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Sample records for oxides volume ii

  1. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes, in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the US Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Operations Office awarded Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation, of Boston Massachusetts and its sub-contractor MODAR, Inc. of Natick Massachusetts a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program was contracted through a Cooperative Agreement that was co-funded by the US Department of Energy and the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. The SCWODAT testing scope outlined by the DOE in the original Cooperative Agreement and amendments thereto was initiated in June 1994 and successfully completed in December 1995. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the MODAR SCWO technology

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins and angiotensin II in the regulation of renal medullary blood flow during volume expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Carol; Llinás, María T; Rodriguez, Francisca; Moreno, Juan M; Salazar, F Javier

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of medullary blood flow (MBF) is essential in maintaining renal function and blood pressure. However, it is unknown whether outer MBF (OMBF) and papillary blood flow (PBF) are regulated independently when extracellular volume (ECV) is enhanced. The aim of this study was to determine whether OMBF and PBF are differently regulated and whether there is an interaction between nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandins (PGs) and angiotensin II (Ang II) in regulating OMBF and PBF when ECV is enhanced. To achieve these goals, OMBF and PBF were measured by laser-Doppler in volume-expanded rats treated with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (meclofenamate, 3 mg/kg) and/or a NO synthesis inhibitor (L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 3 μg/kg/min) and/or Ang II (10 ng/kg/min). OMBF was unchanged by NO or PGs synthesis inhibition but decreased by 36 % (P blood flows to the outer medulla and renal papilla are differently regulated and showing that there is a complex interaction between NO, PGs and Ang II in regulating OMBF and PBF when ECV is enhanced.

  4. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The DART II is a remote, interactive, microprocessor-based data acquistion system suitable for use with air monitors. This volume of DART II documentation contains the following appendixes: adjustment and calibration procedures; mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets; ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction list, octal listing; and cable lists. (RWR)

  5. Site Environmental Report for 1998 Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Volume II of the Site Environment Report for 1998 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and non routine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in chapter 6). Data presented in the tables are given in International System of Units (SI) units of measure

  6. Oxidation of Fe(II) in rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, J D; Whitehead, R F; Kieber, R J; Hardison, D R

    2005-04-15

    Photochemically produced Fe(II) is oxidized within hours under environmentally realistic conditions in rainwater. The diurnal variation between photochemical production and reoxidation of Fe(II) observed in our laboratory accurately mimics the behavior of ferrous iron observed in field studies where the highest concentrations of dissolved Fe(ll) occur in afternoon rain during the period of maximum sunlight intensity followed by gradually decreasing concentrations eventually returning to early morning pre-light values. The experimental work presented here, along with the results of kinetics studies done by others, suggests thatthe primary process responsible for the decline in photochemically produced Fe(II) concentrations is oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. This reaction is first order with respect to both the concentrations of Fe(II) and H2O2. The second-order rate constant determined for six different authentic rain samples varied over an order of magnitude and was always less than or equal to the rate constant determined for this reaction in simple acidic solutions. Oxidation of photochemically produced ferrous iron by other oxidants including molecular oxygen, ozone, hydroxyl radical, hydroperoxyl/superoxide radical, and hexavalent chromium were found to be insignificant under the conditions present in rainwater. This study shows that Fe(II) occurs as at least two different chemical species in rain; photochemically produced Fe(II) that is oxidized over time periods of hours, and a background Fe(II) that is protected against oxidation, perhaps by organic complexation, and is stable against oxidation for days. Because the rate of oxidation of photochemically produced Fe(II) does not increase with increasing rainwater pH, the speciation of this more labile form of Fe(II) is also not controlled by simple hydrolysis reactions.

  7. Free radicals in biology. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    This volume continues the treatment of topics in free radical biology and free radical pathology from Volume I. In the first chapter, pyridinyl radicals, radicals which are models for those derived from NAD, are discussed. Pyridinyl radicals can be synthesized and isolated and directly studied in a number of chemical systems. The next chapter treats the role of glutathione in the cell. It is becoming even more apparent that this vital thiol controls a large number of important cellular functions. The GSH/GSSG balance has recently been implicated as a control for cellular development; this balance also may be important in relaying the effects of oxidants from one site to another in the body. The next chapter outlines the reactions of singlet oxygen; some of these involve free radicals and some do not. This reactive intermediate appears to be important both in photochemical smog and in cellular chemistry where singlet oxygen is produced by nonphotochemical processes. The production of free radicals from dry tissues, a controversial area with conflicting claims is reviewed. The next chapter outlines the current status of the studies of photochemical smog. The next two chapters treat specific reactive materials which are present in smog. The first discusses the chemistry of nitrogen oxides and ozone. The second chapter treats the chemistry of the peroxyacyl nitrites. These compounds, although present in only small concentration, are among the most toxic components of smog. The last two chapters treat radiation damage to proteins and radiation protection and radical reactions produced by radiation in nucleic acids

  8. Phonons: Theory and experiments II. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruesch, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present second volume titled as ''Phonons: Theory and Experiments II'', contains, a thorough study of experimental techniques and the interpretation of experimental results. This three-volume set tries to bridge the gap between theory and experiment, and is addressed to those working in both camps in the vast field of dynamical properties of solids. Topics presented in the second volume include; infrared-, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy, interaction of X-rays with phonons, and inelastic neutron scattering. In addition an account is given of some other techniques, including ultrasonic methods, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, point contact spectroscopy, and spectroscopy of surface phonons, thin films and adsorbates. Both experimental aspects and theoretical concepts necessary for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed. An attempt is made to present the descriptive as well as the analytical aspects of the topics. Simple models are often used to illustrate the basic concepts and more than 100 figures are included to illustrate both theoretical and experimental results. Many chapters contain a number of problems with hints and results giving additional information

  9. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current

  10. 2000 Physical Acoustics Summer School (PASS 00). Volume II: Transparencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bass, Henry

    2001-01-01

    .... Volume II of these proceedings contains copies of the transparencies used by the lecturers and Volume III contains background materials that were sent to student and discussion leader participants...

  11. ALICE: Physics Performance Report, Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandro, B; Antinori, F; Belikov, J A

    2006-01-01

    of the subsystem designs, and a description of the offline framework and Monte Carlo event generators. The present volume, Volume II, contains the majority of the information relevant to the physics performance in proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Following an introductory overview, Chapter 5 describes the combined detector performance and the event reconstruction procedures, based on detailed simulations of the individual subsystems. Chapter 6 describes the analysis and physics reach for a representative sample of physics observables, from global event characteristics to hard processes

  12. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies

  13. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes

  14. AJER VOLUME II-JULY 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    African Journal of Economic Review, Volume 1I, Issue 2, July 2014 ..... This paper also carries out the Chow-break point test (stability test) to test .... Unlike other East African countries, Rwanda has had a lot of political instabilities characterized.

  15. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume II. Design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This volume summarizes the design of the FED. It includes a description of the major systems and subsystems, the supporting plasma design analysis, a projected device cost and associated construction schedule, and a description of the facilities to house and support the device. This effort represents the culmination of the FY81 studies conducted at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). Unique in these design activities has been the collaborative involvement of the Design Center personnel and numerous resource physicists from the fusion community who have made significant contributions in the physics design analysis as well as the physics support of the engineering design of the major FED systems and components

  16. International Photovoltaic Program Plan. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    This second volume of a two-part report on the International Photovoltaic Program Plan contains appendices summarizing the results of analyses conducted in preparation of the plan. These analyses include compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about how US government actions could affect this market; international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  17. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department's research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department's laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B ampersand R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department's appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R ampersand D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R ampersand D performers chosen to execute the Department's missions

  18. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  19. Kinetics of FeII-polyaminocarboxylate oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica M.; Farley, Kevin J.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2018-03-01

    Complexation of iron by naturally-occurring and synthetic organic ligands has a large effect on iron oxidation and reduction rates which in turn affect the aqueous geochemistry of many other chemical constituents. In this study, the kinetics of FeII oxidation in the presence of the polyaminocarboxylate synthetic chelating agents ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trimethylenediamine-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (TMDTA) was investigated over the pH range 5.50-8.53. Batch oxidation experiments in the presence of molecular oxygen were conducted using a 2:1 M concentration ratio of polyaminocarboxylate (ligand, L) to FeII. The experimental data resembled first order kinetics for the oxidation of FeII-L to FeIII-L and observed rate constants at pH 6.0 were comparable to rate constants for the oxidation of inorganic FeII. Similar to other structurally-similar FeII-polyaminocarboxylate complexes, oxidation rates of FeII-EGTA and FeII-TMDTA decrease with increasing pH, which is the opposite trend for the oxidation of FeII complexed with inorganic ligands. However, the oxidation rates of FeII complexed with EGTA and TMDTA were considerably lower (4-5 orders of magnitude) than FeII complexed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The distinguishing feature of the slower-reacting complexes is that they have a longer backbone between diamine functional groups. An analytical equilibrium model was developed to determine the contributions of the species FeIIL2- and FeII(H)L- to the overall oxidation rate of FeII-L. Application of this model indicated that the protonated FeII(H)L species are more than three orders of magnitude more reactive than FeIIL2-. These rate constants were used in a coupled kinetic equilibrium numerical model where the ligand to iron ratio (TOTL:TOTFe) and pH were varied to evaluate the effect on the FeII oxidation rate. Overall, increasing TOTL:TOTFe for EGTA and TMDTA enhances FeII oxidation rates at lower pH and inhibits FeII oxidation

  20. Introduction to "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future, Volume II"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Geist, Eric L.

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-two papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume II of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future". Volume I of this topical issue was published as PAGEOPH, vol. 173, No. 12, 2016 (Eds., E. L. Geist, H. M. Fritz, A. B. Rabinovich, and Y. Tanioka). Three papers in Volume II focus on details of the 2011 and 2016 tsunami-generating earthquakes offshore of Tohoku, Japan. The next six papers describe important case studies and observations of recent and historical events. Four papers related to tsunami hazard assessment are followed by three papers on tsunami hydrodynamics and numerical modelling. Three papers discuss problems of tsunami warning and real-time forecasting. The final set of three papers importantly investigates tsunamis generated by non-seismic sources: volcanic explosions, landslides, and meteorological disturbances. Collectively, this volume highlights contemporary trends in global tsunami research, both fundamental and applied toward hazard assessment and mitigation.

  1. Adsorption behavior of multiwall carbon nanotube/iron oxide magnetic composites for Ni(II) and Sr(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changlun; Hu Jun; Shao Dadong; Li Jiaxing; Wang Xiangke

    2009-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/iron oxide magnetic composites were prepared, and were characterized by scan electron microscopy using a field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer. The adsorptions of Ni(II) and Sr(II) onto MWCNT/iron oxide magnetic composites were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength. The results show that the adsorptions of Ni(II) and Sr(II) on the magnetic composites is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. The adsorption capacity of the magnetic composites is much higher than that of MWCNTs and iron oxides. The solid magnetic composites can be separated from the solution by a magnetic process. The Langmuir model fits the adsorption isotherm data of Ni(II) better than the Freundlich model. Results of desorption study shows that Ni(II) adsorbed onto the magnetic composites can be easily desorbed at pH < 2.0. MWCNT/iron oxide magnetic composites may be a promising candidate for pre-concentration and solidification of heavy metal ions and radionuclides from large volumes of aqueous solution, as required for remediation purposes.

  2. Survey of Biomass Gasification, Volume II: Principles of Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

  3. OXIDATION OF CYCLIC AMINES BY MOLYBDENUM(II) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    metal is in formal oxidation state +2. Since no reduction can take place without oxidation and vice versa, we can reasonably say the reduction of Mo(II) and W(II) species is accompanied by oxidation of the amine. At this juncture, we should point out that C=N bonds are also known to absorb IR radiation in the same spectral ...

  4. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  5. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations

  6. Activity report 1990-1992 and proceedings. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer-Rosa, D.; Waniek, L.; Suhadolc, P.

    1993-01-01

    A report of the European Seismological Commission (ESC) on 1990-1992 activities and Proceedings of the General Assembly of the ESC are presented in two volumes. Volume II covers the following topics: study of seismic sound, seismotectonic analysis, deep seismic sounding, the three-dimensional structure of the European lithosphere-asthenosphere system, complexity in earthquake occurrence, earthquake hazard, strong and weak earthquake ground motions, macroseismology, microzonation, and applications in earthquake engineering. One paper dealing with the connection between seismicity and the CO 2 - 222 Rn content in spring water has been inputted to INIS. (Z.S.)

  7. Low-temperature Synthesis of Tin(II) Oxide From Tin(II) ketoacidoximate Precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Alshankiti, Buthainah

    2015-01-01

    Sn (II) oxide finds numerous applications in different fields such as thin film transistors1, solar cells2 and sensors.3 In this study we present the fabrication of tin monoxide SnO by using Sn (II) ketoacid oximate complexes as precursors. Tin (II

  8. S-1 project. Volume II. Hardware. 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This volume includes highlights of the design of the Mark IIA uniprocessor (SMI-2), and the SCALD II user's manual. SCALD (structured computer-aided logic design system) cuts the cost and time required to design logic by letting the logic designer express ideas as naturally as possible, and by eliminating as many errors as possible - through consistency checking, simulation, and timing verification - before the hardware is built. (GHT)

  9. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  10. Kinetics of oxidation of nickel(II) aza macrocycles by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The kinetics of the oxidation of nickel (II) hexaaza and nickel (II) pentaaza macrocycles by the peroxydisulphate anion, S2O8 2-, were studied in aqueous media. Effect of H on reaction rate was also studied. The rate increases with increase of S2OO8 2- concentration. Rates are almost independent of acid between H 4 ...

  11. Oxidative Metabolites of Curcumin Poison Human Type II Topoisomerases†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketron, Adam C.; Gordon, Odaine N.; Schneider, Claus; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-01-01

    The polyphenol curcumin is the principal flavor and color component of the spice turmeric. Beyond its culinary uses, curcumin is believed to positively impact human health and displays antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and chemopreventive properties. It also is in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. In aqueous solution at physiological pH, curcumin undergoes spontaneous autoxidation that is enhanced by oxidizing agents. The reaction proceeds through a series of quinone methide and other reactive intermediates to form a final dioxygenated bicyclopentadione product. Several naturally occurring polyphenols that can form quinones have been shown to act as topoisomerase II poisons (i.e., increase levels of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage). Because several of these compounds have chemopreventive properties, we determined the effects of curcumin, its oxidative metabolites, and structurally related degradation products (vanillin, ferulic acid, and feruloylmethane), on the DNA cleavage activities of human topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. Intermediates in the curcumin oxidation pathway increased DNA scission mediated by both enzymes ~4-5–fold. In contrast, curcumin and the bicyclopentadione, as well as vanillin, ferulic acid, and feruloylmethane, had no effect on DNA cleavage. As found for other quinone-based compounds, curcumin oxidation intermediates acted as redox-dependent (as opposed to interfacial) topoisomerase II poisons. Finally, under conditions that promote oxidation, the dietary spice turmeric enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. Thus, even within the more complex spice formulation, oxidized curcumin intermediates appear to function as topoisomerase II poisons. PMID:23253398

  12. Enzymic oxidation of carbon monoxide. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, T

    1959-01-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the oxidation of carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide was obtained in a cell free state from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The enzyme activity was assayed manometrically by measuring the rate of gas uptake under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide in the presence of benzyl-viologen as an oxidant. The optimum pH range was 7 to 8. The activity was slightly suppressed by illumination. The enzyme was more stable than hydrogenase or formate dehydrogenase against the heat treatment, suggesting that it is a different entity from these enzymes. In the absence of an added oxidant, the enzyme preparation produced hydrogen gas under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. The phenomenon can be explained assuming the reductive decomposition of water. 17 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Tank waste source term inventory validation. Volume II. Letter report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document comprises Volume II of the Letter Report entitled Tank Waste Source Term Inventory Validation. This volume contains Appendix C, Radionuclide Tables, and Appendix D, Chemical Analyte Tables. The sample data for selection of 11 radionuclides and 24 chemical analytes were extracted from six separate sample data sets, were arranged in a tabular format and were plotted on scatter plots for all of the 149 single-shell tanks, the 24 double-shell tanks and the four aging waste tanks. The solid and liquid sample data was placed in separate tables and plots. The sample data and plots were compiled from the following data sets: characterization raw sample data, recent core samples, D. Braun data base, Wastren (Van Vleet) data base, TRAC and HTCE inventories.

  14. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  15. Tank waste source term inventory validation. Volume II. Letter report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This document comprises Volume II of the Letter Report entitled Tank Waste Source Term Inventory Validation. This volume contains Appendix C, Radionuclide Tables, and Appendix D, Chemical Analyte Tables. The sample data for selection of 11 radionuclides and 24 chemical analytes were extracted from six separate sample data sets, were arranged in a tabular format and were plotted on scatter plots for all of the 149 single-shell tanks, the 24 double-shell tanks and the four aging waste tanks. The solid and liquid sample data was placed in separate tables and plots. The sample data and plots were compiled from the following data sets: characterization raw sample data, recent core samples, D. Braun data base, Wastren (Van Vleet) data base, TRAC and HTCE inventories

  16. Minerals Yearbook, volume II, Area Reports—Domestic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  17. Palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidation of L-tryptophan by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Initial addition of the reaction product, hexacyanoferrate(II), does not affect the rate significantly. A plausible mechanistic scheme explaining all the observed kinetic results has been proposed. The final oxidation products are identified as indole-3-acetaldehyde, ammonium ion and carbon dioxide. The rate law associated ...

  18. A catalytic wet oxidation process for mixed waste volume reduction/recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed wastes have presented a challenge to treatment and destruction technologies. A recently developed catalytic wet oxidation method has promising characteristics for volume reduction and recycling of mixed wastes. The process utilizes iron (III) as an oxidant in the presence of homogeneous cocatalysts which increase organics' oxidation rates and the rate of oxidation of iron (II) by oxygen. The reaction is conducted in an aqueous mineral acid solution at temperatures of 373 - 573 deg K. The mineral acid should solvate a number of heavy metals, including U and Pu. Studies of reaction rates show that the process can oxidize a wide range of organic compounds including aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Rate constants in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -4 sec -1 , depending on the cocatalyst, acidity, type of anions, type of organic, temperature, and time. Activation energies ranged from 25. to 32. KJ/mole. Preliminary measurements of the extent of oxidation which could be obtained ranged from 80% for trichloroethylene to 99.8% for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene; evidence was obtained that absorption by the fluorocarbon liners of the reaction bombs allowed some of the organics to escape exposure to the catalyst solution. The results indicate that complete oxidation of the organics used here, and presumably many others, can be achieved. (author)

  19. Oxygen dependency of neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix differs from abiotic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizing microorganisms are found in many natural environments. It has been hypothesized that, at low oxygen concentrations, microbial iron oxidation is favored over abiotic oxidation. Here, we compare the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation to oxidation in the presence of

  20. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  1. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D.A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.

    2012-01-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  2. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  3. Reinforced soil structures. Volume II, Summary of research and systems information

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Volume II was essentially prepared as an Appendix of supporting information for Volume I. This volume contains much of the supporting theory and a summary of the research used to verify the design approach contained in Volume I, as well as general in...

  4. Technical summary of Groundwater Quality Protection Program at Savannah River Plant. Volume II. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.; Christensen, E.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report (Volume II) presents representative monitoring data for radioactivity in groundwater at SRP. Four major groups of radioactive waste disposal sites and three minor sites are described. Much of the geohydrological and and other background information given in Volume I is applicable to these sites and is incorporated by reference. Several of the sites that contain mixed chemical and radioactive wastes are discussed in both Volumes I and II. Bulk unirradiated uranium is considered primarily a chemical waste which is addressed in Volume I, but generally not in Volume II

  5. Oxidative Ce"3"+ sequestration by fungal manganese oxides with an associated Mn(II) oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Haisu; Tani, Yukinori; Naitou, Hirotaka; Miyata, Naoyuki; Tojo, Fuyumi

    2016-01-01

    Sequestration of Ce"3"+ by biogenic manganese oxides (BMOs) formed by a Mn(II)-oxidizing fungus, Acremonium strictum strain KR21-2, was examined at pH 6.0. In anaerobic Ce"3"+ solution, newly formed BMOs exhibited stoichiometric Ce"3"+ oxidation, where the molar ratio of Ce"3"+ sequestered (Ce_s_e_q) relative to Mn"2"+ released (Mn_r_e_l) was maintained at approximately two throughout the reaction. A similar Ce"3"+ sequestration trend was observed in anaerobic treatment of BMOs in which the associated Mn(II) oxidase was completely inactivated by heating at 85 °C for 1 h or by adding 50 mM NaN_3. Aerobic Ce"3"+ treatment of newly formed BMO (enzymatically active) resulted in excessive Ce"3"+ sequestration over Mn"2"+ release, yielding Ce_s_e_q/Mn_r_e_l > 200, whereas heated or poisoned BMOs released a significant amount of Mn"2"+ with lower Ce"3"+ sequestration efficiency. Consequently, self-regeneration by the Mn(II) oxidase in newly formed BMO effectively suppressed Mn"2"+ release and enhanced oxidative Ce"3"+ sequestration under aerobic conditions. Repeated treatments of heated or poisoned BMOs under aerobic conditions confirmed that oxidative Ce"3"+ sequestration continued even after most Mn oxide was released from the solid phase, indicating auto-catalytic Ce"3"+ oxidation at the solid phase produced through primary Ce"3"+ oxidation by BMO. From X-ray diffraction analysis, the resultant solid phases formed through Ce"3"+ oxidation by BMO under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions consisted of cerianite with crystal sizes of 5.00–7.23 Å. Such nano-sized CeO_2 (CeO_2_,_B_M_O) showed faster auto-catalytic Ce"3"+ oxidation than that on well-crystalized cerianite under aerobic conditions, where the normalized pseudo-first order rate constants for auto-catalytic Ce"3"+ oxidation on CeO_2_,_B_M_O was two orders of magnitude higher. Consequently, we concluded that Ce"3"+ contact with BMOs sequesters Ce"3"+ through two oxidation paths: primary Ce"3

  6. Kilowatt isotope power system. Phase II plan. Volume I. Phase II program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) was begun in 1975 for the purpose of satisfying the power requirements of satellites in the 1980's. The KIPS is a 238 PuO 2 -fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system to provide a design output of 500 to 2000 W. Phase II of the overall 3-phase KIPS program is described. This volume presents a program plan for qualifying the organic Rankine power system for flight test in 1982. The program plan calls for the design and fabrication of the proposed flight power system; conducting a development and a qualification program including both environmental and endurance testing, using an electrical and a radioisotope heat source; planning for flight test and spacecraft integration; and continuing ground demonstration system testing to act as a flight system breadboard and to accumulate life data

  7. Performance of advanced oxide fuel pins in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Jensen, S.M.; Hales, J.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Makenas, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of design and operating parameters on mixed-oxide fuel pin irradiation performance were established for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) advanced oxide EBR-II test series. Fourteen fuel pins breached in-reactor with reference 316 SS cladding. Seven of the breaches are attributed to FCMI. Of the remaining seven breached pins, three are attributed to local cladding over-temperatures similar to the breach mechanism for the reference oxide pins irradiated in EBR-II. FCCI was found to be a contributing factor in two high burnup, i.e., 11.7 at. % breaches. The remaining two breaches were attributed to mechanical interaction of UO 2 fuel and fission products accumulated in the lower cladding insulator gap, and a loss of cladding ductility possibly due to liquid metal embrittlement. Fuel smear density appears to have the most significant impact on lifetime. Quantitative evaluations of cladding diameter increases attributed to FCMI, established fuel smear density, burnup, and cladding thickness-to-diameter ratio as the major parameters influencing the extent of cladding strain

  8. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  9. Principles of quantum computation and information volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, P

    2007-01-01

    Any new textbook in quantum information has some pretty strong competition to contend with. Not only is there the classic text by Nielsen and Chuang from 2000, but also John Preskill's lecture notes, available for free online. Nevertheless, a proper textbook seems more enduring than online notes, and the field has progressed considerably in the seven years since Nielsen and Chuang was published. A new textbook is a great opportunity to give a snapshot of our current state of knowledge in quantum information. Therein also lies a problem: The field has expanded so much that it is impossible to cover everything at the undergraduate level. Quantum information theory is relevant to an extremely large portion of physics, from solid state and condensed matter physics to particle physics. Every discipline that has some relation to quantum mechanics is affected by our understanding of quantum information theory. Those who wish to write a book on quantum information therefore have to make some profound choices: Do you keep the ultimate aim of a quantum computer in mind, or do you focus on quantum communication and precision measurements as well? Do you describe how to build a quantum computer with all possible physical systems or do you present only the underlying principles? Do you include only the tried and tested ideas, or will you also explore more speculative directions? You don't have to take a black-or-white stance on these questions, but how you approach them will profoundly determine the character of your book. The authors of 'Principles of Quantum Computation and Information (Volume II: Basic Tools and Special Topics)' have chosen to focus on the construction of quantum computers, but restrict themselves mainly to general techniques. Only in the last chapter do they explicitly address the issues that arise in the different implementations. The book is the second volume in a series, and consists of four chapters (labelled 5 to 8) called 'Quantum Information Theory

  10. Fungal oxidative dissolution of the Mn(II)-bearing mineral rhodochrosite and the role of metabolites in manganese oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanzhi; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Hansel, Colleen M

    2013-04-01

    Microbially mediated oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides influences the cycling of metals and remineralization of carbon. Despite the prevalence of Mn(II)-bearing minerals in nature, little is known regarding the ability of microbes to oxidize mineral-hosted Mn(II). Here, we explored oxidation of the Mn(II)-bearing mineral rhodochrosite (MnCO3 ) and characteristics of ensuing Mn oxides by six Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi. All fungal species substantially enhanced rhodochrosite dissolution and surface modification. Mineral-hosted Mn(II) was oxidized resulting in formation of Mn(III/IV) oxides that were all similar to δ-MnO2 but varied in morphology and distribution in relation to cellular structures and the MnCO3 surface. For four fungi, Mn(II) oxidation occurred along hyphae, likely mediated by cell wall-associated proteins. For two species, Mn(II) oxidation occurred via reaction with fungal-derived superoxide produced at hyphal tips. This pathway ultimately resulted in structurally unique Mn oxide clusters formed at substantial distances from any cellular structure. Taken together, findings for these two fungi strongly point to a role for fungal-derived organic molecules in Mn(III) complexation and Mn oxide templation. Overall, this study illustrates the importance of fungi in rhodochrosite dissolution, extends the relevance of biogenic superoxide-based Mn(II) oxidation and highlights the potential role of mycogenic exudates in directing mineral precipitation. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Safety Specialist Manpower, Manpower Resources. Volumes II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    These second and third volumes of a four-volume study of manpower in state highway safety programs over the next decade estimate manpower resources by state and in national aggregate and describe present and planned training programs for safety specialists. For each educational level, both total manpower and manpower actually available for…

  12. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bachmann, Corinne E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Camarillo, Mary Kay [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Domen, Jeremy K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foxall, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jin, Ling [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Millstein, Dev E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sandelin, Whitney L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Varadharajan, Charuleka [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cooley, Heather [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Donnelly, Kristina [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew G. [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Hays, Jake [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth B.C. [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Englander, Jacob G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hamdoun, Amro [Univ. of California of San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Nicklisch, Sascha C.T. [Univ. of California of San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Harrison, Robert J. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wettstein, Zachary S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Banbury, Jenner [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Cypher, Brian L. [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott E. [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, the present volume, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, also issued in July 2015, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. A final Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  13. Preliminary feasibility study on storage of radioactive wastes in Columbia River basalts. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1976-11-01

    Volume II comprises four appendices: analytical data and sample locations for basalt flow type localities; Analytical data and sample locations for measured field sections in Yakima basalts; core hole lithology and analytical data; and geophysical logs. (LK)

  14. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 2, 3.0 Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II Tokamak. This particular volume discusses: mechanical systems; electrical systems; shield nuclear analysis and tritium issues; reactor building facilities; and tritium systems

  15. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    This report relates to protection of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. This volume presents the source listings for the Fixed Site Neutralization Model and its supporting modules, the Plex Preprocessor and the Data Preprocessor

  16. Atlas of Ohio Aquatic Insects: Volume II, Plecoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, R Edward; Grubbs, Scott A; Armitage, Brian J; Baumann, Richard W; Clark, Shawn M; Bolton, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species. This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2​. Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan aged lake plains climaxed to an

  17. Sorption and catalytic oxidation of Fe(II) at the surface of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettler, S.; Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Von Gunten, U.

    The effect of sorption and coprecipitation of Fe(II) with calcite on the kinetics of Fe(II) oxidation was investigated. The interaction of Fe(II) with calcite was studied experimentally in the absence and presence of oxygen. The sorption of Fe(II) on calcite occurred in two distinguishable steps:

  18. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume II - Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume II of a two volume set of water pollution studies, contains seven appendices which support the studies. Appendix 1, Water Quality Parameters, consolidates the technical aspects of water quality including chemical, biological, computer program, and equipment information. Appendix 2, Implementation, outlines techniques…

  19. Three Mile Island: a report to the commissioners and to the public. Volume II, Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the third and final part of the second volume of a study of the Three Mile Island accident. Part 3 of Volume II contains descriptions and assessments of responses to the accident by the utility and by the NRC and other government agencies

  20. Investigation of the interaction of copper(II) oxide and electron beam irradiation crosslinkable polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen; Sin, Lee Tin; Ratnam, C.T.; Haraveen, K.J.S.; Tee, Tiam-Ting; Rahmat, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of copper(II) oxide when added to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends were investigated. It was found that the addition of low loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩽2 phr) to LDPE results in significantly poorer gel content and hot set results. However, the incorporation of higher loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩾3 phr) could slightly increase the degree of crosslinking in all irradiated LDPE composites. This is due to the fact that higher amounts of copper(II) oxide could slightly induce the formation of free radicals in LDPE matrix. Besides, increasing irradiation doses was also found to gradually increase the gel content of LDPE composites by generating higher amounts of free radicals. As a consequence, these higher amounts of free radicals released in the LDPE matrix could significantly increase the degree of crosslinking. The addition of copper(II) oxide could reduce the tensile strength and fracture strain (elongation at break) of LDPE composites because of poorer interfacial adhesion effect between copper(II) oxide particles and LDPE matrix. Meanwhile, increasing irradiation doses on all copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites could marginally increase the tensile strength. In addition, increasing irradiation dose could enhance the thermal stability of LDPE composites by increasing the decomposition temperature. The oxidation induction time (OIT) analysis showed that, because of the crosslinking network in the copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites, oxidation reaction is much delayed.

  1. Investigation of the interaction of copper(II) oxide and electron beam irradiation crosslinkable polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen, E-mail: direct.beest@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sin, Lee Tin, E-mail: direct.tinsin@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ratnam, C.T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Haraveen, K.J.S.; Tee, Tiam-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahmat, A.R. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of copper(II) oxide when added to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends were investigated. It was found that the addition of low loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩽2 phr) to LDPE results in significantly poorer gel content and hot set results. However, the incorporation of higher loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩾3 phr) could slightly increase the degree of crosslinking in all irradiated LDPE composites. This is due to the fact that higher amounts of copper(II) oxide could slightly induce the formation of free radicals in LDPE matrix. Besides, increasing irradiation doses was also found to gradually increase the gel content of LDPE composites by generating higher amounts of free radicals. As a consequence, these higher amounts of free radicals released in the LDPE matrix could significantly increase the degree of crosslinking. The addition of copper(II) oxide could reduce the tensile strength and fracture strain (elongation at break) of LDPE composites because of poorer interfacial adhesion effect between copper(II) oxide particles and LDPE matrix. Meanwhile, increasing irradiation doses on all copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites could marginally increase the tensile strength. In addition, increasing irradiation dose could enhance the thermal stability of LDPE composites by increasing the decomposition temperature. The oxidation induction time (OIT) analysis showed that, because of the crosslinking network in the copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites, oxidation reaction is much delayed.

  2. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amelio, J.

    1994-01-01

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state's input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only

  3. The effects of iron(II) on the kinetics of arsenic oxidation and sorption on manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, As(III) oxidation kinetics by a poorly-crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe(II) was investigated using stirred-flow and batch experiments. Chemically synthetic δ-MnO2 was reacted with four influent solutions, containing the same As(III) concentration but different Fe(II) concentrations, at pH 6. The results show an initial rapid As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2, which is followed by an appreciably slow reaction after 8h. In the presence of Fe(II), As(III) oxidation is inhibited due to the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the formation of Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides on the δ-MnO2 surface. However, the sorption of As(III), As(V) and Mn(II) are increased, for the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides provide additional sorption sites. This study suggests that the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) and consequently the precipitation of Fe(III) compounds on the δ-MnO2 surface play an important role in As(III) oxidation and As sequestration. Understanding these processes would be helpful in developing in situ strategies for remediation of As-contaminated waters and soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Atlas of total body radionuclide imaging. Volume I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fordham, E.W.; Ali, A.; Turner, D.A.; Charters, J.

    1982-01-01

    This two-volume work on total body imaging may well be regarded by future historians of nuclear medicine as representing the high points in the art of total body imaging in clinical nuclear medicine. With regard to information content and volume, it is the largest collection of well-interpreted, beautifully reproduced, total body images available to date. The primary goal of this atlas is to demonstrate patterns of abnormality in both typical and less typical variations. This goal is accomplished with many well-described examples of technical artifacts, of normal variants, of common and of rare diseases, and of pitfalls in interpretations. Volume I is entirely dedicated to skeletal imaging with Tc-99m labeled phosphates or phosphonates. The volume is divided into 22 chapters, which include chapters on methodology and instrumentation, chapters on the important bone diseases and other topics such as a treatise on false-negative and false-positive scans, and soft tissue and urinary tract abnormalities recognizable on bone scintigrams

  5. Environmental law and climate change : Volumes I & II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, Jonathan

    Two volume set that brings together 54 of the most influential and important scientific journal articles in the field of climate law, thematically grouped together as follows: introducing climate law, theories and approaches, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, climate justice,

  6. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  7. Secretome-based Manganese(II) Oxidation by Filamentous Ascomycete Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, C. A.; Purvine, S.; Zink, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Chaput, D.; Wu, S.; Santelli, C. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest oxidants in the environment, and Mn(II) oxidation to Mn(III/IV) (hydr)oxides includes both abiotic and microbially-mediated processes. While white-rot Basidiomycete fungi oxidize Mn(II) using laccases and Mn peroxidases in association with lignocellulose degradation, the mechanisms by which filamentous Ascomycete fungi oxidize Mn(II) and a physiological role for Mn(II) oxidation in these organisms remain poorly understood. Through a combination of chemical and in-gel assays, bulk mass spectrometry, and iTRAQ proteomics, we demonstrate enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation in the secretomes of three phylogenetically diverse Ascomycetes that were isolated from Mn-laden sediments. Candidate Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes were species-specific and included bilirubin oxidase and tyrosinase in Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, GMC oxidoreductase in Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a, and FAD-binding oxidoreductases in Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a. These findings were supported by full proteomic characterization of the secretomes, which revealed a lack of Mn, lignin, and versatile peroxidases in these Ascomycetes but a substantially higher proportion of LMCOs and GMC oxidoreductases compared to wood-rot Basidiomycetes. We also identified the potential for indirect enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation by hydroxyl radical, as the secretomes were rich in diverse lignocellulose-degrading enzymes that could participate in Fenton chemistry. A link between Mn(II) oxidation and carbon oxidation analogous to white-rot Basidiomycetes remains unknown in these Ascomycetes. Interestingly, growth rates on rich medium were unaffected by the presence of Mn(II), and the production of Mn(II)-oxidizing proteins in the secretome was constitutive and not inducible by Mn(II). Thus, no physiological benefit of Mn(II) oxidation in these Ascomycetes has yet been identified, and Mn(II) oxidation appears to be a side reaction. Future work will explore the lignin-degrading capacity of

  8. Thermodynamic controls on the kinetics of microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Lance N; Sánchez-España, Javier; Kaley, Bradley; Sheng, Yizhi; Bibby, Kyle; Burgos, William D

    2014-08-19

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major worldwide environmental threat to surface and groundwater quality. Microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation could be exploited for cost-effective AMD treatment; however, its use is limited because of uncertainties associated with its rate and ability to remove Fe from solution. We developed a thermodynamic-based framework to evaluate the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. We measured the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation at five sites in the Appalachian Coal Basin in the US and three sites in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain and found that the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation occurred at the sites with the lowest pH values. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Gibbs free energy of Fe(II) oxidation (ΔG(oxidation)) was also most negative at the sites with the lowest pH values. We then conducted two series of microbial Fe(II) oxidation experiments in laboratory-scale chemostatic bioreactors operated through a series of pH values (2.1-4.2) and found the same relationships between Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, ΔG(oxidation), and pH. Conditions that favored the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation coincided with higher Fe(III) solubility. The solubility of Fe(III) minerals, thus plays an important role on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics. Methods to incorporate microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation into active and passive AMD treatment systems are discussed in the context of these findings. This study presents a simplified model that describes the relationship between free energy and microbial kinetics and should be broadly applicable to many biogeochemical systems.

  9. Low-temperature Synthesis of Tin(II) Oxide From Tin(II) ketoacidoximate Precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Alshankiti, Buthainah

    2015-04-01

    Sn (II) oxide finds numerous applications in different fields such as thin film transistors1, solar cells2 and sensors.3 In this study we present the fabrication of tin monoxide SnO by using Sn (II) ketoacid oximate complexes as precursors. Tin (II) ketoacidoximates of the type [HON=CRCOO]2Sn where R= Me 1, R= CH2Ph 2, and [(MeON=CMeCOO)3Sn]- NH4 +.2H2O 3 were synthesized by in situ formation of the ketoacid oximate ligand. The crystal structures were determined via single crystal X- ray diffraction of the complexes 1-3 revealed square planar and square pyramidal coordination environments for the Sn atom. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in all the complexes. Furthermore, the complexes were characterized by Infrared (IR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and elemental analysis. From thermogravimetric analysis of 1-3, it was found that the complexes decomposed in the range of 160 – 165 oC. Analysis of the gases evolved during decomposition indicated complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step and the formation of SnO. Spin coating of 1 on silicon or glass substrate show uniform coating of SnO. Band gaps of SnO films were measured and found to be in the range of 3.0 – 3.3 eV by UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated surface oxidation of the SnO film. Heating 1 above 140 oC in air gives SnO of size ranging from 10 – 500 nm and is spherical in shape. The SnO nanomaterial is characterized by powder X-ray diffraction(XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  10. Analysis of some nuclear waste management options. Volume II. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, L.E.; Ensminger, D.A.; Giuffre, M.S.; Koplik, C.M.; Oston, S.G.; Pollak, G.D.; Ross, B.I.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes risk analyses performed on that portion of a nuclear fuel cycle which begins following solidification of high-level waste. Risks associated with handling, interim storage and transportation of the waste are assessed, as well as the long term implications of disposal in deep mined cavities. The risk is expressed in terms of expected dose to the general population and peak dose to individuals in the population. This volume consists of appendices which provide technical details of the work performed

  11. Analysis of some nuclear waste management options. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, L.E.; Ensminger, D.A.; Giuffre, M.S.; Koplik, C.M.; Oston, S.G.; Pollak, G.D.; Ross, B.I.

    1978-10-10

    This report describes risk analyses performed on that portion of a nuclear fuel cycle which begins following solidification of high-level waste. Risks associated with handling, interim storage and transportation of the waste are assessed, as well as the long term implications of disposal in deep mined cavities. The risk is expressed in terms of expected dose to the general population and peak dose to individuals in the population. This volume consists of appendices which provide technical details of the work performed.

  12. INEL environmental characterization report. Volume II. Appendices A-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This volume contains appendices: (1) a socioeconomic data base for southeastern Idaho; (2) an ecological characterization of the INEL; (3) site-specific climatology summary, NPR primary and alternate sites; (4) NPR site borehole completion; (5) an investigation of the principal lineament at the INEL; (6) an investigation of Clay Butte, Idaho; (7) Arco and Howe fault study; (8) seismology of the INEL; (9) geologic map of the INEL; and (1) geologic ages of the INEL

  13. Basic Quechua. Volume I: Quechua Reader. Volume II: Quechua Grammar and Dictionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken-Soux, Percy G.; Crapo, Richley H.

    Volume I, the reader, has 86 lessons consisting of short passages and vocabulary lists. The language and the stories presented were learned and collected at the Indian community and Hacienda of Cayara near Potosi, Bolivia. Translations of the passages are provided in a separate section. The second volume presents the grammar and phonology of the…

  14. Biological iron(II) oxidation as pre-treatment to limestone neutralisation of acid water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available at investigating the effect of surface area of the medium that supports bacterial growth on the rate of biological iron (II) oxidation. The study showed that the biological iron (II) oxidation rate is directly proportional to the square root of the medium specific...

  15. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    ii7 L HOWES and THRALL (1972) ,HT n HTY HT m HTX jini ijl HOLTER (1973) and ANDERSON (1979) CHA HAx Y tAs in the preceding table, SPUDICH (1968) - the...detail can one afford? A recent U. S. General Accounting Office ( GAO ) report [150, pp. 28-29] points out that there is a strong inconsistency between...further details). 65. A recent U. S. Getueral Accounting Office ( GAO ) [1501 study has emphasized that empirical study is necessary to strengthen the

  16. USAF Summer Faculty Research Program. 1981 Research Reports. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Spec ialty : IIS F ,re ign Policy ; American Indiana State University Nat ioinal Security Policy Dept. of Political Science A. si ,niled: A! Terre Haute...0 C-4 44 C E) I IC C z)~ w z . 0 cnCd d CCC C’) 0-4-9- ..- E-4 (-4 7-A.A).)).) (QUADI) was constructed in the same manner as for the plate bending...IV modifications in accordance with current policy . They are to expedite safety modifications that could ground airborne systems or inactivate ground

  17. HIBAL Program. Preliminary Warhead-Design. Volume II. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-15

    Mild Steel (iAi i018). ............. 11-2 B. SAE 4130 .. .. .. .... ...... ....... 11-3 C. SAE 4140 ......... .... .... ......... 11-3 D, SAE 4340...11-7 - Test Data for SAE 4140 Steel Frag- ments ...... ................ 11-14 Figure II-7A - 4142 ... .............. 11-15 Figure 11-8 - Test Data...included the following types of steel: SAE 1018, 4130, 4140 and 4340; 5-317 and 5-876 Carpenter tool steel; Anico HY-80 and SSS-100 steel; AISI-S7

  18. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation at circumneutral pH: Reaction kinetics, mineral products, and distribution of neutrophilic iron oxidizers in wetland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizers can conserve energy from Fe(II) oxidation, however, it is still unclear how they can compete against the fast abiotic reaction at neutral pH, or to which extent these bacteria increase the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate. Similar to

  19. Commingled uranium-tailings study. Volume II. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-06-30

    Public Law 96-540, Section 213, directs the Secretary of Energy to develop a plan for a cooperative program to provide assistance in the stabilization and management of defense-related uranium mill tailings commingled with other tailings. In developing the plan, the Secretary is further directed to: (1) establish the amount and condition of tailings generated under federal contracts; (2) examine appropriate methodologies for establishing the extent of federal assistance; and (3) consult with the owners and operators of each site. This technical report summarizes US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor activities in pursuit of items (1), (2), and (3) above. Recommendations regarding policy and a cooperative plan for federal assistance are under separate cover as Volume I.

  20. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1979. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 2 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, D.M.

    1981-04-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume II, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-O; Part 2 contains Appendices P-FF. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  1. Tin( ii ) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin( ii ) oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-10-21

    Tin(ii) ketoacidoximates of the type [HONCRCOO]Sn (R = Me 1, CHPh 2) and (MeONCMeCOO)Sn] NH·2HO 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH (R = H, Me) with tin(ii) chloride dihydrate SnCl·2HO. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HONC(Me)COO]Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO in ambient atmosphere.

  2. An excursion through elementary mathematics, volume ii euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Caminha Muniz Neto, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, in-depth overview of elementary mathematics as explored in Mathematical Olympiads around the world. It expands on topics usually encountered in high school and could even be used as preparation for a first-semester undergraduate course. This second volume covers Plane Geometry, Trigonometry, Space Geometry, Vectors in the Plane, Solids and much more. As part of a collection, the book differs from other publications in this field by not being a mere selection of questions or a set of tips and tricks that applies to specific problems. It starts from the most basic theoretical principles, without being either too general or too axiomatic. Examples and problems are discussed only if they are helpful as applications of the theory. Propositions are proved in detail and subsequently applied to Olympic problems or to other problems at the Olympic level. The book also explores some of the hardest problems presented at National and International Mathematics Olympiads, as well as many...

  3. Characterization of large volume HPGe detectors. Part II: Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, Bart; Reiter, Peter; Pascovici, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Measurements on a 12-fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356keV γ-rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and digital signal processing electronics

  4. Soil microbiology in land reclamation volume II - mycorrhizae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, D.H. (ed.)

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains three separate reports: RRTAC 84-4 (Greenhouse pot studies dealing with amendment of oil sand tailings: effects of peat, sewage sludge and fertilizer on plant growth, mycorrhizae and microbial activity); RRTAC 84-8 (Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) development of slender wheatgrass on amended oil sand tailings and subalpine coal mines spoil); RRTAC 84-7 (Ectomycorrhizae in amended oil sand tailings and subalpine coal mine spoil and in undisturbed Jack pine and spruce stands). In the first report mixtures of two peats were used to amend oil sand tailings and either mineral fertilizers or sewage sludge were added at different rates. The growth of slender wheat grass and jack pine grown in the greenhouse in these media were monitored. In the second report the VAM development of slender wheatgrass was monitored over a 4 year period; in the third the mycorrhizal status of jack pine and bear berry grown in oil sand tailings treated with various amendments and of white spruce and willow grown in subalpine coal mine spoil were monitored over the same period.

  5. Controlled air incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design references manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-11-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities

  6. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-10-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  7. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-10-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities

  8. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included

  10. The Adsorption of Cd(II on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999. The adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH < 5.0, whereas Cd(II adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide at pH < 5.0 and pH > 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X2Cd at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd+ and (SO2CdOH− species at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water–mineral interface.

  11. Statistical model for grain boundary and grain volume oxidation kinetics in UO2 spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.; Shaw, H.F.; Einziger, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This paper addresses statistical characteristics for the simplest case of grain boundary/grain volume oxidation kinetics of UO 2 to U 3 O 7 for a fragment of a spent fuel pellet. It also presents a limited discussion of future extensions to this simple case to represent the more complex cases of oxidation kinetics in spent fuels. 17 refs., 1 fig

  12. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  13. Proceedings of the advanced coal-fired power systems `95 review meeting, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, H.M.; Mollot, D.J.; Venkataraman, V.K.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains papers which were presented at the advanced coal-fired power sytems review meeting. This is volume II. Topics include: hot gas filter issues, hazardous air pollutants, sorbent development, and separation technologies. Individual papers were processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  14. Kilowatt isotope power system, Phase II Plan. Volume IV. Teledyne FSCD vs GDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-15

    This Volume contains Teledyne's input to the Kilowatt Isotope Power System Phase II Plan. Included is a description of the Flight System Heat Generation System, Flight System Radiator, Thermal Insulation Stability, GDS Heat Generation System and GDS Radiator.

  15. Discourse, Paragraph, and Sentence Structure in Selected Philippine Languages. Final Report. Volume II, Sentence Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longacre, Robert E.

    Volume II of "Discourse, Paragraph, and Sentence Structure in Selected Philippine Languages" begins with an explanation of certain assumptions and postulates regarding sentence structure. A detailed treatment of systems of sentence structure and the parameters of such systems follows. Data in the various indigenous languages are…

  16. Biennial Survey of Education, 1916-18. Volume II. Bulletin, 1919, No. 89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1921

    1921-01-01

    Volume II of the Biennial Survey of Education, 1916-1918 includes the following chapters: (1) Education in Great Britain and Ireland (I. L. Kandel); (2) Education in parts of the British Empire: Educational Developments in the Dominion of Canada (Walter A. Montgomery), Public School System of Jamaica (Charles A. Asbury), Recent Progress of…

  17. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces

  18. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Proceedings of the natural gas RD&D contractors review meeting, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R.D. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    This is volume II of papers which were presented at the natural gas RD&D contractors review meeting. Topics include: natural gas upgrading, storage, well drilling, completion, and stimulation. Individual papers were processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  20. Hydrolysis of bis(dimethylamido)tin to tin (II) oxyhydroxide and its selective transformation into tin (II) or tin (IV) oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash; Shi, Lei; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sn6O4(OH)4, a hydrolysis product of Sn(NMe2)2, is transformed to tin (II) or tin (IV) oxide by solid and solution phase processing. Tin (II) oxide is formed by heating Sn6O4(OH)4 at ≤200 °C in air or under inert atmosphere. Tin (IV) oxide

  1. International and Domestic Market Opportunities for Biomass Power: Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-09-01

    This report examines the domestic and international markets for biopower. Domestic and foreign markets present fundamentally different challenges to private power developers. Volume I focuses on the domestic market for biopower. The domestic challenge lies in finding economically viable opportunities for biopower. Vol. I outlines the current state of the U.S. biomass industry, discusses policies affecting biomass development, describes some demonstration projects currently underway, and discusses the future direction of the industry. Volume II focuses on the international market for biopower. Recent literature states that the electricity investment and policy climate in foreign markets are the key elements in successful private project development. Vol. II discusses the financing issues, policy climate, and business incentives and barriers to biopower development. As India and China are the largest future markets for biopower, they are the focus of this volume. Three other top markets- -Brazil, Indonesia, and the Philippines--are also discussed. Potential financial resources wrap up the discussion.

  2. The Adsorption of Cd(II) on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Chen, Tianhu; Zou, Xuehua; Zhu, Mulan; Chen, Dong; Pan, Min

    2017-09-28

    Manganese (Mn) oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II) concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R² > 0.999). The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide at pH 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II) calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X₂Cd) at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd⁺ and (SO)₂CdOH - species) at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water-mineral interface.

  3. The Adsorption of Cd(II) on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Chen, Tianhu; Zou, Xuehua; Zhu, Mulan; Chen, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II) concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999). The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide at pH 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II) calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X2Cd) at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd+ and (SO)2CdOH− species) at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water–mineral interface. PMID:28956849

  4. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 1, Equations and numerics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in Cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the Cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits of modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. This volume, Volume I - Equations and Numerics, describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. The final volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, presents results of numerical simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and comparisons with experimental data. 4 refs

  5. Oxidative C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-diols by silver(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidation of ethylene glycol and related compounds by Ag(II) has been investigated. Complexation of these substrates by Ag(II) precedes their oxidation. Oxidation occurs through electron transfer from an OH group to the Ag(II) within the complex resulting in the formation of alkoxyl-type radicals. The radicals thus formed undergo β-scission to give cleavage products. For ethylene glycol a complexation rate 1.3 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 and oxidation rate approx. 3 x 10 3 s -1 were observed. A general trend for the type of the substrates which would undergo C-C bond scission by Ag(II) is discussed

  6. Phototrophic Fe(II-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Alexis eWalter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II with photosynthetically-produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain. We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II, and determined light-dependent Fe(II-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIF’s before the advent of free oxygen.

  7. Immobilization of radionuclides and heavy metals through anaerobic bio-oxidation of Fe(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lack, J.G.; Chaudhuri, S.K.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; O'Connor, S.M.; Coates, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides (HMR) onto iron and manganese oxides has long been recognized as an important reaction for the immobilization of these compounds. However, in environments containing elevated concentrations of these HMR the adsorptive capacity of the iron and manganese oxides may well be exceeded, and the HMR can migrate as soluble compounds in aqueous systems. Here we demonstrate the potential of a bioremediative strategy for HMR stabilization in reducing environments based on the recently described anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation by Dechlorosoma species. Bio-oxidation of 10 mM Fe(II) and precipitation of Fe(III) oxides by these organisms resulted in rapid adsorption and removal of 55 μM uranium and 81 μM cobalt from solution. The adsorptive capacity of the biogenic Fe(III) oxides was lower than that of abiotically produced Fe(III) oxides (100 μM for both metals), which may have been a result of steric hindrance by the microbial cells on the iron oxide surfaces. The binding capacity of the biogenic oxides for different heavy metals was indirectly correlated to the atomic radius of the bound element. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the uranium was bound to the biogenically produced Fe(III) oxides as U(VI) and that the U(VI) formed bidentate and tridentate inner-sphere complexes with the Fe(III) oxide surfaces. Dechlorosoma suillum oxidation was specific for Fe(II), and the organism did not enzymatically oxidize U(IV) or Co(II). Small amounts (less than 2.5 μM) of Cr(III) were reoxidized by D. suillum; however, this appeared to be inversely dependent on the initial concentration of the Cr(III). The results of this study demonstrate the potential of this novel approach for stabilization and immobilization of HMR in the environment.

  8. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Colleen M; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Webb, Samuel M

    2012-07-31

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  9. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1979. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, D.M.

    1981-04-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-O; Part 2 contains Appendices P-FF. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each Appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  10. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.)

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  11. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  12. Wet Oxidation of Maleic Acid by a Pumice Supported Copper (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pumice supported Cu (II) Schiff base catalysts were prepared by surface chemical modification followed by complexation with Cu (II) acetate. The resulting materials were characterised by Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to confirm the modification. The materials were tested in a wet oxidation ...

  13. Palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidation of L-tryptophan by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dium(II)] were obtained. The reaction exhibits fractional-second order kinetics with respect to [H ... compounds. Its use- fulness may be due to its unequivocal stability, water. ∗ ... metals are known to catalyze many oxidation–reduction reactions because they ... prepared by dissolving potassium hexacyanoferrate(II). (SD Fine ...

  14. Iron(II) porphyrins induced conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting Ting; Liu, Yong Dong; Zhong, Ru Gang

    2015-09-01

    Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by heme proteins was reported as a protective mechanism to hypoxic injury in mammalian physiology. In this study, the pathways of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrin (P) complexes, which were generally recognized as models for heme proteins, were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). In view of two type isomers of combination of nitrite and Fe(II)(P), N-nitro- and O-nitrito-Fe(II)-porphyrin complexes, and two binding sites of proton to the different O atoms of nitrite moiety, four main pathways for the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrins were proposed. The results indicate that the pathway of N-bound Fe(II)(P)(NO2) isomer into Fe(III)(P)(NO) and water is similar to that of O-bound isomer into nitric oxide and Fe(III)(P)(OH) in both thermodynamical and dynamical aspects. Based on the initial computational studies of five-coordinate nitrite complexes, the conversion of nitrite into NO mediated by Fe(II)(P)(L) complexes with 14 kinds of proximal ligands was also investigated. Generally, the same conclusion that the pathways of N-bound isomers are similar to those of O-bound isomer was obtained for iron(II) porphyrin with ligands. Different effects of ligands on the reduction reactions were also found. It is notable that the negative proximal ligands can improve reactive abilities of N-nitro-iron(II) porphyrins in the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide compared to neutral ligands. The findings will be helpful to expand our understanding of the mechanism of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by iron(II) porphyrins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  16. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-06-03

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV).

  17. Effect of Dunaliella tertiolecta organic exudates on the Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A G; Santana-Casiano, J M; González-Dávila, M; Pérez-Almeida, N; Suárez de Tangil, M

    2014-07-15

    The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta on the Fe(II) oxidation rate constants was studied at different stages of growth. The concentration of dissolved organic carbon increased from 2.1 to 7.1 mg L(-1) over time of culture. The oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) was studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2-8.2), temperature (5-35 °C), salinity (10-37), and dissolved organic carbon produced by cells (2.1-7.1 mg L(-1)). The experimental rate always decreased in the presence of organic exudates with respect to that in the control seawater. The Fe(II) oxidation rate constant was also studied in the context of Marcus theory, where ΔG° was 39.31-51.48 kJ mol(-1). A kinetic modeling approach was applied for computing the equilibrium and rate constants for Fe(II) and exudates present in solution, the Fe(II) speciation, and the contribution of each Fe(II) species to the overall oxidation rate constant. The best fit model took into account two acidity equilibrium constants for the Fe(II) complexing ligands with pKa,1=9.45 and pKa,2=4.9. The Fe(II) complexing constants were KFe(II)-LH=3×10(10) and KFe(II)-L=10(7), and the corresponding computed oxidation rates were 68±2 and 36±8 M(-1) min(-1), respectively.

  18. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  19. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  20. Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

  1. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  2. Zeolite-encapsulated Co(II), Mn(II), Cu(II) and Cr(III) salen complexes as catalysts for efficient selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F. H.; Bi, H.; Huang, D. X.; Zhang, M.; Song, Y. B.

    2018-01-01

    Co(II), Mn(II), Cu(II) and Cr(III) salen type complexes were synthesized in situ in Y zeolite by the reaction of ion-exchanged metal ions with the flexible ligand molecules that had diffused into the cavities. Data of characterization indicates the formation of metal salen complexes in the pores without affecting the zeolite framework structure, the absence of any extraneous species and the geometry of encapsulated complexes. The catalytic activity results show that Cosalcyen Y exhibited higher catalytic activity in the water phase selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol, which could be attributed to their geometry and the steric environment of the metal actives sites.

  3. Estimating the cold war mortgage: The 1995 baseline environmental management report. Volume II: Site summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This volume, Volume II presents the site data that was used to generate the Department of Energy's (DOE) initial Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The raw data was obtained by DOE field personnel from existing information sources and anticipated environmental management strategies for their sites and was tempered by general assumptions and guidance developed by DOE Headquarters personnel. This data was then integrated by DOE Headquarters personnel and modified to ensure that overall constraints such as funding and waste management capacity were addressed. The site summaries are presented by State and broken out by discrete activities and projects. The Volume I Glossary has been repeated to facilitate the reader's review of Volume II. The information presented in the site summaries represents the best data and assumptions available as of February 1, 1995. Assumptions that have not been mandated by formal agreement with appropriate regulators and other stakeholders do not constitute decisions by the Department nor do they supersede existing agreements. In addition, actions requiring decisions from external sources regarding unknowns such as future land use and funding/scheduling alternatives, as well as internal actions such as the Department's Strategic Realignment initiative, will alter the basis and general assumptions used to generate the results for this report. Consequently, the numbers presented in the site summaries do not represent outyear budget requests by the field installations

  4. Protection against inhaled oxidants through scavenging of oxidized lipids by macrophage receptors MARCO and SR-AI/II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Bauer, Alison K; Arredouani, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) express the class A scavenger receptors (SRAs) macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor AI/II (SRA-I/II), which recognize oxidized lipids and provide innate defense against inhaled pathogens and particles. Increased MARCO expression...... in lungs of ozone-resistant mice suggested an additional role protecting against inhaled oxidants. After ozone exposure, MARCO-/- mice showed greater lung injury than did MARCO+/+ mice. Ozone is known to generate oxidized, proinflammatory lipids in lung lining fluid, such as 5beta,6beta......-epoxycholesterol (beta-epoxide) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (PON-GPC). Intratracheal instillation of either lipid caused substantial neutrophil influx in MARCO-/- mice, but had no effect in MARCO+/+ mice. Normal AMs showed greater uptake in vitro of beta-epoxide compared with MARCO-/- AMs...

  5. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at PO2. The rate law found in the present study requires us to reconsider distributions of Fe redox species at low PO2 in natural environments, especially in paleoweathering profiles, and may provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of atmospheric oxygen in the Precambrian.

  6. Carbonate-mediated Fe(II) oxidation in the air-cathode fuel cell: a kinetic model in terms of Fe(II) speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Cui, Yu-Zhi; Sun, Min; Jiang, Yuan

    2013-06-06

    Due to the high redox activity of Fe(II) and its abundance in natural waters, the electro-oxidation of Fe(II) can be found in many air-cathode fuel cell systems, such as acid mine drainage fuel cells and sediment microbial fuel cells. To deeply understand these iron-related systems, it is essential to elucidate the kinetics and mechanisms involved in the electro-oxidation of Fe(II). This work aims to develop a kinetic model that adequately describes the electro-oxidation process of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. The speciation of Fe(II) is incorporated into the model, and contributions of individual Fe(II) species to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate are quantitatively evaluated. The results show that the kinetic model can accurately predict the electro-oxidation rate of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. FeCO3, Fe(OH)2, and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the most important species determining the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II). The Fe(II) oxidation rate is primarily controlled by the oxidation of FeCO3 species at low pH, whereas at high pH Fe(OH)2 and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the dominant species. Solution pH, carbonate concentration, and solution salinity are able to influence the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) through changing both distribution and kinetic activity of Fe(II) species.

  7. Constraining the role of anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in deposition of BIFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Posth, N. R.; Hegler, F.; Wartha, E.; Huelin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are Precambrian sedimentary deposits of alternating iron oxide and silica mineral layers. Their presence in the rock record ca.3.8-2.2 Ga makes them particularly intriguing formations for the debate over when oxygen became dominant on Earth. The mechanism(s) of BIF deposition is still unclear; suggestions including both abiotic and biotic processes. We are interested in constraining one of these proposed mechanisms; the direct biological oxidation of Fe(II) via anoxygenic Fe(II)-oxidizing autophototrophs. In order to find the limitations of photoferrotrophic BIF deposition, we take a holistic approach, investigating the oxidation of Fe(II) by modern Fe(II)-oxidizing phototrophs, the precipitation of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, and the fate of the cell-mineral aggregates in the water column and at the basin floor. Specifically, physiology experiments with Fe(II)-oxidizing phototrophs under various conditions of light intensity, pH, Fe(II) concentration and temperature allow us to determine the environmental limits of such organisms. We carry out precipitation experiments to characterize the sedimentation rates, aggregate size and composition in order to resolve the effect of reactions in the water column. Finally, we simulate the diagenetic fate of these aggregates on the basin floor by placing them in gold capsules under T and P conditions relevant for the Transvaal Supergroup BIFs of South Africa. Recently, we have developed a tank simulating the Archean ocean in which the strains grow in continuous culture and collect the aggregates formed under various geochemical conditions. We aim to model the extent of and limitations to photoferrotrophs in BIF deposition. This information will help constrain whether biotic processes were dominant in the Archean ocean and will offer insight to the evolution of the early biogeosphere.

  8. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  9. Preparation and characterization of zinc and cobalt (II, III) oxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Laboratório de Processos de Oxidação Avançados, Departamento de Química, Caixa Postal 10011, ... gated through the heterogeneous photocatalysis mediated by zinc oxide, n-type semiconductor .... 3.2 Band gap energy determination.

  10. Kinetic studies of electrochemical generation of Ag(II) ion and catalytic oxidation of selected organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Smith, W.H.; Martinez, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a method to treat mixed hazardous wastes containing selected organic compounds and heavy metals, including actinide elements. One approach is to destroy the organic via electrochemical oxidation to carbon dioxide, then recover the metal contaminants through normally accepted procedures such as ion exchange, precipitation, etc. The authors have chosen to study the electrochemical oxidation of a simple alcohol, iso-propanol. Much of the recent work reported involved the use of an electron transfer mediator, usually the silver(I)/(II) redox couple. This involved direct electrochemical generation of the mediator at the anode of a divided cell followed by homogeneous reaction of the mediator with the organic compound. In this study the authors have sought to compare the mediated reaction with direct electrochemical oxidation of the organic. In addition to silver(I)/(II) they also looked at the cobalt(II)/(III) redox coupled. In the higher oxidation state both of these metal ions readily hydrolyze in aqueous solution to ultimately form insoluble oxide. The study concluded that in a 6M nitric acid solution at room temperature iso-propanol can be oxidized to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. Acetic acid is a stable intermediate and resists further oxidation. The presence of Co(III) enhances the rate or efficiency of the reaction

  11. Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of dopamine in aqueous solutions: mechanism and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, A Ninh; Waite, T David

    2014-08-01

    Spontaneous oxidation of dopamine (DA) and the resultant formation of free radical species within dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) is thought to bestow a considerable oxidative load upon these neurons and may contribute to their vulnerability to degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). An understanding of DA oxidation under physiological conditions is thus critical to understanding the relatively selective vulnerability of these dopaminergic neurons in PD and may support the development of novel neuro-protective approaches for this disorder. In this study, the oxidation of dopamine (0.2-10μM) was investigated both in the absence and the presence of copper (0.01-0.4μM), a redox active metal that is present at considerable concentrations in the SN, over a range of background chloride concentrations (0.01-0.7M), different oxygen concentrations and at physiological pH7.4. DA was observed to oxidize extremely slowly in the absence of copper and at moderate rates only in the presence of copper but without chloride. The oxidation of DA however was significantly enhanced in the presence of both copper and chloride with the rate of DA oxidation greatest at intermediate chloride concentrations (0.05-0.2M). The variability of the catalytic effect of Cu(II) on DA oxidation at different chloride concentrations can be explained and successfully modeled by appropriate consideration of the reaction of Cu(II) species with DA and the conversion of Cu(I) to Cu(II) through oxygenation. This model suggests that the speciation of Cu(II) and Cu(I) is critically important to the kinetics of DA oxidation and thus the vulnerability to degradation of dopaminergic neuron in the brain milieu. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E's perspective on how these systems will operate

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Cameron A, Arizona, detail area. Volume II A. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II A contains appendices for: stacked profiles; geologic histograms; geochemical histograms; speed and altitude histograms; geologic statistical tables; geochemical statistical tables; magnetic and ancillary profiles; and test line data

  14. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Monument Valley B, Utah, detail area. Volume II A. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II A contains appendices for: stacked profiles; geologic histograms; geochemical histograms; speed and altitude histograms; geologic statistical tables; geochemical statistical tables; magnetic and ancillary profiles; and test line data

  15. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Monument Valley B, Utah, detail area. Volume II B. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II B contains appendices for: flight line maps; geology maps; explanation of geologic legend; flight line/geology maps; radiometric contour maps; magnetic contour maps; and geochemical factor analysis maps

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Monument Valley A, Utah, detail area. Volume II B. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II B contains appendices for: flight line maps; geology maps; explanation of geologic legend; flight line/geology maps; radiometric contour maps; magnetic contour maps; multi-variant analysis maps; and geochemical factor analysis maps

  17. One-Pot Synthesis of Cu(II Complex with Partially Oxidized TTF Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Oshio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The one-pot synthesis of a Cu(II complex with partially oxidized tetrathiafulvalene (TTF moieties in its capping MT-Hsae-TTF ligands, [CuII(MT-sae-TTF2] [CuICl2] was realized by the simultaneous occurrence of Cu(II complexation and CuIICl2 mediated oxidation of TTF moieties. The crystal structure was composed of one-dimensional columns formed by partially oxidized TTF moieties and thus the cation radical salt showed relatively high electrical conductivity. Tight binding band structure calculations indicated the existence of a Peierls gap due to the tetramerization of the TTF moieties in the one-dimensional stacking column at room temperature, which is consistent with the semiconducting behavior of this salt.

  18. Angiotensin II stimulates superoxide production by nitric oxide synthase in thick ascending limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Saikumar, Jagannath H; Massey, Katherine J; Hong, Nancy J; Dominici, Fernando P; Carretero, Oscar A; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) causes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) to become a source of superoxide (O2 (-)) via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent process in endothelial cells. Ang II stimulates both NO and O2 (-) production in thick ascending limbs. We hypothesized that Ang II causes O2 (-) production by NOS in thick ascending limbs via a PKC-dependent mechanism. NO production was measured in isolated rat thick ascending limbs using DAF-FM, whereas O2 (-) was measured in thick ascending limb suspensions using the lucigenin assay. Consistent stimulation of NO was observed with 1 nmol/L Ang II (P thick ascending limbs via a PKC- and NADPH oxidase-dependent process; and (2) the effect of Ang II is not due to limited substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  19. Controlling the oxidation of bis-tridentate cobalt(ii) complexes having bis(2-pyridylalkyl)amines: ligand vs. metal oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjana, S; Donring, S; Sanjib, P; Varghese, B; Murthy, Narasimha N

    2017-08-22

    Two bis-tridentate chelated cobalt(ii) complexes, which differ in the ligand structure by a methylene group, activate molecular oxygen (O 2 ), and give different oxidation products. The O 2 reaction of [Co II (pepma) 2 ] 2+ (1) with unsymmetrical 2-(2-pyridyl)-N-(2-pyridylmethyl)ethanamine (pepma) results in ligand oxidation, to the corresponding Co(ii) imine complex [Co II (pepmi) 2 ] 2+ (2). Contrastingly, the Co(ii) complex [Co II (bpma) 2 ] 2+ (3) of similar symmetrical bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (bpma), undergoes metal oxidation, yielding a cobalt(iii) complex, [Co III (bpma) 2 ] 2+ (4). The reversibility of the amine to imine conversion and the stability of the Co(ii) imine complex (2) are investigated. Furthermore, the solution dynamics of Co(ii) complexes are highlighted with the help of paramagnetic 1 H-NMR spectroscopy.

  20. Oxidation of manganese(II) with ferrate: Stoichiometry, kinetics, products and impact of organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Joseph E; Mai, Xuyen; Jiang, Yanjun; Reckhow, David A; Tobiason, John E

    2016-09-01

    Manganese is a contaminant of concern for many drinking water utilities, and future regulation may be pending. An analysis of soluble manganese (Mn(II)) oxidation by ferrate (Fe(VI)) was executed at the bench-scale, in a laboratory matrix, both with and without the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and at two different pH values, 6.2 and 7.5. In the matrix without NOM, the oxidation of Mn(II) by Fe(VI) followed a stoichiometry of 2 mol Fe(VI) to 3 mol Mn(II). The presence of NOM did not significantly affect the stoichiometry of the oxidation reaction, indicating relative selectivity of Fe(VI) for Mn(II). The size distribution of resulting particles included significant amounts of nanoparticles. Resulting manganese oxide particles were confirmed to be MnO2 via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The rate of the Mn(II) oxidation reaction was fast relative to typical time scales in drinking water treatment, with an estimated second order rate constant of approximately 1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.2 and > 9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.2. In general, ferrate is a potential option for Mn(II) oxidation in water treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Volume I. Environmental effects on contents of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in milk. Volume II. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Milk, animal fodders, soils, humans, livestock, and wildlife on or near 55 dairy farms in Utah were assayed for radionuclide content. Effects of soil chemistry, water supply, plant type, farming practices, geographic location, altitude, rainfall, and other ecological differences were sought by intensive analysis. Although many analyses have not been completed, several cause-effect relationships have been defined. Wet-lands yield more 137 Cs, 131 I, or 90 Sr to milk under like conditions of fallout intensity than dry-lands. In most cases, the station with the highest yield is also practicing wet grazing. 90 Sr and 137 Cs content of milk is enhanced by sandy soils. Increased altitude and higher rainfall lead to higher yields of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in milk. Levels of 137 Cs in milk increase from south to north, and Utah can be divided into several regions, each having a characteristic level of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in milk, meat, and fodders. Poor pastures (over-grazed to the extent that stem bases are eaten and much soil is exposed) yield more 137 Cs and 90 Sr than improved pastures. Feeding green chop alfalfa or putting the animals on the meadows causes marked but temporary increases in the 90 Sr and 137 Cs content of the milk. However, the annual yield for two stations of similar ecology in the same geographic area is essentially the same. Experimental details are presented in Volume I. The appendices in Volume II are made up primarily of the data compiled at the 78 stations

  2. Three Mile Island: a report to the commissioners and to the public. Volume II, Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is part one of three parts of the second volume of the Special Inquiry Group's report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the accident at Three Mile Island. The first volume contained a narrative description of the accident and a discussion of the major conclusions and recommendations. This second volume is divided into three parts. Part 1 of Volume II focuses on the pre-accident licensing and regulatory background. This part includes an examination of the overall licensing and regulatory system for nuclear powerplants viewed from different perspectives: the system as it is set forth in statutes and regulations, as described in Congressional testimony, and an overview of the system as it really works. In addition, Part 1 includes the licensing, operating, and inspection history of Three Mile Island Unit 2, discussions of relevant regulatory matters, a discussion of specific precursor events related to the accident, a case study of the pressurizer design issue, and an analysis of incentives to declare commercial operation

  3. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume II. Country data, CZ-KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. II, are Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany (East), Germany (West), Greece, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Japan, and Korea (South). The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy use; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  4. Final report of the Multiprogram Laboratory Panel Energy Research Advisory Board. Volume II. Support studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Guthrie, M.P.; Nichols, J.P.; Preston, E.L.; West, C.D.; Wilbanks, T.J.; Wilkes, B.Y.; Zerby, A.C.

    1982-09-01

    Volume II - support studies for nine national laboratories include: report of statistical data on the multiprogram laboratories; examples of national laboratory use in foreign countries; domestic models for national laboratory utilization; relationships of laboratories with industry and universities; uses of laboratories for training industrial R and D personnel; legal mandates and constraints on the national laboratories; with appendices on facts about Harwell, CEN-Saclay, TNO, Studsvik, and JAERI-Tokai; the Requirements Boards of the United Kingdom Department of Industry; impact of President's FY 1983 budget; and the PNL experiment

  5. Dead layer and active volume determination for GERDA Phase II detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bjoern [TU Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The GERDA experiment investigates the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge and is currently running Phase I of its physics program. Using the same isotope as the Heidelberg Moscow (HDM) experiment, GERDA aims to directly test the claim of observation by a subset of the HDM collaboration. For the update to Phase II of the experiment in 2013, the collaboration organized the production of 30 new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) type detectors from original 35 kg enriched material and tested their performance in the low background laboratory HADES in SCK.CEN, Belgium. With additional 20 kg of detectors, GERDA aims to probe the degenerated hierarchy scenario. One of the crucial detector parameters is the active volume (AV) fraction which directly enters into all physics analysis. This talk presents the methodology of dead layer and AV determination with different calibration sources such as {sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 228}Th and the results obtained for the new Phase II detectors. Furthermore, the AV fraction turned out to be the largest systematic uncertainty in the analysis of Phase I data which makes it imperative to reduce its uncertainty for Phase II. This talk addresses the major contributions to the AV uncertainty and gives an outlook for improvements in Phase II analysis.

  6. Personal, societal, and ecological values of wilderness: Sixth World Wilderness Congress proceedings on research, management, and allocation, Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Greg H. Aplet; John C. Hendee

    2000-01-01

    The papers contained in Volume II of these Proceedings represent a combination of papers originally scheduled for the delayed 1997 meeting of the World Wilderness Congress and those submitted in response to a second call for papers when the Congress was rescheduled for October 24-29, 1998, in Bangalore, India. Just as in Volume I, the papers are divided into seven...

  7. Forecasting the Future Food Service World of Work. Final Report. Volume II. Centralized Food Service Systems. Service Management Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas F., Ed.; Swinton, John R., Ed.

    Volume II of a three-volume study on the future of the food service industry considers the effects that centralized food production will have on the future of food production systems. Based on information from the Fair Acres Project and the Michigan State University Vegetable Processing Center, the authors describe the operations of a centralized…

  8. Modeling of Cd(II) sorption on mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, M.; Mustafa, S.; Naeem, A.; Shah, K.H.; Hussain, S.Y.; Safdar, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed oxide of iron and silicon (0.75 M Fe(OH)3:0.25 M SiO/sub 2/) was synthesized and characterized by various techniques like surface area analysis, point of zero charge (PZC), energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-rays diffraction (XRD) analysis. The uptake of Cd/sup 2+/ ions on mixed oxide increased with pH, temperature and metal ion concentration. Sorption data have been interpreted in terms of both Langmuir and Freundlich models. The Xm values at pH 7 are found to be almost twice as compared to pH 5. The values of both DH and DS were found to be positive indicating that the sorption process was endothermic and accompanied by the dehydration of Cd/sup 2+/. Further, the negative value of DG confirms the spontaneity of the reaction. The ion exchange mechanism was suggested to take place for each Cd/sup 2+/ ions at pH 5, whereas ion exchange was found coupled with non specific adsorption of metal cations at pH 7. (author)

  9. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  10. Potential Role of Nitrite for Abiotic Fe(II) Oxidation and Cell Encrustation during Nitrate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueglein, Nicole; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have been observed to oxidize Fe(II) at neutral pH under anoxic and microoxic conditions. While most of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria become encrusted with Fe(III)-rich minerals, photoautotrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers avoid cell encrustation. The Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms and the reasons for encrustation remain largely unresolved. Here we used cultivation-based methods and electron microscopy to compare two previously described nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers ( Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002) and two heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 and P. denitrificans Pd 1222). All four strains oxidized ∼8 mM Fe(II) within 5 days in the presence of 5 mM acetate and accumulated nitrite (maximum concentrations of 0.8 to 1.0 mM) in the culture media. Iron(III) minerals, mainly goethite, formed and precipitated extracellularly in close proximity to the cell surface. Interestingly, mineral formation was also observed within the periplasm and cytoplasm; intracellular mineralization is expected to be physiologically disadvantageous, yet acetate consumption continued to be observed even at an advanced stage of Fe(II) oxidation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were detected by lectin staining with fluorescence microscopy, particularly in the presence of Fe(II), suggesting that EPS production is a response to Fe(II) toxicity or a strategy to decrease encrustation. Based on the data presented here, we propose a nitrite-driven, indirect mechanism of cell encrustation whereby nitrite forms during heterotrophic denitrification and abiotically oxidizes Fe(II). This work adds to the known assemblage of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in nature and complicates our ability to delineate microbial Fe(II) oxidation in ancient microbes preserved as fossils in the geological record. PMID:24271182

  11. Cobalamin Protection against Oxidative Stress in the Acidophilic Iron-oxidizing Bacterium Leptospirillum group II CF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Paz Levicán

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Leptospirillum are aerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the phylum Nitrospira. They are important members of microbial communities that catalyze the biomining of sulfidic ores, thereby solubilizing metal ions. These microorganisms live under extremely acidic and metal-loaded environments and thus must tolerate high concentrations of reactive oxygen species. Cobalamin (vitamin B12 is a cobalt-containing tetrapyrrole cofactor involved in intramolecular rearrangement reactions and has recently been suggested to be an intracellular antioxidant. In this work, we investigated the effect of the exogenous addition of cobalamin on oxidative stress parameters in Leptospirillum group II strain CF-1. Our results revealed that the external supplementation of cobalamin reduces the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the damage to biomolecules, and also stimulates the growth and survival of cells exposed to oxidative stress exerted by ferric ion, hydrogen peroxide, chromate and diamide. Furthermore, exposure of strain CF-1 to oxidative stress elicitors resulted in the transcriptional activation of the cbiA gene encoding CbiA of the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. Altogether, these data suggest that cobalamin plays an important role in redox protection of Leptospirillum strain CF-1, supporting survival of this microorganism under extremely oxidative environmental conditions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of cobalamin against oxidative stress may help to develop strategies to make biomining processes more effective.

  12. Copper(II)–imida‐salen Complexes Encapsulated into NaY Zeolite for Oxidations Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuźniarska‐Biernacka, Iwona; Carvalho, M. Alice; Rasmussen, Søren Birk

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of phenol, cychohexanol and hydroquinone has been screened in the presence of copper(II) complexes with the Schiff‐base salen ligand, 1,5‐bis[(E)‐5‐chloro‐2‐hydroxybenzylideneamino]‐1H‐imidazole‐4‐carbonitrile, and encapsulated into NaY zeolite by using two different methods. The new...

  13. Integrated iron(II) oxidation and limestone neutralisation of acid mine water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available dependent on the surface area exposed to the liquid (RSA) and the OH-, oxygen, CaCO3, suspended solids and iron (II) concentrations, and less dependent on specific surface area (SSA) and pressure in the pH range 5 to 6, The chemical oxidation rate (p...

  14. Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitation upon aeration of anaerobic (ground)water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, B.; Griffioen, J.; Behrends, T.; Wassen, M.J.; Schot, P.P.; Osté, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Exfiltration of anaerobic Fe-rich groundwater into surface water plays an important role in controlling the transport of phosphate (P) from agricultural areas to the sea. Previous laboratory and field studies showed that Fe(II) oxidation upon aeration leads to effective immobilization of dissolved P

  15. Study of the emission oxidative reactions of ruthenium (II) complex by cationic compounds in anionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonilha, J.B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative quenching of the emission of the tetraanionic complex tris (4,4' dicarboxylate - 2,2' - bipyridine ruthenium (II) in aqueous solution, by both organic and inorganic compounds in presence of anionic detergents, above and below the critical micelle concentration is studied. The organic cations, the inorganic ion and detergents used are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  16. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters

  17. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters.

  18. Mn(II) oxidation in Fenton and Fenton type systems : Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Genuchten, C.M.; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-01-01

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced

  19. Characterization and evaluation of graphene oxide scaffold for periodontal wound healing of class II furcation defects in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kohei; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Nishida, Erika; Miyata, Saori; Kato, Akihito; Tateyama, Akito; Furihata, Tomokazu; Shitomi, Kanako; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Sugaya, Tsutomu

    2018-01-01

    The 3-dimensional scaffold plays a key role in volume and quality of repair tissue in periodontal tissue engineering therapy. We fabricated a novel 3D collagen scaffold containing carbon-based 2-dimensional layered material, named graphene oxide (GO). The aim of this study was to characterize and assess GO scaffold for periodontal tissue healing of class II furcation defects in dog. GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a 3D collagen sponge scaffold with GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using cytotoxicity and tissue reactivity tests. In addition, GO scaffold was implanted into dog class II furcation defects and periodontal healing was investigated at 4 weeks postsurgery. GO scaffold exhibited low cytotoxicity and enhanced cellular ingrowth behavior and rat bone forming ability. In addition, GO scaffold stimulated healing of dog class II furcation defects. Periodontal attachment formation, including alveolar bone, periodontal ligament-like tissue, and cementum-like tissue, was significantly increased by GO scaffold implantation, compared with untreated scaffold. The results suggest that GO scaffold is biocompatible and possesses excellent bone and periodontal tissue formation ability. Therefore, GO scaffold would be beneficial for periodontal tissue engineering therapy.

  20. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal. Technology status report. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-12-01

    This is the first in a series of reports evaluating environmental control technologies applicable to the coal-to-electricity process. The technologies are described and evaluated from an engineering and cost perspective based upon the best available information obtained from utility experience and development work in progress. Environmental control regulations and the health effects of pollutants are also reviewed. Emphasis is placed primarily upon technologies that are now in use. For SO/sub 2/ control, these include the use of low sulfur coal, cleaned coal, or flue-gas desulfurization systems. Electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters used for the control of particulate matter are analyzed, and combustion modifications for NO/sub x/ control are described. In each area, advanced technologies still in the development stage are described briefly and evaluated on the basis of current knowledge. Fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a near-term technology that is discussed extensively in the report. The potential for control of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions by use of FBC is analyzed, as are the resulting solid waste disposal problems, cost estimates, and its potential applicability to electric utility systems. Volume II presents the detailed technology analyses complete with reference citations. This same material is given in condensed form in Volume I without references. A brief executive summary is also given in Volume I.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process

  2. Destruction of hazardous and mixed wastes using mediated electrochemical oxidation in a Ag(II)HNO3 bench scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, B.; Chiba, Z.; Hsu, P.; Lewis, P.; Murguia, L.; Adamson, M.

    1997-01-01

    Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) is a promising technology for the destruction of organic containing wastes and the remediation of mixed wastes containing transuranic components. The combination of a powerful oxidant and an acid solution allows the conversion of nearly all organics, whether present in hazardous or in mixed waste, to carbon dioxide. Insoluble transuranics are dissolved in this process and may be recovered by separation and precipitation.The MEO technique offers several advantages which are inherent in the system. First, the oxidation/dissolution processes are accomplished at near ambient pressures and temperatures (30-70 degrees C). Second, all waste stream components and oxidation products (with the exception of evolved gases) are contained in an aqueous environment. This electrolyte acts as an accumulator for inorganics which were present in the original waste stream, and the large volume of electrolyte provides a thermal buffer for the energy released during oxidation of the organics. Third, the generation of secondary waste is minimal, as the process needs no additional reagents. Finally, the entire process can be shut down by simply turning off the power, affording a level of control unavailable in some other techniques.Numerous groups, both in the United States and Europe, have made substantial progress in the last decade towards understanding the mechanistic pathways, kinetics, and engineering aspects of the process. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, substantial contributions have been made to this knowledge base in these areas and others. Conceptual design and engineering development have been completed for a pilot plant-scale MEO system, and numerous data have been gathered on the efficacy of the process for a wide variety of anticipated waste components. This presentation will review the data collected at LLNL for a bench scale system based primarily on the use of a Ag(II) mediator in a nitric acid electrolyte; results

  3. Volume-activated trimethylamine oxide efflux in red blood cells of spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koomoa, D L; Musch, M W; MacLean, A V; Goldstein, L

    2001-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the pathway of swelling-activated trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) efflux and its regulation in spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) red blood cells and compare the characteristics of this efflux pathway with the volume-activated osmolyte (taurine) channel present in erythrocytes of fishes. The characteristics of the TMAO efflux pathway were similar to those of the taurine efflux pathway. The swelling-activated effluxes of both TMAO and taurine were significantly inhibited by known anion transport inhibitors (DIDS and niflumic acid) and by the general channel inhibitor quinine. Volume expansion by hypotonicity, ethylene glycol, and diethyl urea activated both TMAO and taurine effluxes similarly. Volume expansion by hypotonicity, ethylene glycol, and diethyl urea also stimulated the activity of tyrosine kinases p72syk and p56lyn, although the stimulations by the latter two treatments were less than by hypotonicity. The volume activations of both TMAO and taurine effluxes were inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors, suggesting that activation of tyrosine kinases may play a role in activating the osmolyte effluxes. These results indicate that the volume-activated TMAO efflux occurs via the organic osmolyte (taurine) channel and may be regulated by the volume activation of tyrosine kinases.

  4. The study of the volume expansion of aluminum during porous oxide formation at galvanostatic regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrublevsky, I.; Parkoun, V.; Sokol, V.; Schreckenbach, J.; Marx, G

    2004-01-30

    The volume expansion factor of porous alumina, formed by through anodizing of an Al foil of thickness 11.5 {mu}m in the range of current densities of 4-35 mA cm{sup -2} in oxalic and sulfuric acid at 18-24 deg. C has been studied. The microstructure of anodizing samples has been observed using scanning electron microscopy. The thickness of obtained porous alumina films was measured by a mechanical profilometer with a computer signal-processing. The volume expansion factor of porous alumina varied from 1.35 to 1.65. Linear dependences were obtained for the volume expansion factor of porous alumina versus the anodizing voltage and the ionic current-density logarithm versus the inverse volume expansion factor. Unlike oxide formation in sulfuric acid, these dependences have two subsequential rectilinear regions in oxalic acid. This peculiarity of the dependences in oxalic acid was explained by formation of a region of the immobile negative space charge in the barrier Al oxide layer and its influence on the ionic transport.

  5. High production volume chemical Amine Oxide [C8-C20] category environmental risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Tibazarwa, Caritas; Greggs, William

    2009-01-01

    and personal care products. Given the lack of persistence or bioaccumulation, and the low likelihood of these chemicals partitioning to soil, the focus of the environmental assessment is on the aquatic environment. In the United States, the E-FAST model is used to estimate effluent concentrations in the United......An environmental assessment of amine oxides has been conducted under the OECD SIDS High Production Volume (HPV) Program via the Global International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) Amine Oxides Consortium. Amine oxides are primarily used in conjunction with surfactants in cleaning...... States from manufacturing facilities and from municipal facilities resulting from consumer product uses. Reasonable worst-case ratios of predicted environmental concentration (PEC) to predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) range from 0.04 to 0.003, demonstrating that these chemicals are a low risk...

  6. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  7. Decoupling photochemical Fe(II) oxidation from shallow-water BIF deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Amskold, Larry; Lalonde, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    to the rise of atmospheric oxygen and the development of a protective ozone layer, the Earth's surface was subjected to high levels of ultraviolet radiation. Bulk ocean waters that were anoxic at this time could have supported high concentrations of dissolved Fe(II). Under such conditions, dissolved ferrous...... for biology [Fran??ois, L.M., 1986, Extensive deposition of banded iron formations was possible without photosynthesis. Nature 320, 352-354]. Here, we evaluate the potential importance of photochemical oxidation using a combination of experiments and thermodynamic models. The experiments simulate......-type systems, then we are driven to conclude that oxide-facies BIF are the product of a rapid, non-photochemical oxidative process, the most likely candidates being direct or indirect biological oxidation, and that a significant fraction of BIF could have initially been deposited as ferrous minerals. ?? 2007...

  8. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3was a function of the concentration of NO3−ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local......Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...

  9. Heater test planning for the Near Surface Test Facility at the Hanford reservation. Volume II. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, A.; Binnall, E.; Chan, T.; McEvoy, M.; Nelson, P.; Remer, J.

    1979-04-01

    Volume II contains the following information: theoretical support for radioactive waste storage projects - development of data analysis methods and numerical models; injectivity temperature profiling as a means of permeability characterization; geophysical holes at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), Hanford; proposed geophysical and hydrological measurements at NSTF; suggestions for characterization of the discontinuity system at NSTF; monitoring rock property changes caused by radioactive waste storage using the electrical resistivity method; microseismic detection system for heated rock; Pasco Basin groundwater contamination study; a letter to Mark Board on Gable Mountain Faulting; report on hydrofracturing tests for in-situ stress measurement, NSTF, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation; and borehole instrumentation layout for Hanford Near Surface Test Facility

  10. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  11. Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - Volume II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Duić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems – JSDEWES is an international journal dedicated to the improvement and dissemination of knowledge on methods, policies and technologies for increasing the sustainability of development by de-coupling growth from natural resources and replacing them with knowledge based economy, taking into account its economic, environmental and social pillars, as well as methods for assessing and measuring sustainability of development, regarding energy, transport, water, environment and food production systems and their many combinations. In total 32 manuscripts were published in Volume II, all of them reviewed by at least two reviewers. The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems would like to thank reviewers for their contribution to the quality of the published manuscripts.

  12. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  13. Methods of Celestial Mechanics Volume II: Application to Planetary System, Geodynamics and Satellite Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    G. Beutler's Methods of Celestial Mechanics is a coherent textbook for students as well as an excellent reference for practitioners. Volume II is devoted to the applications and to the presentation of the program system CelestialMechanics. Three major areas of applications are covered: (1) Orbital and rotational motion of extended celestial bodies. The properties of the Earth-Moon system are developed from the simplest case (rigid bodies) to more general cases, including the rotation of an elastic Earth, the rotation of an Earth partly covered by oceans and surrounded by an atmosphere, and the rotation of an Earth composed of a liquid core and a rigid shell (Poincaré model). (2) Artificial Earth Satellites. The oblateness perturbation acting on a satellite and the exploitation of its properties in practice is discussed using simulation methods (CelestialMechanics) and (simplified) first order perturbation methods. The perturbations due to the higher-order terms of the Earth's gravitational potential and reso...

  14. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables

  15. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hao; Pan, Haixia; Xu, Jianqiang; Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An efficient Mn(II) oxidation marine sediments microbial community was obtained. • High-throughput sequencing indicated new Mn(II) oxidation associated genus. • Na_3MnPO_4CO_3 and MnCO_3 were synthesized by the consortium. • Consortium exhibited Mn(II) oxidation performance over a range of harsh conditions. - Abstract: Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1 mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5 mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N_2 adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g"−"1 adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na_3MnPO_4CO_3_. Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation.

  16. Infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang Yi; Siratori, Tomoya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Wang, Guosheng

    2014-10-03

    The effects of temperature and density on retention of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical fluid chromatography were investigated at temperatures of 308.15-343.15K and pressure range from 8 to 40MPa by the chromatographic impulse response method with curve fitting. The retention factors were utilized to derive the infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide. The determined partial molar volumes were small and positive at high pressures but exhibited very large and negative values in the highly compressible near critical region of carbon dioxide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Final report on Phase II remedial action at the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    Volume 2 presents the radiological measurement data taken after remedial action on properties surrounding the former Middlesex Sampling Plant during Phase II of the DOE Middlesex Remedial Action Program. Also included are analyses of the confirmatory radiological survey data for each parcel with respect to the remedial action criteria established by DOE for the Phase II cleanup and a discussion of the final status of each property. Engineering details of this project and a description of the associated health physics and environmental monitoring activities are presented in Volume 1

  18. Regulation characteristics of oxide generation and formaldehyde removal by using volume DBD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingyan, CHEN; Xiangxiang, GAO; Ke, CHEN; Changyu, LIU; Qinshu, LI; Wei, SU; Yongfeng, JIANG; Xiang, HE; Changping, ZHU; Juntao, FEI

    2018-02-01

    Discharge plasmas in air can be accompanied by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and electron impact, which can produce large numbers of reactive species such as hydroxyl radical (OH·), oxygen radical (O·), ozone (O3), and nitrogen oxides (NO x ), etc. The composition and dosage of reactive species usually play an important role in the case of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) treatment with the discharge plasmas. In this paper, we propose a volume discharge setup used to purify formaldehyde in air, which is configured by a plate-to-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) channel and excited by an AC high voltage source. The results show that the relative spectral-intensity from DBD cell without formaldehyde is stronger than the case with formaldehyde. The energy efficiency ratios (EERs) of both oxides yield and formaldehyde removal can be regulated by the gas flow velocity in DBD channel, and the most desirable processing effect is the gas flow velocity within the range from 2.50 to 3.33 m s-1. Moreover, the EERs of both the generated dosages of oxides (O3 and NO2) and the amount of removed formaldehyde can also be regulated by both of the applied voltage and power density loaded on the DBD cell. Additionally, the EERs of both oxides generation and formaldehyde removal present as a function of normal distribution with increasing the applied power density, and the peak of the function is appeared in the range from 273.5 to 400.0 W l-1. This work clearly demonstrates the regulation characteristic of both the formaldehyde removal and oxides yield by using volume DBD, and it is helpful in the applications of VOCs removal by using discharge plasma.

  19. Linking Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria to natural attenuation at a former U mining site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, D.; Bohu, T.; Beyer, A.; Schäffner, F.; Händel, M.; Johnson, C.; Merten, D.; Büchel, G.; Totsche, K.; Küsel, K.

    2012-04-01

    Uranium mining near Ronneburg, Germany resulted in widespread environmental contamination with acid mine drainage (AMD) and high concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Despite physical remediation of the area, groundwater is still a source of heavy metal contaminants, e.g., Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn, to nearby ecosystems. However, natural attenuation of heavy metals is occurring in Mn oxide rich soils and sediments ranging in pH from 5 to 7. While microorganisms readily oxidize Mn(II) and precipitate Mn oxides at pH ~7 under oxic conditions, few studies describe Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH ~5 and/or in the presence of heavy metals. In this study we (1) isolated MOB from the contaminated Ronneburg area at pH 5.5 and 7 and (2) evaluated the biological formation of Mn oxides. We isolated nine MOB strains at pH 7 (members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes phyla) and a single isolate at pH 5.5 (Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14, within the β-Proteobacteria). LA-ICP-MS showed that all isolates accumulated Mn and Fe in their biomass. However, the Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14 oxidizes more Mn without additional Fe in the medium. Preliminary FTIR analysis indicated that all isolates formed precipitates, which showed absorption bands that were characteristic for birnessite. High resolution TEM showed variable morphology of precipitates and EDS confirmed the presence of Mn oxides. Isolate AB_14 was not surrounded with precipitates whereas our Actinobacteria isolate AB_18 was encrusted with Mn oxides. Electron diffraction is currently being used to confirm the presence of birnessite and other Mn oxide phases. This, the first known report of any organism capable of Mn oxidation at low pH, demonstrated that MOB can be involved in the natural attenuation of both moderately acidic and neutral pH soils and sediments via the formation of biogenic Mn oxides. Future work will fully evaluate the minerals formed in this process as well

  20. Dichloroacetate Decreases Cell Health and Activates Oxidative Stress Defense Pathways in Rat Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Valauri-Orton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichloroacetate (DCA is a water purification byproduct that is known to be hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic and to induce peripheral neuropathy and damage macrophages. This study characterizes the effects of the haloacetate on lung cells by exposing rat alveolar type II (L2 cells to 0–24 mM DCA for 6–24 hours. Increasing DCA concentration and the combination of increasing DCA concentration plus longer exposures decrease measures of cellular health. Length of exposure has no effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, glutathione, SOD, or CAT. Increasing DCA concentration alone does not affect total glutathione or its redox ratio but does increase activity in the SOD/CAT oxidative stress defense pathway. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells rely on SOD and CAT more than glutathione to combat DCA-induced stress.

  1. Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2009-09-14

    Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of

  2. Kinetic Investigations on Pd(II) Catalyzed Oxidation of Some Amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic investigations on Pd(II) catalyzed oxidation of dl-serine and dl-threonine by acidic solution of potassium bromate in the presence of mercuric acetate, as a scavenger have been made in the temperature range of 30–45°C. The rate shows zero order kinetics in bromate [BrO3‾] and order of reaction is one with respect ...

  3. Biochemistry and Ecology of Novel Cytochromes Catalyzing Fe(II) Oxidation by an Acidophilic Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. W.; Jeans, C. J.; Thelen, M. P.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Hettich, R. C.; Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    An acidophilic microbial community found in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA forms abundant biofilms in extremely acidic (pHindicated that several variants of Cyt579 were present in Leptospirillum strains. Intact protein MS analysis identified the dominant variants in each biofilm and documented multiple N-terminal cleavage sites for Cyt579. By combining biochemical, geochemical and microbiological data, we established that the sequence variation and N-terminal processing of Cyt579 are selected by ecological conditions. In addition to the soluble Cyt579, the second cytochrome appears as a much larger protein complex of ~210 kDa predominant in the biofilm membrane fraction, and has an alpha-band absorption at 572 nm. The 60 kDa cytochrome subunit, Cyt572, resides in the outer membrane of LeptoII, and readily oxidizes Fe(II) at low pH (0.95 - 3.0). Several genes encoding Cyt572 were localized within a recombination hotspot between two strains of LeptoII, causing a large range of variation in the sequences. Genomic sequencing and MS proteomic studies established that the variants were also selected by ecological conditions. A general mechanistic model for Fe(II) oxidation has been developed from these studies. Initial Fe(II) oxidation by Cyt572 occurs at the outer membrane. Cyt572 then transfers electrons to Cyt579, perhaps representing an initial step in energy flow to the biofilm community. Amino acid variations and post-translational modifications of these unique cytochromes may represent fine-tuning of function in response to local environmental conditions.

  4. Nuclear legislation analytical study. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD member countries. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This volume II of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. This volume also contains tables of international conventions of relevance to the nuclear field. (NEA) [fr

  5. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  6. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    hydroxide planar layer were preserved during the oxidation, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. The high positive charge in the hydroxide layer produced by the oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III) is partially compensated by the deprotonation of hydroxy groups, as shown by X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy...... between the alkyl chains of the intercalated dodecanoate anions play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure and hindering the collapse of the iron(II)–iron(III) (hydr)oxide structure during oxidation. This is the first report describing the formation of a stable planar layered octahedral iron......(III) (hydr)oxide. oxGRC12 shows promise as a sorbent and host for hydrophobic reagents, and as a possible source of single planar layers of iron(III) (hydr)oxide....

  7. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume II: Control Technology and General Source Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume II, explains in detail the following: technology of source control, modification of operations, particulate control equipment, sulfur dioxide removal systems for power plants, and control equipment for gases and vapors; inspection procedures for general sources, fuel…

  8. IGF-II transgenic mice display increased aberrant colon crypt multiplicity and tumor volume after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oesterle Doris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In colorectal cancer insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II is frequently overexpressed. To evaluate, whether IGF-II affects different stages of tumorigenesis, we induced neoplastic alterations in the colon of wild-type and IGF-II transgenic mice using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF served as markers of early lesions in the colonic mucosa, whereas adenomas and carcinomas characterized the endpoints of tumor development. DMH-treatment led initially to significantly more ACF in IGF-II transgenic than in wild-type mice. This increase in ACF was especially prominent for those consisting of ≥three aberrant crypts (AC. Nevertheless, adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the colon, present after 34 weeks in both genetic groups, were not found at different frequency. Tumor volumes, however, were significantly higher in IGF-II transgenic mice and correlated with serum IGF-II levels. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of proliferation and apoptosis revealed increased cell proliferation rates in tumors of IGF-II transgenic mice without significant affection of apoptosis. Increased proliferation was accompanied by elevated localization of β-catenin in the cytosol and cell nuclei and reduced appearance at the inner plasma membrane. In conclusion, we provide evidence that IGF-II, via activation of the β-catenin signaling cascade, promotes growth of ACF and tumors without affecting tumor numbers.

  9. Cucumis sativus Aqueous Fraction Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Inflammation and Oxidative Stress In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Trejo-Moreno

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress play major roles in endothelial dysfunction, and are key factors in the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of three subfractions (SFs from the Cucumis sativus aqueous fraction to reduce inflammatory factors and oxidative stress induced by angiotensin II (Ang II in human microvascular endothelial cells-1 (HMEC-1 cells. The cells were cultured with different concentrations of Ang II and 0.08 or 10 μg/mL of SF1, SF2, or SF3, or 10 μmol of losartan as a control. IL-6 (Interleukin 6 concentration was quantified. To identify the most effective SF combinations, HMEC-1 cells were cultured as described above in the presence of four combinations of SF1 and SF3. Then, the effects of the most effective combination on the expression of adhesion molecules, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO were evaluated. Finally, a mass spectrometry analysis was performed. Both SF1 and SF3 subfractions decreased the induction of IL-6 by Ang II, and C4 (SF1 and SF3, 10 μg/mL each was the most effective combination to inhibit the production of IL-6. Additionally, C4 prevented the expression of adhesion molecules, reduced the production of ROS, and increased the bioavailability of NO. Glycine, arginine, asparagine, lysine, and aspartic acid were the main components of both subfractions. These results demonstrate that C4 has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

  10. A fluorescent DNA based probe for Hg(II) based on thymine-Hg(II)-thymine interaction and enrichment via magnetized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Ke; Hu, Liu-Yin; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Huang, Da-Wei; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2018-03-03

    The authors describe a fluorometric assay for the determination of Hg(II). A naphthalimide derivative is used as a label for a thymine (T) rich ssDNA, and graphene oxide magnetized with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles acts as a quencher and preconcentrators. In the absence of Hg(II), the labeled ssDNA does not separate from the magnetized graphene oxide. As a result, fluorescence is fully quenched. In the presence of Hg(II), a T-Hg(II)-T link is formed dues to the highly affinity between T and Hg(II). Hence, fluorescence is restored. The assay has a linear response in the 1.0 to 10.0 nM Hg(II) concentration range, and a 0.65 nM detection limit. The method is selective and sensitive. It was applied to the analysis of spiked environmental water samples, and data agreed well with those obtained by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Graphical abstract Strategy of a fluorescent probe for detecting Hg(II). The method has a 0.65 nM detection limit and is selective. MGO: magnetized graphene oxide, AHN: a fluorescent derivative of naphthalimide.

  11. Persistent type II endoleak after EVAR: the predictive value of the AAA thrombus volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitto, Enrico; Gargiulo, Mauro; Mascoli, Chiara; Freyrie, Antonio; DE Matteis, Massimo; Serra, Carla; Bianchini Massoni, Claudio; Faggioli, Gianluca; Stella, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    Persistent type II endoleaks (ELIIp, ≥6 months) after an endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) can be associated with adverse outcomes. The aims of this study are the evaluation of the incidence of ELIIp, their preoperative morphological predictive features (PMF) and the post-EVAR abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution in the presence of ELIIp. Patients underwent EVAR between 2008 and 2010 were prospectively collected. Cases with ELIIp (group A: AG) were identified. A control group without ELIIp (group B: BG), homogeneous for clinical characteristics, follow-up timing and methods (CTA and/or CEUS at 6.12 months and yearly thereafter) was retrospectively selected. The PMF evaluated by computed-tomography-angiography (CTA) were: AAA-diameter, number and diameter of AAA efferent patent vessels (EPV), AAA-total volume (TV), AAA-thrombus volume (THV) and TV/THV rate (%VR). Volumes were calculated by the dedicated vessels analysis software. AG and BG were compared. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the incidence of ELIIp. Secondary endpoints were to analyze the relation between PMF and ELIIp and to assess the post-EVAR AAA-evolution in the presence of ELIIp. Between 2008 and 2010, 200 patients underwent EVAR to treat AAA electively. An ELIIp was detected in 35cases (17.5%) (AG). Twenty-seven patients (13.5%) were included in BG. An overall of 62 patients (GA+GB) were analyzed. The mean pre-operative AAA diameter and EPV were 58±11.6 mm and 5.5±1.8 mm, respectively. The mean TV and THV were 187±111.5 cc and 82±75 cc, respectively. The median %VR was 42.3%. ELIIp was correlated to EPV≥6 (χ2, p=.015) and %VR AAA growth post-EVAR. ELIIp is a not rare complication and it could require re-interventions. Our data suggest that VEP≥6 or %VT<40% are risk factors for ELIIp. No PMF was able to predict the ELIIp evolution. The relative high rate of re-interventions, could suggest the need of adjunctive/preventing primary procedures in patients at high-risk for ELIIp.

  12. The history of the IEA volume II: major policies and actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.

    1995-01-01

    Volume II of the History of the International Energy Agency (IEA) continues the story which began with the Origins and Structure of the Agency in Volume I. After examining the industrial countries'energy policies leading up to the 1973-1974 crisis, the current Volume focuses on the new policies adopted in the IEA during its first twenty years.The first part of this book deals with a section on 'Energy Policy Origins of the 1973-1974 Oil Supply Vulnerability : The Optimistic-Passive Approach to Oil Policy'. The main events and developments leading up to the crisis are briefly outlined together with a short presentation of the policy views and critical conclusions that were made on that situation by some of the most knowledgeable oil specialists of the period. The second part surveys IEA oil security, beginning with the oil Emergency Sharing System. The IAE's long-term policies for reducing its Members'dependence on imported oil are the subject of the third part. In this part is described the development of some of the leading IEA work in the field of energy and the environment, the Agency's far-reaching reviews of Members'policies in this sector and a discussion of the 'free markets' policy and of the IEA Shared Goals of 1993. The fourth part deals with the still longer-term Energy Research and Development in the IEA and is a review of the internal organization of IEA work in the R and D field. The fifth part follows with a discussion of the Oil Market policies and practices of the Agency, where the main and durable goals are 'transparency and information dissemination'. The last part addresses the Agency's policies and actions with respect to Co-operation with Non-Member Countries. Then, it takes up Members'policies and activities in connection with the oil producer and consumer country dialogue of 1976-1977 and outlines its disappointing outcome. (O.L.). 2 figs., 13 tabs

  13. Oxidized calmodulin kinase II regulates conduction following myocardial infarction: a computational analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Christensen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII mediates critical signaling pathways responsible for divergent functions in the heart including calcium cycling, hypertrophy and apoptosis. Dysfunction in the CaMKII signaling pathway occurs in heart disease and is associated with increased susceptibility to life-threatening arrhythmia. Furthermore, CaMKII inhibition prevents cardiac arrhythmia and improves heart function following myocardial infarction. Recently, a novel mechanism for oxidative CaMKII activation was discovered in the heart. Here, we provide the first report of CaMKII oxidation state in a well-validated, large-animal model of heart disease. Specifically, we observe increased levels of oxidized CaMKII in the infarct border zone (BZ. These unexpected new data identify an alternative activation pathway for CaMKII in common cardiovascular disease. To study the role of oxidation-dependent CaMKII activation in creating a pro-arrhythmia substrate following myocardial infarction, we developed a new mathematical model of CaMKII activity including both oxidative and autophosphorylation activation pathways. Computer simulations using a multicellular mathematical model of the cardiac fiber demonstrate that enhanced CaMKII activity in the infarct BZ, due primarily to increased oxidation, is associated with reduced conduction velocity, increased effective refractory period, and increased susceptibility to formation of conduction block at the BZ margin, a prerequisite for reentry. Furthermore, our model predicts that CaMKII inhibition improves conduction and reduces refractoriness in the BZ, thereby reducing vulnerability to conduction block and reentry. These results identify a novel oxidation-dependent pathway for CaMKII activation in the infarct BZ that may be an effective therapeutic target for improving conduction and reducing heterogeneity in the infarcted heart.

  14. Oxygen concentrators performance with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ronaldo Moll

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Few investigations have addressed the safety of oxygen from concentrators for use in anesthesia in association with nitrous oxide. This study evaluated the percent of oxygen from a concentrator in association with nitrous oxide in a semi-closed rebreathing circuit. Methods: Adult patients undergoing low risk surgery were randomly allocated into two groups, receiving a fresh gas flow of oxygen from concentrators (O293 or of oxygen from concentrators and nitrous oxide (O293N2O. The fraction of inspired oxygen and the percentage of oxygen from fresh gas flow were measured every 10 min. The ratio of FiO2/oxygen concentration delivered was compared at various time intervals and between the groups. Results: Thirty patients were studied in each group. There was no difference in oxygen from concentrators over time for both groups, but there was a significant improvement in the FiO2 (p < 0.001 for O293 group while a significant decline (p < 0.001 for O293N2O. The FiO2/oxygen ratio varied in both groups, reaching a plateau in the O293 group. Pulse oximetry did not fall below 98.5% in either group. Conclusion: The FiO2 in the mixture of O293 and nitrous oxide fell during the observation period although oxygen saturation was higher than 98.5% throughout the study. Concentrators can be considered a stable source of oxygen for use during short anesthetic procedures, either pure or in association with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume.

  15. Comparison of the performance of different modified graphene oxide nanosheets for the extraction of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from natural samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayar, Omid; Mehrani, Kheirollah; Mehrani, Azadeh; Hoseinzadeh, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanosheets were modified with amino groups and the resulting material was used as a sorbent for the extraction of cadmium and lead ions. The nanosheets were characterized by IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and elemental analysis. The effects of sample pH, eluent parameters (type, concentration and volume of eluent), flow rates (of both sample and eluent), and of a variety of other ions on the efficiency of the extraction of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were optimized. Following solid phase extraction, the elements were determined by FAAS. The limits of detection are <0.9 μg L −1 for Pb(II) and <5 ng L −1 for Cd(II). The relative standard deviations are <2.2 %. The method was validated by analyzing several certified reference materials and was then used for Pb(II) and Cd(II) determination in natural waters and vegetables. (author)

  16. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  17. Resolving Iron(II) Sorption and Oxidative Growth on Hematite (001) Using Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Sandra D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Liu, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Arey, Bruce W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Perea, Daniel E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2018-02-13

    The distribution of iron resulting from the autocatalytic interaction of aqueous Fe(II) with the hematite (001) surface was directly mapped in three dimensions (3D) for the first time, using iron isotopic labelling and atom probe tomography (APT). Analyses of the mass spectrum showed that natural abundance ratios in 56Fe-dominant hematite are recovered at depth with good accuracy, whereas at the relict interface with 57Fe(II) solution evidence for hematite growth by oxidative adsorption of Fe(II) was found. 3D reconstructions of the isotope positions along the surface normal direction showed a zone enriched in 57Fe, which was consistent with an average net adsorption of 3.2 – 4.3 57Fe atoms nm–2. Statistical analyses utilizing grid-based frequency distribution analyses show a heterogeneous, non-random distribution of oxidized Fe on the (001) surface, consistent with Volmer-Weber-like island growth. The unique 3D nature of the APT data provides an unprecedented means to quantify the atomic-scale distribution of sorbed 57Fe atoms and the extent of segregation on the hematite surface. This new ability to spatially map growth on single crystal faces at the atomic scale will enable resolution to long-standing unanswered questions about the underlying mechanisms for electron and atom exchange involved in a wide variety of redox-catalyzed processes at this archetypal and broadly relevant interface.

  18. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Lundquist Parker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When iron-starved, the Mn(II-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1, siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs: chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III.

  19. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Geszvain, Kati; Davis, Richard E.; Gruffaz, Christelle; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Torpey, Justin W.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-01-01

    When iron-starved, the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1), siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II) oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS, and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs): chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group, and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains) were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III). PMID:24847318

  20. Metallothionein-I plus II and receptor megalin are altered in relation to oxidative stress in cerebral lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.O.; Hansen, P.B.; Nielsen, Signe Ledou

    2010-01-01

    . This article characterizes the histopathology and expression profiles of metallothionein-I + II (MT-I + II) and their receptor megalin along with proliferation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in PCNSL and in central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas due to relapse from DLBCL (collectively referred to as CNS...

  1. Preparation of iron molybdate catalysts for methanol to formaldehyde oxidation based on ammonium molybdoferrate(II precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nikolenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated that iron molybdate catalysts for methanol oxidation can be prepared using Fe(II as a precursor instead of Fe(III. This would allow for reduction of acidity of preparation solutions as well as elimination of Fe(III oxide impurities which are detrimental for the process selectivity. The system containing Fe(II and Mo(VI species in aqueous solution was investigated using UV–Vis spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that three types of chemical reactions occur in the Fe(II–Mo(VI system: (i formation of complexes between Fe(II and molybdate(VI ions, (ii inner sphere oxidation of coordinated Fe(II by Mo(VI and (iii decomposition of the Fe–Mo complexes to form scarcely soluble Fe(III molybdate, Mo(VI hydrous trioxide and molybdenum blue. Solid molybdoferrate(II prepared by interaction of Fe(II and Mo(VI in solution was characterized by EDXA, TGA, DTA and XRD and a scheme of its thermal evolution proposed. The iron molybdate catalyst prepared from Fe(II precursor was tested in methanol-to-formaldehyde oxidation in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor to show similar activity and selectivity to the conventional catalyst prepared with the use of Fe(III.

  2. Phase equilibria and excess molar volumes of tetrahydrofuran (1) + deuterium oxide (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejcek, P.; Matous, J.; Novak, J.P.; Pick, J.

    1975-01-01

    Vapour + liquid equilibrium at 313.15 and 333.15K, liquid + liquid equilibrium throughout the whole region of limited miscibility, and excess molar volumes at 298.15K have been studied for tetrahydrofuran + deuterium oxide. The mixtures show large positive deviations from Raoult's law and a closed loop of limited miscibility. The modified Redlich-Kister equation has been used for the correlation of the vapour + liquid equilibrium. The computation has been carried out according to a recently proposed procedure which makes it possible to obtain such constants of the correlation relation which are not inconsistent with physical reality, i.e. with the complete miscibility (partial delta 2 G/deltax 1 2 >0) under experimental conditions. Thermodynamic consistency was checked by the classical Redlich-Kister test and the one proposed by Ulrichson and Stevenson. Excess molar volumes are negative at all compositions with a point of inflexion in the water-rich region which indicates the extremes in partial molar volumes. (author)

  3. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  4. Complex-wide review of DOE's Low-Level Waste Management ES ampersand H vulnerabilities. Volume II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    Volume I of this report presents a summary of DOE's complex-wide review of its low-level waste management system, including the assessment scope and methodology, site-specific and complex-wide vulnerabilities, and DOE's conclusions and recommendations. Volume II presents a more detailed discussion of the assessment methodology and evaluation instruments developed by the Assessment Working Group for identifying site-specific vulnerabilities, categorizing and classifying vulnerabilities, and identifying and analyzing complex-wide vulnerabilities. Attachments A and B of this volume contain, respectively, the Site Evaluation Survey and the Vulnerability Assessment Form used in those processes. Volume III contains the site-specific assessment reports for the 36 sites (38 facilities) assessed in the complex-wide review from which the complex-wide vulnerabilities were drawn

  5. Fluorescence-based detection of nitric oxide in aqueous and methanol media using a copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Biplab; Kumar, Pankaj; Ghosh, Pokhraj; Kalita, Apurba

    2011-03-14

    The quenched fluorescent intensity of a copper(II) complex, 1, of a fluorescent ligand, in degassed methanol or aqueous (buffered at pH 7.2) solution, was found to reappear on exposure to nitric oxide. Thus, it can function as a fluorescence based nitric oxide sensor. It has been found that the present complex can be used to sense nanomolar quantities of nitric oxide in both methanol and pH 7.2 buffered-water medium.

  6. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs. PMID:23818588

  7. Degradation of zinc oxide thin films in aqueous environment. Pt. II. Coated films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, L. de; Mitton, D.B.; Monetta, T.; Bellucci, F. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Materials and Production Engineering; Springer, J. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    cn Part I of this research, the degradation mechanism of two different bare ZnO thin films was assessed. Degradation of the electrical properties of ZnO as well as changes in morphology were observed for both films. In the current paper, the degradation of zinc oxide thin films coated with protective acrylic paint is addressed during exposure to (i) an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution at 85 C and (ii) a standard damp heat test at 85% R.H. and 85 C. Electrical and electrochemical techniques were employed to monitor zinc oxide degradation during exposure to the test environments. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was employed to investigate the delamination phenomena at the ZnO/coating interface and a simple equivalent circuit was developed to quantitatively measure the delamination ratio. The effect of different silane based adhesion promoters (glycidil-oxypropyl-trimethoxy-silane and aminopropyl-trimethoxy-silane) was also investigated. (orig.)

  8. Structural information on the coordination compounds formed by manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and mercury(II) thiocyanates with 4-cyanopyridine N-oxide from their magnetic moments, electronic and infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, I. S.; Yadava, C. L.; Singh, Raghuvir

    1982-05-01

    Coordination compounds formed by the interaction of 4-cyanopyridine. N-oxide (4-CPO), a potentially bidentate ligand, with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and rnercury(II) thiocyanates have been prepared and characterized from their elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibilities, electronic and infrared spectral studies down to 200 cm -1 in the solid state. The compounds isolated are: Mn(4-CPO) 2(NCS) 2, Co(4-CPO) 2(NCS) 2,Ni(4-CPO) 2(NCS) 2,Zn(4-CPO) 2(NCS) 2, Cd(4-CPO)(NCS) 2 and Hg(4-CPO) 2(SCN) 2. It is shown that 4-CPO acts as a terminal N-oxide oxygen bonded monodentate ligand in all the metal(II) thiocyanate complexes studied. Tentative stereochemistries of the complexes in the solid state are discussed. The ligand field parameters 10 Dq, B, β and λ calculated for the manganese(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes are consistent with their proposed stereochemistries.

  9. Exchange interactions in a dinuclear manganese (II) complex with cyanopyridine-N-oxide bridging ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markosyan, A.S. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University (United States); Gaidukova, I.Yu.; Ruchkin, A.V. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Anokhin, A.O. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division of the Russian, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Irkhin, V.Yu., E-mail: valentin.irkhin@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division of the Russian, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ryazanov, M.V.; Kuz’mina, N.P. [Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, V.N. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic properties of dinuclear manganese(II) complex [Mn(hfa){sub 2}cpo]{sub 2} (where hfa is hexafluoroacetylacetonate anion and cpo is 4-cyanopyridine-N-oxide) are presented. The non-monotonous dependence of magnetic susceptibility is explained in terms of the hierarchy of exchange parameters by using exact diagonalization. The thermodynamic behavior of pure cpo and [Mn(hfa){sub 2}(cpo)]{sub 2} is simulated numerically by an extrapolation to spin S=5/2. The Mn–Mn exchange integral is evaluated.

  10. Review of Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) Schools. Volume II: Quantitative Analysis of Educational Quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Lowell

    2000-01-01

    This volume compiles, and presents in integrated form, IDA's quantitative analysis of educational quality provided by DoD's dependent schools, It covers the quantitative aspects of volume I in greater...

  11. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hao, E-mail: zhouhao@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Food and Environment, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China); Pan, Haixia [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Food and Environment, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China); Xu, Jianqiang [School of Life Science and Medicine, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China); Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Food and Environment, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • An efficient Mn(II) oxidation marine sediments microbial community was obtained. • High-throughput sequencing indicated new Mn(II) oxidation associated genus. • Na{sub 3}MnPO{sub 4}CO{sub 3} and MnCO{sub 3} were synthesized by the consortium. • Consortium exhibited Mn(II) oxidation performance over a range of harsh conditions. - Abstract: Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1 mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5 mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g{sup −1} adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na{sub 3}MnPO{sub 4}CO{sub 3.} Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation.

  12. Identification of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from a low-pH contaminated former uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M; Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-08-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Identification of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from a low-pH contaminated former uranium mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A.; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments.

  14. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark. Volume II: Summary Results of Exercise 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Olson, Andy M.

    2005-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) completed under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship a PWR main steam line break (MSLB) benchmark against coupled system three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic codes. Another OECD/NRC coupled-code benchmark was recently completed for a BWR turbine trip (TT) transient and is the object of the present report. Turbine trip transients in a BWR are pressurisation events in which the coupling between core space-dependent neutronic phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. The data made available from actual experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 plant make the present benchmark particularly valuable. While defining and coordinating the BWR TT benchmark, a systematic approach and level methodology not only allowed for a consistent and comprehensive validation process, but also contributed to the study of key parameters of pressurisation transients. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises, two initial states and five transient scenarios. The BWR TT Benchmark will be published in four volumes as NEA reports. CD-ROMs will also be prepared and will include the four reports and the transient boundary conditions, decay heat values as a function of time, cross-section libraries and supplementary tables and graphs not published in the paper version. BWR TT Benchmark - Volume I: Final Specifications was issued in 2001 [NEA/NSC/DOC(2001)]. The benchmark team [Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in co-operation with Exelon Nuclear and the NEA] has been responsible for coordinating benchmark activities, answering participant questions and assisting them in developing their models, as well as analysing submitted solutions and providing reports summarising the results for each phase. The benchmark team has also been involved in the technical aspects of the benchmark, including sensitivity studies for the different exercises. Volume II summarises the results for Exercise 1 of the

  15. Sphaerotilus natans encrusted with nanoball-shaped Fe(III) oxide minerals formed by nitrate-reducing mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunhwa; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2014-10-01

    Ferrous iron has been known to function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms in both anoxic and oxic environments. A diversity of bacteria has been known to oxidize both soluble and solid-phase Fe(II) forms coupled to the reduction of nitrate. Here, we show for the first time Fe(II) oxidation by Sphaerotilus natans strain DSM 6575(T) under mixotrophic condition. Sphaerotilus natans has been known to form a sheath structure enclosing long chains of rod-shaped cells, resulting in a thick biofilm formation under oxic conditions. Here, we also demonstrate that strain DSM 6575(T) grows mixotrophically with pyruvate, Fe(II) as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor and single cells of strain DSM 6575(T) are dominant under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, strain DSM 6575(T) forms nanoball-shaped amorphous Fe(III) oxide minerals encrusting on the cell surfaces through the mixotrophic iron oxidation reaction under anoxic conditions. We propose that cell encrustation results from the indirect Fe(II) oxidation by biogenic nitrite during nitrate reduction and that causes the bacterial morphological change to individual rod-shaped single cells from filamentous sheath structures. This study extends the group of existing microorganisms capable of mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation by a new strain, S. natans strain DSM 6575(T) , and could contribute to biogeochemical cycles of Fe and N in the environment. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  16. Free volume dependence on electrical properties of Poly (styrene co-acrylonitrile)/Nickel oxide polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningaraju, S.; Hegde, Vinayakaprasanna N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    Polymer nanocomposites of Poly (styrene co-acrylonitrile)/Nickel Oxide (PSAN/NiO) have been prepared. The increased free volume sizes up to 0.4 wt% of NiO loading indicates overall reduction in packing density of polymer network. The decreased o-Ps lifetime (τ3) at higher concentration of NiO indicates improved interfacial interaction between the surface of NiO nanoparticles and side chain of PSAN polymer matrix. The increased AC/DC conductivity at lower wt% of NiO loading demonstrates increased number of electric charge carriers/mobile ions and their mobility. The increased dielectric constant and dielectric loss up to 0.4 wt% of NiO loading suggests the increased dipoles polarization.

  17. Study on the adsorption of Cu(II) by folic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cuicui [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Heyi, E-mail: geheyi@sina.com [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Zhao, Yueying [Shandong Xiaguang Industrial Co., Ltd., Jining 272000 (China); Liu, Shanshan; Zou, Yu; Zhang, Wenbo [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2017-02-01

    The folic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide (FA-mGO) as a new adsorbent has been synthesized in this work for the elimination of Cu(II) from waste water. The as-prepared FA-mGO was tested by SEM, TEM, particle size analyzer, FTIR, XRD, Roman spectrum, TGA and magnetic properties analyzer. Some factors, such as adsorbent dose, pH, contact time, initial concentration of adsorbate and temperature were explored. The results showed that the FA-mGO had the better adsorption performance than mGO. After 40 min, the adsorption equilibrium could be reached. Furthermore, the adsorption property obeyed the pseudo-second order kinetic model and the Temkin isotherms well. The maximum adsorption capacity was 283.29 mg/g for Cu(II) from Pseudo-second-order model at pH=5 and 318 K. The chelation action between FA and Cu(II) along with electrostatic incorporation between GO and Cu(II) determined the favourable adsorption property. Besides, thermodynamic studies results ∆G{sup 0}<0, ∆H{sup 0}>0, ∆S{sup 0}>0 suggested that the adsorption mechanism was an endothermic and spontaneous process essentially. Finally, desorption and reusability studies imply FA-mGO has an excellent reproducibility and is benefit to environmental protection and resource conservation. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of preparing FA-mGO. - Highlights: • The FA-mGO was synthesized for the removal of Cu(II). • The chelation action and electrostatic incorporation determined the favourable adsorption property. • The adsorption property obeyed the pseudo-second-order and Temkin models well. • The adsorption mechanism was an endothermic and spontaneous process. • The FA-mGO has an excellent reproducibility.

  18. High turnover catalysis of water oxidation by Mn(II) complexes of monoanionic pentadentate ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidler-Egdal, Rune Kirk; Nielsen, Anne; Bond, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    -pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (bcbpen(-)), show the presence of a mixture of closely related Mn(II) species, assigned to the mono, di-, tri- and poly-cationic complexes [Mn(II)(L)(H(2)O)](n)(n+), L = mcbpen(-) or bcbpen(-) with n = 1, 2, 3, etc. In solution, these complexes are reversibly oxidized by tert......:1 reaction of TBHP with [Mn] is rate determining and the resultant species is proposed to be the mononuclear, catalytically competent, [Mn(IV)(O)(mcbpen)](+). At very close m/z values [Mn(III)(OH)(mcbpen)](+), [Mn(2)(III/IV)(O)(2)(mcbpen)(2)](+) and [Mn(IV)(2)(O)(2)(mcbpen)(2)](2+) are detected by ESI MS......-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP), (NH(4))(2)[Ce(NO(3))(6)], Ce(ClO(4))(4), oxone and [Ru(bipy)(3)](3+) to form metastable (t(½) = min to h) higher valent (hydr)oxide species, showing a collective maximum absorbance at 430 nm. The same species can be produced by [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+)-mediated photooxidization...

  19. High Turnover Catalysis of Water Oxidation by Mn(II) complexes of Monoanionic Pentadentate Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidler-Egdal, Rune Kirk; Nielsen, Anne; Bond, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    -pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (bcbpen−), show the presence of a mixture of closely related Mn(II) species, assigned to the mono, di-, tri- and poly-cationic complexes [MnII(L)(H2O)]nn+, L = mcbpen− or bcbpen− with n = 1, 2, 3, etc. In solution, these complexes are reversibly oxidized by tert-butyl hydrogen...... determining and the resultant species is proposed to be the mononuclear, catalytically competent, [MnIV(O)(mcbpen)]+. At very close m/z values [MnIII(OH)(mcbpen)]+, [Mn2III/IV(O)2(mcbpen)2]+ and [MnIV2(O)2(mcbpen)2]2+are detected by ESI MS and CE when the concentration of TBHP is comparable to or lower than...... peroxide (TBHP), (NH4)2[Ce(NO3)6], Ce(ClO4)4, oxone and [Ru(bipy)3]3+ to form metastable (t½ = min to h) higher valent (hydr)oxide species, showing a collective maximum absorbance at 430 nm. The same species can be produced by [Ru(bipy)3]2+-mediated photooxidization in the presence of an electron acceptor...

  20. Base-enhanced catalytic water oxidation by a carboxylate–bipyridine Ru(II) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Na [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Concepcion, Javier J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Binstead, Robert A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rudd, Jennifer A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vannucci, Aaron K. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Dares, Christopher J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Coggins, Michael K. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Meyer, Thomas J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-04-06

    In aqueous solution above pH 2.4 with 4% (vol/vol) CH3CN, the complex [RuII(bda)(isoq)2] (bda is 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate; isoq is isoquinoline) exists as the open-arm chelate, [RuII(CO2-bpy-CO2$-$)(isoq)2(NCCH3)], as shown by 1H and 13C-NMR, X-ray crystallography, and pH titrations. Rates of water oxidation with the open-arm chelate are remarkably enhanced by added proton acceptor bases, as measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). In 1.0 M PO43–, the calculated half-time for water oxidation is ~7 μs. In conclusion, the key to the rate accelerations with added bases is direct involvement of the buffer base in either atom–proton transfer (APT) or concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways.

  1. Implication of volume changes in uranium oxides: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, B.; Szpunar, J.A.; Milman, V.; Goldberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    In severe nuclear accident scenarios (in air environments and high temperatures) UO 2 fuel pellets oxidise to produce uranium oxides with higher oxygen content, e.g., U 4 O 9 or U 3 O 8 . As a first step in investigating the microstructural changes following UO 2 oxidation to hexagonal high temperature phase of U 3 O 8 , density functional quantum mechanical calculations of the structure, elastic properties and electronic structure of U 3 O 8 have been performed. The calculated properties of hexagonal phase of U 3 O 8 are compared to those of the orthorhombic pseudo-hexagonal phase which is stable at room temperature. The total energy technique based on the local density approximation plus Hubbard U as implemented in the CASTEP code is used to investigate changes in the lattice constants. The first-principles calculations predict a 35-42% increase in volume per uranium atom as a result of the transformation from UO 2 to U 3 O 8 , in agreement with experimental data. The implications of this prediction on the linear expansion and fragmentation of fuel are discussed. (authors)

  2. Catalytic behaviors of Co{sup II} and Mn{sup II} compounds bearing α-Diimine ligands for oxidative polymerization or drying oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Gilvan E.S.; Nunes, Everton V.; Dantas, Roberta C.; Meneghetti, Mario R.; Meneghetti, Simoni M.P., E-mail: simoni.plentz@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceió, AL (Brazil). Grupo de Catálise e Reatividade Química; Simone, Carlos A. de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), São Carlos, USP, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física

    2018-05-01

    The oxidative polymerization of linseed oil was investigated comparing the classical catalysts cobalt(II) 2-ethylhexanoate and manganese(II) 2-ethylhexanoate and their derivatives modified by the presence of chelating nitrogen ligands, i.e., 2,2’-bipyridyl, 2-(acetyl-2,6-diisopropylphenylimine)- pyridine and [N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imine]acenaphthoquinone. The suitable stoichiometries between the two precursor complexes with the three ligands were determined by UV-visible spectroscopy. All complexes were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, and one complex was characterized also by X-ray diffraction. The apparent kinetic constants of oxidative polymerization of linseed oil was determined, for each catalytic system, via the periodic measurements of the oil viscosity during the oxidation reaction. The results indicated that the modifications of the classical two complexes with the chelating nitrogen ligands improved the catalytic efficiency at least to the manganese complex. (author)

  3. Efficient removal of cobalt(II) and strontium(II) metals from water using ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid functionalized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amer, Hany; Moustafa, Wafaa M. [Nuclar Fuel Cycle Department, Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Naser City, Cairo (Egypt); Farghali, Ahmed A.; El Rouby, Waleed M.A. [Materials Science and Nanotechnology Department, Faculty of Postgraduate Studies for Advanced Sciences (PASA), Beni-Suef University (Egypt); Khalil, Waleed F. [Nuclar Fuel Cycle Department, Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Naser City, Cairo (Egypt); Materials Science and Nanotechnology Department, Faculty of Postgraduate Studies for Advanced Sciences (PASA), Beni-Suef University (Egypt)

    2017-12-04

    Graphene oxide (GO) with high specific surface area was prepared and functionalized with ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). The as-prepared GO and the functionalized one (GO-EDTA) were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. The as-prepared and EDTA functionalized GO were applied as adsorbent to remove strontium(II) and cobalt(II) from water. The results indicated that the prepared materials are efficient adsorbents for strontium(II) and cobalt(II) removal. The adsorption of Co{sup II} and Sr{sup II} under effects of contact time, temperature, and pH was investigated It is concluded that the maximum adsorption capacities of GO for Co{sup II} and Sr{sup II} were about 168 and 140 mg.g{sup -1}, whereas of GO-EDTA the values were about 197 and 158 mg.g{sup -1}, respectively. It is indicated that pH 6 and temperature 40 C are the best condition for Co{sup II} and Sr{sup II} removal from water. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms indicated that Langmuir isotherm is best fit for Co{sup II} and Sr{sup II} equilibrium adsorption. Adsorption kinetics were studied by applying pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models on the experimental data. The results proved that pseudo second-order model is the best represented adsorption kinetics. Appling the intraparticle diffusion regressions on the experimental data indicated that intraparticle diffusion involved in adsorption process, which was not the only rate-controlling step. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Nano-structured Ni(II)-curcumin modified glassy carbon electrode for electrocatalytic oxidation of fructose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, M. Yousef; Mousavi, M.F.; Ghasemi, S.

    2008-01-01

    A nano-structured Ni(II)-curcumin (curcumin: 1,7-bis[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) film is electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The morphology of polyNi(II)-curcumin (NC) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM results show NC has a nano-globular structure in the range 20-50 nm. Using cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, chronoamperometry, steady-state polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the nano-structure NC film acts as an efficient material for the electrocatalytic oxidation of fructose. According to the voltammetric studies, the increase in the anodic peak current and subsequent decrease in the corresponding cathodic current, fructose was oxidized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. The EIS results show that the charge-transfer resistance has as a function of fructose concentration, time interval and applied potential. The increase in the fructose concentration and time interval in fructose solution results in enhanced charge transfer resistance in Nyquist plots. The EIS results indicate that fructose electrooxidation at various potentials shows different impedance behaviors. At lower potentials, a semicircle is observed in the first quadrant of impedance plot. With further increase of the potential, a transition of the semicircle from the first to the second quadrant occurs. Also, the results obtained show that the rate of fructose electrooxidation depends on concentration of OH - . Electron transfer coefficient, diffusion coefficient and rate constant of the electrocatalytic oxidation reaction are obtained. The modified electrode was used as a sensor for determination of fructose with a good dynamic range and a low detection limit

  5. Oxidation behavior analysis of cladding during severe accidents with combined codes for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xingwei; Cao, Xinrong; Liu, Zhengzhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A new verified oxidation model of cladding has been added in Severe Accident Program (SAP). • A coupled analysis method utilizing RELAP5 and SAP codes has been developed and applied to analyze a SA caused by LBLOCA. • Analysis of cladding oxidation under a SA for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II NPP) has been performed by SAP. • Estimation of the production of hydrogen has been achieved by coupled codes. - Abstract: Core behavior at a high temperature is extremely complicated during transition from Design Basic Accident (DBA) to the severe accident (SA) in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The progression of core damage is strongly affected by the behavior of fuel cladding (oxidation, embrittlement and burst). A Severe Accident Program (SAP) is developed to simulate the process of fuel cladding oxidation, rupture and relocation of core debris based on the oxidation models of cladding, candling of melted material and mechanical slumping of core components. Relying on the thermal–hydraulic boundary parameters calculated by RELAP5 code, analysis of a SA caused by the large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) without mitigating measures for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II NPP) was performed by SAP for finding the key sequences of accidents, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation and oxidation behavior of the cladding

  6. Recommended criteria for the evaluation of on-site nuclear power plant emergency plans, volume II: criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A critical review of existing Canadian and international nuclear power plant (NPP) emergency plans, evaluation criteria, and approaches has been conducted to provide AECB staff with information which can be used to assess the adequacy of NPP on-site emergency response plans. The results of this work are published in two volumes. Volume I, Basis Document, provides the reasons why certain requirements are in place. It also gives comprehensive references to various standards.Volume II, Criteria, contains the criteria which relate to on-site actions and their integration with control room activities and the roles of off-site responsible organizations. The recommended criteria provide information on what is required, and not on how to accomplish the requirements. The licensees are given the latitude to decide on the methods and processes needed to meet the requirements. The documents do not address NPP off-site plans and response capability, or the control room emergency operating procedures and response capability. This report contains only Volume II: Criteria. 55 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Copper(II) oxide solubility behavior in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1990-02-01

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of copper(II) oxide (CuO) in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at temperatures between 292 and 535 K. Copper solubilities are observed to increase continuously with temperature and phosphate concentration. The measured solubility is examined via a Cu(II) ion hydrolysis/complexing model and thermodynamic functions for the hydrolysis/complexing reactions are obtained from a least- squares analysis of the data. Altogether, thermochemical properties are established for five anionic complexes: Cu(OH) 3 - , Cu(OH) 4 = , Cu(OH) 2 (HPO 4 ) = , Cu(OH) 3 (H 2 PO 4 ) = , and Cu(OH) 2 (PO 4 ) ≡ . Precise thermochemical parameters are also derived for the Cu(OH) + hydroxocomplex based on CuO solubility behavior previously observed in pure water (*) at elevated temperatures. The relative ease of Cu(II) ion hydrolysis is such that Cu(OH) 3 - species become the preferred hydroxocomplex for pH ≥ 9.4. 20 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Infertility and recurrent miscarriage with complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takamasa; Yasuda, Kayo; Miyazawa, Masaki; Mitsushita, Junji; Johnson, Thomas E; Hartman, Phil S; Ishii, Naoaki

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with some forms of both male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient knowledge of the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. There are a number of animal models for understanding age-dependent decrease of reproductive ability and diabetic embryopathy, especially abnormal spermatogenesis, oogenesis and embryogenesis with mitochondrial dysfunctions. Several important processes occur in mitochondria, including ATP synthesis, calcium ion storage, induction of apoptosis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These events have different effects on the several aspects of reproductive function. Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, developed after studies with the mev-1 mutant of the nematode C. elegans, offer the ability to carefully regulate expression of doxycycline-induced mutated SDHC(V69E) levels and hence modulate endogenous oxidative stress. The mev-1 models have served to illuminate the effects of complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial ROS production, although interestingly they maintain normal mitochondrial and intracellular ATP levels. In this review, the reproductive dysfunctions are presented focusing on fertility potentials in each gamete, early embryogenesis, maternal conditions with placental function and neonatal development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Production of Nitrous Oxide from Nitrite in Stable Type II Methanotrophic Enrichments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jaewook; Wang, Zhiyue; Yuan, Tong; Zhang, Ping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S

    2015-09-15

    The coupled aerobic-anoxic nitrous decomposition operation is a new process for wastewater treatment that removes nitrogen from wastewater and recovers energy from the nitrogen in three steps: (1) NH4(+) oxidation to NO2(-), (2) NO2(-) reduction to N2O, and (3) N2O conversion to N2 with energy production. Here, we demonstrate that type II methanotrophic enrichments can mediate step two by coupling oxidation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P3HB) to NO2(-) reduction. Enrichments grown with NH4(+) and NO2(-) were subject to alternating 48-h aerobic and anoxic periods, in which CH4 and NO2(-) were added together in a "coupled" mode of operation or separately in a "decoupled mode". Community structure was stable in both modes and dominated by Methylocystis. In the coupled mode, production of P3HB and N2O was low. In the decoupled mode, significant P3HB was produced, and oxidation of P3HB drove reduction of NO2(-) to N2O with ∼ 70% conversion for >30 cycles (120 d). In batch tests of wasted cells from the decoupled mode, N2O production rates increased at low O2 or high NO2(-) levels. The results are significant for the development of engineered processes that remove nitrogen from wastewater and for understanding of conditions that favor environmental production of N2O.

  10. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  11. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results

  12. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Zeiner

    Full Text Available Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a. We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-19

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  14. Simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V) by Fe–Mn binary oxide: Positive effects of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruiping [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu, Feng [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Chengzhi, E-mail: czhu@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); He, Zan [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Fe–Mn binary oxide achieves the simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V). • Cd(II) at above 0.25 mmol/L improves Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO. • Cd(II) improves more significant Sb(V) adsorption than Ca{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}. • Sb(V) adsorption decreases whereas Cd(II) adsorption increases with elevated pH. • The increased ζ-potential and Cd(II)–Sb(V) precipitation favors Sb(V) adsorption. - Abstract: The coexistence of cadmium ion (Cd(II)) and antimonate (Sb(V)) creates the need for their simultaneous removal. This study aims to investigate the effects of positively-charged Cd(II) on the removal of negative Sb(V) ions by Fe–Mn binary oxide (FMBO) and associated mechanisms. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption density (Q{sub max,Sb(V)}) increased from 1.02 to 1.32 and 2.01 mmol/g in the presence of Cd(II) at 0.25 and 0.50 mmol/L. Cd{sup 2+} exhibited a more significant positive effect than both calcium ion (Ca{sup 2+}) and manganese ion (Mn{sup 2+}). Cd{sup 2+} showed higher affinity towards FMBO and increased its ζ-potential more significantly compared to Ca{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}. The simultaneous adsorption of Sb(V) and Cd(II) onto FMBO can be achieved over a wide initial pH (pH{sub i}) range from 2 to 9, and Q{sub Sb(V)} decreases whereas Q{sub Cd(II)} increases with elevated pH{sub i}. Their combined values, as expressed by Q{sub Sb(V)+Cd(II)}, amount to about 2 mmol/g and vary slightly in the pH{sub i} range 4–9. FTIR and XPS spectra indicate the significant synergistic effect of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO, and that little chemical valence transformation occurs. These results may be valuable for the treatment of wastewater with coexisting heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Sb(V).

  15. Advanced oxidation removal of hypophosphite by O3/H2O2 combined with sequential Fe(II) catalytic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zilong; Dong, Wenyi; Wang, Hongjie; Chen, Guanhan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zekun; Gao, Yaguang; Zhou, Beili

    2017-08-01

    Elimination of hypophosphite (HP) was studied as an example of nickel plating effluents treatment by O 3 /H 2 O 2 and sequential Fe(II) catalytic oxidation process. Performance assessment performed with artificial HP solution by varying initial pH and employing various oxidation processes clearly showed that the O 3 /H 2 O 2 ─Fe(II) two-step oxidation process possessed the highest removal efficiency when operating under the same conditions. The effects of O 3 dosing, H 2 O 2 concentration, Fe(II) addition and Fe(II) feeding time on the removal efficiency of HP were further evaluated in terms of apparent kinetic rate constant. Under improved conditions (initial HP concentration of 50 mg L -1 , 75 mg L -1 O 3 , 1 mL L -1 H 2 O 2 , 150 mg L -1 Fe(II) and pH 7.0), standard discharge (<0.5 mg L -1 in China) could be achieved, and the Fe(II) feeding time was found to be the limiting factor for the evolution of apparent kinetic rate constant in the second stage. Characterization studies showed that neutralization process after oxidation treatment favored the improvement of phosphorus removal due to the formation of more metal hydroxides. Moreover, as a comparison with lab-scale Fenton approach, the O 3 /H 2 O 2 ─Fe(II) oxidation process had more competitive advantages with respect to applicable pH range, removal efficiency, sludge production as well as economic costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Feedback to Managers, Volume II: A Review and Comparison of Sixteen Multi-Rater Feedback Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, Ellen; Leslie, Jean Brittain

    "Feedback to Managers" is a two-volume report. Volume 2 compares 16 of the better feedback instruments available. The following are the instruments: (1) ACUMEN Group Feedback; (2) BENCHMARKS; (3) the Campbell Leadership Index; (4) COMPASS: the Managerial Practices Survey; (5) the Executive Success Profile; (6) Leader Behavior Analysis…

  17. Saline-water bioleaching of chalcopyrite with thermophilic, iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Helen R; Collinson, David M; Corbett, Melissa K; Shiers, Denis W; Kaksonen, Anna H; Watkin, Elizabeth L J

    2016-09-01

    The application of thermoacidophiles for chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) bioleaching in hot, acidic, saline solution was investigated as a possible process route for rapid Cu extraction. The study comprised a discussion of protective mechanisms employed for the survival and/or adaptation of thermoacidophiles to osmotic stress, a compilation of chloride tolerances for three genera of thermoacidophiles applied in bioleaching and an experimental study of the activities of three species in a saline bioleaching system. The data showed that the oxidation rates of iron(II) and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (tetrathionate) were reduced in the presence of chloride levels well below chloride concentrations in seawater, limiting the applicability of these microorganisms in the bioleaching of CuFeS2 in saline water. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. A novel sensitive Cu(II) and Cd(II) nanosensor platform: Graphene oxide terminated p-aminophenyl modified glassy carbon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Atar, Necip; Ustundag, Zafer; Solak, Ali Osman

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We electrochemically prepared sensor based on graphene oxide. • The prepared electrode was characterized by using various techniques. • The proposed nanosensor showed good stability, selectivity and high sensitivity. • The proposed nanosensor electrode was used for the analysis of Cd(II) and Cu(II). - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) based glassy carbon (GC) electrode has been prepared. Firstly, p-nitrophenyl (NP) modified GC (NP/GC) electrode was prepared via the electrochemical reduction of its tetraflouroborate diazonium salt. After the formation of NP/GC electrode, the negative potential was applied to NP/GC electrode to reduce the nitro groups to amine. p-Aminophenyl (AP) modified GC (AP/GC) electrode was immersed into a graphene oxide solution containing 1-ethyl-3(3-(dimethlyamino)propyl)-carbodiimide. Hence, we constructed GO terminated AP modified GC (GO/AP/GC) electrode. NP/GC, AP/GC and GO/AP/GC electrodes were characterized sequentially using cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the presence of 1.0 mM of potassium ferricyanide in 0.1 M KCl. In addition, GO and GO/AP/GC surfaces were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The GO/AP/GC electrode was used for the analysis of Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions by adsorptive stripping voltammetry. The linearity range and the detection limit of Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions were 1.0 × 10 −11 –5.0 × 10 −10 M and 3.3 × 10 −12 M (S/N = 3), respectively

  19. Dispersive solid phase micro-extraction of mercury(II from environmental water and vegetable samples with ionic liquid modified graphene oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollahpour Atefeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new dispersive solid phase micro-extraction (dispersive-SPME method for separation and preconcentration of mercury(II using ionic liquid modified magnetic reduced graphene oxide (IL-MrGO nanoparticles, prior to the measurement by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS has been developed. The IL-MrGO composite was characterized by Brunauer– Emmett–Teller method (BET for adsorption-desorption measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The method is based on the sorption of mercury( II on IL-MrGO nanoparticles due to electrostatic interaction and complex formation of ionic liquid part of IL-MrGO with mercury(II. The effect of experimental parameters for preconcentration of mercury(II, such as solution type, concentration and volume of the eluent, pH, time of the sorption and desorption, amount of the sorbent and coexisting ion concentration have been optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.08–10 ng mL-1 with a determination coefficient of 0.9995. The limit of detection (LOD of the method at a signal to noise ratio of 3 was 0.01 ng mL-1. Intra-day and inter-day precisions were obtained equal to 3.4 and 4.5 %, respectively. The dispersive solid phase micro-extraction of mercury(II on IL-MrGO nanoparticles coupled with cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry was successfully used for extraction and determination of mercury(II in water and vegetable samples.

  20. O2 Activation and Double C-H Oxidation by a Mononuclear Manganese(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Claire; Padamati, Sandeep K; Sundberg, Jonas; McKee, Vickie; Browne, Wesley R; McKenzie, Christine J

    2016-01-11

    A Mn(II) complex, [Mn(dpeo)2](2+) (dpeo=1,2-di(pyridin-2-yl)ethanone oxime), activates O2, with ensuing stepwise oxidation of the methylene group in the ligands providing an alkoxide and ultimately a ketone group. X-ray crystal-structure analysis of an intermediate homoleptic alkoxide Mn(III) complex shows tridentate binding of the ligand via the two pyridyl groups and the newly installed alkoxide moiety, with the oxime group no longer coordinated. The structure of a Mn(II) complex of the final ketone ligand, cis-[MnBr2(hidpe)2] (hidpe=2-(hydroxyimino)-1,2-di(pyridine-2-yl)ethanone) shows that bidentate oxime/pyridine coordination has been resumed. H2(18)O and (18)O2 labeling experiments suggest that the inserted O atoms originate from two different O2 molecules. The progress of the oxygenation was monitored through changes in the resonance-enhanced Raman bands of the oxime unit. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High Power Compact Single-Frequency Volume Bragg Er-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is based on successful results of Phase I project where it was shown that the use of volume Bragg gratings in PTR glass as selectors of transverse and...

  2. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  3. Coordination functionalization of graphene oxide with tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of nickel(II): Generation of paramagnetic centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Alzate-Carvajal, Natalia [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Henao-Holguín, Laura V. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Rybak-Akimova, Elena V. [Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elbg1111@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • [Ni(cyclam)]{sup 2+} and [Ni(tet b)]{sup 2+} cations coordinate to carboxylic groups of GO. • The coordination takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based medium. • The coordination results in the conversion from low-spin to high-spin Ni(II). • Functionalized GO samples were characterized by various instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We describe a novel approach to functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) which allows for a facile generation of paramagnetic centers from two diamagnetic components. Coordination attachment of [Ni(cyclam)]{sup 2+} or [Ni(tet b)]{sup 2+} tetraazamacrocyclic cations to carboxylic groups of GO takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based reaction medium. The procedure is very straightforward and does not require high temperatures or other harsh conditions. Changing the coordination geometry of Ni(II) from square-planar tetracoordinated to pseudooctahedral hexacoordinated brings about the conversion from low-spin to high-spin state of the metal centers. Even though the content of tetraazamacrocyclic complexes in functionalized GO samples was found to be relatively low (nickel content of ca. 1 wt%, as determined by thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements easily detected the appearance of paramagnetic properties in GO + [Ni(cyclam)] and GO + [Ni(tet b)] nanohybrids, with effective magnetic moments of 1.95 BM and 2.2 BM for, respectively. According to density functional theory calculations, the main spin density is localized at the macrocyclic complexes, without considerable extension to graphene sheet, which suggests insignificant ferromagnetic coupling in the nanohybrids, in agreement with the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements. The coordination attachment of Ni(II) tetraazamacrocycles to GO results in considerable changes in Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra

  4. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VII. Cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteat, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This document, Volume VII EBT-P Cryogenic System Title I Design Report, describes the system that resulted from the Title I Preliminary Design effort. It is a self-contained document that can be read apart from the other Volumes comprising the EBT-P Title I Report. This document is a contract deliverable item and provides the detail necessary to support the Cryogenic System design contained in the EBT-P Baseline Design Data Book

  5. Simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V) by Fe–Mn binary oxide: Positive effects of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Feng; Hu, Chengzhi; He, Zan; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe–Mn binary oxide achieves the simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V). • Cd(II) at above 0.25 mmol/L improves Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO. • Cd(II) improves more significant Sb(V) adsorption than Ca"2"+ and Mn"2"+. • Sb(V) adsorption decreases whereas Cd(II) adsorption increases with elevated pH. • The increased ζ-potential and Cd(II)–Sb(V) precipitation favors Sb(V) adsorption. - Abstract: The coexistence of cadmium ion (Cd(II)) and antimonate (Sb(V)) creates the need for their simultaneous removal. This study aims to investigate the effects of positively-charged Cd(II) on the removal of negative Sb(V) ions by Fe–Mn binary oxide (FMBO) and associated mechanisms. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption density (Q_m_a_x_,_S_b_(_V_)) increased from 1.02 to 1.32 and 2.01 mmol/g in the presence of Cd(II) at 0.25 and 0.50 mmol/L. Cd"2"+ exhibited a more significant positive effect than both calcium ion (Ca"2"+) and manganese ion (Mn"2"+). Cd"2"+ showed higher affinity towards FMBO and increased its ζ-potential more significantly compared to Ca"2"+ and Mn"2"+. The simultaneous adsorption of Sb(V) and Cd(II) onto FMBO can be achieved over a wide initial pH (pH_i) range from 2 to 9, and Q_S_b_(_V_) decreases whereas Q_C_d_(_I_I_) increases with elevated pH_i. Their combined values, as expressed by Q_S_b_(_V_)_+_C_d_(_I_I_), amount to about 2 mmol/g and vary slightly in the pH_i range 4–9. FTIR and XPS spectra indicate the significant synergistic effect of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO, and that little chemical valence transformation occurs. These results may be valuable for the treatment of wastewater with coexisting heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Sb(V).

  6. Adsorption and co-adsorption of graphene oxide and Ni(II) on iron oxides: A spectroscopic and microscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Guodong; Huang, Chengcai; Chen, Guohe; Sheng, Jiang; Ren, Xuemei; Hu, Baowei; Ma, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiangke; Huang, Yuying; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar

    2018-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) may strongly interact with toxic metal ions and mineral particles upon release into the soil environment. We evaluated the mutual effects between GO and Ni (Ni(II)) with regard to their adsorption and co-adsorption on two minerals (goethite and hematite) in aqueous phase. Results indicated that GO and Ni could mutually facilitate the adsorption of each other on both goethite and hematite over a wide pH range. Addition of Ni promoted GO co-adsorption mainly due to the increased positive charge of minerals and cation-π interactions, while the presence of GO enhanced Ni co-adsorption predominantly due to neutralization of positive charge and strong interaction with oxygen-containing functional groups on adsorbed GO. Increasing adsorption of GO and Ni on minerals as they coexist may thus reduce their mobility in soil. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy data revealed that GO altered the microstructure of Ni on minerals, i.e., Ni formed edge-sharing surface species (at R Ni-Fe ∼3.2 Å) without GO, while a GO-bridging ternary surface complexes (at R Ni-C ∼2.49 Å and R Ni-Fe ∼4.23 Å) was formed with GO. These findings improved the understanding of potential fate and toxicity of GO as well as the partitioning processes of Ni ions in aquatic and soil environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiology, Fe(II oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D. Swanner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for Fe(II oxidation and deposition of Fe(III-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF. While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II-rich waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III (oxyhydroxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Fe(II toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II. These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  8. Molecular and component volumes of N,N-dimethyl-N-alkylamine N-oxides in DOPC bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belicka, Michal; Klacsova, Maria; Karlovska, Janka

    2014-01-01

    The volumetric properties of fluid bilayers formed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) with incorporated N ,N -dimethyl-N -alkylamine N -oxides (Cn NO, n = 6, 10–18 is the even number of carbons in alkyl chain) were studied by vibrating tube densitometry in the temperature interval from 20 °C...... to 50 °C. It was found that the DOPC and Cn NO mixed ideally in the investigated composition range and hence the molecular volumes of DOPC (V DOPC) and incorporated Cn NO (V CnNO) were constant and additive within error limits. From the temperature dependencies of the molecular volumes of DOPC and Cn...... NO their coefficients of isobaric thermal expansivities in the investigated temperature interval were obtained. The V CnNO volumes of Cn NO incorporated into DOPC bilayers showed linear dependencies on the Cn NO alkyl chain length at all measured temperatures. This allowed to calculate the component volume of the Cn...

  9. Obesity disproportionately impacts lung volumes, airflow and exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, Su-Wei; Chung, Ren-Hua; Hsu, Jing-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Han; Liao, Sui-Ling; Hua, Man-Chin; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chen, Li-Chen; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chang, Su-Ching; Huang, Jing-Long

    2017-01-01

    The current literature focusing on the effect of obesity and overweight on lung function and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in children, particularly among healthy children of non-European descent, remains controversial. Furthermore, whether the relationship of obesity and overweight with lung function and FeNO in children is modified by atopy is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of excess weight on lung function parameters and FeNO among Asian children, with a particular focus on exploring the potential effect modification by atopy. We investigated the effect of excess weight on lung function and FeNO in a population sample of 1,717 children aged 5 to 18 years and explored the potential modifying effect of atopy. There were positive associations of body mass index (BMI) z-score with forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75) (all Pchildren from the general population, independent of atopic status. Excess weight inversely affects FeNO in atopic but not in non-atopic children.

  10. Angiotensin II type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage without blood pressure increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnol, Anna; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Hartmann, Christina; Schupp, Nicole

    2017-12-01

    Hypertensive patients have an increased risk of developing kidney cancer. We have shown in vivo that besides elevating blood pressure, angiotensin II causes DNA damage dose dependently. Here, the role of blood pressure in the formation of DNA damage is studied. Mice lacking one of the two murine angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) subtypes, AT1aR, were equipped with osmotic minipumps, delivering angiotensin II during 28 days. Parameters of oxidative stress and DNA damage of kidneys and hearts of AT1aR-knockout mice were compared with wild-type (C57BL/6) mice receiving angiotensin II, and additionally, with wild-type mice treated with candesartan, an antagonist of both AT1R subtypes. In wild-type mice, angiotensin II induced hypertension, reduced kidney function, and led to a significant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, genomic damage was markedly increased in this group. All these responses to angiotensin II could be attenuated by concurrent administration of candesartan. In AT1aR-deficient mice treated with angiotensin II, systolic pressure was not increased, and renal function was not affected. However, angiotensin II still led to an increase of ROS in kidneys and hearts of these animals. Additionally, genomic damage in the form of double-strand breaks was significantly induced in kidneys of AT1aR-deficient mice. Our results show that angiotensin II induced ROS production and DNA damage even without the presence of AT1aR and independently of blood pressure changes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  12. Uptake and Release of Cerium During Fe-Oxide Formation and Transformation in Fe(II) Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedel, Sorin; Dideriksen, Knud; Christiansen, Bo C.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-oxides are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and form during Fe(0) corrosion. Depending on redox conditions and solution composition, Fe-oxides such as ferrihydrite, goethite, magnetite, and green rust (GR) may form. These phases typically have high surface area and large affinity for adsorption......(III) release. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed Ce(III) adsorbed on magnetite. When Fe-oxides were synthesized by air oxidation of Fe(II) solutions at pH 7, GR(Na,SO4) played a catalytic role in the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) by O-2, removing more than 90% of the dissolved Ce. Transmission electron...

  13. GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. GENII [Generation II]: The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Non-noble metal graphene oxide-copper (II) ions hybrid electrodes for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Muralikrishna, S.; Ravishankar, T.N.; Ramakrishnappa, T.; Nagaraju, Doddahalli H.; Krishna Pai, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Non-noble metal and inexpensive graphene oxide-copper (II) ions (GO-Cu2+) hybrid catalysts have been explored for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We were able to tune the binding abilities of GO toward the Cu2+ ions and hence their catalytic

  16. Cu(II)-catalyzed esterification reaction via aerobic oxidative cleavage of C(CO)-C(alkyl) bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ran; He, Liang-Nian; Liu, An-Hua; Song, Qing-Wen

    2016-02-04

    A novel Cu(II)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative esterification of simple ketones for the synthesis of esters has been developed with wide functional group tolerance. This process is assumed to go through a tandem sequence consisting of α-oxygenation/esterification/nucleophilic addition/C-C bond cleavage and carbon dioxide is released as the only byproduct.

  17. A ruthenium(II) complex as turn-on Cu(II) luminescent sensor based on oxidative cyclization mechanism and its application in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Zonglun; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Wang, Chaoxia; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-02-01

    Copper ions play a vital role in a variety of fundamental physiological processes not only in human beings and plants, but also for extensive insects and microorganisms. In this paper, a novel water-soluble ruthenium(II) complex as a turn-on copper(II) ions luminescent sensor based on o-(phenylazo)aniline was designed and synthesized. The azo group would undergo a specific oxidative cyclization reaction with copper(II) ions and turn into high luminescent benzotriazole, triggering significant luminescent increasements which were linear to the concentrations of copper(II) ions. The sensor distinguished by its high sensitivity (over 80-fold luminescent switch-on response), good selectivity (the changes of the emission intensity in the presence of other metal ions or amino acids were negligible) and low detection limit (4.42 nM) in water. Moreover, the copper(II) luminescent sensor exhibited good photostability under light irradiation. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed sensor in biological samples assay was also studied and imaged copper(II) ions in living pea aphids successfully.

  18. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  19. Nitrite to nitric oxide interconversion by heme FeII complex assisted by [CuI(tmpa)]+

    KAUST Repository

    Turias, Francesc; Solà , Miquel; Falivene, Laura; Cavallo, Luigi; Poater, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The present computational study complements the recent experimental efforts by Karlin and coworkers to describe the interconversion of nitrite to nitric oxide by means of an iron porphyrin complex together with a Cu chemical system, i.e., the iron(II) complex (F8TPP)FeII [F8TPP = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)porphyrinate(2−)] and a preformed copper(II)–nitrito complex [(tmpa)CuII(NO2)][B(C6F5)4] [tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine], being the latter an oxidized species of [(tmpa)CuI(MeCN)]+. By DFT calculations, we unravel how the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide takes place through a μ-oxo heme-FeIII–O–CuII complex, following a mimetic path as in the cytochrome c oxidase. Mayer bond order (MBO) and energy decomposition analyses are used to analyze the bonding strength of such nitro derivatives to either copper or iron. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  20. Nitrite to nitric oxide interconversion by heme FeII complex assisted by [CuI(tmpa)]+

    KAUST Repository

    Turias, Francesc

    2015-09-09

    The present computational study complements the recent experimental efforts by Karlin and coworkers to describe the interconversion of nitrite to nitric oxide by means of an iron porphyrin complex together with a Cu chemical system, i.e., the iron(II) complex (F8TPP)FeII [F8TPP = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)porphyrinate(2−)] and a preformed copper(II)–nitrito complex [(tmpa)CuII(NO2)][B(C6F5)4] [tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine], being the latter an oxidized species of [(tmpa)CuI(MeCN)]+. By DFT calculations, we unravel how the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide takes place through a μ-oxo heme-FeIII–O–CuII complex, following a mimetic path as in the cytochrome c oxidase. Mayer bond order (MBO) and energy decomposition analyses are used to analyze the bonding strength of such nitro derivatives to either copper or iron. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  1. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill.

  2. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill

  3. SLIM-MAUD: an approach to assessing human error probabilities using structured expert judgment. Volume II. Detailed analysis of the technical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.; Humphreys, P.; Rosa, E.A.; Kirwan, B.; Rea, K.

    1984-07-01

    This two-volume report presents the procedures and analyses performed in developing an approach for structuring expert judgments to estimate human error probabilities. Volume I presents an overview of work performed in developing the approach: SLIM-MAUD (Success Likelihood Index Methodology, implemented through the use of an interactive computer program called MAUD-Multi-Attribute Utility Decomposition). Volume II provides a more detailed analysis of the technical issues underlying the approach

  4. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to

  5. Evaluation of Fe(II) oxidation at an acid mine drainage site using laboratory-scale reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Juliana; Burgos, William

    2010-05-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a severe environmental threat to the Appalachian region of the Eastern United States. The Susquehanna and Potomac River basins of Pennsylvania drain to the Chesapeake Bay, which is heavily polluted by acidity and metals from AMD. This study attempted to unravel the complex relationships between AMD geochemistry, microbial communities, hydrodynamic conditions, and the mineral precipitates for low-pH Fe mounds formed downstream of deep mine discharges, such as Lower Red Eyes in Somerset County, PA, USA. This site is contaminated with high concentrations of Fe (550 mg/L), Mn (115 mg/L), and other trace metals. At the site 95% of dissolved Fe(II) and 56% of total dissolved Fe is removed without treatment, across the mound, but there is no change in the concentration of trace metals. Fe(III) oxides were collected across the Red Eyes Fe mound and precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and elemental analysis. Schwertmannite was the dominant mineral phase with traces of goethite. The precipitates also contained minor amounts of Al2O3, MgO,and P2O5. Laboratory flow-through reactors were constructed to quantify Fe(II) oxidation and Fe removal over time at terrace and pool depositional facies. Conditions such as residence time, number of reactors in sequence and water column height were varied to determine optimal conditions for Fe removal. Reactors with sediments collected from an upstream terrace oxidized more than 50% of dissolved Fe(II) at a ten hour residence time, while upstream pool sediments only oxidized 40% of dissolved Fe(II). Downstream terrace and pool sediments were only capable of oxidizing 25% and 20% of Fe(II), respectively. Fe(II) oxidation rates measured in the reactors were determined to be between 3.99 x 10-8and 1.94 x 10-7mol L-1s-1. The sediments were not as efficient for total dissolved Fe removal and only 25% was removed under optimal conditions. The removal efficiency for all sediments

  6. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume II. Inland waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, R.F. III; Sharma, R.K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 33 power plants located on inland waters other than the Great Lakes has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV

  7. Temporal changes in cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and remodeling induced by exercise in hypertension: Role for local angiotensin II reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião D Silva

    Full Text Available Exercise training reduces renin-angiotensin system (RAS activation, decreases plasma and tissue oxidative stress and inflammation in hypertension. However, the temporal nature of these phenomena in response to exercise is unknown. We sought to determine in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and age-matched WKY controls the weekly effects of training on blood pressure (BP, plasma and left ventricle (LV Ang II and Ang-(1-7 content (HPLC, LV oxidative stress (DHE staining, gene and protein expression (qPCR and WB of pro-inflammatory cytokines, antioxidant enzymes and their consequence on hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. SHR and WKY were submitted to aerobic training (T or maintained sedentary (S for 8 weeks; measurements were made at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy was accompanied by acute plasma Ang II increase with amplified responses during the late phase of LV hypertrophy. Similar pattern was observed for oxidative stress markers, TNF alpha and interleukin-1β, associated with cardiomyocytes' diameter enlargement and collagen deposition. SHR-T exhibited prompt and marked decrease in LV Ang II content (T1 vs T4 in WKY-T, normalized oxidative stress (T2, augmented antioxidant defense (T4 and reduced both collagen deposition and inflammatory profile (T8, without changing cardiomyocytes' diameter and LV hypertrophy. These changes were accompanied by decreased plasma Ang II content (T2-T4 and reduced BP (T8. SHR-T and WKY-T showed parallel increases in LV and plasma Ang-(1-7 content. Our data indicate that early training-induced downregulation of LV ACE-AngII-AT1 receptor axis is a crucial mechanism to reduce oxidative/pro-inflammatory profile and improve antioxidant defense in SHR-T, showing in addition this effect precedes plasma RAS deactivation.

  8. Amorphous manganese-calcium oxides as a possible evolutionary origin for the CaMn₄ cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-06-01

    In this paper a few calcium-manganese oxides and calcium-manganese minerals are studied as catalysts for water oxidation. The natural mineral marokite is also studied as a catalyst for water oxidation for the first time. Marokite is made up of edge-sharing Mn(3+) in a distorted octahedral environment and eight-coordinate Ca(2+) centered polyhedral layers. The structure is similar to recent models of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II. Thus, the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II does not have an unusual structure and could be synthesized hydrothermally. Also in this paper, oxygen evolution is studied with marokite (CaMn₂O₄), pyrolusite (MnO₂) and compared with hollandite (Ba(0.2)Ca(0.15)K(0.3)Mn(6.9)Al(0.2)Si(0.3)O(16)), hausmannite (Mn₃O₄), Mn₂O₃.H₂O, Ca Mn₃O₆.H₂O, CaMn₄O₈.H₂O, CaMn₂O₄.H₂O and synthetic marokite (CaMn₂O₄). I propose that the origin of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II resulted from absorption of calcium and manganese ions that were precipitated together in the archean oceans by protocyanobacteria because of changing pH from ~5 to ~8-10. As reported in this paper, amorphous calcium-manganese oxides with different ratios of manganese and calcium are effective catalysts for water oxidation. The bond types and lengths of the calcium and manganese ions in the calcium-manganese oxides are directly comparable to those in the OEC. This primitive structure of these amorphous calcium-manganese compounds could be changed and modified by environmental groups (amino acids) to form the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II.

  9. Handbook of Game Theory and Industrial Organization, Volume II: Applications. An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Corchon, Luis; Marini, Marco A.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce here the second volume of the Handbook of Game Theory and Industrial Organization, by L. C. Corchón and M. A. Marini (ed.), Edward Elgar, Cheltenam, UK and Northampton, MA, describing its main aim and its basic structure.

  10. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase I report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1977-10-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) baseline large module time estimates, (2) baseline intermediate module time estimates, (3) baseline small module time estimates, (4) alternate concept estimates, (5) maintenance equipment concepts, (6) additional reactor design definition, and (7) TOCOMO supplements. (MOW)

  11. Influence of pressure on the properties of chromatographic columns. II. The column hold-up volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Martin, Michel; Guiochon, Georges

    2005-04-08

    The effect of the local pressure and of the average column pressure on the hold-up column volume was investigated between 1 and 400 bar, from a theoretical and an experimental point of view. Calculations based upon the elasticity of the solids involved (column wall and packing material) and the compressibility of the liquid phase show that the increase of the column hold-up volume with increasing pressure that is observed is correlated with (in order of decreasing importance): (1) the compressibility of the mobile phase (+1 to 5%); (2) in RPLC, the compressibility of the C18-bonded layer on the surface of the silica (+0.5 to 1%); and (3) the expansion of the column tube (columns packed with the pure Resolve silica (0% carbon), the derivatized Resolve-C18 (10% carbon) and the Symmetry-C18 (20% carbon) adsorbents, using water, methanol, or n-pentane as the mobile phase. These solvents have different compressibilities. However, 1% of the relative increase of the column hold-up volume that was observed when the pressure was raised is not accounted for by the compressibilities of either the solvent or the C18-bonded phase. It is due to the influence of the pressure on the retention behavior of thiourea, the compound used as tracer to measure the hold-up volume.

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Volume II. Conceptual design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate six candidate hullforms as candidates for the OTEC commercial plant. This volume is a summary of the conceptual design including facility requirements, cost, schedule, and site sensitivity. Two OTEC commercial plant configurations are considered in this study: the ship and the semi-submersible. Engineering drawings are presented. (WHR)

  13. Technical Assistance in Evaluating Career Education Projects. Final Report. Volume II: Final Career Education Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, A. Jackson; And Others

    This document contains the second of five volumes reporting the activities and results of a career education evaluation project conducted to accomplish the following two objectives: (1) to improve the quality of evaluations by career education projects funded by the United States Office of Career Education (OCE) through the provision of technical…

  14. Catalog of physical protection equipment. Book 1: Volume II. Intrusion detection components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    This volume covers acoustic components, microwave/radar components, electro-optic barriers, electric field components, orientation components, ferrous metal detection components, proximity detection components, vibration detection components, seismic components, pressure-sensitive components, pressure mats, continuity components, electrical/magnetic switches, fire detection components, and mechanical contact switches

  15. Savannah River Plant - Project 8980 engineering and design history. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-01

    This volume provides an engineering and design history of the 100 area of the Savannah River Plant. This site consisted of five separate production reactor sites, 100-R, P, L, K, and C. The document summarizes work on design of the reactors, support facilities, buildings, siting, etc. for these areas.

  16. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume III: appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    This volume contains time estimate summaries to the second level of detail for scheduled or unscheduled maintenance of the first wall/blanket, some selected subsystem components and maintenance equipment. Elaboration of selected maintenance equipment functions and performance as well as conceptual designs is also included

  17. Book Review: Sustainable Luxury and Social Entrepreneurship. Volume II: More Stories from the Pioneers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold, Else

    2017-01-01

    volume Sustainable Luxury and Social Entrepreneurship: Stories of the Pioneers, published in 2014. The book series, as well as the awards, seeks to investigate and promote the motives, context, and practical endeavours of sustainable entrepreneurs within the premium and luxury sector....

  18. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume II, Country Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Howard; And Others

    This document, the second of three volumes concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, presents country profiles for Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Viet-Nam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The profile emphasizes background, higher education, educational…

  19. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  20. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1977-1981: formerly Publications of LASL Research. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, C.J.; Garcia, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    This volume is a bibliography of Los Alamos publications during the specified period in the following areas: general physics; nuclear physics; particles and fields; radioisotope and radiation applications; nuclear materials security safeguards; solar energy; theoretical plasma physics; and transportation of property and nuclear materials

  1. SEL/Project Language. Level II, Kindergarten, Volume I (Lessons 1-16).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ann E.; And Others

    The document is an intervention curriculum guide designed to facilitate the initial adjustment of disadvantaged Southeastern children to kindergarten or first grade. The major emphasis is on the teaching of language skills in combination with subject matter learning using a language-experience approach. This volume contains Lessons 1-16 of a…

  2. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Part II: applications and fundamentals. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boumans, P.W.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second part of the two-volume treatise by this well-known and respected author. This volume reviews applications of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), summarizes fundamental studies, and compares ICP-AES methods with other methods of analysis. The first six chapters are devoted to specific fields of application, including the following: metals and other industrial materials, geology, the environment, agriculture and food, biology and clinical analysis, and organic materials. The chapter on the analysis of organic materials also covers the special instrumental considerations required when organic solvents are introduced into an inductively coupled plasma. A chapter on the direct analysis of solids completes the first part of this volume. Each of the applications chapters begins with a summary of the types of samples that are encountered in that field, and the kinds of problems that an elemental analysis can help to solve. This is followed by a tutorial approach covering applicability, advantages, and limitations of the methods. The coverage is thorough, including sample handling, storage, and preparation, acid, and fusion dissolution, avoiding contamination, methods of preconcentration, the types of interferences that can be expected and ways to reduce them, and the types of ICP plasmas that are used. The second half of the volume covers fundamental studies of ICP-AES: basic processes of aerosol generation, plasma modeling and computer simulation, spectroscopic diagnostics, excitation mechanisms, and discharge characteristics. This section introduces the experimental and modeling methods that have been used to obtain fundamental information about ICPs

  3. Photo-Geomorphology of Coastal Landforms, Cat Island, Bahamas. Volume II,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report provides the aerial imagery used in the analysis of the coastal landforms of Cat Island in the east-central Bahama Islands. Interpretive...published volume Coastal Landform of Cat Island, Bahamas: A Study of Holocene Accretionary Topography and Sea-Level Change but may also serve as an

  4. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME II: PROCESS OVERVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume presents initial results of a study to identify the issues and barriers associated with retrofitting existing solvent-based equipment to accept waterbased adhesives as part of an EPA effort to improve equipment cleaning in the coated and laminated substrate manufactur...

  5. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase I report. Volume II. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1977-10-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) baseline large module time estimates, (2) baseline intermediate module time estimates, (3) baseline small module time estimates, (4) alternate concept estimates, (5) maintenance equipment concepts, (6) additional reactor design definition, and (7) TOCOMO supplements

  6. A DDC Bibliography on Computers in Information Sciences. Volume II. Information Sciences Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The unclassified and unlimited bibliography compiles references dealing specifically with the role of computers in information sciences. The volume contains 239 annotated references grouped under three major headings: Artificial and Programming Languages, Computer Processing of Analog Data, and Computer Processing of Digital Data. The references…

  7. Engineering Drawing Practices - Volume I of II: Aerospace and Ground Support Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual establishes the essential requirements and reference documents for the preparation and revision of digital product definition data sets prepared for or by NASA at KSC. This volume is only applicable to KSC in-house programs/projects. These requirements do not apply to the preparation of illustrations, artwork, or figures in technical publications.

  8. Communications Strategies on Alcohol and Highway Safety. Volume II. High School Youth. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey Advertising, Inc., New York, NY.

    The second part of a two-part, two volume study deals with high school youth and identifies target populations and communications strategies for encouraging personal action steps to prevent drunk driving. Data, collected from interviews and questionnaires, are summarized and presented in tabular form. One fourth of high schoolers in a…

  9. Technical Reports (Part II). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information System of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center funded by a Title III grant under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. These reports demonstrate the use of the stored data; methods of interpreting the printouts from…

  10. Systems Book for a Student Information System. End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The necessary handbooks for use of the Student Information System (SIS), developed and tested by the Western Nevada Regional Education Center under a 1968-71 Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant, are presented in this volume. As noted, the purpose of the SIS is to supply data and information to persons or organizations who make…

  11. Industrial Special Wastes Generated in Iowa and Manpower Characteristics of Employee Handlers, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David R.

    This document, Vol. II in a set, presents the results of the development and instruction of two pilot modules. The first module deals with pesticide container recycling. The second module deals with hazardous substances, especially paints and solvents. Each module contains background information, instructor narrative, student activities, and…

  12. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, Volume II, Number 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Lewis B., Ed.

    1971-01-01

    The six articles presented in this journal are: I. Research in Action: The Transfer of Research in Music and Music Education into the Classroom by Jack R. Stephenson; II. Programmed Instruction and Music Education by Douglas L. Turpin; III. Music Education and the Blind by Joan Thief Gagnepain; IV. Improved Teaching Through the Use of the…

  13. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 1, 1. 0 Introduction; 2. 0 plasma engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II tokamak test reactor. Specific topics discussed are the physics objectives for Tiber, magnetics, baseline operating point, pulsed inductive operation, edge physics and impurity control, fueling, disruption control, vertical stability and impurity flow reversal. (LSP)

  14. The Experience of Soviet Medicine in World War II 1941-1945. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-25

    countries. The low percentage of neuropsychological patients in the Soviet Army is evidence of the achievements of pre- war years of the Soviet people...unsplinted 269 I I II I fracture did not bother them. To the question of the physician about =npn.aints, they most often pointed out hunger . As early

  15. Adsorption of Cu(II) on Oxidized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Presence of Hydroxylated and Carboxylated Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Zhan; Li, Shicheng; Qi, Wei; Liu, Peng; Liu, Fuqiang; Ye, Yuanlv; Wu, Liansheng; Wang, Lei; Wu, Wangsuo

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of Cu(II) on oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs) as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and hydroxylated fullerene (C60(OH)n) and carboxylated fullerene (C60(C(COOH)2)n) were studied under ambient conditions using batch techniques. The results showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) had rapidly reached equilibrium and the kinetic process was well described by a pseudo-second-order rate model. Cu(II) adsorption on oMWCNTs was dependent on pH but independent of ionic strength. Compared with the Freundlich model, the Langmuir model was more suitable for analyzing the adsorption isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from temperature-dependent adsorption isotherms suggested that Cu(II) adsorption on oMWCNTs was spontaneous and endothermic. The effect of C60(OH)n on Cu(II) adsorption of oMWCNTs was not significant at low C60(OH)n concentration, whereas a negative effect was observed at higher concentration. The adsorption of Cu(II) on oMWCNTs was enhanced with increasing pH values at pH adsorption of Cu(II) onto oMWCNTs at pH 4–6. The double sorption site model was applied to simulate the adsorption isotherms of Cu(II) in the presence of C60(OH)n and fitted the experimental data well. PMID:24009683

  16. Quantitative analysis of O-2 and Fe2+ profiles in gradient tubes for cultivation of microaerophilic Iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueder, U.; Druschel, G.; Emerson, D.

    2018-01-01

    The classical approach for the cultivation of neutrophilic microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria is agar-based gradient tubes where these bacteria find optimal growth conditions in opposing gradients of oxygen (O-2) and dissolved Fe(II) (Fe2+). The goals of this study were to quantify...... imply that transfer of cultures to fresh tubes within 48-72 h is crucial to provide optimal growth conditions for microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizers, particularly for the isolation of new strains....

  17. IGF-II promotes neuroprotection and neuroplasticity recovery in a long-lasting model of oxidative damage induced by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Montañez, E; Millon, C; Boraldi, F; Garcia-Guirado, F; Pedraza, C; Lara, E; Santin, L J; Pavia, J; Garcia-Fernandez, M

    2017-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a naturally occurring hormone that exerts neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases and ageing. Accumulating evidence suggests that the effects of IGF-II in the brain may be explained by its binding to the specific transmembrane receptor, IGFII/M6P receptor (IGF-IIR). However, relatively little is known regarding the role of IGF-II through IGF-IIR in neuroprotection. Here, using adult cortical neuronal cultures, we investigated whether IGF-II exhibits long-term antioxidant effects and neuroprotection at the synaptic level after oxidative damage induced by high and transient levels of corticosterone (CORT). Furthermore, the involvement of the IGF-IIR was also studied to elucidate its role in the neuroprotective actions of IGF-II. We found that neurons treated with IGF-II after CORT incubation showed reduced oxidative stress damage and recovered antioxidant status (normalized total antioxidant status, lipid hydroperoxides and NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase activity). Similar results were obtained when mitochondria function was analysed (cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and subcellular mitochondrial distribution). Furthermore, neuronal impairment and degeneration were also assessed (synaptophysin and PSD-95 expression, presynaptic function and FluoroJade B® stain). IGF-II was also able to recover the long-lasting neuronal cell damage. Finally, the effects of IGF-II were not blocked by an IGF-IR antagonist, suggesting the involvement of IGF-IIR. Altogether these results suggest that, in or model, IGF-II through IGF-IIR is able to revert the oxidative damage induced by CORT. In accordance with the neuroprotective role of the IGF-II/IGF-IIR reported in our study, pharmacotherapy approaches targeting this pathway may be useful for the treatment of diseases associated with cognitive deficits (i.e., neurodegenerative disorders, depression, etc

  18. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  19. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  20. Mg II ABSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF A VOLUME-LIMITED SAMPLE OF GALAXIES AT z ∼ 0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Cooke, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    We present an initial survey of Mg II absorption characteristics in the halos of a carefully constructed, volume-limited subsample of galaxies embedded in the spectroscopic part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We observed quasars near sightlines to 20 low-redshift (z ∼ 0.1), luminous (M r + 5log h ≤-20.5) galaxies in SDSS DR4 and DR6 with the LRIS-B spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The primary systematic criteria for the targeted galaxies are a redshift z ∼> 0.1 and the presence of an appropriate bright background quasar within a projected 75 h -1 kpc of its center, although we preferentially sample galaxies with lower impact parameters and slightly more star formation within this range. Of the observed systems, six exhibit strong (W eq (2796) ≥ 0.3 A) Mg II absorption at the galaxy's redshift, six systems have upper limits which preclude strong Mg II absorption, while the remaining observations rule out very strong (W eq (2796) ≥ 1-2 A) absorption. The absorbers fall at higher impact parameters than many non-absorber sightlines, indicating a covering fraction f c ∼ -1 kpc (f c ∼ 0.25). The data are consistent with a possible dependence of covering fraction and/or absorption halo size on the environment or star-forming properties of the central galaxy.

  1. Kempe's engineers year-book for 1977. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prockter, C.E. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The second volume of this two-volume yearbook contains data on: electrical and electronic engineering; aerodynamics and aircraft propulsion; gas turbines; internal combustion engines; motor vehicles; fuels; fluidics; nuclear energy; gas and gas engineering; steam engineering and steam turbines; marine diesel engines; naval architecture; mining engineering; industrial explosives; air compression, pneumatic equipment, etc.; refrigeration, heating, ventilation and air conditioning; lighting; industrial safety and protection; fire protection; highway engineering; surveying; foundation and earthwork; cements, mortars and clay products; buildings; public health engineering; concretes; design of steel structures; bridges and bridgework; paints and coatings; patents, designs and trade marks; depreciation; legal notes for engineers; factory planning and layout; and agricultural engineering. (1325p.) A subject index is provided. (LCL)

  2. COOMET.RI(II)-S1.Rn-222 (169/UA/98): Rn-222 volume activity comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skliarov, V.; Rottger, A.; Honig, A.; Korostin, S.; Kuznetsov, S.; Lapenas, A.; Milevsky, V.; Ivaniukovich, A.; Kharitonov, I.; Sepman, S.

    2009-01-01

    According to a first program, a supplementary comparison of Rn-222 volume activity was drawn up as a bilateral supplementary comparison between NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and VNIIFTRI, Russia. It took place in March 2005. In April 2005, at the 5. meeting of COOMET held in Braunschweig (Germany), representatives of these institutes exchanged data which showed the comparability of the national standards of Ukraine and Russia for the check points. During the discussion of the procedure some other institutes decided to join the comparison program, which was extended to BelGIM (Belarus), PTB (Germany), VNIIM (Russia) and RMTC (Latvia). The national standards of volume activity of radon-222 were thus calibrated using one standard radon radiometer as the transfer standard. Results are shown in the Final Report of the comparison. (authors)

  3. COOMET.RI(II)-S1.Rn-222 (169/UA/98): Rn-222 volume activity comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarov, V. [National Scientific Centre, Institute of Metrology (NSC IM), Kharkiv (Ukraine); Rottger, A.; Honig, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany); Korostin, S.; Kuznetsov, S. [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Physical, Technical and Radio Measurements (VNIIFTRI), Moscow Region, Mendeleyevo (Russian Federation); Lapenas, A. [Latvian National Metrology Centre Ltd, Radiation Metrology and Testing Centre (RMTC), Salaspils (Latvia); Milevsky, V.; Ivaniukovich, A. [Belarussian State Institute of Metrology (BelGIM), Minsk (Belarus); Kharitonov, I.; Sepman, S. [D I Mendeleyev Institute of metrology (VNIIM), Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    According to a first program, a supplementary comparison of Rn-222 volume activity was drawn up as a bilateral supplementary comparison between NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and VNIIFTRI, Russia. It took place in March 2005. In April 2005, at the 5. meeting of COOMET held in Braunschweig (Germany), representatives of these institutes exchanged data which showed the comparability of the national standards of Ukraine and Russia for the check points. During the discussion of the procedure some other institutes decided to join the comparison program, which was extended to BelGIM (Belarus), PTB (Germany), VNIIM (Russia) and RMTC (Latvia). The national standards of volume activity of radon-222 were thus calibrated using one standard radon radiometer as the transfer standard. Results are shown in the Final Report of the comparison. (authors)

  4. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  5. Cultural Resources Investigations at Redstone Arsenal, Madison County, Alabama. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    was an infant or child . Parts of broken pottery vessels were found with two of the burials. I As mentioned above, ceramics were relatively infrequent...ai-j- IL is also due to a certain amiount of I tI ’rt ie 1(a ao -- tilit- iV! t-ri i process does not porn i t an extant I ii tfel to !, -,I) Ip it

  6. Preventive Medicine in World War II. Volume 7. Communicable Diseases. Arthropodborne other than Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    in Peru or in other countries. In Ecuador , bartonellosis has l»een report«! from the Provinces of Loja and Oro. This author " cultivated...fatal, caused by BartoneUa baciUiformis and transmitted by the bite of Phlebotomies. The dis- ease is limited to certain parts of Peru, Ecuador , and...Colombia. The disease was not a military problem in World War II. American troops stationed in Peru (Talara) and Ecuador (Salinas) were outside the

  7. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  8. Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This document, Volume 2, provides the inventory of waste addressed in this Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The inventories consist of waste from the following four groups: (1) Tank waste; (2) Cesium (Cs) and Strontium (Sr) capsules; (3) Inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs); and (4) Anticipated future tank waste additions. The major component by volume of the overall waste is the tank waste inventory (including future tank waste additions). This component accounts for more than 99 percent of the total waste volume and approximately 70 percent of the radiological activity of the four waste groups identified previously. Tank waste data are available on a tank-by-tank basis, but the accuracy of these data is suspect because they primarily are based on historical records of transfers between tanks rather than statistically based sampling and analyses programs. However, while the inventory of any specific tank may be suspect, the overall inventory for all of the tanks combined is considered more accurate. The tank waste inventory data are provided as the estimated overall chemical masses and radioactivity levels for the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The tank waste inventory data are broken down into tank groupings or source areas that were developed for analyzing groundwater impacts

  9. Sonochemical synthesis and photocatalytic property of zinc oxide nanoparticles doped with magnesium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xianyong; Liu, Zhaoyue; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by sonochemical strategy. → Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles present good photocatalytic properties. → The change of band gap contributes to their high efficiency in photocatalyst. -- Abstract: Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by sonochemical method. The products were characterized by scan electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). SEM images revealed that ZnO doped with Mg(II) nanoparticles and ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the same strategy all had spherical topography. XRD patterns showed that the doped nanoparticles had the same crystals structures as the pure ZnO nanoparticles. The Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles had larger lattice volume than the un-doped nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) not only demonstrated the moral ratio of Mg and Zn element on the surface of nanoparticles, but their valence in nanoparticles as well. The Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles presented good properties in photocatalyst compared with pure ZnO nanoparticles.

  10. Applicability of anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbo; Carlson, Han K; Coates, John D

    2013-08-06

    Microbial processes that produce solid-phase minerals could be judiciously applied to modify rock porosity with subsequent alteration and improvement of floodwater sweep in petroleum reservoirs. However, there has been little investigation of the application of this to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we investigate a unique approach of altering reservoir petrology through the biogenesis of authigenic rock minerals. This process is mediated by anaerobic chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms that precipitate iron minerals from the metabolism of soluble ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) coupled to the reduction of nitrate. This mineral biogenesis can result in pore restriction and reduced pore throat diameter. Advantageously and unlike biomass plugs, these biominerals are not susceptible to pressure or thermal degradation. Furthermore, they do not require continual substrate addition for maintenance. Our studies demonstrate that the biogenesis of insoluble iron minerals in packed-bed columns results in effective hydrology alteration and homogenization of heterogeneous flowpaths upon stimulated microbial Fe(2+) biooxidation. We also demonstrate almost 100% improvement in oil recovery from hydrocarbon-saturated packed-bed columns as a result of this metabolism. These studies represent a novel departure from traditional microbial EOR approaches and indicate the potential for nitrate-dependent Fe(2+) biooxidation to improve volumetric sweep efficiency and enhance both the quality and quantity of oil recovered.

  11. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-12-01

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as

  12. Hydrolysis of bis(dimethylamido)tin to tin (II) oxyhydroxide and its selective transformation into tin (II) or tin (IV) oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-03-01

    Sn6O4(OH)4, a hydrolysis product of Sn(NMe2)2, is transformed to tin (II) or tin (IV) oxide by solid and solution phase processing. Tin (II) oxide is formed by heating Sn6O4(OH)4 at ≤200 °C in air or under inert atmosphere. Tin (IV) oxide nanoparticles are formed in the presence of a carboxylic acid and base in air at room temperature. IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (coupled with infrared spectroscopy), powder X-ray diffraction, high temperature X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy are used for the characterization of Sn6O4(OH)4 and the investigation of its selective decomposition into SnO or SnO2. Spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction results indicate that SnO is formed by the removal of water from crystalline Sn6O4(OH)4. SEM shows octahedral morphology of the Sn6O4(OH)4, SnO and SnO2 with particle size from 400 nm-2 μm during solid state conversion. Solution phase transformation of Sn6O4(OH)4 to SnO2 occurs in the presence of potassium glutarate and oxygen. SnO2 particles are 15-20 nm in size.

  13. Oxidation of cyclic amines by molybdenum(II and tungsten(II halocarbonyls, [M(CO4X2]2 (M = Mo, W; X = Cl, Br

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Mbuvi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The molybdenum(II and tungsten(II halocarbonyls, [M(CO4X2]2 (M = Mo, W; X = Cl, Br react with a large excess of the nitrogen bases, 1-methylpyrrolidine, 1-methylpiperidine, 1-ethylpiperidine and 2-ethylpiperidine to give aminecarbonyl complexes of the type M(CO3L3 (L= alkylamine. Excess piperidine reacts with the tungsten halocarbonyls, [W(CO4X2]2 (X = Cl, Br, to give the trans isomer of the complex, W(CO3(C5H11N3. The halogens were recovered as the amminium salts, amine, HX. The oxidized amine dimerized to form a yellow product which was recovered as an oily liquid but in very small amounts. However, in the reaction between Mo(CO4Br2 and 1-ethylpiperidine, a yellow crystalline solid, with a melting point of 224 oC was recovered in sufficient amounts for elemental analysis, melting point and spectral data. Its mass spectrum showed a molecular ion peak at m+/z = 222, a clear evidence that the oxidized amine dimerizes. The cyclic dibasic amine piperazine, C4H10N2 is not, however, oxidized by these halocarbonyls but rather it reacts by substituting some CO groups to form products of the type, M(CO3(C4H10N22X2 (M = Mo, W; X = Cl, Br. Products were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry.

  14. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  15. Nitric oxide and bcl-2 mediated the apoptosis induced by nickel(II) in human T hybridoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Fuqin; Zhang Dongmei; Wang Xinchang; Chen Junhui

    2007-01-01

    Although effects of nickel(II) on the immune system have long been recognized, little is known about the effects of nickel(II) on the induction of apoptosis and related signaling events in T cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles and signaling pathways of nickel(II) in the induction of apoptosis in a human T cell line jurkat. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of Ni involved significant morphological changes and chromosomal condensation (Hoechst 33258 staining). Analyses of hypodiploid cells and FITC-Annexin V and PI double staining showed significant increase of apoptosis in jurkat cells 6, 12 and 24 h after nickel(II) treatment. Flow cytometry analysis also revealed that the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) occurred concomitantly with the onset of NiCl 2 -induced apoptosis. Induction of apoptotic cell death by nickel was mediated by reduction of bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, nickel stimulated the generation of nitric oxide (NO). These results suggest that nickel(II) chloride induces jurkat cells apoptosis via nitric oxide generation, mitochondrial depolarization and bcl-2 suppression

  16. Comparative study of the influence of antimony oxide additives (III) and nickel hydroxide (II) on electrochemical behavior of cadmium electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadnikova, N.V.; Lvova, L.A.; Ryabskaya, I.A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparative study of the influence of additives indicated that with partial or complete replacement in the active mass of the cadmium electrode of nickel hydroxide (II) by antimony oxide (III), the electrochemical characteristics do not significantly change. During prolonged storage of charged cadmium electrodes the presence of nickel hydroxide (II) and intermetal compound (IMC) of cadmium with nickel is formed and the specific surface increases. In the case of adding antimony (III) formation of noticeable quantities of IMC of cadmium with antimony is not observed. The specific surface is reduced during storage.

  17. Subseabed Disposal Program Plan. Volume II. FY80 budget and subtask work plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume of the Subseabed Disposal Program Plan presents a breakdown of the master program structure by major activity. Each activity is described and accompanied by a specific cost plan schedule and a milestone plan. The costs have been compiled in the Cost Plan Schedules attached to each Subtask Work Plan. The FY 1980 budget for the Subseabed Disposal Program is summarized at the second level of the Work Breakdown Structure. The milestone plans for FY 80 are presented. The milestones can be changed only with the concurrence of the Sandia Subseabed Program Manager

  18. Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project. Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Report/Statement II. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Fueled 7,634,0(X) 51 Geothermal 1,302,M(K) 9 Nuclear 2,160,(MX) 14 Total Thermal 11,096,(kM) 74 Hydroelectric 3,877,M(X) 26 Solar 0 0t Total Company...Nuclear 16,273,963 17 "Total Thermal 48,094,316 50 Hydroelectric 8,007,631 8 Solar 35 0 Total Company Generation 56,101,982 58 Helms Pumpback Energy...returnable beverage containers, prohibition of disposable diapers , and other measures to reduce the volume of the urban solid waste streams. Appeaidix 19-B

  19. Environmental contaminants in food. Volume II-Part B: Working papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains working papers written for Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) to assist in preparation of the report Environmental Contaminants in Food. The contents include: (1) Toxic substances in food information systems: design and management; (2) Assessment of carcinogenic risks from PCBs in food; (3) Economic analysis of alternative action levels in the regulation of environmental contaminants in food; (4) Analysis of foods for radioactivity; (5) Approaches to monitoring environmental contaminants in food; (6) Analytical systems for the determination of metals in food and water supplies; (7) Assessment of methods for regulating 'unavoidable' contaminants in the food supply; and (8) Consumer risk from environmental contaminants in food

  20. Kilowatt isotope power system. Phase II plan. Volume V. Safety, quality assurance and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) was begun in 1975 for the purpose of satisfying the power requirements of satellites in the 1980's. The KIPS is a 238 PuO 2 -fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system to provide a design output of 500 to 2000 W. Included in this volume are: launch and flight safety considerations; quality assurance techniques and procedures to be followed through system fabrication, assembly and inspection; and the reliability program made up of reliability prediction analysis, failure mode analysis and criticality analysis

  1. Structuring polymer blends with bicontinuous phase morphology. Part II. Tailoring blends with ultralow critical volume fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Utracki, Leszek

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis providing a guideline for the development of immiscible polymer blends with co-continuous phase structure at very low critical volume fraction of one component is. postulated and experimentally verified. Based on a number of simplifying assumptions the following relation was derived......: phi(cr) = k(lambdagamma)(1-z)/(theta(b)(*))(z) where lambdagamma is a Deborah number and theta(b)(*) is a dimensionless break-up time. The equation parameters, k and z are constant that depend on the flow field hence on the blending equipment. For the studies an internal mixer with Walzenkneter...

  2. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 2: Ptolemy II Software Architecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    file (EPS) suitable for inclusion in word processors. The image in figure 7.3 is such an EPS file imported into FrameMaker . At this time, the EPS...can be imported into word processors. This figure was imported into FrameMaker . 152 Ptolemy II Plot Package 7.2.4 Modifying the format You can control...FixToken class 57 FrameMaker 149 full name 4 function closures 59 function dependency 48 FunctionDependency class 48 FunctionToken 122 FunctionToken

  3. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Biological Resources Survey, Dry Lake Valley, Nevada. Volume II, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    years ago; the transplant was considered unsuccessful. Sagebrush is the principal item in the diet of adult sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), and...canyon areas in the normal chukar partridge range but can also extend its range to areas too dry for the chukar. The transplant was not con- sidered...determined. - Ertee E-TR-48-II-I SSL1’N SL xx- C - - _ 0S91’ - - I. 009t N - - 0’J o,, s). N, - . ,o 09 -SW,- - - ,o T z X -4 oseo 0L91 - N - = - ozot ma

  4. The effect of Ca2+ ions and ionic strength on Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese(IV) oxides, believed to form primarily through microbial activities, are extremely important mineral phases in marine environments where they scavenge a variety of trace elements and thereby control their distributions. The presence of various ions common in seawater are known to influence Mn oxide mineralogy yet little is known about the effect of these ions on the kinetics of bacterial Mn(II) oxidation and Mn oxide formation. We examined factors affecting bacterial Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1 in natural and artificial seawater of varying ionic conditions. Ca2+ concentration dramatically affected Mn(II) oxidation, while Mg2+, Sr2+, K+, Na+ and NO3- ions had no effect. The rate of Mn(II) oxidation at 10 mM Ca2+ (seawater composition) was four or five times that without Ca2+. The relationship between Ca2+ content and oxidation rate demonstrates that the equilibrium constant is small (on the order of 0.1) and the binding coefficient is 0.5. The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation changed depending on the amount of Ca2+ present, suggesting that Ca2+ exerts a direct effect on the enzyme perhaps as a stabilizing bridge between polypeptide components. We also examined the effect of varying concentrations of NaCl or KNO3 (0-2000 mM) on the kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation in solutions containing 10 mM Ca2+. Mn(II) oxidation was unaffected by changes in ionic strength (I) below 0.2, but it was inhibited by increasing salt concentrations above this value. Our results suggest that the critical coagulation concentration is around 200 mM of salt (I = ca. 0.2), and that the ionic strength of seawater (I > 0.2) accelerates the precipitation of Mn oxides around the spores. Under these conditions, the aggregation of Mn oxides reduces the supply of dissolved O2 and/or Mn2+ and inhibits the Mn(II) → Mn(III) step controlling the enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II). Our results suggest that the hardness and ionic strength of the aquatic environment

  5. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua G Choudhury

    Full Text Available The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS (a bacterial endotoxin, and (b to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted

  6. Genetic Targeting of Arginase-II in Mouse Prevents Renal Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Rajapakse, Angana; Xiong, Yuyan; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Verrey, François; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced levels of the L-arginine:ureahydrolase, including the two isoenzymes arginase-I (Arg-I) and arginase-II (Arg-II) in vascular endothelial cells promote uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), leading to increased superoxide radical anion and decreased NO production thereby endothelial dysfunction. Arg-II but not Arg-I is abundantly expressed in kidney and the role of Arg-II in CKD is uncertain and controversial. We aimed to investigate the role of Arg-II in renal damage associated with diet-induced obesity mouse model. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in Arg-II gene (Arg-II -/- ) were fed with either a normal chow (NC) or a high-fat-diet (HFD) for 14 weeks (starting at the age of 7 weeks) to induce obesity. In WT mice, HFD feeding caused frequent renal lipid accumulation, enhancement of renal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels which could be attenuated by a NOS inhibitor, suggesting uncoupling of NOS in kidney. HFD feeding also significantly augmented renal Arg-II expression and activity. All the alterations in the kidney under HFD feeding were reduced in Arg-II -/- mice. Moreover, mesangial expansion as analyzed by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and renal expression of vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in HFD-fed WT mouse assessed by immunoblotting were reduced in the HFD-fed Arg-II -/- mice, although there was no significant difference in body weight and renal weight/body weight ratio between the WT and Arg-II -/- mice. Thus, Arg-II expression/activity is enhanced in kidney of diet-induced obesity mice. Genetic targeting of Arg-II prevents renal damage associated with obesity, suggesting an important role of Arg-II in obesity-associated renal disease development.

  7. Genetic Targeting of Arginase-II in Mouse Prevents Renal Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diet-Induced Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced levels of the L-arginine:ureahydrolase, including the two isoenzymes arginase-I (Arg-I and arginase-II (Arg-II in vascular endothelial cells promote uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, leading to increased superoxide radical anion and decreased NO production thereby endothelial dysfunction. Arg-II but not Arg-I is abundantly expressed in kidney and the role of Arg-II in CKD is uncertain and controversial. We aimed to investigate the role of Arg-II in renal damage associated with diet-induced obesity mouse model. Wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in Arg-II gene (Arg-II-/- were fed with either a normal chow (NC or a high-fat-diet (HFD for 14 weeks (starting at the age of 7 weeks to induce obesity. In WT mice, HFD feeding caused frequent renal lipid accumulation, enhancement of renal ROS levels which could be attenuated by a NOS inhibitor, suggesting uncoupling of NOS in kidney. HFD feeding also significantly augmented renal Arg-II expression and activity. All the alterations in the kidney under HFD feeding were reduced in Arg-II-/- mice. Moreover, mesangial expansion as analysed by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS staining and renal expression of vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 in HFD-fed WT mouse assessed by immunoblotting were reduced in the HFD-fed Arg-II-/- mice, although there was no significant difference in body weight and renal weight/body weight ratio between the WT and Arg-II-/- mice. Thus, Arg-II expression/activity is enhanced in kidney of diet-induced obesity mice. Genetic targeting of Arg-II prevents renal damage associated with obesity, suggesting an important role of Arg-II in obesity-associated renal disease development.

  8. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  9. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  10. Amidines for versatile ruthenium(II)-catalyzed oxidative C-H activations with internal alkynes and acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; John, Michael; Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-04-25

    Cationic ruthenium complexes derived from KPF6 or AgOAc enabled efficient oxidative CH functionalizations on aryl and heteroaryl amidines. Thus, oxidative annulations of diversely decorated internal alkynes provided expedient access to 1-aminoisoquinolines, while catalyzed C-H activations with substituted acrylates gave rise to structurally novel 1-iminoisoindolines. The powerful ruthenium(II) catalysts displayed a remarkably high site-, regio- and, chemoselectivity. Therefore, the catalytic system proved tolerant of a variety of important electrophilic functional groups. Detailed mechanistic studies provided strong support for the cationic ruthenium(II) catalysts to operate by a facile, reversible C-H activation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposl of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type.Volume II is an integral part of the Office of Environmental Management''s (EM''s) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS), which portrays the impacts of EM''s waste management activities at each of the 17 major DOE sites evaluated in the WM PEIS

  12. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Bae [The Division of Cardiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changsoo [The Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eunmi [Cardiovascular Research Institute and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung [The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Chun [The Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ki-Chul [Cardiovascular Research Institute and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Boyoung, E-mail: cby6908@yuhs.ac [The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  13. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  14. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Huan, Shuang-Yan [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  15. PDC 2016. Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference - Volume II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Participatory Design in an Era of Participation : Introduction to volume 2 Participatory Design is a diverse collection of principles and practices aimed at making technologies, tools, environments, businesses and social institutions more responsive to human needs. A central tenet of Participatory...... is ‘Participatory Design in an Era of Participation’. Over 25 years after the first PDC in 1990, participation and co-creation have become essential features of design and research into technology. Living in an era of participation prompts critical questions around the goals and practices of involving people....... • In “Expanding the ‘How’ of Participatory Design”, five papers provide insights into techniques and methods that support novel perspectives on how participatory design activities might be practiced or reflected upon. This includes examples that should benefit practitioners and researchers who wish to think...

  16. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume I: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify design features of fusion power reactors which contribute to the achievement of high levels of maintainability. Volume 1, the Executive Summary, presents the progress achieved toward this objective in this phase and includes a comparison with the results of the first phase study efforts. A series of maintainability design guidelines and an improved maintenance system are defined as initial steps in developing the requirements for a maintainable tokamak fusion power system. The principle comparative studies that are summarized include the determination of the benefits of various vacuum wall arrangements, the effect of unscheduled and scheduled maintenance of the first wall/blanket, some initial investigation of maintenance required for subsystems other than the first wall/blanket, and the impact of maintenance equipment failures

  17. The acid digestion process for radioactive waste: The radioactive waste management series. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecille, L.; Simon, R.

    1983-01-01

    This volume focuses on the acid digestion process for the treatment of alpha combustible solid waste by presenting detailed performance figures for the principal sub-assemblies of the Alona pilot plant, Belgium. Experience gained from the operation of the US RADTU plant, the only other acid digestion pilot plant, is also summarized, and the performances of these two plants compared. In addition, the research and development programmes carried out or supported by the Commission of the European Communities are reviewed, and details of an alternative to acid digestion for waste contamination described. Topics considered include review of the treatment of actinides-bearing radioactive wastes; alpha waste arisings in fuel fabrication; Alona Demonstration Facility for the acid digestion process at Eurochemic Mol (Belgium); the treatment of alpha waste at Eurochemic by acid digestion-feed pretreatment and plutonium recovery; US experience with acid digestion of combustible transuranic waste; and The European Communities R and D actions on alpha waste

  18. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  19. In situ leaching of a nuclear rubblized copper ore body. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This volume contains detailed descriptions of technical and economical evaluations undertaken for the feasibility study. A summary of these results can be found in Vol. 1 along with the conclusions derived from the feasibility study and the recommendations tendered for future work. The sections of this study are presented in process order, and each section is complete in itself. The form of the presentation, hopefully, is logical and in a manner suitable for design purposes. As a further aid, each section has its own table of contents. The sections presented include method of attack, reference case, description of concept, nuclear rubblization, blasting plan, underground plumbing, fluid circulation, leaching technology, wellhead plant and pipeline, process plant, material and heat balance, hydrology, radioactivity, seismic, economics, sensitivity analysis, guide for environmental studies, exploration, and recommended experimental program. (U.S.)

  20. Automating the Exchange of Military Personnel Data Among Selected Army Organizations. Volume II. Appendices,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    w OO Id Sa f3 c c c o AJ -0h C CU 0 L -A- V)’ 0~ uiZ~u ’ w ii C 1a. b. % US %0 0 U4 4 ~ c 0C - = 0 IC a.4 0 0. 0~ 0 >00 ~C U a -60 A f 0 C3T...O 0 o’’ " - _0 3.. T5 4c( #j r. 0 < E C, -. .0 cc1 ,-, ;, 0. .- 0 ". a - c- r-. w 0 . .4 -4 f .%d 00 U a W W)w 44 0 ,U " 0 0 C) Z C4 W oa OC > acCA . 0

  1. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume II, Chapter 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Operations in Tech Area IV commenced in 1980 with the construction of Buildings 980 and 981 and the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator, which at the time was a major facility in SNL's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. The Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator was a third-generation fusion accelerator that followed Proto I and Proto II, which were operated in Tech Area V. Another accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, was constructed in Tech Area IV because there was not enough room in Tech Area V, a highly restricted area that contains SNL's reactor facilities. In the early 1980s, more fusion-related facilities were constructed in Tech Area IV. Building 983 was built to house a fourth-generation fusion accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, now called Z Machine, and Buildings 960 and 961 were built to house office space, electrical and mechanical laboratories, and highbay space for pulsed power research and development. In the mid 1980s, Building 970 was constructed to house the Simulation Technology Laboratory. The main facility in the Simulation Technology Laboratory is the High-Energy Radiation Megavolt Electron Source (HERMES) III, a third-generation gamma ray accelerator that is used primarily for the simulation of gamma rays produced by nuclear weapons. The previous generations, HERMES I and HERMES II, had been located in Tech Area V. In the late 1980s, Proto II was moved from Tech Area V to the Simulation Technology Laboratory and modified to function as an x-ray simulation accelerator, and construction of Buildings 962 and 963 began. These buildings comprised the Strategic Defense Facility, which was initially intended to support the nation's Strategic Defense Initiative or ''Star Wars'' program. It was to house a variety of pulsed power-related facilities to conduct research in such areas as directed-energy weapons (electron beams, lasers, and microwaves) and an earth-to-orbit launcher. With the reduction of the Strategic Defense

  2. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  3. New York City Police Department Automated Fuel Monitoring System. Volume II. Documentation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-16

    toward solving troublesome problems. In addition, the private sector market has been stimulated to respond to system needs identified during the course of...8 -3Q .ifL I.N’ p uii3NLIE- __-U3 7/11 Ud-.i T01 LNI TERM ON-LN 151 071 328- ______ 33N.________ -~R~ NLINE 2141 53 07/11 16-ttl 145 INS TERM ON-LINE...4Z-46 131 LN4 TERM NLINE --3o56a 55 O7ALL-ZU _1 L. N ~Ii8ILON-~ik 1559 53 01/17 eZ-4.8 137 INN TERM4 ON-LINE " . " - 7 - M -1 ------------- - . 7 .Dm

  4. Production Systems as a Programming Language for Artificial Intelligence Applications. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    CUETR1PLE(’ PiM -1,CI,’XX,’XX); This means: "if letter-I is R, then emit cue P and image DUNNO." Note that the LHS test is in two parts, testing the...Il) (IZ 110(31116 (rpEto PI-il (IMM POP$ (CIETPIRLE Mi-i NX XX XXI rvzt ! ni. ti-s ’SriII Otte ISs. ri-S ’S11f FIPE’ USING1 (SlIMEtl LI-I Li-I LI-I...MAi0OfWSENOAVl. *0 l’G(PM) I TACE IN=u P20 06 Otte ’ aMATOWLSVXMOOIOPP) Grp IATONSIM~vgvINV lm.IWMWO) InSAWEQWOI10l a MNT( fI )1s(D7yVSVI) MAIO41S1Ittly 113.111~f

  5. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth.

  6. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; Mourya, B.S.; Krishnamurthi, S.; Meena, R.M.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    The Indian Ridge System basalt bearing Mn-oxide coatings had todorokite as the major and birnesite as the minor mineral. We posit that microorganisms associated with these basalts participate in the oxidation of Mn and contribute to mineral...

  7. Fabrication of the tea saponin functionalized reduced graphene oxide for fast adsorptive removal of Cd(II) from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Liu, Zhifeng; Wu, Zhibin; Zeng, Guangming; Shao, Binbin; Liu, Yujie; Jiang, Yilin; Zhong, Hua; Liu, Yang

    2018-05-01

    A novel graphene-based material of tea saponin functionalized reduced graphene oxide (TS-RGO) was synthesized via a facil thermal method, and it was characterized as the absorbent for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions. The factors on adsorption process including solution pH, contact time, initial concentration of Cd(II) and background electrolyte cations were studied to optimize the conditions for maximum adsorption at room temperature. The results indicated that Cd(II) adsorption was strongly dependent on pH and could be strongly affected by background electrolytes and ionic strength. The optimal pH and required equilibrium time was 6.0 and 10 min, respectively. The Cd(II) removal decreased with the presence of background electrolyte cations (Na+ < Ca2+ < Al3+). The adsorption kinetics of Cd(II) followed well with the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherm fitted well to the Langmuir model, indicating that the adsorption was a monolayer adsorption process occurred on the homogeneous surfaces of TS-RGO. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 127 mg/g at 313 K and pH 6.0. Therefore, the TS-RGO was considered to be a cost-effective and promising material for the removal of Cd(II) from wastewater.

  8. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II-oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer eMIOT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is however thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had however never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidences of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasm encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a strategy of survival in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern

  9. Assessment of the health and environmental effects of power generation in the Midwest. Volume II. Ecological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, A J; Pentecost, E D

    1977-04-01

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six Midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for the period 1975 to 2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. Volume I of the report includes a characterization of the energy demand and siting scenarios, coal related technologies, and coal resources, and the related impacts on air quality, water quality, and human health. Volume II includes background information on the native ecosystems, climate, soils, and agricultural land use and a description of the ecological impacts expected from coal utilization in southern Illinois, which as ecosystems representative of a large segment of the six-state area.

  10. Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

  11. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV 241 Pu and 208-keV 237 U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings

  12. Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of rare earth ternary oxides Li Ln(II) 2 Ln(III)O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malki, M.

    1987-06-01

    Properties of a new class of rare earth ternary oxides Li Ln(II) 2 Ln(III)O 4 where Ln(II) is a divalent metal (Sr, Eu) and Ln(III) a trivalent rare earth (Eu, Gd, Dy, Er and Y). These orthorhombic compounds (type Li Eu 3 O 4 ) allow the study of many magnetic phenomena and their evolution in function of the nature of Ln(II) and Ln(III): diamagnetic ions Sr 2+ , Y 3+ ; isotrope magnetic ions: Eu 2+ , Gd 3+ and anisotrope magnetic ions Dy 3+ , Er 3+ . Magnetic and electric properties are obtained by classical techniques and from hyperfine interaction by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The possibility to use several Moessbauer resonance (nuclei Eu 151, Gd 155, Dy 161 and Er 166) completes informations obtained by the macroscopic study [fr

  13. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) impairs nitric oxide contributing to Angiotensin II-induced cavernosal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Kenia P; Bomfim, Gisele F; Toque, Haroldo A; Szasz, Theodora; Clinton Webb, R

    2017-12-15

    Angiotensin II (AngII), a corpus cavernosum (CC) constrictor peptide, modulates Toll like receptor (TLR) expression, a key element of the innate immune system, contributing to impaired vascular function in pathological conditions. However, it is unknown whether TLR4 is involved in AngII-induced erectile dysfunction. In this study, we investigated whether TLR4 plays a role in cavernosal dysfunction caused by AngII upregulation. Cavernosal smooth muscle cells (CSMC) from C57/BL6 mice were treated with AngII (0.1μM) or bacterial LPS (50ng/ml) for 12-24h and TLR4 expression was assessed. Mice were infused with AngII (90ng/min, 28days) and treated with anti-TLR4 antibody (0.1mg/daily, i.p.) for the last 14days of the treatment. CC tissue was used for functional studies and for Western blotting. Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) activity was measured by conversion of [ 3 H]-l-arginine to [ 3 H]-l-citrulline, systemic TNF-α levels by ELISA, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by immunofluorescence. We report upregulation of TLR4 in CSMC following AngII or LPS stimulation. In AngII-infused mice, chronic treatment with anti-TLR4 antibody (28±2.1%) attenuates adrenergic CC contraction, which also ameliorates nitrergic (68.90±0.21 vs. 51.07±0.63, 8Hz, AngII-infused mice treated vs. non-treated). Decreased endothelial NOS expression, reduced NOS activity, and augmented levels of TNF-α, and ROS were found following AngII-infusion. These alterations were prevented, or at least decreased by anti-TLR4 antibody treatment. Inhibition of TLR4 ameliorates AngII-impaired cavernosal relaxation, decreases TNF-α levels, and restores NO bioavailability, demonstrating that TLR4 partly mediates AngII-induced cavernosal dysfunction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. International Best Practice Basis for Assessing Recovery Operations. Annex II of Technical Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This volume seeks to identify lessons learned related to post-accident recovery that may further improve preparedness worldwide. This objective assessment of the recovery programme is made according to international best practice. In the practice and assessment of radiation and nuclear safety, international best practice is a process or technique that is likely to consistently produce superior results. An important principle is that a ‘best’ practice can evolve to become better as improvements are discovered and lessons are learned from past experience. The lessons to be learned from the recovery programme as it unfolds in Japan will feed back into improving international best practice in post-accident recovery worldwide. Best practice is used to maintain quality and is a component of quality management systems and standards, such as ISO 9000. It is generally regarded as being the most efficient and effective way to accomplish desired outcomes. The body of best practice is used as a benchmark and for self assessment

  16. Study of advanced fission power reactor development for the United States. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of a multi-phase research study which had as its objective the comparative study of various advanced fission reactors and evaluation of alternate strategies for their development in the USA through the year 2020. By direction from NSF, ''advanced'' reactors were defined as those which met the dual requirements of (1) offering a significant improvement in fissile fuel utilization as compared to light-water reactors and (2) currently receiving U.S. Government funding. (A detailed study of the LMFBR was specifically excluded, but cursory baseline data were obtained from ERDA sources.) Included initially were the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Subsequently, the CANDU Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) was included for comparison due to increased interest in its potential. This volume presents the reasoning process and analytical methods utilized to arrive at the conclusions for the overall study

  17. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment

  18. Experimental fusion power reactor conceptual design study. Final report. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1976-12-01

    This document is the final report which describes the work carried out by General Atomic Company for the Electric Power Research Institute on a conceptual design study of a fusion experimental power reactor (EPR) and an overall EPR facility. The primary objective of the two-year program was to develop a conceptual design of an EPR that operates at ignition and produces continuous net power. A conceptual design was developed for a Doublet configuration based on indications that a noncircular tokamak offers the best potential of achieving a sufficiently high effective fuel containment to provide a viable reactor concept at reasonable cost. Other objectives included the development of a planning cost estimate and schedule for the plant and the identification of critical R and D programs required to support the physics development and engineering and construction of the EPR. This volume contains the following sections: (1) reactor components, (2) auxiliary systems, (3) operations, (4) facility design, (5) program considerations, and (6) conclusions and recommendations

  19. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment.

  20. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  2. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Helene Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  3. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume II.- Asturias, Cantabria and Pais Vasco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, C; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Roquero, C.; Magister, M.

    1998-01-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore. an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidades Autonomas de Asturias, Cantabria and Pais Vasco. (Author) 34 refs

  4. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume II, Site Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousand of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  5. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix A. Regulation. Volume II. Coordinated Basic Data and Computer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    F- fta fm~p- ri- a V.- On ;a~V~ I’ .C1A 1" ~ P 0%AJfVtN Q I1’t I O a0 4 . 0 * a C C COO a * a ma. 93 *a Ob fu -E tvvP- fl NurvI M I-Al N Ir-N fuII...NU N4 -4ftfNA fmd .-. - -9 0 0 0r IL 0 w wow 00~ 0Nm(U a 0P.-CM@W aO 0 1.4- 41- &0 M Im -4 & - 40 0 P-0 om fc I- 20o w wwef -4 . aaW4 MMM a-MI- n0 4...O zq~ f-’ W 9 A o a i. po j -4 N NfUfJ .-. AD uw s )LA~L; 4DW L NANI f & ftA DNN W LL) mij 3 z I- -9 9 a -j -z~u nV1 0 ~ OPP~~.N fj- , MD0* n’DCL t cc

  6. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  7. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G eff , is defined by: G eff - Σ M (F M x G M ) F M -fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials

  8. The protonation state around TyrD/TyrD• in photosystem II is reflected in its biphasic oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Ho, Felix; Ahmadova, Nigar; Brinkert, Katharina; Hammarström, Leif; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2017-02-01

    The tyrosine residue D2-Tyr160 (Tyr D ) in photosystem II (PSII) can be oxidized through charge equilibrium with the oxygen evolving complex in PSII. The kinetics of the electron transfer from Tyr D has been followed using time-resolved EPR spectroscopy after triggering the oxidation of pre-reduced Tyr D by a short laser flash. After its oxidation Tyr D is observed as a neutral radical (Tyr D • ) indicating that the oxidation is coupled to a deprotonation event. The redox state of Tyr D was reported to be determined by the two water positions identified in the crystal structure of PSII [Saito et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 7690]. To assess the mechanism of the proton coupled electron transfer of Tyr D the oxidation kinetics has been followed in the presence of deuterated buffers, thereby resolving the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of Tyr D oxidation at different H/D concentrations. Two kinetic phases of Tyr D oxidation - the fast phase (msec-sec time range) and the slow phase (tens of seconds time range) were resolved as was previously reported [Vass and Styring (1991) Biochemistry 30, 830]. In the presence of deuterated buffers the kinetics was significantly slower compared to normal buffers. Furthermore, although the kinetics were faster at both high pH and pD values the observed KIE was found to be similar (~2.4) over the whole pL range investigated. We assign the fast and slow oxidation phases to two populations of PSII centers with different water positions, proximal and distal respectively, and discuss possible deprotonation events in the vicinity of Tyr D . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M; Akob, Denise M.; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  10. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsing eBohu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase (MCO expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS, particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  11. Emissions of Fe(II) and its kinetic of oxidation at Tagoro submarine volcano, El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dávila, M.; Santana-González, C.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The eruptive process that took place in October 2011 in the submarine volcano Tagoro off the Island of El Hierro (Canary Island) and the subsequent degasification stage, five months later, have increased the concentration of TdFe(II) (Total dissolved iron(II)) in the waters nearest to the volcanic edifice. In order to detect any variation in concentrations of TdFe(II) due to hydrothermal emissions, three cruises were carried out two years after the eruptive process in October 2013, March 2014, May 2015, March 2016 and November 2016. The results from these cruises confirmed important positive anomalies in TdFe(II), which coincided with negatives anomalies in pHF,is (pH in free scale, at in situ conditions) located in the proximity of the main cone. Maximum values in TdFe(II) both at the surface, associated to chlorophyll a maximum, and at the sea bottom, were also observed, showing the important influence of organic complexation and particle re-suspension processes. Temporal variability studies were carried out over periods ranging from hours to days in the stations located over the main and two secondary cones in the volcanic edifice with positive anomalies in TdFe(II) concentrations and negative anomalies in pHF,is values. Observations showed an important variability in both pHF,is and TdFe(II) concentrations, which indicated the volcanic area was affected by a degasification process that remained in the volcano after the eruptive phase had ceased. Fe(II) oxidation kinetic studies were also undertaken in order to analyze the effects of the seawater properties in the proximities of the volcano on the oxidation rate constants and t1/2 (half-life time) of ferrous iron. The increased TdFe(II) concentrations and the low associated pHF,is values acted as an important fertilization event in the seawater around the Tagoro volcano at the Island of El Hierro providing optimal conditions for the regeneration of the area.

  12. Seasonal variability of oxidative stress markers in city bus drivers – Part II: Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Švecová, Vlasta; Milcová, Alena; Lněničková, Zdena; Solanský, I.; Šrám, Radim

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 642, 1-2 (2008), s. 21-27 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Air pollution * Oxidative stress * Bus drivers Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  13. Acute Urinary Bladder Distension Triggers ICAM-1-mediated Renal Oxidative Injury via the Norepinephrine–renin–angiotensin II System in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Show-Shing Chen

    2009-08-01

    Conclusion: Acute urinary retention enhances renal sympathetic activity, which causes renal vasoconstriction and increases oxidative stress, adhesion-molecule expression and leukocyte infiltration in the rat kidney via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor pathway.

  14. THE EFFECT OF WATER CAPACITY ON THE ACTIVITY OF PD(II-CU(II CATALYST ANCHORED TO ACID-MODIFIED CLINOPTILOLITE IN THE REACTION OF LOW-TEMPERATURE CARBON MONOXIDE OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Rakitskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The maximum activity of Pd(II-Cu(II catalyst anchored to acid modified clinoptilolite in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen has been found at the water content in the range from 3.3 to 4.2 mmol/g.

  15. Effect of process parameters on removal and recovery of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from electroplating wastewater by fixed-bed column of nano-dimensional titanium (IV) oxide agglomerates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debnath, S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal performances of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from water was investigated using agglomerated nanoparticle of hydrous titanium(IV) oxide (NTO) packed fixed bed. The parameters varied were the bed depth, flow rate and feed solution concentrations...

  16. Oxidation of Cu(II) aminopolycarboxylates by carbonate radical. A flash photolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.C.; Bardhan, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    Reactions of carbonate radical (CO 3 -. ) generated by photolysis or by radiolysis of a carbonate solution, with Cu(II) complexes of aminopolycarboxylic acids viz., Cu(II)ethylenediamine tetraacetate [Cu II EDTA] 2- and Cu(II)-iminodiacetate [Cu II IDA] were studied at pH 10.5 and ionic strength 0.2 mol x dm -3 . Time-resolved spectroscopy and kinetics for the transients were studied using flash photolysis and stable products arising from the ligand degradation of the complex were ascertained by steady-state radiolysis experiments. From the kinetic data it is observed that CO 3 -. radical reacts initially with Cu II -complex to form a transient intermediate having maximum absorption at 335 nm and 430 nm. From the subsequent reactions of this intermediate it was assigned to be Cu III .species. This Cu(III) species undergoes intermolecular electron transfer with the Cu II -complex to give a radical intermediate which again slowly reacts with Cu II -complex to give a long lived species containing Cu-C bond. This long lived species, however, slowly decomposed to give glyoxalic reaction between Cu III -complex and a suitable donor, the one electron reduction potential for [Cu III EDTA] 1- /[Cu II EDTA] 2- and [Cu III IDA] +1 /Cu II IDA was determined. (author)

  17. Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewell, W. J.; Dell' orto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Hayes, T. D.; Leuschner, A. P.; Sherman, D. F.

    1980-04-01

    Earlier studies have shown that although large quantities of agricultural residues are generated on small farms, it was difficult to economically justify use of conventional anaerobic digestion technology, such as used for sewage sludge digestion. A simple, unmixed, earthen-supported structure appeared to be capable of producing significant quantities of biogas at a cost that would make it competitive with many existing fuels. The goal of this study was to define and demonstrate a methane fermentation technology that could be practical and economically feasible on small farms. This study provides the first long term, large scale (reactor volumes of 34 m/sup 3/) parallel testing of the major theory, design, construction, and operation of a low cost approach to animal manure fermentation as compared to the more costly and complex designs. The main objectives were to define the lower limits for successful fermentor operation in terms of mixing, insulation, temperature, feed rate, and management requirements in a cold climate with both pilot scale and full scale fermentors. Over a period of four years, innovative fermentation processes for animal manures were developed from theoretical concept to successful full scale demonstration. Reactors were sized for 50 to 65 dairy animals, or for the one-family dairy size. The results show that a small farm biogas generation system that should be widely applicable and economically feasible was operated successfully for nearly two years. Although this low cost system out-performed the completely mixed unit throughout the study, perhaps the greatest advantage of this approach is its ease of modification, operation, and maintenance.

  18. Microcomputer based program for predicting heat transfer under reactor accident conditions. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.C.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Leung, L.K.H.; Wong, Y.L.; Nguyen, C.

    1987-07-01

    A microcomputer based program called Heat Transfer Prediction Software (HTPS) has been developed. It calculates the heat transfer for tube and bundle geometries for steady state and transient conditions. This program is capable of providing the best estimated of the hot pin temperatures during slow transients for 37- and 28-element CANDU type fuel bundles. The program is designed for an IBM-PC AT/XT (or IBM-PC compatible computer) equipped with a Math Co-processor. The following input parameters are required: pressure, mass flux, hydraulic diameter, and quality. For the steady state case, the critical heat flux (CHF), the critical heat flux temperature, the minimum film boiling temperature, and the minimum film boiling heat flux are the primary outputs. With either the surface heat flux or wall temperature specified, the program determines the heat transfer regime and calculates the surface heat flux, wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient. For the slow transient case, the pressure, mass flux, quality, and volumetric heat generation rate are the time dependent input parameters are required to calculate the hot pin sheath temperatures and surface heat fluxes. A simple routine for generating properties has been developed for light water to support the above program. It contains correlations that have been verified for pressures ranging from 0.6kPa to 30 MPa, and temperatures up to 1100 degrees Celcius. The thermodynamic and transport properties that can be generated from this routine are: density, specific volume, enthalpy, specific heat capacity, conductivity, viscosity, surface tension and Prandtle number for saturated liquid, saturated vapour, subcooled liquid of superheated vapour. A software for predicting flow regime has also been developed. It determines the flow pattern at specific flow conditions, and provides a correction factor for calculating the CHF during partially stratified horizontal flow. The technical bases for the program and its structure

  19. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  1. The effect of long-term, high-volume aerobic exercise training on postprandial lipemia and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Bell, Heather K

    2010-04-01

    We have previously found no effect of moderate-volume aerobic exercise training (approximately 3 hrs*wk(-1)) on postprandial oxidative stress. It is possible that a higher volume of exercise is needed to impact postprandial oxidative stress in young, otherwise healthy individuals. Our purpose was to compare blood triglycerides (TAGs) and oxidative stress biomarkers in 10 healthy untrained and 10 healthy highly aerobically trained (eg, >or= 40 miles running*wk(-1) or >or= 150 miles cycling*wk(-1)) men and women following ingestion of a lipid meal. Blood samples were collected before (in a 10-hour fasted state), and 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after ingestion of a lipid load (heavy whipping cream at 1 g*kg(-1)). Blood samples were analyzed for TAGs, malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and nitrate/nitrite (NOx). No training status or interaction effects were noted for TAGs, MDA, H2O2, or NOx (P > 0.05). However, a time effect was noted for TAGs (P = 0.01), with values higher at 2 hours (67 +/- 6 mg*dL(-1)) compared with premeal (41 +/- 6 mg*dL(-1)). A time effect was also noted for H2O2 (P = 0.0001), with values higher at 2 hours (24 +/- 3 micromol*L(-1)), 4 hours (23 +/- 3 micromol*L(-1)), and 6 hours (21 +/- 3 mumol.L(-1)) compared with premeal (7 +/- 2 micromol*L(-1)). The time effect for MDA approached significance (P = 0.07), with values peaking at 4 hours post-meal (1.59 +/- 0.16 micromol*L(-1)) compared with premeal (0.99 +/- 0.15 micromol*L(-1)). These data indicate that aerobic exercise training (even when performed at a relatively high volume) does not attenuate postprandial lipemia or oxidative stress as compared with no exercise when healthy men and women consume a lipid load in the form of heavy whipping cream. Fasting TAG values may be most important in this regard. It is possible that long-term exercise may be capable of attenuating postprandial lipemia or oxidative stress in older individuals, those with chronic disease, or those with

  2. Ultrasonic synthesis of two new zinc(II) bipyridine coordination polymers: New precursors for preparation of zinc(II) oxide nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Mohammad Jaafar Soltanian; Hayati, Payam; Firoozadeh, Azita; Janczak, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles of two zinc(II) coordination polymers (CPs), [Zn(μ-4,4'-bipy)Cl 2 ] n (1) and [Zn(μ-4,4'-bipy)Br 2 ] n (2) L=bpy=4,4'-bipyridine ligand, have been synthesized by use of a sonochemical process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental analyses. The single crystal X-ray data of compounds 1 and 2 imply that the Zn +2 ions are four coordinated. Topological analysis shows that 1D coordination networks of 1 and 2 can be classified as underlying nets of topological types 2C1. Nanoparticles of zinc(II) oxide have been prepared by calcination of two different zinc (II) CPs at 450°C that were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and IR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Amino siloxane oligomer-linked graphene oxide as an efficient adsorbent for removal of Pb(II) from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Shenglian; Xu, Xiangli; Zhou, Guiyin; Liu, Chengbin; Tang, Yanhong; Liu, Yutang

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A high performance sorbent, oligomer-linked graphene oxide, was prepared by using oligomeric poly3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as crosslinking agents. The sorbent could selectively remove Pb(II) with high adsorption capacity. - Highlights: • Oligomer-linked graphene oxide sharply fattened function groups. • The sorbent exhibited high adsorption capacity toward Pb(II). • Pb, Cu and Fe were selectively removed from smelter industrial effluent. • The sorption could be conducted at a wide pH range of about 4.0–7.0. - Abstract: A high performance sorbent, oligomer-linked graphene oxide (GO) composite, was prepared through simple cross-linking reactions between GO sheets and poly3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (PAS) oligomers as crosslinking agents. The three-dimensional PAS oligomers prevented GO sheets from aggregation, provided foreign molecules with easier access, and introduced a large amount of amino functional groups. The morphology, structure and property of the PAS-GO composite were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourie transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adsorption performance of PAS-GO was investigated in removing Pb(II) ions from water. Compared to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane functionalized GO (AS-GO) which was prepared by the direct reaction between 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and GO, PAS-GO exhibited much higher adsorptivity toward Pb(II) with the maximum adsorption capacity of 312.5 mg/g at 303 K and furthermore the maximum adsorption capacity increased with increasing temperature. The adsorption could be conducted in a wide pH range of 4.0–7.0. Importantly, PAS-GO had a priority tendency to adsorb Pb, Cu and Fe from a mixed solution of metal ions, especially from a practical industrial effluent

  4. Leptin Inhibits the Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Angiotensin II through Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to investigate whether leptin modifies angiotensin (Ang II-induced proliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs from 10-week-old male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO. Methods. NO and NO synthase (NOS activity were assessed by the Griess and 3H-arginine/citrulline conversion assays, respectively. Inducible NOS (iNOS and NADPH oxidase subutnit Nox2 expression was determined by Western-blot. The proliferative responses to Ang II were evaluated through enzymatic methods. Results. Leptin inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferative response of VSMCs from control rats. This inhibitory effect of leptin was abolished by NOS inhibitor, NMMA, and iNOS selective inhibitor, L-NIL, and was not observed in leptin receptor-deficient fa/fa rats. SHR showed increased serum leptin concentrations and lipid peroxidation. Despite a similar leptin-induced iNOS up-regulation, VSMCs from SHR showed an impaired NOS activity and NO production induced by leptin, and an increased basal Nox2 expression. The inhibitory effect of leptin on Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation was attenuated. Conclusion. Leptin blocks the proliferative response to Ang II through NO-dependent mechanisms. The attenuation of this inhibitory effect of leptin in spontaneous hypertension appears to be due to a reduced NO bioavailability in VSMCs.

  5. 3d-4f {Co(II)3Ln(OR)4} Cubanes as Bio-Inspired Water Oxidation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Fabio; Moré, René; Hodel, Florian; Luber, Sandra; Patzke, Greta Ricarda

    2015-09-02

    Although the {CaMn4O5} oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II is a major paradigm for water oxidation catalyst (WOC) development, the comprehensive translation of its key features into active molecular WOCs remains challenging. The [Co(II)3Ln(hmp)4(OAc)5H2O] ({Co(II)3Ln(OR)4}; Ln = Ho-Yb, hmp = 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine) cubane WOC series is introduced as a new springboard to address crucial design parameters, ranging from nuclearity and redox-inactive promoters to operational stability and ligand exchange properties. The {Co(II)3Ln(OR)4} cubanes promote bioinspired WOC design by newly combining Ln(3+) centers as redox-inactive Ca(2+) analogues with flexible aqua-/acetate ligands into active and stable WOCs (max. TON/TOF values of 211/9 s(-1)). Furthermore, they open up the important family of 3d-4f complexes for photocatalytic applications. The stability of the {Co(II)3Ln(OR)4} WOCs under photocatalytic conditions is demonstrated with a comprehensive analytical strategy including trace metal analyses and solution-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigations. The productive influence of the Ln(3+) centers is linked to favorable ligand mobility, and the experimental trends are substantiated with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics studies.

  6. ARPA-E Impacts: A Sampling of Project Outcomes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, Eric [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)

    2017-02-27

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) is demonstrating that a collaborative model has the power to deliver real value. The Agency’s first compilation booklet of impact sheets, published in 2016, began to tell the story of how ARPA-E has already made an impact in just seven years—funding a diverse and sophisticated research portfolio on advanced energy technologies that enable the United States to tackle our most pressing energy challenges. One year later our research investments continue to pay off, with a number of current and alumni project teams successfully commercializing their technologies and advancing the state of the art in transformative areas of energy science and engineering. There is no single measure that can fully illustrate ARPA-E’s success to date, but several statistics viewed collectively begin to reveal the Agency’s impact. Since 2009, ARPA-E has provided more than $1.5 billion in funding for 36 focused programs and three open funding solicitations, totaling over 580 projects. Of those, 263 are now alumni projects. Many teams have successfully leveraged ARPA-E’s investment: 56 have formed new companies, 68 have partnered with other government agencies to continue their technology development, and 74 teams have together raised more than $1.8 billion in reported funding from the private sector to bring their technologies to market. However, even when viewed together, those measures do not capture ARPA-E’s full impact. To best understand the Agency’s success, the specific scientific and engineering challenges that ARPA-E project teams have overcome must be understood. This booklet provides concrete examples of those successes, ranging from innovations that will bear fruit in the future to ones that are beginning to penetrate the market as products today. Importantly, half of the projects highlighted in this volume stem from OPEN solicitations, which the agency has run in 2009, 2012, and 2015. ARPA-E’s OPEN programs

  7. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M; Akob, Denise M.; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  8. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section I-II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II which consists of map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780, and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the presented data (1:62,500), this sub-section was divided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets

  9. Role of shear stress in nitric oxide-dependent modulation of renal angiotensin II vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endlich, K; Muller, C; Barthelmebs, M; Helwig, J J

    1999-08-01

    1. Renal vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II (ANGII) is known to be modulated by nitric oxide (NO). Since shear stress stimulates the release of a variety of vasoactive compounds from endothelial cells, we studied the impact of shear stress on the haemodynamic effect of ANGII in isolated perfused kidneys of rats under control conditions and during NO synthase inhibition with L-NAME (100 microM). 2. Kidneys were perfused in the presence of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (10 microM indomethacin) with Tyrode's solution of relative viscosity zeta=1 (low viscosity perfusate, LVP) or, in order to augment shear stress, with Tyrode's solution containing 7% Ficoll 70 of relative viscosity zeta=2 (high viscosity perfusate, HVP). 3. Vascular conductance was 3.5+/-0.4 fold larger in HVP as compared with LVP kidneys, associated with an augmentation of overall wall shear stress by 37+/-5%. During NO inhibition, vascular conductance was only 2.5+/-0.2 fold elevated in HVP vs LVP kidneys, demonstrating shear stress-induced vasodilatation by NO and non-NO/non-prostanoid compound(s). 4. ANGII (10 - 100 pM) constricted the vasculature in LVP kidneys, but was without effect in HVP kidneys. During NO inhibition, in contrast, ANGII vasoconstriction was potentiated in HVP as compared with LVP kidneys. 5. The potentiation of ANGII vasoconstriction during NO inhibition has been shown to be mediated by endothelium-derived P450 metabolites and to be sensitive to AT2 receptor blockade in our earlier studies. Accordingly, in HVP kidneys, increasing concentrations of the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 (5 and 500 nM) gradually abolished the potentiation of ANGII vasoconstriction during NO inhibition, but did not affect vasoconstriction in response to ANGII in LVP kidneys. 6. Our results demonstrate, that augmentation of shear stress by increasing perfusate viscosity induces vasodilatation in the rat kidney, which is partially mediated by NO. Elevated levels of shear stress attenuate

  10. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, M; Tominski, C; Halama, M; Byrne, J M; Obst, M; Kleindienst, S; Behrens, S; Kappler, A

    2017-07-01

    Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans ) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers ( Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter ) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats. IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate

  11. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, M.; Tominski, C.; Halama, M.; Byrne, J. M.; Obst, M.; Behrens, S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats. IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate

  12. Remediation of Soil and Ground Water Contaminated with PAH using Heat and Fe(II)-EDTA Catalyzed Persulfate Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadim, Farhad; Huang, Kun-Chang; Dahmani, Amine M.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of degrading 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic (PAH) hydrocarbons (PAHs) with heat and Fe(II)-EDTA catalyzed persulfate oxidation was investigated in the laboratory. The experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature (i.e. 20 deg. C, 30 deg. C and 40 deg. C) and iron-chelate levels (i.e., 250 mg/L-, 375 mg/L- and 500 mg/L-Fe(II)) on the degradation of dissolved PAHs in aqueous systems, using a series of amber glass jars as the reactors that were placed on a shaker inside an incubator for temperature control. Each experiment was run in duplicate and had two controls (i.e., no persulfate in systems). Samples were collected after a reaction period of 144 hrs and measured for PAHs, pH and sodium persulfate levels. The extent of degradation of PAHs was determined by comparing the data for samples with the controls.The experimental results showed that persulfate oxidation under each of the tested conditions effectively degraded the 16 target PAHs. All of the targeted PAHs were degraded to below the instrument detection limits (∼4 μ/L) from a range of initial concentration (i.e., 5 μ/L for benzo(a)pyrene to 57 μ/L for Phenanthrene) within 144 hrs with 5 g/L of sodium persulfate at 20 deg. C, 30 deg. C and 40 deg. C. The data indicated that the persulfate oxidation was effective in degrading the PAHs and that external heat and iron catalysts might not be needed for the degradation of PAHs.The Fe(II)-EDTA catalyzed persulfate also effectively degraded PAHs in the study. In addition, the data on the variation of persulfate concentrations during the experiments indicated that Fe(II)-EDTA accelerated the consumption of persulfate ions.The obtained degradation data cannot be used to evaluate the influence of temperature and Fe(II) levels on the PAH degradation because the PAHs under each of the tested conditions were degraded to below the instrument detection limit within the first sampling point. However, these experiments have

  13. Seasonal variability of oxidative stress markers in city bus drivers. Part II. Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Pavel; Svecova, Vlasta; Milcova, Alena; Lnenickova, Zdena; Solansky, Ivo; Sram, Radim J

    2008-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the seasonal variability of markers of oxidative damage to lipids (15-F2t-isoprostane, 15-F2t-IsoP) and proteins (protein carbonyl levels) in 50 bus drivers and 50 controls from Prague, Czech Republic, and to identify factors affecting oxidative stress markers. The samples were collected in three seasons with different levels of air pollution. The exposure to environmental pollutants (carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, c-PAHs, particulate matter, PM2.5 and PM10, and volatile organic compounds, VOC) was monitored by personal and/or stationary monitors. For the analysis of both markers, ELISA techniques were used. The median levels of individual markers in bus drivers versus controls were as follows: 15-F2t-IsoP (nmol/mmol creatinine): winter 2005, 0.81 versus 0.68 (pbus drivers in winter seasons, but not in summer. Lipid peroxidation was positively correlated with c-PAHs and PM exposure; protein oxidation correlated negatively and was highest in summer suggesting another factor(s) affecting protein carbonyl levels.

  14. TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM URANIUM MINING, VOLUME II: INVESTIGATION OF POTENTIAL HEALTH, GEOGRAPHIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES OF ABANDONED URANIUM MINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volume II investigates the potential radiogenic risks from abandoned uranium mines and evaluates which may pose the greatest hazards to members of the public and to the environment. The intent of this report is to identify who may be most likely to be exposed to wastes at small a...

  15. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 3, 5.0 Radiation safety and environment; 6.0 Physics and technology R and D needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II Tokamak. This particular volume discusses: safety and environmental requirements and design targets; accident analyses; personnel safety and maintenance exposure; effluent control; waste management and decommissioning; safety considerations in building design; and safety and environmental conclusions and recommendations

  16. High School and Beyond. 1980 Senior Coort. Third-Follow-Up (1986). Data File User's Manual. Volume II: Survey Instruments. Contractor Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebring, Penny; And Others

    Survey instruments used in the collection of data for the High School and Beyond base year (1980) through the third follow-up surveys (1986) are provided as Volume II of a user's manual for the senior cohort data file. The complete user's manual is designed to provide the extensive documentation necessary for using the cohort data files. Copies of…

  17. Antimicrobial Exposure Assessment Task Force II (AEATF II) Volume 5: Governing Document for a Multi-Year Antimicrobial Chemical Exposure Monitoring Program (interim draft document with changes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the overall scope of the AEATF II program, demonstrates the need for additional human exposure monitoring data and explains the proposed methodology for the exposure monitoring studies proposed for conduct by the AEATF II.

  18. Antimicrobial Exposure Assessment Task Force II (AEATF II) Volume 5: Governing Document for a Multi-Year Antimicrobial Chemical Exposure Monitoring Program (interim draft document)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the overall scope of the AEATF II program, demonstrates the need for additional human exposure monitoring data and explains the proposed methodology for the exposure monitoring studies proposed for conduct by the AEATF II.

  19. Amalgamation based optical and colorimetric sensing of mercury(II) ions with silver graphene oxide nanocomposite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Khosro Zangeneh; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Jayabal, Subramaniam; Huang, Nay Ming; Ramaraj, Ramasamy; Lim, Hong Ngee; Ong, Boon Hoong; Bien, Chia Sheng Daniel; Kee, Yeh Yee

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a facile method for the preparation of a conjugate composed of silver nanoparticles and graphene oxide (Ag GO) via chemical reduction of silver precursors in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) while sonicating the solution. The Ag GO was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The nanocomposite undergoes a color change from yellow to colorless in presence of Hg(II), and this effect is based on the disappearance of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption of the AgNPs due to the formation of silver-mercury amalgam. The presence of GO, on the other hand, prevents the agglomeration of the AgNPs and enhances the stability of the nanocomposite material in solution. Hence, the probe represents a viable optical probe for the determination of mercury(II) ions in that it can be used to visually detect Hg(II) concentrations as low as 100 μM. The instrumental LOD is 338 nM. (author)

  20. Low density lipoprotein for oxidation and metabolic studies. Isolation from small volumes of plasma using a tabletop ultracentrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himber, J; Bühler, E; Moll, D; Moser, U K

    1995-01-01

    A rapid method is described for the isolation of small volumes of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) free of plasma protein contaminants using the TL-100 Tabletop Ultracentrifuge (Beckman). The isolation of LDL was achieved by a 25 min discontinuous gradient density centrifugation between the density range of 1.006 and 1.21 g/ml, recovery of LDL by tube slicing followed by a 90 min flotation step (d = 1.12 g/ml). The purity of LDL and apolipoprotein B100 (apo B100) were monitored by agarose electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), radial immunodiffusion and micropreparative fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The ability of LDL oxidation was assessed by following absorbance at 234 nm after addition of copper ions. The functional integrity of the isolated LDL was checked by clearance kinetics after injection of [125I]-labelled LDL in estrogen-treated rats. The additional purification step led to LDL fractions free of protein contamination and left apo B100, alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene intact. The LDL prepared in this way was free of albumin, as evident from analytic tests and from its enhanced oxidative modification by copper ions. Used for analytical purposes, this method allows LDL preparations from plasma volumes up to 570 microliters. This method is also convenient for metabolic studies in small animals, especially those relating to the determination of kinetic parameters of LDL in which LDL-apo B100 has to be specifically radiolabelled.

  1. Bismuth oxide based ceramics with improved electrical and mechanical properties: Part II. Structural and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; van de Velde, G.M.H.; de Vries, K.J.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Coprecipitation as a method of preparation for bismuth oxides based ceramics yields relatively strong and machineable materials in comparison with the solid state reaction. Compositions within the system (1−x)Bi2O3|xEr2O3 containing up to twenty five mole percent of erbium oxide show a slow

  2. Formation and Transformation of Iron Oxide-Kaolinite Associations in the Presence of Iron(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, S.Y.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.H.; Tan, W.F.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxide-kaolinite associations are important components of tropical and subtropical soils and have significant influence on the physical and chemical properties of soils. In this study, the formation and transformation of Fe oxide-kaolinite associations as a function of pH, temperature, and time

  3. Expanding rare-earth oxidation state chemistry to molecular complexes of holmium(II) and erbium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew R; Bates, Jefferson E; Fieser, Megan E; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Evans, William J

    2012-05-23

    The first molecular complexes of holmium and erbium in the +2 oxidation state have been generated by reducing Cp'(3)Ln [Cp' = C(5)H(4)SiMe(3); Ln = Ho (1), Er (2)] with KC(8) in the presence of 18-crown-6 in Et(2)O at -35 °C under argon. Purification and crystallization below -35 °C gave isomorphous [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Ln] [Ln = Ho (3), Er (4)]. The three Cp' ring centroids define a trigonal-planar geometry around each metal ion that is not perturbed by the location of the potassium crown cation near one ring with K-C(Cp') distances of 3.053(8)-3.078(2) Å. The metrical parameters of the three rings are indistinguishable within the error limits. In contrast to Ln(2+) complexes of Eu, Yb, Sm, Tm, Dy, and Nd, 3 and 4 have average Ln-(Cp' ring centroid) distances only 0.029 and 0.021 Å longer than those of the Ln(3+) analogues 1 and 2, a result similar to that previously reported for the 4d(1) Y(2+) complex [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Y] (5) and the 5d(1) La(2+) complex [K(18-crown-6)(Et(2)O)][Cp″(3)La] [Cp″ = 1,3-(Me(3)Si)(2)C(5)H(3)]. Surprisingly, the UV-vis spectra of 3 and 4 are also very similar to that of 5 with two broad absorptions in the visible region, suggesting that 3-5 have similar electron configurations. Density functional theory calculations on the Ho(2+) and Er(2+) species yielded HOMOs that are largely 5d(z(2)) in character and supportive of 4f(10)5d(1) and 4f(11)5d(1) ground-state configurations, respectively.

  4. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH)52-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH) 5 2- has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH) 5 2- complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  5. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inst. Lavoisier, IREM UMR 8637, Univ. de Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles (France); Eysseric, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  6. In vitro antibacterial activity of oxide and non-oxide bioceramics for arthroplastic devices: II. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschetto, Francesco; Toyama, Nami; Horiguchi, Satoshi; Bock, Ryan M; McEntire, Bryan J; Adachi, Tetsuya; Marin, Elia; Zhu, Wenliang; Mazda, Osam; Bal, B Sonny; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2018-04-30

    The metabolic response of Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) bacteria to bioceramic substrates was probed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Oxide zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) and non-oxide silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates were tested. Bacteria exposed to silica glass substrates were used as a control. S. epidermidis, a major cause of periprosthetic infections, was screened to obtain a precise time-lapse knowledge of its molecular composition and to mechanistically understand its interaction with different substrates. At the molecular level, the structure of proteins, lipids, nucleic acid, and aromatic amino acids evolved with time in response to different substrates. In combination with statistical validation and local pH measurements, a chemical lysis mechanism was spectroscopically observed in situ on the Si3N4 substrates. Utilization of FTIR in this study avoided fluorescence noise which occurred while probing the ZTA samples with Raman spectroscopy in a companion paper. The substrate-driven dynamics of polysaccharide and peptide variations in the bacterial cell wall, peculiar to Si3N4 bioceramics, are elucidated.

  7. Iron oxide impregnated Morus alba L. fruit peel for biosorption of Co(II): biosorption properties and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Chang, Yoon-Young; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Kim, Im-Soon

    2013-01-01

    Biosorption is an ecofriendly wastewater treatment technique with high efficiency and low operating cost involving simple process for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. In the present investigation, Morus alba L. fruit peel powder (MAFP) and iron oxide impregnated Morus alba L. fruit peel powder (IO-MAFP) were prepared and used for treating Co(II) contaminated aqueous solutions. Further the materials were characterized by using FTIR and SEM-EDX analysis. From FT-IR analysis it was found that hydroxyl, methoxy, and carbonyl groups are responsible for Co(II) biosorption. The kinetic data obtained for both biosorbents was well fitted with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium data was in tune with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The thermodynamic studies were also carried and it was observed that sorption process was endothermic at 298-328 K. These studies demonstrated that both biosorbents were promising, efficient, economic, and biodegradable sorbents.

  8. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

  9. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses

  10. Making oxidation potentials predictable: Coordination of additives applied to the electronic fine tuning of an iron(II) complex

    KAUST Repository

    Haslinger, Stefan

    2014-11-03

    This work examines the impact of axially coordinating additives on the electronic structure of a bioinspired octahedral low-spin iron(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (Fe-NHC) complex. Bearing two labile trans-acetonitrile ligands, the Fe-NHC complex, which is also an excellent oxidation catalyst, is prone to axial ligand exchange. Phosphine- and pyridine-based additives are used for substitution of the acetonitrile ligands. On the basis of the resulting defined complexes, predictability of the oxidation potentials is demonstrated, based on a correlation between cyclic voltammetry experiments and density functional theory calculated molecular orbital energies. Fundamental insights into changes of the electronic properties upon axial ligand exchange and the impact on related attributes will finally lead to target-oriented manipulation of the electronic properties and consequently to the effective tuning of the reactivity of bioinspired systems.

  11. Making oxidation potentials predictable: Coordination of additives applied to the electronic fine tuning of an iron(II) complex

    KAUST Repository

    Haslinger, Stefan; Kü ck, Jens W.; Hahn, Eva M.; Cokoja, Mirza; Pö thig, Alexander; Basset, Jean-Marie; Kü hn, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the impact of axially coordinating additives on the electronic structure of a bioinspired octahedral low-spin iron(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (Fe-NHC) complex. Bearing two labile trans-acetonitrile ligands, the Fe-NHC complex, which is also an excellent oxidation catalyst, is prone to axial ligand exchange. Phosphine- and pyridine-based additives are used for substitution of the acetonitrile ligands. On the basis of the resulting defined complexes, predictability of the oxidation potentials is demonstrated, based on a correlation between cyclic voltammetry experiments and density functional theory calculated molecular orbital energies. Fundamental insights into changes of the electronic properties upon axial ligand exchange and the impact on related attributes will finally lead to target-oriented manipulation of the electronic properties and consequently to the effective tuning of the reactivity of bioinspired systems.

  12. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of tetraphosphorus in the presence of copper(II chloride modified by humic (fulvo- acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It was established that in mild conditions (50-70 oC, РО2= 1 atm white phosphorus effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water-toluene solutions of copper(II chloride modified by humic (fulvo- acid to give mainly phosphoric acid. Humic (fulvo- acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, intermediate and final products, optimum conditions of new catalytic reaction of P4 oxidation by oxygen in water medium were defined by kinetics, volumometry, redox-potentiometry, 31Р{1Н} NMR spectroscopy and  titration. 

  13. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of sodium hypophosphite in the presence of copper (II chloride modified by humic (fulvo- acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It was established that in soft conditions (50-70oC, PO2 = 1 atm sodium hypophosphite effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water solutions of copper(II chloride  to give mainly a phosphorous acid. Humic (fulvo- acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, the intermediate and final products, optimal conditions of new catalytic reaction of NaH2PO2 oxidation by oxygen in water solution were defined by kinetics, volumometry, redox-potentiometry and a titration.

  14. Cladding oxidation during air ingress. Part II: Synthesis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, E.; Haurais, F.; Bals, C.; Coindreau, O.; Fernandez-Moguel, L.; Vasiliev, A.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A state-of-the-art for air oxidation modelling in the frame of severe accident is done. • Air oxidation models from main severe accident codes are detailed. • Simulations from main severe accident codes are compared against experimental results. • Perspectives in terms of need for further model development and experiments are given. - Abstract: Air ingress is a potential risk in some low probable situations of severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced Zr-based cladding oxidation and core degradation affecting the release of fission products. This is particularly true speaking about ruthenium release, due to its high radiotoxicity and its ability to form highly volatile oxides in a significant manner in presence of air. The oxygen affinity is decreasing from the Zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions. It is consequently of great need to understand the phenomena governing cladding oxidation by air as a prerequisite for the source term issues in such scenarios. In the past years, many works have been done on cladding oxidation by air under severe accident conditions. This paper with in addition the paper “Cladding oxidation during air ingress – Part I: Synthesis of experimental results” of this journal issue aim at assessing the state of the art on this phenomenon. In this paper, the modelling of air ingress phenomena in the main severe accident codes (ASTEC, ATHLET-CD, MAAP, MELCOR, RELAP/SCDAPSIM, SOCRAT) is described in details, as well as the validation against the integral experiments QUENCH-10, QUENCH-16 and PARAMETER-SF4. A full review of cladding oxidation by air is thus established.

  15. Spectrophotometric investigation on the kinetics of oxidation of adrenaline by dioxygen of μ-dioxytetrakis(histidinato)-dicobalt(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiquee, M. Z. A.; Siddiqui, Masoom R.; Ali, Mohd. Sajid; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.

    The cobalt(II)histidine complex binds molecular oxygen reversibly to form an oxygen adduct complex, μ-dioxytetrakis-(histidinato)dicobalt(II). The molecular oxygen can be released from the oxygenated complex by heating it or by passing N2, He or Ar gas through its solution. μ-Dioxytetrakis-(histidinato)dicobalt(II) complex oxidizes adrenaline into leucoadrenochrome at 25 °C while at higher temperature (>40 °C) adrenochrome with λmax at 490 nm is formed. The rate of formation of leucoadrenochrome was found to be independent of [bis(histidinato)cobalt(II)]. The rate of reaction for the formation of leucoadrenochrome and adrenochrome increased with the increase in [adrenaline] at its lower concentration but become independent at higher concentration. Similarly, the rate of formation of both leucoadrenochrome and adrenochrome was linearly dependent upon [NaOH]. The values of activation parameters i.e. ΔEa, ΔH‡ and ΔS‡ for the formation of leucoadrenochrome are reported.

  16. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of tetraphosphorus in the presence of copper(II) chloride modified by humic (fulvo-) acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov; Dina Akbayeva; Zh. Eshova

    2012-01-01

    It was established that in mild conditions (50-70 oC, РО2= 1 atm) white phosphorus effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water-toluene solutions of copper(II) chloride modified by humic (fulvo-) acid to give mainly phosphoric acid. Humic (fulvo-) acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, intermediate and final ...

  17. Investigation of self-powered gamma flux detectors with Lead(II) oxide serving as both emitter and insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, H.; Yue, S.; Jonkmans, G.; Sur, B.; Hilborn, J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Lead(II) oxide as the electron-emitting component and the insulating component of self-powered flux detectors is a concept that had not been previously explored. Detectors constructed from various combinations of electrodes (stainless steel, Al, Pb, and W) and insulating materials (Al 2 O 3 and PbO) were irradiated in a 427 Gy/h gamma field. Although high gamma sensitivities were achieved, PbO did not prove to be a strong emitter of gamma-induced electrons. Nevertheless, PbO did serve as a better insulator than one that is currently in use, namely alumina. (author)

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Neutrophilic Iron(II Oxidizer Genomes for Candidate Genes in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomei He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular electron transfer (EET is recognized as a key biochemical process in circumneutral pH Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB. In this study, we searched for candidate EET genes in 73 neutrophilic FeOB genomes, among which 43 genomes are complete or close-to-complete and the rest have estimated genome completeness ranging from 5 to 91%. These neutrophilic FeOB span members of the microaerophilic, anaerobic phototrophic, and anaerobic nitrate-reducing FeOB groups. We found that many microaerophilic and several anaerobic FeOB possess homologs of Cyc2, an outer membrane cytochrome c originally identified in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The “porin-cytochrome c complex” (PCC gene clusters homologous to MtoAB/PioAB are present in eight FeOB, accounting for 19% of complete and close-to-complete genomes examined, whereas PCC genes homologous to OmbB-OmaB-OmcB in Geobacter sulfurreducens are absent. Further, we discovered gene clusters that may potentially encode two novel PCC types. First, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC3” encodes a porin, an extracellular and a periplasmic cytochrome c with remarkably large numbers of heme-binding motifs. Second, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC4” encodes a porin and three periplasmic multiheme cytochromes c. A conserved inner membrane protein (IMP encoded in PCC3 and PCC4 gene clusters might be responsible for translocating electrons across the inner membrane. Other bacteria possessing PCC3 and PCC4 are mostly Proteobacteria isolated from environments with a potential niche for Fe(II oxidation. In addition to cytochrome c, multicopper oxidase (MCO genes potentially involved in Fe(II oxidation were also identified. Notably, candidate EET genes were not found in some FeOB, especially the anaerobic ones, probably suggesting EET genes or Fe(II oxidation mechanisms are different from the searched models. Overall, based on current EET models, the search extends our understanding of bacterial EET and

  19. Cyclopentadienyl molybdenum(II/VI) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: Synthesis, structure, and reactivity under oxidative conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Shenyu

    2010-04-26

    A series of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes CpMo(CO) 2(NHC)X (NHC = IMe = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene, X = Br, 1; NHC = 1,3-dipropylimidazol-2-ylidene, X = Br, 2; NHC = IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6- trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, X = Br, 3; NHC = IBz = 1,3-dibenzylimidazol- 2-ylidene, X = Br, 4a, and X = Cl, 4b; NHC = 1-methyl-3-propylimidazol-2- ylidene, X = Br, 5) and [CpMo(CO)2(IMes)(CH3CN)][BF 4] (6) have been synthesized and fully characterized. The stability of metal-NHC ligand bonds in these compounds under oxidative conditions has been investigated. The thermally stable Mo(VI) dioxo NHC complex [CpMoO 2(IMes)][BF4] (9) has been isolated by the oxidation of the ionic complex 6 by TBHP (tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide). Complex 6 can be applied as a very active (TOFs up to 3400 h-1) and selective olefin epoxidation catalyst. While under oxidative conditions (in the presence of TBHP), compounds 1-5 decompose into imidazolium bromide and imidazolium polyoxomolybdate. The formation of polyoxomolybdate as oxidation products had not been observed in a similar epoxidation catalyzed by Mo(II) and Mo(VI) complexes. DFT studies suggest that the presence of Br- destabilizes the CpMo(VI) oxo NHC carbene species, consistent with the experimental observations. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. Transformation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids/Esters to Corresponding Keto Fatty Acids/Esters by Aerobic Oxidation with Pd(II)/Lewis Acid Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, Ahmed M; Zhang, Sicheng; Zeng, Miao; Chen, Zhuqi; Yin, Guochuan

    2017-08-16

    Utilization of renewable biomass to partly replace the fossil resources in industrial applications has attracted attention due to the limited fossil feedstock with the increased environmental concerns. This work introduced a modified Wacker-type oxidation for transformation of unsaturated fatty acids/esters to the corresponding keto fatty acids/esters, in which Cu 2+ cation was replaced with common nonredox metal ions, that is, a novel Pd(II)/Lewis acid (LA) catalyst. It was found that adding nonredox metal ions can effectively promote Pd(II)-catalyzed oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids/esters to the corresponding keto fatty acids/esters, even much better than Cu 2+ , and the promotional effect is highly dependent on the Lewis acidity of added nonredox metal ions. The improved catalytic efficiency is attributed to the formation of heterobimetallic Pd(II)/LA species, and the oxidation mechanism of this Pd(II)/LA catalyst is also briefly discussed.

  1. A Compact, Efficient Pyrolysis/Oxidation System for Solid Waste Resource Recovery in Space, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pyrolysis processing can be used in near term missions for volume reduction, water recovery (drying), stabilization, and enhanced water and oxygen recovery through...

  2. Determination of HCl and VOC Emission from Thermal Degradation of PVC in the Absence and Presence of Copper, Copper(II Oxide and Copper(II Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad J. Jafari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl chloride (PVC has played a key role in the development of the plastic industry over the past 40 years. Thermal degradation of PVC leads to formation of many toxic pollutants such as HCl, aromatic and volatile organic carbon vapors. Thermal degradation of PVC and PVC in the present of copper, cupric oxide and copper(II chloride were investigated in this study using a laboratory scale electrical furnace. HCl and Cl- ion were analyzed by a Dionex ion chromatograph and VOCs compounds were analyzed using GC or GC-MS. The results showed that HCl plus Cl- ion and benzene formed about 99% and 80% respectively in the first step of thermal degradation under air atmosphere. The presence of cupric oxide increases the percentage of short chain hydrocarbons more than 184% and decreases the amount of the major aromatic hydrocarbon and HCl plus Cl- ion to 90% and 65% respectively. The total aromatic hydrocarbon emitted less than when atmosphere was air and difference was statistically significant (Pvalue<0.000

  3. The group theory of oxidation II: cosets of non-split groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keurentjes, Arjan

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation program given in the first article of this series (see preceding article in this issue) is extended to cover oxidation of 3d sigma model theories on a coset G/H, with G non-compact (but not necessarily split), and H the maximal compact subgroup. We recover the matter content, the equations of motion and Bianchi identities from group lattice and Cartan involution. Satake diagrams provide an elegant tool for the computations, the maximal oxidation dimension, and group disintegration chains can be directly read off. We give a complete list of theories that can be recovered from oxidation of a 3-dimensional coset sigma model on G/H, where G is a simple non-compact group

  4. One electron oxidation of Ni(II)-iminodiacetate by carbonate radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.C.; Bardhan, D.K.; Bhattacharyya, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Reactions of carbonate radical (CO 3 - ), generated by photolysis or by radiolysis of a carbonate solution with nickel(II)-iminodiacetate (Ni(II)IDA) were studied at pH 10.5 and ionic strength (I)=0.2 mol x dm -3 . The stable product arising from the ligand degradation in the complex is mainly glyoxalic acid. Time-resolved spectroscopy and transient kinetics were studied using flash photolysis. From the kinetic data it was suggested that the carbonate radical initially reacts with Ni(III)IDA with a rate constant (2.4.±0.4) x 10 6 dm 3 x mol -1 x s -1 to form a Ni(II)IDA species which, however, undergoes a first-order transformation (k=2.7 x 10 2 x s -1 ) to give a radical intermediate of the type Ni(II)RNHCHCO - 2 ) which rapidly forms an adduct containing a Ni-C bond. This adduct decays very slowly to give rise to glyoxalic acid. From a consideration of equilibrium between Ni(II)IDA and Ni(III)IDA, the one electron reduction potential for the Ni(III)IDA/Ni(II)IDA couple was determined to be 1.467 V. (author) 30 refs.; 5 figs

  5. Part II: Effects of gamma irradiation on lipid and cholesterol oxidation in mechanically deboned turkey meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrassy, E.; Meszaros, L.; Beczner, J.; Polyak-Feher, K.; Gaal, O.; Lebovics, V.K.; Lugasi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The pasteurizing effect of a 2 kGy radiation dose on non-frozen mechanically deboned turkey meat was achieved without increase in cholesterol oxidation products or increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance values during 15 d of chilled storage following the treatments, while untreated samples were spoiled. The addition of antioxidants, such as thyme oil or α-tocopherol plus ascorbic acid, significantly inhibited the oxidative changes of cholesterol and lipids during 3 kGy treatment. (author)

  6. Nitrous Oxide and Serious Long-term Morbidity and Mortality in the Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anaesthesia (ENIGMA)-II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Kate; Myles, Paul S; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Peyton, Philip J; Chan, Matthew T V; Paech, Michael J; Sessler, Daniel I; Beattie, W Scott; Devereaux, P J; Wallace, Sophie

    2015-12-01

    The Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anaesthesia (ENIGMA)-II trial randomly assigned 7,112 noncardiac surgery patients at risk of perioperative cardiovascular events to 70% N2O or 70% N2 groups. The aim of this follow-up study was to determine the effect of nitrous oxide on a composite primary outcome of death and major cardiovascular events at 1 yr after surgery. One-year follow-up was conducted via a medical record review and telephone interview. Disability was defined as a Katz index of independence in activities of daily living score less than 8. Adjusted odds ratios and hazard ratios were calculated as appropriate for primary and secondary outcomes. Among 5,844 patients evaluated at 1 yr, 435 (7.4%) had died, 206 (3.5%) had disability, 514 (8.8%) had a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction, and 111 (1.9%) had a fatal or nonfatal stroke during the 1-yr follow-up period. Exposure to nitrous oxide did not increase the risk of the primary outcome (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.25; P = 0.27), disability or death (odds ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.27; P = 0.44), death (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.43; P = 0.10), myocardial infarction (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.17; P = 0.78), or stroke (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.58; P = 0.70). These results support the long-term safety of nitrous oxide administration in noncardiac surgical patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease.

  7. Volume II: Compendium Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    breaking down of fuel into finer droplets, this design aims to increase the efficiency for liquid hydrocarbons and enable the use of JP-8 diesel in...varying the equivalent weight of the oligomeric diamine component, obeys universal response as the test temperature (T) is held constant in relation to...methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(styrene) (PS), and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (POEM) and PS. These copolymers may support ionic

  8. Marinobacter subterrani, a genetically tractable neutrophilic Fe(II-oxidizing strain isolated from the Soudan Iron Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Michael Bonis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation, characterization, and development of a robust genetic system for a halophilic, Fe(II-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a vertical borehole originating 714 m below the surface located in the Soudan Iron Mine in northern Minnesota, USA. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene places the isolate in the genus Marinobacter of the Gammaproteobacteria. The genome of the isolate was sequenced using a combination of short- and long-read technologies resulting in 2 contigs representing a 4.4 Mbp genome. Using genomic information, we used a suicide vector for targeted deletion of specific flagellin genes, resulting in a motility-deficient mutant. The motility mutant was successfully complemented by expression of the deleted genes in trans. Random mutagenesis using a transposon was also achieved. Capable of heterotrophic growth, this isolate represents a microaerophilic Fe(II-oxidizing species for which a system for both directed and random mutagenesis has been established. Analysis of 16S rDNA suggests Marinobacter represents a major taxon in the mine, and genetic interrogation of this genus may offer insight into the structure of deep subsurface communities as well as an additional tool for analyzing nutrient and element cycling in the subsurface ecosystem.

  9. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  10. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    effects on F-actin. The subsequent F-actin depolymerization, however, appeared MLCK- and PKC-dependent, and the initial swelling-induced F-actin depolymerization was MLCK-dependent; both effects were apparently secondary to kinase-mediated effects on cell volume changes. NHE1 in EATC is activated both....... Moreover, Rho kinase inhibition did not significantly affect NHE1 activation, neither by shrinkage nor by CL-A. Implications for the possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation are discussed....

  11. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part II: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Héquet

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The performances of a laboratory PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO device were determined using a recirculation closed-loop pilot reactor. The closed-loop system was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: a perfectly mixed reservoir with a volume of VR = 0.42 m3 and a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device with a volume of VP = 5.6 × 10−3 m3. The PCO device was composed of a pleated photocatalytic filter (1100 cm2 and two 18-W UVA fluorescent tubes. The Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR of the apparatus was measured under different operating conditions. The influence of three operating parameters was investigated: (i light irradiance I from 0.10 to 2.0 mW·cm−2; (ii air velocity v from 0.2 to 1.9 m·s−1; and (iii initial toluene concentration C0 (200, 600, 1000 and 4700 ppbv. The results showed that the conditions needed to apply a first-order decay model to the experimental data (described in Part I were fulfilled. The CADR values, ranging from 0.35 to 3.95 m3·h−1, were mainly dependent on the light irradiance intensity. A square root influence of the light irradiance was observed. Although the CADR of the PCO device inserted in the closed-loop reactor did not theoretically depend on the flow rate (see Part I, the experimental results did not enable the confirmation of this prediction. The initial concentration was also a parameter influencing the CADR, as well as the toluene degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate rmax ranged from 342 to 4894 ppbv/h. Finally, this study evidenced that a recirculation closed-loop pilot could be used to develop a reliable standard test method to assess the effectiveness of PCO devices.

  12. Synthesising highly reactive tin oxide using Tin(II2- ethylhexanoate polynucleation as precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Montenegro Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tin oxide is a widely used compound in technological applications, particularity as a catalyst, gas sensor and in making varistors, transparent conductors, electrocatalytic electrodes and photovoltaic cells. An ethylhexanoate tin salt, a carboxylic acid and poly-esterification were used for synthesising highly reactive tin oxide in the present study. Synthesis was controlled by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and recording changes in viscosity. The tin oxide characteristics so obtained were determined using FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The SnO2 dust synthesised and heat-treated at 550°C yielded high density aggregates, having greater than 50 μm particle size. This result demonstrates the high reactivity of the ceramic powders synthesised here.

  13. The Role of Vasodilator Receptors of Renin-angiotensin System on Nitric Oxide Formation and Kidney Circulation after Angiotensin II Infusion in Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Maryam; Hasanshahi, Jalal; Moslemi, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a vasodilator factor has renoprotective effect against renal ischemia. The balance between angiotensin II (Ang II) and NO can affect kidney homeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine NO alteration in response to renin-Ang system vasodilator receptors antagonists (PD123319; Ang II type 2 receptor antagonist and A779; Mas receptor antagonist) in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in rats. Sixty-three Wistar male and female rats were used. Animals from each gender were divided into four groups received saline, Ang II, PD123319 + Ang II, and A779 + Ang II after renal IRI. Renal IRI induced with an adjustable hook. Blood pressure and renal blood flow (RBF) measured continuously. The nitrite levels were measured in serum, kidney, and urine samples. In female rats, the serum and kidney nitrite levels increased significantly by Ang II ( P < 0.05) and decreased significantly ( P < 0.05) when PD123319 was accompanied with Ang II. Such observation was not seen in male. Ang II decreased RBF significantly in all groups ( P < 0.05), while PD + Ang II group showed significant decrease in RBF in comparison with the other groups in female rats ( P < 0.05). Males show more sensibility to Ang II infusion; in fact, it is suggested that there is gender dimorphism in the Ang II and NO production associated with vasodilator receptors.

  14. A study of the oxidation of nickel-titanium intermetallics. II. Phase composition of the scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuprina, V G [Institut Problem Materialovedeniia, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR)

    1989-06-01

    The phase composition of the scale formed on NiTi during oxidation in air in the temperature range 600-1000 C was investigated by X-ray diffraction and layer-by-layer metallographic analyses. The scale was found to contain NiO, NiO.TiO2, TiO2, Ti2O3, Ti3O5, Ni, and Ni(Ti) solid solution; an Ni3Ti sublayer was present at the scale-alloy boundary. Oxygen diffusion in the scale toward the sublayer and counterdiffusion of Ni(+2) were found to be the principal processes responsible for NiTi oxidation. 8 refs.

  15. Surfactant controlled low-temperature thermal decomposition route to zinc oxide nanorods from zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purkayastha, Debraj Dhar; Sarma, Bedabrat; Bhattacharjee, Chira R., E-mail: crbhattacharjee@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized via a low-temperature thermal decomposition of zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate, [Zn(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}){sub 2}].H{sub 2}O. A relatively inexpensive surfactant, octadecylamine (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}NH{sub 2}) served both as a reaction solvent and a capping agent during the synthesis of ZnO nanorods. The synthesized nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, UV–visible, and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The XRD spectrum furnished evidence for the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. TEM images revealed the material to be rod shaped having diameter 30 nm and length 200 nm. The HRTEM image showed that the lattice fringes between the two adjacent planes are 0.244 nm apart, which corresponds to the interplanar separation of the (1 0 1) plane of hexagonal ZnO. The electron diffraction (ED) pattern confirmed the single crystalline nature of the nanorods. The PL spectrum showed two UV emissions at 356 nm (∼3.48 eV) and 382 nm (∼3.25 eV). ZnO nanorods also showed very weak blue bands at 445, 453 and 470 nm. - Highlights: Low temperature thermal decomposition of zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate gave zinc oxide nanorods. Powder XRD showed hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO having average diameter about 24 nm. TEM images revealed the material to be of rod shape having diameter 30 nm and length 200 nm. ZnO showed band gap luminescence at 356 nm, excitonic emission at 382 nm and defect related blue bands. The synthesis is simple and can act as a paradigm for obtaining various metal oxide nanomaterials.

  16. Standardized assessment to enhance the diagnostic value of prostate volume; Part II: Correlation with prostate-specific antigen levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnink, R. G.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Huynen, A. L.; Giesen, R. J.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.

    1996-01-01

    Standardized estimations of prostate volumes are used for interpretation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. In 243 patients with clinically benign diagnosis, automated and reference prostate volumes and transition zone volumes are correlated to PSA levels. Besides, growth curves of PSA level

  17. Nickel Oxide (NiO nanoparticles prepared by solid-state thermal decomposition of Nickel (II schiff base precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dehno Khalaji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, plate-like NiO nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot solid-state thermal decomposition of nickel (II Schiff base complex as new precursor. First, the nickel (II Schiff base precursor was prepared by solid-state grinding using nickel (II nitrate hexahydrate, Ni(NO32∙6H2O, and the Schiff base ligand N,N′-bis-(salicylidene benzene-1,4-diamine for 30 min without using any solvent, catalyst, template or surfactant. It was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and elemental analysis (CHN. The resultant solid was subsequently annealed in the electrical furnace at 450 °C for 3 h in air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of NiO were produced and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD at 2θ degree 0-140°, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The XRD and FT-IR results showed that the product is pure and has good crystallinity with cubic structure because no characteristic peaks of impurity were observed, while the SEM and TEM results showed that the obtained product is tiny, aggregated with plate-like shape, narrow size distribution with an average size between 10-40 nm. Results show that the solid state thermal decomposition method is simple, environmentally friendly, safe and suitable for preparation of NiO nanoparticles. This method can also be used to synthesize nanoparticles of other metal oxides.

  18. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Immobilized Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) Complex for Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Reductive Dehalogenation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Hao, Zhongkai; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hexing

    2016-05-18

    A sodium benzenesulfonate (PhSO3Na)-functionalized reduced graphene oxide was synthesized via a two-step aryl diazonium coupling and subsequent NaCl ion-exchange procedure, which was used as a support to immobilize tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy)3Cl2) by coordination reaction. This elaborated Ru(bpy)3-rGO catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic efficiency in visible-light-driven reductive dehalogenation reactions under mild conditions, even for ary chloride. Meanwhile, it showed the comparable reactivity with the corresponding homogeneous Ru(bpy)3Cl2 catalyst. This high catalytic performance could be attributed to the unique two-dimensional sheet-like structure of Ru(bpy)3-rGO, which efficiently diminished diffusion resistance of the reactants. Meanwhile, the nonconjugated PhSO3Na-linkage between Ru(II) complex and the support and the very low electrical conductivity of the catalyst inhibited energy/electron transfer from Ru(II) complex to rGO support, resulting in the decreased support-induced quenching effect. Furthermore, it could be easily recycled at least five times without significant loss of catalytic reactivity.

  19. Photoenhanced Oxidative DNA Cleavage with Non-Heme Iron(II) Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qian; Browne, Wesley R.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    The DNA cleavage activity of iron(II) complexes of a series of monotopic pentadentate N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine (N4Py)-derived ligands (1-5) was investigated under laser irradiation at 473, 400.8, and 355 nm in the absence of a reducing agent and compared to that under

  20. Alternative products to carbazoles in the oxidation of diphenylamines with palladium (II) acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Raposo, M. Manuela M.; Campos, Ana M. F. Oliveira; Shannon, Patrick V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Although simple diphenylamines are conveniently oxidised with Palladium (II) acetate to give carbazoles, for more complex examples, carbazoles are minor products amongst many. CRUP (Portugal). British Council - Treaty of Windsor Programme. Junta Nacional de Investigação Científica e Tecnológica.

  1. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  2. Copper(II)-catalyzed electrophilic amination of quinoline N-oxides with O-benzoyl hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Jia, Chunqi; Sun, Kai; Lv, Yunhe; Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Kexiao; Wu, Hankui

    2015-03-21

    Copper acetate-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization amination of quinoline N-oxides was achieved using O-benzoyl hydroxylamine as an electrophilic amination reagent, thereby affording the desired products in moderate to excellent yields. Electrophilic amination can also be performed in good yield on a gram scale.

  3. Physiochemical Characterization of Iodine (V Oxide Part II: Morphology and Crystal Structure of Particulate Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Little

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the production of particulate films of iodine (V oxides is investigated. The influence that sonication and solvation of suspended particles in various alcohol/ketone/ester solvents have on the physical structure of spin or drop cast films is examined in detail with electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Results indicate that sonicating iodine oxides in alcohol mixtures containing trace amounts of water decreases deposited particle sizes and produces a more uniform film morphology. UV-visible spectra of the pre-cast suspensions reveal that for some solvents, the iodine oxide oxidizes the solvent, producing I2 and lowering the pH of the suspension. Characterizing the crystals within the cast films reveal their composition to be primarily HI3O8, their orientations to exhibit a preferential orientation, and their growth to be primarily along the ac-plane of the crystal, enhanced at higher spin rates. Spin-coating at lower spin rates produces laminate-like particulate films versus higher density, one-piece films of stacked particles produced by drop casting. The particle morphology in these films consists of a combination of rods, plates, cubes, and rhombohedra structure.

  4. Sorption of Sr(II) onto nanocomposites of graphene oxide-polymeric matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeníková, M.; Ecorchard, Petra; Szatmáry, L.; Mrózek, Ondřej; Salačová, P.; Tolasz, Jakub

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 315, č. 2 (2018), s. 263-272 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04020222 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Graphene oxide * Nanocomposite * PA66 * Polystyrene * Radiostrontium removal Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  5. Bibliography of mass spectroscopy literature for 1972 compiled by a computer method. Volume II. Key Word Out of Context (KWOC) Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capellen, J.; Svec, H.J.; Sage, C.R.; Sun, R.

    1975-08-01

    This report covers the year 1972, and lists approximately 10,000 articles of interest to mass spectroscopists. This two-volume report consists of three sections. Vol. II contains the Key Word Out of Context Index (KWOC Index) section. The KWOC Index lists the key words, the reference numbers of the articles in which the key word appears, and the first 100 characters of the title

  6. EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats: role of NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Zahid Rasul; Silva, Grazielle C; Ribeiro, Thais Porto; León-González, Antonio J; Kassem, Mohamad; Mirajkar, Abdur; Alvi, Azhar; Abbas, Malak; Zgheel, Faraj; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Auger, Cyril

    2017-12-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid:docosahexaenoic acid (EPA:DHA) 6:1, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid formulation, has been shown to induce a sustained formation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase-derived NO, a major vasoprotective factor. This study examined whether chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents hypertension and endothelial dysfunction induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in rats. Male Wister rats received orally corn oil or EPA:DHA 6:1 (500 mg kg -1 per day) before chronic infusion of Ang II (0.4 mg kg -1 per day). Systolic blood pressure was determined by tail cuff sphingomanometry, vascular reactivity using a myograph, oxidative stress using dihydroethidium and protein expression by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Ang II-induced hypertension was associated with reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxations of secondary branch mesenteric artery rings affecting the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)- and the NO-mediated relaxations, both of which were improved by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS-2870. The Ang II treatment induced also endothelium-dependent contractile responses (EDCFs), which were abolished by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin. An increased level of vascular oxidative stress and expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p47 phox and p22 phox ), COX-1 and COX-2, endothelial NO synthase and Ang II type 1 receptors were observed in the Ang II group, whereas SK Ca and connexin 37 were downregulated. Intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction by improving both the NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations, and by reducing EDCFs and the expression of target proteins. The present findings indicate that chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats, most likely by preventing NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

  7. Natriuretic peptide receptor-C activation attenuates angiotensin II-induced enhanced oxidative stress and hyperproliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Padma; Hossain, Ekhtear; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2018-02-07

    We showed previously that natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) agonist, C-ANP 4-23 , attenuated the enhanced expression of Giα proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) through the inhibition of enhanced oxidative stress. Since the enhanced levels of endogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) contribute to the overexpression of Giα proteins and augmented oxidative stress in VSMC from SHR, the present study was undertaken to investigate if C-ANP 4-23 could also attenuate angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced oxidative stress and associated signaling. Ang II treatment of aortic VSMC augmented the levels of superoxide anion (O 2 - ), NADPH oxidase activity, and the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits and C-ANP 4-23 treatment attenuated all these to control levels. In addition, Ang II-induced enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and protein carbonyl content were also attenuated toward control levels by C-ANP 4-23 treatment. On the other hand, Ang II inhibited the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and augmented the levels of peroxynitrite (OONO - ) in VSMC which were restored to control levels by C-ANP 4-23 treatment. Furthermore, C-ANP 4-23 treatment attenuated Ang II-induced enhanced expression of Giα proteins, phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK 1,2 as well as hyperproliferation of VSMC as determined by DNA synthesis, and metabolic activity. These results indicate that C-ANP 4-23 , via the activation of NPR-C, attenuates Ang II-induced enhanced nitroxidative stress, overexpression of Giα proteins, increased activation of the p38/JNK/ERK 1,2 signaling pathways, and hyperproliferation of VSMC. It may be suggested that C-ANP 4-23 could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of vascular remodeling associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  8. Iron and Arsenic Speciation During As(III) Oxidation by Manganese Oxides in the Presence of Fe(II): Molecular-Level Characterization Using XAFS, Mössbauer, and TEM Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Livi, Kenneth J. T. [The High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microbeam Facility, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, United States; Xu, Wenqian [Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, New York 11796, United States; Li, Wei [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States; Key Laboratory of Surficial Geochemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046, People’s Republic of China; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States

    2018-01-17

    The redox state and speciation of metalloid arsenic (As) determine its toxicity and mobility. Knowledge of biogeochemical processes influencing the As redox state is therefore important to understand and predict its environmental behavior. Many previous studies examined As(III) oxidation by various Mn-oxides, but little is known the environmental influences (e.g. co-existing ions) on such process. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by a poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite (δ-MnO2) in the presence of Fe(II) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis revealed that, at low Fe(II) concentration (100 μM), As(V) was the predominant As species on the solid phase, while at higher Fe(II) concentration (200-1000 μM), both As(III) and As(V) were sorbed on the solid phase. As K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analysis showed an increasing As-Mn/Fe distance over time, indicating As prefers to bind with the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides. As adsorbed on Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides as a bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complex. Both Mössbauer and TEM-EDS investigations demonstrated that the oxidized Fe(III) products formed during Fe(II) oxidation by δ-MnO2 were predominantly ferrihydrite, goethite, and ferric arsenate like compounds. However, Fe EXAFS analysis also suggested the formation of a small amount of lepidocrocite. The Mn K-edge XANES data indicated that As(III) and Fe(II) oxidation occurs as a two electron transfer with δ-MnO2 and the observed Mn(III) is due to conproportionation of surface sorbed Mn(II) with Mn(IV) in δ-MnO2 structure. This study reveals that the mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2 in the presence of Fe(II) are very complex, involving many simultaneous reactions, and the formation of

  9. Catalytic water oxidation by ruthenium(II) quaterpyridine (qpy) complexes: evidence for ruthenium(III) qpy-N,N'''-dioxide as the real catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Ng, Siu-Mui; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-12-22

    Polypyridyl and related ligands have been widely used for the development of water oxidation catalysts. Supposedly these ligands are oxidation-resistant and can stabilize high-oxidation-state intermediates. In this work a series of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(qpy)(L)2 ](2+) (qpy=2,2':6',2'':6'',2'''-quaterpyridine; L=substituted pyridine) have been synthesized and found to catalyze Ce(IV) -driven water oxidation, with turnover numbers of up to 2100. However, these ruthenium complexes are found to function only as precatalysts; first, they have to be oxidized to the qpy-N,N'''-dioxide (ONNO) complexes [Ru(ONNO)(L)2 ](3+) which are the real catalysts for water oxidation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Discussion of "Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100 Parts I and II"*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John

    2017-10-01

    Fuchs and Kaplan carried out experiments in an attempt to ascertain whether oxide bifilms were present in a vacuum-cast Ni-base superalloy but concluded negatively. Although this author challenged their interpretation of their findings, both parties had overlooked the presence in the alloy of boron which is now known to inhibit bifilm formation. However, even though boron can help significantly, improved filling system designs remain important if other damaging entrainment defects are to be avoided.

  11. Reduction-oxidation Enabled Glass-ceramics to Stainless Steel Bonding Part II interfacial bonding analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Among glass-ceramic compositions modified with a variety of oxidants (AgO, FeO, NiO, PbO, SnO, CuO, CoO, MoO3 and WO3) only CuO and CoO doped glass-ceramics showed existence of bonding oxides through reduction-oxidation (redox) at the GC-SS interface. The CuO-modified glass-ceramics demonstrate the formation of a continuous layer of strong bonding Cr2O3 at the interface in low partial oxygen (PO2) atmosphere. However, in a local reducing atmosphere, the CuO is preferentially reduced at the surface of glass-ceramic rather than the GC-SS interface for redox. The CoO-modified glass-ceramics demonstrate improved GC-SS bonding. But the low mobility of Co++ ions in the GC limited the amount of CoO that can diffuse to and participate in redox at the interface.

  12. Surface characteristics, copper release, and toxicity of nano- and micrometer-sized copper and copper(II) oxide particles: a cross-disciplinary study.

    OpenAIRE

    Midander, Klara; Cronholm, Pontus; Karlsson, Hanna L.; Elihn, Karine; Moller, Lennart; Leygraf, Christofer; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2009-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and multianalytical research effort is undertaken to assess the toxic aspects of thoroughly characterized nano- and micrometer-sized particles of oxidized metallic copper and copper(II) oxide in contact with cultivated lung cells, as well as copper release in relevant media. All particles, except micrometer-sized Cu, release more copper in serum-containing cell medium (supplemented Dulbecco's minimal essential medium) compared to identical exposures in phosphate-buffered ...

  13. Development of disposable bulk-modified screen-printed electrode based on bismuth oxide for stripping chronopotentiometric analysis of lead (II) and cadmium (II) in soil and water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadara, Rashid O.; Tothill, Ibtisam E.

    2008-01-01

    A bulk-modified screen-printed carbon electrode characterised for metal ion detection is presented. Bismuth oxide (Bi 2 O 3 ) was mixed with graphite-carbon ink to obtain the modified electrode. The best composition was 2% Bi 2 O 3 (wt%) in the graphite-carbon ink. The modified electrode with onboard screen-printed carbon counter and silver-silver chloride pseudo-reference electrodes exhibited good performance in the electrochemical measurement of lead (II) and cadmium (II). The electrode displayed excellent linear behaviour in the concentration range examined (20-300 μg L -1 ) with limits of detection of 8 and 16 μg L -1 for both lead (II) and cadmium (II), respectively. The analytical utility of the modified electrode was illustrated by the stripping chronopotentiometric determinations of lead (II) in soil extracts and wastewater samples

  14. Development of disposable bulk-modified screen-printed electrode based on bismuth oxide for stripping chronopotentiometric analysis of lead (II) and cadmium (II) in soil and water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadara, Rashid O. [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Silsoe, Bedfordshire MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Nottinghamshire NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: kayusee2001@yahoo.co.uk; Tothill, Ibtisam E. [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Silsoe, Bedfordshire MK45 4DT (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-08

    A bulk-modified screen-printed carbon electrode characterised for metal ion detection is presented. Bismuth oxide (Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was mixed with graphite-carbon ink to obtain the modified electrode. The best composition was 2% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} (wt%) in the graphite-carbon ink. The modified electrode with onboard screen-printed carbon counter and silver-silver chloride pseudo-reference electrodes exhibited good performance in the electrochemical measurement of lead (II) and cadmium (II). The electrode displayed excellent linear behaviour in the concentration range examined (20-300 {mu}g L{sup -1}) with limits of detection of 8 and 16 {mu}g L{sup -1} for both lead (II) and cadmium (II), respectively. The analytical utility of the modified electrode was illustrated by the stripping chronopotentiometric determinations of lead (II) in soil extracts and wastewater samples.

  15. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1977. Volume II. Project listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This volume contains Biomedical and Environmental Research, Environmental Control Technology Research, and Operational and Environmental Safety Research project listings. The projects are ordered numerically by log number.

  16. Teaching Standard English as a Second Dialect to Primary School Children in Hilo, Hawaii. Volume I of II Volumes. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert O. H.

    This document describes a four-year program designed to develop and test a method for teaching standard English to nonstandard dialect speakers in the first four grades of elementary school in Hilo, Hawaii. Chapters in this first volume are (1) Introduction, (2) Project Site and Evaluation Strategy, (3) Instrumentation, (4) Development of Lesson…

  17. Possibility of Modification of Zeolites by Iron Oxides and its Utilization for Removal of Pb(II from Water Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lovás

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion-exchange properties of cations from lattice and ions from solutions are characteristic for zeolites. Zeolites as sorbents are used in many branches of industry. Ion-exchange reactions of cations on zeolites have been a theme of many works. With the exception of using natural zeolites as the sorbent, a modification of surface of zeolites and preparation of synthetic zeolites has received interest lately. One of the common modification of zeolites is modification by iron oxides, which increases capacity of adsorption. In this work, we prepared a modified zeolite by the precipitation of magnetite on the surface of zeolite. This new adsorbent was used to remove of Pb(II from waste water. The maximum adsorption capacity was 73,25 mg/g from the solution of Pb with the concentration of 400 mg/l.

  18. A new approach for crystallization of copper(ii) oxide hollow nanostructures with superior catalytic and magnetic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Landfester, Katharina; Chandra, Amreesh; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    We report the synthesis of copper(ii) oxide hollow nanostructures at ambient pressure and close to room temperature by applying the soft templating effect provided by the confinement of droplets in miniemulsion systems. Particle growth can be explained by considering a mechanism that involves both diffusion and reaction control. The catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol in aqueous media is used as a model reaction to prove the catalytic activity of the materials: the synthesized hollow structures show nearly 100 times higher rate constants than solid CuO microspheres. The kinetic behavior and the order of the reduction reaction change due to the increase of the surface area of the hollow structures. The synthesis also leads to modification of physical properties such as magnetism.We report the synthesis of copper(ii) oxide hollow nanostructures at ambient pressure and close to room temperature by applying the soft templating effect provided by the confinement of droplets in miniemulsion systems. Particle growth can be explained by considering a mechanism that involves both diffusion and reaction control. The catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol in aqueous media is used as a model reaction to prove the catalytic activity of the materials: the synthesized hollow structures show nearly 100 times higher rate constants than solid CuO microspheres. The kinetic behavior and the order of the reduction reaction change due to the increase of the surface area of the hollow structures. The synthesis also leads to modification of physical properties such as magnetism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Associated structural and morphological analysis, XPS characterization, BET surface area, catalytic measurements, recycle tests of the catalyst, and magnetic characterizations. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05579b

  19. Electrochemistry of Anilines. II. Oxidation to Dications, Electrochemical and uv/vis Spectroelectrochemical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-06

    the products of bulk electrolyses . We did not investigate the oxidation of Id in this second wave because of the reason mentioned above. THE OVERALL...Nitrenium ion 6b reacts in a chemical reaction. Bulk electrolysis of lb in the presence cf water and 2,6-lutidine shows that ,iinozuinoie ib is ..red. sc...proton exchange equilibrium: NH NH C.CC 00 OeH-,-. 0C 7 OC-: - 4 - C C., . ,O, elettroinalytical experiments, traces of water are presumably reacting

  20. The Nuclear Receptor, Nor-1, Markedly Increases Type II Oxidative Muscle Fibers and Resistance to Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Pearen, Michael A.; Eriksson, Natalie A.; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L.; Goode, Joel M.; Martel, Nick; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Muscat, George E. O.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NR) have been implicated as regulators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The orphan NR4A subgroup has emerged as regulators of metabolic function. Targeted silencing of neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (Nor-1)/NR4A3 in skeletal muscle cells suggested that this NR was necessary for oxidative metabolism in vitro. To investigate the in vivo role of Nor-1, we have developed a mouse model with preferential expression of activated Nor-1 in skeletal muscle. In skeletal...

  1. Characterization of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase II Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, J

    2003-08-29

    Approximately 98 grams of neptunium(IV) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) were produced at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for use in gas generation tests to support the neptunium stabilization program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The NpO{sub 2} was produced according to the anticipated HB-Line flowsheet consisting of anion exchange, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. Characterization of the NpO{sub 2} product to be used in gas generation tests included bulk and tap density measurements, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, specific surface area measurements, and moisture analysis.

  2. Interactions of nickel(II) with histones: enhancement of 2'-deoxyguanosine oxidation by Ni(II) complexes with CH3CO-Cys-Ala-Ile-His-NH2, a putative metal binding sequence of histone H3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, W; Lukszo, J; Kasprazak, K S

    1996-03-01

    Studies of 2'-deoxyguanosine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of CH3CO-Cys-Ala-Ile-His-NH2 (CAIH) and/or NiCl2 have been carried out in 100 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. The dimeric CAIH oxidation product, CAIH disulfide, and its weak, octahedral Ni(II) complex, rather than the monomeric CAIH and its strong, square-planar Ni(II) complex, were found to be major catalysts of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) formation. The presence of Ni(II) largely enhanced 8-oxo-dG yield, especially at submillimolar concentrations of H2O2. The reaction was found not to involve detectable amounts of free radicals or Ni(III). These results, together with those published previously [Bal, W. et al. (1995) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 8, 683-692], lay a framework for the detailed investigations of the interactions of histone octamer with Ni(II) and other metal ions. They also suggest that molecular mechanisms of nickel carcinogenesis may involve oxidative damage processes catalyzed by weak Ni(II) complexes with cellular components.

  3. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Part Nine; Morale and Esprit De Corps. Segments I & II, Volume IX-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The ninth volume of the introduction to psychology and leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) concentrates on morale and esprit de corps and is presented in two documents. Like Volume One (EM 010 420), this document is a self-instructional syndactic text with…

  4. Ion-ion correlation, solvent excluded volume and pH effects on physicochemical properties of spherical oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Aljzmi, Amal; Almusaynid, Manal; Khan, Asrar; Valderrama, Esteban; Nash, Kelly L; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-15

    One major source of complexity in the implementation of nanoparticles in aqueous electrolytes arises from the strong influence that biological environments has on their physicochemical properties. A key parameter for understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles is the formation of the surface charge density. In this article, we present an efficient and accurate approach that combines a recently introduced classical solvation density functional theory for spherical electrical double layers with a surface complexation model to account for ion-ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical nanoparticles. We apply the proposed computational approach to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms on the surface chemistry of spherical silica (SiO2) nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, as well as pH level and electrolyte concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge density and Zeta potential. We validate our predictions for 580Å and 200Å nanoparticles immersed in acid, neutral and alkaline mono-valent aqueous electrolyte solutions against experimental data. Our results on mono-valent electrolyte show that the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations contribute significantly to the surface charge density and Zeta potential of the nanoparticle at high electrolyte concentration and pH levels, where the solvent crowding effects and electrostatic screening have shown a profound influence on the protonation/deprotonation reactions at the liquid/solute interface. The success of this approach in describing physicochemical properties of silica nanoparticles supports its broader application to study other spherical metal oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ternary iron(II) complex with an emissive imidazopyridine arm from Schiff base cyclizations and its oxidative DNA cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arindam; Dhar, Shanta; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2005-01-21

    The ternary iron(II) complex [Fe(L')(L")](PF6)3(1) as a synthetic model for the bleomycins, where L' and L" are formed from metal-mediated cyclizations of N,N'-(2-hydroxypropane-1,3-diyl)bis(pyridine-2-aldimine)(L), is synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. In the six-coordinate iron(ii) complex, ligands L' and L" show tetradentate and bidentate chelating modes of bonding. Ligand L' is formed from an intramolecular attack of the alcoholic OH group of L to one imine moiety leading to the formation of a stereochemically constrained five-membered ring. Ligand L" which is formed from an intermolecular reaction involving one imine moiety of L and pyridine-2-carbaldehyde has an emissive cationic imidazopyridine pendant arm. The complex binds to double-stranded DNA in the minor groove giving a Kapp value of 4.1 x 10(5) M(-1) and displays oxidative cleavage of supercoiled DNA in the presence of H2O2 following a hydroxyl radical pathway. The complex also shows photo-induced DNA cleavage activity on UV light exposure involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species.

  6. Mercury (II) reduction and co-precipitation of metallic mercury on hydrous ferric oxide in contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jan-Helge; Bischoff, Cornelia; Ahrens, Christian G M; Biester, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) speciation and sorption analyses in contaminated aquifers are useful for understanding transformation, retention, and mobility of Hg in groundwater. In most aquifers hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) are among the most important sorbents for trace metals; however, their role in sorption or mobilization of Hg in aquifers has been rarely analyzed. In this study, we investigated Hg chemistry and Hg sorption to HFO under changing redox conditions in a highly HgCl2-contaminated aquifer (up to 870μgL(-1) Hg). Results from aqueous and solid phase Hg measurements were compared to modeled (PHREEQC) data. Speciation analyses of dissolved mercury indicated that Hg(II) forms were reduced to Hg(0) under anoxic conditions, and adsorbed to or co-precipitated with HFO. Solid phase Hg thermo-desorption measurements revealed that between 55 and 93% of Hg bound to HFO was elemental Hg (Hg(0)). Hg concentrations in precipitates reached more than 4 weight %, up to 7000 times higher than predicted by geochemical models that do not consider unspecific sorption to and co-precipitation of elemental Hg with HFO. The observed process of Hg(II) reduction and Hg(0) formation, and its retention and co-precipitation by HFO is thought to be crucial in HgCl2-contaminated aquifers with variable redox-conditions regarding the related decrease in Hg solubility (factor of ~10(6)), and retention of Hg in the aquifer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synergistic effect of graphene nanosheets and zinc oxide nanoparticles for effective adsorption of Ni (II) ions from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadian, Mahboubeh; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.; Fard, Mina Matin; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein

    2018-03-01

    The threat of toxic substances such as heavy metals to public health and wildlife has led to an increasing public awareness. Different techniques for neutralizing the toxic effects of heavy metals in wastewater have been used. Here, we prepared a new and efficient type of adsorbent, zinc oxide-graphene nanocomposite (ZnO-Gr), via a green method to remove Ni (II) ions from aqueous solutions. A facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique in the presence of an ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide [C6mim] [NTf2], was used to prepare ZnO-Gr. The synergistic effect between graphene nanosheets and ZnO nanoparticles in this new adsorbent for Ni (II) ions caused a maximum adsorption capacity of 66.7 mg g-1 at room temperature which is much higher than that of graphene nanosheets (3.8 mg g-1) and other carbonaceous nanomaterials used as an adsorbent in the literature. The maximum desorption percentage (90.32%) was achieved at pH 3.6. By thermodynamic study, we found that the adsorption of this heavy metal ion on ZnO-Gr was spontaneous (Δ G° = -6.14 kJ mol-1) and endothermic (Δ H° = 53.31 kJ mol-1) with entropy change of Δ S° = 199.45 J K-1 mol- 1.

  8. Organization of Genes Required for the Oxidation of Methanol to Formaldehyde in Three Type II Methylotrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, C.; Machlin, S.; Zhang, Y.; Donaldson, K.; Hanson, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    Restriction maps of genes required for the synthesis of active methanol dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium organophilum XX and Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 have been completed and compared. In these two species of pink-pigmented, type II methylotrophs, 15 genes were identified that were required for the expression of methanol dehydrogenase activity. None of these genes were required for the synthesis of the prosthetic group of methanol dehydrogenase, pyrroloquinoline quinone. The structural gene required for the synthesis of cytochrome cL, an electron acceptor uniquely required for methanol dehydrogenase, and the genes encoding small basic peptides that copurified with methanol dehydrogenases were closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. A cloned 22-kilobase DNA insert from Methylsporovibrio methanica 81Z, an obligate type II methanotroph, complemented mutants that contained lesions in four genes closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. The methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome cL structural genes were found to be transcribed independently in M. organophilum XX. Only two of the genes required for methanol dehydrogenase synthesis in this bacterium were found to be cotranscribed. PMID:16348074

  9. Nanomorphology Effects in Semiconductors with Native Ferromagnetism: Hierarchical Europium (II) Oxide Tubes Prepared via a Topotactic Nanostructure Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepka, Bastian; Erler, Philipp; Selzer, Severin; Kollek, Tom; Boldt, Klaus; Fonin, Mikhail; Nowak, Ulrich; Wolf, Daniel; Lubk, Axel; Polarz, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Semiconductors with native ferromagnetism barely exist and defined nanostructures are almost unknown. This lack impedes the exploration of a new class of materials characterized by a direct combination of effects on the electronic system caused by quantum confinement effects with magnetism. A good example is EuO for which currently no reliable routes for nanoparticle synthesis can be established. Bottom-up approaches applicable to other oxides fail because of the labile oxidation state +II. Instead of targeting a direct synthesis, the two steps-"structure control" and "chemical transformation"-are separated. The generation of a transitional, hybrid nanophase is followed by its conversion into EuO under full conservation of all morphological features. Hierarchical EuO materials are now accessible in the shape of oriented nanodisks stacked to tubular particles. Magnetically, the coupling of either vortex or onion states has been found. An unexpected temperature dependence is governed by thermally activated transitions between these states. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of chlorpheniramine at polytyramine film doped with ruthenium (II) complex: Measurement, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaish, Emad A.; Al-Hinaai, Mohammed; Al-Harthy, Salim; Laxman, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • XPS data confirm doping of ruthenium onto the polytyramine moiety. • Doping of Ru decreases the Pty resistivity and increases the electron transfer kinetics. • The resulting sensor is stable for a large range of CPM concentration. • Estimated values of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were comparable. • Application to commercial dosage forms was excellent and satisfactory. - Abstract: A solid-state sensor based on polytyramine film deposited at glassy carbon electrode doped with tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)Ru(II) complex (Ru/Pty/GCE) was constructed electrochemically. A redox property represented by [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 3+/2+ couple immobilized at the Pty moiety was characterized using typical voltammetric techniques. The XPS data and AFM images confirm the grafting of Ru species on the top of Pty while the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data supports the immobilization of both surface modifiers onto the GCE. The constructed sensor exhibits a substantial reactivity, stability and high sensitivity to chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) oxidation. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was brought down to 338 nM using differential pulse voltammetry method. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated using hydrodynamic method. The apparent diffusion coefficient and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant for the CPM oxidation were 2.67 × 10 −5 cm 2 s −1 and 3.21 × 10 −3 cm s −1 , respectively. Interference studies and real sample analysis were conducted with excellent performance and satisfactory results

  11. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphism (G894T and Diabetes Mellitus (Type II among South Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Angeline

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to find out whether the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS G894T single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in South Indian (Tamil population. A total number of 260 subjects comprising 100 type 2 diabetic mellitus patients and 160 healthy individuals with no documented history of diabetes were included for the study. DNA was isolated, and eNOS G894T genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction enzyme analysis using Ban II. The genotype distribution in patients and controls were compatible with the Hardy-Weinberg expectations (P>0.05. Odds ratio indicates that the occurrence of mutant genotype (GT/TT was 7.2 times (95% CI = 4.09–12.71 more frequent in the cases than in controls. Thus, the present study demonstrates that there is an association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (G894T polymorphism with diabetes mellitus among South Indians.

  12. Conditions for the formation of pure birnessite during the oxidation of Mn(II) cations in aqueous alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boumaiza, Hella [Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux et Catalyse, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université El Manar (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Département de Génie Biologique et Chimique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologies (INSAT), Université de Carthage, Tunis (Tunisia); Coustel, Romain [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Medjahdi, Ghouti [Institut Jean Lamour, Centre de Compétences Rayons X et Spectroscopie (X-Gamma), UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine (France); Ruby, Christian, E-mail: Christian.ruby@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    Birnessite was synthetized through redox reaction by mixing MnO{sub 4}{sup -}, Mn{sup 2+} and OH{sup -} solutions. The Mn(VII): Mn(II) ratio of 0.33 was chosen and three methods were used consisting in a quick mixing under vigorous stirring of two of the three reagents and then on the dropwise addition of the third one. The obtained solids were characterized by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopies. Their average oxidation states were determined from ICP and CEC measurements while their surface properties were investigated by XPS. This study provides an increased understanding of the importance of dissolved oxygen in the formation of birnessite and hausmannite and shows the ways to obtain pure birnessite. The role of counter-ion ie. Na{sup +} or K{sup +} was also examined. - Graphical abstract: Pathways of birnessite formation. - Highlights: • Pure birnessite is prepared through a redox reaction. • Hausmannite formation is prevented by controlling dissolved O2. • The employed counterion influences the purity of birnessite. • Initial Mn(OH){sub 2} is oxidized by both MnO{sub 4}{sup -} and dissolved O{sub 2}.

  13. Expression of metallothioneins I and II related to oxidative stress in the liver of aluminium-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Chaabane, Mariem; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Abdelhedi, Sameh; Jamoussi, Kamel; Boudawara, Tahya; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-10-01

    Hepatotoxicity, induced by aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ), has been well studied but there are no reports about liver metallothionein (MT) genes induction. Therefore, it is of interest to establish the mechanism involving the relation between MT gene expression levels and the oxidative stress status in hepatic cells of aluminium-treated rats. Aluminium (Al) was administered to rats in their drinking water at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for three weeks. AlCl 3 provoked hepatotoxicity objectified by an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), protein carbonyls (PCO) and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), non-protein thiols (NPSH) and vitamin C. CAT and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were decreased while Mn-SOD gene expression, total Metallothionein content and MT I and MT II genes induction were increased. There are changes in plasma of some trace elements, albumin levels, transaminases, LDH and ALP activities. All these changes were supported by histopathological observations.

  14. Short stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part II. Sensitivity and interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarri, J. I.; Kesler, O.

    In the first part of this two-paper series, we presented a numerical model of the impedance behaviour of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) aimed at simulating the change in the impedance spectrum induced by contact degradation at the interconnect-electrode, and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The purpose of that investigation was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic technique to identify degradation modes in situ. In the present paper, we appraise the predictive capabilities of the proposed method in terms of its robustness to uncertainties in the input parameters, many of which are very difficult to measure independently. We applied this technique to the degradation modes simulated in Part I, in addition to anode sulfur poisoning. Electrode delamination showed the highest robustness to input parameter variations, followed by interconnect oxidation and interconnect detachment. The most sensitive degradation mode was sulfur poisoning, due to strong parameter interactions. In addition, we simulate several simultaneous two-degradation-mode scenarios, assessing the method's capabilities and limitations for the prediction of electrochemical behaviour of SOFC's undergoing multiple simultaneous degradation modes.

  15. Short stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part II. Sensitivity and interaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazzarri, J.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Kesler, O. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2008-01-21

    In the first part of this two-paper series, we presented a numerical model of the impedance behaviour of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) aimed at simulating the change in the impedance spectrum induced by contact degradation at the interconnect-electrode, and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The purpose of that investigation was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic technique to identify degradation modes in situ. In the present paper, we appraise the predictive capabilities of the proposed method in terms of its robustness to uncertainties in the input parameters, many of which are very difficult to measure independently. We applied this technique to the degradation modes simulated in Part I, in addition to anode sulfur poisoning. Electrode delamination showed the highest robustness to input parameter variations, followed by interconnect oxidation and interconnect detachment. The most sensitive degradation mode was sulfur poisoning, due to strong parameter interactions. In addition, we simulate several simultaneous two-degradation-mode scenarios, assessing the method's capabilities and limitations for the prediction of electrochemical behaviour of SOFC's undergoing multiple simultaneous degradation modes. (author)

  16. OH-initiated oxidation of benzene - Part II. Influence of elevated NOx concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klotz, B; Volkamer, R; Hurley, MD

    2002-01-01

    The present work represents a continuation of part I of this series of papers, in which we investigated the phenol yields in the OH-initiated oxidation of benzene under conditions of low to moderate concentrations of NOx, to elevated NOx levels. The products of the OH-initiated oxidation of benzene...... concentrations of NOx, the phenol yield increases with increasing O-2 partial pressure. The rate constant of the reaction of hydroxycyclohexadienyl peroxyl radicals with NO was determined to be (1.7 +/- 0.6) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). This reaction leads to the formation of E, E-2,4-hexadienedial...... as the main identiable product (29 +/- 16. The reaction of the hydroxycyclohexadienyl radical with NO2 gave phenol (5.9 +/- 3.4 and E,E-2,4-hexadienedial (3.4 +/- 1.9, no other products could be identified. The residual FTIR product spectra indicate the formation of unknown nitrates or other nitrogen...

  17. Silica functionalized Cu(II) acetylacetonate Schiff base complex: An efficient catalyst for the oxidative condensation reaction of benzyl alcohol with amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarasu, G.; Malathy, M.; Karthikeyan, P.; Rajavel, R.

    2017-09-01

    Silica functionalized Cu(II) acetylacetonate Schiff base complex via the one pot reaction of silica functionalized 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with acetyl acetone and copper acetate has been reported. The synthesized material was well characterized by analytical techniques such as FT-IR, UV-DRS, XRD, SEM-EDX, HR-TEM, EPR, ICP-AES and BET analysis. The characterization results confirmed the grafting of Cu(II) Schiff base complex on the silica surface. The catalytic activity of synthesized silica functionalized Cu(II) acetylacetonate Schiff base complex was evaluated through the oxidative condensation reaction of benzyl alcohol to imine.

  18. Determination of the O/M ratios of polynary uranium oxides by Ce(IV)-Fe(II) back titration after dissolution in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, T.; Sato, N.; Yamada, K.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium (IV) in polynary uranium oxides is determined after the solid has been dissolved in a warm mixed solution of sulphuric and phosphoric acids containing excess Ce(IV). The latter is titrated with a Fe(II) standard solution using ferroin as indicator. This method is especially effective for (mixed) uranium oxides which are difficult to dissolve in hot Ce(IV) sulphuric acid. The standard deviation of the determined x value in polynary oxides is estimated to be below ± 0.004 for samples of 10-30 mg. (orig.)

  19. Determination of the O/M ratios of polynary uranium oxides by Ce(IV)-Fe(II) back titration after dissolution in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, T; Sato, N; Yamada, K

    1996-01-01

    Uranium (IV) in polynary uranium oxides is determined after the solid has been dissolved in a warm mixed solution of sulphuric and phosphoric acids containing excess Ce(IV). The latter is titrated with a Fe(II) standard solution using ferroin as indicator. This method is especially effective for (mixed) uranium oxides which are difficult to dissolve in hot Ce(IV) sulphuric acid. The standard deviation of the determined x value in polynary oxides is estimated to be below +/- 0.004 for samples of 10-30 mg.

  20. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II Ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ibrahim

    Full Text Available A photoelectrochemical (PEC sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II ions (Cu2+ was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO surface, with triethanolamine (TEA used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5-120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection.

  1. Oxidative Reactivity and Cytotoxic Properties of a Platinum(II) Complex Prepared by Outer-Sphere Amide Bond Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Justin J.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Benzyl amine was coupled to the dangling carboxylic acid groups of the platinum(II) complex [Pt(edda)Cl2], where edda = ethylenediamine-N,N’-diacetic acid, to give the diamidetethered complex [Pt(L)Cl2] (1), where L = ethylenediamine-N,N’-bis(N-benzylacetamide). Complex 1 was oxidized with both PhICl2 and Br2. Oxidation with PhICl2 cleanly afforded the tetrachloride complex, [Pt(L)Cl4] (2), whereas oxidation with Br2 gave rise to several mixed halide complexes of the general formula, [Pt(L)ClxBr4-x], where x = 1, 2, or 3. Complexes 1 and 2 were fully characterized by 1H, 13C, and 195Pt NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ESI-MS. These compounds exist as a mixture of diastereomers that arise from the chirality of the two coordinated nitrogen atoms. Crystal structures of 1, 2, and [Pt(L)ClxBry] (3) are reported. Although refined as the tetrabromide complex [Pt(L)Br4], the crystal structure of 3 is a mixture of species with site-occupancy disorder of chloride and bromide ligands. DFT calculations indicate that the two sets of diastereomers of 1 and 2 are effectively thermoneutral, a conclusion that is also supported by the observation of both members of each pair by NMR spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 was measured by the MTT assay in HeLa cells and compared to that of cisplatin. Both exhibit IC50 values close to 50 μM and are therefore substantially less toxic than cisplatin, for which the IC50 is 1 μM. PMID:24489429

  2. Unraveling uranium induced oxidative stress related responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Part II: responses in the leaves and general conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Cuypers, Ann; Horemans, Nele; Remans, Tony; Opdenakker, Kelly; Smeets, Karen; Bello, Daniel Martinez; Havaux, Michel; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2011-06-01

    The cellular redox balance seems an important modulator under heavy metal stress. While for other heavy metals these processes are well studied, oxidative stress related responses are also known to be triggered under uranium stress but information remains limited. This study aimed to further unravel the mechanisms by which plants respond to uranium stress. Seventeen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown on a modified Hoagland solution under controlled conditions, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM uranium for 1, 3 and 7 days. While in Part I of this study oxidative stress related responses in the roots were discussed, this second Part II discusses oxidative stress related responses in the leaves and general conclusions drawn from the results of the roots and the leaves will be presented. As several responses were already visible following 1 day exposure, when uranium concentrations in the leaves were negligible, a root-to-shoot signaling system was suggested in which plastids could be important sensing sites. While lipid peroxidation, based on the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive compounds, was observed after exposure to 100 μM uranium, affecting membrane structure and function, a transient concentration dependent response pattern was visible for lipoxygenase initiated lipid peroxidation. This transient character of uranium stress responses in leaves was emphasized by results of lipoxygenase (LOX2) and antioxidative enzyme transcript levels, enzyme capacities and glutathione concentrations both in time as with concentration. The ascorbate redox balance seemed an important modulator of uranium stress responses in the leaves as in addition to the previous transient responses, the total ascorbate concentration and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate redox balance increased in a concentration and time dependent manner. This could represent either a slow transient response or a stable increase with regard to plant acclimation to uranium stress. Copyright

  3. Kinetic effects of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration: nitrile hydratase insights from bioinspired ruthenium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Davinder; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic investigations inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase were performed on a series of ruthenium(II) complexes to determine the effect of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration. The rate of benzonitrile hydration was quantified as a function of catalyst, nitrile, and water concentrations. Precatalysts L(n)RuPPh3 (n = 1-3; L(1) = 4,7-bis(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(2) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(3) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfenato-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane) were activated by substitution of triphenylphosphine with substrate in hot dimethylformamide solution. Rate measurements are consistent with a dynamic equilibrium between inactive aqua (L(n)Ru-OH2) and active nitrile (L(n)Ru-NCR) derivatives with K = 21 ± 1, 9 ± 0.9, and 23 ± 3 for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Subsequent hydration of the L(n)Ru-NCR intermediate yields the amide product with measured hydration rate constants (k's) of 0.37 ± 0.01, 0.82 ± 0.07, and 1.59 ± 0.12 M(-1) h(-1) for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Temperature dependent studies reveal that sulfur oxidation lowers the enthalpic barrier by 27 kJ/mol, but increases the entropic barrier by 65 J/(mol K). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/LanL2DZ (Ru); 6-31G(d) (all other atoms)) support a nitrile bound catalytic cycle with lowering of the reaction barrier as a consequence of sulfur oxidation through enhanced nitrile binding and attack of the water nucleophile through a highly organized transition state.

  4. Styrene Oxidation by Copper(II Complexes Salen-Type Encapsulated into Nay Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuźniarska-Biernacka I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osadzenie kompleksu miedzi(II z zasadą Schitta typu salen na zeolicie typu NaY zostało prze powadzone za pomocą dwóch metod „flexible ligand" i „in situ”. Katalityczne właściwości otrzymanego kompleksu oraz jego heterogenizowanych analogów badano w reakcji utleniania styrenu w obecności TBHP. Jako rozpuszczalnik stosowano acetonitryl. Testowane katalizatory wykazują średnią aktywność katalityczną z tendencją wytwarzania aldehy du benzoesowego. Oba heterogenizowane katalizatory mogą być wykorzystywane ponownie bez utraty aktywności katalitycznych.

  5. Performance of commercially produced mixed-oxide fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, J.W.; Lawrence, L.A.

    1980-11-01

    Commercially produced fuels for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) were irradiated in EBR-II under conditions of high cladding temperature (approx. 700 0 C) and low power (approx. 200 W/cm) to verify that manufacturing processes did not introduce variables which significantly affect general fuel performance. Four interim examinations and a terminal examination were completed to a peak burnup of 5.2 at. % to provide irradiation data pertaining to fuel restructuring and dimensional stability at low fuel temperature, fuel-cladding reactions at high cladding temperature and general fuel behavior. The examinations indicate completely satisfactory irradiation performance for low heat rates and high cladding temperatures to 5.2 at. % burnup

  6. Thermodynamic study of (heptane + amine) mixtures. II. Excess and partial molar volumes at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepori, Luciano; Gianni, Paolo; Spanedda, Andrea; Matteoli, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Excess and partial molar volumes of primary (amines + heptane) mixtures. → Excess volumes are positive for small size amines and decrease as the size increases. → Group contributions to predict the partial molar volumes of amines in heptane. → The void volume is larger for branched than for linear amines in heptane. - Abstract: Excess molar volumes V E at 298.15 K were determined by means of a vibrating tube densimeter for binary mixtures of heptane + primary n-alkyl (C 3 to C 10 ) and branched amines (iso-propyl-, iso-, sec-, and tert-butyl-, iso-, tert-pentyl-, and pentan-3-amine) in the whole composition range. The apparent molar volumes of solid dodecyl- and tetradecylamine in heptane dilute solution were also determined. The V E values were found positive for mixtures involving C 3 to C 8 linear amines, with V E decreasing with chain lengthening. Heptane + nonyl and decylamine showed s-shaped, markedly asymmetric, curves. Mixtures with branched C 3 to C 5 amines displayed positive V E 's larger than those observed in the mixtures of the corresponding linear isomers. Partial molar volumes V o at infinite dilution in heptane were evaluated for the examined amines and compared with those of alkanes and alkanols taken from the literature. An additivity scheme, based on the intrinsic volume approach, was applied to estimate group (CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, C, NH 2 , and OH) contributions to V o . The effect of branching on V o and the limiting slope of the apparent excess molar volumes were evaluated and discussed in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions.

  7. AIR POLLUTION INFLUENCES ON EXHALED NITRIC OXIDE AMONG PEOPLE WITH TYPE II DIABETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Zanobetti, Antonella; Cohen, Allison; De Souza, Celine; Coull, Brent A; Horton, Edward S; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R

    2016-04-01

    In a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we examined associations of short-term air pollutant exposures with pulmonary inflammation, measured as fraction of exhaled pulmonary nitric oxide (FeNO). Sixty-nine Boston Metropolitan residents with T2DM completed up to 5 bi-weekly visits with 321 offline FeNO measurements. We measured ambient concentrations of particle mass, number and components at our stationary central site. Ambient concentrations of gaseous air pollutants were obtained from state monitors. We used linear models with fixed effects for participants, adjusting for 24-hour mean temperature, 24-hour mean water vapor pressure, season, and scrubbed room NO the day of the visit, to estimate associations between FeNO and interquartile range increases in exposure. Interquartile increases in the 6-hour averages of black carbon (BC) (0.5 μg/m 3 ) and particle number (PN) (1,000 particles/cm 3 ) were associated with increases in FeNO of 3.84% (95% CI 0.60% to 7.18%) and 9.86 % (95% CI 3.59% to 16.52%), respectively. We also found significant associations of increases in FeNO with increases in 24-hour moving averages of BC, PN and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Recent studies have focused on FeNO as a marker for eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation in asthmatic populations. This study adds support to the relevance of FeNO as a marker for pulmonary inflammation in diabetic populations, whose underlying chronic inflammatory status is likely to be related to innate immunity and proinflammatory adipokines.

  8. Preliminary thermal and thermomechanical modeling for the near surface test facility heater experiments at Hanford. Volume II: Appendix D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Remer, J.S.

    1978-12-01

    Appendix D is a complete set of figures illustrating the detailed calculations necessary for designing the heater experiments at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) at Hanford, Washington. The discussion of the thermal and thermomechanical modeling that yielded these calculations is presented in Volume 1. A summary of the figures and the models they illustrate is given in table D1. The most important figures have also been included in the discussion in Volume 1, and Table D2 lists the figure numbers in this volume that correspond to figure numbers used there

  9. Development of a reduced-graphene-oxide based superparamagnetic nanocomposite for the removal of nickel (II) from an aqueous medium via a fluorescence sensor platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nandi, D

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced-graphene-oxide based superparamagnetic nanocomposite (GC) was fabricated and applied for the remediation of Ni(II) from an aqueous medium. The as-prepared GC was extensively characterized by Raman, TEM, AFM, SEM–EDX, SQUID, and BET analyses...

  10. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microcystis aeruginosa-laden water treatment using enhanced coagulation by persulfate/Fe(II), ozone and permanganate: Comparison of the simultaneous and successive oxidant dosing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Qu, Fangshu; Chen, Wei; Liang, Heng; Wang, Tianyu; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Yu, Huarong; Li, Guibai; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2017-11-15

    In this study, the application of enhanced coagulation with persulfate/Fe(II), permanganate and ozone for Microcystis-laden water treatment was investigated. Two oxidant dosage strategies were compared in terms of the organic removal performance: a simultaneous dosing strategy (SiDS) and a successive dosing strategy (SuDS). To optimize the oxidant species, oxidant doses and oxidant dosage strategy, the zeta potential, floc size and dimension fraction, potassium release and organic removal efficiency during the coagulation of algae-laden water were systematically investigated and comprehensively discussed. Ozonation causes most severe cell lysis and reduces organic removal efficiency because it releases intracellular organics. Moreover, ozonation can cause the release of odor compounds such as 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) and geosmin (GSM). With increasing doses, the performance of pollutant removal by coagulation enhanced by persulfate/Fe(II) or permanganate did not noticeably improve, which suggests that a low dosage of persulfate/Fe(II) and permanganate is the optimal strategy to enhance coagulation of Microcystis-laden water. The SiDS performs better than the SuDS because more Microcystis cell lysis occurs and less DOC is removed when oxidants are added before the coagulants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a wireless MEMS multifunction sensor system and field demonstration of embedded sensors for monitoring concrete pavements, volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This two-pronged study evaluated the performance of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) micro-electromechanical sensors and systems (MEMS) embedded in concrete pavement (Final Report Volume I) and developed a wireless MEMS multifunctional sensor system f...

  13. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: selected immobilization processes, directory of selected European organizations involved in HLW management, U.S. high-level waste inventories, and selected European HLW program

  14. N-3 PUFAs protect against aortic inflammation and oxidative stress in angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Wales

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with infiltration of inflammatory cells into the aortic wall. The inflammatory response is also evident in animal models, such as apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/- mice that have been infused with angiotensin II, prior to development of aortic aneurysm. Since omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs and their metabolites have anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving activity, we hypothesised that dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs would protect against inflammatory processes in this mouse model. Twenty C57 and 20 ApoE-/- 3-4 week old male mice were supplemented with a low (0.14%, n = 10/group or high (0.70%, n = 10/group n-3 PUFA diet for 8 weeks before 2-day infusion with 0.9% saline or angiotensin II (1000 ng/kg/min. Four ApoE-/- mice on the low n-3 PUFA diet and none of the ApoE-/- mice on the high n-3 PUFA diet showed morphological evidence of abdominal aortic dissection. The plasma concentration of the n-3 PUFA metabolite, resolvin D1 was higher in angiotensin II-infused ApoE-/- mice fed the high, compared to the low n-3 PUFA diet. The number of neutrophils and macrophages infiltrating the abdominal aorta was elevated in ApoE-/- mice on the low n-3 PUFA diet, and this was significantly attenuated in mice that were fed the high n-3 PUFA diet. Most neutrophils and macrophages were associated with dissected aortas. Immunoreactivity of the catalytic subunit of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase, Nox2, and superoxide were elevated in ApoE-/- mice that were fed the low n-3 PUFA diet, and this was also significantly attenuated in mice that were fed the high n-3 PUFA diet. Together, the findings indicate that supplementation of ApoE-/- mice with a diet high in n-3 PUFA content protected the mice against pro-inflammatory and oxidative stress responses following short-term infusion with angiotensin II.

  15. Oxidation of Bromide to Bromine by Ruthenium(II) Bipyridine-Type Complexes Using the Flash-Quench Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kelvin Yun-Da; Chang, I-Jy

    2017-07-17

    Six ruthenium complexes, [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ (1), [Ru(bpy) 2 (deeb)] 2+ (2), [Ru(deeb) 2 (dmbpy)] 2+ (3), [Ru(deeb) 2 (bpy)] 2+ (4), [Ru(deeb) 3 ] 2+ (5), and [Ru(deeb) 2 (bpz)] 2+ (6) (bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine; deeb: 4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine; dmbpy: 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, bpz: 2,2'-bipyrazine), have been employed to sensitize photochemical oxidation of bromide to bromine. The oxidation potential for complexes 1-6 are 1.26, 1.36, 1.42, 1.46, 1.56, and 1.66 V vs SCE, respectively. The bimolecular rate constants for the quenching of complexes 1-6 by ArN 2 + (bromobenzenediazonium) are determined as 1.1 × 10 9 , 1.6 × 10 8 , 1.4 × 10 8 , 1.2 × 10 8 , 6.4 × 10 7 , and 8.9 × 10 6 M -1 s -1 , respectively. Transient kinetics indicated that Br - reacted with photogenerated Ru(III) species at different rates. Bimolecular rate constants for the oxidation of Br - by the Ru(III) species derived from complexes 1-5 are observed as 1.2 × 10 8 , 1.3 × 10 9 , 4.0 × 10 9 , 4.8 × 10 9 , and 1.1 × 10 10 , M -1 s -1 , respectively. The last reaction kinetics observed in the three-component system consisting of a Ru sensitizer, quencher, and bromide is shown to be independent of the Ru sensitizer. The final product was identified as bromine by its reaction with hexene. The last reaction kinetics is assigned to the disproportionation reaction of Br 2 -• ions, for which the rate constant is determined as 5 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 . Though complex 6 has the highest oxidation potential in the Ru(II)/Ru(III) couple, its excited state fails to react with ArN 2 + sufficiently for subsequent reactions. The Ru(III) species derived from complex 1 reacts with Br - at the slowest rate. Complexes 2-5 are excellent photosensitizers to drive photooxidation of bromide to bromine.

  16. Unraveling uranium induced oxidative stress related responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Part II: responses in the leaves and general conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie, E-mail: nvanhoud@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Cuypers, Ann [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Horemans, Nele [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Remans, Tony; Opdenakker, Kelly; Smeets, Karen [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bello, Daniel Martinez [Hasselt University, Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Havaux, Michel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA)/Cadarache, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, Departement d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale et de Microbiologie, Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosynthese, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vangronsveld, Jaco [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    The cellular redox balance seems an important modulator under heavy metal stress. While for other heavy metals these processes are well studied, oxidative stress related responses are also known to be triggered under uranium stress but information remains limited. This study aimed to further unravel the mechanisms by which plants respond to uranium stress. Seventeen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown on a modified Hoagland solution under controlled conditions, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 {mu}M uranium for 1, 3 and 7 days. While in Part I of this study oxidative stress related responses in the roots were discussed, this second Part II discusses oxidative stress related responses in the leaves and general conclusions drawn from the results of the roots and the leaves will be presented. As several responses were already visible following 1 day exposure, when uranium concentrations in the leaves were negligible, a root-to-shoot signaling system was suggested in which plastids could be important sensing sites. While lipid peroxidation, based on the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive compounds, was observed after exposure to 100 {mu}M uranium, affecting membrane structure and function, a transient concentration dependent response pattern was visible for lipoxygenase initiated lipid peroxidation. This transient character of uranium stress responses in leaves was emphasized by results of lipoxygenase (LOX2) and antioxidative enzyme transcript levels, enzyme capacities and glutathione concentrations both in time as with concentration. The ascorbate redox balance seemed an important modulator of uranium stress responses in the leaves as in addition to the previous transient responses, the total ascorbate concentration and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate redox balance increased in a concentration and time dependent manner. This could represent either a slow transient response or a stable increase with regard to plant acclimation to uranium stress

  17. Diversity and Transcriptional Levels of RuBisCO Form II of Sulfur-Oxidizing γ-Proteobacteria in Coastal-Upwelling Waters with Seasonal Anoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Léniz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal wind-driven upwelling, high primary production in surface waters, and oxygen deficiency in subsurface waters characterize the coastal ecosystem of the subtropical eastern South Pacific (ESP, and shape the nature and dynamics of the microbial community structure and function. We investigated the diversity, abundance, and transcriptional levels of the gene encoding the large subunit form II of the RuBisCO enzyme (cbbM in the pelagic microbial community at a continental-shelf site off central Chile over 2 years. We focused on cbbM genes affiliated with the sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria cluster, whose members are known to dominate in oxygen-deficient marine environments and are highly abundant in the study area. Phylogenetic analysis of cbbM sequences suggests the presence of a novel group of chemolithoautotrophs, closely related to the SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 clade. Through (RT-qPCR, we studied the cbbM gene abundance and transcript dynamics over an annual cycle, finding a significantly higher number of cbbM copies per unit volume in months of active upwelling and at depths in which oxygen was scarce or absent. The same temporal pattern was observed at the transcriptional level. We also analyzed the relative expression of key genes for carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycling in six metatranscriptomic datasets, for two characteristic periods within the annual cycle: the anoxic upwelling and the suboxic downwelling. Our results indicate that coastal waters of the subtropical ESP contain transcriptionally active populations of carbon fixing pelagic bacteria, whose dynamics is controlled, in large part, by fluctuations in oxygen levels. They also suggest that chemolithoautotrophic processes coupled to the sulfur and nitrogen cycles become increasingly important for the carbon economy of marine coastal waters as oxygen concentrations decline.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with a covalently attached copper(II) salen complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Bazarganipour, Mehdi

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyl functionalized copper(II) Schiff-base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-ethylene-1,2-diaminecopper(II), [Cu((OH) 2-salen)], has been covalently anchored on modified MWCNTs. The new modified MWCNTs ([Cu((OH) 2-salen)]-MWCNTs) have been characterized by TEM, thermal analysis, XRD, XPS, UV-vis, DRS, FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The modified copper(II) MWCNTs solid was used to affect the catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene with tert-butylhydroperoxide as the oxidant at 333 K. The system is truly heterogeneous (no leaching observed) and reusable (no decrease in activity) in three consecutive runs. Acetophenone was the major product though small amounts of o- and p-hydroxyacetophenones were also formed revealing that C-H bond activation takes place both at benzylic and aromatic ring carbon atoms. Ring hydroxylation was more over the "neat" complexes than over the encapsulated complexes.

  19. Size, density and composition of cell-mineral aggregates formed during anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation: Impact on modern and ancient environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R.; Huelin, Sonia; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-Fe(III) mineral aggregates produced by anoxygenic Fe(II)-oxidizing photoautotrophic microorganisms (photoferrotrophs) may be influential in the modern Fe cycle and were likely an integral part of ancient biogeochemical cycles on early Earth. While studies have focused on the environmental...... conditions under which modern photoferrotrophs grow and the kinetics, physiology and mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation, no systematic analyses of the physico-chemical characteristics of those aggregates, such as shape, size, density and chemical composition, have as yet been conducted. Herein, experimental...... results show most aggregates are bulbous or ragged in shape, with an average particle size of 10-40??m, and densities that typically range between 2.0 and 2.4g/cm 3; the cell fraction of the aggregates increased and their density decreased with initial Fe(II) concentration. The mineralogy of the ferric...

  20. Central receiver solar thermal power system. Phase 1. CDRL item 2; Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume II. System decription and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1977-10-01

    An active system analysis and integration effort has been maintained. These activities have included the transformation of initial program requirements into a preliminary system design, the evolution of subsystem requirements which lay the foundation for subsystem design and test activity, and the overseeing of the final preliminary design effort to ensure that the subsystems are operationally compatible and capable of producing electricity at the lowest possible cost per unit of energy. Volume II of the Preliminary Design Report presents the results of the overall system effort that went on during this contract. The effort is assumed to include not only the total system definition and design but also all subsystem interactions.