise...... to large variation and insufficient statistical power. The purpose of this study was to perform a correlation matrix analysis of multiple multi-scale parameters describing co-segregation of traits in order to identify differences between lean and obese minipigs. More than 40 parameters, ranging from...

  2. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by up-regulating antioxidant enzymes.

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the up-regulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited fivefold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both messenger RNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 proteins were up-regulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea-supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126, which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Grinding at Modified Atmosphere or Vacuum on Browning, Antioxidant Capacities, and Oxidative Enzyme Activities of Apple.

    Kim, Ah-Na; Lee, Kyo-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Chun, Jiyeon; Kerr, William L; Choi, Sung-Gil

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of grinding at atmospheric pressure (control), under vacuum (∼2.67 kPa), or with modified atmosphere (N 2 and CO 2 ) on the browning, antioxidant activity, phenolics, and oxidative enzyme activity of apples as a function of time. The control group was affected most, showing distinct browning and losing most of the antioxidant activity and concentrations of the main phenolic compounds. The modified atmosphere groups retained color, antioxidant activity, and phenolic compounds better than the control group. Least changes were obtained with vacuum grinding, particularly in terms of preventing enzymatic browning and oxidation of antioxidants apples. At 12 h after grinding, vacuum-ground apples retained total phenolic contents 5.32, 1.54, and 1.49 times higher than control, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide gas-ground samples, respectively. The oxidative enzyme activity, including that of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase, decreased in the control and modified atmosphere group, but they were maintained in the samples ground under the vacuum. In this study, we found that grinding with modified atmosphere or vacuum conditions could effectively prevent browning as well as loss of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of ground apples. These results can help scientists and engineers build better grinding systems for retaining nutrient and quality factors of ground apples. In addition, these results may be useful to other fruit and vegetable industries that wish to retain fresh-like quality and nutritional value during grinding and storage. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes.

  5. The effect of oxidation on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolytic biodegradation of poly(urethane)s.

    Labow, Rosalind S; Tang, Yiwen; McCloskey, Christopher B; Santerre, J Paul

    2002-01-01

    Although the biodegradation of polyurethanes (PU) by oxidative and hydrolytic agents has been studied extensively, few investigations have reported on the combination of their effects. Since neutrophils (PMN) arrive at an implanted device first and release HOCl, followed by monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) which have potent esterase activities and oxidants of their own, the combined effect of oxidative and hydrolytic degradation on radiolabeled polycarbonate-polyurethanes (PCNU)s was investigated and compared to that of a polyester-PU (PESU) and a polyether-PU (PEU). The PCNUs were synthesized with PCN (MW = 1,000), and butanediol (14C-BD) and one of two diisocyanates, hexane-1,6-diisocyanate (14C-HDI) or methylene bis-p-phenyl diisocyanate (MDI). The PESU and PEU were synthesized using toluene-diisocyanate (14C-TDI), with polycaprolactone and polytetramethylene oxide as soft segments respectively, and ethylene diamine as the chain extender. The effect of pre-treatment with 0.1 mM HOC1 for 1 week on the HDI-based PCNUs and both TDI-based PUs resulted in a significant inhibition of radiolabel release (RR) elicited by cholesterol esterase (CE), when compared to buffer alone, whereas the MDI-based PCNU showed a small but significant increase. When PMN were activated on the HDI-based PCNU surface with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), HOCl was released for 3 h, and was almost completely abolished by sodium azide (AZ). Simultaneously, the PMN-elicited RR, shown previously to be due to the esterolytic cleavage by serine proteases, was inhibited approximately 75% by PMA-activation of the cells, but significantly increased relative to the latter when AZ was added. Both in vitro oxidation by HOCl and the release of HOCI by PMN were associated with the inhibition of RR and suggest perturbations between oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms of biodegradation.

  6. Regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial beta-oxidation as targets for treatment of the metabolic syndrome

    Schreurs, M.; Kuipers, F.; van der Leij, F. R.

    P>Insulin sensitizers like metformin generally act through pathways triggered by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) controls mitochondrial beta-oxidation and is inhibited by malonyl-CoA, the product of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). The adenosine

  7. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    Baraibar, Martín A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not...

  8. High activity of fatty acid oxidation enzymes in human placenta: implications for fetal-maternal disease

    Oey, N. A.; den Boer, M. E. J.; Ruiter, J. P. N.; Wanders, R. J. A.; Duran, M.; Waterham, H. R.; Boer, K.; van der Post, J. A. M.; Wijburg, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    As the human fetus and placenta are considered to be primarily dependent on glucose oxidation for energy metabolism, the cause of the remarkable association between severe maternal pregnancy complications and the carriage of a fetus with an inborn error of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid

  9. Pomegranate peel extract attenuates oxidative stress by decreasing coronary angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in hypertensive female rats.

    Dos Santos, Roger L; Dellacqua, Lais O; Delgado, Nathalie T B; Rouver, Wender N; Podratz, Priscila L; Lima, Leandro C F; Piccin, Mariela P C; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Mauad, Helder; Graceli, Jones B; Moyses, Margareth R

    2016-01-01

    Based on the antioxidant properties of pomegranate, this study was designed to investigate the effects of pomegranate peel extract on damage associated with hypertension and aging in a spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. The influence of pomegranate consumption was examined on systolic blood pressure (SBP), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) coronary activity, oxidative stress, and vascular morphology. Four- or 28-wk-old SHR model rats were treated for 30 d, with terminal experimental animal age being 8 and 32 wk, respectively, with either pomegranate extract (SHR-PG) or filtered water (SHR). Data showed significant reduction in SBP and coronary ACE activity in both age groups. The levels of superoxide anion, a measure of oxidative stress, were significantly lower in animals in the SHR-PG group compared to SHR alone. Coronary morphology demonstrated total increases in vascular wall areas were in the SHR group, and pomegranate peel extract diminished this effect. Pomegranate peel extract consumption conferred protection against hypertension in the SHR model. This finding was demonstrated by marked reduction in coronary ACE activity, oxidative stress, and vascular remodelling. In addition, treatment was able to reduce SBP in both groups. Evidence indicates that the use of pomegranate peel extract may prove beneficial in alleviating coronary heart disease.

  10. Solubilization of low-rank coal by Trichoderma atroviride: Evidence for the involvement of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes by using C-14-labelled lignite

    Holker, U.; Schmiers, H.; Grosse, S.; Winkelhofer, M.; Polsakiewicz, M.; Ludwig, S.; Dohse, J.; Hofer, M. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany). Inst. of Botany

    2002-04-01

    The deuteromycete Trichoderma atroviride is able to solubilize lignite in dependence on a given carbon source for growth. When cultivated on media containing glutamate, this mold excreted a set of different enzymes with hydrolytic activity. Addition of lignite to the growth media induced the synthesis of extracellular lignite-specific esterase activity but no evidence has been provided for its direct involvement in the process of lignite solubilization. Hence, the basic capability of T. atroviride enzymes to degrade a variety of ester and ether bonds at the surface or within the bulky lignite structure was tested using coal following its direct labelling with C-14-alkyl iodide. The participation of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes in lignite degradation was assessed by measuring the release of C-14 radioactivity from selectively alkylated carboxylic and phenolic OH groups. T. atroviride cleaved both carboxylic esters using esterases and the phenolic ether bonds by using oxidative enzymes, most likely laccases.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of nitrite, nitric oxide, and nitrous oxide respiratory enzymes reveal a complex evolutionary history for denitrification.

    Jones, Christopher M; Stres, Blaz; Rosenquist, Magnus; Hallin, Sara

    2008-09-01

    Denitrification is a facultative respiratory pathway in which nitrite (NO2(-)), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O) are successively reduced to nitrogen gas (N(2)), effectively closing the nitrogen cycle. The ability to denitrify is widely dispersed among prokaryotes, and this polyphyletic distribution has raised the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) having a substantial role in the evolution of denitrification. Comparisons of 16S rRNA and denitrification gene phylogenies in recent studies support this possibility; however, these results remain speculative as they are based on visual comparisons of phylogenies from partial sequences. We reanalyzed publicly available nirS, nirK, norB, and nosZ partial sequences using Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic inference. Concomitant analysis of denitrification genes with 16S rRNA sequences from the same organisms showed substantial differences between the trees, which were supported by examining the posterior probability of monophyletic constraints at different taxonomic levels. Although these differences suggest HGT of denitrification genes, the presence of structural variants for nirK, norB, and nosZ makes it difficult to determine HGT from other evolutionary events. Additional analysis using phylogenetic networks and likelihood ratio tests of phylogenies based on full-length sequences retrieved from genomes also revealed significant differences in tree topologies among denitrification and 16S rRNA gene phylogenies, with the exception of the nosZ gene phylogeny within the data set of the nirK-harboring genomes. However, inspection of codon usage and G + C content plots from complete genomes gave no evidence for recent HGT. Instead, the close proximity of denitrification gene copies in the genomes of several denitrifying bacteria suggests duplication. Although HGT cannot be ruled out as a factor in the evolution of denitrification genes, our analysis suggests that other phenomena, such gene

  12. Oxidative stress increases internal calcium stores and reduces a key mitochondrial enzyme.

    Gibson, Gary E; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C H; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2002-03-16

    Fibroblasts from patients with genetic and non-genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) show many abnormalities including increased bombesin-releasable calcium stores (BRCS), diminished activities of the mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), and an altered ability to handle oxidative stress. The link between genetic mutations (and the unknown primary event in non-genetic forms) and these other cellular abnormalities is unknown. To determine whether oxidative stress could be a convergence point that produces the other AD-related changes, these experiments tested in fibroblasts the effects of H(2)O(2), in the presence or absence of select antioxidants, on BRCS and KGDHC. H(2)O(2) concentrations that elevated carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (c-H(2)DCF)-detectable ROS increased BRCS and decreased KGDHC activity. These changes are in the same direction as those in fibroblasts from AD patients. Acute treatments with the antioxidants Trolox, or DMSO decreased c-H(2)DCF-detectable ROS by about 90%, but exaggerated the H(2)O(2)-induced increases in BRCS by about 4-fold and did not alter the reduction in KGDHC. Chronic pretreatments with Trolox more than doubled the BRCS, tripled KGDHC activities, and reduced the effects of H(2)O(2). Pretreatment with DMSO or N-acetyl cysteine diminished the BRCS and either had no effect, or exaggerated the H(2)O(2)-induced changes in these variables. The results demonstrate that BRCS and KGDHC are more sensitive to H(2)O(2) derived species than c-H(2)DCF, and that oxidized derivatives of the antioxidants exaggerate the actions of H(2)O(2). The findings support the hypothesis that select abnormalities in oxidative processes are a critical part of a cascade that leads to the cellular abnormalities in cells from AD patients.

  13. Increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and decreased antioxidant enzyme activities in prostate cancer.

    Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Eken, Ayse; Matevska, Nadica; Erdem, Onur; Sayal, Ahmet; Savaser, Ayhan; Banev, Saso; Petrovski, Daniel; Dzikova, Sonja; Georgiev, Vladimir; Sikole, Aleksandar; Ozgök, Yaşar; Suturkova, Ljubica; Dimovski, Aleksandar J; Aydin, Ahmet

    2009-08-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the oxidative/nitrosative stress status in prostate cancer (CaP) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). 312 men from two different populations were included: 163 men from Macedonia (73 CaP patients, 67 BPH patients and 23 control subjects) and 149 men from Turkey (34 prostate cancer patients, 100 BPH patients and 15 control subjects). We measured erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, erythrocyte activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT); plasma nitrite/nitrate (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)), cGMP and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. A similar pattern of alteration in the oxidative/nitrosative stress-related parameters was found in both, Macedonian and Turkish studied samples: higher MDA concentrations with lower GPX and CuZn-SOD activities in CaP patients versus controls and BPH groups. The CAT activity was decreased in the CaP patients versus controls in the Turkish studied sample. Furthermore, CaP patients had increased plasma NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) and cGMP levels versus controls and BPH groups in both studied samples. This study has confirmed an imbalance in the oxidative stress/antioxidant status and revealed an altered nitrosative status in prostate cancer patients.

  14. Synthesis, Structure Elucidation, and Redox Properties of (superscript 99)Tc Complexes of Lacunary Wells-Dawson Polyoxometalates: Insights into Molecular (superscript 99)Tc-Metal Oxide Interactions

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Howell, Robertha C.; Mbomekalle, Israel M.; Lukens, Wayne W. Jr.; Bian, Fang; Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2011-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc (β max , 293.7; half-life, 2.1 x 10 5 years) is an abundant product of uranium-235 fission in nuclear reactors and is present throughout the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Understanding and controlling the extensive redox chemistry of 99 Tc is important in identifying tunable strategies to separate 99 Tc from spent fuel and from waste tanks and, once separated, to identify and develop an appropriately stable waste form for 99 Tc. Polyoxometalates (POMs), nanometer-sized models for metal oxide solid-state materials, are used in this study to provide a molecular level understanding of the speciation and redox chemistry of incorporated 99 Tc. In this study, 99 Tc complexes of the (α 2 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 10- and (α 1 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 10- isomers were prepared. Ethylene glycol was used as a 'transfer ligand' to minimize the formation of TcO 2 · xH 2 O. The solution structures, formulations, and purity of TcVO(α 1 /α 2 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 7- were determined by multinuclear NMR. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the complexes is in agreement with the formulation and structures determined from 31 P and 183 W NMR. Preliminary electrochemistry results are consistent with the EXAFS results, showing a facile reduction of the TcVO(α 1 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 7- species compared to the TcVO(α 2 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 7- analog. The α 1 defect is unique in that a basic oxygen atom is positioned toward the α 1 site, and the Tc V O center appears to form a dative metal-metal bond with a framework W site. These attributes may lead to the assistance of protonation events that facilitate reduction. Electrochemistry comparison shows that the ReV analogs are about 200 mV more difficult to reduce in accordance with periodic trends.

  15. Synthesis, structure elucidation and redox properties of 99Tc complexes of lacunary Wells Dawson polyoxometalates: insights into molecular 99Tc - metal oxide interactions

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Howell, Robertha C.; Mbomekalle, Israel M.; Lukens, Wayne W. Jr; Bian, Fang; Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2011-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc (β max : 250 keV, half-life: 2 x 10 5 year) is an abundant product of uranium-235 fission in nuclear reactors and is present throughout the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford and Savannah River. Understanding and controlling the extensive redox chemistry of 99 Tc is important to identify tunable strategies to separate 99 Tc from spent fuel and from waste tanks and once separated, to identify and develop an appropriately stable waste-form for 99 Tc. Polyoxometalates (POMs), nanometer sized models for metal oxide solid-state materials, are used in this study to provide a molecular level understanding of the speciation and redox chemistry of incorporated 99 Tc. In this study, 99 Tc complexes of the (α 2 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 10- and (α 1 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 10- isomers were prepared. Ethylene glycol was used as a 'transfer ligand' to minimize the formation of TcO 2 · xH 2 O. The solution structures, formulations, and purity of Tc V O(α 1 /α 2 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 7- were determined by multinuclear NMR. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the complexes are in agreement with the formulation and structures determined from 31 P and 183 W NMR. Preliminary electrochemistry results are consistent with the EXAFS results, showing a facile reduction of the Tc V O(α 1 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 7- species compared to the Tc V O(α 2 -P 2 W 17 O 61 ) 7- analog. The α 1 -defect is unique in that a basic oxygen atom is positioned toward the α 1 -site and the Tc V O center appears to form a dative metal-metal bond with a framework W site. These attributes may lead to the assistance of protonation events that facilitate reduction. Electrochemistry comparison shows that the Re V analogs are about 200 mV more difficult to reduce in accordance with periodic trends.

  16. An Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensor for 3-Hydroxybutyrate Detection Using Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified by Reduced Graphene Oxide and Thionine

    Gonzalo Martínez-García

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor for 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB involving immobilization of the enzyme 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase onto a screen-printed carbon electrode modified with reduced graphene oxide (GO and thionine (THI is reported here. After addition of 3-hydroxybutyrate or the sample in the presence of NAD+ cofactor, the generated NADH could be detected amperometrically at 0.0 V vs. Ag pseudo reference electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a calibration plot for 3-HB was constructed showing a wide linear range between 0.010 and 0.400 mM 3-HB which covers the clinically relevant levels for diluted serum samples. In addition, a limit of detection of 1.0 µM, much lower than that reported using other biosensors, was achieved. The analytical usefulness of the developed biosensor was demonstrated via application to spiked serum samples.

  17. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gender-related differences in the responses of oxidative enzymes and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) to exercise. METHODS: The influence of exercise (90 min, 60%VO(2peak)) on citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity and mRNA content...... expression and phosphorylation were unaffected by training status (NS). CONCLUSION: Basal transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational control of CS and HAD seems to be gender-dependent. Also, gender differences in translation and/or post-translational protein modification of CS occur during...... not differ between females and males (NS). In females only, CS activity was enhanced (P differ between UT and ET but, nevertheless, CS activity was 56% higher in ET than in UT volunteers (P

  18. Effects of lemongrass oil and citral on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in rats

    Chien-Chun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from a lemongrass variety of Cymbopogon flexuosus [lemongrass oil (LO] is used in various food and aroma industry products and exhibits biological activities, such as anticancer and antimicrobial activities. To investigate the effects of 200 LO (200 mg/kg and 400 LO (400 mg/kg and its major component, citral (240 mg/kg, on drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in the liver, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a pelleted diet and administered LO or citral by gavage for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks of feeding, the effects of LO and citral on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen were determined. The results showed that rats treated with 400 LO or citral had significantly reduced hepatic testosterone 6β-hydroxylation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activities. In addition, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity was significantly increased by citral, and Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP glucurosyltransferase activity was significantly increased by 400 LO in the rat liver. Treatment with 400 LO or citral reduced lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species levels in the liver. After acetaminophen treatment, however, LO and citral treatment resulted in little or no change in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity and acetaminophen-protein adducts content in the liver. Our results indicate that LO and citral may change the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes and reduce oxidative stress in the liver. However, LO and citral may not affect the detoxification of acetaminophen.

  19. Effects of lemongrass oil and citral on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in rats.

    Li, Chien-Chun; Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Chang, Chun-Hua; Liu, Yun-Ta; Yao, Hsien-Tsung

    2018-01-01

    The essential oil from a lemongrass variety of Cymbopogon flexuosus [lemongrass oil (LO)] is used in various food and aroma industry products and exhibits biological activities, such as anticancer and antimicrobial activities. To investigate the effects of 200 LO (200 mg/kg) and 400 LO (400 mg/kg) and its major component, citral (240 mg/kg), on drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in the liver, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a pelleted diet and administered LO or citral by gavage for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks of feeding, the effects of LO and citral on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen were determined. The results showed that rats treated with 400 LO or citral had significantly reduced hepatic testosterone 6β-hydroxylation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activities. In addition, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity was significantly increased by citral, and Uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP) glucurosyltransferase activity was significantly increased by 400 LO in the rat liver. Treatment with 400 LO or citral reduced lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species levels in the liver. After acetaminophen treatment, however, LO and citral treatment resulted in little or no change in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity and acetaminophen-protein adducts content in the liver. Our results indicate that LO and citral may change the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes and reduce oxidative stress in the liver. However, LO and citral may not affect the detoxification of acetaminophen. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effect of ingestion of microwaved foods on serum anti-oxidant enzymes and vitamins of albino rats

    Benedict C. Eke, BSc, MSc

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ingestion of microwaved foods on serum antioxidant enzymes and vitamins in albino rats was investigated. In the study, thirty two (32 male wistar albino rats were obtained and grouped into four groups (A, B, C and D of eight animals each. The animals were acclimatized for 7 days on commercial rat feed. The animals in groups B, C and D were all fed ad libitum with porridge yam, porridge beans and jellof rice with meat/fish reheated for 2 min, 4 min and 6 min for groups B, C and D respectively for 42 days. Group A was fed with un-microwaved food and water for the duration of the study (42 days and served as control. Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, Catalase (CAT activities, vitamins A and E concentrations were determined using standard methods. Result obtained from the study showed that microwaved food consumption resulted in a significant (P < 0.05 decrease in SOD and CAT activity in rats fed with the microwaved food. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme activity were more significantly (P < 0.05 reduced in rats exposed to food microwaved for 6 min compared to the control group (A. Also, serum vitamins A and E concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05 decreased in rats fed with food exposed to microwaves for 6 min as compared to the control group. Microwaves and increased microwaving time resulted to a significant reduction in SOD, CAT, vitamin A and E in fed rats. Therefore our study demonstrated that consumption of microwaved foods resulted in a significant decrease in antioxidant protection and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of oxidative stress and degenerative diseases.

  1. Effect of aspirin and prostaglandins on the carbohydrate metabolism in albino rats.: glucose oxidation through different pathways and glycolytic enzymes

    Balasubramanian, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of chronic and acute doses of aspirin and prostaglandins F2α and E2 individually on the oxidation of glucose through Embden Meyerhof-TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathways and some key glycolytic enzymes of liver were studied in male albino rats. Studies were extended to find the combined effect of PGF2α and E2 with an acute dose of aspirin. There was increased utilisation of both 1- 14 C glucose and 6- 14 C glucose on aspirin treatment. However, the metabolism through the EM-TCA pathway was more pronounced as shown by a reduced ratio of 14 CO 2 from 1- 14 C and 6- 14 C glucose. Two hepatic key glycolytic enzymes viz. hexokinase and pyruvate kinase were increased due to aspirin treatment. Withdrawal of aspirin corrected the above impaired carbohydrate metabolism in liver. Prostaglandin F2α also caused a reduction in the utilisation of 1- 14 C glucose, while PGE2 recorded an increase in the utilisation of both 1- 14 C and 6- 14 C glucose when compared to controls, indicating that different members of prostaglandins could affect metabolisms and differently. Administration of the PGs and aspirin together showed an increase in the utilisation of 6- 14 C glucose. (auth.)

  2. Structures and reaction pathways of the molybdenum centres of sulfite-oxidizing enzymes by pulsed EPR spectroscopy.

    Enemark, John H; Astashkin, Andrei V; Raitsimring, Arnold M

    2008-12-01

    SOEs (sulfite-oxidizing enzymes) are physiologically vital and occur in all forms of life. During the catalytic cycle, the five-co-ordinate square pyramidal oxo-molybdenum active site passes through the Mo(V) state, and intimate details of the structure can be obtained from variable frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy through the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions of nearby magnetic nuclei. By employing variable spectrometer operational frequencies, it is possible to optimize the measurement conditions for difficult quadrupolar nuclei of interest (e.g. (17)O, (33)S, (35)Cl and (37)Cl) and to simplify the interpretation of the spectra. Isotopically labelled model Mo(V) compounds provide further insight into the electronic and geometric structures and chemical reactions of the enzymes. Recently, blocked forms of SOEs having co-ordinated sulfate, the reaction product, were detected using (33)S (I=3/2) labelling. This blocking of product release is a possible contributor to fatal human sulfite oxidase deficiency in young children.

  3. Magnetically triggered clustering of biotinylated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of streptavidinylated enzymes

    Hodenius, Michael; De Cuyper, Marcel; Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Christiane; Elling, Lothar; Bornemann, Jörg; Wong, John E; Richtering, Walter; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the production and characterization of water-compatible, iron oxide based nanoparticles covered with functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)–biotin surface groups (SPIO–PEG–biotin). Synthesis of the functionalized colloids occurred by incubating the oleate coated particles used as precursor magnetic fluid with anionic liposomes containing 14 mol% of a phospholipid–PEG–biotin conjugate. The latter was prepared by coupling dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DC 14:0 PE) to activated α-biotinylamido-ω –N-hydroxy-succinimidcarbonyl–PEG (NHS–PEG–biotin). Physical characterization of the oleate and PEG–biotin iron oxide nanocolloids revealed that they appear as colloidal stable clusters with a hydrodynamic diameter of 160 nm and zeta potentials of − 39 mV (oleate coated particles) and − 14 mV (PEG–biotin covered particles), respectively, as measured by light scattering techniques. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements revealed specific saturation magnetizations of 62–73 emu g −1 Fe 3 O 4 and no hysteresis was observed at 300 K. MR relaxometry at 3 T revealed very high r 2 relaxivities and moderately high r 1 values. Thus, both nanocolloids can be classified as small, superparamagnetic, negative MR contrast agents. The capacity to functionalize the particles was illustrated by binding streptavidin alkaline phosphatase (SAP). It was found, however, that these complexes become highly aggregated after capturing them on the magnetic filter device during high-gradient magnetophoresis, thereby reducing the accessibility of the SAP. (paper)

  4. Identification of a Substrate-binding Site in a Peroxisomal β-Oxidation Enzyme by Photoaffinity Labeling with a Novel Palmitoyl Derivative*

    Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Tomohiro, Takenori; Narita, Kotomi; Suzumura, Miyuki; Glumoff, Tuomo; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in a number of important metabolic pathways including β-oxidation of fatty acids and their derivatives. Therefore, peroxisomes possess various β-oxidation enzymes and specialized fatty acid transport systems. However, the molecular mechanisms of these proteins, especially in terms of substrate binding, are still unknown. In this study, to identify the substrate-binding sites of these proteins, we synthesized a photoreactive palmitic acid analogue bearing a d...

  5. Oxidative enzymes activity in sugarcane juice as a function of the planting system

    Tadeu Alcides Marques

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the largest producer of sugarcane in the world, the industrial process transforms this crop into ethanol and/or granulated sugar. Some cultivars exhibit enzymatic browning in the extracted sugarcane juice at levels harmful to the manufacturing process of white granulated sugar. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of sugarcane straw used as soil coverage, the use of different planting systems, and treatments with hydrogel polymer on enzymatic activity. The cultivar RB 86 7515 was sampled for 8 months; the first sample was obtained by cutting the upper portion of the stalk at the internode, which was taken to the laboratory for determination of the enzymatic activity of polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD. The soil coverage with different forms of straw as well as the planting systems did not change the enzymatic activity of polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD. The polyphenoloxidase (PPO activity increased with the use of a polymer due to increased polyphenoloxidase (PPO activity in the groove system. The enzymes studied showed changes in activity during the experimental period. The production of sugar at the end of the season (August to November avoids the periods of highest enzymatic activity.

  6. Comparative evaluation of oxidative enzyme activities during adventitious rooting in the cuttings of grapevine rootstocks.

    Kose, Cafer; Erdal, Serkan; Kaya, Ozkan; Atici, Okkeş

    2011-03-15

    This study investigated changes in peroxidase (POX) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities through adventitious rooting in hardwood cuttings of grapevine rootstocks. Three grapevine rootstocks with different propensity to produce adventitious roots were selected: recalcitrant (Ramsey), non-recalcitrant (Rupestris du Lot) and intermediate (99R) cultivars. The averages of root number at 65 days were 96 in Lot, 76 in 99R and 30 in Ramsey. Both enzyme activities characteristically increased before adventitious rooting, regardless of rooting ability of the rootstocks, and then decreased. POX activity increased in Ramsey cuttings at 22 days, in Lot and 99R cuttings at 14 days after planting, and then decreased gradually until 51 days. The highest POX activity was determined in Ramsey rootstock with the highest rooting ability and the lowest activity was determined in the rootstocks with the lowest rooting ability. PPO activity gradually increased in Ramsey rootstock cuttings from 10 days to 22 days, in Lot and 99R cuttings at 14 days, and then decreased until 51 days. A significant correlation was identified between high POX activity and adventitious rooting capability in rootstocks, but the same result was not determined with PPO activity. A recalcitrant rooting variety cannot increase POX activity sufficiently before rooting. Therefore applications that could increase POX activity in stem cuttings during rooting may facilitate increased rooting in such rootstocks. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Isotope Effects Associated with N2O Production by Fungal and Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductases: Implications for Enzyme Mechanisms

    Hegg, E. L.; Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is both a powerful greenhouse gas and a key participant in ozone destruction. Microbial activity accounts for over 70% of the N2O produced annually, and the atmospheric concentration of N2O continues to rise. Because the fungal and bacterial denitrification pathways are major contributors to microbial N2O production, understanding the mechanism by which NO is reduced to N2O will contribute to both N2O source tracing and quantification. Our strategy utilizes stable isotopes to probe the enzymatic mechanism of microbial N2O production. Although the use of stable isotopes to study enzyme mechanisms is not new, our approach is distinct in that we employ both measurements of isotopic preferences of purified enzyme and DFT calculations, thereby providing a synergistic combination of experimental and computational approaches. We analyzed δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom) of N2O produced by purified fungal cytochrome P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum as well as bacterial cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans. P450nor exhibits an inverse kinetic isotope effect for Nβ (KIE = 0.9651) but a normal isotope effect for both Nα (KIE = 1.0127) and the oxygen atom (KIE = 1.0264). These results suggest a mechanism where NO binds to the ferric heme in the P450nor active site and becomes Nβ. Analysis of the NO-binding step indicated a greater difference in zero point energy in the transition state than the ground state, resulting in the inverse KIE observed for Nβ. Following protonation and rearrangement, it is speculated that this complex forms a FeIV-NHOH- species as a key intermediate. Our data are consistent with the second NO (which becomes Nα and O in the N2O product) attacking the FeIV-NHOH- species to generate a FeIII-N2O2H2 complex that enzymatically (as opposed to abiotically) breaks down to release N2O. Conversely, our preliminary data

  8. Differential induction of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes by clofibric acid and aspirin in piglet tissues.

    Yu, X X; Odle, J; Drackley, J K

    2001-11-01

    Peroxisomal beta-oxidation (POX) of fatty acids is important in lipid catabolism and thermogenesis. To investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferators on peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation in piglet tissues, newborn pigs (1-2 days old) were allowed ad libitum access to milk replacer supplemented with 0.5% clofibric acid (CA) or 1% aspirin for 14 days. CA increased ratios of liver weight to body weight (P < 0.07), kidney weight to body weight (P < 0.05), and heart weight to body weight (P < 0.001). Aspirin decreased daily food intake and final body weight but increased the ratio of heart weight to body weight (P < 0.01). In liver, activities of POX, fatty acyl-CoA oxidase (FAO), total carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT), and catalase were 2.7-, 2.2-, 1.5-fold, and 33% greater, respectively, for pigs given CA than for control pigs. In heart, these variables were 2.2-, 4.1-, 1.9-, and 1.8-fold greater, respectively, for pigs given CA than for control pigs. CA did not change these variables in either kidney or muscle, except that CPT activity was increased approximately 110% (P < 0.01) in kidney. Aspirin increased only hepatic FAO and CPT activities. Northern blot analysis revealed that CA increased the abundance of catalase mRNA in heart by approximately 2.2-fold. We conclude that 1) POX and CPT in newborn pigs can be induced by peroxisomal proliferators with tissue specificity and 2) the relatively smaller induction of POX in piglets (compared with that in young or adult rodents) may be related to either age or species differences.

  9. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  10. Phosphatidylinositol response and proliferation of oxidative enzyme-activated human T lymphocytes: suppression by plasma lipoproteins

    Akeson, A.L.; Scupham, D.W.; Harmony, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol (PI) response and DNA synthesis of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase (NAGO)-stimulated human T lymphocytes are suppressed by low density lipoproteins (LDL). To understand the mechanism of lymphocyte activation more fully, the PI response and DNA synthesis and suppression of these events by LDL in NAGO-stimulated T lymphocytes were characterized. Between 30 min and 6 hr after NAGO stimulation, there was an increase of 32 Pi incorporation into PI without increased incorporation into the phosphorylated forms of PI or into other phospholipids. DNA synthesis as determined by [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation depended on the lymphocyte-accessory monocyte ratio and total cell density. Optimal stimulation of the PI response and DNA synthesis occurred at the same concentration of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase. While the PI response was only partially suppressed by LDL with optimal suppression at 10 to 20 micrograms of protein/ml, DNA synthesis was completely suppressed although at much higher LDL concentrations, greater than 100 micrograms protein/ml. As monocyte numbers are increased, LDL suppression of DNA synthesis is decreased. The ability of NAGO to stimulate the PI response and DNA synthesis in a similar way, and the suppression of both events by LDL, suggests the PI response is important for lymphocyte activation and proliferation. Stimulation of human T lymphocytes by oxidative mitogens, neuraminidase, and galactose oxidase caused increased phosphatidylinositol metabolism and increased DNA synthesis. Both responses were suppressed by low density lipoproteins

  11. Consensus structures of the Mo(v) sites of sulfite-oxidizing enzymes derived from variable frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy, isotopic labelling and DFT calculations.

    Enemark, John H

    2017-10-10

    Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes from eukaryotes and prokaryotes have five-coordinate distorted square-pyramidal coordination about the molybdenum atom. The paramagnetic Mo(v) state is easily generated, and over the years four distinct CW EPR spectra have been identified, depending upon enzyme source and the reaction conditions, namely high and low pH (hpH and lpH), phosphate inhibited (P i ) and sulfite (or blocked). Extensive studies of these paramagnetic forms of sulfite-oxidizing enzymes using variable frequency pulsed electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy, isotopic labeling and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have led to the consensus structures that are described here. Errors in some of the previously proposed structures are corrected.

  12. Elucidation of a carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster encoding a novel enzyme, 2,2'-beta-hydroxylase, from Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 and combinatorial biosynthesis of new or rare xanthophylls.

    Nishida, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Kyoko; Kasai, Hiroaki; Shizuri, Yoshikazu; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Sawabe, Akiyoshi; Komemushi, Sadao; Miki, Wataru; Misawa, Norihiko

    2005-08-01

    A carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster mediating the production of 2-hydroxyastaxanthin was isolated from the marine bacterium Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 by using a common crtI sequence as the probe DNA. A sequence analysis revealed this cluster to contain 12 open reading frames (ORFs), including the 7 known genes, crtW, crtY, crtI, crtB, crtE, idi, and crtZ. The individual ORFs were functionally analyzed by complementation studies using Escherichia coli that accumulated various carotenoid precursors due to the presence of other bacterial crt genes. In addition to functionally identifying the known crt genes, we found that one (ORF11, named crtG) coded for a novel enzyme, carotenoid 2,2'-beta-hydroxylase, which showed intriguingly partial homology with animal sterol-C5-desaturase. When this crtG gene was introduced into E. coli accumulating zeaxanthin and canthaxanthin, the resulting transformants produced their 2-hydroxylated and 2,2'-dihydroxylated products which were structurally novel or rare xanthophylls, as determined by their nuclear magnetic resonance and high-performance liquid chromatography/photodiode array detector/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry spectral data. The new carotenoid produced was suggested to have a strong inhibitory effect on lipid peroxidation.

  13. Elucidation of a Carotenoid Biosynthesis Gene Cluster Encoding a Novel Enzyme, 2,2′-β-Hydroxylase, from Brevundimonas sp. Strain SD212 and Combinatorial Biosynthesis of New or Rare Xanthophylls

    Nishida, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Kyoko; Kasai, Hiroaki; Shizuri, Yoshikazu; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Sawabe, Akiyoshi; Komemushi, Sadao; Miki, Wataru; Misawa, Norihiko

    2005-01-01

    A carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster mediating the production of 2-hydroxyastaxanthin was isolated from the marine bacterium Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 by using a common crtI sequence as the probe DNA. A sequence analysis revealed this cluster to contain 12 open reading frames (ORFs), including the 7 known genes, crtW, crtY, crtI, crtB, crtE, idi, and crtZ. The individual ORFs were functionally analyzed by complementation studies using Escherichia coli that accumulated various carotenoid precursors due to the presence of other bacterial crt genes. In addition to functionally identifying the known crt genes, we found that one (ORF11, named crtG) coded for a novel enzyme, carotenoid 2,2′-β-hydroxylase, which showed intriguingly partial homology with animal sterol-C5-desaturase. When this crtG gene was introduced into E. coli accumulating zeaxanthin and canthaxanthin, the resulting transformants produced their 2-hydroxylated and 2,2′-dihydroxylated products which were structurally novel or rare xanthophylls, as determined by their nuclear magnetic resonance and high-performance liquid chromatography/photodiode array detector/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry spectral data. The new carotenoid produced was suggested to have a strong inhibitory effect on lipid peroxidation. PMID:16085816

  14. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  15. Structural evidence for the partially oxidized dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms of the cofactor of porphobilinogen deaminase: structures of the Bacillus megaterium enzyme at near-atomic resolution

    Azim, N.; Deery, E.; Warren, M. J.; Wolfenden, B. A. A.; Erskine, P.; Cooper, J. B.; Coker, A.; Wood, S. P.; Akhtar, M.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses a key early step in the biosynthesis of tetrapyrroles in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. Two near-atomic resolution structures of PBGD from B. megaterium are reported that demonstrate the time-dependent accumulation of partially oxidized forms of the cofactor, including one that possesses a tetrahedral C atom in the terminal pyrrole ring. The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses an early step of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthesis pathway in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. The enzyme possesses a dipyrromethane cofactor, which is covalently linked by a thioether bridge to an invariant cysteine residue (Cys241 in the Bacillus megaterium enzyme). The cofactor is extended during the reaction by the sequential addition of the four substrate molecules, which are released as a linear tetrapyrrole product. Expression in Escherichia coli of a His-tagged form of B. megaterium PBGD has permitted the X-ray analysis of the enzyme from this species at high resolution, showing that the cofactor becomes progressively oxidized to the dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms. In previously solved PBGD structures, the oxidized cofactor is in the dipyromethenone form, in which both pyrrole rings are approximately coplanar. In contrast, the oxidized cofactor in the B. megaterium enzyme appears to be in the dipyrromethanone form, in which the C atom at the bridging α-position of the outer pyrrole ring is very clearly in a tetrahedral configuration. It is suggested that the pink colour of the freshly purified protein is owing to the presence of the dipyrromethene form of the cofactor which, in the structure reported here, adopts the same conformation as the fully reduced dipyrromethane form

  16. Effect of sodium chloride and cadmium on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    Li, Chunsheng; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6% NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory effect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  17. Pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin induces hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes, oxidative stress and apoptosis in rats.

    Martínez, María-Aránzazu; Ares, Irma; Rodríguez, José-Luis; Martínez, Marta; Roura-Martínez, David; Castellano, Victor; Lopez-Torres, Bernardo; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo

    2018-08-01

    This study aimed to examine in rats the effects of the Type II pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform activities, oxidative stress markers, gene expression of proinflammatory, oxidative stress and apoptosis mediators, and CYP isoform gene expression and metabolism phase I enzyme PCR array analysis. Lambda-cyhalothrin, at oral doses of 1, 2, 4 and 8mg/kg bw for 6days, increased, in a dose-dependent manner, hepatic activities of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (CYP1A1), methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (CYP1A2), pentoxyresorufin O-depentylase (CYP2B1/2), testosterone 7α- (CYP2A1), 16β- (CYP2B1), and 6β-hydroxylase (CYP3A1/2), and lauric acid 11- and 12-hydroxylase (CYP4A1/2). Similarly, lambda-cyhalothrin (4 and 8mg/kg bw, for 6days), in a dose-dependent manner, increased significantly hepatic CYP1A1, 1A2, 2A1, 2B1, 2B2, 2E1, 3A1, 3A2 and 4A1 mRNA levels and IL-1β, NFκB, Nrf2, p53, caspase-3 and Bax gene expressions. PCR array analysis showed from 84 genes examined (P1.5), changes in mRNA levels in 18 genes: 13 up-regulated and 5 down-regulated. A greater fold change reversion than 3-fold was observed on the up-regulated ALDH1A1, CYP2B2, CYP2C80 and CYP2D4 genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) groups the expressed genes into biological mechanisms that are mainly related to drug metabolism. In the top canonical pathways, Oxidative ethanol degradation III together with Fatty Acid α-oxidation may be significant pathways for lambda-cyhalothrin. Our results may provide further understanding of molecular aspects involved in lambda-cyhalothrin-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Antioxidant enzymes as potential targets in cardioprotection and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Enzyme antioxidants: the next stage of pharmacological counterwork to the oxidative stress

    Alexander V. Vavaev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The focus in antioxidant research is on enzyme derivative investigations. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD is of particular interest, as it demonstrates in vivo the protective action against development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus. The reliable association of coronary artery disease with decreased level of heparin-released EC-SOD was established in clinical research. To create a base for and to develop antioxidant therapy, various SOD isozymes, catalase (CAT, methods of gene therapy, and combined applications of enzymes are used. Covalent bienzyme SOD-CHS-CAT conjugate (CHS, chondroitin sulphate showed high efficacy and safety as the drug candidate. There is an evident trend to use the components of glycocalyx and extracellular matrix for target delivery of medical substances. Development of new enzyme antioxidants for therapeutic application is closely connected with progress in medical biotechnology, pharmaceutical industry, and bioeconomy.

  19. Effect of di(n-butyl) phthalate on testicular oxidative damage and antioxidant enzymes in hyperthyroid rats.

    Lee, Ena; Ahn, Mee Young; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, In Young; Han, Soon Young; Kang, Tae Seok; Hong, Jin Hwan; Park, Kui Lea; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2007-06-01

    This study compared the effects of di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) on the oxidative damage and antioxidant enzymes activity in testes of hyperthyroid rats. Hyperthyroidism was induced in pubertal male rats by intraperitoneal injection of triiodothyronine (T3, 10 microg/kg body weight) for 30 days. An oral dose of DBP (750 mg/kg) was administered simultaneously to normal or hyperthyroid (T3) rats over a 30-day period. No changes in body weight were observed in the hyperthyroid groups (T3, T3 + DBP) compared with controls. There were significantly higher serum T3 levels observed in the hyperthyroid rats than in the control, but the serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels were markedly lower in the hyperthyroid rats. DBP significantly decreased the weight of the testes in the normal (DBP) and hyperthyroid (T3 + DBP) groups. The serum testosterone concentrations were significantly lower in only DBP group. DBP significantly increased the 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) level in the testes, whereas the DBP-induced 8-OHdG levels were slightly higher in T3 + DBP group. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly higher in the testes of the DBP or T3 + DBP groups. Catalase (CAT) activity was significantly higher in the DBP treatment group, but the T3 + DBP group showed slightly lower DBP-induced CAT activity. The testicular expression of thyroid hormone receptor alpha-1 (TRalpha-1) was significantly higher in the DBP groups, and androgen receptor (AR) expression was not detected in the DBP treatment group. In addition, DBP significantly increased the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-r (PPAR-r) levels in the testis. These results suggest that hyperthyroidism can cause a change in the expression level of PPAR-r in testes, and may increase the levels of oxidative damage induced by the metabolic activation of DBP.

  20. Endurance exercise induces mRNA expression of oxidative enzymes in human skeletal muscle late in recovery

    Leick, Lotte; Plomgaard, Peter S.; Grønløkke, L.

    2010-01-01

    exercise. To test the hypothesis that mRNA expression of many oxidative enzymes is up-regulated late in recovery (10-24 h) after exercise, male subjects (n=8) performed a 90-min cycling exercise (70% VO(2-max)), with muscle biopsies obtained before exercise (pre), and after 10, 18 and 24 h of recovery....... The mRNA expression of carnitine-palmitoyltransferase (CPT)I, CD36, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD), cytochrome (Cyt)c, aminolevulinate-delta-synthase (ALAS)1 and GLUT4 was 100-200% higher at 10-24 h of recovery from exercise than in a control trial. Exercise induced a 100-300% increase...... in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1alpha, citrate synthase (CS), CPTI, CD36, HAD and ALAS1 mRNA contents at 10-24 h of recovery relative to before exercise. No protein changes were detected in Cytc, ALAS1 or GLUT4. This shows that mRNA expression of several training...

  1. Effect of the structure of commercial poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide) demulsifier bases on the demulsification of water-in-crude oil emulsions: elucidation of the demulsification mechanism

    Ramalho, Joao Batista V.S. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Lechuga, Fernanda C.; Lucas, Elizabete F., E-mail: elucas@ima.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2010-07-01

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions are formed during petroleum production and asphaltenes play an important role in their stabilization. Demulsifiers are added to destabilize such emulsions,however the demulsification mechanism is not completely known. In this paper, the performances of commercial poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide) demulsifiers were studied using synthetic water-in-oil emulsions and model-systems (asphaltenes in organic solvent). No change in the asphaltene aggregate size induced by the demulsifier was observed. The demulsification performance decreased as the asphaltene aggregate size increased, so it can be suggested that the demulsification mechanism is correlated to the voids between the aggregates adsorbed on the water droplets surface. (author)

  2. Effect of the structure of commercial poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide) demulsifier bases on the demulsification of water-in-crude oil emulsions: elucidation of the demulsification mechanism

    Ramalho, Joao Batista V.S.; Lechuga, Fernanda C.; Lucas, Elizabete F.

    2010-01-01

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions are formed during petroleum production and asphaltenes play an important role in their stabilization. Demulsifiers are added to destabilize such emulsions,however the demulsification mechanism is not completely known. In this paper, the performances of commercial poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide) demulsifiers were studied using synthetic water-in-oil emulsions and model-systems (asphaltenes in organic solvent). No change in the asphaltene aggregate size induced by the demulsifier was observed. The demulsification performance decreased as the asphaltene aggregate size increased, so it can be suggested that the demulsification mechanism is correlated to the voids between the aggregates adsorbed on the water droplets surface. (author)

  3. Effect of the structure of commercial poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide demulsifier bases on the demulsification of water-in-crude oil emulsions: elucidation of the demulsification mechanism

    João Batista V. S. Ramalho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-crude oil emulsions are formed during petroleum production and asphaltenes play an important role in their stabilization. Demulsifiers are added to destabilize such emulsions,however the demulsification mechanism is not completely known. In this paper, the performances of commercial poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide demulsifiers were studied using synthetic water-in-oil emulsions and model-systems (asphaltenes in organic solvent. No change in the asphaltene aggregate size induced by the demulsifier was observed. The demulsification performance decreased as the asphaltene aggregate size increased, so it can be suggested that the demulsification mechanism is correlated to the voids between the aggregates adsorbed on the water droplets surface.

  4. Benzene Exposure Alters Expression of Enzymes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Male C3H/He Mice

    Rongli Sun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Benzene is a well-known hematotoxic carcinogen that can cause leukemia and a variety of blood disorders. Our previous study indicated that benzene disturbs levels of metabolites in the fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO pathway, which is crucial for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic and leukemic cells. The present research aims to investigate the effects of benzene on changes in the expression of key enzymes in the FAO pathway in male C3H/He mice. Results showed that benzene exposure caused reduced peripheral white blood cell (WBC, red blood cell (RBC, platelet (Pit counts, and hemoglobin (Hgb concentration. Investigation of the effects of benzene on the expression of FA transport- and β-oxidation-related enzymes showed that expression of proteins Cpt1a, Crat, Acaa2, Aldh1l2, Acadvl, Crot, Echs1, and Hadha was significantly increased. The ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential decreased in mice exposed to benzene. Meanwhile, reactive oxygen species (ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were significantly increased in the benzene group. Our results indicate that benzene induces increased expression of FA transport and β-oxidation enzymes, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress, which may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

  5. Curcumin Induces Nrf2 Nuclear Translocation and Prevents Glomerular Hypertension, Hyperfiltration, Oxidant Stress, and the Decrease in Antioxidant Enzymes in 5/6 Nephrectomized Rats

    Edilia Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal injury resulting from renal ablation induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6NX is associated with oxidant stress, glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, and impaired Nrf2-Keap1 pathway. The purpose of this work was to know if the bifunctional antioxidant curcumin may induce nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and prevents 5/6NX-induced oxidant stress, renal injury, decrease in antioxidant enzymes, and glomerular hypertension and hyperfiltration. Four groups of rats were studied: (1 control, (2 5/6NX, (3 5/6NX +CUR, and (4 CUR (n=8–10. Curcumin was given by gavage to NX5/6 +CUR and CUR groups (60 mg/kg/day starting seven days before surgery. Rats were studied 30 days after NX5/6 or sham surgery. Curcumin attenuated 5/6NX-induced proteinuria, systemic and glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and increase in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. This protective effect was associated with enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and with prevention of 5/6NX-induced oxidant stress and decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that the protective effect of curcumin against 5/6NX-induced glomerular and systemic hypertension, hyperfiltration, renal dysfunction, and renal injury was associated with the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the prevention of both oxidant stress and the decrease of antioxidant enzymes.

  6. Plasma oxidative stress level of IgA nephropathy in children and the effect of early intervention with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    Pei, Yuxin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Ruan, Jingwei; Rong, Liping; Jiang, Mengjie; Mo, Ying; Jiang, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the change of the plasma oxidative stress level in children with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and analyze its relativity to the clinical and pathological classification. To discuss the early effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on the plasma oxidative stress level in children with IgA nephropathy. Thirty-eight children with IgAN were divided into groups according to their clinical features, pathologic grades, and treatments. Twenty healthy children were included in the control group. The plasma level of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), malonaldehyde (MDA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were detected. The plasma level of oxidative stress was significantly increased in the IgAN group, including a higher plasma level of AOPP and MDA and a lower plasma level of SOD. After treatment, the plasma level of oxidative stress was significantly decreased in the ACEI group. The children with IgAN had an increase in the plasma level of oxidative stress, expressed as an increased plasma level of AOPP and MDA and a decreased plasma level of SOD. Oxidative stress was associated with the progression of IgAN in children. Early treatment with ACEI therapy can significantly reduce the plasma level of oxidative stress in children with IgAN. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Studies on meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages

    Yu, Qin Ping; Feng, Ding Yuan; Xiao, Juan; Wu, Fan; He, Xiao Jun; Xia, Min Hao; Dong, Tao; Liu, Yi Hua; Tan, Hui Ze; Zou, Shi Geng; Zheng, Tao; Ou, Xian Hua; Zuo, Jian Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective This experiment investigated meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and expression of genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages. Methods Sixty 4-week-old Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 6 replicate groups, each containing 10 pigs. One pig from each group was sacrificed at day 35, 63, 98, and 161 to isolate longissimus dorsi and triceps muscles. Results Meat color scores were higher in pigs at 35 d than those at 63 d and 98 d (pMeat color scores were correlated to the proportion of oxymyoglobin (r = 0.59, pmeat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential varied at different stages. PMID:28728400

  8. SnO(2) quantum dots-reduced graphene oxide composite for enzyme-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of urea.

    Dutta, Dipa; Chandra, Sudeshna; Swain, Akshaya K; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2014-06-17

    Most of the urea sensors are biosensors and utilize urease, which limit their use in harsh environments. Recently, because of their exceptional ability to endorse faster electron transfer, carbonaceous material composites and quantum dots are being used for fabrication of a sensitive transducer surface for urea biosensors. We demonstrate an enzyme free ultrasensitive urea sensor fabricated using a SnO2 quantum dots (QDs)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite. Due to the synergistic effect of the constituents, the SnO2 QDs/RGO (SRGO) composite proved to be an excellent probe for electrochemical sensing. The morphology and structure of the composite was characterized by various techniques, and it was observed that SnO2 QDs are decorated on RGO layers. Electrochemical studies were performed to evaluate the characteristics of the sensor toward detection of urea. Amperometry studies show that the SRGO/GCE electrode is sensitive to urea in the concentration range of 1.6 × 10(-14)-3.9 × 10(-12) M, with a detection limit of as low as 11.7 fM. However, this is an indirect measurement for urea wherein the analytical signal is recorded as a decrease in the amperommetric and/or voltammetric current from the solution redox species ferrocyanide. The porous structure of the SRGO matrix offers a very low transport barrier and thus promotes rapid diffusion of the ionic species from the solution to the electrode, leading to a rapid response time (∼5 s) and ultrahigh sensitivity (1.38 μA/fM). Good analytical performance in the presence of interfering agents, low cost, and easy synthesis methodology suggest that SRGO can be quite promising as an electroactive material for effective urea sensing.

  9. Tailoring Enzyme-Like Activities of Gold Nanoclusters by Polymeric Tertiary Amines for Protecting Neurons Against Oxidative Stress.

    Liu, Ching-Ping; Wu, Te-Haw; Lin, Yu-Lung; Liu, Chia-Yeh; Wang, Sabrina; Lin, Shu-Yi

    2016-08-01

    The cytotoxicity of nanozymes has drawn much attention recently because their peroxidase-like activity can decompose hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) to produce highly toxic hydroxyl radicals (•OH) under acidic conditions. Although catalytic activities of nanozymes are highly associated with their surface properties, little is known about the mechanism underlying the surface coating-mediated enzyme-like activities. Herein, it is reported for the first time that amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs-NH2 ) unexpectedly lose their peroxidase-like activity while still retaining their catalase-like activity in physiological conditions. Surprisingly, the methylated form of AuNCs-NH2 (i.e., MAuNCs-N(+) R3 , where R = H or CH3 ) results in a dramatic recovery of the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity while blocking most primary and tertiary amines (1°- and 3°-amines) of dendrimers to form quaternary ammonium ions (4°-amines). However, the hidden peroxidase-like activity is also found in hydroxyl-terminated dendrimer-encapsulated AuNCs (AuNCs-OH, inside backbone with 3°-amines), indicating that 3°-amines are dominant in mediating the peroxidase-like activity. The possible mechanism is further confirmed that the enrichment of polymeric 3°-amines on the surface of dendrimer-encapsulated AuNCs provides sufficient suppression of the critical mediator •OH for the peroxidase-like activity. Finally, it is demonstrated that AuNCs-NH2 with diminished cytotoxicity have great potential for use in primary neuronal protection against oxidative damage. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effects of whole-body γ-irradiation on lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzymes in the liver of N-nitrosodiethylamine-treated mice

    Grudzinski, I.P.; Frankiewicz-Jozko, A; Gajewska, J.; Szczypka, M.; Szymanski, A.

    2000-01-01

    B6c3F1 mice were treated per os with either normal saline or N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg body weight) daily for 21 days. On day 22 nd of the experiment , the animals were whole-body γ-irradiated (10 Gy) and examined at 3.5 days post-radiation exposure. Pretreatment of mice with NDEA at the lowest dosage (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and catalase (CAT) activity in the liver. Since the agent at the highest doses (1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg) did not have any effects on TBARS, it was associated with the selective increase of thiol (SH) groups and GSH-linked anti-oxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX), transferase (GST) and reductase (GR). γ-irradiation decreased TBARS and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and GPX activity in NDEA-treated mice. Simultaneously, γ-rays did not have any effects on GST and GR enzymes, and it slightly decreased SH groups and CAT activity. Results of the present study indicate that NDEA can promote lipid peroxidation in mice liver. γ-irradiation of mice at a dose of 10 Gy modifies the activity of hepatic anti-oxidant enzymes, which in turn can lead to the reduction of NDEA-induced lipid peroxidation and/or pro-oxidant shift(s). The anti-oxidant enzymes such as SOD and GPX are suggested to be mainly involved in this process. (author)

  11. The putative endoglucanase PcGH61D from Phanerochaete chrysosporium is a metal-dependent oxidative enzyme that cleaves cellulose.

    Bjørge Westereng

    Full Text Available Many fungi growing on plant biomass produce proteins currently classified as glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61, some of which are known to act synergistically with cellulases. In this study we show that PcGH61D, the gene product of an open reading frame in the genome of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, is an enzyme that cleaves cellulose using a metal-dependent oxidative mechanism that leads to generation of aldonic acids. The activity of this enzyme and its beneficial effect on the efficiency of classical cellulases are stimulated by the presence of electron donors. Experiments with reduced cellulose confirmed the oxidative nature of the reaction catalyzed by PcGH61D and indicated that the enzyme may be capable of penetrating into the substrate. Considering the abundance of GH61-encoding genes in fungi and genes encoding their functional bacterial homologues currently classified as carbohydrate binding modules family 33 (CBM33, this enzyme activity is likely to turn out as a major determinant of microbial biomass-degrading efficiency.

  12. Use of isotope effects to elucidate enzyme mechanisms

    Cleland, W.W.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical bond breaking steps are normally not rate limiting for enzymatic reactions. However, comparison of deuterium and tritium isotope effects on the same reaction, especially when coupled with 13 C isotope effects for the same step measured with deuterated as well as unlabeled substrates, allows calculation of the intrinsic isotope effects on the bond breaking steps and thus a determination of the commitments to catalysis for the reactants. The variation in observed isotope effects as a function of reactant concentration can be used to determine kinetic mechanisms, while the pH variation of isotope effects can determine the stickiness of the reactants and which portions of the reactant mechanism are pH dependent. Finally the size of primary and secondary intrinsic isotope effects can be used to determine transition state structure

  13. Integrated use of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative damage in two fish species to assess pollution in man-made hydroelectric reservoirs.

    Sakuragui, M M; Paulino, M G; Pereira, C D S; Carvalho, C S; Sadauskas-Henrique, H; Fernandes, M N

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between contaminant body burden and the oxidative stress status of the gills and livers of two wild fish species in the Furnas Hydroelectric Power Station (HPS) reservoir (Minas Gerais, Brazil). Gills and livers presented similar pathways of metals and organochlorine bioaccumulation. During June, organochlorines were associated with lipid peroxidation (LPO), indicating oxidative stress due to the inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. In the most polluted areas, metal concentrations in the liver were associated with metallothionein. During December, contaminants in the gills and liver were associated with catalase activity and LPO. Aldrin/dieldrin was the contaminant most associated with oxidative damage in the livers of both species. This integrated approach shed light on the relationship between adverse biological effects and bioaccumulation of contaminants inputted by intensive agricultural practices and proved to be a suitable tool for assessing the environmental quality of man-made reservoirs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between maternal micronutrient status, oxidative stress, and common genetic variants in antioxidant enzymes at 15 weeks׳ gestation in nulliparous women who subsequently develop preeclampsia.

    Mistry, Hiten D; Gill, Carolyn A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Seed, Paul T; Hesketh, John E; Méplan, Catherine; Schomburg, Lutz; Chappell, Lucy C; Morgan, Linda; Poston, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific condition affecting 2-7% of women and a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Deficiencies of specific micronutrient antioxidant activities associated with copper, selenium, zinc, and manganese have previously been linked to preeclampsia at the time of disease. Our aims were to investigate whether maternal plasma micronutrient concentrations and related antioxidant enzyme activities are altered before preeclampsia onset and to examine the dependence on genetic variations in these antioxidant enzymes. Predisease plasma samples (15±1 weeks׳ gestation) were obtained from women enrolled in the international Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study who subsequently developed preeclampsia (n=244) and from age- and BMI-matched normotensive controls (n=472). Micronutrient concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; associated antioxidant enzyme activities, selenoprotein-P, ceruloplasmin concentration and activity, antioxidant capacity, and markers of oxidative stress were measured by colorimetric assays. Sixty-four tag-single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes and selenoprotein-P were genotyped using allele-specific competitive PCR. Plasma copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations were modestly but significantly elevated in women who subsequently developed preeclampsia (both Ppreeclampsia. The modest elevation in copper may contribute to oxidative stress, later in pregnancy, in those women that go on to develop preeclampsia. The lack of evidence to support the hypothesis that functional SNPs influence antioxidant enzyme activity in pregnant women argues against a role for these genes in the etiology of preeclampsia. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioavailability of catechins from guaraná (Paullinia cupana) and its effect on antioxidant enzymes and other oxidative stress markers in healthy human subjects.

    Yonekura, Lina; Martins, Carolina Aguiar; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Monteiro, Marcela Piedade; César, Luiz Antônio Machado; Mioto, Bruno Mahler; Mori, Clara Satsuki; Mendes, Thaíse Maria Nogueira; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Arçari, Demetrius Paiva; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva

    2016-07-13

    We assessed the effects of guaraná (Paullinia cupana) consumption on plasma catechins, erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and biomarkers of oxidative stress (ex vivo LDL oxidation, plasma total antioxidant status and ORAC, and lymphocyte single cell gel electrophoresis) in healthy overweight subjects. Twelve participants completed a 15-day run-in period followed by a 15-day intervention with a daily intake of 3 g guaraná seed powder containing 90 mg (+)-catechin and 60 mg (-)-epicatechin. Blood samples were taken on the first and last day of the intervention period, fasting and 1 h post-dose. The administration of guaraná increased plasma ORAC, while reducing ex vivo LDL oxidation (only in the first study day) and hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes, at 1 h post-dose. Plasma catechin (0.38 ± 0.12 and 0.44 ± 0.18 nmol mL(-1)), epicatechin (0.59 ± 0.18 and 0.64 ± 0.25 nmol mL(-1)) and their methylated metabolites were observed at 1 h post-dose but were almost negligible after overnight fasting. The activities of catalase (in both study days) and glutathione peroxidase (in the last intervention day) increased at 1 h post-dose. Furthermore, the activity of both enzymes remained higher than the basal levels in overnight-fasting individuals on the last intervention day, suggesting a prolonged effect of guaraná that continues even after plasma catechin clearance. In conclusion, guaraná catechins are bioavailable and contribute to reduce the oxidative stress of clinically healthy individuals, by direct antioxidant action of the absorbed phytochemicals and up-regulation of antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes.

  16. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

    Foulon, V; Croes, K; Waelkens, E

    1999-01-01

    Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

  17. Functional Layer-by-Layer Thin Films of Inducible Nitric Oxide (NO) Synthase Oxygenase and Polyethylenimine: Modulation of Enzyme Loading and NO-Release Activity.

    Gunasekera, Bhagya; Abou Diwan, Charbel; Altawallbeh, Ghaith; Kalil, Haitham; Maher, Shaimaa; Xu, Song; Bayachou, Mekki

    2018-03-07

    Nitric oxide (NO) release counteracts platelet aggregation and prevents the thrombosis cascade in the inner walls of blood vessels. NO-release coatings also prevent thrombus formation on the surface of blood-contacting medical devices. Our previous work has shown that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) films release NO fluxes upon enzymatic conversion of the substrate l-arginine. In this work, we report on the modulation of enzyme loading in layer-by-layer (LbL) thin films of inducible nitric oxide synthase oxygenase (iNOSoxy) on polyethylenimine (PEI). The layer of iNOSoxy is electrostatically adsorbed onto the PEI layer. The pH of the iNOSoxy solution affects the amount of enzyme adsorbed. The overall negative surface charge of iNOSoxy in solution depends on the pH and hence determines the density of adsorbed protein on the positively charged PEI layer. We used buffered iNOSoxy solutions adjusted to pHs 8.6 and 7.0, while saline PEI solution was used at pH 7.0. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the outermost layer shows higher protein adsorption with iNOSoxy at pH 8.6 than with a solution of iNOSoxy at pH 7.0. Graphite electrodes with PEI/iNOSoxy films show higher catalytic currents for nitric oxide reduction mediated by iNOSoxy. The higher enzyme loading translates into higher NO flux when the enzyme-modified surface is exposed to a solution containing the substrate and a source of electrons. Spectrophotometric assays showed higher NO fluxes with iNOSoxy/PEI films built at pH 8.6 than with films built at pH 7.0. Fourier transform infrared analysis of iNOSoxy adsorbed on PEI at pH 8.6 and 7.0 shows structural differences of iNOSoxy in films, which explains the observed changes in enzymatic activity. Our findings show that pH provides a strategy to optimize the NOS loading and enzyme activity in NOS-based LbL thin films, which enables improved NO release with minimum layers of PEI/NOS.

  18. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa

    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH. We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6 and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  19. Nitro-Oleic Acid Reduces J774A.1 Macrophage Oxidative Status and Triglyceride Mass: Involvement of Paraoxonase2 and Triglyceride Metabolizing Enzymes.

    Rosenblat, Mira; Rom, Oren; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids possess anti-atherogenic properties, but their effects on macrophage oxidative status and lipid metabolism that play important roles in atherosclerosis development are unclear. This study compared the effects of nitro-oleic acid (OLA-NO2) with those of native oleic acid (OLA) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, anti-oxidants and metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol in J774A.1 macrophages. Upon incubating the cells with physiological concentrations of OLA-NO2 (0-1 µM) or with equivalent levels of OLA, ROS levels measured by 2, 7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, decreased dose-dependently, but the anti-oxidative effects of OLA-NO2 were significantly augmented. Copper ion addition increased ROS generation in OLA treated macrophages without affecting OLA-NO2 treated cells. These effects could be attributed to elevated glutathione levels and to increased activity and expression of paraoxonase2 that were observed in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated cells. Beneficial effects on triglyceride metabolism were noted in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated macrophages in which cellular triglycerides were reduced due to attenuated biosynthesis and accelerated hydrolysis of triglycerides. Accordingly, OLA-NO2 treated cells demonstrated down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1, the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis, and increased expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase that regulate triglyceride hydrolysis. Finally, OLA-NO2 vs OLA treatment resulted in modest but significant beneficial effects on macrophage cholesterol metabolism, reducing cholesterol biosynthesis rate and low density lipoprotein influx into the cells, while increasing high density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Collectively, compared with OLA, OLA-NO2 modestly but significantly reduces macrophage oxidative status and cellular triglyceride content via modulation of cellular anti-oxidants and triglyceride

  20. The effect of aqueous extract of Avicennia marina (Forsk. Vierh. leaves on liver enzymes' activity, oxidative stress parameters and liver histopathology in male diabetic rats

    Akram Hamzevi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avicennia marina has antioxidant and anti-diabetic properties. This study was conducted to examine the effect of aqueous extract of A. marina on liver enzymes' activity, oxidative stress parameters and liver histopathology in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 28 male rats were allocated into the equal groups of control, diabetic control and experimental diabetic 1 and 2. The diabetes in diabetic control and experimental diabetic groups was induced using an intraperitoneal injection of 120 mg/kg alloxan. The experimental diabetic groups received the aqueous extract of A. marina (100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p. in alternate days for one month. Sterile distilled water was injected to the animals of control and diabetic control groups. At the end of the treatment period, serum levels of ALT, AST, GGT and ALP were measured. Then, levels of SOD, GST, CAT and MDA were measured in the liver tissue. The liver sections were prepared and examined by an optical microscope. Results: Results showed that administration of the A. marina extract (100 and 300 mg/kg, ip to the diabetic rats significantly decreased the serum levels of liver enzymes and tissue level of MDA. Also, the activity of the liver tissue's antioxidant enzymes was increased (P<0.05. The A. marina extract dose-dependently decreased liver damages in diabetic rats. Conclusion: Administration of the A. marina extract improves liver tissue oxidative stress indices and decreases the serum level of liver enzymes. Also, A. marina extract improves liver tissue injuries induced by diabetes.

  1. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and other oxidative enzymes are abundantly secreted by Aspergillus nidulans grown on different starches

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    of Aspergillus nidulans grown on cereal starches from wheat and high-amylose (HA) maize, as well as legume starch from pea for 5 days. Aspergillus nidulans grew efficiently on cereal starches, whereas growth on pea starch was poor. The secretomes at days 3-5 were starch-type dependent as also reflected...... by amylolytic activity measurements. Nearly half of the 312 proteins in the secretomes were carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), mostly glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and oxidative auxiliary activities (AAs). The abundance of the GH13 α-amylase (AmyB) decreased with time, as opposed to other starch...

  2. Oxidation of the tryptophan 32 residue of human superoxide dismutase 1 caused by its bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity triggers the non-amyloid aggregation of the enzyme.

    Coelho, Fernando R; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F; Lima, Filipe S; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-10-31

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1(WT) and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp(32) residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp(32) residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1(WT) and hSOD1(G93A) mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp(32) residue in the process. The results showed that Trp(32) residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp(32) residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1(W32F) mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp(32) residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Quantitative production of compound I from a cytochrome P450 enzyme at low temperatures. Kinetics, activation parameters, and kinetic isotope effects for oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    Wang, Qin; Sheng, Xin; Horner, John H; Newcomb, Martin

    2009-08-05

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are commonly thought to oxidize substrates via an iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical cation transient termed Compound I, but kinetic studies of P450 Compounds I are essentially nonexistent. We report production of Compound I from cytochrome P450 119 (CYP119) in high conversion from the corresponding Compound II species at low temperatures in buffer mixtures containing 50% glycerol by photolysis with 365 nm light from a pulsed lamp. Compound I was studied as a reagent in oxidations of benzyl alcohol and its benzylic mono- and dideuterio isotopomers. Pseudo-first-order rate constants obtained at -50 degrees C with concentrations of substrates between 1.0 and 6.0 mM displayed saturation kinetics that gave binding constants for the substrate in the Compound I species (K(bind)) and first-order rate constants for the oxidation reactions (k(ox)). Representative results are K(bind) = 214 M(-1) and k(ox) = 0.48 s(-1) for oxidation of benzyl alcohol. For the dideuterated substrate C(6)H(5)CD(2)OH, kinetics were studied between -50 and -25 degrees C, and a van't Hoff plot for complexation and an Arrhenius plot for the oxidation reaction were constructed. The H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) at -50 degrees C were resolved into a large primary KIE (P = 11.9) and a small, inverse secondary KIE (S = 0.96). Comparison of values extrapolated to 22 degrees C of both the rate constant for oxidation of C(6)H(5)CD(2)OH and the KIE for the nondeuterated and dideuterated substrates to values obtained previously in laser flash photolysis experiments suggested that tunneling could be a significant component of the total rate constant at -50 degrees C.

  4. The biochemical effects of occupational exposure to lead and cadmium on markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes activity in the blood of glazers in tile industry.

    Hormozi, Maryam; Mirzaei, Ramazan; Nakhaee, Alireza; Izadi, Shahrokh; Dehghan Haghighi, Javid

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of occupational exposure to lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) on markers of oxidative stress in glazers in tile industries. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined in the blood of 80 subjects, including 40 glazers and 40 nonexposed subjects. Mean levels of blood Cd (8.90 ± 2.80 µg/L) and blood Pb (62.90 ± 38.10 µg/L) of glazers showed a significant increase compared with the control group. In the serum of glazers, the level of MDA was significantly higher and the level of TAC was significantly lower than the control group. We have noted a disturbance in the levels of antioxidants by a significant increase in the CAT activity and a significant decrease in the activities of SOD and GPx in the serum of glazers compared with the controls. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the serum MDA level and CAT activity were positively associated with the blood levels of Pb and Cd. Also, GPx and SOD were negatively correlated with blood Cd levels. The study clearly indicated that co-exposure to Cd and Pb can induce oxidative stress in glazers, resulting in increased lipid peroxidation and altered antioxidant enzymes.

  5. Comparison of anti-oxidant enzymes activity and levels of zinc and selenium in sperm and seminal plasma between fertile and idiopathic infertile men

    Hadi Kharazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced lipidperoxidation can lead to dysfunction of sperm and thereby, infertility may be occurred. So, always there is a balance between amount of ROS and anti-oxidant molecules in semen. Anti-oxidant enzymes of sperm; superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, catalse and zinc and selenium can protect it from destructive effects of ROS. Hence, the present study was designed to compare the activities of these enzymes and trace elements between fertile and idiopathic infertile men.Methods: Semen specimens were collected from 30 infertile men with proven infertility by an urologist, and 30 fertile men as control donors, with age range between 20-40 years old. Semen analysis was conducted by CASA method. Atomic absorption method was used for measuring of zinc and selenium concentration. Activity assays of SOD and GPX were performed by Randox Kits. Aebi method also was applied for evaluation of catalase activity.Results: There was no difference between the activities of enzymes in fertile men and infertile ones. Also, it wasn't seen any difference in the selenium and zinc levels of seminal plasma. There was no relationship between evaluated items with sperm parameters. Only, in asthenoteratospermic individuals negative correlations were found between GPX and sperm motility, selenium and sperm morphology. Also, in these individuals ,there was a positive correlation between SOD and catalse activity.Conclusion: Measuring activities of SOD, GPx, and catalase and the contents of zinc and selenium of seminal plasma do not appear to be suitable tools for determining the fertility potential of sperm.

  6. Molecular phylogeny and intricate evolutionary history of the three isofunctional enzymes involved in the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen IX.

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru; Tajima, Naoyuki; Wada, Hajime; Sato, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Tetrapyrroles such as heme and chlorophyll are essential for biological processes, including oxygenation, respiration, and photosynthesis. In the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway, protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (Protox) catalyzes the formation of protoporphyrin IX, the last common intermediate for the biosynthesis of heme and chlorophyll. Three nonhomologous isofunctional enzymes, HemG, HemJ, and HemY, for Protox have been identified. To reveal the distribution and evolution of the three Protox enzymes, we identified homologs of each along with other heme biosynthetic enzymes by whole-genome clustering across three domains of life. Most organisms possess only one of the three Protox types, with some exceptions. Detailed phylogenetic analysis revealed that HemG is mostly limited to γ-Proteobacteria whereas HemJ may have originated within α-Proteobacteria and transferred to other Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria. In contrast, HemY is ubiquitous in prokaryotes and is the only Protox in eukaryotes, so this type may be the ancestral Protox. Land plants have a unique HemY homolog that is also shared by Chloroflexus species, in addition to the main HemY homolog originating from Cyanobacteria. Meanwhile, organisms missing any Protox can be classified into two groups; those lacking most heme synthetic genes, which necessarily depend on external heme supply, and those lacking only genes involved in the conversion of uroporphyrinogen III into heme, which would use a precorrin2-dependent alternative pathway. However, hemN encoding coproporphyrinogen IX oxidase was frequently found in organisms lacking Protox enzyme, which suggests a unique role of this gene other than in heme biosynthesis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  8. Spectroscopic Analyses of the Biofuels-Critical Phytochemical Coniferyl Alcohol and Its Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation Products

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Adams, Paul; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Anup

    2011-07-13

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudo-kinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 mu L volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 mu M respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 mu g/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 mu g/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 mu M coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 mu M when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 mu g/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  9. Wiring of Glucose Oxidizing Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzymes by Methylene Blue-Modified Third Generation Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers Attached to Spectroscopic Graphite Electrodes

    Castaing, Victor; Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Methylene blue(MB)-labelled 3 G dendrimers electronically wire flavoenzymes to graphite electrodes. • Dendrimer-templated organization of MB improves electron transfer efficiency. • Covalent attachment of dendrimers to graphite provides stability of binding superior to S-Au. • Sugar-oxidizing hexose oxidase can be wired with no loss of FAD and electrocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Electro-enzymatic biotransformation requires an efficient and robust electronic communication between the biomolecules and electrodes, often performed by the relevant electron transfer (ET) mediating systems. Of those, redox-labeled dendrimeric structures, biocompatible and bearing spatially ordered multiple redox centers, represent an advanced alternative to the existing approaches. Here we show that methylene blue (MB)-labeled G3 PAMAM dendrimers covalently attached to the high-surface area spectroscopic graphite (Gr) electrodes form stable and spatially resolved electronic wires, characterized by the heterogeneous ET rate constant of 7.1 ± 0.1 s"−"1; they can be used for electronic wiring of glucose-oxidizing FAD-containing enzymes, such as hexose oxidase (HOX), and further bioelectrocatalysis of glucose oxidation, starting, at pH 7, from -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Thus, dendrimer-templated electronic wires, comprising MB molecules conjugated to the periphery of the PAMAM and anchored to the surface of cost-effective Gr electrodes represent an efficient and robust tool for protein wiring to electrodes for their perspective bioelectronic applications in biosensors and biofuel cells.

  10. MIBG causes oxidative stress and up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE(2c)

    Cornelissen, J.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Voûte, P. A.; van Gennip, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    We report the effects of meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a neuroblastoma-seeking agent, on cell proliferation and several oxidative stress-related parameters in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE(2c). MIBG inhibited the proliferation of this cell line in micromolar concentrations.

  11. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  12. Pancreatic Enzymes

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  13. Low chronic doses impact on activity and component composition of oxidizing enzymes and dehydrogenates and feather-crass DNA structure

    Sarsenbaev, K.N.; Sarsembeva, M.; Ajdosova, S.S.; Zaka, R.; Misset, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to study of nuclear explosion effects to morphological, biochemical and genetic properties of dominant plant of the STS - feather-grass. The cited data are evidence of birth of new genotypes having effective enzymatic anti-oxidative system and genes that coordinated them. It is result of the feather-grass growing during 40 years under conditions of chronic radiation. (author)

  14. [Activity of antioxidative enzymes and concentration of malondialdehyde as oxidative status markers in women with non-autoimmunological subclinical hyperthyroidism].

    Rybus-Kalinowska, Barbara; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Kalinowski, Mariusz; Kukla, Michał; Birkner, Ewa; Jochem, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    The recent investigations point out the significant role of oxidative stress in the development of thyroid gland disease. The present study was designed to investigate the variation of oxidative stae in women with non-autoimmunological subclinical hyperthyroidism. The study was conducted on 20 females with non-autoimmunological subclinical hyperthyroidism and 15 healthy women. Manganase-containing superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) plasma activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) plasma concentration were measured. EC-SOD plasma activity was significantly higher in women with subclinical hyperthyroidism when compared with the control group (13.3 +/- 2.1 vs. 10.9 +/- 1.4 NU/ml; p < 0.05), unlike Mn-SOD (4.2 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.0 +/- 1.0 NU/ml). MDA plasma concentration increased significantly in women with subclinical hyperthyroidism (3.5 +/- 1.2 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.6 micromol/l; p < 0.05). The increased EC-SOD plasma activity may reflect disturbances of oxidative state in subclinical hyperthyroidism. Parallel increase of MDA plasma concentration may indicate enhancement of lipid peroxidationin in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  15. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial Oxidative Enzyme Impairment and Restoration in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Angel, Thomas E.; Lewis, Michael P.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Wiedner, Susan D.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-10-24

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and concomitant development of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct effect of a HFD or if the mitochondrial function is reduced with increased HFD duration. We hypothesized that the function of mitochondrial oxidative and lipid metabolism functions in skeletal muscle mitochondria for HFD mice are similar or elevated relative to standard diet (SD) mice, thereby IR is neither cause nor consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. We applied a chemical probe approach to identify functionally reactive ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of C57Bl/6J mice fed HFD or SD chow for 2-, 8-, or 16-weeks; feeding time points known to induce IR. A total of 293 probe-labeled proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, of which 54 differed in abundance between HFD and SD mice. We found proteins associated with the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and lipid metabolism were altered in function when comparing SD to HFD fed mice at 2-weeks, however by 16-weeks HFD mice had TCA cycle, β-oxidation, and respiratory chain function at levels similar to or higher than SD mice.

  16. Essential oil from lemon peels inhibit key enzymes linked to neurodegenerative conditions and pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation.

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Olasehinde, Tosin A; Ademosun, Ayokunle O

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of essential oil from lemon (Citrus limoni) peels on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities in vitro. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation, dried with anhydrous Na2SO4 and characterized using gas chromatography. Antioxidant properties of the oil and inhibition of pro-oxidant-induced lipid peroxidation in rats brain homogenate were also assessed. The essential oil inhibited AChE and BChE activities in a concentration-dependent manner. GC analysis revealed the presence of sabinene, limonene, α-pinene, β-pinene, neral, geranial, 1,8-cineole, linalool, borneol, α-terpineol, terpinen-4-ol, linalyl acetate and β-caryophyllene. Furthermore, the essential oil exhibited antioxidant activities as typified by ferric reducing property, Fe(2+)-chelation and radicals [DPPH, ABTS, OH, NO] scavenging abilities. The inhibition of AChE and BChE activities, inhibition of pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activities could be possible mechanisms for the use of the essential oil in the management and prevention of oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration.

  17. Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.

    Persson, Ingrid A L; Persson, Karin; Hägg, Staffan; Andersson, Rolf G G

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Studies on meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages

    Qin Ping Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective This experiment investigated meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and expression of genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages. Methods Sixty 4-week-old Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 6 replicate groups, each containing 10 pigs. One pig from each group was sacrificed at day 35, 63, 98, and 161 to isolate longissimus dorsi and triceps muscles. Results Meat color scores were higher in pigs at 35 d than those at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05, and those at 98 d were lower than those at 161 d (p<0.05. The total myoglobin was higher on 161 d compared with those at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05. Increase in the proportions of metmyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin and a decrease in oxymyoglobin were observed between days 35 and 161 (p<0.05. Meat color scores were correlated to the proportion of oxymyoglobin (r = 0.59, p<0.01, and negatively correlated with deoxymyoglobin and metmyoglobin content (r = −0.48 and −0.62, p<0.05. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH activity at 35 d and 98 d was higher than that at 161 d (p<0.05. The highest lactate dehydrogenase/MDH ratio was achieved at 161 d (p<0.05. Calcineurin mRNA expression decreased at 35 d compared to that at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05. Myocyte enhancer factor 2 mRNA results indicated a higher expression at 161 d than that at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05. Conclusion Porcine meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential varied at different stages.

  19. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of different dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics ( Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  20. EncM, a versatile enterocin biosynthetic enzyme involved in Favorskii oxidative rearrangement, aldol condensation, and heterocycle-forming reactions

    Xiang, Longkuan; Kalaitzis, John A.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2004-01-01

    The bacteriostatic natural product enterocin from the marine microbe “Streptomyces maritimus” has an unprecedented carbon skeleton that is derived from an aromatic polyketide biosynthetic pathway. Its caged tricyclic, nonaromatic core is derived from a linear poly-β-ketide precursor that formally undergoes a Favorskii-like oxidative rearrangement. In vivo characterization of the gene encM through mutagenesis and heterologous biosynthesis demonstrated that its protein product not only is solely responsible for the oxidative C—C rearrangement, but also facilitates two aldol condensations plus two heterocycle forming reactions. In total, at least five chiral centers and four rings are generated by this multifaceted flavoprotein. Heterologous expression of the enterocin biosynthesis genes encABCDLMN in Streptomyces lividans resulted in the formation of the rearranged metabolite desmethyl-5-deoxyenterocin and the shunt products wailupemycins D-G. Addition of the methyltransferase gene encK, which was previously proposed through mutagenesis to additionally assist EncM in the Favorskii rearrangement, shifted the production to the O-methyl derivative 5-deoxyenterocin. The O-methyltransferase EncK seems to be specific for the pyrone ring of enterocin, because bicyclic polyketides bearing pyrone rings are not methylated in vivo. Expression of encM with different combinations of homologous actinorhodin biosynthesis genes did not result in the production of oxidatively rearranged enterocin-actinorhodin hybrid compounds as anticipated, suggesting that wild-type EncM may be specific for its endogenous type II polyketide synthase or for benzoyl-primed polyketide precursors. PMID:15505225

  1. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  2. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in type 2 diabetic patients with and without diastolic dysfunction and hypertension

    Kostić Nada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antioxidant systems are important factors affecting the oxidation of lipoproteins and thereby the progression of atherosclerotic disease. It has been suggested that physical activity might maintain and promote the antioxidant defence capacity against the oxidative stress. Left ventricular dysfunction (LVDD and hypertension are more common in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM type 2. Objective. To evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with DM type 2, particularly with LVDD and hypertension and to determine the influence of acute exercise training on the investigated parameters. Methods. To assess the oxidative stress of patients, we determined the following antioxidative parameters: triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol, low density cholesterol, OxLDL cholesterol, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, plasminogen activator-type 1 (PAI-1 which were measured at rest and immediately after the acute bout of the cardiopulmonary exercise cycle ergometer test. Results. In basal conditions, diabetic patients had a significant increase of TG (3.12±1.09 vs 1.74±0.9 mmol/l; p<0.01, OxLDL cholesterol (84.73±16.9 vs 79.00±29.26 mmol/l; p<0.05 and SOD enzyme activity (913.38±120.36 vs 877.14 ±153.18; p<0.05 compared to controls. During the acute exercise test, there were significantly greater levels of OxLDL (84.73±16.90 vs 92.33±23.29 mmol/l; p<0.05 in study patients. SOD significantly increased in both groups during exercise, in diabetic patients (913.38±120.36 vs 921.50±130.03 U/g Hb; p<0.05 and in controls (877.14±153.18 vs 895.00±193.49 U/g Hb; p<0.05. GSH-Px significantly increased only in diabetic patients after acute exercise (45.04±11.19 vs 51.81±15.07 U/g Hb; p<0.01, but not in controls. PAI significantly decreased during the exercise test only in healthy subjects (2.60±0.35 vs 2.22±0.65; p<0.05. Type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular complications (LVDD and hypertension had a significant

  3. Antioxidant Enzyme Activities and Lipid Oxidation in Rape (Brassica campestris L. Bee Pollen Added to Salami during Processing

    Yawei Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present research investigated the antioxidant effect of rape (Brassica campestris L. bee pollen (RBP on salami during processing. Eight flavonoids in RBP ethanol extract were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS analysis, and quercetin, rutin, and kaempferol were the major bioactive compounds. The RBP ethanol extract exhibited higher total antioxidant capacity than 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tertramethylchromancarboxylic acid (trolox at the same concentration. The salami with 0.05% RBP extract had higher catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activities than that of the control throughout the processing time (p < 0.05. Significant decreases in peroxide value (POV and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS were obtained in the final salami product with 0.05% RBP ethanol extract or 1% RBP (p < 0.05. These results suggested that RBP could improve oxidative stability and had a good potential as a natural antioxidant for retarding lipid oxidation.

  4. Antioxidant-enzyme reaction to the oxidative stress due to alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Chahid, Karim; Laglaoui, Amin; Zantar, Said; Ennabili, Abdeslam

    2015-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) becomes one of the world's foremost vegetables, and its world production and consumption have increased fairly quickly. The capacity to induce oxidative stress in tomato plant, exposed to three xenobiotics such as alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb, was investigated by the evaluation of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) rate; also, we studied the response of tomato to this stress by assessing the response of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). The effect of the insecticides was observed using four concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100%) for germinating seeds and only the recommended concentration in agriculture (100%) for growing plants. Our results show an important accumulation of MDA, demonstrating the increase of lipid peroxidation in consequence of the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to insecticide treatment. In response to this oxidative stress in tomato seedlings and plants, the activities of antioxidant-enzyme system were generally enhanced. The electrophoretic analysis showed also the apparition of new isoenzymes as the case for CAT and POD.

  5. In Vivo Alkaline Comet Assay and Enzyme-modified Alkaline Comet Assay for Measuring DNA Strand Breaks and Oxidative DNA Damage in Rat Liver.

    Ding, Wei; Bishop, Michelle E; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E; Davis, Kelly J; Manjanatha, Mugimane G

    2016-05-04

    Unrepaired DNA damage can lead to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance cancer development. Therefore, identifying potential DNA damaging agents is important for protecting public health. The in vivo alkaline comet assay, which detects DNA damage as strand breaks, is especially relevant for assessing the genotoxic hazards of xenobiotics, as its responses reflect the in vivo absorption, tissue distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of chemicals, as well as DNA repair process. Compared to other in vivo DNA damage assays, the assay is rapid, sensitive, visual and inexpensive, and, by converting oxidative DNA damage into strand breaks using specific repair enzymes, the assay can measure oxidative DNA damage in an efficient and relatively artifact-free manner. Measurement of DNA damage with the comet assay can be performed using both acute and subchronic toxicology study designs, and by integrating the comet assay with other toxicological assessments, the assay addresses animal welfare requirements by making maximum use of animal resources. Another major advantage of the assays is that they only require a small amount of cells, and the cells do not have to be derived from proliferating cell populations. The assays also can be performed with a variety of human samples obtained from clinically or occupationally exposed individuals.

  6. Activation of proteolytic enzymes and depression of the sarcolemmal Na+/K+-ATPase in ischemia-reperfused heart may be mediated through oxidative stress.

    Singh, Raja B; Hryshko, Larry; Freed, Darren; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2012-02-01

    We tested whether the activation of proteolytic enzymes, calpain, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is mediated through oxidative stress. For this purpose, isolated rat hearts were subjected to a 30 min global ischemia followed by a 30 min reperfusion. Cardiac function was monitored and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase, calpain, and MMP were measured. Depression of cardiac function and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in I/R hearts was associated with increased calpain and MMP activities. These alterations owing to I/R were similar to those observed in hearts perfused with hypoxic medium, H(2)O(2) and xanthine plus xanthine oxidase. The I/R-induced changes were attenuated by ischemic preconditioning as well as by perfusing the hearts with N-acetylcysteine or mercaptopropionylglycine. Inhibition of MMP activity in hearts treated with doxycycline depressed the I/R-induced changes in cardiac function and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity without affecting the calpain activation. On the other hand, inhibition of calpain activity upon treatment with leupeptin or MDL 28170 significantly reduced the MMP activity in addition to attenuating the I/R-induced alterations in cardiac function and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. These results suggest that the I/R-induced depression in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and cardiac function may be a consequence of the increased activities of both calpain and MMP because of oxidative stress in the heart.

  7. An electric detection of immunoglobulin G in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using an indium oxide nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistor

    Lee, Dongjin; Cui, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) are used to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles were layer-by-layer self-assembled with the oppositely charged polyelectrolyte as the electrochemical transducer and antibody immobilization site, respectively. The assay was conducted on a novel platform of indium oxide nanoparticle ISFETs, where the electric signals are generated in response to the concentration of target IgG using the labeled detecting antibody. The sandwiched ELISA structure catalyzed the conversion of the acidic substrate into neutral substance with the aid of horseradish peroxidase. The pH change in the substrate solution was detected by nanoparticle ISFETs. Normal rabbit IgG was used as a model antigen whose detection limit of 0.04 ng ml −1 was found. The facile electric detection in the conventional assay through the semiconducting nanoparticle ISFET has potential applications as a point-of-care detection or a sensing element in a lab-on-a-chip system

  8. Effects of Urtica dioica supplementation on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in type 2 diabetic patients: A double blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Amiri Behzadi, Alidad; Kalalian-Moghaddam, Hamid; Ahmadi, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of diabetic complications including metabolic abnormality-induced diabetic micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications. Urtica dioica L. ( U. dioica ) has been traditionally used in Iranian medicine as an herbal remedy for hypoglycemic or due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 50 women with type 2 diabetes participated in this study and were randomly divided into two groups namely, control and intervention groups. Control group received placebo and intervention group received hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica . Before and after 8 weeks of continuous treatment, some biochemical serum levels including FPG, TG, SGPT, SGOT, HDL, LDL, SOD and NO were measured. The results indicated that after 8 weeks, in the intervention group, FPG, TG, and SGPT levels significantly decreased and HDL, NO and SOD levels significantly increased as compared to the control group. Our results encourage the use of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica as an antioxidant agent for additional therapy of diabetes as hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica may decrease risk factors of cardiovascular incidence and other complications in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Effects of Urtica dioica supplementation on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in type 2 diabetic patients: A double blind, randomized clinical trial

    Alidad Amiri Behzadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of diabetic complications including metabolic abnormality-induced diabetic micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications. Urtica dioica L. (U. dioica has been traditionally used in Iranian medicine as an herbal remedy for hypoglycemic or due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: 50 women with type 2 diabetes participated in this study and were randomly divided into two groups namely, control and intervention groups. Control group received placebo and intervention group received hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica. Before and after 8 weeks of continuous treatment, some biochemical serum levels including FPG, TG, SGPT, SGOT, HDL, LDL, SOD and NO were measured. Results: The results indicated that after 8 weeks, in the intervention group, FPG, TG, and SGPT levels significantly decreased and HDL, NO and SOD levels significantly increased as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our results encourage the use of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica as an antioxidant agent for additional therapy of diabetes as hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica may decrease risk factors of cardiovascular incidence and other complications in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  10. Decoration of reduced graphene oxide with rhodium nanoparticles for the design of a sensitive electrochemical enzyme biosensor for 17β-estradiol.

    Povedano, Eloy; Cincotto, Fernando H; Parrado, Concepción; Díez, Paula; Sánchez, Alfredo; Canevari, Thiago C; Machado, Sergio A S; Pingarrón, José M; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2017-03-15

    A novel nanocomposite material consisting of reduced graphene oxide/Rh nanoparticles was prepared by a one-pot reaction process. The strategy involved the simultaneous reduction of RhCl 3 and graphene oxide with NaBH 4 and the in situ deposition of the metal nanoparticles on the 2D carbon nanomaterial planar sheets. Glassy carbon electrode coated with this nanocomposite was employed as nanostructured support for the cross-linking of the enzyme laccase with glutaraldehyde to construct a voltammperometric biosensor for 17β-estradiol in the 0.9-11 pM range. The biosensor showed excellent analytical performance with high sensitivity of 25.7AµM -1 cm -1 , a very low detection limit of 0.54pM and high selectivity. The biosensor was applied to the rapid and successful determination of the hormone in spiked synthetic and real human urine samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Co-ordinated stage-dependent enhancement of Plasmodium falciparum antioxidant enzymes and heat shock protein expression in parasites growing in oxidatively stressed or G6PD-deficient red blood cells

    Müller Sylke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (RBCs are equipped with protective antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs. The latter are only considered to protect against thermal stress. Important issues are poorly explored: first, it is insufficiently known how both systems are expressed in relation to the parasite developmental stage; secondly, it is unknown whether P. falciparum HSPs are redox-responsive, in view of redox sensitivity of HSP in eukaryotic cells; thirdly, it is poorly known how the antioxidant defense machinery would respond to increased oxidative stress or inhibited antioxidant defense. Those issues are interesting as several antimalarials increase the oxidative stress or block antioxidant defense in the parasitized RBC. In addition, numerous inhibitors of HSPs are currently developed for cancer therapy and might be tested as anti-malarials. Thus, the joint disruption of the parasite antioxidant enzymes/HSP system would interfere with parasite growth and open new perspectives for anti-malaria therapy. Methods Stage-dependent mRNA expression of ten representative P. falciparum antioxidant enzymes and hsp60/70–2/70–3/75/90 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in parasites growing in normal RBCs, in RBCs oxidatively-stressed by moderate H2O2 generation and in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Protein expression of antioxidant enzymes was assayed by Western blotting. The pentosephosphate-pathway flux was measured in isolated parasites after Sendai-virus lysis of RBC membrane. Results In parasites growing in normal RBCs, mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes and HSPs displayed co-ordinated stage-dependent modulation, being low at ring, highest at early trophozoite and again very low at schizont stage. Additional exogenous oxidative stress or growth in antioxidant blunted G6PD-deficient RBCs indicated remarkable flexibility of both systems, manifested by enhanced, co-ordinated mRNA expression of

  13. Co-ordinated stage-dependent enhancement of Plasmodium falciparum antioxidant enzymes and heat shock protein expression in parasites growing in oxidatively stressed or G6PD-deficient red blood cells.

    Akide-Ndunge, Oscar Bate; Tambini, Elisa; Giribaldi, Giuliana; McMillan, Paul J; Müller, Sylke; Arese, Paolo; Turrini, Francesco

    2009-05-29

    Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (RBCs) are equipped with protective antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs). The latter are only considered to protect against thermal stress. Important issues are poorly explored: first, it is insufficiently known how both systems are expressed in relation to the parasite developmental stage; secondly, it is unknown whether P. falciparum HSPs are redox-responsive, in view of redox sensitivity of HSP in eukaryotic cells; thirdly, it is poorly known how the antioxidant defense machinery would respond to increased oxidative stress or inhibited antioxidant defense. Those issues are interesting as several antimalarials increase the oxidative stress or block antioxidant defense in the parasitized RBC. In addition, numerous inhibitors of HSPs are currently developed for cancer therapy and might be tested as anti-malarials. Thus, the joint disruption of the parasite antioxidant enzymes/HSP system would interfere with parasite growth and open new perspectives for anti-malaria therapy. Stage-dependent mRNA expression of ten representative P. falciparum antioxidant enzymes and hsp60/70-2/70-3/75/90 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in parasites growing in normal RBCs, in RBCs oxidatively-stressed by moderate H2O2 generation and in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Protein expression of antioxidant enzymes was assayed by Western blotting. The pentosephosphate-pathway flux was measured in isolated parasites after Sendai-virus lysis of RBC membrane. In parasites growing in normal RBCs, mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes and HSPs displayed co-ordinated stage-dependent modulation, being low at ring, highest at early trophozoite and again very low at schizont stage. Additional exogenous oxidative stress or growth in antioxidant blunted G6PD-deficient RBCs indicated remarkable flexibility of both systems, manifested by enhanced, co-ordinated mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes and HSPs. Protein expression of

  14. Nitric oxide synthase-I containing cortical interneurons co-express antioxidative enzymes and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 following focal ischemia: evidence for direct and indirect mechanisms towards their resistance to neuropathology.

    Bidmon, H J; Emde, B; Kowalski, T; Schmitt, M; Mayer, B; Kato, K; Asayama, K; Witte, O W; Zilles, K

    2001-09-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide-I is constitutively expressed in approximately 2% of cortical interneurons and is co-localized with gamma-amino butric acid, somatostatin or neuropeptide Y. These interneurons additionally express high amounts of glutamate receptors which mediate the glutamate-induced hyperexcitation following cerebral injury, under these conditions nitric oxide production increases contributing to a potentiation of oxidative stress. However, perilesional nitric oxide synthase-I containing neurons are known to be resistant to ischemic and excitotoxic injury. In vitro studies show that nitrosonium and nitroxyl ions inactivate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, resulting in neuroprotection. The question remains of how these cells are protected against their own high intracellular nitric oxide production after activation. In this study, we investigated immunocytochemically nitric oxide synthase-I containing cortical neurons in rats after unilateral, cortical photothrombosis. In this model of focal ischemia, perilesional, constitutively nitric oxide synthase-I containing neurons survived and co-expressed antioxidative enzymes, such as manganese- and copper-zinc-dependent superoxide dismutases, heme oxygenase-2 and cytosolic glutathione peroxidase. This enhanced antioxidant expression was accompanied by a strong perinuclear presence of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. No colocalization was detectable with upregulated heme oxygenase-1 in glia and the superoxide and prostaglandin G(2)-producing cyclooxygenase-2 in neurons. These results suggest that nitric oxide synthase-I containing interneurons are protected against intracellular oxidative damage and apoptosis by Bcl-2 and several potent antioxidative enzymes. Since nitric oxide synthase-I positive neurons do not express superoxide-producing enzymes such as cyclooxygenase-1, xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 in response to injury, this may additionally contribute to their resistance by reducing their internal

  15. Enzyme mimics of spinel-type CoxNi1−xFe2O4 magnetic nanomaterial for eletroctrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen peroxide

    Luo, Liqiang; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Fang; Si, Xiaojing; Ding, Yaping; Deng, Dongmei; Wang, Tianlin

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Spinel-type Co x Ni 1−x Fe 2 O 4 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were synthesized. •Co x Ni 1−x Fe 2 O 4 were first employed as novel enzyme mimic sensing materials of H 2 O 2 . •Co 0.5 Ni 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 /CPE showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to H 2 O 2 . •Co 0.5 Ni 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 /CPE was successfully applied to determine H 2 O 2 in toothpastes. -- Abstract: A series of spinel-type Co x Ni 1−x Fe 2 O 4 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) magnetic nanomaterials were solvothermally synthesized as enzyme mimics for the eletroctrocatalytic oxidation of H 2 O 2 . X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope were employed to characterize the composition, structure and morphology of the material. The electrochemical properties of spinel-type Co x Ni 1−x Fe 2 O 4 with different (Co/Ni) molar ratio toward H 2 O 2 oxidation were investigated, and the results demonstrated that Co 0.5 Ni 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 modified carbon paste electrode (Co 0.5 Ni 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 /CPE) possessed the best electrocatalytic activity for H 2 O 2 oxidation. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve for H 2 O 2 determination on Co 0.5 Ni 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 /CPE was linear in a wide range of 1.0 × 10 −8 –1.0 × 10 −3 M with low detection limit of 3.0 × 10 −9 M (S/N = 3). The proposed Co 0.5 Ni 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 /CPE was also applied to the determination of H 2 O 2 in commercial toothpastes with satisfactory results, indicating that Co x Ni 1−x Fe 2 O 4 is a promising hydrogen peroxidase mimics for the detection of H 2 O 2

  16. Effect of exogenous melatonin and different photoperiods on oxidative status and antioxidant enzyme activity in Chhotanagpuri ewe.

    Choudhary, Pankaj Kumar; Ishwar, Ajay Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Niyogi, Debasish; Kumar, Mukesh

    2018-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of exogenous melatonin under different photoperiods on oxidative status in Chhotanagpuri ewe. A total of 42 non-pregnant, non-lactating Chhotanagpuri ewe, having body weight ranging between 14.11±0.09 and 15.38±0.06 kg, were selected and were isolated from rams 2 months before melatonin administration. The selected animals were allocated randomly into seven groups, namely, Group I (normal control), Group II (long day [LD] control), Group III (LD+melatonin administration orally, 3 mg/day), Group IV (LD+melatonin administration subcutaneously, 1 mg/day), Group V (short day [SD] control), Group VI (SD+melatonin administration orally, 3 mg/day), and Group VII (SD+melatonin administration subcutaneously, 1 mg/day) comprising six animals in each group. Rams were then introduced into each group after completion of exogenous administration of melatonin. Blood samples with anticoagulant in vials were collected from each animal day before the start of the experiment and thereafter every month up to 5 th month. Hemolysate was prepared for estimation of oxidative stress parameters such as malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). It was observed that the level of MDA was significantly (pexogenous administration of melatonin was significantly (pexogenous administration of melatonin, SOD concentration was significantly (pexogenous administration of melatonin, CAT concentration was significantly (pexogenous melatonin was able to reduce significantly the level of MDA and increased the activity of SOD and CAT in Chhotanagpuri ewe.

  17. Oxidative stress in deep scattering layers: Heat shock response and antioxidant enzymes activities of myctophid fishes thriving in oxygen minimum zones

    Lopes, Ana Rita; Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Pires, Vanessa; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Diel vertical migrators, such as myctophid fishes, are known to encounter oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) during daytime in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and, therefore, have to cope with temperature and oxidative stress that arise while ascending to warmer, normoxic surface waters at night-time. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant defense strategies and heat shock response (HSR) in two myctophid species, namely Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense, at shallow and warm surface waters (21 kPa, 20-25 °C) and at hypoxic, cold (≤1 kPa, 10 °C) mesopelagic depths. More specifically, we quantified (i) heat shock protein concentrations (HSP70/HSC70) (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], and (iii) lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. HSP70/HSC70 levels increased in both myctophid species at warmer, well-oxygenated surface waters probably to prevent cellular damage (oxidative stress) due to increased oxygen demand under elevated temperatures and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. On the other hand, CAT and GST activities were augmented under hypoxic conditions, probably as preparatory response to a burst of oxyradicals during the reoxygenation phase (while ascending). SOD activity decreased under hypoxia in B. panamense, but was kept unchanged in T. mexicanus. MDA levels in B. panamense did not change between the surface and deep-sea conditions, whereas T. mexicanus showed elevated MDA and HSP70/HSC70 concentrations at warmer surface waters. This indicated that T. mexicanus seems to be not so well tuned to temperature and oxidative stress associated to diel vertical migrations. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how different species might respond to the impacts of environmental stressors (e.g. expanding mesopelagic hypoxia

  18. PEP-1-SIRT2 inhibits inflammatory response and oxidative stress-induced cell death via expression of antioxidant enzymes in murine macrophages.

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Dae Won; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Chi Hern; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Hyeon, Jiye; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Son, Ora; Park, Jinseu; Han, Kyu Hyung; Cho, Yoon Shin; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2013-10-01

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a member of the sirtuin family of proteins, plays an important role in cell survival. However, the biological function of SIRT2 protein is unclear with respect to inflammation and oxidative stress. In this study, we examined the protective effects of SIRT2 on inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage using a cell permeative PEP-1-SIRT2 protein. Purified PEP-1-SIRT2 was transduced into RAW 264.7 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and protected against lipopolysaccharide- and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced cell death and cytotoxicity. Also, transduced PEP-1-SIRT2 significantly inhibited the expression of cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In addition, PEP-1-SIRT2 decreased cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of cleaved caspase-3, whereas it elevated the expression of antioxidant enzymes such as MnSOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, topical application of PEP-1-SIRT2 to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-treated mouse ears markedly inhibited expression levels of COX-2 and proinflammatory cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs. These results demonstrate that PEP-1-SIRT2 inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress by reducing the levels of expression of cytokines and ROS, suggesting that PEP-1-SIRT2 may be a potential therapeutic agent for various disorders related to ROS, including skin inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Climate change (elevated CO{sub 2}, elevated temperature and moderate drought) triggers the antioxidant enzymes' response of grapevine cv. Tempranillo, avoiding oxidative damage

    Salazar-Parra, C.; Aguirreolea, J.; Sanchez-Diaz, M.; Irigoyen, J.J.; Morales, F. (Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Seccion Biologia Vegetal (Unidad Asociada al CSIC, EEAD, Zaragoza e ICVV, Logrono), Facultades de Ciencias y Farmacia, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain))

    2012-07-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation (A{sub N}) and photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are affected by different environmental stress factors, such as those associated with climate change. Under stress conditions, it can be generated an electron excess that cannot be consumed, which can react with O{sub 2}, producing reactive oxygen species. This work was aimed to evaluate the influence of climate change (elevated CO{sub 2}, elevated temperature and moderate drought) on the antioxidant status of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cv. Tempranillo leaves, from veraison to ripeness. The lowest ratios between electrons generated (ETR) and consumed (A{sub N} + respiration + photorespiration) were observed in plants treated with elevated CO{sub 2} and elevated temperature. In partially irrigated plants under current ambient conditions, electrons not consumed seemed to be diverted to alternative ways. Oxidative damage to chlorophylls and carotenoids was not observed. However, these plants had increases in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances, an indication of lipid peroxidation. These increases matched well with an early rise of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and antioxidant enzyme activities, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6). Enzymatic activities were maintained high until ripeness. In conclusion, plants grown under current ambient conditions and moderate drought were less efficient to cope with oxidative damage than well-irrigated plants, and more interestingly, plants grown under moderate drought but treated with elevated CO{sub 2} and elevated temperature were not affected by oxidative damage, mainly because of higher rates of electrons consumed in photosynthetic carbon fixation. (Author)

  20. Genetic inactivation of mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA preserves neuronal viability and mitochondrial integrity in response to oxidative challenges

    Michael eForte

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential to neuronal viability and function due to their roles in ATP production, intracellular calcium regulation, and activation of apoptotic pathways. Accordingly, mitochondrial dysfunction has been indicated in a wide variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent evidence points to the permeability transition pore (PTP as a key player in mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases, in which pathologic opening leads to mitochondrial swelling, rupture, release of cytochrome c, and neuronal death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are inducers of PTP opening, have been prominently implicated in the progression of many of these neurodegenerative diseases. In this context, inactivation of a mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA (p66 has been recently shown to prevent the neuronal cell death leading to axonal severing in the murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. To further characterize the response of neurons lacking p66, we assessed their reaction to treatment with oxidative stressors implicated in neurodegenerative pathways. Specifically, p66-knockout (p66-KO and wild-type (WT neurons were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO, and assessed for cell viability and changes in mitochondrial properties, including morphology and ROS production. The results showed that p66-KO neurons had greater survival following treatment with oxidative stressors and generated less ROS when compared to WT neurons. Correspondingly, mitochondria in p66-KO neurons showed diminished morphological changes in response to these challenges. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of developing mitochondria-targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders, and emphasize p66, mitochondrial ROS, and the PTP as key targets for maintaining mitochondrial and neuronal

  1. Malaysian brown seaweeds Sargassum siliquosum and Sargassum polycystum: Low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), α-amylase, and α-glucosidase inhibition activities.

    Nagappan, Hemlatha; Pee, Poh Ping; Kee, Sandra Hui Yin; Ow, Ji Tsong; Yan, See Wan; Chew, Lye Yee; Kong, Kin Weng

    2017-09-01

    Two Malaysian brown seaweeds, Sargassum siliquosum and Sargassum polycystum were first extracted using methanol to get the crude extract (CE) and further fractionated to obtain fucoxanthin-rich fraction (FRF). Samples were evaluated for their phenolic, flavonoid, and fucoxanthin contents, as well as their inhibitory activities towards low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), α-amylase, and α-glucosidase. In LDL oxidation assay, an increasing trend in antioxidant activity was observed as the concentration of FRF (0.04-0.2mg/mL) and CE (0.2-1.0mg/mL) increased, though not statistically significant. As for serum oxidation assay, significant decrease in antioxidant activity was observed as concentration of FRF increased, while CE showed no significant difference in inhibitory activity across the concentrations used. The IC 50 values for ACE inhibitory activity of CE (0.03-0.42mg/mL) were lower than that of FRF (0.94-1.53mg/mL). When compared to reference drug Voglibose (IC 50 value of 0.61mg/mL) in the effectiveness in inhibiting α-amylase, CE (0.58mg/mL) gave significantly lower IC 50 values while FRF (0.68-0.71mg/mL) had significantly higher IC 50 values. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of CE (IC 50 value of 0.57-0.69mg/mL) and FRF (IC 50 value of 0.50-0.53mg/mL) were comparable to that of reference drug (IC 50 value of 0.54mg/mL). Results had shown the potential of S. siliquosum and S. polycystum in reducing cardiovascular diseases related risk factors following their inhibitory activities on ACE, α-amylase and α-glucosidase. In addition, it is likelihood that FRF possessed antioxidant activity at low concentration level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokines, oxidative stress, and cytochrome P450 enzymes in HIV-infected individuals.

    Anusha Ande

    Full Text Available Mild-to-moderate tobacco smoking is highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals, and is known to exacerbate HIV pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the specific effects of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokine production, and oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 (CYP pathways in HIV-infected individuals who have not yet received antiretroviral therapy (ART. Thirty-two human subjects were recruited and assigned to four different cohorts as follows: a HIV negative non-smokers, b HIV positive non-smokers, c HIV negative mild-to-moderate smokers, and d HIV positive mild-to-moderate smokers. Patients were recruited in Cameroon, Africa using strict selection criteria to exclude patients not yet eligible for ART and not receiving conventional or traditional medications. Those with active tuberculosis, hepatitis B or with a history of substance abuse were also excluded. Our results showed an increase in the viral load in the plasma of HIV positive patients who were mild-to-moderate smokers compared to individuals who did not smoke. Furthermore, although we did not observe significant changes in the levels of most pro-inflammatory cytokines, the cytokine IL-8 and MCP-1 showed a significant decrease in the plasma of HIV-infected patients and smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Importantly, HIV-infected individuals and smokers showed a significant increase in oxidative stress compared with HIV negative non-smoker subjects in both plasma and monocytes. To examine the possible pathways involved in increased oxidative stress and viral load, we determined the mRNA levels of several antioxidant and cytochrome P450 enzymes in monocytes. The results showed that the levels of most antioxidants are unaltered, suggesting their inability to counter oxidative stress. While CYP2A6 was induced in smokers, CYP3A4 was induced in HIV and HIV positive smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Overall, the findings suggest

  3. Effect of Piper betle on cardiac function, marker enzymes, and oxidative stress in isoproterenol-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    Arya, Dharamvir Singh; Arora, Sachin; Malik, Salma; Nepal, Saroj; Kumari, Santosh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2010-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the cardioprotective potential of Piper betle (P. betle) against isoproterenol (ISP)-induced myocardial infarction in rats. Rats were randomly divided into eight groups viz. control, ISP, P. betle (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) and P. betle (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) + ISP treated group. P. betle leaf extract (75, 150, or 300 mg/kg) or saline was orally administered for 30 days. ISP (85 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered at an interval of 24 h on the 28(th) and 29(th) day and on day 30 the functional and biochemical parameters were measured. ISP administration showed a significant decrease in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP, MAP), heart rate (HR), contractility (+LVdP/dt), and relaxation (-LVdP/dt) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). ISP also caused significant decrease in myocardial antioxidants; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), and myocyte injury marker enzymes; creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB) isoenzyme and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) along with enhanced lipid peroxidation; thiobarbituric acid reacting species (TBARS) in heart. Pre-treatment with P. betle favorably modulated hemodynamic (SAP, DAP, and MAP) and ventricular function parameters (-LVdP/dt and LVEDP). P. betle pre-treatment also restored SOD, CAT, GSH, and GPx, reduced the leakage of CK-MB isoenzyme and LDH along with decreased lipid peroxidation in the heart. Taken together, the biochemical and functional parameters indicate that P. betle 150 and 300 mg/kg has a significant cardioprotective effect against ISP-induced myocardial infarction. Results of the present study suggest the cardioprotective potential of P. betle.

  4. Catalase, a remarkable enzyme: targeting the oldest antioxidant enzyme to find a new cancer treatment approach.

    Glorieux, Christophe; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2017-09-26

    This review is centered on the antioxidant enzyme catalase and will present different aspects of this particular protein. Among them: historical discovery, biological functions, types of catalases and recent data with regard to molecular mechanisms regulating its expression. The main goal is to understand the biological consequences of chronic exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide leading to cellular adaptation. Such issues are of the utmost importance with potential therapeutic extrapolation for various pathologies. Catalase is a key enzyme in the metabolism of H2O2 and reactive nitrogen species, and its expression and localization is markedly altered in tumors. The molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of catalase, the oldest known and first discovered antioxidant enzyme, are not completely elucidated. As cancer cells are characterized by an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a rather altered expression of antioxidant enzymes, these characteristics represent an advantage in terms of cell proliferation. Meanwhile, they render cancer cells particularly sensitive to an oxidant insult. In this context, targeting the redox status of cancer cells by modulating catalase expression is emerging as a novel approach to potentiate chemotherapy.

  5. Effect of selenium-saturated bovine lactoferrin (Se-bLF) on antioxidant enzyme activities in human gut epithelial cells under oxidative stress.

    Burrow, Hannah; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Mahidhara, Ganesh; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2011-10-01

    Cancer and many chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increased amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The potential cellular and tissue damage created by ROS has significant impact on many disease and cancer states and natural therapeutics are becoming essential in regulating altered redox states. We have shown recently that iron content is a critical determinant in the antitumour activity of bovine milk lactoferrin (bLF). We found that 100% iron-saturated bLF (Fe-bLF) acts as a potent natural adjuvant and fortifying agent for augmenting cancer chemotherapy and thus has a broad utility in the treatment of cancer. Furthermore, we also studied the effects of iron saturated bLF's ability as an antioxidant in the human epithelial colon cancer cell line HT29, giving insights into the potential of bLF in its different states. Thus, metal saturated bLF could be implemented as anti-cancer neutraceutical. In this regard, we have recently been able to prepare a selenium (Se) saturated form of bLF, being up to 98% saturated. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine how oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) alters antioxidant enzyme activity within HT29 epithelial colon cancer cells, and observe changes in this activity by treatments with different antioxidants ascorbic acid (AA), Apo (iron free)-bLF and selenium (Se)-bLF. The states of all antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione- s-transferase (GsT), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) demonstrated high levels within untreated HT29 cells compared to the majority of other treatments being used, even prior to H2O2 exposure. All enzymes showed significant alterations in activity when cells were treated with antioxidants AA, Apo-bLF or Se-bLF, with and/or without H2O2 exposure. Obvious indications that the Se content of the bLF potentially interacted with the glutathione (GSH)/GPx/GR/GsT associated redox system could be

  6. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    Jennifer M. Bratt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia.

  7. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha; Rabowsky, Michelle F.; Last, Michael S.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia. PMID:20953358

  8. ARGINASE ENZYMES IN ISOLATED AIRWAYS FROM NORMAL AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE 2-KNOCKOUT MICE EXPOSED TO OVALBUMIN

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Jerold A.

    2009-01-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses---inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration--were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the NOS2

  9. Methyl jasmonate counteracts boron toxicity by preventing oxidative stress and regulating antioxidant enzyme activities and artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L.

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M Masroor A; Idrees, Mohd; Naeem, M; Moinuddin; Hashmi, Nadeem

    2011-07-01

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient, but it is phytotoxic if present in excessive amounts in soil for certain plants such as Artemisia annua L. that contains artemisinin (an important antimalarial drug) in its areal parts. Artemisinin is a sesquiterpene lactone with an endoperoxide bridge. It is quite expensive compound because the only commercial source available is A. annua and the compound present in the plant is in very low concentration. Since A. annua is a major source of the antimalarial drug and B stress is a deadly threat to its cultivation, the present research was conducted to determine whether the exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) could combat the ill effects of excessive B present in the soil. According to the results obtained, the B toxicity induced oxidative stress and reduced the stem height as well as fresh and dry masses of the plant remarkably. The excessive amounts of soil B also lowered the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO(2) concentration and total chlorophyll content in the leaves. In contrast, the foliar application of MeJA enhanced the growth and photosynthetic efficiency both in the stressed and non-stressed plants. The excessive B levels also increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Endogenous H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) levels were also high in the stressed plants. However, the MeJA application to the stressed plants reduced the amount of lipid peroxidation and stimulated the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, enhancing the content and yield of artemisinin as well. Thus, it was concluded that MeJA might be utilized in mitigating the B toxicity and improving the content and yield of artemisinin in A. annua plant.

  10. Isolated and mixed effects of diuron and its metabolites on biotransformation enzymes and oxidative stress response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Felício, Andréia Arantes; Freitas, Juliane Silberschmidt; Scarin, Jéssica Bolpeti; de Souza Ondei, Luciana; Teresa, Fabrício Barreto; Schlenk, Daniel; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2018-03-01

    Diuron is one of the most used herbicide in the world, and its field application has been particularly increased in Brazil due to the expansion of sugarcane crops. Diuron has often been detected in freshwater ecosystems and it can be biodegraded into three main metabolites in the environment, the 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA), 3,4-dichlorophenylurea (DCPU) and 3,4-dichlorophenyl-N-methylurea (DCPMU). Negative effects under aquatic biota are still not well established for diuron, especially when considering its presence in mixture with its different metabolites. In this study, we evaluated the effects of diuron alone or in combination with its metabolites, DCPMU, DCPU and 3,4-DCA on biochemical stress responses and biotransformation activity of the fish Oreochromis niloticus. Results showed that diuron and its metabolites caused significant but dispersed alterations in oxidative stress markers and biotransformation enzymes, except for ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, that presented a dose-dependent increase after exposure to either diuron or its metabolites. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was significant lower in gills after exposure to diuron metabolites, but not diuron. Diuron, DCPMU and DCA also decreased the multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) activity. Lipid peroxidation levels were increased in gill after exposure to all compounds, indicating that the original compound and diuron metabolites can induce oxidative stress in fish. The integration of all biochemical responses by the Integrated Biomarker Response (IBR) model indicated that all compounds caused significant alterations in O. niloticus, but DCPMU caused the higher alterations in both liver and gill. Our findings imply that diuron and its metabolites may impair the physiological response related to biotransformation and antioxidant activity in fish at field concentrations. Such alterations could interfere with the ability of aquatic animals to adapt to environments contaminated by

  11. Pharmacological hypothesis: Nitric oxide-induced inhibition of ADAM-17 activity as well as vesicle release can in turn prevent the production of soluble endothelin-converting enzyme.

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Parkington, Helena C; Smith, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) are two highly potent vasoactive molecules with opposing effects on the vasculature. Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) catalyse the production of ET-1 and NO, respectively. It is well established that these molecules play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases and have therefore become targets of therapy. Many studies have examined the mechanism(s) by which NO regulates ET-1 production. Expression and localization of ECE-1 is a key factor that determines the rate of ET-1 production. ECE-1 can either be membrane bound or be released from the cell surface to produce a soluble form. NO has been shown to reduce the expression of both membrane-bound and soluble ECE-1. Several studies have examined the mechanism(s) behind NO-mediated inhibition of ECE expression on the cell membrane. However, the precise mechanism(s) behind NO-mediated inhibition of soluble ECE production are unknown. We hypothesize that both exogenous and endogenous NO, inhibits the production of soluble ECE-1 by preventing its release via extracellular vesicles (e.g., exosomes), and/or by inhibiting the activity of A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease-17 (ADAM17). If this hypothesis is proven correct in future studies, these pathways represent targets for the therapeutic manipulation of soluble ECE-1 production. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. The effect of dietary Chlorella vulgaris inclusion on goat's milk chemical composition, fatty acids profile and enzymes activities related to oxidation.

    Tsiplakou, E; Abdullah, M A M; Mavrommatis, A; Chatzikonstantinou, M; Skliros, D; Sotirakoglou, K; Flemetakis, E; Labrou, N E; Zervas, G

    2018-02-01

    The impact of dietary supplementation with microalgae on goat's milk chemical composition, fatty acids (FA) profile and enzymes activities related to antioxidant mechanism has not been well documented. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary inclusion of Chlorella vulgaris on the following: (i) milk yield, chemical composition and FA profile, (ii) the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in blood plasma and (iii) the activities of SOD, GR and lactoperoxidase (LPO) in milk of goats. Furthermore, the oxidative stress indicators for measuring total antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity [ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assays] and oxidative stress biomarkers [malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls (PC)] were also determined in blood plasma and milk of the animals. For this purpose, 16 cross-bred goats were divided into two homogenous groups. Each goat of both groups was fed individually with alfalfa hay and concentrates separately. The concentrates of the control group (Control) had no microalgae, while those of the Chlorella group were supplemented with 10 g lyophilized Chlorella vulgaris/kg concentrates (Chlorella). Thus, the average intake was 5.15 g Chlorella vulgaris/kg DM. The results showed that the dietary inclusion of Chlorella vulgaris had not noticeable impact on goat's milk yield, chemical composition and FA profile. Significantly higher SOD (by 10.31%) and CAT (by 18.66%) activities in the blood plasma of goats fed with Chlorella vulgaris compared with the control were found. Moreover, the dietary supplementation with Chlorella vulgaris caused a significant increase in SOD (by 68.84%) activity and a reduction in PC (by 24.07%) content in goat's milk. In conclusion, the Chlorella vulgaris inclusion in goat's diets improved the

  13. Anti-oxidative stress regulator NF-E2-related factor 2 mediates the adaptive induction of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes by lipid peroxidation metabolite 4-hydroxynonenal

    Huang Ying

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2 regulates a battery of antioxidative and phase II drug metabolizing/detoxifying genes through binding to the antioxidant response elements (ARE. NRF2-ARE signaling plays a central role in protecting cells from a wide spectrum of reactive toxic species including reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS. 4-hydroxylnonenal (4-HNE is a major end product from lipid peroxidation of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA induced by oxidative stress, and it is highly reactive to nucleophilic sites in DNA and proteins, causing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. In this study, we examined the role of NRF2 in regulating the 4-HNE induced gene expression of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Results When HeLa cells were treated with 4-HNE, NRF2 rapidly transloated into the nucleus, as determined by the distribution of NRF2 tagged with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and increased NRF2 protein in the nuclear fraction. Transcriptional activity of ARE-luciferase was significantly induced by 0.01-10 μM of 4-HNE in a dose-dependent manner, and the induction could be blocked by pretreatment with glutathione (GSH. 4-HNE induced transcriptional expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST A4, aldoketone reductase (AKR 1C1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and the induction was attenuated by knocking down NRF2 using small interfering RNA. Conclusions NRF2 is critical in mediating 4-HNE induced expression of antioxidant and detoxifying genes. This may account for one of the major cellular defense mechanisms against reactive metabolites of lipids peroxidation induced by oxidative stress and protect cells from cytotoxicity.

  14. Quercetin treatment regulates the Na+,K+-ATPase activity, peripheral cholinergic enzymes, and oxidative stress in a rat model of demyelination.

    Carvalho, Fabiano B; Gutierres, Jessié M; Beckmann, Diego; Santos, Rosmarini P; Thomé, Gustavo R; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Stefanello, Naiara; Andrades, Amanda; Aiello, Graciane; Ripplinger, Angel; Lucio, Bruna M; Ineu, Rafael; Mazzanti, Alexandre; Morsch, Vera; Schetinger, Maria Rosa; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2018-07-01

    Quercetin is reported to exert a plethora of health benefits through many different mechanisms of action. This versatility and presence in the human diet has attracted the attention of the scientific community, resulting in a huge output of in vitro and in vivo (preclinical) studies. Therefore, we hypothesized that quercetin can protect Na + ,K + -ATPase activity in the central nervous system, reestablish the peripheral cholinesterases activities, and reduce oxidative stress during demyelination events in rats. In line with this expectation, our study aims to find out how quercetin acts on the Na + ,K + -ATPase activity in the central nervous system, peripheral cholinesterases, and stress oxidative markers in an experimental model of demyelinating disease. Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: vehicle, quercetin, ethidium bromide (EB), and EB plus quercetin groups. The animals were treated once a day with vehicle (ethanol 20%) or quercetin 50 mg/kg for 7 (demyelination phase, by gavage) or 21 days (remyelination phase) after EB (0.1%, 10 μL) injection (intrapontine).The encephalon was removed, and the pons, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were dissected to verify the Na + ,K + -ATPase activity. Our results showed that quercetin protected against reduction in Na + ,K + -ATPase in the pons and cerebellum in the demyelination phase, and it increased the activity of this enzyme in the remyelination phase. During the demyelination, quercetin promoted the increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in whole blood and lymphocytes induced by EB, and it reduced the increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in lymphocytes in the remyelination phase. On day 7, EB increased the superoxide dismutase and decreased catalase activities, as well as increased the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels. Taken together, these results indicated that quercetin regulates the Na + ,K + -ATPase activity, affects the alterations of redox state

  15. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  16. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  17. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and V˙O2 kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Thomassen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    perturbation during INT. Pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (V˙O2-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min(-1) kg(-1)) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ~65% V˙O2-max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ~85% V˙O2-max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50...... DW(-1) min(-1)) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. V˙O2 kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ...... of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change V˙O2 kinetics....

  18. Oral administration of Nigella sativa oil ameliorates the effect of cisplatin on membrane enzymes, carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative damage in rat liver

    Zeba Farooqui

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CP is a potent anti-cancer drug widely used against solid tumors. However, it exhibits pronounced adverse effects including hepatotoxicity. Several strategies were attempted to prevent CP hepatotoxicity but were not found suitable for therapeutic application. Nigella sativa has been shown to prevent/reduce the progression of certain type of cardiovascular, kidney and liver diseases. Present study investigates whether N. sativa oil (NSO can prevent CP induced hepatotoxic effects. Rats were divided into four groups viz. control, CP, NSO and CPNSO. Animals in CPNSO and NSO group were administered NSO (2 ml/kg bwt, orally with or without single hepatotoxic dose of CP (6 mg/kg bwt, i.p. respectively. CP hepatotoxicity was recorded by increased serum ALT and AST activities. CP treatment caused oxidant/antioxidant imbalances as reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Furthermore, the activities of various carbohydrate metabolism and membrane enzymes were altered by CP treatment. In contrast, NSO administration to CP treated rats, markedly ameliorated the CP elicited deleterious alterations in liver. Histopathological observations showed extensive liver damage in CP treated animals while greatly reduced tissue injury in CPNSO group. In conclusion, NSO appears to protect CP induced hepatotoxicity by improving energy metabolism and strengthening antioxidant defense mechanism. Keywords: Cisplatin, Nigella sativa oil, Carbohydrate metabolism, Antioxidant

  19. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  20. Enzyme Informatics

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  1. Carbon monoxide inhibits omega-oxidation of leukotriene B4 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: evidence that catabolism of leukotriene B4 is mediated by a cytochrome P-450 enzyme.

    Shak, S; Goldstein, I M

    1984-09-17

    Carbon monoxide significantly inhibits omega-oxidation of exogenous leukotriene B4 to 20-OH-leukotriene B4 and 20-COOH-leukotriene B4 by unstimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes as well as omega-oxidation of leukotriene B4 that is generated when cells are stimulated with the calcium ionophore, A23187. Inhibition of omega-oxidation by carbon monoxide is concentration-dependent, completely reversible, and specific. Carbon monoxide does not affect synthesis of leukotriene B4 by stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes or other cell functions (i.e., degranulation, superoxide anion generation). These findings suggest that a cytochrome P-450 enzyme in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes is responsible for catabolizing leukotriene B4 by omega-oxidation.

  2. Protective effects of a wheat germ rich diet against the toxic influence of profenofos on rat tissue lipids and oxidative pentose phosphate shunt enzymes

    Abdel-Rahim, G. A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of technical and formulated forms of profenofos on the metabolic lipid fractions of the liver, brain and kidneys as well as the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD, which consider lipid related enzymes, were studied. The two forms of profenofos were given separately either orally or by dermal at doses of 1/20 LD50 for 3 months (one dose every 48 h. Total lipids and lipid fractions (cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipid contents decreased in the three studied organ tissues either in technical or formulated profenofos-induced rats compared with normal control animals. The highest effect was observed in the case of orally formulated profenofo induction, and the lowest was detected for the dermal technical one. The same trend was found in the activities of G6PD and 6PGD associated with lipid metabolism in the liver, brain and kidney tissues under the same conditions. On other hand, the treatment of profenofos-induced animals by feeding a wheat germ rich diet (as antioxidant agent produced significant improvements in both lipid fraction content and enzyme activity. In addition, the effects of the wheat germ rich diet (α-tocopherol rich source readjusted and improved the disturbed metabolic fractions of the lipid profiles in the profenofos-induced rats as well as their related enzyme activities (G6PD and 6PGD: oxidative pentose phosphate shunt.

    El efecto de formas técnicas o formuladas de profenofós en la fracción lipídica metabólica de hígado, cerebro y riñones así como la actividad de la glucosa-6-fosfato deshidrogenasa (G6PD y 6-fosfogluconato deshidrogenasa (6PGD, que son consideradas enzimas relacionadas con los lípidos, fueron estudiadas. Ambas formas de profenofós fueron suministradas separadamente tanto por vía oral como cutánea a una dosis de 1/20 LD50 durante 3 meses (una dosis cada 48 horas. Los lípidos totales y

  3. Label-free and enzyme-free detection of transcription factors with graphene oxide fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe.

    Zhu, Desong; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of a variety of essential cellular processes and some of them have been recognized as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets of some diseases. Sensitive and accurate detection of TFs is of great importance to better understanding their roles in gene regulation and evaluation of disease state. Here, we developed a simple, label-free and enzyme-free new fluorescent strategy for the detection of TFs by graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe (MGHP). The MGHP possessed of three functions simultaneously, adsorbing onto GO with the loop part, binding to target with the stem part and serving as signal carrier with the terminal G-quadruplex. First, the MGHP was adsorbed quickly to GO. Next, the TF bound to the stem part of MGHP to form a huge target-MGHP complex, which led to desorption of the complex from GO. Finally, NMM was inserted into G-quadruplex in the complex to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. The GO used here, as a fluorescence switch, could quickly and efficiently quench the fluorescence of NMM inserted into the MGHP absorbed on the GO, guaranteeing a high signal-to-noise ratio. Sensitive detection of purified NF-κB p50 and HeLa cell nuclear extracts were achieved with detection limits of 0.2nM and 7.8ng/µL, respectively. Moreover, this proposed strategy could be used to screen inhibitors of NF-κB p50 activity. The strategy proposed here might offer a new potential approach for reliable quantification of TFs in clinical diagnostics and treatment research of some diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In silico molecular docking studies of new potential 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones on selected Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania enzyme targets.

    Romero, Angel H; López, Simón E

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a series of 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones under its E-configuration have exhibited excellent in vitro antichagasic and antileishmanial profiles. Preliminary assays on both parasites suggested that the most active derivatives act through oxidative and nitrosative stress mechanisms; however, their exact mode of actions as anti-trypanosomal and anti-leishmanial agents have not been completely elucidated. This motivated to perform a molecular docking study on essential trypanosomatid enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), trypanothione reductase (TryR), cysteine-protease (CP) and pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1). In addition, to understand the experimental results of nitric oxide production obtained for infected macrophages with Leishmania parasite, a molecular docking was evaluated on nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme of Rattus norvegicus. Both diastereomers (E and Z) of the 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones were docked on the mentioned targets. In general, molecular docking on T. cruzi enzymes revealed that the E-diastereomers exhibited lower binding energies than Z-diastereomers on the Fe-SOD and CP enzymes, while Z-diastereomers showed lower docking energies than E-isomers on TryR enzyme. For the Leishmania docking studies, the Z-isomers exhibited the best binding affinities on the PTR1 and iNOS enzymes, while the TryR enzyme showed a minor dependence with the stereoselectivity of the tested phthalazines. However, either the structural information of the ligand-enzyme complexes or the experimental data suggest that the significant antitrypanosomatid activity of the most active derivatives is not associated to the inhibition of the SOD, CP and PTR1 enzymes, while the TryR inhibition and nitric oxide generation in host cells emerge as interesting antitrypanosomatid therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  6. Structure elucidation of secondary natural products

    Seger, C.

    2001-06-01

    The presented thesis deals with the structure elucidation of secondary natural products. Most of the compounds under investigation were terpenes, especially triterpenes, alkaloids and stilbenoids. Besides characterizing a multitude of already known and also new compounds, it was possible to detect and correct wrongly assigned literature data. The methodological aspect of this thesis lies - beside in the utilization of modern 2D NMR spectroscopy - in the evaluation of computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE) techniques in the course of spectroscopy supported structure elucidation processes. (author)

  7. Roles of Human CYP2A6 and Monkey CYP2A24 and 2A26 Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in the Oxidation of 2,5,2',5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl.

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Takenaka, Shigeo; Koga, Nobuyuki; Uehara, Shotaro; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kim, Donghak; Guengerich, F Peter; Komori, Masayuki

    2016-12-01

    2,5,2',5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) induced type I binding spectra with cytochrome P450 (P450) 2A6 and 2A13, with K s values of 9.4 and 0.51 µM, respectively. However, CYP2A6 oxidized 2,5,2',5'-TCB to form 4-hydroxylated products at a much higher rate (∼1.0 minute -1 ) than CYP2A13 (∼0.02 minute -1 ) based on analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5,2',5'-TCB by CYP2A6 was greater than that of 3-hydroxy-2,5,2',5'-TCB and three other hydroxylated products. Several human P450 enzymes, including CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B6, 2D6, 2E1, 2C9, and 3A4, did not show any detectable activities in oxidizing 2,5,2',5'-TCB. Cynomolgus monkey CYP2A24, which shows 95% amino acid identity to human CYP2A6, catalyzed 4-hydroxylation of 2,5,2',5'-TCB at a higher rate (∼0.3 minute -1 ) than CYP2A26 (93% identity to CYP2A6, ∼0.13 minute -1 ) and CYP2A23 (94% identity to CYP2A13, ∼0.008 minute -1 ). None of these human and monkey CYP2A enzymes were catalytically active in oxidizing other TCB congeners, such as 2,4,3',4'-, 3,4,3',4'-, and 3,5,3',5'-TCB. Molecular docking analysis suggested that there are different orientations of interaction of 2,5,2',5'-TCB with the active sites (over the heme) of human and monkey CYP2A enzymes, and that ligand interaction energies (U values) of bound protein-ligand complexes show structural relationships of interaction of TCBs and other ligands with active sites of CYP2A enzymes. Catalytic differences in human and monkey CYP2A enzymes in the oxidation of 2,5,2',5'-TCB are suggested to be due to amino acid changes at substrate recognition sites, i.e., V110L, I209S, I300F, V365M, S369G, and R372H, based on the comparison of primary sequences. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. Salicylic-Acid-Induced Chilling- and Oxidative-Stress Tolerance in Relation to Gibberellin Homeostasis, C-Repeat/Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding Factor Pathway, and Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in Cold-Stored Tomato Fruit.

    Ding, Yang; Zhao, Jinhong; Nie, Ying; Fan, Bei; Wu, Shujuan; Zhang, Yu; Sheng, Jiping; Shen, Lin; Zhao, Ruirui; Tang, Xuanming

    2016-11-02

    Effects of salicylic acid (SA) on gibberellin (GA) homeostasis, C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor (CBF) pathway, and antioxidant enzyme systems linked to chilling- and oxidative-stress tolerance in tomato fruit were investigated. Mature green tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Moneymaker) were treated with 0, 0.5, and 1 mM SA solution for 15 min before storage at 4 °C for 28 days. In comparison to 0 or 0.5 mM SA, 1 mM SA significantly decreased the chilling injury (CI) index in tomato fruit. In the SA-treated fruit, the upregulation of GA biosynthetic gene (GA3ox1) expression was followed by gibberellic acid (GA 3 ) surge and DELLA protein degradation. CBF1 participated in the SA-modulated tolerance and stimulated the expression of GA catabolic gene (GA2ox1). Furthermore, 1 mM SA enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes and, thus, reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation. Our findings suggest that SA might protect tomato fruit from CI and oxidative damage through regulating GA metabolism, CBF1 gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activities.

  9. In vivo gene expression profiling of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana elucidates its infection stratagems in Anopheles mosquito.

    Lai, Yiling; Chen, Huan; Wei, Ge; Wang, Guandong; Li, Fang; Wang, Sibao

    2017-08-01

    The use of entomopathogenic fungi to control mosquitoes is a promising tool for reducing vector-borne disease transmission. To better understand infection stratagems of insect pathogenic fungi, we analyzed the global gene expression profiling of Beauveria bassiana at 36, 60, 84 and 108 h after topical infection of Anopheles stephensi adult mosquitoes using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). A total of 5,354 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are identified over the course of fungal infection. When the fungus grows on the mosquito cuticle, up-regulated DEGs include adhesion-related genes involved in cuticle attachment, Pth11-like GPCRs hypothesized to be involved in host recognition, and extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation and penetration of the mosquito cuticle. Once in the mosquito hemocoel, the fungus evades mosquito immune system probably through up-regulating expression of β-1,3-glucan degrading enzymes and chitin synthesis enzymes for remodeling of cell walls. Moreover, six previous unknown SSCP (small secreted cysteine-rich proteins) are significantly up-regulated, which may serve as "effectors" to suppress host defense responses. B. bassiana also induces large amounts of antioxidant genes to mitigate host-generated exogenous oxidative stress. At late stage of infection, B. bassiana activates a broad spectrum of genes including nutrient degrading enzymes, some transporters and metabolism pathway components, to exploit mosquito tissues and hemolymph as a nutrient source for hyphal growth. These findings establish an important framework of knowledge for further comprehensive elucidation of fungal pathogenesis and molecular mechanism of Beauveria-mosquito interactions.

  10. Metabolomic elucidation of pork from different crossbreds

    Bertram, Hanne Christine S.; Straadt, Ida Krestine; Clausen, Morten Rahr

    , and correlations between individual metabolites and sensory attributes were elucidated. A high content of carnosine in the meat was associated with a low value of many sensory attributes related to meat flavor/taste. Surprsingly, IMP and inosine were in general not correlated with sensory attributes related...... to meat flavor/taste. Water-holding capacity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of the meat were determined to elucidate the correlations between individual metabolites and these two parameters that are of importance for the technological meat quality. In conclusion, the present study reveals...

  11. Does Pictorial Elucidation Foster Recollection of Idioms?

    Boers, Frank; Piquer Piriz, Ana Maria; Stengers, Helene; Eyckmans, June

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that pictorial elucidation helps learners comprehend and remember the meaning of second language (L2) idioms. In this article we address the question whether it also helps retention of the form of idioms, i.e. their precise lexical composition. In a small-scale experiment, the meaning of English idioms was clarified…

  12. Synthesis and NMR Elucidation of Novel Pentacycloundecane ...

    Herein we report the synthesis and NMR elucidation of five novel pentacycloundecane (PCU)-derived short peptides as potential HIV protease inhibitors. 1H and 13C spectral analysis show major overlapping of methine resonance of the PCU 'cage' thereby making it extremely difficult to assign the NMR signals. Attachment ...

  13. Synthesis and NMR elucidation of novel pentacycloundecane ...

    NICO

    SYNTHESIS AND NMR ELUCIDATION OF NOVEL. PENTACYCLOUNDECANE DERIVED PEPTIDES. Rajshekhar Karpoormath, a. Oluseye K. Onajole, a. Thavendran Govender, b. Glenn E. M. Maguire, a and Hendrik G. Kruger a* a. School of Chemistry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4001, South Africa b. School of ...

  14. Biosynthesis and maturation of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes in fibroblasts in relation to the Zellweger syndrome and infantile Refsum disease

    Schram, A. W.; Strijland, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Wanders, R. J.; Schutgens, R. B.; van den Bosch, H.; Tager, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the peroxisomal enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase (acetyl-CoA acyl-transferase, EC 2.3.1.16), and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was studied in cultured skin fibroblasts from a control subject and from patients with Zellweger syndrome and the infantile form of Refsum

  15. Mn K-edge XANES spectroscopy of photosynthetic water oxidation enzyme in the S0-, S1-, S2- and S3-states induced by flash excitation

    Ono, Taka-aki; Noguchi, Takumi; Inoue, Yorinao; Kusunoki, Masami; Matsushita, Tadashi; Oyanagi, Hiroyuki.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic and structural rearrangement of the Mn-cluster during the four step oxidation of water in photosynthetic oxygen evolution was studied by XANES spectroscopy. The Mn K-edge energy of the spectrum was changed with flash number to show a clear quadruple oscillation, indicating a periodic change in oxidation and electronic state of the Mn-cluster depending on Joliot and Kok's oxygen clock. (author)

  16. Rational and combinatorial engineering of the glucan synthesizing enzyme amylosucrase

    Albenne, C.; Van Der Veen, B.A.; Potocki-Véronèse, G.

    2003-01-01

    Rational engineering of amylosucrase required detailed investigations of the molecular basis of catalysis. Biochemical characterization of the enzyme coupled to structural analyses enabled the polymerization mechanism to be elucidated. This provided key information for successfully changing amylo...

  17. Active peptides from skate (Okamejei kenojei) skin gelatin diminish angiotensin-I converting enzyme activity and intracellular free radical-mediated oxidation.

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Ryu, BoMi; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-15

    Skin gelatin of skate (Okamejei kenojei) was hydrolyzed using Alcalase, flavourzyme, Neutrase and protamex. It was found that the Alcalase hydrolysate exhibited the highest angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Then, Alcalase hydrolysate was further hydrolyzed with protease and separated by an ultrafiltration membrane system. Finally, two peptides responsible for ACE inhibitory activity were identified to be MVGSAPGVL (829Da) and LGPLGHQ (720Da), with IC50 values of 3.09 and 4.22μM, respectively. Moreover, the free radical-scavenging activity of the purified peptides was determined in human endothelial cells. In addition, the antioxidative mechanism of the purified peptides was evaluated by protein and gene expression levels of antioxidant enzymes. The current study demonstrated that the peptides derived from skate skin gelatin could be used in the food industry as functional ingredients with potent antihypertensive and antioxidant benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using Genomics for Natural Product Structure Elucidation.

    Tietz, Jonathan I; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are the most historically bountiful source of chemical matter for drug development-especially for anti-infectives. With insights gleaned from genome mining, interest in natural product discovery has been reinvigorated. An essential stage in NP discovery is structural elucidation, which sheds light not only on the chemical composition of a molecule but also its novelty, properties, and derivatization potential. The history of structure elucidation is replete with techniquebased revolutions: combustion analysis, crystallography, UV, IR, MS, and NMR have each provided game-changing advances; the latest such advance is genomics. All natural products have a genetic basis, and the ability to obtain and interpret genomic information for structure elucidation is increasingly available at low cost to non-specialists. In this review, we describe the value of genomics as a structural elucidation technique, especially from the perspective of the natural product chemist approaching an unknown metabolite. Herein we first introduce the databases and programs of interest to the natural products chemist, with an emphasis on those currently most suited for general usability. We describe strategies for linking observed natural product-linked phenotypes to their corresponding gene clusters. We then discuss techniques for extracting structural information from genes, illustrated with numerous case examples. We also provide an analysis of the biases and limitations of the field with recommendations for future development. Our overview is not only aimed at biologically-oriented researchers already at ease with bioinformatic techniques, but also, in particular, at natural product, organic, and/or medicinal chemists not previously familiar with genomic techniques.

  19. The influence of cigarette smoking on blood and salivary super oxide dismutase enzyme levels among smokers and nonsmokers—A cross sectional study

    Haziel Diana Jenifer

    2015-04-01

    Systemic and local antioxidant status is affected by periodontal disease and by the impact of smoking. The increased blood and salivary superoxide dismutase enzyme levels in smokers may be an adaptive defense mechanism to counteract the increased reactive oxygen species production induced by smoking. This study emphasizes the importance of saliva as an easy noninvasive tool in diagnosing patients who are more prone to precancerous lesions and conditions, and its importance in patient education and motivation programs for smoking cessation.

  20. Study of the Chemistry of Coordination of Oxide-anions of Nitrogen with Species of Iron and Copper as Models of Enzymes of the Cycle of the Nitrogen

    Quesada Espinoza, F

    2001-01-01

    In the present work, a study is carried out about the reactivity of some nitrogen oxide-anions, like nitrite (NO 2 - ) and trioxide-dinitrate (N 2 O 3 2- ), besides nitric oxide (NO), with copper species, iron, and cobalt in their states of oxidation II, in presence of the binding spectator bispicen. The synthesis and characterization of the [Cu(bispicen)NO 2 ]BF 4 was obtained, which can help to consolidate some mechanisms, proposed for the action of the nitrite reductase. The Fe(bispicen)(NO 2 ) 2 was also characterized; this is the fourth compound that presents two nitrites coordinated to an iron (II) through nitrogen. It has the characteristic of possessing short connection distances, which gives it a special attractiveness, and it opens the possibility of studying a spin exchange [es

  1. Alleviating exercise-induced muscular stress using neat and processed bee pollen: oxidative markers, mitochondrial enzymes, and myostatin expression in rats

    Sameer Ketkar

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The study establishes the antioxidant, mitochondrial upregulatory, and myostatin inhibitory effects of both MIMBP and PMIMBP in exercise-induced oxidative stress conditions, suggesting their usefulness in effective management of exercise-induced muscular stress. Further, processing of MIMBP with an edible lipid-surfactant mixture was found to improve the therapeutic efficiency of pollen.

  2. Investigation of the induction of oxidative DNA damage by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for thymine glycol containing DNA

    Pohlenz-Michel, C.

    1988-01-01

    The report explains an ELISA test system for the detection and quantification of toxic effects on genes, induced by mutagenic or carcinogenic chemicals introduced by way of reactive oxygen species. Sensitivity and reproducibility are defined, and the system's applicability to the detection of oxidative DNA damage as a result of the metabolism of chemicals in cellular systems is discussed. (TRV) [de

  3. Effect of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) intake on urinary apigenin excretion, blood antioxidant enzymes and biomarkers for oxidative stress in human subjects

    Nielsen, S. E.; Young, J.F.; Daneshvar, B.

    1999-01-01

    with parsley (P catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) activities did not change. No significant changes were observed in plasma protein 2-adipic semialdehyde residues, a biomarker of plasma protein oxidation...

  4. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-08

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Spectroscopic databases - A tool for structure elucidation

    Luksch, P [Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe, Gesellschaft fuer Wissenschaftlich-Technische Information mbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    1990-05-01

    Spectroscopic databases have developed to useful tools in the process of structure elucidation. Besides the conventional library searches, new intelligent programs have been added, that are able to predict structural features from measured spectra or to simulate for a given structure. The example of the C13NMR/IR database developed at BASF and available on STN is used to illustrate the present capabilities of online database. New developments in the field of spectrum simulation and methods for the prediction of complete structures from spectroscopic information are reviewed. (author). 10 refs, 5 figs.

  6. Effect of curcumin and curcumin copper complex (1:1) on radiation-induced changes of anti-oxidant enzymes levels in the livers of Swiss albino mice

    Koiram, P R; Veerapur, V P; Mazhuvancherry, U K [Manipal Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal (India); Kunwar, A; Mishra, B; Barik, A; Priyadarsini, I K [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India)

    2007-05-15

    The effect of mononuclear copper (II) complex of curcumin in 1:1 stoichiometry (hereafter referred to as complex) administered 30 mim before {gamma}-irradiation (4.5 Gy) on alterations in antioxidant and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in livers was studied in comparison to curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The different antioxidants like glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, superoxide dismuatase (SOD), TBARS and total thiols were estimated in the liver homogenates excised at different time intervals (1, 2 and 4 h) post irradiation using colorimetric methods. There was a radiation-induced decrease in the levels of all the studied enzymes at 1 h post irradiation, while an increase was observed at later time points. Both curcumin and complex treatment in sham-irradiated mice decreased the levels of GSH and total thiols, whereas there was an increase in the levels of catalase, GST and SOD compared to normal control. Under the influence of irradiation, both curcumin and complex treatment protected the decline in the levels of GSH, GST, SOD, catalase and total thiols, and inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation. Further, the complex was found to be more effective in protecting the enzymes at 1 h post irradiation compared to curcumin treated group. This may be due to the higher rate constants of the complex compared to curcumin for their reactions with various free radicals. (author)

  7. Effect of curcumin and curcumin copper complex (1:1) on radiation-induced changes of anti-oxidant enzymes levels in the livers of Swiss albino mice

    Koiram, P.R.; Veerapur, V.P.; Mazhuvancherry, U.K.; Kunwar, A.; Mishra, B.; Barik, A.; Priyadarsini, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of mononuclear copper (II) complex of curcumin in 1:1 stoichiometry (hereafter referred to as complex) administered 30 mim before γ-irradiation (4.5 Gy) on alterations in antioxidant and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in livers was studied in comparison to curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The different antioxidants like glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, superoxide dismuatase (SOD), TBARS and total thiols were estimated in the liver homogenates excised at different time intervals (1, 2 and 4 h) post irradiation using colorimetric methods. There was a radiation-induced decrease in the levels of all the studied enzymes at 1 h post irradiation, while an increase was observed at later time points. Both curcumin and complex treatment in sham-irradiated mice decreased the levels of GSH and total thiols, whereas there was an increase in the levels of catalase, GST and SOD compared to normal control. Under the influence of irradiation, both curcumin and complex treatment protected the decline in the levels of GSH, GST, SOD, catalase and total thiols, and inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation. Further, the complex was found to be more effective in protecting the enzymes at 1 h post irradiation compared to curcumin treated group. This may be due to the higher rate constants of the complex compared to curcumin for their reactions with various free radicals. (author)

  8. Development of an enzyme free glucose sensor based on copper oxide-graphene composite by using green reducing agent ascorbic acid

    Palve, Yogesh Pandit; Jha, Neetu

    2018-05-01

    In this research work we have developed high sensitive and selective glucose sensor based on copper oxide-graphene composite which is prepared by green synthesis method and used for nonenzymatic glucose sensor. In present paper we report that present method highly selective, simple, efficient, accurate, ecofriendly, less toxic. The prepared composite were characterized by material characterization like SEM, XRD and also by electrochemical characterization like CV, chronoamperometry represents that copper oxide-graphene shows excellent electrocatalytic activity towards glucose, exhibiting a good sensitivity of 103.84 µA mM-1 cm-2, a fast response time 2s, a low detection limit 0.00033µM and linear range from 10 µM-3000 µM. The present sensor can successfully apply for determination of glucose concentration in human blood sample.

  9. Impact of application of zinc oxide nanoparticles on callus induction, plant regeneration, element content and antioxidant enzyme activity in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. under salt stress

    Alharby Hesham F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of nanomaterials and their potential applications have been given considerable attention by researchers in various fields, especially agricultural biotechnology. However, not much has been done to evaluate the role or effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP in regulating physiological and biochemical processes in response to salt-induced stress. For this purpose, some callus growth traits, plant regeneration rate, mineral element (sodium, potassium, phosphorous and nitrogen contents and changes in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX in tissues of five tomato cultivars were investigated in a callus culture exposed to elevated concentrations of salt (3.0 and 6.0 g L-1NaCl, and in the presence of zinc oxide nanoparticles (15 and 30 mg L-1. The relative callus growth rate was inhibited by 3.0 g L-1 NaCl; this was increased dramatically at 6.0 g L-1. Increasing exposure to NaCl was associated with a significantly higher sodium content and SOD and GPX activities. Zinc oxide nanoparticles mitigated the effects of NaCl, and in this application of lower concentrations (15 mg L-1 was more effective than a higher concentration (30 mg L-1. This finding indicates that zinc oxide nanoparticles should be investigated further as a potential anti-stress agent in crop production. Different tomato cultivars showed different degrees of tolerance to salinity in the presence of ZnO-NP. The cultivars Edkawy, followed by Sandpoint, were less affected by salt stress than the cultivar Anna Aasa.

  10. Elucidation of axonal transport by radioautography

    Droz, Bernard.

    1979-01-01

    Radioautography permits to distinguish various pathways within the axons: the axoplasm which includes soluble enzymes and constituents of the cytoskeleton moving with slow axoplasmic flow; the mitochondria which are conveyed as organelles; the smooth endoplasmic reticulum which ensures the fast axonal transport of membrane constituents delivered to axolemma, synaptic vesicles, presynaptic membranes or mitochondria. Furthermore radioautography makes it possible to visualize intercellular exchanges of molecules between axon and glia

  11. Inhibitory potentials of phenolic-rich extracts from Bridelia ferruginea on two key carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes and Fe2+-induced pancreatic oxidative stress.

    Afolabi, Olakunle Bamikole; Oloyede, Omotade Ibidun; Agunbiade, Shadrack Oludare

    2018-05-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the various antioxidant potentials and inhibitory effects of phenolic-rich leaf extracts of Bridelia ferruginea (BF) on the in vitro activities of some key enzymes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates. In this study, BF leaf free and bound phenolic-rich extracts were used. We quantified total phenolic and flavonoid contents, and evaluated several antioxidant activities using assays for ferric reducing antioxidant power, total antioxidant activity (phosphomolybdenum reducing ability), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Also, extracts were tested for their ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. The total phenolic and total flavonoid contents in the free phenolic extract of BF were significantly greater than in the bound phenolic extract. Also, all the antioxidant activities considered were significantly greater in the free phenolic extract than in the bound phenolic extract. In the same vein, the free phenolic-rich extract had a significantly higher percentage inhibition against α-glucosidase activity (IC 50  = 28.5 µg/mL) than the bound phenolic extract (IC 50  = 340.0 µg/mL). On the contrary, the free phenolic extract (IC 50  = 210.0 µg/mL) had significantly lower inhibition against α-amylase than the bound phenolic-rich extract (IC 50  = 190.0 µg/mL). The phenolic-rich extracts of BF leaves showed antioxidant potentials and inhibited two key carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes in vitro. Copyright © 2018 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  13. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources. PMID:28674011

  14. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  15. Effect of cadmium on phenolic compounds, antioxidant enzyme activity and oxidative stress in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) plantlets grown in vitro.

    Manquián-Cerda, K; Escudey, M; Zúñiga, G; Arancibia-Miranda, N; Molina, M; Cruces, E

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd(2+)) can affect plant growth due to its mobility and toxicity. We evaluated the effects of Cd(2+) on the production of phenolic compounds and antioxidant response of Vaccinium corymbosum L. Plantlets were exposed to Cd(2+) at 50 and 100µM for 7, 14 and 21 days. Accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the antioxidant enzyme SOD was determined. The profile of phenolic compounds was evaluated using LC-MS. The antioxidant activity was measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the ferric reducing antioxidant power test (FRAP). Cd(2+) increased the content of MDA, with the highest increase at 14 days. The presence of Cd(2+) resulted in changes in phenolic compounds. The main phenolic compound found in blueberry plantlets was chlorogenic acid, whose abundance increased with the addition of Cd(2+) to the medium. The changes in the composition of phenolic compounds showed a positive correlation with the antioxidant activity measured using FRAP. Our results suggest that blueberry plantlets produced phenolic compounds with reducing capacity as a selective mechanism triggered by the highest activity of Cd(2+). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of accelerated electrons and γ-quanta (60Co) on activity of oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes of rat brain

    Lyshov, V.F.; Vasin, M.V.; Chernov, Yu.N.

    1992-01-01

    In experiments with 112 male Wistar rats it was shown that accelerated electrons (85 Gy) caused a significant increase in activities of by 15.8 % and (LDG) by 17.0 %, and a decrease in activities of AP and MAO by 10.6 and 7.8 % respectively within the sensorimotor region of the cerebral cortex immediately after irradiation. Activity of SDG and MAO decreased (by 16.4 % and 7.8 % respectively) in the caudate nucleus over the same period of time. An increase in the accelerated electron dose from 85 to 500 Gy did not change the direction and the rate of the radiation response of the enzymes. Exposure of rats to 60 Co-γ-quanta (75 Gy) increased SDG and LDG activity (by 21.4 and 17.3 % respectively) within the sensorimotor cortex as late as 10 min after irradiation. A repeated significant increase in SDG and LDG activity was observed 2 hr after irradiation

  17. Effect of Allium flavum L. and Allium melanantherum Panč. Extracts on Oxidative DNA Damage and Antioxidative Enzymes Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase.

    Mitić-Ćulafić, Dragana; Nikolić, Biljana; Simin, Nataša; Jasnić, Nebojša; Četojević-Simin, Dragana; Krstić, Maja; Knežević-Vukčević, Jelena

    2016-03-01

    Allium flavum L. and Allium melanantherum Panč. are wild growing plants used in traditional diet in Balkan region. While chemical composition and some biological activities of A. flavum have been reported, A. melanantherum, as an endemic in the Balkan Peninsula, has never been comprehensively examined. After chemical characterization of A. melanantherum, we examined the protective effect of methanol extracts of both species against t-butyl hydro-peroxide (t-BOOH)-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis. The bacterial reverse mutation assay was performed on Escherichia coli WP2 oxyR strain. DNA damage was monitored in human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) with alkaline comet assay. Obtained results indicated that extracts reduced t-BOOH-induced DNA damage up to 70 and 72% for A. flavum and A. melanantherum extract, respectively, and showed no effect on t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis. Since the results indicated modulatory effect on cell-mediated antioxidative defense, the effect of extracts on total protein content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) amounts and activities were monitored. Both extracts increased total protein content, while the increase of enzyme amount and activity was obtained only with A. melanantherum extract and restricted to CAT. The activity of CuZnSOD family was not affected, while SOD1 and SOD2 amounts were significantly decreased, indicating potential involvement of extracellular CuZnSOD. Obtained results strongly support the traditional use of A. flavum and A. melanantherum in nutrition and recommend them for further study.

  18. Essential Oil from Clove Bud (Eugenia aromatica Kuntze) Inhibit Key Enzymes Relevant to the Management of Type-2 Diabetes and Some Pro-oxidant Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Rats Pancreas in vitro.

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Akinbola, Ifeoluwa A; Ademosun, Ayokunle O; Sanni, David M; Odubanjo, Oluwatoyin V; Olasehinde, Tosin A; Oyeleye, Sunday I

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of enzymes involved in the breakdown of carbohydrates is considered a therapeutic approach to the management of type-2 diabetes. This study sought to investigate the effects of essential oil from clove bud on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. Essential oil from clove bud was extracted by hydrodistillation, dried with anhydrous Na2SO4 and characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of the essential oil on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities were investigated. The antioxidant properties of the oil and the inhibition of Fe(2+) and sodium nitroprusside-induced malondialdehyde (MDA) production in rats pancreas homogenate were also carried out. The essential oil inhibited α-amylase (EC50=88.9 μl/L) and α-glucosidase (EC50=71.94 μl/L) activities in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the essential oil inhibited Fe(2+) and SNP-induced MDA production and exhibited antioxidant activities through their NO*, OH*, scavenging and Fe(2+)- chelating abilities. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the essential oil were 12.95 mg/g and 6.62 mg/g respectively. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of α-pinene, β-pinene, neral, geranial, gamma terpinene, cis-ocimene, allo ocimene, 1,8-cineole, linalool, borneol, myrcene and pinene-2-ol in significant amounts. Furthermore, the essential oils exhibited antioxidant activities as typified by hydroxyl (OH) and nitric oxide (NO)] radicals scavenging and Fe(2+)-chelating abilities. The inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities, inhibition of pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas and antioxidant activities could be possible mechanisms for the use of the essential oil in the management and prevention of oxidative stress induced type-2 diabetes.

  19. Study of the protective effect of ascorbic acid against the toxicity of stannous chloride on oxidative damage, antioxidant enzymes and biochemical parameters in rabbits.

    Yousef, M I; Awad, T I; Elhag, F A; Khaled, F A

    2007-06-25

    Stannous chloride (SnCl2) is a reducing chemical agent used in several man-made products. SnCl2 can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, the present study has been carried out to investigate the antioxidant action of l-ascorbic acid (AA) in minimizing SnCl2 toxicity on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme, and biochemical parameters in male New Zealand white rabbits. Animals were assigned to one of four treatment groups: 0mg AA and 0mg SnCl2/kg BW (control); 40 mg AA/kg BW; 20mg SnCl2/kg BW; 20mg SnCl2 plus 40 mg AA/kg BW. Rabbits were orally administered the respective doses every other day for 12 weeks. Results obtained showed that SnCl2 significantly (Pacid-reactive substances (TBARS; the marker of lipid peroxidation) in plasma, while the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the level of sulfhydryl groups (SH-group) were decreased (Pacid phosphatase (AcP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were decreased (Pcholesterol, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), glucose, urea and total bilirubin. On the other hand, the level of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL), total protein (TP), albumin (A) and globulin (G) were significantly (PAscorbic acid alone significantly decreased the levels of TBARS, lipids and urea, and increased the activities of GST, SOD and CAT, and the levels of SH-group and proteins. While the rest of the tested parameters were not affected. Also, the presence of AA with SnCl2 alleviated its harmful effects on most of the tested parameters. Therefore, the present results revealed that treatment with AA could minimize the toxic effects of stannous chloride.

  20. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  1. Elucidation of the mechanism for anomalous blueshift

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Koga, J.K.; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2004-01-01

    The anomalous blue shift of high intensity laser which was discovered by the present authors occurs in the process of gas ionization accompanied with the self-focusing. This shift does not depend either on the laser power or on the gas density and all photons are shifted by a certain frequency, while the one which has been known in common depends on both the intensity and density and only some part of the laser photons is shifted. In order to elucidate this phenomenon, the occurrence conditions of the anomalous blue shift were investigated and the results are compared with theory. The shifts were measured by focusing the laser beam in the gas-filled chamber with an off-axis-parabolic mirror and with a convex lens. When the reflective lens was used the amount of the shift depended significantly on the ionization rate of the plasma, while it depended on the pulse width when the transmission lens was used indicating that the shift is determined by the valence due to the ionization at the focusing point. (S. Funahashi)

  2. Biochemical research elucidating metabolic pathways in Pneumocystis*

    Kaneshiro E.S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing the Pneumocystis carinii genome have helped identify potential metabolic pathways operative in the organism. Also, data from characterizing the biochemical and physiological nature of these organisms now allow elucidation of metabolic pathways as well as pose new challenges and questions that require additional experiments. These experiments are being performed despite the difficulty in doing experiments directly on this pathogen that has yet to be subcultured indefinitely and produce mass numbers of cells in vitro. This article reviews biochemical approaches that have provided insights into several Pneumocystis metabolic pathways. It focuses on 1 S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet; SAM, which is a ubiquitous participant in numerous cellular reactions; 2 sterols: focusing on oxidosqualene cyclase that forms lanosterol in P. carinii; SAM:sterol C-24 methyltransferase that adds methyl groups at the C-24 position of the sterol side chain; and sterol 14α-demethylase that removes a methyl group at the C-14 position of the sterol nucleus; and 3 synthesis of ubiquinone homologs, which play a pivotal role in mitochondrial inner membrane and other cellular membrane electron transport.

  3. Interactive effects of aluminum and cadmium on phenolic compounds, antioxidant enzyme activity and oxidative stress in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) plantlets cultivated in vitro.

    Manquián-Cerda, K; Cruces, E; Escudey, M; Zúñiga, G; Calderón, R

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the potential role of phenolic compounds in Al and Cd stress tolerance mechanisms, Vaccinium corymbosum cv. Legacy plantlets were exposed to different metal concentrations. The present study used an in vitro plant model to test the effects of the following treatments: 100μM Al; 100μMAl + 50μMCd; and 100μMAl + 100μMCd during periods of 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The oxidative damage was determined by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The antioxidant activity values were determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazine (DPPH) and the ferric reducing antioxidant power test (FRAP). Additionally, the phenolic compound concentrations were determined using HPLC-DAD. The exposure to Al and Cd increased the MDA and H 2 O 2 contents differentially, while the antioxidant capacity values showed differences between DPPH and FRAP with the largest changes in FRAP relative to Cd. SOD had the highest activity in the first 7 days, leading to a significant increase in phenolic compounds observed after 14 days, and chlorogenic acid was the major compound identified. Our results revealed that phenolic compounds seem to play an important role in the response to ROS. Therefore, the mechanisms of tolerance to Al and Cd in V. corymbosum will be determined by the type of metal and time of exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Graphene Oxide Directed One-Step Synthesis of Flowerlike Graphene@HKUST-1 for Enzyme-Free Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide in Biological Samples.

    Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Yizhen; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Zhang, Yanhui; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-11-30

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF)-based electroactive nanocomposite containing graphene fragments and HKUST-1 was synthesized via a facile one-step solvothermal method using graphene oxide (GO), benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (BTC), and copper nitrate (Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ) as the raw materials. The morphology and structure characterization revealed that the GO could induce the transformation of HKUST-1 from octahedral structure to the hierarchical flower shape as an effective structure-directing agent. Also, it is interesting to find out that the GO was torn into small fragments to participate in the formation of HKUST-1 and then transformed into the reduction form during the solvothermal reaction process, which dramatically increased the surface area, electronic conductivity, and redox-activity of the material. Electrochemical assays showed that the synergy of graphene and HKUST-1 in the nanocomposite leaded to high electrocatalysis, fast response, and excellent selectivity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Based on these remarkable advantages, satisfactory results were obtained when the nanocomposite was used as a sensing material for electrochemical determination of H 2 O 2 in the complex biological samples such as human serum and living Raw 264.7 cell fluids.

  5. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant.

    Ahmad-Faris Seman-Kamarulzaman

    Full Text Available Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that's highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate

  6. Monoterpenol Oxidative Metabolism: Role in Plant Adaptation and Potential Applications

    Ilc, Tina; Parage, Claire; Boachon, Benoît; Navrot, Nicolas; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Plants use monoterpenols as precursors for the production of functionally and structurally diverse molecules, which are key players in interactions with other organisms such as pollinators, flower visitors, herbivores, fungal, or microbial pathogens. For humans, many of these monoterpenol derivatives are economically important because of their pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, flavor, or fragrance applications. The biosynthesis of these derivatives is to a large extent catalyzed by enzymes from the cytochrome P450 superfamily. Here we review the knowledge on monoterpenol oxidative metabolism in plants with special focus on recent elucidations of oxidation steps leading to diverse linalool and geraniol derivatives. We evaluate the common features between oxidation pathways of these two monoterpenols, such as involvement of the CYP76 family, and highlight the differences. Finally, we discuss the missing steps and other open questions in the biosynthesis of oxygenated monoterpenol derivatives. PMID:27200002

  7. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  8. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  9. Effects of Delta-tocotrienol Supplementation on Liver Enzymes, Inflammation, Oxidative stress and Hepatic Steatosis in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Pervez, Muhammad Amjad; Khan, Dishad Ahmet; Ijaz, Aamir; Khan, Shamrez

    2018-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing public health problem worldwide and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Currently, there is no definitive treatment for this disease. δ-Tocotrienol has potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and may reduce liver injury in NAFLD. The present study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of δ-tocotrienol in the treatment of NAFLD. The present study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study conducted in patients aged > 20 years, belonging to both sexes, having ultrasound-proven fatty liver disease, having a fatty liver index (FLI) of ≥ 60, and persistent elevation of alanine transaminase. A total of 71 patients were assigned to receive either oral δ-tocotrienol (n=35, 300 mg twice daily) or placebo (n=36) for 12 weeks. At the baseline and at the end of the study, clinical and biochemical parameters, including lipid profile, liver function tests, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. Body mass index and FLI were calculated, and ultrasound grading of hepatic steatosis was performed. Out of 71 enrolled patients, 64 patients, 31 in the δ-tocotrienol group and 33 in the placebo group, completed the study. After 12 weeks of supplementation, δ-tocotrienol showed greater efficacy than placebo by decreasing serum aminotransferases, hs-CRP, MDA, and FLI score (phepatic steatosis on ultrasound examination. No adverse effects were reported. δ-Tocotrienol was safe, and it effectively improved aminotransferase levels and inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in patients with NAFLD. Large-scale randomized clinical trials are warranted to further support these findings.

  10. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(ω)-H···¯O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN¯, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O¯) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(ω)-H to ¯O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Elucidating the neurotoxic effects of MDMA and its analogs.

    Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Ahuja, Manuj; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Deruiter, Jack; Clark, Randall; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2014-04-17

    There is a rapid increase in the use of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its structural congeners/analogs globally. MDMA and MDMA-analogs have been synthesized illegally in furtive dwellings and are abused due to its addictive potential. Furthermore, MDMA and MDMA-analogs have shown to have induced several adverse effects. Hence, understanding the mechanisms mediating this neurotoxic insult of MDMA-analogs is of immense importance for the public health in the world. We synthesized and investigated the neurotoxic effects of MDMA and its analogs [4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 2, 6-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDMA), and N-ethyl-3, 4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDEA)]. The stimulatory or the dopaminergic agonist effects of MDMA and MDMA-analogs were elucidated using the established 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned animal model. Additionally, we also investigated the neurotoxic mechanisms of MDMA and MDMA-analogs on mitochondrial complex-I activity and reactive oxygen species generation. MDMA and MDMA-analogs exhibited stimulatory activity as compared to amphetamines and also induced several behavioral changes in the rodents. MDMA and MDMA-analogs enhanced the reactive oxygen generation and inhibited mitochondrial complex-I activity which can lead to neurodegeneration. Hence the mechanism of neurotoxicity, MDMA and MDMA-analogs can enhance the release of monoamines, alter the monoaminergic neurotransmission, and augment oxidative stress and mitochondrial abnormalities leading to neurotoxicity. Thus, our study will help in developing effective pharmacological and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MDMA and MDMA-analog abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure Biology of Membrane Bound Enzymes

    Fu, Dax [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Physiology

    2016-11-30

    The overall goal of the proposed research is to understand the membrane-associated active processes catalyzed by an alkane $\\square$-hydroxylase (AlkB) from eubacterium Pseudomonase oleovorans. AlkB performs oxygenation of unactivated hydrocarbons found in crude oils. The enzymatic reaction involves energy-demanding steps in the membrane with the uses of structurally unknown metal active sites featuring a diiron [FeFe] center. At present, a critical barrier to understanding the membrane-associated reaction mechanism is the lack of structural information. The structural biology efforts have been challenged by technical difficulties commonly encountered in crystallization and structural determination of membrane proteins. The specific aims of the current budget cycle are to crystalize AlkB and initiate X-ray analysis to set the stage for structural determination. The long-term goals of our structural biology efforts are to provide an atomic description of AlkB structure, and to uncover the mechanisms of selective modification of hydrocarbons. The structural information will help elucidating how the unactivated C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons are oxidized to initiate biodegradation and biotransformation processes. The knowledge gained will be fundamental to biotechnological applications to biofuel transformation of non-edible oil feedstock. Renewable biodiesel is a promising energy carry that can be used to reduce fossil fuel dependency. The proposed research capitalizes on prior BES-supported efforts on over-expression and purification of AlkB to explore the inner workings of a bioenergy-relevant membrane-bound enzyme.

  13. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-01-01

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 (angstrom) resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  14. Impact of Bee Venom Enzymes on Diseases and Immune Responses.

    Hossen, Md Sakib; Shapla, Ummay Mahfuza; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md Ibrahim

    2016-12-27

    Bee venom (BV) is used to treat many diseases and exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, antimutagenic, radioprotective, anti-nociceptive immunity promoting, hepatocyte protective and anti-cancer activity. According to the literature, BV contains several enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phospholipase B, hyaluronidase, acid phosphatase and α-glucosidase. Recent studies have also reported the detection of different classes of enzymes in BV, including esterases, proteases and peptidases, protease inhibitors and other important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Nevertheless, the physiochemical properties and functions of each enzyme class and their mechanisms remain unclear. Various pharmacotherapeutic effects of some of the BV enzymes have been reported in several studies. At present, ongoing research aims to characterize each enzyme and elucidate their specific biological roles. This review gathers all the current knowledge on BV enzymes and their specific mechanisms in regulating various immune responses and physiological changes to provide a basis for future therapies for various diseases.

  15. Impact of Bee Venom Enzymes on Diseases and Immune Responses

    Md. Sakib Hossen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom (BV is used to treat many diseases and exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, antimutagenic, radioprotective, anti-nociceptive immunity promoting, hepatocyte protective and anti-cancer activity. According to the literature, BV contains several enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2, phospholipase B, hyaluronidase, acid phosphatase and α-glucosidase. Recent studies have also reported the detection of different classes of enzymes in BV, including esterases, proteases and peptidases, protease inhibitors and other important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Nevertheless, the physiochemical properties and functions of each enzyme class and their mechanisms remain unclear. Various pharmacotherapeutic effects of some of the BV enzymes have been reported in several studies. At present, ongoing research aims to characterize each enzyme and elucidate their specific biological roles. This review gathers all the current knowledge on BV enzymes and their specific mechanisms in regulating various immune responses and physiological changes to provide a basis for future therapies for various diseases.

  16. Palmito de pupunha (Bactris gasipaes Kunth. composição mineral e cinética de enzimas oxidativas Heart of palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth.: mineral composition and kinetics of oxidative enzymes

    Nathália Ottoboni Galdino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A análise da presença de enzimas oxidativas como a peroxidase (POD e a polifenoloxidase (PPO e o controle da atividade destas enzimas são importantes na preservação e no processamento de alimentos. Este trabalho teve por objetivo determinar a atividade enzimática da polifenoloxidase (PPO e da peroxidase (POD do palmito de pupunha, bem como avaliar o comportamento destas enzimas frente ao tratamento térmico e assim calcular a cinética de inativação térmica das mesmas para suas porções termorresistente e termolábil. Para a extração de peroxidase (POD e polifenoloxidase (PPO de palmito, utilizou-se solução tampão fosfato de sódio 100 mM com diferentes pHs (5,5; 6,0; 6,5 e 7,0. O melhor pH de extração da POD foi 5,5 e da PPO, 6,5. Estes extratos foram tratados em diferentes temperaturas (65, 70, 75 e 80 °C por períodos de 1 a 10 minutos. A POD e a PPO sofreram um decréscimo de 70 e 80%, respectivamente, em relação às suas atividades iniciais. As energias de ativação, nas temperaturas estudadas, para a porção termolábil e termorresistente da peroxidase foram 154,0 e 153,0 kJ.mol-1, respectivamente, enquanto que para a polifenoloxidase foram 26,3 e 27,0 kJ.mol-1, respectivamente. Resultados apresentaram valores que estão dentro da faixa de energia de ativação reportada para o processo de inativação térmica de enzimas.Analysis of oxidative enzymes such as peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO and the control of the activity of these enzymes are important in food preservation and also in food processing. The aim of this work was to determine polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD enzymatic activity in heart of palm, as well as to evaluate enzyme behavior during thermal treatment, determining the kinetics of thermal inactivation of the heat resistant and heat labile portions. For the extraction of peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO from the heart of palm solution, 100 mM sodium phosphate buffer with

  17. A role of proton transfer in peroxidase-catalyzed process elucidated by substrates docking calculations

    Ziemys Arturas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous kinetic investigations of fungal-peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of N-aryl hydroxamic acids (AHAs and N-aryl-N-hydroxy urethanes (AHUs revealed that the rate of reaction was independent of the formal redox potential of substrates. Moreover, the oxidation rate was 3–5 orders of magnitude less than for oxidation of physiological phenol substrates, though the redox potential was similar. Results To explain the unexpectedly low reactivity of AHAs and AHUs we made ab initio calculations of the molecular structure of the substrates following in silico docking in the active center of the enzyme. Conclusions AHAs and AHUs were docked at the distal side of heme in the sites formed by hydrophobic amino acid residues that retarded a proton transfer and finally the oxidation rate. The analogous phenol substrates were docked at different sites permitting fast proton transfer in the relay of distal His and water that helped fast substrate oxidation.

  18. Blind trials of computer-assisted structure elucidation software

    Moser Arvin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the largest challenges in chemistry today remains that of efficiently mining through vast amounts of data in order to elucidate the chemical structure for an unknown compound. The elucidated candidate compound must be fully consistent with the data and any other competing candidates efficiently eliminated without doubt by using additional data if necessary. It has become increasingly necessary to incorporate an in silico structure generation and verification tool to facilitate this elucidation process. An effective structure elucidation software technology aims to mimic the skills of a human in interpreting the complex nature of spectral data while producing a solution within a reasonable amount of time. This type of software is known as computer-assisted structure elucidation or CASE software. A systematic trial of the ACD/Structure Elucidator CASE software was conducted over an extended period of time by analysing a set of single and double-blind trials submitted by a global audience of scientists. The purpose of the blind trials was to reduce subjective bias. Double-blind trials comprised of data where the candidate compound was unknown to both the submitting scientist and the analyst. The level of expertise of the submitting scientist ranged from novice to expert structure elucidation specialists with experience in pharmaceutical, industrial, government and academic environments. Results Beginning in 2003, and for the following nine years, the algorithms and software technology contained within ACD/Structure Elucidator have been tested against 112 data sets; many of these were unique challenges. Of these challenges 9% were double-blind trials. The results of eighteen of the single-blind trials were investigated in detail and included problems of a diverse nature with many of the specific challenges associated with algorithmic structure elucidation such as deficiency in protons, structure symmetry, a large number of

  19. The expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in the liver of rats exposed to high-fructose diet in the period from weaning to adulthood.

    Glban, Alhadi M; Vasiljević, Ana; Veličković, Nataša; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Blagojević, Duško; Matić, Gordana; Nestorov, Jelena

    2015-08-30

    Increased fructose consumption correlates with rising prevalence of various metabolic disorders, some of which were linked to oxidative stress. The relationship between fructose consumption and oxidative stress is complex and effects of a fructose-rich diet on the young population have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-fructose diet applied in the period from weaning to adulthood induces oxidative stress in the liver, thus contributing to induction or aggravation of metabolic disturbances in later adulthood. To that end we examined the effects of high-fructose diet on expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes, markers of lipid peroxidation and protein damage in the liver as the main fructose metabolizing tissue. High-fructose diet increased only SOD2 (mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase) activity, with no effect on other antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation or accumulation of damaged proteins in the liver. The results show that fructose-induced metabolic disturbances could not be attributed to oxidative stress, at least not at young age. The absence of oxidative stress in the liver observed herein implies that young organisms are capable of maintaining redox homeostasis when challenged by fructose-derived energy overload. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  1. Immobilization of bilirubin oxidase on graphene oxide flakes with different negative charge density for oxygen reduction. The effect of GO charge density on enzyme coverage, electron transfer rate and current density.

    Filip, Jaroslav; Andicsová-Eckstein, Anita; Vikartovská, Alica; Tkac, Jan

    2017-03-15

    Previously we showed that an effective bilirubin oxidase (BOD)-based biocathode using graphene oxide (GO) could be prepared in 2 steps: 1. electrostatic adsorption of BOD on GO; 2. electrochemical reduction of the BOD-GO composite to form a BOD-ErGO (electrochemically reduced GO) film on the electrode. In order to identify an optimal charge density of GO for BOD-ErGO composite preparation, several GO fractions differing in an average flake size and ζ-potential were prepared using centrifugation and consequently employed for BOD-ErGO biocathode preparation. A simple way to express surface charge density of these particular GO nanosheets was developed. The values obtained were then correlated with biocatalytic and electrochemical parameters of the prepared biocathodes, i.e. electrocatalytically active BOD surface coverage (Γ), heterogeneous electron transfer rate (k S ) and a maximum biocatalytic current density. The highest bioelectrocatalytic current density of (597±25)μAcm -2 and the highest Γ of (23.6±0.9)pmolcm -2 were obtained on BOD-GO composite having the same moderate negative charge density, but the highest k S of (79.4±4.6)s -1 was observed on BOD-GO composite having different negative charge density. This study is a solid foundation for others to consider the influence of a charge density of GO on direct bioelectrochemistry/bioelectrocatalysis of other redox enzymes applicable for construction of biosensors, bioanodes, biocathodes or biofuel cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids via modification of enzyme charge.

    Nordwald, Erik M; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-09-01

    Due to the propensity of ionic liquids (ILs) to inactivate enzymes, the development of strategies to improve enzyme utility in these solvents is critical to fully exploit ILs for biocatalysis. We have developed a strategy to broadly improve enzyme utility in ILs based on elucidating the effect of charge modifications on the function of enzymes in IL environments. Results of stability studies in aqueous-IL mixtures indicated a clear connection between the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites and enzyme stability in ILs. Stability studies of the effect of [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ] on chymotrypsin specifically found an optimum ratio of positively-charged amine-to-negatively-charged acid groups (0.39). At this ratio, the half-life of chymotrypsin was increased 1.6- and 4.3-fold relative to wild-type chymotrypsin in [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ], respectively. The half-lives of lipase and papain were similarly increased as much as 4.0 and 2.4-fold, respectively, in [BMIM][Cl] by modifying the ratio of positive-to-negative sites of each enzyme. More generally, the results of stability studies found that modifications that reduce the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites improve enzyme stability in ILs. Understanding the impact of charge modification on enzyme stability in ILs may ultimately be exploited to rationally engineer enzymes for improved function in IL environments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Structure-function relationships of family GH70 glucansucrase and 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes, and their evolutionary relationships with family GH13 enzymes

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Gangoiti, Joana; Bai, Yuxiang; Pijning, Tjaard; Van Leeuwen, Sander S; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to produce large amounts of α-glucan exopolysaccharides. Family GH70 glucansucrase (GS) enzymes catalyze the synthesis of these α-glucans from sucrose. The elucidation of the crystal structures of representative GS enzymes has advanced our understanding of their

  4. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  5. Enhanced visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of α-Fe2O3 adsorbing redox enzymes

    Kai Kamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report fabrication of hybrid photocatalyst composed of an n-type semiconductor (α-Fe2O3 and a redox enzyme (horseradish peroxidase; HRP, and its performance for oxidation of luminol in an aqueous solution. The hybrid photocatalyst is simply formed via physical adsorption of HRP to an α-Fe2O3 sintered body. Under visible light irradiation, the bare α-Fe2O3 with a narrow bandgap photocatalytically oxidizes luminol along with blue emission that can be used as an indicator of the photocatalytic performance. The blue emission is largely strengthened after the adsorption of HRP, demonstrating that the presence of enzyme improves apparent photocatalytic activity of α-Fe2O3. The favorable effect is derived from synergistic oxidation of luminol by the biocatalysts (HRP as well as by the photocatalyst (α-Fe2O3. In this paper, influence of excitation wavelength, adsorption amount of HRP, and reaction temperature on the overall photocatalytic activity are elucidated, and then a reaction mechanism of the proposed novel hybrid photocatalyst is discussed in detail.

  6. Enzyme/Mod. List: E0000000102 [jPOST repository metadata[Archive

    Full Text Available E0000000102 Enzyme1 Trypsin Carbamidomethyl (C) Acetyl (N-term) Oxidation (M) Brucella abortus 104M The Enz...yme specificity was set to trypsin and a maximum of two missed cleavages were allow

  7. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in products that the compound may rapidly degrade during and/or after the isolation, due to sensitivity to light, air oxidation, and/or temperature. In this way, precautions need to be taken, as much as possible to avoid any such chemical inter-conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived from either natural or synthetic sources.

  8. Enzyme Histochemistry for Functional Histology in Invertebrates.

    Cima, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    In invertebrates, enzyme histochemistry has recently found a renaissance regarding its applications in morphology and ecology. Many enzyme activities are useful for the morphofunctional characterization of cells, as biomarkers of biological and pathologic processes, and as markers of the response to environmental stressors. Here, the adjustments to classic techniques, including the most common enzymes used for digestion, absorption, transport, and oxidation, as well as techniques for azo-coupling, metal salt substitution and oxidative coupling polymerization, are presented in detail for various terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates. This chapter also provides strategies to solve the problems regarding anesthesia, small body size, the presence of an exo- or endoskeleton and the search for the best fixative in relation to the internal fluid osmolarity. These techniques have the aim of obtaining good results for both the pre- and post-embedding labeling of specimens, tissue blocks, sections, and hemolymph smears using both light and transmission electron microscopy.

  9. High fat diet aggravates arsenic induced oxidative stress in rat heart and liver.

    Dutta, Mousumi; Ghosh, Debosree; Ghosh, Arnab Kumar; Bose, Gargi; Chattopadhyay, Aindrila; Rudra, Smita; Dey, Monalisa; Bandyopadhyay, Arkita; Pattari, Sanjib K; Mallick, Sanjaya; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic is a well known global groundwater contaminant. Exposure of human body to arsenic causes various hazardous effects via oxidative stress. Nutrition is an important susceptible factor which can affect arsenic toxicity by several plausible mechanisms. Development of modern civilization led to alteration in the lifestyle as well as food habits of the people both in urban and rural areas which led to increased use of junk food containing high level of fat. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of high fat diet on heart and liver tissues of rats when they were co-treated with arsenic. This study was established by elucidating heart weight to body weight ratio as well as analysis of the various functional markers, oxidative stress biomarkers and also the activity of the antioxidant enzymes. Histological analysis confirmed the biochemical investigations. From this study it can be concluded that high fat diet increased arsenic induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel enzymes for the degradation of cellulose

    Horn Svein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bulk terrestrial biomass resource in a future bio-economy will be lignocellulosic biomass, which is recalcitrant and challenging to process. Enzymatic conversion of polysaccharides in the lignocellulosic biomass will be a key technology in future biorefineries and this technology is currently the subject of intensive research. We describe recent developments in enzyme technology for conversion of cellulose, the most abundant, homogeneous and recalcitrant polysaccharide in lignocellulosic biomass. In particular, we focus on a recently discovered new type of enzymes currently classified as CBM33 and GH61 that catalyze oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These enzymes promote the efficiency of classical hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases by acting on the surfaces of the insoluble substrate, where they introduce chain breaks in the polysaccharide chains, without the need of first “extracting” these chains from their crystalline matrix.

  11. Polyphenol Oxidase Enzyme and Inactivation Methods

    Leman Yılmaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase enzyme is found in vegetables and fruits, as well as in some animal organs and microorganisms. Polyphenol oxidase enzyme responsible for enzymatic browning is a group of copper proteins that catalyses the oxidation of phenolic compounds to quinones, which produce brown pigments, commonly found in fruits and vegetables. During the industrial preparation of fruits and vegetables, results of catalytic effect of polyphenol oxidase causes enzymatic browning. Enzymatic browning impairs the appearance of products containing phenolic compounds along with undesirable colour, odor and taste formation and significant loss of nutritional value of the products. This affects the acceptability of the products by the consumers and causes economic losses. In this review, some characteristics of polyphenol oxidase enzyme in different fruits and vegetables have been reviewed and information about chemical antibrowning agents, thermal applications, irradiation applications and alternative methods such as high pressure processing, pulse electric field, supercritical carbon dioxide and ultrasound applications to inactivate this enzyme has been presented.

  12. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  13. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  14. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  15. Subunit topology in the V type ATPase and related enzymes

    Chaban, Yuriy

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades impressive progress has been made in understanding of the catalytic mechanism of F-type ATP synthase, which is the key enzyme in the energy metabolism of eukaryotes and most bacteria. This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the process of oxidative phosphorylation in bacteria

  16. The role of enzymes in fungus-growing ant evolution

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard

    behaviour. Here we report the first large-scale comparative study on fungus garden enzyme profiles and show that various interesting changes can be documented. A more detailed analysis of laccase expression, an enzyme that is believed to oxidize phenols in defensive secondary plant compounds such as tannins...

  17. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that successf......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  18. Targeted enzyme prodrug therapies.

    Schellmann, N; Deckert, P M; Bachran, D; Fuchs, H; Bachran, C

    2010-09-01

    The cure of cancer is still a formidable challenge in medical science. Long-known modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are successful in a number of cases; however, invasive, metastasized and inaccessible tumors still pose an unresolved and ongoing problem. Targeted therapies designed to locate, detect and specifically kill tumor cells have been developed in the past three decades as an alternative to treat troublesome cancers. Most of these therapies are either based on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs or tumor site-specific activation of prodrugs. The latter is a two-step procedure. In the first step, a selected enzyme is accumulated in the tumor by guiding the enzyme or its gene to the neoplastic cells. In the second step, a harmless prodrug is applied and specifically converted by this enzyme into a cytotoxic drug only at the tumor site. A number of targeting systems, enzymes and prodrugs were investigated and improved since the concept was first envisioned in 1974. This review presents a concise overview on the history and latest developments in targeted therapies for cancer treatment. We cover the relevant technologies such as antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) as well as related therapies such as clostridial- (CDEPT) and polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) with emphasis on prodrug-converting enzymes, prodrugs and drugs.

  19. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present

  1. Mechanisms of Persistence of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria Nitrosomonas to the Biocide Free Nitrous Acid.

    Laloo, Andrew E; Wei, Justin; Wang, Dongbo; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Vanwonterghem, Inka; Waite, David; Steen, Jason; Kaysen, Anne; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Wang, Qilin; Schulz, Benjamin; Nouwens, Amanda; Wilmes, Paul; Hugenholtz, Philip; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2018-05-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) exerts a broad range of antimicrobial effects on bacteria, although susceptibility varies considerably among microorganisms. Among nitrifiers found in activated sludge of wastewater treatment processes (WWTPs), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are more susceptible to FNA compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). This selective inhibition of NOB over AOB in WWTPs bypasses nitrate production and improves the efficiency and costs of the nitrogen removal process in both the activated sludge and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) system. However, the molecular mechanisms governing this atypical tolerance of AOB to FNA have yet to be understood. Herein we investigate the varying effects of the antimicrobial FNA on activated sludge containing AOB and NOB using an integrated metagenomics and label-free quantitative sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH-MS) metaproteomic approach. The Nitrosomonas genus of AOB, on exposure to FNA, maintains internal homeostasis by upregulating a number of known oxidative stress enzymes, such as pteridine reductase and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase. Denitrifying enzymes were upregulated on exposure to FNA, suggesting the detoxification of nitrite to nitric oxide. Interestingly, proteins involved in stress response mechanisms, such as DNA and protein repair enzymes, phage prevention proteins, and iron transport proteins, were upregulated on exposure to FNA. In addition enzymes involved in energy generation were also upregulated on exposure to FNA. The total proteins specifically derived from the NOB genus Nitrobacter was low and, as such, did not allow for the elucidation of the response mechanism to FNA exposure. These findings give us an understanding of the adaptive mechanisms of tolerance within the AOB Nitrosomonas to the biocidal agent FNA.

  2. A combined ToF-SIMS and XPS study for the elucidation of the role of water in the performances of a Post-Plasma Process using LaMnO3+δ as catalyst in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene

    Nuns, N.; Beaurain, A.; Dinh, M. T. Nguyen; Vandenbroucke, A.; De Geyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, C.; Giraudon, J.-M.; Lamonier, J.-F.

    2014-11-01

    LaMnO3+δ which is an environment-friendly and inexpensive material has been previously used as catalyst in Post-Plasma Catalysis (PPC) in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) which is a solvent widely used in dry cleaning and degreasing processes. It has been shown that the process efficiency increases in moist air (RH = 18%).The issue we want to address herein is the effect of water on the location of chlorine at the surface of the catalyst as chlorine is able to alter the catalyst structure, activity and stability. Therefore, a combined Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) study has been carried out on the fresh LaMnO3+δ catalyst (LM) and used catalysts after performing PPC with TCE diluted in dry synthetic air (LM0) or with industrial air containing water (LM18; 18 stands for the Relative Humidity) and CO2 (about 560 ppmv) at a temperature of 150 °C. XPS and ToF-SIMS results both show the presence of chlorine on the tested catalysts whose amount increases by exposure of the catalyst to the reactive mixture in dry synthetic air. XPS results reveal that chlorine is present as both chloride ion and covalent chlorine on LM0 while organic chlorinated residues are absent on LM18 catalyst. ToF-SIMS study indicates that lanthanum excess as oxide(hydroxide) partially covering the perovskite mainly transforms into LaOCl and to a minor extent into LaCl3. Extent of Mn chlorination seems to be favored over LM0 having a higher MnClx±/MnOCl± ionic ratio compared to LM18. Furthermore ToF-SIMS clearly identifies C1 chlorinated organic ions, mainly CH2Cl+ and CHCl2-, on LM0 which may contribute to the XPS Cl organic component. From the combined ToF-SIMS and XPS results it is found that water delays the surface degradation extent of the perovskite into related (oxy)(hydroxy)chlorinated inorganic phases by less molecular chlorine and related chlorine species on the catalyst surface. A reaction scheme of

  3. A combined ToF-SIMS and XPS study for the elucidation of the role of water in the performances of a Post-Plasma Process using LaMnO3+δ as catalyst in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene

    Nuns, N.; Beaurain, A.; Dinh, M.T. Nguyen; Vandenbroucke, A.; De Geyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, C.; Giraudon, J.-M.; Lamonier, J.-F.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Water promotes the cleaning of the perovskite active sites. • Water is able to tune the degradation pathway of dichloroacetyl chloride. • Detection of CH 2 Cl + and CHCl 2 + by ToF-SIMS on the catalyst in dry air. - Abstract: LaMnO 3+δ which is an environment-friendly and inexpensive material has been previously used as catalyst in Post-Plasma Catalysis (PPC) in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) which is a solvent widely used in dry cleaning and degreasing processes. It has been shown that the process efficiency increases in moist air (RH = 18%).The issue we want to address herein is the effect of water on the location of chlorine at the surface of the catalyst as chlorine is able to alter the catalyst structure, activity and stability. Therefore, a combined Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) study has been carried out on the fresh LaMnO 3+δ catalyst (LM) and used catalysts after performing PPC with TCE diluted in dry synthetic air (LM0) or with industrial air containing water (LM18; 18 stands for the Relative Humidity) and CO 2 (about 560 ppmv) at a temperature of 150 °C. XPS and ToF-SIMS results both show the presence of chlorine on the tested catalysts whose amount increases by exposure of the catalyst to the reactive mixture in dry synthetic air. XPS results reveal that chlorine is present as both chloride ion and covalent chlorine on LM0 while organic chlorinated residues are absent on LM18 catalyst. ToF-SIMS study indicates that lanthanum excess as oxide(hydroxide) partially covering the perovskite mainly transforms into LaOCl and to a minor extent into LaCl 3 . Extent of Mn chlorination seems to be favored over LM0 having a higher MnCl x ± /MnOCl ± ionic ratio compared to LM18. Furthermore ToF-SIMS clearly identifies C1 chlorinated organic ions, mainly CH 2 Cl + and CHCl 2 − , on LM0 which may contribute to the XPS Cl organic

  4. A combined ToF-SIMS and XPS study for the elucidation of the role of water in the performances of a Post-Plasma Process using LaMnO{sub 3+δ} as catalyst in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene

    Nuns, N. [Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, Lille (France); IMMCL Chevreul, Institut des Molécules et de la Matière Condensée, Lille (France); Beaurain, A. [Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, Lille (France); Dinh, M.T. Nguyen [Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, Lille (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Vandenbroucke, A.; De Geyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, C. [Research Unit Plasma Technology, Departement of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); Giraudon, J.-M., E-mail: jean-marc.giraudon@univ-lille1.fr [Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, Lille (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Lamonier, J.-F. [Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, Lille (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Water promotes the cleaning of the perovskite active sites. • Water is able to tune the degradation pathway of dichloroacetyl chloride. • Detection of CH{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and CHCl{sub 2}{sup +} by ToF-SIMS on the catalyst in dry air. - Abstract: LaMnO{sub 3+δ} which is an environment-friendly and inexpensive material has been previously used as catalyst in Post-Plasma Catalysis (PPC) in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) which is a solvent widely used in dry cleaning and degreasing processes. It has been shown that the process efficiency increases in moist air (RH = 18%).The issue we want to address herein is the effect of water on the location of chlorine at the surface of the catalyst as chlorine is able to alter the catalyst structure, activity and stability. Therefore, a combined Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) study has been carried out on the fresh LaMnO{sub 3+δ} catalyst (LM) and used catalysts after performing PPC with TCE diluted in dry synthetic air (LM0) or with industrial air containing water (LM18; 18 stands for the Relative Humidity) and CO{sub 2} (about 560 ppmv) at a temperature of 150 °C. XPS and ToF-SIMS results both show the presence of chlorine on the tested catalysts whose amount increases by exposure of the catalyst to the reactive mixture in dry synthetic air. XPS results reveal that chlorine is present as both chloride ion and covalent chlorine on LM0 while organic chlorinated residues are absent on LM18 catalyst. ToF-SIMS study indicates that lanthanum excess as oxide(hydroxide) partially covering the perovskite mainly transforms into LaOCl and to a minor extent into LaCl{sub 3}. Extent of Mn chlorination seems to be favored over LM0 having a higher MnCl{sub x}{sup ±}/MnOCl{sup ±} ionic ratio compared to LM18. Furthermore ToF-SIMS clearly identifies C1 chlorinated organic ions, mainly CH{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and CHCl

  5. Microbial nitrilases: versatile, spiral forming, industrial enzymes.

    Thuku, R N; Brady, D; Benedik, M J; Sewell, B T

    2009-03-01

    The nitrilases are enzymes that convert nitriles to the corresponding acid and ammonia. They are members of a superfamily, which includes amidases and occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The superfamily is characterized by having a homodimeric building block with a alpha beta beta alpha-alpha beta beta alpha sandwich fold and an active site containing four positionally conserved residues: cys, glu, glu and lys. Their high chemical specificity and frequent enantioselectivity makes them attractive biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates. Nitrilases are also used in the treatment of toxic industrial effluent and cyanide remediation. The superfamily enzymes have been visualized as dimers, tetramers, hexamers, octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and variable length helices, but all nitrilase oligomers have the same basic dimer interface. Moreover, in the case of the octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and the helices, common principles of subunit association apply. While the range of industrially interesting reactions catalysed by this enzyme class continues to increase, research efforts are still hampered by the lack of a high resolution microbial nitrilase structure which can provide insights into their specificity, enantioselectivity and the mechanism of catalysis. This review provides an overview of the current progress in elucidation of structure and function in this enzyme class and emphasizes insights that may lead to further biotechnological applications.

  6. Elucidation of the TMab-6 Monoclonal Antibody Epitope Against Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase.

    Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Itai, Shunsuke; Chang, Yao-Wen; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Harada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-05-03

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and mutations of the TERT promoter are significant in the pathogenesis of 1p/19q-codeleted oligodendrogliomas and isocitrate dehydrogenase gene wild-type glioblastomas, as well as melanomas and squamous cell carcinomas. We previously developed an antihuman TERT monoclonal antibody (mAb), TMab-6, which is applicable in immunohistochemistry for human tissues. However, the binding epitope of TMab-6 against TERT is yet to be elucidated. In this study, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry were utilized for investigating the epitope of TMab-6. The findings revealed that the critical epitope of TMab-6 is the TERT sequence PSTSRPPRPWD; Thr310 and Ser311 of TERT are especially significant amino acids for TMab-6 recognition.

  7. Tannin structural elucidation and quantitative ³¹P NMR analysis. 1. Model compounds.

    Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele; Lange, Heiko; Crestini, Claudia

    2013-10-02

    Tannins and flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plants that display a wide array of biological activities. This peculiarity is related to the inhibition of extracellular enzymes that occurs through the complexation of peptides by tannins. Not only the nature of these interactions, but more fundamentally also the structure of these heterogeneous polyphenolic molecules are not completely clear. This first paper describes the development of a new analytical method for the structural characterization of tannins on the basis of tannin model compounds employing an in situ labeling of all labile H groups (aliphatic OH, phenolic OH, and carboxylic acids) with a phosphorus reagent. The ³¹P NMR analysis of ³¹P-labeled samples allowed the unprecedented quantitative and qualitative structural characterization of hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, and catechin tannin model compounds, forming the foundations for the quantitative structural elucidation of a variety of actual tannin samples described in part 2 of this series.

  8. Metagenomic and proteomic analyses to elucidate the mechanism of anaerobic benzene degradation

    Abu Laban, Nidal [Helmholtz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the mechanism of anaerobic benzene degradation using metagenomic and proteomic analyses. The objective of the study is to find out the microbes and biochemistry involved in benzene degradation. Hypotheses are proposed for the initial activation mechanism of benzene under anaerobic conditions. Two methods for degradation, molecular characterization and identification of benzene-degrading enzymes, are described. The physiological and molecular characteristics of iron-reducing enrichment culture are given and the process is detailed. Metagenome analysis of iron-reducing culture is presented using a pie chart. From the metagenome analysis of benzene-degrading culture, putative mobile element genes were identified in the aromatic-degrading configurations. Metaproteomic analysis of iron-reducing cultures and the anaerobic benzene degradation pathway are also elucidated. From the study, it can be concluded that gram-positive bacteria are involved in benzene degradation under iron-reducing conditions and that the catalysis mechanism of putative anaerobic benzene carboxylase needs further investigation.

  9. Isolation and Elucidation of 15-Acetylguanacone from Soursop ...

    ADOWIE PERE

    002/C. The structure of compound 200/A2 was elucidated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy .... Molecular Docking Experiments, Protein preparation ... ligand conformations in the binding sites through the .... Molecular dynamics simulation of diacetyl-guancone. Bioorgnic and Medicinal Chemistry 15: 4369-.

  10. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    Liu, Qing; Manzano, David; Tanić, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew tha...

  11. Elucidation of cladofulvin biosynthesis reveals a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase required for anthraquinone dimerization.

    Griffiths, Scott; Mesarich, Carl H; Saccomanno, Benedetta; Vaisberg, Abraham; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Cox, Russell; Collemare, Jérôme

    2016-06-21

    Anthraquinones are a large family of secondary metabolites (SMs) that are extensively studied for their diverse biological activities. These activities are determined by functional group decorations and the formation of dimers from anthraquinone monomers. Despite their numerous medicinal qualities, very few anthraquinone biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated so far, including the enzymatic dimerization steps. In this study, we report the elucidation of the biosynthesis of cladofulvin, an asymmetrical homodimer of nataloe-emodin produced by the fungus Cladosporium fulvum A gene cluster of 10 genes controls cladofulvin biosynthesis, which begins with the production of atrochrysone carboxylic acid by the polyketide synthase ClaG and the β-lactamase ClaF. This compound is decarboxylated by ClaH to yield emodin, which is then converted to chrysophanol hydroquinone by the reductase ClaC and the dehydratase ClaB. We show that the predicted cytochrome P450 ClaM catalyzes the dimerization of nataloe-emodin to cladofulvin. Remarkably, such dimerization dramatically increases nataloe-emodin cytotoxicity against mammalian cell lines. These findings shed light on the enzymatic mechanisms involved in anthraquinone dimerization. Future characterization of the ClaM enzyme should facilitate engineering the biosynthesis of novel, potent, dimeric anthraquinones and structurally related compound families.

  12. Enzymic lactose hydrolysis

    Miller, J J; Brand, J C

    1980-01-01

    Acid or enzymic hydrolysis can be used to hydrolyze lactose. Advantages of both are compared and details of enzymic hydrolysis using yeast or fungal enzymes given. The new scheme outlined involves recycling lactase. Because lactose and lactase react to ultrafiltration (UF) membranes differently separation is possible. Milk or milk products are ultrafiltered to separate a concentrate from a lactose-rich permeate which is treated with lactase in a reactor until hydrolysis reaches a required level. The lactase can be removed by UF as it does not permeate the membrane, and it is recycled back to the reactor. Permeate from the second UF stage may or may not be recombined with the concentrate from the first stage to produce a low lactose product (analysis of a typical low-lactose dried whole milk is given). Batch or continuous processes are explained and a batch process without enzyme recovery is discussed. (Refs. 4).

  13. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  14. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Enzymes are biocatalytic protein molecules that enhance the rates of ... to physical forces (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic 1, electrostatic and Van der ... conformation. In 1995 ... surface against 14.7% in Klenow poll (some of the hydrophobic.

  15. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  16. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  17. Nitric oxide: a physiologic messenger.

    Lowenstein, C J; Dinerman, J L; Snyder, S H

    1994-02-01

    To review the physiologic role of nitric oxide, an unusual messenger molecule that mediates blood vessel relaxation, neurotransmission, and pathogen suppression. A MEDLINE search of articles published from 1987 to 1993 that addressed nitric oxide and the enzyme that synthesizes it, nitric oxide synthase. Animal and human studies were selected from 3044 articles to analyze the clinical importance of nitric oxide. Descriptions of the structure and function of nitric oxide synthase were selected to show how nitric oxide acts as a biological messenger molecule. Biochemical and physiologic studies were analyzed if the same results were found by three or more independent observers. Two major classes of nitric oxide synthase enzymes produce nitric oxide. The constitutive isoforms found in endothelial cells and neurons release small amounts of nitric oxide for brief periods to signal adjacent cells, whereas the inducible isoform found in macrophages releases large amounts of nitric oxide continuously to eliminate bacteria and parasites. By diffusing into adjacent cells and binding to enzymes that contain iron, nitric oxide plays many important physiologic roles. It regulates blood pressure, transmits signals between neurons, and suppresses pathogens. Excess amounts, however, can damage host cells, causing neurotoxicity during strokes and causing the hypotension associated with sepsis. Nitric oxide is a simple molecule with many physiologic roles in the cardiovascular, neurologic, and immune systems. Although the general principles of nitric oxide synthesis are known, further research is necessary to determine what role it plays in causing disease.

  18. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Cupric Oxides

    Lu Lin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%. In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H2-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

  19. Enzyme That Makes You Cry-Crystal Structure of Lachrymatory Factor Synthase from Allium cepa.

    Silvaroli, Josie A; Pleshinger, Matthew J; Banerjee, Surajit; Kiser, Philip D; Golczak, Marcin

    2017-09-15

    The biochemical pathway that gives onions their savor is part of the chemical warfare against microbes and animals. This defense mechanism involves formation of a volatile lachrymatory factor (LF) ((Z)-propanethial S-oxide) that causes familiar eye irritation associated with onion chopping. LF is produced in a reaction catalyzed by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS). The principles by which LFS facilitates conversion of a sulfenic acid substrate into LF have been difficult to experimentally examine owing to the inherent substrate reactivity and lability of LF. To shed light on the mechanism of LF production in the onion, we solved crystal structures of LFS in an apo-form and in complex with a substrate analogue, crotyl alcohol. The enzyme closely resembles the helix-grip fold characteristic for plant representatives of the START (star-related lipid transfer) domain-containing protein superfamily. By comparing the structures of LFS to that of the abscisic acid receptor, PYL10, a representative of the START protein superfamily, we elucidated structural adaptations underlying the catalytic activity of LFS. We also delineated the architecture of the active site, and based on the orientation of the ligand, we propose a mechanism of catalysis that involves sequential proton transfer accompanied by formation of a carbanion intermediate. These findings reconcile chemical and biochemical information regarding thioaldehyde S-oxide formation and close a long-lasting gap in understanding of the mechanism responsible for LF production in the onion.

  20. Adsorption of monocomponent enzymes in enzyme mixture analyzed quantitatively during hydrolysis of lignocellulose substrates.

    Várnai, Anikó; Viikari, Liisa; Marjamaa, Kaisa; Siika-aho, Matti

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of purified Trichoderma reesei cellulases (TrCel7A, TrCel6A and TrCel5A) and xylanase TrXyn11 and Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase AnCel3A was studied in enzyme mixture during hydrolysis of two pretreated lignocellulosic materials, steam pretreated and catalytically delignified spruce, along with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). The enzyme mixture was compiled to resemble the composition of commercial cellulase preparations. The hydrolysis was carried out at 35 °C to mimic the temperature of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Enzyme adsorption was followed by analyzing the activity and the protein amount of the individual free enzymes in the hydrolysis supernatant. Most enzymes adsorbed quickly at early stages of the hydrolysis and remained bound throughout the hydrolysis, although the conversion reached was fairly high. Only with the catalytically oxidized spruce samples, the bound enzymes started to be released as the hydrolysis degree reached 80%. The results based on enzyme activities and protein assay were in good accordance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Elucidating Functional Aspects of P-type ATPases

    Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    and helped enlighten how thapsigargin, a potent inhibitor of SERCA1a, depends on a water mediated hydrogen bond network when bound to SERCA1a. Furthermore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the same P-type ATPase were used to assess a long-standing question whether cholesterol affects SERCA1a through...... similar to that of the wild type (WT) protein. The discrepancy between the newly determined crystal structure of LpCopA and the functional manifestations of the missense mutation in human CopA, could indicate that LpCopA is insufficient in structurally elucidating the effect of disease-causing mutations...... in the human CopA proteins. MD simulations, which combine coarse-grained (CG) and atomistic procedures, were set up in order to elucidate mechanistic implications exerted by the lipid bilayer on LpCopA. The MD simulations of LpCopA corroborated previous and new in vivo activity data and showed...

  2. elucidating the mechanism of the adsorption of mucin

    dcu user

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies of electron transfer reaction of butane-1,3-diol and Cr(VI) ion in ... The oxidation of diols other than. 1,2-diols by transition metal ions and their complexes has received little attention. An increased interest in these reactions was noticed after the oxidation of propane-1,3-, butane-1,3- and ...

  3. Elucidation of Molecular Pathogenic Mechanisms of Norrie Disease

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Norrie disease (ND) is a rare X-linked recessive congenital blindness, sometimes associated with deafness and mental retardation. In this thesis the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of this syndrome should be elucidated using the Ndph knockout mouse model. Gene expression studies but also histology and protein biochemistry were used to characterize the affected organs, eye and brain. Gene expression analyses of eyes at p21 using cDNA subtrac...

  4. Elucidate Innovation Performance of Technology-driven Mergers and Acquisitions

    Huang, L.; Wang, K.; Yu, H.; Shang, L.; Mitkova, L.

    2016-07-01

    The importance and value of Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) have increased with the expectancy to obtain key technology capabilities and rapid impact on innovation. This article develops an original analytical framework to elucidate the impact of the technology and product relatedness (similarity/complementarity) of the Technology-driven M&A’ partners on post-innovation performance. We present results drawing on a multiple case studies of Chinese High-Tech firms from three industries. (Author)

  5. Recent advances in the elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Gao-Yi Tan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With the successful production of artemisinic acid in yeast, the promising potential of synthetic biology for natural product biosynthesis is now being realized. The recent total biosynthesis of opioids in microbes is considered to be another landmark in this field. The importance and significance of enzymes in natural product biosynthetic pathways have been re-emphasized by these advancements. Therefore, the characterization and elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis are undoubtedly fundamental for the development of new drugs and the heterologous biosynthesis of active natural products. Here, discoveries regarding enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis over the past year are briefly reviewed.

  6. Recent advances in the elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Tan Gao-Yi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the successful production of artemisinic acid in yeast, the promising potential of synthetic biology for natural product biosynthesis is now being realized. The recent total biosynthesis of opioids in microbes is considered to be another landmark in this field. The importance and significance of enzymes in natural product biosynthetic pathways have been re-emphasized by these advancements. Therefore, the characterization and elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis are undoubtedly fundamental for the development of new drugs and the heterologous biosynthesis of active natural products. Here, discoveries regarding enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis over the past year are briefly reviewed.

  7. Random-walk enzymes

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  8. Rational Inhibitors of DNA Base Excision Repair Enzymes: New Tools for Elucidating the Role of BER in Cancer Chemotherapy. Addendum

    2006-11-01

    exponential decay to obtain koff (eq 5). Because of the very slow dissociation of UF‚M, its koff was measured by manually mixing a solution consisting...integrated high-throughput ( HTP ) platform for discovering small-molecule ligands that inhibit UNG. The strategy takes advantage of the extrahelical...robust HTP activity assay, and initial hits are quickly optimized using subsequent structure-activity studies. This tethering approach, which uses

  9. Non-homologous isofunctional enzymes: a systematic analysis of alternative solutions in enzyme evolution.

    Omelchenko, Marina V; Galperin, Michael Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2010-04-30

    Evolutionarily unrelated proteins that catalyze the same biochemical reactions are often referred to as analogous - as opposed to homologous - enzymes. The existence of numerous alternative, non-homologous enzyme isoforms presents an interesting evolutionary problem; it also complicates genome-based reconstruction of the metabolic pathways in a variety of organisms. In 1998, a systematic search for analogous enzymes resulted in the identification of 105 Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers that included two or more proteins without detectable sequence similarity to each other, including 34 EC nodes where proteins were known (or predicted) to have distinct structural folds, indicating independent evolutionary origins. In the past 12 years, many putative non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were identified in newly sequenced genomes. In addition, efforts in structural genomics resulted in a vastly improved structural coverage of proteomes, providing for definitive assessment of (non)homologous relationships between proteins. We report the results of a comprehensive search for non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) that yielded 185 EC nodes with two or more experimentally characterized - or predicted - structurally unrelated proteins. Of these NISE sets, only 74 were from the original 1998 list. Structural assignments of the NISE show over-representation of proteins with the TIM barrel fold and the nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold. From the functional perspective, the set of NISE is enriched in hydrolases, particularly carbohydrate hydrolases, and in enzymes involved in defense against oxidative stress. These results indicate that at least some of the non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were recruited relatively recently from enzyme families that are active against related substrates and are sufficiently flexible to accommodate changes in substrate specificity.

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  11. Lignocellulolytic enzyme production of Pleurotus ostreatus growth in agroindustrial wastes

    José Maria Rodrigues da Luz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus has nutritional and medicinal characteristics that depend on the growth substrate. In nature, this fungus grows on dead wood, but it can be artificially cultivated on agricultural wastes (coffee husks, eucalyptus sawdust, corncobs and sugar cane bagasse. The degradation of agricultural wastes involves some enzyme complexes made up of oxidative (laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase and hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases and tanases. Understanding how these enzymes work will help to improve the productivity of mushroom cultures and decrease the potential pollution that can be caused by inadequate discharge of the agroindustrial residues. The objective of this work was to assess the activity of the lignocellulolytic enzymes produced by two P. ostreatus strains (PLO 2 and PLO 6. These strains were used to inoculate samples of coffee husks, eucalyptus sawdust or eucalyptus bark add with or without 20 % rice bran. Every five days after substrate inoculation, the enzyme activity and soluble protein concentration were evaluated. The maximum activity of oxidative enzymes was observed at day 10 after inoculation, and the activity of the hydrolytic enzymes increased during the entire period of the experiment. The results show that substrate composition and colonization time influenced the activity of the lignocellulolytic enzymes.

  12. Structure elucidation and immunomodulatory activity of a beta glucan from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma sinense.

    Xiao-Qiang Han

    Full Text Available A polysaccharide named GSP-2 with a molecular size of 32 kDa was isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma sinense. Its structure was well elucidated, by a combined utilization of chemical and spectroscopic techniques, to be a β-glucan with a backbone of (1→4- and (1→6-Glcp, bearing terminal- and (1→3-Glcp side-chains at O-3 position of (1→6-Glcp. Immunological assay exhibited that GSP-2 significantly induced the proliferation of BALB/c mice splenocytes with target on only B cells, and enhanced the production of several cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and derived dendritic cells. Besides, the fluorescent labeled GSP-2 was phagocytosed by the RAW 264.7 cells and induced the nitric oxide secretion from the cells.

  13. Structure Elucidation and Immunomodulatory Activity of A Beta Glucan from the Fruiting Bodies of Ganoderma sinense

    Yue, Rui-Qi; Dong, Cai-Xia; Chan, Chung-Lap; Ko, Chun-Hay; Cheung, Wing-Shing; Luo, Ke-Wang; Dai, Hui; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Leung, Ping-Chung; Han, Quan-Bin

    2014-01-01

    A polysaccharide named GSP-2 with a molecular size of 32 kDa was isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma sinense. Its structure was well elucidated, by a combined utilization of chemical and spectroscopic techniques, to be a β-glucan with a backbone of (1→4)– and (1→6)–Glcp, bearing terminal- and (1→3)–Glcp side-chains at O-3 position of (1→6)–Glcp. Immunological assay exhibited that GSP-2 significantly induced the proliferation of BALB/c mice splenocytes with target on only B cells, and enhanced the production of several cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and derived dendritic cells. Besides, the fluorescent labeled GSP-2 was phagocytosed by the RAW 264.7 cells and induced the nitric oxide secretion from the cells. PMID:25014571

  14. Human cytochrome P450 enzymes of importance for the bioactivation of methyleugenol to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Horst, J.P.F. ter; Awad, H.M.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to elucidate the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of methyleugenol to its proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Incubations with Supersomes, expressing individual P450 enzymes to a high level, revealed that P450 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19,

  15. The surface science of enzymes

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  16. Elucidating reactivity regimes in cyclopentane oxidation: Jet stirred reactor experiments, computational chemistry, and kinetic modeling

    Rachidi, Mariam El; Thion, Sé bastien; Togbé , Casimir; Dayma, Guillaume; Mehl, Marco; Dagaut, Philippe; Pitz, William J.; Zá dor, Judit; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and quantification of species generated during the combustion of cyclopentane in a jet stirred reactor (JSR). Experiments were carried out for temperatures between 740 and 1250K, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 3.0, and at an operating pressure of 10atm. The fuel concentration was kept at 0.1% and the residence time of the fuel/O/N mixture was maintained at 0.7s. The reactant, product, and intermediate species concentration profiles were measured using gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The concentration profiles of cyclopentane indicate inhibition of reactivity between 850-1000K for ϕ = 2.0 and ϕ = 3.0. This behavior is interesting, as it has not been observed previously for other fuel molecules, cyclic or non-cyclic. A kinetic model including both low- and high-temperature reaction pathways was developed and used to simulate the JSR experiments. The pressure-dependent rate coefficients of all relevant reactions lying on the PES of cyclopentyl+O, as well as the C-C and C-H scission reactions of the cyclopentyl radical were calculated at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The simulations reproduced the unique reactivity trend of cyclopentane and the measured concentration profiles of intermediate and product species. Sensitivity and reaction path analyses indicate that this reactivity trend may be attributed to differences in the reactivity of allyl radical at different conditions, and it is highly sensitive to the C-C/C-H scission branching ratio of the cyclopentyl radical decomposition.

  17. Elucidating reactivity regimes in cyclopentane oxidation: Jet stirred reactor experiments, computational chemistry, and kinetic modeling

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2016-06-23

    This study is concerned with the identification and quantification of species generated during the combustion of cyclopentane in a jet stirred reactor (JSR). Experiments were carried out for temperatures between 740 and 1250K, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 3.0, and at an operating pressure of 10atm. The fuel concentration was kept at 0.1% and the residence time of the fuel/O/N mixture was maintained at 0.7s. The reactant, product, and intermediate species concentration profiles were measured using gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The concentration profiles of cyclopentane indicate inhibition of reactivity between 850-1000K for ϕ = 2.0 and ϕ = 3.0. This behavior is interesting, as it has not been observed previously for other fuel molecules, cyclic or non-cyclic. A kinetic model including both low- and high-temperature reaction pathways was developed and used to simulate the JSR experiments. The pressure-dependent rate coefficients of all relevant reactions lying on the PES of cyclopentyl+O, as well as the C-C and C-H scission reactions of the cyclopentyl radical were calculated at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The simulations reproduced the unique reactivity trend of cyclopentane and the measured concentration profiles of intermediate and product species. Sensitivity and reaction path analyses indicate that this reactivity trend may be attributed to differences in the reactivity of allyl radical at different conditions, and it is highly sensitive to the C-C/C-H scission branching ratio of the cyclopentyl radical decomposition.

  18. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  19. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Advances in enzyme bioelectrochemistry

    ANDRESSA R. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioelectrochemistry can be defined as a branch of Chemical Science concerned with electron-proton transfer and transport involving biomolecules, as well as electrode reactions of redox enzymes. The bioelectrochemical reactions and system have direct impact in biotechnological development, in medical devices designing, in the behavior of DNA-protein complexes, in green-energy and bioenergy concepts, and make it possible an understanding of metabolism of all living organisms (e.g. humans where biomolecules are integral to health and proper functioning. In the last years, many researchers have dedicated itself to study different redox enzymes by using electrochemistry, aiming to understand their mechanisms and to develop promising bioanodes and biocathodes for biofuel cells as well as to develop biosensors and implantable bioelectronics devices. Inside this scope, this review try to introduce and contemplate some relevant topics for enzyme bioelectrochemistry, such as the immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces, the electron transfer, the bioelectrocatalysis, and new techniques conjugated with electrochemistry vising understand the kinetics and thermodynamics of redox proteins. Furthermore, examples of recent approaches in designing biosensors and biofuel developed are presented.

  1. Embedded enzymes catalyse capture

    Kentish, Sandra

    2018-05-01

    Membrane technologies for carbon capture can offer economic and environmental advantages over conventional amine-based absorption, but can suffer from limited gas flux and selectivity to CO2. Now, a membrane based on enzymes embedded in hydrophilic pores is shown to exhibit combined flux and selectivity that challenges the state of the art.

  2. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  3. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  4. Structural similarities and functional differences clarify evolutionary relationships between tRNA healing enzymes and the myelin enzyme CNPase.

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2017-05-16

    Eukaryotic tRNA splicing is an essential process in the transformation of a primary tRNA transcript into a mature functional tRNA molecule. 5'-phosphate ligation involves two steps: a healing reaction catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) in association with cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase), and a sealing reaction catalyzed by an RNA ligase. The enzymes that catalyze tRNA healing in yeast and higher eukaryotes are homologous to the members of the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily, in particular to the vertebrate myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). We employed different biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the overall structural and functional features of the tRNA healing enzymes yeast Trl1 PNK/CPDase and lancelet PNK/CPDase and compared them with vertebrate CNPase. The yeast and the lancelet enzymes have cyclic phosphodiesterase and polynucleotide kinase activity, while vertebrate CNPase lacks PNK activity. In addition, we also show that the healing enzymes are structurally similar to the vertebrate CNPase by applying synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. We provide a structural analysis of the tRNA healing enzyme PNK and CPDase domains together. Our results support evolution of vertebrate CNPase from tRNA healing enzymes with a loss of function at its N-terminal PNK-like domain.

  5. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  6. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  7. Field and lab conditions alter microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics driving decomposition of the same leaf litter

    Zachary L Rinkes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in climate and edaphic factors influence field decomposition rates and preclude a complete understanding of how microbial communities respond to plant litter quality. In contrast, laboratory microcosms isolate the intrinsic effects of litter chemistry and microbial community from extrinsic effects of environmental variation. Used together, these paired approaches provide mechanistic insights to decomposition processes. In order to elucidate the microbial mechanisms underlying how environmental conditions alter the trajectory of decay, we characterized microbial biomass, respiration, enzyme activities, and nutrient dynamics during early (< 10% mass loss, mid- (10-40% mass loss, and late (> 40% mass loss decay in parallel field and laboratory litter bag incubations for deciduous tree litters with varying recalcitrance (dogwood < maple < maple-oak mixture < oak. In the field, mass loss was minimal (< 10% over the first 50 days (January-February, even for labile litter types, despite above-freezing soil temperatures and adequate moisture during these winter months. In contrast, microcosms displayed high C mineralization rates in the first week. During mid-decay, the labile dogwood and maple litters in the field had higher mass loss per unit enzyme activity than the lab, possibly due to leaching of soluble compounds. Microbial biomass to litter mass (B:C ratios peaked in the field during late decay, but B:C ratios declined between mid- and late decay in the lab. Thus, microbial biomass did not have a consistent relationship with litter quality between studies. Higher oxidative enzyme activities in oak litters in the field, and higher nitrogen (N accumulation in the lab microcosms occurred in late decay. We speculate that elevated N suppressed fungal activity and/or biomass in microcosms. Our results suggest that differences in microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics alter the decay trajectory of the same leaf litter under field and lab

  8. Field and lab conditions alter microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics driving decomposition of the same leaf litter.

    Rinkes, Zachary L; Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Moorhead, Daryl L; Grandy, A Stuart; Weintraub, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in climate and edaphic factors influence field decomposition rates and preclude a complete understanding of how microbial communities respond to plant litter quality. In contrast, laboratory microcosms isolate the intrinsic effects of litter chemistry and microbial community from extrinsic effects of environmental variation. Used together, these paired approaches provide mechanistic insights to decomposition processes. In order to elucidate the microbial mechanisms underlying how environmental conditions alter the trajectory of decay, we characterized microbial biomass, respiration, enzyme activities, and nutrient dynamics during early (40% mass loss) decay in parallel field and laboratory litter bag incubations for deciduous tree litters with varying recalcitrance (dogwood litter types, despite above-freezing soil temperatures and adequate moisture during these winter months. In contrast, microcosms displayed high C mineralization rates in the first week. During mid-decay, the labile dogwood and maple litters in the field had higher mass loss per unit enzyme activity than the lab, possibly due to leaching of soluble compounds. Microbial biomass to litter mass (B:C) ratios peaked in the field during late decay, but B:C ratios declined between mid- and late decay in the lab. Thus, microbial biomass did not have a consistent relationship with litter quality between studies. Higher oxidative enzyme activities in oak litters in the field, and higher nitrogen (N) accumulation in the lab microcosms occurred in late decay. We speculate that elevated N suppressed fungal activity and/or biomass in microcosms. Our results suggest that differences in microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics alter the decay trajectory of the same leaf litter under field and lab conditions.

  9. Structure elucidation of a novel oligosaccharide (Medalose) from camel milk

    Gangwar, Lata; Singh, Rinku; Deepak, Desh

    2018-02-01

    Free oligosaccharides are the third most abundant solid component in milk after lactose and lipids. The study of milk oligosaccharides indicate that nutrients are not only benefits the infant's gut but also perform a number of other functions which include stimulation of growth, receptor analogues to inhibit binding of pathogens and substances that promote postnatal brain development. Surveys reveal that camel milk oligosaccharides possess varied biological activities that help in the treatment of diabetes, asthma, anaemia, piles and also a food supplement to milking mothers. In this research, camel milk was selected for its oligosaccharide contents, which was then processed by Kobata and Ginsburg method followed by the HPLC and CC techniques. Structure elucidation of isolated compound was done by the chemical degradation, chemical transformation and comparison of chemical shift of NMR data of natural and acetylated oligosaccharide structure reporter group theory, the 1H, 13C NMR, 2D-NMR (COSY, TOCSY and HSQC) techniques, and mass spectrometry. The structure was elucidated as under: MEDALOSE

  10. Biochemistry of methyl-coenzyme M reductase: the nickel metalloenzyme that catalyzes the final step in synthesis and the first step in anaerobic oxidation of the greenhouse gas methane.

    Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Methane, the major component of natural gas, has been in use in human civilization since ancient times as a source of fuel and light. Methanogens are responsible for synthesis of most of the methane found on Earth. The enzyme responsible for catalyzing the chemical step of methanogenesis is methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), a nickel enzyme that contains a tetrapyrrole cofactor called coenzyme F430, which can traverse the Ni(I), (II), and (III) oxidation states. MCR and methanogens are also involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. This review describes structural, kinetic, and computational studies aimed at elucidating the mechanism of MCR. Such studies are expected to impact the many ramifications of methane in our society and environment, including energy production and greenhouse gas warming.

  11. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  12. Activity of certain enzymes in cadmium-poisoned chicks

    Kench, J E; Gubb, P J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Activities of a number of enzymes in the liver and other tissues of newly hatched cadmium poisoned chicks have been compared with those of normal controls before and after incubation with Cd/sup +2/ at a concentration similar to that present in vivo. Concentrations of Cd/sup +2/ in the various cellular fractions were determined, after wet oxidation, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Interaction of Cd/sup +2/ with enzymes may provide information on the localization of enzymes within mitochondria and other cellular structures. 7 references.

  13. Elucidation of the Structure Formation of Polymer-Conjugated Proteins in Solution and Block Copolymer Templates

    Ferebee, Rachel L.

    The broader technical objective of this work is to contribute to the development of enzyme-functionalized nanoporous membranes that can function as autonomous and target selective dynamic separators. The scientific objective of the research performed within this thesis is to elucidate the parameters that control the mixing of proteins in organic host materials and in block copolymers templates in particular. A "biomimetic" membrane system that uses enzymes to selectively neutralize targets and trigger a change in permeability of nanopores lined with a pH-responsive polymer has been fabricated and characterized. Mechanical and functional stability, as well as scalability, have been demonstrated for this system. Additional research has focused on the role of polymeric ligands on the solubility characteristics of the model protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). For this purpose BSA was conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands of varied degree of polymerization and grafting density. Combined static and dynamic light scattering was used (in conjunction with MALDI-TOF) to determine the second virial coefficient in PBS solutions. At a given mass fraction PEG or average number of grafts, the solubility of BSA-PEG conjugates is found to increase with the degree of polymerization of conjugated PEG. This result informs the synthesis of protein-conjugate systems that are optimized for the fabrication of block copolymer blend materials with maximum protein loading. Blends of BSA-PEG conjugates and block copolymer (BCP) matrices were fabricated to evaluate the dispersion morphology and solubility limits in a model system. Electron microscopy was used to evaluate the changes in lamellar spacing with increased filling fraction of BSA-PEG conjugates.

  14. Exquisite Enzyme-Fenton Biomimetic Catalysts for Hydroxyl Radical Production by Mimicking an Enzyme Cascade.

    Zhang, Qi; Chen, Shuo; Wang, Hua; Yu, Hongtao

    2018-03-14

    Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is a key reactant in the Fenton process. As a byproduct of enzymatic reaction, H 2 O 2 can be obtained via catalytical oxidation of glucose using glucose oxidase in the presence of O 2 . Another oxidation product (gluconic acid) can suitably adjust the microenvironmental pH contributing to the Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ cycle in the Fenton reaction. Enzymes are extremely efficient at catalyzing a variety of reactions with high catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and yields in living organisms. Inspired by the multiple functions of natural multienzyme systems, an exquisite nanozyme-modified α-FeOOH/porous carbon (PC) biomimetic catalyst constructed by in situ growth of glucose oxidase-mimicking Au nanoparticles and crystallization of adsorbed ferric ions within carboxyl into hierarchically PC is developed as an efficient enzyme-Fenton catalyst. The products (H 2 O 2 , ∼4.07 mmol·L -1 ) of the first enzymatic reaction are immediately used as substrates for the second Fenton-like reaction to generate the valuable • OH (∼96.84 μmol·L -1 ), thus mimicking an enzyme cascade pathway. α-FeOOH nanocrystals, attached by C-O-Fe bondings, are encapsulated into the mesoporous PC frameworks, facilitating the electron transfer between α-FeOOH and the PC support and greatly suppressing iron leaching. This study paves a new avenue for designing biomimetic enzyme-based Fenton catalysts mimicking a natural system for • OH production.

  15. elucidating the mechanism of the adsorption of mucin to ...

    dcu user

    . Although some kinetic information has been published on the oxidation of secondary alcohol by Cr(VI) 1,2, 8-16 complementary studies on its possible reaction pathways are scanty. It is in the light of this that the present work was undertaken ...

  16. Heme-containing enzymes and inhibitors for tryptophan metabolism.

    Yan, Daojing; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2017-09-20

    Iron-containing enzymes such as heme enzymes play crucial roles in biological systems. Three distinct heme-containing dioxygenase enzymes, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) catalyze the initial and rate-limiting step of l-tryptophan catabolism through the kynurenine pathway in mammals. Overexpression of these enzymes causes depletion of tryptophan and the accumulation of metabolic products, which contributes to tumor immune tolerance and immune dysregulation in a variety of disease pathologies. In the past few decades, IDO1 has garnered the most attention as a therapeutic target with great potential in cancer immunotherapy. Many potential inhibitors of IDO1 have been designed, synthesized and evaluated, among which indoximod (d-1-MT), INCB024360, GDC-0919 (formerly NLG-919), and an IDO1 peptide-based vaccine have advanced to the clinical trial stage. However, recently, the roles of TDO and IDO2 have been elucidated in immune suppression. In this review, the current drug discovery landscape for targeting TDO, IDO1 and IDO2 is highlighted, with particular attention to the recent use of drugs in clinical trials. Moreover, the crystal structures of these enzymes, in complex with inhibitors, and the mechanisms of Trp catabolism in the first step, are summarized to provide information for facilitating the discovery of new enzyme inhibitors.

  17. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  18. Cellulase enzyme and biomass utilization

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... human population grows and economic development. However, the current .... conditions and the production cost of the related enzyme system. Therefore ... Given the importance of this enzyme to these so many industries,.

  19. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    Sagai Masaru

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The potential mechanisms of action of ozone therapy are reviewed in this paper. The therapeutic efficacy of ozone therapy may be partly due the controlled and moderate oxidative stress produced by the reactions of ozone with several biological components. The line between effectiveness and toxicity of ozone may be dependent on the strength of the oxidative stress. As with exercise, it is well known that moderate exercise is good for health, whereas excessive exercise is not. Severe oxidative stress activates nuclear transcriptional factor kappa B (NFκB, resulting in an inflammatory response and tissue injury via the production of COX2, PGE2, and cytokines. However, moderate oxidative stress activates another nuclear transcriptional factor, nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. Nrf2 then induces the transcription of antioxidant response elements (ARE. Transcription of ARE results in the production of numerous antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, GPx, glutathione-s-transferase(GSTr, catalase (CAT, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase (NQO-1, phase II enzymes of drug metabolism and heat shock proteins (HSP. Both free antioxidants and anti-oxidative enzymes not only protect cells from oxidation and inflammation but they may be able to reverse the chronic oxidative stress. Based on these observations, ozone therapy may also activate Nrf2 via moderate oxidative stress, and suppress NFκB and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, activation of Nrf2 results in protection against neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Mild immune responses are induced via other nuclear transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT and activated protein-1 (AP-1. Additionally, the effectiveness of ozone therapy in vascular diseases may also be explained by the activation of another nuclear transcriptional factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1a, which is also induced via

  20. Chemistry of phospholipid oxidation.

    Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M

    2012-10-01

    The oxidation of lipids has long been a topic of interest in biological and food sciences, and the fundamental principles of non-enzymatic free radical attack on phospholipids are well established, although questions about detail of the mechanisms remain. The number of end products that are formed following the initiation of phospholipid peroxidation is large, and is continually growing as new structures of oxidized phospholipids are elucidated. Common products are phospholipids with esterified isoprostane-like structures and chain-shortened products containing hydroxy, carbonyl or carboxylic acid groups; the carbonyl-containing compounds are reactive and readily form adducts with proteins and other biomolecules. Phospholipids can also be attacked by reactive nitrogen and chlorine species, further expanding the range of products to nitrated and chlorinated phospholipids. Key to understanding the mechanisms of oxidation is the development of advanced and sensitive technologies that enable structural elucidation. Tandem mass spectrometry has proved invaluable in this respect and is generally the method of choice for structural work. A number of studies have investigated whether individual oxidized phospholipid products occur in vivo, and mass spectrometry techniques have been instrumental in detecting a variety of oxidation products in biological samples such as atherosclerotic plaque material, brain tissue, intestinal tissue and plasma, although relatively few have achieved an absolute quantitative analysis. The levels of oxidized phospholipids in vivo is a critical question, as there is now substantial evidence that many of these compounds are bioactive and could contribute to pathology. The challenges for the future will be to adopt lipidomic approaches to map the profile of oxidized phospholipid formation in different biological conditions, and relate this to their effects in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxidized phospholipids

  1. SUCROSE SYNTHASE: ELUCIDATION OF COMPLEX POST-TRANSLATIONAL REGULATORY MECHANISMS

    Steven C. Huber

    2009-05-12

    Studies have focused on the enzyme sucrose synthase, which plays an important role in the metabolism of sucrose in seeds and tubers. There are three isoforms of SUS in maize, referred to as SUS1, SUS-SH1, and SUS2. SUS is generally considered to be tetrameric protein but recent evidence suggests that SUS can also occur as a dimeric protein. The formation of tetrameric SUS is regulated by sucrose concentration in vitro and this could also be an important factor in the cellular localization of the protein. We found that high sucrose concentrations, which promote tetramer formation, also inhibit the binding of SUS1 to actin filaments in vitro. Previously, high sucrose concentrations were shown to promote SUS association with the plasma membrane. The specific regions of the SUS molecule involved in oligomerization are not known, but we identified a region of the SUS1 moelcule by bioinformatic analysis that was predicted to form a coiled coil. We demonstrated that this sequence could, in fact, self-associate as predicted for a coiled coil, but truncation analysis with the full-length recombinant protein suggested that it was not responsible for formation of dimers or tetramers. However, the coiled coil may function in binding of other proteins to SUS1. Overall, sugar availability may differentially influence the binding of SUS to cellular structures, and these effects may be mediated by changes in the oligomeric nature of the enzyme.

  2. Analysis of platelet eluate for the elucidation of sensitization to HLA in kidney transplant candidate

    Hugo Mendonça Mundim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While a 42-year-old male patient was being prepared for deceased-donor renal transplantation, anti-HLA-A2 antibodies were detected in the serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. The patient denied any transfusion history and previous transplant. Crossmatch by complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC and CDC with anti-human globulin (CDC-AHG proved negative with a four-cell panel with positive typing for HLA-A2. Adsorption of antibodies with platelets and analysis of eluate were suggested to elucidate discrepancies in results by ELISA and by CDC-AHG. ELISA showed that adsorbed serum with platelets did not reveal antibodies for HLA-A2 specificity and suggested that they were removed by their specific binding with HLA-A2 antigens on the platelet surface. Eluate analysis by ELISA showed antibodies for HLA-A2 specificity. No antibodies for HLA-A2 specificity in the non-adsorbed serum were detected by CDC-AHG method. Revision of patient’s data showed that a previous transfusion had occurred, which may have been the source of HLA sensitization. The suggested method may be a contribution towards the evaluation of sensitivity between CDC-AHG and ELISA methods for characterizing antibodies in the patient’s serum.

  3. Study of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels in tobacco chewers and smokers: A pilot study

    Chundru Venkata Naga Sirisha

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study gave us an insight about the relationship between antioxidant enzyme activity, oxidative stress and tobacco. The altered antioxidant enzyme levels observed in this study will act as a predictor for pre potentially malignant lesions. Therefore an early intervention of tobacco habit and its related oxidative stress would prevent the development of tobacco induced lesions.

  4. Enzyme That Makes You Cry–Crystal Structure of Lachrymatory Factor Synthase from Allium cepa

    Silvaroli, Josie A. [Department; Pleshinger, Matthew J. [Department; College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, United States; Banerjee, Surajit [Department; Northeastern; Kiser, Philip D. [Department; Research; Cleveland; Golczak, Marcin [Department; Cleveland

    2017-07-26

    The biochemical pathway that gives onions their savor is part of the chemical warfare against microbes and animals. This defense mechanism involves formation of a volatile lachrymatory factor (LF) ((Z)-propanethial S-oxide) that causes familiar eye irritation associated with onion chopping. LF is produced in a reaction catalyzed by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS). The principles by which LFS facilitates conversion of a sulfenic acid substrate into LF have been difficult to experimentally examine owing to the inherent substrate reactivity and lability of LF. To shed light on the mechanism of LF production in the onion, we solved crystal structures of LFS in an apo-form and in complex with a substrate analogue, crotyl alcohol. The enzyme closely resembles the helix-grip fold characteristic for plant representatives of the START (star-related lipid transfer) domain-containing protein superfamily. By comparing the structures of LFS to that of the abscisic acid receptor, PYL10, a representative of the START protein superfamily, we elucidated structural adaptations underlying the catalytic activity of LFS. We also delineated the architecture of the active site, and based on the orientation of the ligand, we propose a mechanism of catalysis that involves sequential proton transfer accompanied by formation of a carbanion intermediate. These findings reconcile chemical and biochemical information regarding thioaldehyde S-oxide formation and close a long-lasting gap in understanding of the mechanism responsible for LF production in the onion.

  5. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  6. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... for several batches of hydrolysis, and thereby reduces the overall cost associated with the hydrolysis. Research on this subject has been ongoing for many years and several promising technologies and methods have been developed and demonstrated. But only in a very few cases have these technologies been...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...

  7. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  8. Enzymatic oxidation of 2-phenylethylamine to phenylacetic acid and 2-phenylethanol with special reference to the metabolism of its intermediate phenylacetaldehyde.

    Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I; Kouretas, Demetrios; Gounaris, Elias G; Beedham, Christine

    2004-12-01

    2-phenylethylamine is an endogenous constituent of the human brain and is implicated in cerebral transmission. This bioactive amine is also present in certain foodstuffs such as chocolate, cheese and wine and may cause undesirable side effects in susceptible individuals. Metabolism of 2-phenylethylamine to phenylacetaldehyde is catalysed by monoamine oxidase B but the oxidation to its acid is usually ascribed to aldehyde dehydrogenase and the contribution of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase, if any, is ignored. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of the molybdenum hydroxylases, aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase, in the metabolism of phenylacetaldehyde derived from its parent biogenic amine. Treatments of 2-phenylethylamine with monoamine oxidase were carried out for the production of phenylacetaldehyde, as well as treatments of synthetic or enzymatic-generated phenylacetaldehyde with aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. The results indicated that phenylacetaldehyde is metabolised mainly to phenylacetic acid with lower concentrations of 2-phenylethanol by all three oxidising enzymes. Aldehyde dehydrogenase was the predominant enzyme involved in phenylacetaldehyde oxidation and thus it has a major role in 2-phenylethylamine metabolism with aldehyde oxidase playing a less prominent role. Xanthine oxidase does not contribute to the oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde due to low amounts being present in guinea pig. Thus aldehyde dehydrogenase is not the only enzyme oxidising xenobiotic and endobiotic aldehydes and the role of aldehyde oxidase in such reactions should not be ignored.

  9. Biochemical basis of the high resistance to oxidative stress in ...

    Unknown

    581. Keywords. Apoptosis; D. discoideum; oxidative stress; antioxidant enzymes; lipid peroxidation ..... multiple toxic effects of oxidative stress that is related to several pathological conditions ... culture. This work was supported by a grant to RB.

  10. [Neuropsychological approach to elucidating delusion and psychotic symptoms].

    Kato, Motoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychological symptom-oriented approach is a critical method to elucidate delusion and psychotic symptoms in patients with focal brain damages and schizophrenia. In Capgras delusion (CD), the delusional misidentification of familiar people disguised as others, the patients with right amygdala damage and bilateral ventromedial prefrontal lesions have a deficient or reduced emotional valence of the person with intact configurational processes of the face. Reduplicative paramnesia (RP) is a specific phenomenon characterized by subjective certainty that a familiar place or person has been duplicated. Clinical evidences indicated that the patient with RP following right prefrontal damages showed the lack of emotional valence for the present hospital. This abnormal sense of familiarity triggered the deficits of the orientation of self to the outside world, that is, double orientation, resulting in the development of geographical reduplicative paramnesia. In line with the pathogenesis of CD and RP after brain damages, the delusion in schizophrenia may have a germ as developmental origins, which include the aberrant or salient perceptual experiences and abnormal sense of agency, and might be further aggravated by the impairment of causal reasoning process such as the jumping-to-conclusions bias.

  11. Elucidating high-dimensional cancer hallmark annotation via enriched ontology.

    Yan, Shankai; Wong, Ka-Chun

    2017-09-01

    Cancer hallmark annotation is a promising technique that could discover novel knowledge about cancer from the biomedical literature. The automated annotation of cancer hallmarks could reveal relevant cancer transformation processes in the literature or extract the articles that correspond to the cancer hallmark of interest. It acts as a complementary approach that can retrieve knowledge from massive text information, advancing numerous focused studies in cancer research. Nonetheless, the high-dimensional nature of cancer hallmark annotation imposes a unique challenge. To address the curse of dimensionality, we compared multiple cancer hallmark annotation methods on 1580 PubMed abstracts. Based on the insights, a novel approach, UDT-RF, which makes use of ontological features is proposed. It expands the feature space via the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) ontology graph and utilizes novel feature selections for elucidating the high-dimensional cancer hallmark annotation space. To demonstrate its effectiveness, state-of-the-art methods are compared and evaluated by a multitude of performance metrics, revealing the full performance spectrum on the full set of cancer hallmarks. Several case studies are conducted, demonstrating how the proposed approach could reveal novel insights into cancers. https://github.com/cskyan/chmannot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nicotinoprotein methanol dehydrogenase enzymes in Gram-positive methylotrophic bacteria

    Hektor, Harm J.; Kloosterman, Harm; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2000-01-01

    A novel type of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme has been characterized from Gram-positive methylotrophic (Bacillus methanolicus, the actinomycetes Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri) and non-methylotrophic bacteria (Rhodococcus strains). Its in vivo role is in oxidation of methanol and

  13. The development, characterization, and application of biomimetic nanoscale enzyme immobilization

    Haase, Nicholas R.

    The utilization of enzymes is of interest for applications such as biosensors and biofuel cells. Immobilizing enzymes provides a means to develop these applications. Previous immobilization efforts have been accomplished by exposing surfaces on which silica-forming molecules are present to solutions containing an enzyme and a silica precursor. This approach leads to the enzyme being entrapped in a matrix three orders of magnitude larger than the enzyme itself, resulting in low retention of enzyme activity. The research herein introduces a method for the immobilization of enzymes during the layer-by-layer buildup of Si-O and Ti-O coatings which are nanoscale in thickness. This approach is an application of a peptide-induced mineral deposition method developed in the Sandhage and Kroger groups, and it involves the alternating exposure of a surface to solutions containing the peptide protamine and then an aqueous precursor solution of silicon- or titanium-oxide at near-neutral pH. A method has been developed that enables in situ immobilization of enzymes in the protamine/mineral oxide coatings. Depending on the layer and mineral (silica or titania) within which the enzyme is incorporated, the resulting multilayer biocatalytic hybrid materials retain 20 -- 100% of the enzyme activity. Analyses of kinetic properties of the immobilized enzyme, coupled with characterization of physical properties of the mineral-bearing layers (thickness, porosity, pore size distribution), indicates that the catalytic activities of the enzymes immobilized in the different layers are largely determined by substrate diffusion. The enzyme was also found to be substantially stabilized against heat-induced denaturation and largely protected from proteolytic attack. These functional coatings are then developed for use as antimicrobial materials. Glucose oxidase, which catalyzes production of the cytotoxic agent hydrogen peroxide, was immobilized with silver nanoparticles, can release

  14. Application of enzyme leach soil analysis for epithermal gold exploration in the Andes of Ecuador

    Williams, T.M.; Gunn, A.G. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Enzyme Leach (EL) soil surveys were undertaken over known epithermal Au mineralisation at El Mozo and Llano Largo, Azuay, Ecuador to assess the utility of the technique for identifying such deposits in the Ecuadorian Andes. The results indicate the development of both apical- and oxidation-type EL anomalies over auriferous structures at the two sites, the former systematically incorporating Au, and the latter Cl and Br. The spectrum of elements responsive to mineralisation at El Mozo (Cl, Br, I, La, Ce, Nd, Cu, Pb, Au, As, Sb, Ag, Zr, Sr) was found to be considerably greater than at Llano Largo (Cl, Br, Au, As, Sb, Ag, Zn), probably reflecting the contrasting high- and low-sulphidation assemblages of the two prospects. Ratios of EL versus aqua-regia extractable trace element concentrations ranged from 1: < 100 for Mn to 1: >400 for chalcophile elements such as Pb, Sb, As, Bi and Ag. Strong correlations between the concentrations of several analytes (including Mn, Sr, Cu, Co, As) extracted by the two procedures indicate, however, that EL datasets are extensively influenced by bulk matrix composition. Spatial variations of EL extractable Mn were found to exert no major influence on apical or oxidation suite anomaly patterns at El Mozo. However, Mn-normalisation of halogen data for Llano Largo elucidated otherwise obscure oxidation features, potentially related to Au mineralisation. Ratios between elements subject to apical enrichment and those of the oxidation suite (e.g. Cl/Au and Bi/Br) were found to highlight known Au targets with improved clarity. The formation mechanism of the recorded Au anomalies is uncertain, but may involve physical enrichment of Au in the soil during pedogenesis with subsequent in-situ formation of (EL soluble) Au halide complexes. The strength of such apical features is, in part, probably a function of the minimal depths to mineralisation which characterise El Mozo and Llano Largo. Oxidation halos formed by volatile non-metallic elements

  15. Bimetallic-organic framework derived porous Co3O4/Fe3O4/C-loaded g-C3N4 nanocomposites as non-enzymic electrocatalysis oxidization toward ascorbic acid, dopamine acid, and uric acid

    Hu, Bin; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Zhuo-Wei; Song, Yingpan; Wang, Minghua; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Chun-Sen

    2018-05-01

    We report on the synthesis of Co- and Fe-based bimetallic nanocatalysts embedded in mesoporous carbon and g-C3N4 nanosheets (denoted as Co3O4/Fe3O4/mC@g-C3N4) for selectively simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine acid (DA), and uric acid (UA). These electrocatalysts consisting of bimetallic Co-Fe alloy nanoparticles encapsulated in N-doped carbon matrix were prepared via pyrolysis of Co/Fe-MOFs after grinding with high amounts of melamine. Chemical/crystal structures suggest high contents of mesoporous carbon in calcinated Co3O4/Fe3O4/mC nanocomposites, which exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward small biomolecules. The intrinsic performances of Co/Fe-MOFs with large specific surface area and regular nodes in the two-dimensional nanostructured g-C3N4 nanosheets endowed the as-prepared series of Co3O4/Fe3O4/mC@g-C3N4 nanocomposites with remarkable electrocatalytic activities and high adsorption ability toward oxidation of AA, DA, and UA. The developed biosensors also showed long-term stability and high selectivity for targeted analytes, with satisfactory results on actual samples in human urine. The results indicate that the as-synthesized Co3O4/Fe3O4/mC@g-C3N4 nanostructure exhibits good electrocatalytic activity and potential applications in clinical diagnosis and biosensing.

  16. Effect of neonatal malnutrition on expression of nitric oxide synthase enzyme, production of free radicals and in vitro viability of alveolar macrophages infected with methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    de Morais, Natália Gomes; da Costa, Thacianna Barreto; Pedrosa, Amanda Lúcia Farias; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; da Gonçalves de Albuquerque, Suênia Cunha; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; de Paiva Cavalcanti, Milena; de Castro, Célia Maria Machado Barbosa

    2016-02-01

    Evaluate the effects of neonatal malnutrition on the microbicidal response and viability of in vitro macrophages infected with Staphylococcus aureus sensitive/resistant to methicillin. Male Wistar rats (n = 24) were divided into two distinct groups: nourished (rats breast-fed by mothers undergoing diet with 17% casein) and malnourished (rats breast-fed by mothers undergoing diet with 8% casein). Macrophages were recovered after surgical tracheostomy procedure by collecting bronchoalveolar lavage. Four systems were established: negative control, composed only by phagocytes; positive control, macrophages plus lipopolysaccharide; and two test systems, macrophages plus Staphylococcus aureus sensitive and resistant to methicillin. Plates were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. After this period, tests for the analysis of cell viability and microbicidal response were performed. In the statistical analysis, the Student's t and ANOVA tests were used, accepting p resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, increased production of superoxide anion in the malnourished group was detected. Neonatal malnutrition focusing on critical periods of development promoted lower expression of iNOS, nitric oxide production, cell viability, and exacerbated reactive oxygen species production. The high levels of reactive oxygen species may favor the onset of serious and systemic infections with fatal outcome if associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  17. On enzyme kinetic parameters modification of gamma irradiation

    Ferdes, O.S.; Ferdes, M.; Turcu, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gamma-ray action on biomolecules there were investigated the modifications in activity and other kinetic parameters for some enzymes irradiated in pure dry state at relative high doses. There were considered bacterial and fungal α-amylases, glucoamylase and Mucor sp. protease irradiated by a 60 Co gamma-ray source in the dose range 1.0-30.0 kGy, at different dose-rates between 0.5-2.0 kGy/h, at room temperature. Considering the enzyme inactivation in this dose range, the dose-effect relationships have an expected form and depend on the irradiation conditions but not significantly on the dose rate. The catalytic properties of enzymes were modified by irradiation. By usual methods it is evidenced a direct correlation between the enzymatic activities, Michaelis-Menten constant, K m , reaction velocities, v, and the irradiation dose. These experimental findings can support a self-consistent theoretical approach on biophysical radiation action on biological active molecules like enzymes. At the same time, some enzyme behaviour to irradiation could be considered like a good biological indicator of radiation response. (Author) 4 Figs., 19 Refs

  18. Elucidation of the pathways of catabolic glutamate conversion in three thermophilic anaerobic bacteria.

    Plugge, C M; van Leeuwen, J M; Hummelen, T; Balk, M; Stams, A J

    2001-07-01

    The glutamate catabolism of three thermophilic syntrophic anaerobes was compared based on the combined use of [(13)C] glutamate NMR measurements and enzyme activity determinations. In some cases the uptake of intermediates from different pathways was studied. The three organisms, Caloramator coolhaasii, Thermanaerovibrio acidaminovorans and strain TGO, had a different stoichiometry of glutamate conversion and were dependent on the presence of a hydrogen scavenger (Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Z245) to a different degree for their growth. C. coolhaasii formed acetate, CO(2), NH(4)(+) and H(2) from glutamate. Acetate was found to be formed through the beta-methylaspartate pathway in pure culture as well as in coculture. T. acidaminovorans converted glutamate to acetate, propionate, CO(2), NH(4)(+) and H(2). Most likely, this organism uses the beta-methylaspartate pathway for acetate formation. Propionate formation occurred through a direct oxidation of glutamate via succinyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA. The metabolism of T. acidaminovorans shifted in favour of propionate formation when grown in coculture with the methanogen, but this did not lead to the use of a different glutamate degradation pathway. Strain TGO, an obligate syntrophic glutamate-degrading organism, formed propionate, traces of succinate, CO(2), NH(4)(+) and H(2). Glutamate was converted to propionate oxidatively via the intermediates succinyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA. A minor part of the succinyl-CoA was converted to succinate and excreted.

  19. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  20. Elucidation of Operon Structures across Closely Related Bacterial Genomes

    Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components. PMID:24959722

  1. Synthetic Elucidation of Design Principles for Molecular Qubits

    Graham, Michael James

    Quantum information processing (QIP) is an emerging computational paradigm with the potential to enable a vast increase in computational power, fundamentally transforming fields from structural biology to finance. QIP employs qubits, or quantum bits, as its fundamental units of information, which can exist in not just the classical states of 0 or 1, but in a superposition of the two. In order to successfully perform QIP, this superposition state must be sufficiently long-lived. One promising paradigm for the implementation of QIP involves employing unpaired electrons in coordination complexes as qubits. This architecture is highly tunable and scalable, however coordination complexes frequently suffer from short superposition lifetimes, or T2. In order to capitalize on the promise of molecular qubits, it is necessary to develop a set of design principles that allow the rational synthesis of complexes with sufficiently long values of T2. In this dissertation, I report efforts to use the synthesis of series of complexes to elucidate design principles for molecular qubits. Chapter 1 details previous work by our group and others in the field. Chapter 2 details the first efforts of our group to determine the impact of varying spin and spin-orbit coupling on T2. Chapter 3 examines the effect of removing nuclear spins on coherence time, and reports a series of vanadyl bis(dithiolene) complexes which exhibit extremely long coherence lifetimes, in excess of the 100 mus threshold for qubit viability. Chapters 4 and 5 form two complimentary halves of a study to determine the exact relationship between electronic spin-nuclear spin distance and the effect of the nuclear spins on T2. Finally, chapter 6 suggests next directions for the field as a whole, including the potential for work in this field to impact the development of other technologies as diverse as quantum sensors and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

  2. Effect of turmeric on xenobiotic metabolising enzymes.

    Goud, V K; Polasa, K; Krishnaswamy, K

    1993-07-01

    Diet contains several substances capable of inhibiting chemical carcinogenesis. It is known that such inhibitors may either act directly by scavenging the reactive substances or indirectly by promoting mechanisms which enhance detoxification. Turmeric which contains curcumin both in vitro and in vivo is an active antimutagen. Studies were therefore conducted to evaluate the effects of turmeric on xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in hepatic tissue of rats fed turmeric ranging from 0.5-10% in the diet. Enzymes such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, UDP glucuronyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase were assayed after four weeks of turmeric fed diets. No significant differences were seen in the activating enzyme AHH. However, UDPGT was significantly elevated in rats fed 10% turmeric while GSHT registered a significant increase in 5 and 10% turmeric fed diet as compared to controls and 0.5-1.0% turmeric fed animals. The results suggest that turmeric may increase detoxification systems in addition to its anti-oxidant properties. Curcumin perhaps is the active principle in turmeric. Turmeric used widely as a spice would probably mitigate the effects of several dietary carcinogens.

  3. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  4. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D.

    1990-01-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of [2H5]phenylalanine, [1-13C]propionate, and [1-13C]leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD

  5. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  6. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, and the use of molecular tools, including mice deficient in either enzyme, has shed light on their functions. Although DGAT enzymes are involved in TG synthesis, they have distinct protein sequences and differ in their biochemical, cellular, and physiological functions. Both enzymes may be useful as therapeutic targets for diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of DGAT enzymes, focusing on new advances since the cloning of their genes, including possible roles in human health and diseases. PMID:18757836

  7. Enzyme stabilization for pesticide degradation

    Rivers, D.B.; Frazer, F.R. III; Mason, D.W.; Tice, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymes offer inherent advantages and limitations as active components of formulations used to decontaminate soil and equipment contaminated with toxic materials such as pesticides. Because of the catalytic nature of enzymes, each molecule of enzyme has the potential to destroy countless molecules of a contaminating toxic compound. This degradation takes place under mild environmental conditions of pH, temperature, pressure, and solvent. The basic limitation of enzymes is their degree of stability during storage and application conditions. Stabilizing methods such as the use of additives, covalent crosslinking, covalent attachment, gel entrapment, and microencapsulation have been directed developing an enzyme preparation that is stable under extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to organic solvents. Initial studies were conducted using the model enzymes subtilisin and horseradish peroxidase.

  8. Essential elucidation for preparation of supported nickel phosphide upon nickel phosphate precursor

    Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Baoquan

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of supported nickel phosphide (Ni 2 P) depends on nickel phosphate precursor, generally related to its chemical composition and supports. Study of this dependence is essential and meaningful for the preparation of supported Ni 2 P with excellent catalytic activity. The chemical nature of nickel phosphate precursor is revealed by Raman and UV–vis spectra. It is found that initial P/Ni mole ratio ≥0.8 prohibits the Ni-O-Ni bridge bonding (i.e., nickel oxide). This chemical bonding will not result in Ni 2 P structure, verified by XRD characterization results. The alumina (namely, γ-Al 2 O 3 , θ-Al 2 O 3 , or α-Al 2 O 3 ) with distinct physiochemical properties also results in diverse chemical nature of nickel phosphate, and then different nickel phosphides. The influence of alumina support on producing Ni 2 P was explained by the theory of surface energy heterogeneity, calculated by the NLDFT method based on N 2 -sorption isotherm. The uniform surface energy of α-Al 2 O 3 results only in the nickel phosphosate precursor and thus the Ni 2 P phase. - Graphical abstract: Surface energy heterogeneity in alumina (namely α-Al 2 O 3 , θ-Al 2 O 3 , and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) supported multi-oxidic precursors with different reducibilities and thus diverse nickel phosphides (i.e., Ni 3 P, Ni 12 P 5 , Ni 2 P). - Highlights: • Preparing pure Ni 2 P. • Elucidating nickel phosphate precursor. • Associating with surface energy

  9. Direct comparison of enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to localize an enzyme

    van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2002-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes is compared directly with localization of enzyme activity with (catalytic) enzyme histochemical methods. The two approaches demonstrate principally different aspects of an enzyme. The immunohistochemical method localizes the enzyme protein whether it is

  10. Engineered Nickel Oxide Nanoparticle Causes Substantial Physicochemical Perturbation in Plants

    Indrani Manna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Concentration of engineered nickel oxide nanoparticle (NiO-NP in nature is on the rise, owing to large scale industrial uses, which have accreted the scope of its exposure to plants, the primary producers of the ecosystem. Though an essential micronutrient for the animal system, supported by numerous studies confirming its toxicity at higher dosages, nickel oxide is graded as a human carcinogen by WHO. A few studies do depict toxicity and bioaccumulation of nickel in plants; however, interaction of NiO-NP with plants is not well-elucidated. It is known that exposure to NiO-NP can incite stress response, leading to cytotoxicity and growth retardation in some plants, but a defined work on the intricate physicochemical cellular responses and genotoxic challenges is wanting. The present study was planned to explore cytotoxicity of NiO-NP in the model plant, Allium cepa L., its internalization in the tissue and concomitant furore created in the antioxidant enzyme system of the plant. The prospect of the NiO-NP causing genotoxicity was also investigated. Detailed assessments biochemical profiles and genotoxicity potential of NiO-NP on A. cepa L. was performed and extended to four of its closest economically important relatives, Allium sativum L., Allium schoenoprasum L., Allium porrum L., and Allium fistulosum L. Growing root tips were treated with seven different concentrations of NiO-NP suspension (10–500 mg L−1, with deionised distilled water as negative control and 0.4 mM EMS solution as positive control. Study of genotoxic endpoints, like, mitotic indices (MI, chromosomal aberrations (CAs, and chromosome breaks confirmed NiO-NP induced genotoxicity in plants, even at a very low dose (10 mg L−1. That NiO-NP also perturbs biochemical homeostasis, disrupting normal physiology of the cell, was confirmed through changes in state of lipid peroxidation malonaldehyde (MDA, as well as, in oxidation marker enzymes, like catalase (CAT, super oxide

  11. A mechanistic study on the oxidative coupling of methane over lithium doped magnesium oxide catalysts

    Geerts, J.W.M.H.; Kasteren, van J.M.N.; Wiele, van der K.; Imarisio, G.; Frias, M.; Berntgen, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the importance of various reaction steps in the oxidative convers ion of methane, experiments were carried out with three reaction products: ethane, ethylene and carbon monoxide. These products were studied seperately, in oxidation experiments with and without a catalyst. Moreover , the

  12. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  14. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  15. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    Grace, Joseph M.; Verseux, Cyprien; Gentry, Diana; Moffet, Amy; Thayabaran, Ramanen; Wong, Nathan; Rothschild, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of bacteria to the presence of a toxic metal, automatically adjusting the level of toxicity based on the

  16. Global characterization of in vivo enzyme catalytic rates and their correspondence to in vitro kcat measurements

    Davidi, Dan; Noor, Elad; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Bar-Even, Arren; Flamholz, Avi; Tummler, Katja; Barenholz, Uri; Goldenfeld, Miki; Shlomi, Tomer; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Turnover numbers, also known as kcat values, are fundamental properties of enzymes. However, kcat data are scarce and measured in vitro, thus may not faithfully represent the in vivo situation. A basic question that awaits elucidation is: how representative are kcat values for the maximal catalytic rates of enzymes in vivo? Here, we harness omics data to calculate kmaxvivo, the observed maximal catalytic rate of an enzyme inside cells. Comparison with kcat values from Escherichia coli, yields a correlation of r2= 0.62 in log scale (p enzymes and the backward flux dictated by thermodynamics, we further refine the correspondence between kmaxvivo and kcat values. The approach we present here characterizes the quantitative relationship between enzymatic catalysis in vitro and in vivo and offers a high-throughput method for extracting enzyme kinetic constants from omics data. PMID:26951675

  17. Analysis of enzyme production by submerged culture of Aspergillus oryzae using whole barley.

    Masuda, Susumu; Kikuchi, Kaori; Matsumoto, Yuko; Sugimoto, Toshikazu; Shoji, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Masayuki

    2009-10-01

    We have reported on high enzyme production by submerged culture of Aspergillus kawachii using barley with the husk (whole barley). To elucidate the mechanism underlying this high enzyme production, we performed a detailed analysis. Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 was submerged-cultured using whole barley and milled whole barley. Enzyme production was analyzed in terms of changes in medium components and gene expression levels. When whole barley was used, high production of glucoamylase and alpha-amylase and high gene expression levels of these enzymes were observed. Low ammonium concentrations were maintained with nitrate ion uptake continuing into the late stage using whole barley. These findings suggest that the sustainability of nitrogen metabolism is related to high enzyme production, and that a mechanism other than that associated with the conventional amylase expression system is involved in this relationship.

  18. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  19. Differential oxidative and antioxidative response of duckweed Lemna minor toward plant growth promoting/inhibiting bacteria.

    Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Kuroda, Masashi; Morikawa, Masaaki; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria colonizing the plant rhizosphere are believed to positively or negatively affect the host plant productivity. This feature has inspired researchers to engineer such interactions to enhance crop production. However, it remains to be elucidated whether rhizobacteria influences plant oxidative stress vis-a-vis other environmental stressors, and whether such influence is associated with their growth promoting/inhibiting ability. In this study, two plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) and two plant growth-inhibiting bacteria (PGIB) were separately inoculated into axenic duckweed (Lemna minor) culture under laboratory conditions for 4 and 8 days in order to investigate their effects on plant oxidative stress and antioxidant activities. As previously characterized, the inoculation of PGPB and PGIB strains accelerated and reduced the growth of L. minor, respectively. After 4 and 8 days of cultivation, compared to the PGPB strains, the PGIB strains induced larger amounts of O 2 •- , H 2 O 2 , and malondialdehyde (MDA) in duckweed, although all bacterial strains consistently increased O 2 •- content by two times more than that in the aseptic control plants. Activities of five antioxidant enzymes were also elevated by the inoculation of PGIB, confirming the severe oxidative stress condition in plants. These results suggest that the surface attached bacteria affect differently on host oxidative stress and its response, which degree correlates negatively to their effects on plant growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The microglial NADPH oxidase complex as a source of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Landreth Gary E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, and manifests as progressive cognitive decline and profound neuronal loss. The principal neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are the senile plaques and the neurofibrillary tangles. The senile plaques are surrounded by activated microglia, which are largely responsible for the proinflammatory environment within the diseased brain. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells in the brain. In response to contact with fibrillar beta-amyloid, microglia secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory molecules. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress emanating from activated microglia contribute to the neuronal loss characteristic of this disease. The source of fibrillar beta-amyloid induced reactive oxygen species is primarily the microglial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase. The NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme complex that, upon activation, produces the highly reactive free radical superoxide. The cascade of intracellular signaling events leading to NADPH oxidase assembly and the subsequent release of superoxide in fibrillar beta-amyloid stimulated microglia has recently been elucidated. The induction of reactive oxygen species, as well as nitric oxide, from activated microglia can enhance the production of more potent free radicals such as peroxynitrite. The formation of peroxynitrite causes protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, which ultimately lead to neuronal cell death. The elimination of beta-amyloid-induced oxidative damage through the inhibition of the NADPH oxidase represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. HT oxidation activity of soil irradiated with gamma radiation

    Momoshima, Noriyuki; Tjahaja, P.I.; Takashima, Yoshimasa

    1992-01-01

    The HT oxidation activity was examined for soils irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays at various doses. The HT oxidation rate decreased with increase of initial H 2 concentration, indicating a similar oxidation mechanism between HT and H 2 . Irradiated soils showed decrease of oxidation activity with dose suggests that HT and H 2 oxidation activities were affected by sterilization with γ-rays. The decline of the oxidation activity with dose was analyzed by a composite of two components with different radiosensitivity and they were considered to be activities of soil microorganisms and abiotic soil enzymes. The oxidation activity due to soil microorganisms would be important at low dose range and more radioresistant abiotic soil enzymes would be responsible for the oxidation activity observed at more than several kGy. In non-irradiated soil about half of the oxidation activity was considered resulting from abiotic soil enzymes. (author)

  2. In vivo oxidative stress alters thiol redox status of peroxiredoxin 1 and 6 and impairs rat sperm quality

    Yannan Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and antioxidant activity is a major culprit of male infertility. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs are major antioxidant enzymes of mammalian spermatozoa and are thiol oxidized and inactivated by ROS in a dose-dependent manner. Their deficiency and/or inactivation have been associated with men infertility. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of oxidative stress, generated by the in vivo tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BHP treatment on rat epididymal spermatozoa during their maturation process. Adult Sprague-Dawley males were treated with 300 μmoles tert-BHP/kg or saline (control per day intraperitoneal for 15 days. Lipid peroxidation (2-thibarbituric acid reactive substances assay, total amount and thiol oxidation of PRDXs along with the total amount of superoxide dismutase (SOD, motility and DNA oxidation (8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine were determined in epididymal spermatozoa. Total amount of PRDXs and catalase and thiol oxidation of PRDXs were determined in caput and cauda epididymis. While animals were not affected by treatment, their epididymal spermatozoa have decreased motility, increased levels of DNA oxidation and lipid peroxidation along with increased PRDXs (and not SOD amounts. Moreover, sperm PRDXs were highly thiol oxidized. There was a differential regulation in the expression of PRDX1 and PRDX6 in the epididymis that suggests a segment-specific role for PRDXs. In conclusion, PRDXs are increased in epididymal spermatozoa in an attempt to fight against the oxidative stress generated by tert-BHP in the epididymis. These findings highlight the role of PRDXs in the protection of sperm function and DNA integrity during epididymal maturation.

  3. The Protective Roles of the Antioxidant Enzymes Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in the Green Photosynthetic Bacterium Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    Blankenship, Robert E.; Rothschild, Lynn (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the biochemical response of the green thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus to oxidative stress. Lab experiments focused primarily on characterizing the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and the response of this organism to oxidative stress. Experiments in the field at the hotsprings in Yellowstone National Park focused on the changes in the level of these enzymes during the day in response to oxidants and to the different types of ultraviolet radiation.

  4. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  6. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    Enzymes have long been of interest to the detergent industry due to their ability to improve the cleaning efficiency of synthetic detergents, contribute to shortening washing times, and reduce energy and water consumption, provision of environmentally friendlier wash water effluents and fabric care....... However, incorporating enzymes in detergent formulations gives rise to numerous practical problems due to their incompatibility with and stability against various detergent components. In powdered detergent formulations, these issues can be partly overcome by physically isolating the enzymes in separate...... particles. However, enzymes may loose a significant part of their activity over a time period of several weeks. Possible causes of inactivation of enzymes in a granule may be related to the release of hydrogen peroxide from the bleaching chemicals in a moisture-containing atmosphere, humidity, autolysis...

  7. Proteasomal control of cytokinin synthesis protects Mycobacterium tuberculosis against nitric oxide

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Tu, Shengjiang; Novák, Ondřej; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; McAllister, Fiona E.; Aravind, L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Strnad, Miroslav; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Summary One of several roles of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome is to defend against host-produced nitric oxide (NO), a free radical that can damage numerous biological macromolecules. Mutations that inactivate proteasomal degradation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in bacteria that are hypersensitive to NO and attenuated for growth in vivo, but it was not known why. To elucidate the link between proteasome function, NO-resistance, and pathogenesis, we screened for suppressors of NO hypersensitivity in a mycobacterial proteasome ATPase mutant and identified mutations in Rv1205. We determined that Rv1205 encodes a pupylated proteasome substrate. Rv1205 is a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY, which catalyzes the production of hormones called cytokinins. Remarkably, we report for the first time that an obligate human pathogen secretes several cytokinins. Finally, we determined that the Rv1205-dependent accumulation of cytokinin breakdown products is likely responsible for the sensitization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome-associated mutants to NO. PMID:25728768

  8. Enzymes in Human Milk.

    Dallas, David C; German, J Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Milk proteins are a complex and diverse source of biological activities. Beyond their function, intact milk proteins also act as carriers of encrypted functional sequences that, when released as peptides, exert biological functions, including antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity, which could contribute to the infant's competitive success. Research has now revealed that the release of these functional peptides begins within the mammary gland itself. A complex array of proteases produced in mother's milk has been shown to be active in the milk, releasing these peptides. Moreover, our recent research demonstrates that these milk proteases continue to digest milk proteins within the infant's stomach, possibly even to a larger extent than the infant's own proteases. As the neonate has relatively low digestive capacity, the activity of milk proteases in the infant may provide important assistance to digesting milk proteins. The coordinated release of these encrypted sequences is accomplished by selective proteolytic action provided by an array of native milk proteases and infant-produced enzymes. The task for scientists is now to discover the selective advantages of this protein-protease-based peptide release system. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  10. A century of enzyme kinetic analysis, 1913 to 2013.

    Johnson, Kenneth A

    2013-09-02

    This review traces the history and logical progression of methods for quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics from the 1913 Michaelis and Menten paper to the application of modern computational methods today. Following a brief review of methods for fitting steady state kinetic data, modern methods are highlighted for fitting full progress curve kinetics based upon numerical integration of rate equations, including a re-analysis of the original Michaelis-Menten full time course kinetic data. Finally, several illustrations of modern transient state kinetic methods of analysis are shown which enable the elucidation of reactions occurring at the active sites of enzymes in order to relate structure and function. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Digestive enzymes of some earthworms.

    Mishra, P C; Dash, M C

    1980-10-15

    4 species of tropical earthworms differed with regard to enzyme activity. The maximum activity of protease and of cellulase occurred in the posterior region of the gut of the earthworms. On the average Octochaetona surensis shows maximum activity and Drawida calebi shows minimum activity for all the enzymes studied.

  12. Elucidating Adsorptive Fractions of Natural Organic Matter on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Ateia, Mohamed; Apul, Onur G; Shimizu, Yuta; Muflihah, Astri; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-06-20

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds that is omnipresent in natural waters. To date, the understanding of the adsorption of NOM components by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is limited because of the limited number of comprehensive studies in the literature examining the adsorption of NOM by CNTs. In this study, 11 standard NOM samples from various sources were characterized, and their adsorption behaviors on four different CNTs were examined side-by-side using total organic carbon, fluorescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analysis. Adsorption was influenced by the chemical properties of the NOM, including aromaticity, degree of oxidation, and carboxylic acidity. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) analysis showed preferential adsorption of decomposed and terrestrial-derived NOM compared to freshly produced and microbial-derived NOM. HPSEC analysis revealed preferential adsorption of fractions in the molecular weight range of 0.5-2 kDa for humic acids but in the molecular weight range of 1-3 kDa for all fulvic acids and reverse-osmosis isolates. However, the smallest characterized fraction (MW < 0.4 kDa) in all samples did not adsorb on the CNTs.

  13. Photoreactivating enzyme from Escherichia coli

    Snapka, R.M.; Fuselier, C.O.

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) has been purified in large amounts from an E.coli strain lysogenic for a defective lambda bacteriophage carrying the phr gene. The resulting enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.2 and an ionic strength optimum of 0.18. It consisted of an apoprotein and cofactor, both of which were necessary for catalytic activity. The apoprotein had a monomer molecular weight of 35,200 and showed stable aggregates under denaturing conditions. The amino acid analysis of the E.coli enzyme was very similar to that of the photoreactivating enzyme from orchid seedlings (Cattelya aurantiaca). Both had arginine at the amino terminus. The cofactor, like the holoenzyme, showed absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and emission properties indicative of an adenine moiety. Although the isolated enzyme had an action spectrum which peaked at about 360 nm, neither the cofactor, apoenzyme nor holoenzyme showed any detectable absorption between 300 and 400 nm. (author)

  14. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  15. Photoreactivating enzyme from Escherichia coli

    Snapka, R M; Fuselier, C O [California Univ., Irvine (USA)

    1977-05-01

    Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) has been purified in large amounts from an E.coli strain lysogenic for a defective lambda bacteriophage carrying the phr gene. The resulting enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.2 and an ionic strength optimum of 0.18. It consisted of an apoprotein and cofactor, both of which were necessary for catalytic activity. The apoprotein had a monomer molecular weight of 35,200 and showed stable aggregates under denaturing conditions. The amino acid analysis of the E.coli enzyme was very similar to that of the photoreactivating enzyme from orchid seedlings (Cattelya aurantiaca). Both had arginine at the amino terminus. The cofactor, like the holoenzyme, showed absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and emission properties indicative of an adenine moiety. Although the isolated enzyme had an action spectrum which peaked at about 360 nm, neither the cofactor, apoenzyme nor holoenzyme showed any detectable absorption between 300 and 400 nm.

  16. Addressing the Recalcitrance of Cellulose Degradation through Cellulase Discovery, Nano-scale Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms, and Kinetic Modeling

    Walker, Larry P., Bergstrom, Gary; Corgie, Stephane; Craighead, Harold; Gibson, Donna; Wilson, David

    2011-06-13

    This research project was designed to play a vital role in the development of low cost sugars from cellulosic biomass and contributing to the national effort to displace fossil fuel usage in the USA transportation sector. The goal was to expand the portfolio of cell wall degrading enzymes through innovative research at the nano-scale level, prospecting for novel cellulases and building a kinetic framework for the development of more effective enzymatic conversion processes. More precisely, the goal was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for some cellulases that are very familiar to members of our research team and to investigate what we hope are novel cellulases or new enzyme combinations from the world of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Hydrolytic activities of various cellulases and cellulase cocktails were monitored at the nanoscale of cellulose fibrils and the microscale of pretreated cellulose particles, and we integrated this insight into a heterogeneous reaction framework. The over-riding approach for this research program was the application of innovative and cutting edge optical and high-throughput screening and analysis techniques for observing how cellulases hydrolyze real substrates.

  17. Androgen receptor requires JunD as a coactivator to switch on an oxidative stress generation pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Basu, Hirak S; Church, Dawn R; Hoffmann, F Michael; Wilding, George

    2010-06-01

    Relatively high oxidative stress levels in the prostate are postulated to be a major factor for prostate carcinogenesis and prostate cancer (CaP) progression. We focused on elucidating metabolic pathways of oxidative stress generation in CaP cells. Previously, we showed that the transcription factor JunD is essential for androgen-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in androgen-dependent human CaP cells. We also recently showed that androgen induces the first and regulatory enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in a polyamine catabolic pathway that produces copious amounts of metabolic ROS. Here, we present coimmunoprecipitation and Gaussia luciferase reconstitution assay data that show that JunD forms a complex with androgen-activated androgen receptor (AR) in situ. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation assay data show that JunD binds directly to a specific SSAT promoter sequence only in androgen-treated LNCaP cells. Using a vector containing a luciferase reporter gene connected to the SSAT promoter and a JunD-silenced LNCaP cell line, we show that JunD is essential for androgen-induced SSAT gene expression. The elucidation of JunD-AR complex inducing SSAT expression leading to polyamine oxidation establishes the mechanistic basis of androgen-induced ROS production in CaP cells and opens up a new prostate-specific target for CaP chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic drug development. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  18. BAKERY ENZYMES IN CEREAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Václav Koman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE Bread is the most common and traditional food in the world. For years, enzymes such as malt and fungal alpha-amylase have been used in bread making. Due to the changes in the baking industry and the ever-increasing demand for more natural products, enzymes have gained real importance in bread-making. If an enzyme is added, it is often destroyed by the heat during the baking process. For generations, enzymes have been used for the improvement of texture and appearance, enhancement of nutritional values and generation of appealing flavours and aromas. Enzymes used in bakery industry constitute nearly one third of the market. The bakery products have undergone radical improvements in quality over the past years in terms of flavour, texture and shelf-life. The the biggest contributor for these improvementsis the usage of enzymes. Present work seeks to systematically describe bakery enzymes, their classification, benefits, usage and chemical reactions in the bread making process.doi:10.5219/193

  19. Nutrigenetics and modulation of oxidative stress.

    Da Costa, Laura A; Badawi, Alaa; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress develops as a result of an imbalance between the production and accumulation of reactive species and the body's ability to manage them using exogenous and endogenous antioxidants. Exogenous antioxidants obtained from the diet, including vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotenoids, have important roles in preventing and reducing oxidative stress. Individual genetic variation affecting proteins involved in the uptake, utilization and metabolism of these antioxidants may alter their serum levels, exposure to target cells and subsequent contribution to the extent of oxidative stress. Endogenous antioxidants include the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, paraoxanase, and glutathione S-transferase. These enzymes metabolize reactive species and their by-products, reducing oxidative stress. Variation in the genes coding these enzymes may impact their enzymatic antioxidant activity and, thus, the levels of reactive species, oxidative stress, and risk of disease development. Oxidative stress may contribute to the development of chronic disease, including osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Indeed, polymorphisms in most of the genes that code for antioxidant enzymes have been associated with several types of cancer, although inconsistent findings between studies have been reported. These inconsistencies may, in part, be explained by interactions with the environment, such as modification by diet. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies in the field of nutrigenetics, which have examined interactions between diet, genetic variation in antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Automated analyzer of enzyme immunoassay].

    Osawa, S

    1995-09-01

    Automated analyzers for enzyme immunoassay can be classified by several points of view: the kind of labeled antibodies or enzymes, detection methods, the number of tests per unit time, analytical time and speed per run. In practice, it is important for us consider the several points such as detection limits, the number of tests per unit time, analytical range, and precision. Most of the automated analyzers on the market can randomly access and measure samples. I will describe the recent advance of automated analyzers reviewing their labeling antibodies and enzymes, the detection methods, the number of test per unit time and analytical time and speed per test.

  1. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase.

    Carlin, D A; Bertolani, S J; Siegel, J B

    2015-02-11

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  2. Preventive effect of zinc on nickel-induced oxidative liver injury in rats

    MIDOU

    2013-12-18

    Dec 18, 2013 ... induced oxidative liver injury and lipid peroxidation probably due to its antioxidant proprieties. ... enzyme in every enzyme classification (Coyle et al.,. 2002). Others .... control group had a regular histological structure with a.

  3. Finding Biomass Degrading Enzymes Through an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP)

    Ma, Hongyan; Delafield, Daniel G.; Wang, Zhe; You, Jianlan; Wu, Si

    2017-04-01

    The microbial secretome, known as a pool of biomass (i.e., plant-based materials) degrading enzymes, can be utilized to discover industrial enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Proteomics approaches have been applied to discover novel enzyme candidates through comparing protein expression profiles with enzyme activity of the whole secretome under different growth conditions. However, the activity measurement of each enzyme candidate is needed for confident "active" enzyme assignments, which remains to be elucidated. To address this challenge, we have developed an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP) that systematically correlates protein-level enzymatic activity patterns and protein elution profiles using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. The ACPP optimized a high performance anion exchange separation for efficiently fractionating complex protein samples while preserving enzymatic activities. The detected enzymatic activity patterns in sequential fractions using microplate-based assays were cross-correlated with protein elution profiles using a customized pattern-matching algorithm with a correlation R-score. The ACPP has been successfully applied to the identification of two types of "active" biomass-degrading enzymes (i.e., starch hydrolysis enzymes and cellulose hydrolysis enzymes) from Aspergillus niger secretome in a multiplexed fashion. By determining protein elution profiles of 156 proteins in A. niger secretome, we confidently identified the 1,4-α-glucosidase as the major "active" starch hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.96) and the endoglucanase as the major "active" cellulose hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.97). The results demonstrated that the ACPP facilitated the discovery of bioactive enzymes from complex protein samples in a high-throughput, multiplexing, and untargeted fashion.

  4. Multi-enzyme Process Modeling

    Andrade Santacoloma, Paloma de Gracia

    are affected (in a positive or negative way) by the presence of the other enzymes and compounds in the media. In this thesis the concept of multi-enzyme in-pot term is adopted for processes that are carried out by the combination of enzymes in a single reactor and implemented at pilot or industrial scale...... features of the process and provides the information required to structure the process model by using a step-by-step procedure with the required tools and methods. In this way, this framework increases efficiency of the model development process with respect to time and resources needed (fast and effective....... In this way the model parameters that drives the main dynamic behavior can be identified and thus a better understanding of this type of processes. In order to develop, test and verify the methodology, three case studies were selected, specifically the bi-enzyme process for the production of lactobionic acid...

  5. PIXE analysis of Zn enzymes

    Solis, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L.; Romero, I.; Celis, H.

    1999-01-01

    Zinc is a necessary component in the action and structural stability of many enzymes. Some of them are well characterized, but in others, Zn stoichiometry and its association is not known. PIXE has been proven to be a suitable technique for analyzing metallic proteins embedded in electrophoresis gels. In this study, PIXE has been used to investigate the Zn content of enzymes that are known to carry Zn atoms. These include the carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme well characterized by other methods and the cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum that is known to require Zn to be stable but not how many metal ions are involved or how they are bound to the enzyme. Native proteins have been purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and direct identification and quantification of Zn in the gel bands was performed with an external proton beam of 3.7 MeV energy

  6. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  7. Watching Individual Enzymes at Work

    Blank, Kerstin; Rocha, Susana; De Cremer, Gert; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Hofkens, Johan

    Single-molecule fluorescence experiments are a powerful tool to analyze reaction mechanisms of enzymes. Because of their unique potential to detect heterogeneities in space and time, they have provided unprecedented insights into the nature and mechanisms of conformational changes related to the catalytic reaction. The most important finding from experiments with single enzymes is the generally observed phenomenon that the catalytic rate constants fluctuate over time (dynamic disorder). These fluctuations originate from conformational changes occurring on time scales, which are similar to or slower than that of the catalytic reaction. Here, we summarize experiments with enzymes that show dynamic disorder and introduce new experimental strategies showing how single-molecule fluorescence experiments can be applied to address other open questions in medical and industrial enzymology, such as enzyme inactivation processes, reactant transfer in cascade reactions, and the mechanisms of interfacial catalysis.

  8. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  9. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Ruebush, S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  10. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, ...

  11. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications

    Robinson, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed. PMID:26504249

  12. Mitomycin C induced alterations in antioxidant enzyme levels in a model insect species, Spodoptera eridania.

    Batcabe, J P; MacGill, R S; Zaman, K; Ahmad, S; Pardini, R S

    1994-05-01

    1. An insect species, the southern armyworm Spodoptera eridania, was used as an in vivo model to examine mitomycin C's (MMC) pro-oxidant effect reflected in alterations of antioxidant enzymes. 2. Following a 2-day exposure to 0.01 and 0.05% w/w dietary concentrations, MMC only induced superoxide dismutase activity. All other enzyme activities were not affected, indicating oxidative stress was mild. 3. Following a 5-day exposure to 0.05% w/w dietary MMC, the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase and its peroxidase activity and DT-diaphorase were induced. GR activity was not altered. The high constitutive catalase activity was also not affected. These responses of S. eridania's antioxidant enzymes are analogous to those of mammalian systems in alleviating MMC-induced oxidative stress. 4. S. eridania emerges as an appropriate non-mammalian model for initial and cost-effective screening of drug-induced oxidative stress.

  13. Oxidative damage and antioxidant defense in thymus of malnourished lactating rats.

    Gavia-García, Graciela; González-Martínez, Haydeé; Miliar-García, Ángel; Bonilla-González, Edmundo; Rosas-Trejo, María de Los Ángeles; Königsberg, Mina; Nájera-Medina, Oralia; Luna-López, Armando; González-Torres, María Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with oxidative damage by altered antioxidant protection mechanisms. Specifically, the aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative damage (DNA and lipid) and antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione peroxidase [GPx], and catalase [CAT] mRNA, and protein expression) in thymus from malnourished rat pups. Malnutrition was induced during the lactation period by the food competition method. Oxidative DNA damage was determined quantifying 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by high-performance liquid chromatography. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Levels of gene and protein expression of SOD, GPx, and CAT were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. Antioxidant enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation significantly increased in second-degree (MN-2) and third-degree malnourished (MN-3) rats compared with well-nourished rats. Higher amounts of oxidative damage, lower mRNA expression, and lower relative concentrations of protein, as well as decreased antioxidant activity of SOD, GPx, and CAT were associated with the MN-2 and MN-3 groups. The results of this study demonstrated that higher body-weight deficits were related to alterations in antioxidant protection, which contribute to increased levels of damage in the thymus. To our knowledge, this study demonstrated for the first time that early in life, malnutrition leads to increased DNA and lipid oxidative damage, attributable to damaged antioxidant mechanisms including transcriptional and enzymatic activity alterations. These findings may contribute to the elucidation of the causes of previously reported thymus dysfunction, and might explain partially why children and adults who have overcome child undernourishment experience immunologic deficiencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. de novo computational enzyme design.

    Zanghellini, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology as well as metabolic engineering are poised to transform industrial biotechnology by allowing us to design cell factories for the sustainable production of valuable fuels and chemicals. To deliver on their promises, such cell factories, as much as their brick-and-mortar counterparts, will require appropriate catalysts, especially for classes of reactions that are not known to be catalyzed by enzymes in natural organisms. A recently developed methodology, de novo computational enzyme design can be used to create enzymes catalyzing novel reactions. Here we review the different classes of chemical reactions for which active protein catalysts have been designed as well as the results of detailed biochemical and structural characterization studies. We also discuss how combining de novo computational enzyme design with more traditional protein engineering techniques can alleviate the shortcomings of state-of-the-art computational design techniques and create novel enzymes with catalytic proficiencies on par with natural enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PIERO ontology for analysis of biochemical transformations: effective implementation of reaction information in the IUBMB enzyme list.

    Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Zen-ichi; Muto, Ai; Moriya, Yuki; Okamoto, Shinobu; Kawashima, Shuichi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2014-12-01

    Genomics is faced with the issue of many partially annotated putative enzyme-encoding genes for which activities have not yet been verified, while metabolomics is faced with the issue of many putative enzyme reactions for which full equations have not been verified. Knowledge of enzymes has been collected by IUBMB, and has been made public as the Enzyme List. To date, however, the terminology of the Enzyme List has not been assessed comprehensively by bioinformatics studies. Instead, most of the bioinformatics studies simply use the identifiers of the enzymes, i.e. the Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. We investigated the actual usage of terminology throughout the Enzyme List, and demonstrated that the partial characteristics of reactions cannot be retrieved by simply using EC numbers. Thus, we developed a novel ontology, named PIERO, for annotating biochemical transformations as follows. First, the terminology describing enzymatic reactions was retrieved from the Enzyme List, and was grouped into those related to overall reactions and biochemical transformations. Consequently, these terms were mapped onto the actual transformations taken from enzymatic reaction equations. This ontology was linked to Gene Ontology (GO) and EC numbers, allowing the extraction of common partial reaction characteristics from given sets of orthologous genes and the elucidation of possible enzymes from the given transformations. Further future development of the PIERO ontology should enhance the Enzyme List to promote the integration of genomics and metabolomics.

  16. Homology models guide discovery of diverse enzyme specificities among dipeptide epimerases in the enolase superfamily

    Lukk, Tiit; Sakai, Ayano; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana D.; Imker, Heidi J.; Song, Ling; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Toro, Rafael; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Vetting, Matthew W.; Nair, Satish K.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advance in genome sequencing presents substantial challenges for protein functional assignment, with half or more of new protein sequences inferred from these genomes having uncertain assignments. The assignment of enzyme function in functionally diverse superfamilies represents a particular challenge, which we address through a combination of computational predictions, enzymology, and structural biology. Here we describe the results of a focused investigation of a group of enzymes in the enolase superfamily that are involved in epimerizing dipeptides. The first members of this group to be functionally characterized were Ala-Glu epimerases in Eschericiha coli and Bacillus subtilis, based on the operon context and enzymological studies; these enzymes are presumed to be involved in peptidoglycan recycling. We have subsequently studied more than 65 related enzymes by computational methods, including homology modeling and metabolite docking, which suggested that many would have divergent specificities;, i.e., they are likely to have different (unknown) biological roles. In addition to the Ala-Phe epimerase specificity reported previously, we describe the prediction and experimental verification of: (i) a new group of presumed Ala-Glu epimerases; (ii) several enzymes with specificity for hydrophobic dipeptides, including one from Cytophaga hutchinsonii that epimerizes D-Ala-D-Ala; and (iii) a small group of enzymes that epimerize cationic dipeptides. Crystal structures for certain of these enzymes further elucidate the structural basis of the specificities. The results highlight the potential of computational methods to guide experimental characterization of enzymes in an automated, large-scale fashion. PMID:22392983

  17. Enzyme Stability and Activity in Non-Aqueous Reaction Systems: A Mini Review

    Shihui Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enormous interest in biocatalysis in non-aqueous phase has recently been triggered due to the merits of good enantioselectivity, reverse thermodynamic equilibrium, and no water-dependent side reactions. It has been demonstrated that enzyme has high activity and stability in non-aqueous media, and the variation of enzyme activity is attributed to its conformational modifications. This review comprehensively addresses the stability and activity of the intact enzymes in various non-aqueous systems, such as organic solvents, ionic liquids, sub-/super-critical fluids and their combined mixtures. It has been revealed that critical factors such as Log P, functional groups and the molecular structures of the solvents define the microenvironment surrounding the enzyme molecule and affect enzyme tertiary and secondary structure, influencing enzyme catalytic properties. Therefore, it is of high importance for biocatalysis in non-aqueous media to elucidate the links between the microenvironment surrounding enzyme surface and its stability and activity. In fact, a better understanding of the correlation between different non-aqueous environments and enzyme structure, stability and activity can contribute to identifying the most suitable reaction medium for a given biotransformation.

  18. Community Composition and Ultrastructure of a Nitrate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Enrichment Culture.

    Gambelli, Lavinia; Guerrero-Cruz, Simon; Mesman, Rob J; Cremers, Geert; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Kartal, Boran; Lueke, Claudia; van Niftrik, Laura

    2018-02-01

    Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas and can be oxidized aerobically or anaerobically through microbe-mediated processes, thus decreasing methane emissions in the atmosphere. Using a complementary array of methods, including phylogenetic analysis, physiological experiments, and light and electron microscopy techniques (including electron tomography), we investigated the community composition and ultrastructure of a continuous bioreactor enrichment culture, in which anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was coupled to nitrate reduction. A membrane bioreactor was seeded with AOM biomass and continuously fed with excess methane. After 150 days, the bioreactor reached a daily consumption of 10 mmol nitrate · liter -1 · day -1 The biomass consisted of aggregates that were dominated by nitrate-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing " Candidatus Methanoperedens"-like archaea (40%) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing " Candidatus Methylomirabilis"-like bacteria (50%). The " Ca Methanoperedens" spp. were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunogold localization of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr) enzyme, which was located in the cytoplasm. The " Ca Methanoperedens" sp. aggregates consisted of slightly irregular coccoid cells (∼1.5-μm diameter) which produced extruding tubular structures and putative cell-to-cell contacts among each other. " Ca Methylomirabilis" sp. bacteria exhibited the polygonal cell shape typical of this genus. In AOM archaea and bacteria, cytochrome c proteins were localized in the cytoplasm and periplasm, respectively, by cytochrome staining. Our results indicate that AOM bacteria and archaea might work closely together in the process of anaerobic methane oxidation, as the bacteria depend on the archaea for nitrite. Future studies will be aimed at elucidating the function of the cell-to-cell interactions in nitrate-dependent AOM. IMPORTANCE Microorganisms performing nitrate- and nitrite-dependent anaerobic

  19. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  20. Oxidative stress and non-enzymic antioxidant status in hypertensive ...

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... Nwanjo, H. U.1*, Oze, G.2, Okafor, M. C.2, Nwosu, D.1 and Nwankpa P.2 ... such as Vitamin C, vitamin E and reduced glutathione in plasma were significantly .... Plasma lipids, Apolipoproteins and Lp(a) levels in elderly.

  1. Oxidative enzymes in coconut cultivars in response to Raoiella ...

    Usuario

    2016-08-17

    Aug 17, 2016 ... Santiago, Chile. ... R. indica feeding were studied in the cultivars where red palm mites showed .... decision was made due to the lack of information on which specific .... Técnica de Ambato) for his valuable revision of English.

  2. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі; Інга Володимирівна Леус; Тетяна Іванівна Сергієнко; Марина Вячеславівна Горіла; Наталія Іванівна Штеменко

    2015-01-01

    The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superox...

  3. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase activity decreased

  4. Models for non-heme iron containing oxidation enzymes

    Roelfes, Johannes Gerhardus

    2000-01-01

    IJzer is een van de essentiël elementen voor alle levende wezens. Heel veel belangrijke functies in organismen worden vervuld door ijzer bevattende eiwitten. De bekendste voorbeelden hiervan zijn ongetwijfeld hemoglobine en myoglobine, die het transport van zuurstof van de longen naar de rest van

  5. Red Yeast Rice Protects Circulating Bone Marrow-Derived Proangiogenic Cells against High-Glucose-Induced Senescence and Oxidative Stress: The Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    Jung-Tung Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammation and oxidative stress of bone marrow-derived proangiogenic cells (PACs, also named endothelial progenitor cells, triggered by hyperglycemia contributes significantly to vascular dysfunction. There is supporting evidence that the consumption of red yeast rice (RYR; Monascus purpureus-fermented rice reduces the vascular complications of diabetes; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate the effects of RYR extract in PACs, focusing particularly on the role of a potent antioxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1. We found that treatment with RYR extract induced nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor nuclear translocation and HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in PACs. RYR extract inhibited high-glucose-induced (30 mM PAC senescence and the development of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a dose-dependent manner. The HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin IX also decreased high-glucose-induced cell senescence and oxidative stress, whereas the HO-1 enzyme inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX and HO-1 small interfering RNA significantly reversed RYR extract-caused inhibition of senescence and reduction of oxidative stress in high-glucose-treated PACs. These results suggest that RYR extract serves as alternative and complementary medicine in the treatment of these diseases, by inducing HO-1, thereby decreasing the vascular complications of diabetes.

  6. Salvia officinalis l. (sage) Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Oxidative Brain Damage In Rats

    Osman, N. N.; Abd El Azime, A.Sh.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the oxidative stress and the role of antioxidant system in the management of gamma irradiation induced whole brain damage in rats . Also, to elucidate the potential role of Salvia officinalis (sage) in alleviating such negative effects. Rats were subjected to gamma radiation (6 Gy). Sage extract was daily given to rats during 14 days before starting irradiation and continued after radiation exposure for another 14 days. The results revealed that the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl content (PCC) and nitric oxide (NO) content were significantly increased, while the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the reduced glutathione (GSH) content were significantly decreased in the brain homogenate of irradiated rats. Additionally, brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), acid phosphatase (ACP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were significantly increased. On the other hand, the results showed that, administration of sage extract to rats was able to ameliorate the mentioned parameters and the values returned close to the normal ones. It could be concluded that sage extract, by its antioxidant constituents, could modulate radiation induced oxidative stress and enzyme activities in the brain.

  7. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    Andersen, Mikael R.; Salazar, Margarita; Schaap, Peter; van de Vondervoort, Peter; Culley, David E.; Thykaer, Jette; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Albang, Richard; Albermann, Kaj; Berka, Randy; Braus, Gerhard; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Corrochano, Luis; Dai, Ziyu; van Dijck, Piet; Hofmann, Gerald; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Menke, Hildegard; Meijer, Martin; Meijer, Susan; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Nielsen, Michael L.; van Ooyen, Albert; Pel, Herman J.; Poulsen, Lars; Samson, Rob; Stam, Hein; Tsang, Adrian; van den Brink, Johannes M.; ATkins, Alex; Aerts, Andrea; Shapiro, Harris; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Salamov, Asaf; Lou, Yigong; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Martinez, Diego; van Peij, Noel; Roubos, Johannes A.; Nielsen, Jens B.; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-06-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger exhibits great diversity in its phenotype. It is found globally, both as marine and terrestrial strains, produces both organic acids and hydrolytic enzymes in high amounts, and some isolates exhibit pathogenicity. Although the genome of an industrial enzyme-producing A. niger strain (CBS 513.88) has already been sequenced, the versatility and diversity of this species compels additional exploration. We therefore undertook whole genome sequencing of the acidogenic A. niger wild type strain (ATCC 1015), and produced a genome sequence of very high quality. Only 15 gaps are present in the sequence and half the telomeric regions have been elucidated. Moreover, sequence information from ATCC 1015 was utilized to improve the genome sequence of CBS 513.88. Chromosome-level comparisons uncovered several genome rearrangements, deletions, a clear case of strain-specific horizontal gene transfer, and identification of 0.8 megabase of novel sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms per kilobase (SNPs/kb) between the two strains were found to be exceptionally high (average: 7.8, maximum: 160 SNPs/kb). High variation within the species was confirmed with exo-metabolite profiling and phylogenetics. Detailed lists of alleles were generated, and genotypic differences were observed to accumulate in metabolic pathways essential to acid production and protein synthesis. A transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of the electron transport chain, specifically the alternative oxidative pathway in ATCC 1015, while CBS 513.88 showed significant up regulation of genes associated with biosynthesis of amino acids that are abundant in glucoamylase A, tRNA-synthases and protein transporters.

  10. Oxidized Lipoprotein as a Major Vessel Cell Proliferator in Oxidized Human Serum.

    Yoshiro Saito

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is correlated with the incidence of several diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer, and oxidized biomolecules have been determined as biomarkers of oxidative stress; however, the detailed molecular relationship between generated oxidation products and the promotion of diseases has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, to clarify the role of serum oxidation products in vessel cell proliferation, which is related to the incidence of atherosclerosis and cancer, the major vessel cell proliferator in oxidized human serum was investigated. Oxidized human serum was prepared by free radical exposure, separated using gel chromatography, and then each fraction was added to several kinds of vessel cells including endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. It was found that a high molecular weight fraction in oxidized human serum specifically induced vessel cell proliferation. Oxidized lipids were contained in this high molecular weight fraction, while cell proliferation activity was not observed in oxidized lipoprotein-deficient serum. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins induced vessel cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that oxidized lipoproteins containing lipid oxidation products function as a major vessel cell proliferator in oxidized human serum. These findings strongly indicate the relevance of determination of oxidized lipoproteins and lipid oxidation products in the diagnosis of vessel cell proliferation-related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer.

  11. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  12. Gene expression for peroxisome-associated enzymes in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by ciprofibrate, a hypolipidemic compound

    Rao, M.S.; Nemali, M.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Administration of hypolipidemic compounds leads to marked proliferation of peroxisomes and peroxisome-associated enzymes (PAE) in the livers of rodents and non-rodent species. The increase peroxisome-associated enzymes such as fatty acid β-oxidation system and catalase is shown to be due to an increase in the levels of mRNA. In this experiment they have examined hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), induced in male F-344 rats by ciprofibrate (0.025%, w/w for 60 weeks), for gene expression of PAE. Total RNA was purified from HCC as well as from control and ciprofibrate (0.025% for 2 weeks) fed rat livers. Northern blot analysis was performed using [32/sub p/]cDNA probes for albumin, fatty acetyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and catalase. mRNA levels in HCC for albumin, fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes and catalase were comparable with those levels observed in the livers of rats given ciprofibrate for 2 weeks. In control livers the mRNAs for β-oxidation enzymes were low. Albumin mRNA levels in all the 3 groups were comparable. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether the increased level of mRNAs for the β-oxidation enzymes in HCC is due to the effect of ciprofibrate or to the gene amplification

  13. Rethinking fundamentals of enzyme action.

    Northrop, D B

    1999-01-01

    Despite certain limitations, investigators continue to gainfully employ concepts rooted in steady-state kinetics in efforts to draw mechanistically relevant inferences about enzyme catalysis. By reconsidering steady-state enzyme kinetic behavior, this review develops ideas that allow one to arrive at the following new definitions: (a) V/K, the ratio of the maximal initial velocity divided by the Michaelis-Menten constant, is the apparent rate constant for the capture of substrate into enzyme complexes that are destined to yield product(s) at some later point in time; (b) the maximal velocity V is the apparent rate constant for the release of substrate from captured complexes in the form of free product(s); and (c) the Michaelis-Menten constant K is the ratio of the apparent rate constants for release and capture. The physiologic significance of V/K is also explored to illuminate aspects of antibiotic resistance, the concept of "perfection" in enzyme catalysis, and catalytic proficiency. The conceptual basis of congruent thermodynamic cycles is also considered in an attempt to achieve an unambiguous way for comparing an enzyme-catalyzed reaction with its uncatalyzed reference reaction. Such efforts promise a deeper understanding of the origins of catalytic power, as it relates to stabilization of the reactant ground state, stabilization of the transition state, and reciprocal stabilizations of ground and transition states.

  14. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-Mee, Wipawee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Wittaya-Areekul, Sakchai

    2014-01-01

    To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv). At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism. PMID:24672632

  15. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv. At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism.

  16. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  17. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  18. Positive regulation of prostate cancer cell growth by lipid droplet forming and processing enzymes DGAT1 and ABHD5.

    Mitra, Ranjana; Le, Thuc T; Gorjala, Priyatham; Goodman, Oscar B

    2017-09-06

    Neoplastic cells proliferate rapidly and obtain requisite building blocks by reprogramming metabolic pathways that favor growth. Previously, we observed that prostate cancer cells uptake and store lipids in the form of lipid droplets, providing building blocks for membrane synthesis, to facilitate proliferation and growth. Mechanisms of lipid uptake, lipid droplet dynamics and their contribution to cancer growth have yet to be defined. This work is focused on elucidating the prostate cancer-specific modifications in lipid storage pathways so that these modified gene products can be identified and therapeutically targeted. To identify genes that promote lipid droplet formation and storage, the expression profiles of candidate genes were assessed and compared between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and prostate cancer cells. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes were inhibited and growth assays performed to elucidate their role in the growth of the cancer cells. Cell cycle, apoptosis and autophagy assays were performed to ascertain the mechanism of growth inhibition. Our results indicate that DGAT1, ABHD5, ACAT1 and ATGL are overexpressed in prostate cancer cells compared to PBMCs and of these overexpressed genes, DGAT1 and ABHD5 aid in the growth of the prostate cancer cells. Blocking the expression of both DGAT1 and ABHD5 results in inhibition of growth, cell cycle block and cell death. DGAT1 siRNA treatment inhibits lipid droplet formation and leads to autophagy where as ABHD5 siRNA treatment promotes accumulation of lipid droplets and leads to apoptosis. Both the siRNA treatments reduce AMPK phosphorylation, a key regulator of lipid metabolism. While DGAT1 siRNA reduces phosphorylation of ACC, the rate limiting enzyme in de novo fat synthesis and triggers phosphorylation of raptor and ULK-1 inducing autophagy and cell death, ABHD5 siRNA decreases P70S6 phosphorylation, leading to PARP cleavage, apoptosis and cell death. Interestingly, DGAT-1 is involved

  19. Modeling physiological processes in plankton on enzyme kinetic principles

    Ted Packard

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Many ecologically important chemical transformations in the ocean are controlled by biochemical enzyme reactions in plankton. Nitrogenase regulates the transformation of N2 to ammonium in some cyanobacteria and serves as the entryway for N2 into the ocean biosphere. Nitrate reductase controls the reduction of NO3 to NO2 and hence new production in phytoplankton. The respiratory electron transfer system in all organisms links the carbon oxidation reactions of intermediary metabolism with the reduction of oxygen in respiration. Rubisco controls the fixation of CO2 into organic matter in phytoplankton and thus is the major entry point of carbon into the oceanic biosphere. In addition to these, there are the enzymes that control CO2 production, NH4 excretion and the fluxes of phosphate. Some of these enzymes have been recognized and researched by marine scientists in the last thirty years. However, until recently the kinetic principles of enzyme control have not been exploited to formulate accurate mathematical equations of the controlling physiological expressions. Were such expressions available they would increase our power to predict the rates of chemical transformations in the extracellular environment of microbial populations whether this extracellular environment is culture media or the ocean. Here we formulate from the principles of bisubstrate enzyme kinetics, mathematical expressions for the processes of NO3 reduction, O2 consumption, N2 fixation, total nitrogen uptake.

  20. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for m