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Sample records for oxide reaction controlled

  1. Reduced-graphene-oxide supported tantalum-based electrocatalysts: Controlled nitrogen doping and oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Mo, Qijie; Guo, Yulin; Chen, Nana; Gao, Qingsheng

    2018-03-01

    Controlled N-doping is feasible to engineer the surface stoichiometry and the electronic configuration of metal-oxide electrocatalysts toward efficient oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). Taking reduced graphene oxide supported tantalum-oxides (TaOx/RGO) for example, this work illustrated the controlled N-doping in both metal-oxides and carbon supports, and the contribution to the improved ORR activity. The active N-doped TaOx/RGO electrocatalysts were fabricated via SiO2-assisted pyrolysis, in which the amount and kind of N-doping were tailored toward efficient electrocatalysis. The optimal nanocomposites showed a quite positive half-wave potential (0.80 V vs. RHE), the excellent long-term stability, and the outstanding tolerance to methanol crossing. The improvement in ORR was reasonably attributed to the synergy between N-doped TaOx and N-doped RGO. Elucidating the importance of controlled N-doping for electrocatalysis, this work will open up new opportunities to explore noble-metal-free materials for renewable energy applications.

  2. Synthetic Control of Kinetic Reaction Pathway and Cationic Ordering in High-Ni Layered Oxide Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dawei [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Kou, Ronghui [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Ren, Yang [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Sun, Cheng-Jun [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhao, Hu [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Zhang, Ming-Jian [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Li, Yan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Huq, Ashifia [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Ko, J. Y. Peter [The Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Pan, Feng [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Sun, Yang-Kook [Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 South Korea; Yang, Yong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Bai, Jianming [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Wang, Feng [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA

    2017-08-25

    Nickel-rich layered transition metal oxides, LiNi1-x(MnCo)(x)O-2 (1-x >= 0.5), are appealing candidates for cathodes in next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for electric vehicles and other large-scale applications, due to their high capacity and low cost. However, synthetic control of the structural ordering in such a complex quaternary system has been a great challenge, especially in the presence of high Ni content. Herein, synthesis reactions for preparing layered LiNi0.7Mn0.15Co0.15O2 (NMC71515) by solid-state methods are investigated through a combination of time-resolved in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy measurements. The real-time observation reveals a strong temperature dependence of the kinetics of cationic ordering in NMC71515 as a result of thermal-driven oxidation of transition metals and lithium/oxygen loss that concomitantly occur during heat treatment. Through synthetic control of the kinetic reaction pathway, a layered NMC71515 with low cationic disordering and a high reversible capacity is prepared in air. The findings may help to pave the way for designing high-Ni layered oxide cathodes for LIBs.

  3. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  4. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  5. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m2 g-1), a high mass activity (398 mA mg-1) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm-2), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst.

  6. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D) + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; Kolb, Charles; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas; Brune, William

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D) + N2O → 2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3 → NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D) + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO3-) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  7. Controlling site selectivity in Pd-catalyzed oxidative cross-coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Thomas W; Hull, Kami L; Sanford, Melanie S

    2011-03-30

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the factors controlling site selectivity in the Pd-mediated oxidative coupling of 1,3-disubstituted and 1,2,3-trisubstituted arenes (aryl-H) with cyclometalating substrates (L~C-H). The influence of both the concentration and the steric/electronic properties of the quinone promoter are studied in detail. In addition, the effect of steric/electronic modulation of the carboxylate ligand is discussed. Finally, we demonstrate that substitution of the carboxylate for a carbonate X-type ligand leads to a complete reversal in site selectivity for many arene substrates. The origins of these trends in site selectivity are discussed in the context of the mechanism of Pd-catalyzed oxidative cross-coupling.

  8. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegrist, Robert L; Crimi, Michelle; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Illangasekare, Tissa; Dugan, Pamela; Heiderscheidt, Jeff; Jackson, Shannon; Petri, Ben; Sahl, Jason; Seitz, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation involves the introduction of chemical oxidants into the subsurface to destroy organic contaminants in soil and ground water, with the goal being to reduce the mass, mobility...

  9. Glutaredoxin-2 is required to control oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac muscle by mediating deglutathionylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Xuan, Jian Ying; McBride, Skye; Maharsy, Wael; Thorn, Stephanie; Holterman, Chet E; Kennedy, Christopher R J; Rippstein, Peter; deKemp, Robert; da Silva, Jean; Nemer, Mona; Lou, Marjorie; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2014-05-23

    Glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) modulates the activity of several mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue by catalyzing deglutathionylation reactions. However, it remains uncertain whether Grx2 is required to control mitochondrial ATP output in heart. Here, we report that Grx2 plays a vital role modulating mitochondrial energetics and heart physiology by mediating the deglutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins. Deletion of Grx2 (Grx2(-/-)) decreased ATP production by complex I-linked substrates to half that in wild type (WT) mitochondria. Decreased respiration was associated with increased complex I glutathionylation diminishing its activity. Tissue glucose uptake was concomitantly increased. Mitochondrial ATP output and complex I activity could be recovered by restoring the redox environment to that favoring the deglutathionylated states of proteins. Grx2(-/-) hearts also developed left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and mice became hypertensive. Mitochondrial energetics from Grx2 heterozygotes (Grx2(+/-)) were also dysfunctional, and hearts were hypertrophic. Intriguingly, Grx2(+/-) mice were far less hypertensive than Grx2(-/-) mice. Thus, Grx2 plays a vital role in modulating mitochondrial metabolism in cardiac muscle, and Grx2 deficiency leads to pathology. As mitochondrial ATP production was restored by the addition of reductants, these findings may be relevant to novel redox-related therapies in cardiac disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Access to lincomycin N-oxide isomers controlled by reaction conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, Stanislav; Sedmera, Petr; Halada, Petr; Havlíček, Libor; Spížek, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2004), s. 2943-2945 ISSN 0040-4039 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020002 Keywords : lincomycin oxidation * hydrogen peroxide * alkaline Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.484, year: 2004

  11. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Contact Areas. Ground Water, 36(4):495-502. Atlas , R.M., and R. Bartha (1987). Microbial Ecology , Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company, Menlo Park...relatively few species ( Atlas and Bartha 1987). If selection for bioremediation processes following oxidation does occur, competition for substrates...Experiments.....................................................................3-23 3.6.3. Microbial Culture Preparation for Evaluation of Coupling

  12. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D  + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3 is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2 to nitric acid (HNO3, making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2 radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2 radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D + N2O  →  2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3  →  NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS measurements with nitrate (NO3− reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  13. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  14. Characterization of catalytic supports based in mixed oxides for control reactions of NO and N2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Perez H, R.; Gomez C, A.; Diaz, G.

    1999-01-01

    The catalytic supports Al 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 -La 2 O 3 were prepared by the Precipitation and Coprecipitation techniques. The catalytic supports Al 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 -La 2 O 3 were characterized by several techniques to determine: texture (Bet), crystallinity (XRD), chemical composition (Sem)(Ftir) and it was evaluated their total acidity by reaction with 2-propanol. The investigation will be continued with the cobalt addition and this will be evaluated for its catalytic activity in control reactions of N O and N 2 O. (Author)

  15. Application of photo-excitation reaction on titanium oxide thin film for control of wettability; Sanka chitann hakumakujo no hikari reiki hanno no nuresei seigyo eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Nakajima, A.; Hashimoto, K. [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Takada, Y. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-03-31

    It is clarified that the photo-excitation hydrophilic reaction increasing wettability remarkably is induced by changing surface structure of titanium oxide radiated light. There are already many examples being in practical use of coating products applied hydrophilic reaction of titanium oxide surface such as drip-proof side millers for automobiles, self-cleaning building materials, and the like. When surface of titanium oxide having high activities for oxidisation and decomposition is coated organic materials and radiated light, wettability of surface changes as organic materials are decomposed. If it is possible to change wettability shaping pattern drastically by radiating light, the possibility of application for printing materials will be developed. After increasing contact angle by coating water and oil repellent on the titanium oxide thin film, images can be shaped by radiating light into pattern for changing surface of titanium oxide to be ultra hydrophilicity as decomposition of repellent. At that time, contact angle is 150 degree in water, 80 degree in oil, for not radiated aria, and is 0 degree in water and oil for radiated aria. Application for control technology of wettability keeps possibility of broader development to itself, not staying ability of self-cleaning and drip-proof. (NEDO)

  16. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures

  17. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  18. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  19. Oxidation reactions of bilirubin in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Hari; Gopinathan, C.

    1990-01-01

    The radical cation of bilirubin (BR) has been tentatively identified as a transient intermediate in the reactions of BR with different oxidizing species such as Br 2 - , I 2 - and CH 3 I . OH. The rate constants for these reactions have been determined as 2.4 x 10 9 , l.0 x 10 9 and 2.7 x 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively. Biliverdin is likely to be among the stable products formed on oxidation of BR by these oxidizing species. (author)

  20. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    Heterogeneously catalyzed selective oxidation reactions have attracted a lot of attention in recent time. The first part of the present thesis provides an overview over heterogeneous copper and silver catalysts for selective oxidations in the liquid phase and compared the performance and catalytic...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a catalyst...... revealed that all catalysts were more active in combination with ceria nanoparticles and that under the tested reaction conditions silver was equally or even more efficient than the gold catalysts. Calcination at 900 °C of silver on silica prepared by impregnation afforded a catalyst which was used...

  1. Shape-controlled synthesis of Pd polyhedron supported on polyethyleneimine-reduced graphene oxide for enhancing the efficiency of hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Panpan; Li, Feng; Ma, Jianxin; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xueyao; Huo, Hongfei; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activity of noble-metal nanoparticles (NPs) often has closely connection with their sizes and geometric shape. In the work, polyhedral NPs of palladium (Pd) with controlled sizes, shapes, and different proportions of {100} to {111} facets on the surface were prepared by a seed-mediated approach. Electrochemical experiment demonstrates that the catalytic performance of the Pd nanocubes (NCs) enclosed by {100} facets is more active than Pd octahedrons enclosed by {111} facets for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), which is consistent with density functional theory (DFT) calculation results. Meanwhile, with the assistance of a polyethyleneimine-reduced graphene oxide (PEI-rGO) support, the examined Pd cube/PEI-rGO50:1 (10 wt. %) electrocatalyst presents outstanding HER activity comparable with that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. This correlation between the HER catalytic activity and surface structure will contribute to the reasonable design of Pd catalysts for HER with high efficiency and low metal loading.

  2. Advances in the catalysts development in base of mixed oxides for control reactions of N2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.A.; Perez, R.; Gomez, A.; Diaz, G.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic supports Al 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 -La 2 O 3 were prepared by the precipitation and coprecipitation techniques. The catalytic supports Al 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 -La 2 O 3 were characterized by several techniques for to determine texture (BET), crystallinity (XRD), chemical composition (SEM), FTIR and it was evaluated their total acidity by the reaction with 2-propanol. It was continued with the cobalt addition by Impregnation and coprecipitation and it was evaluated its catalytic activity in the N 2 O decomposition reaction. Also it was realized the N 2 O reduction with Co using these catalysts. (Author)

  3. Some reactions of oxidizing radicals with enzymes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundall, R.B.; Bisby, R.H.; Hoe, S.T.; Sims, H.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    A range of oxidizing radicals including some inorganic radical anions and the superoxide radical, can be generated by radiolysis of aqueous solutions. These radicals are more selective in their reactions with amino acids than the hydroxyl radical. Factors controlling the apparent reactivity of radical anions with proteins, such as free radical equilibria and ion-binding, are described. The superoxide radical inactivates papain by reaction with the cysteine residue. This reaction has been studied in solutions subjected to radiations of varying linear energy transfer. (Auth.)

  4. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  5. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  6. Electron transfer number control of the oxygen reduction reaction on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxides for the air electrodes of zinc-air batteries and organic degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The mean electron transfer number (n) of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is controlled by nitrogen doping for the air electrodes of Zn-air batteries and electrochemical organic degradation. Melamine and pyrrole are employed as the nitrogen sources for fabricating N-doped rGO (N-rGO) by microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis (MAHS). The n value of the ORR is determined by the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry and is successfully controlled from 2.34 to 3.93 by preparation variables. The N-doped structures are examined by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis. The morphology and the defect degree of N-rGOs are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. N-rGOs with high and low n values are employed as the air electrode catalysts of zinc-air batteries and in-situ hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) generation, respectively. The highest discharge cell voltage of 1.235 V for a Zn-air battery is obtained at 2 mA cm"−"2 meanwhile the current efficiency of H_2O_2 generation in 1-h electrolysis at 0 V (vs. RHE) reaches 43%. The electrocatalytic degradation of orange G (OG), analyzed by UV-VIS absorption spectra, reveals a high decoloration degree from the relative absorbance of 0.38 for the azo π-conjugation structure of OG. - Highlights: • The mean electron transfer number (n) is controlled by nitrogen doping. • Melamine and pyrrole are used as the nitrogen sources for fabricating N-rGO. • The n value is successfully controlled from 2.34 to 3.93 by preparation variables. • The highest discharge cell voltage of 1.235 V for a Zn-air battery. • The current efficiency of H_2O_2 generation 1-h electrolysis reaches 43%.

  7. Electron transfer number control of the oxygen reduction reaction on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxides for the air electrodes of zinc-air batteries and organic degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; Li, Po-Chieh; Hu, Chi-Chang, E-mail: cchu@che.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-11-01

    The mean electron transfer number (n) of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is controlled by nitrogen doping for the air electrodes of Zn-air batteries and electrochemical organic degradation. Melamine and pyrrole are employed as the nitrogen sources for fabricating N-doped rGO (N-rGO) by microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis (MAHS). The n value of the ORR is determined by the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry and is successfully controlled from 2.34 to 3.93 by preparation variables. The N-doped structures are examined by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis. The morphology and the defect degree of N-rGOs are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. N-rGOs with high and low n values are employed as the air electrode catalysts of zinc-air batteries and in-situ hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) generation, respectively. The highest discharge cell voltage of 1.235 V for a Zn-air battery is obtained at 2 mA cm{sup −2} meanwhile the current efficiency of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation in 1-h electrolysis at 0 V (vs. RHE) reaches 43%. The electrocatalytic degradation of orange G (OG), analyzed by UV-VIS absorption spectra, reveals a high decoloration degree from the relative absorbance of 0.38 for the azo π-conjugation structure of OG. - Highlights: • The mean electron transfer number (n) is controlled by nitrogen doping. • Melamine and pyrrole are used as the nitrogen sources for fabricating N-rGO. • The n value is successfully controlled from 2.34 to 3.93 by preparation variables. • The highest discharge cell voltage of 1.235 V for a Zn-air battery. • The current efficiency of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation 1-h electrolysis reaches 43%.

  8. Methods for forming complex oxidation reaction products including superconducting articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, R.A.; Urquhart, A.W.; Nagelberg, A.S.; Newkirk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for producing a superconducting complex oxidation reaction product of two or more metals in an oxidized state. It comprises positioning at least one parent metal source comprising one of the metals adjacent to a permeable mass comprising at least one metal-containing compound capable of reaction to form the complex oxidation reaction product in step below, the metal component of the at least one metal-containing compound comprising at least a second of the two or more metals, and orienting the parent metal source and the permeable mass relative to each other so that formation of the complex oxidation reaction product will occur in a direction towards and into the permeable mass; and heating the parent metal source in the presence of an oxidant to a temperature region above its melting point to form a body of molten parent metal to permit infiltration and reaction of the molten parent metal into the permeable mass and with the oxidant and the at least one metal-containing compound to form the complex oxidation reaction product, and progressively drawing the molten parent metal source through the complex oxidation reaction product towards the oxidant and towards and into the adjacent permeable mass so that fresh complex oxidation reaction product continues to form within the permeable mass; and recovering the resulting complex oxidation reaction product

  9. Kinetics of the gas-phase tritium oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failor, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Homogeneous gas-phase kinetics of tritium oxidation (2T 2 + O 2 →2T 2 O) have been studied with a model that accounts explicitly for radiolysis of the major species and the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of ionic, excited-state, and neutral species. Results from model calculations are given for 10 -4 -1.0 mol% T 2 in O 2 (298 K, 1 atm). As the reaction evolves three different mechanisms control T 2 O production, each with a different overall rate expression and a different order with respect to the T 2 concentration. The effects of self-radiolysis of pure T 2 on the tritium oxidation reaction were calculated. Tritium atoms, the primary product of T 2 self-radiolysis, altered the oxidation mechanism only during the first few seconds following the initiation of the T 2 -O 2 reaction. Ozone, an important intermediate in T 2 oxidation, was monitored in-situ by U.V. absorption spectroscopy for 0.01-1.0 mol% T 2 an 1 atm O 2 . The shape of the experimental ozone time profile agreed with the model predictions. As predicted, the measured initial rate of ozone production varied linearly with initial T 2 concentration ([T 2 ] 0.6 o ), but at an initial rate one-third the predicted value. The steady-state ozone concentration ([O 3 ]ss) was predicted to be dependent on [T 2 ] 0.3 o , but the measured value was [T 2 ] 0.6 o , resulting in four times higher [O 3 ]ss than predicted for a 1.0% T 2 -O 2 mixture. Adding H 2 to the T 2 -O 2 mixture, to provide insight into the differences between the radiolytic and chemical behavior of the tritium, produced a greater decrease in [O 3 ]ss than predicted. Adjusting the reaction cell surface-to-volume ratio showed implications of minor surface removal of ozone

  10. The GC/AED studies on the reactions of sulfur mustard with oxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popiel, StanisIaw; Witkiewicz, Zygfryd; Szewczuk, Aleksander

    2005-01-01

    A gas chromatograph coupled with an atomic emission detector was used to identify and to determine the products formed on oxidation of sulfur mustard. The oxidation rate and the resulting oxidates were studied in relation to oxidant type and reaction medium parameters. Hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, sodium perborate, potassium monopercarbonate, ammonium peroxydisulfate, potassium peroxymonosulfate (oxone), and tert-butyl peroxide were used as oxidants. Oxidations were run in aqueous media or in solvents of varying polarities. The oxidation rate was found to be strongly related to oxidant type: potassium peroxymonosulfate (oxone) and sodium hypochlorite were fast-acting oxidants; sodium perborate, hydrogen peroxide, ammonium peroxydisulfate, and sodium monopercarbonate were moderate oxidants; tert-butyl peroxide was the slowest-acting oxidant. In non-aqueous solvents, the oxidation rate was strongly related to solvent polarity. The higher the solvent polarity, the faster the oxidation rate. In the acid and neutral media, the mustard oxidation rates were comparable. In the alkaline medium, oxidation was evidently slower. A suitable choice of the initial oxidant-to-mustard concentration ratio allowed to control the type of the resulting mustard oxidates. As the pH of the reaction medium was increased, the reaction of elimination of hydrogen chloride from mustard oxidates becomes more and more intensive

  11. Control of magnetism by electrical charge doping or redox reactions in a surface-oxidized Co thin film with a solid-state capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, T.; Koyama, T.; Chiba, D.

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the electric field (EF) effect on magnetism in a Co thin film with a naturally oxidized surface. The EF was applied to the oxidized Co surface through a gate insulator layer made of HfO2, which was formed using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The efficiency of the EF effect on the magnetic anisotropy in the sample with the HfO2 layer deposited at the appropriate temperature for the ALD process was relatively large compared to the previously reported values with an unoxidized Co film. The coercivity promptly and reversibly followed the variation in gate voltage. The modulation of the channel resistance was at most ˜0.02%. In contrast, a dramatic change in the magnetic properties including the large change in the saturation magnetic moment and a much larger EF-induced modulation of the channel resistance (˜10%) were observed in the sample with a HfO2 layer deposited at a temperature far below the appropriate temperature range. The response of these properties to the gate voltage was very slow, suggesting that a redox reaction dominated the EF effect on the magnetism in this sample. The frequency response for the capacitive properties was examined to discuss the difference in the mechanism of the EF effect observed here.

  12. Plasma and controlled thermonuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitsa, P.

    1980-01-01

    The principle and prospects are given of three methods of achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction. The original and so far most promising TOKAMAK method is presented invented in the USSR. Another method is the heating of a sphere about 1 mm in diameter from a mixture of deuterium and tritium by focused laser light from all sides. The third method consists in continuous plasma heating. A rope-like plasma discharge at a temperature of more than a million K results in the gas from microwave oscillations. The discharge is placed in a magnetic field and the ion temperature is increased by magneto-acoustic waves. A reactor is proposed operating on this principle and problems are pointed out which will have to be resolved. (M.S.)

  13. Plasma and controlled thermonuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitsa, P

    1980-06-01

    The principle and prospects are given of three methods of achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction. The original and so far most promising TOKAMAK method is presented invented in the USSR. Another method is the heating of a sphere about 1 mm in diameter from a mixture of deuterium and tritium by focused laser light from all sides. The third method consists in continuous plasma heating. A rope-like plasma discharge at a temperature of more than a million K results in the gas from microwave oscillations. The discharge is placed in a magnetic field and the ion temperature is increased by magneto-acoustic waves. A reactor is proposed operating on this principle and problems are pointed out which will have to be resolved.

  14. Molecular controls of the oxygenation and redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2013-06-10

    The broad classes of O(2)-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O(2)-binding functions. The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes.

  15. Molecular Controls of the Oxygenation and Redox Reactions of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I.; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The broad classes of O2-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O2-binding functions. Recent Advances: The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. Critical Issues: An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. Future Directions: This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2298–2313. PMID:23198874

  16. Reactions of organic zinc- and cadmium elementoxides with ethylene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.A.; Krasnov, Yu.N.

    1980-01-01

    Studied are reactions of triphenylmethoxy, -triphenylsiloxyethylzinc and -cadmium with ethylene oxide in ratio of 1:1. Reactions have been carried out in tolyene solutions in ampules sealed in argon atmosphere. It is found that interaction of triphenylsiloxy-, triphenylmethoxyethylcadmium and triphenylsiloxyethylzinc with ethylene oxide occurs at the metal-carbon bond with formation of implantation products. Triphenylmethoxyethylzinc reacts with ethylene oxide both at the metal-carbon and metal-oxygen bonds. Alkoxytriphenylsiloxyderivatives of zinc and cadmium are thermally instable and decompose under the conditions of reaction (130 deg C) with migration of phenyl group from silicon to zinc or cadmium, giving alkoxyphenylderivative and with bensene splitting out

  17. Green oxidations: Titanium dioxide induced tandem oxidation coupling reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeena, Vineet; Robinson, Ross S

    2009-01-01

    Summary The application of titanium dioxide as an oxidant in tandem oxidation type processes is described. Under microwave irradiation, quinoxalines have been synthesized in good yields from the corresponding ?-hydroxyketones.

  18. Versatile Dual Photoresponsive System for Precise Control of Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Bing, Wei; Wang, Faming; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-08-22

    A versatile method for photoregulation of chemical reactions was developed through a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive materials. This regulatory effect was achieved through photoresponsive modulation of reaction temperature and pH values, two prominent factors influencing reaction kinetics. Photothermal nanomaterial graphene oxide (GO) and photobase reagent malachite green carbinol base (MGCB) were selected for temperature and pH regulation, respectively. Using nanocatalyst- and enzyme-mediated chemical reactions as model systems, we demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of this method. In addition, a photoresponsive, multifunctional "Band-aid"-like hydrogel platform was presented for programmable wound healing. Overall, this simple, efficient, and reversible system was found to be effective for controlling a wide variety of chemical reactions. Our work may provide a method for remote and sustainable control over chemical reactions for industrial and biomedical applications.

  19. Positive patch test reactions to oxidized limonene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    to oxidized R-limonene. OBJECTIVE: To study the exposure to limonene among consecutive dermatitis patients reacting to oxidized R-limonene in an international setting, and to assess the relevance of the exposure for the patients' dermatitis. METHODS: Oxidized R-limonene 3.0% (containing limonene...... hydroperoxides at 0.33%) in petrolatum was tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Australia, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Spain, and Sweden. A questionnaire assessing exposure to limonene-containing products was completed. RESULTS: Overall, exposure to products containing limonene was found...

  20. Uranium oxidation: Characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water by infrared and sorption analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, E. L.; Smyrl, N. R.; Condon, J. B.; Eager, M. H.

    1984-04-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. The results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. Inert gas sorption analyses and diffuse reflectance infrared studies combined with electron microscopy prove valuable in defining the chemistry and morphology of the oxidic products and hydrated intermediates.

  1. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  2. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Some Environmentally Relevant Reactions of Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janoš Pavel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive forms of cerium oxide were prepared by a thermal decomposition of various precursors, namely carbonates, oxalates and citrates, commercially available nanocrystalline cerium oxide (nanoceria was involved in the study for comparison. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD were used to examine the morphology and crystallinity of the samples, respectively, whereas the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET method of nitrogen adsorption was used to determine surface areas. Interactions of cerium oxide with some phosphorus-containing compounds were investigated. Some of the examined samples, especially those prepared by annealing from carbonate precursors, exhibited an outstanding ability to destroy highly toxic organophosphates, such as pesticides (parathion methyl, or nerve agents (soman, VX. There were identified some relations between the degradation efficiency of cerium oxides and their crystallinity. It was also shown that cerium oxide is able to destroy one of widely used flame retardants - triphenyl phosphate. A phosphatase-mimetic activity of various cerium oxides was examined with the aid of a standardized phosphatase test.

  4. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  5. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  6. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourisse, D.

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [fr

  7. Reaction of iodine oxidation by potassium permanganate in tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, M.L.; Legin, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    Stoichiometry was determined and kinetics of iodine oxidation by potassium permanganate in tributylphosphate was studied. Kinetic scheme, which agrees with stoichiometry and experimental kinetic equation of the reaction, is suggested. A mixture is the reaction product. It is ascertained that when the mixture is heated, thermal decomposition of iodate to iodide occurs without elementary iodine separation, which is catalyzed by polymanganate

  8. Electrode Reaction Pathway in Oxide Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan

    Oxide anodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with the advantage of fuel flexibility, resistance to coarsening, small chemical expansion and etc. have been attracting increasing interest. Good performance has been reported with a few of perovskite structure anodes, such as (LaSr)(CrMn)O3. However, more improvements need to be made before meeting the application requirement. Understanding the oxidation mechanism is crucial for a directed optimization, but it is still on the early stage of investigation. In this study, reaction mechanism of oxide anodes is investigated on doped YCrO 3 with H2 fuel, in terms of the origin of electrochemical activity, rate-determining steps (RDS), extension of reactive zone, and the impact from overpotential under service condition to those properties. H2 oxidation on the YCs anodes is found to be limited by charge transfer and H surface diffusion. A model is presented to describe the elementary steps in H2 oxidation. From the reaction order results, it is suggested that any models without taking H into the charge transfer step are invalid. The nature of B site element determines the H2 oxidation kinetics primarily. Ni displays better adsorption ability than Co. However, H adsorption ability of such oxide anode is inferior to that of Ni metal anode. In addition, the charge transfer step is directly associated with the activity of electrons in the anode; therefore it can be significantly promoted by enhancement of the electron activity. It is found that A site Ca doping improves the polarization resistance about 10 times, by increasing the activity of electrons to promote the charge transfer process. For the active area in the oxide anode, besides the traditional three-phase boundary (3PB), the internal anode surface as two-phase boundary (2PB) is proven to be capable of catalytically oxidizing the H2 fuel also when the bulk lattice is activated depending on the B site elements. The contribution from each part is estimated by switching

  9. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yang Shengchun, E-mail: ysch1209@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); You Hongjun, E-mail: hjyou@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun [School of Science, MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  10. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Yan; Tong, Xi-Li; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Han, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ying-Yong; Jin, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Yong; Guo, Xiang-Yun

    2012-02-11

    Cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) were prepared by reducing copper acetate supported on graphite oxide using diethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent. The Cu(2)O/RGO composite exhibits excellent catalytic activity and remarkable tolerance to methanol and CO in the oxygen reduction reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  11. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Akimasa; Matsuzaki, Ryoko; Saeki, Yuzo

    1978-01-01

    The details of the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide were examined at 20 and 60 0 C. The main products by the reaction were vanadium dichloride oxide, sulfur, and hydrogen chloride. In addition to these products, small amounts of vanadium trichloride, vanadium tetrachloride, disulfur dichloride, and sulfur dioxide were formed. The formations of the above-mentioned reaction products can be explained as follows: The first stage is the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). Then the resulting sulfur reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + 2S(s)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l). The resulting disulfur dichloride subsequently reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + S 2 Cl 2 (l)→2VCl 4 (l) + S(s) + SO 2 (g). The resulting vanadium tetrachloride reacts with the sulfur formed during the reaction, 2VCl 4 (l) + 2S(s)→2VCl 3 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l), and also reacts with hydrogen sulfide, 2VCl 4 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VCl 3 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). (auth.)

  13. Solid-phase vibrational redox reactions in coordinated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikova, G.P.; Korol'kov, D.V.; Kostikov, Yu.P.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of multicomponent oxides (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x , etc.), incorporating different valency forms of each of two (or more) different elements have been compared with the properties of the known chemical systems, where vibrational (periodic) redox-reactions are realized a fortiori. The essence of the new theoretical concept suggested consists in the following: high-T c superconductivity of the complex oxides and similar compounds originates from vibrational redox reaction proceeding in solid phase and involving different valency atoms of every element

  14. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  15. Theoretical investigation of the reaction of Mn+ with ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Guo, Wenyue; Zhao, Lianming; Liu, Zhaochun; Lu, Xiaoqing; Shan, Honghong

    2012-01-12

    The potential energy surfaces of Mn(+) reaction with ethylene oxide in both the septet and quintet states are investigated at the B3LYP/DZVP level of theory. The reaction paths leading to the products of MnO(+), MnO, MnCH(2)(+), MnCH(3), and MnH(+) are described in detail. Two types of encounter complexes of Mn(+) with ethylene oxide are formed because of attachments of the metal at different sites of ethylene oxide, i.e., the O atom and the CC bond. Mn(+) would insert into a C-O bond or the C-C bond of ethylene oxide to form two different intermediates prior to forming various products. MnO(+)/MnO and MnH(+) are formed in the C-O activation mechanism, while both C-O and C-C activations account for the MnCH(2)(+)/MnCH(3) formation. Products MnO(+), MnCH(2)(+), and MnH(+) could be formed adiabatically on the quintet surface, while formation of MnO and MnCH(3) is endothermic on the PESs with both spins. In agreement with the experimental observations, the excited state a(5)D is calculated to be more reactive than the ground state a(7)S. This theoretical work sheds new light on the experimental observations and provides fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanism of ethylene oxide with transition metal cations.

  16. Nonlinear control of the Salnikov model reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores different nonlinear control schemes, applied to a simple model reaction. The model is the Salnikov model, consisting of two ordinary differential equations. The control strategies investigated are I/O-linearisation, Exact linearisation, exact linearisation combined with LQR...

  17. Gas phase reactions of nitrogen oxides with olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altshuller, A P; Cohen, I

    1961-01-01

    The nature of the condensation products formed in the gas phase reactions of nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide with pentene-1, 2-methylbutene-2, and 2-methylbutadiene-1,3 was investigated. The reactants were combined at partial pressures in the range of 0.1 to 2.5 mm with the total pressure at one atmosphere. The products were determined by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy and colorimetry. The condensates included primary and secondary nitro compounds and alkyl nitrates. Strong hydroxyl and single bond carbon to oxygen stretching vibrations indicate the presence of either nitroalcohols or simple aliphatic alcohols formed through oxidation reactions. Carbonyl stretching frequencies observable in some of the reactions support the conclusion that a portion of the reactants disappear by oxidation rather than by nitration processes. The available results do not indicate the presence of appreciable amounts of tert.-nitro compounds, conjugated nitro-olefins, or gem-dinitro-alkanes. The reactivities of the olefins with the nitrogen oxides are in the decreasing order: 2-methyl-butadiene-1,3, 2-methylbutene-2, pentene-1. 20 references.

  18. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-12-20

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  19. Kinetic and reaction pathways of methanol oxidation on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.W.; McCready, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol oxidation kinetics were measured on Pt wires in a flow reactor at pressures between 30 and 130 Pa. The kinetics were measured as a function of oxygen-to-methanol equivalence ratio phi and wire temperature. In methanol-lean feeds (phi 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were the only products; in methanol-rich feeds (phi > 1), CO, H 2 , H 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were observed. Experiments with 18 O 2 showed that the principal methanol oxidation pathway does not involve C-O bond dissociation. However, the 18 O 2 experiments, together with other features of the methanol oxidation data, also provided evidence for a minor oxidation pathway (accounting for less than 1% of the product CO 2 ) which proceeds through a carbon intermediate. A mathematical model is presented which describes the principal CH 3 OH oxidation pathway as a series reaction involving adsorbed H 2 CO and CO intermediates. Consistent with experimental results, the model predicts that inhibition by adsorbed CO should be weaker for CH 3 OH and H 2 CO oxidation than for CO oxidation. 34 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  20. Pulse radiolysis study on oxidation reactions of gallic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwibedy, P.; Dey, G.R.; Naik, D.B.; Kishore, Kamal

    1998-01-01

    Reactions of OH . /O - and other oxidising radicals viz. N 3 . , Br 2 .- , Cl 2 .- with gallic acid (GA) have been studied at various pHs. At pH 6.8, OH . radicals react with GA giving an adduct which in turn reacts with the parent GA to give a dimeric species. At pH 9.7, the initial OH adduct formed is able to oxidize GA to give a semi-oxidised species. At pH 12 and ∼ 13.6, OH . /O .- radicals directly bring about oxidation of GA. (author)

  1. Characterization of catalytic supports based in mixed oxides for control reactions of NO and N{sub 2}O; Caracterizacion de soportes cataliticos basados en oxidos mixtos para reacciones de control de NO y N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Perez H, R.; Gomez C, A.; Diaz, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The catalytic supports Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by the Precipitation and Coprecipitation techniques. The catalytic supports Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were characterized by several techniques to determine: texture (Bet), crystallinity (XRD), chemical composition (Sem)(Ftir) and it was evaluated their total acidity by reaction with 2-propanol. The investigation will be continued with the cobalt addition and this will be evaluated for its catalytic activity in control reactions of N O and N{sub 2}O. (Author)

  2. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian, A; Schoppmann, K; Sromicki, J; Brungs, S; von der Wiesche, M; Hock, B; Kolanus, W; Hemmersbach, R; Ullrich, O

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to...

  3. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  4. Practical considerations of pyrite oxidation control in uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The problems posed by the oxidation of pyrite in uranium tailings include the generation of sulfuric acid and acid sulfate metal salts. These have substantial negative impacts on watercourse biota by themselves, and the lowered pH levels tend to mobilize heavy metals present in the tailings the rate of oxidation of pyrite at lower pH levels is catalyzed by sulfur and iron oxidizing bacteria present in soils. No single clear solution to the problems came from this study. Exclusion of air is a most important preventative of bacterial catalysis of oxidation. Bactericides, chemically breaking the chain of integrated oxidation reactions, maintaining anaerobic conditions, or maintaining a neutral or alkaline pH all reduce the oxidation rate. Removal of pyrite by flotation will reduce but not eliminate the impact of pyrite oxidation. Controlled oxidation of the remaining sulfide in the flotation tails would provide an innocuous tailing so far as acidity generation is concerned

  5. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  6. Control of Surface and Edge Oxidation on Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kaci L; Wells, Rebekah A; Hu, Jun; Yang, Teng; Dong, Baojuan; Guo, Huaihong; Woomer, Adam H; Druffel, Daniel L; Alabanza, Anginelle; Tománek, David; Warren, Scott C

    2017-03-15

    Phosphorene is emerging as an important two-dimensional semiconductor, but controlling the surface chemistry of phosphorene remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that controlled oxidation of phosphorene determines the composition and spatial distribution of the resulting oxide. We used X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to measure the binding energy shifts that accompany oxidation. We interpreted these spectra by calculating the binding energy shift for 24 likely bonding configurations, including phosphorus oxides and hydroxides located on the basal surface or edges of flakes. After brief exposure to high-purity oxygen or high-purity water vapor at room temperature, we observed phosphorus in the +1 and +2 oxidation states; longer exposures led to a large population of phosphorus in the +3 oxidation state. To provide insight into the spatial distribution of the oxide, transmission electron microscopy was performed at several stages during the oxidation. We found crucial differences between oxygen and water oxidants: while pure oxygen produced an oxide layer on the van der Waals surface, water oxidized the material at pre-existing defects such as edges or steps. We propose a mechanism based on the thermodynamics of electron transfer to interpret these observations. This work opens a route to functionalize the basal surface or edges of two-dimensional (2D) black phosphorus through site-selective chemical reactions and presents the opportunity to explore the synthesis of 2D phosphorene oxide by oxidation.

  7. Sulphation reactions of oxidic dust particles in waste heat boiler environment. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranki, T.

    1999-09-01

    behaviour of flash smelting dust particles. Generally initial sulphation rate of small particles was noticed to be very fast, presumably until the whole oxide surface is covered by the dense sulphate layer. After the initial period the reaction rate slowed down and in some experiments even seemed to cease totally. At least after the fast start, sulphation of metal oxides was noticed to follow the parabolic rate law, which indicates that the rate controlling step is then solid-state diffusion through the dense growing sulphate layer. Most of the investigations suggest that the sulphate layer grows outwards from the oxide surface. The microstructure (porosity) of the particles was found to have a significant effect on the conversion rate. As a conclusion, based on several experiments with small calcium oxide particles sulphation is suggested to be a two-stage process: Initially chemical reaction controls the process until the surface coverage is complete, and weight of the sample increases linearly vs. time. This stage is followed by the parabolic reaction period, when the solid state diffusion controls the sulphate growth rate, and there is a parabolic relation between weight-gain and time. (orig.) 49 refs.

  8. Covalently Bonded Chitosan on Graphene Oxide via Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M. Castaño

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures have played an important role in creating a new field of materials based on carbon. Chemical modification of carbon nanostructures through grafting has been a successful step to improve dispersion and compatibility in solvents, with biomolecules and polymers to form nanocomposites. In this sense carbohydrates such as chitosan are extremely valuable because their functional groups play an important role in diversifying the applications of carbon nanomaterials. This paper reports the covalent attachment of chitosan onto graphene oxide, taking advantage of this carbohydrate at the nanometric level. Grafting is an innovative route to modify properties of graphene, a two-dimensional nanometric arrangement, which is one of the most novel and promising nanostructures. Chitosan grafting was achieved by redox reaction using different temperature conditions that impact on the morphology and features of graphene oxide sheets. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Raman and Energy Dispersive spectroscopies were used to study the surface of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide. Results show a successful modification indicated by the functional groups found in the grafted material. Dispersions of chitosan-grafted-graphene oxide samples in water and hexane revealed different behavior due to the chemical groups attached to the graphene oxide sheet.

  9. Positive patch test reactions to oxidized limonene: exposure and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus; Johansen, Jeanne D; Garcia-Bravo, Begoña; Gimenez Arnau, Ana; Goh, Chee-Leok; Nixon, Rosemary; White, Ian R

    2014-11-01

    R-Limonene is a common fragrance terpene found in domestic and industrial products. R-Limonene autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. In a recent multicentre study, 5.2% (range 2.3-12.1%) of 2900 patients showed a positive patch test reaction to oxidized R-limonene. To study the exposure to limonene among consecutive dermatitis patients reacting to oxidized R-limonene in an international setting, and to assess the relevance of the exposure for the patients' dermatitis. Oxidized R-limonene 3.0% (containing limonene hydroperoxides at 0.33%) in petrolatum was tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Australia, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Spain, and Sweden. A questionnaire assessing exposure to limonene-containing products was completed. Overall, exposure to products containing limonene was found and assessed as being probably relevant for the patients' dermatitis in 36% of the limonene-allergic patients. In Barcelona and Copenhagen, > 70% of the patients were judged to have had an exposure to limonene assessed as relevant. Oxidized R-limonene is a common fragrance allergen, and limonene was frequently found in the labelling on the patients' products, and assessed as relevant for the patients' dermatitis. A large number of domestic and occupational sources for contact with R-limonene were identified. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ionic Conductivity and its Role in Oxidation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Mazin Abdulla

    In the field of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a substantial portion of research is focused on the ability of some oxide materials to conduct oxygen anions through their structure. For electrolytes, the benefits of improving bulk transport of ions are obvious: decrease the resistive losses of the electrolyte, and device efficiency goes up and higher power densities are possible. Even for cathode materials, better bulk ion transport leads to an increase in the oxygen exchange rate at the cathode surface, and the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode surface is the rate limiting step for SOFC operation at intermediate temperatures (500-700ºC). As operation in this regime is a key step towards lowering the manufacturing cost and increasing the lifetime of devices, much effort is spent searching for new, more conductive materials, and analyzing existing materials to discover the structure-activity relationships that influence ionic conductivity. In the first part of this work, an overview is given of the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) techniques that are used to probe the structure of the materials in later parts. In the second part, NPD was used to analyze the structures of perovskite-type cathode materials, and show that increases in bulk conductivity led to increases in the surface oxygen exchange rate of these materials. In the final part, the methods used for SOFC cathode design were applied towards the design of oxide catalysts used for certain hydrocarbon partial oxidation reactions. The reactions studied follow the Mars van Krevelen mechanism, where oxygen atoms in the catalyst are consumed as part of the reaction and are subsequently replenished by oxygen in the gas phase. Similar to SOFC cathode operation, these processes include an oxygen reduction step, so it was hypothesized that increasing the ionic conductivity of the catalysts would improve their performance, just as it does for SOFC cathode materials. While the results are preliminary, the

  11. Mechanism of catalytic action of oxide systems in reactions of aldehyde oxidation to carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushkevich, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanism of selective action of oxide catalysts (on the base of V 2 O 4 , MoO 3 ) of aldehyde oxidation to acids is considered, reaction acrolein oxidation to acrylic acid is taken as an example. Multistage mechanism of the process is established; it involves consequent transformation of coordination-bonded aldehyde into carbonyl-bonded aldehyde and symmetric carboxylate. Principles of active surface construction are formulated, they take into account the activity of stabilization center of concrete intermediate compound and bond energy of oxygen with surface. (author)

  12. Long life reaction control system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullo, Thomas J.; Judd, Craig

    1993-02-01

    Future single stage to orbit systems will utilize oxygen/hydrogen propellants in their main propulsion means due to the propellant's high energy content and environmental acceptability. Operational effectiveness studies and life cycle cost studies have indicated that minimizing the number of different commodities on a given vehicle not only reduces cost, but reduces the ground span times in both the pre- and postflight operations. Therefore, oxygen and hydrogen should be used for the reaction controls systems, eliminating the need to deal with toxic or corrosive fluids. When the hydrogen scramjet powered NASP design development began in 1985, new system design studies considered overall integration of subsystems; in the context of that approach, O2/H2 reaction controls system were more than competitive with storable propellant systems and had the additional benefits of lower life cycle cost, rapid turnaround times, and O2 and H2 commodities for use throughout the vehicle. Similar benefits were derived in rocket-powered SSTO vehicles.

  13. Insight into the Reaction Mechanism of Graphene Oxide with Oxidative Free Radical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xuejiao; XU Liangyou

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide(GO),as an important derivative of graphene,could be considered as a super aromatic molecule decorated with a range of reactive oxygen-containing groups on its surface,which endows graphene high reactivity with other molecules.In our previous work,we demonstrated that GO sheets were cut into small pieces(graphene quantum dots,GQDs) by oxidative free radicals(hydroxyl radical HO or oxygen radical [O]) under UV irradiation.It is notable that reactions involving free radicals are influenced by reaction conditions pronouncedly.However,researches on details about reactions of GO with free radicals have not been reported thus far.In this work,the effects of different factors on the photo-Fenton reaction of GO were studied.It is demonstrated that the reaction rate is closely related to the concentration of free radicals.It is speculated that through the optimization of reaction conditions,the reaction of graphene with free radicals could carry out efficiently for further applications.

  14. Radiolytic oxidation of propane: computer modeling of the reaction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Hanrahan, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of gaseous propane under gamma radiolysis was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25 o C, at oxygen pressures from 1 to 15 torr. Major oxygen-containing products and their G-values with 10% added oxygen are as follows: acetone, 0.98; i-propyl alcohol, 0.86; propionaldehyde, 0.43; n-propyl alcohol, 0.11; acrolein, 0.14; and allyl alcohol, 0.038. The formation of major oxygen-containing products was explained on the basis that the alkyl radicals combine with molecular oxygen to give peroxyl radicals; the peroxyl radicals react with one another to give alkoxyl radicals, which in turn react with one another to form carbonyl compounds and alcohols. The reaction scheme for the formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on a mechanism involving 28 reactions. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases. (author)

  15. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  16. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with uranium zirconium oxide solid solution - Zirconium hinders oxidative uranium dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yuta; Takano, Masahide; Watanabe, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    We studied oxidative dissolution of uranium and zirconium oxide [(U,Zr)O2] in aqueous H2O2 solution to estimate (U,Zr)O2 stability to interfacial reactions with H2O2. Studies on the interfacial reactions are essential for anticipating how a (U,Zr)O2-based molten fuel may chemically degrade after a severe accident. The fuel's high radioactivity induces water radiolysis and continuous H2O2 generation. Subsequent reaction of the fuel with H2O2 may oxidize the fuel surface and facilitate U dissolution. We conducted our experiments with (U,Zr)O2 powder (comprising Zr:U mole ratios of 25:75, 40:60, and 50:50) and quantitated the H2O2 reaction via dissolved U and H2O2 concentrations. Although (U,Zr)O2 reacted more quickly than UO2, the dissolution yield relative to H2O2 consumption was far less for (U,Zr)O2 compared to that of UO2. The reaction kinetics indicates that most of the H2O2 catalytically decomposed to O2 at the surface of (U,Zr)O2. We confirmed the H2O2 catalytic decomposition via O2 production (quantitative stoichiometric agreement). In addition, post-reaction Raman scattering spectra of the undissolved (U,Zr)O2 showed no additional peaks (indicating a lack of secondary phase formation). The (U,Zr)O2 matrix is much more stable than UO2 against H2O2-induced oxidative dissolution. Our findings will improve understanding on the molten fuels and provide an insight into decommissioning activities after a severe accident.

  17. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the inc......The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase...... in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4â10......-10 mol FeS2/gâs are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate...

  18. Reaction Control Engine for Space Launch Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have begun a series of engine tests on a new breed of space propulsion: a Reaction Control Engine developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI). The engine, developed by TRW Space and Electronics of Redondo Beach, California, is an auxiliary propulsion engine designed to maneuver vehicles in orbit. It is used for docking, reentry, attitude control, and fine-pointing while the vehicle is in orbit. The engine uses nontoxic chemicals as propellants, a feature that creates a safer environment for ground operators, lowers cost, and increases efficiency with less maintenance and quicker turnaround time between missions. Testing includes 30 hot-firings. This photograph shows the first engine test performed at MSFC that includes SLI technology. Another unique feature of the Reaction Control Engine is that it operates at dual thrust modes, combining two engine functions into one engine. The engine operates at both 25 and 1,000 pounds of force, reducing overall propulsion weight and allowing vehicles to easily maneuver in space. The low-level thrust of 25 pounds of force allows the vehicle to fine-point maneuver and dock while the high-level thrust of 1,000 pounds of force is used for reentry, orbit transfer, and coarse positioning. SLI is a NASA-wide research and development program, managed by the MSFC, designed to improve safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of space travel for second generation reusable launch vehicles.

  19. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development

  20. Catalyzed oxidation reactions. IV. Picolinic acid catalysis of chromic acid oxidations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocek, J.; Peng, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Picolinic acid and several closely related acids are effective catalysts in the chromic acid oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols; the oxidation of other substrates is accelerated only moderately. The reaction is first order in chromium-(VI), alcohol, and picolinic acid; it is second order in hydrogen ions at low acidity and approaches acidity independence at high perchloric acid concentrations. A primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is observed at high but not at low acidities. At low acidity the reaction has a considerably lower activation energy and more negative activation entropy than at higher acidities. The reactive intermediate in the proposed mechanism is a negatively charged termolecular complex formed from chromic acid, picolinic acid, and alcohol. The rate-limiting step of the reaction changes with the acidity of the solution. At higher acidities the intermediate termolecular complex is formed reversibly and the overall reaction rate is determined by the rate of its decomposition into reaction products; at low acidities the formation of the complex is irreversible and hence rate limiting. Picolinic acids with a substituent in the 6 position show a greatly reduced catalytic activity. This observation is interpreted as suggesting a square pyramidal or octahedral structure for the reactive chromium (VI) intermediate. The temperature dependence of the deuterium isotope effect has been determined and the significance of the observed large values for E/sub a//sup D/ - E/sub a//sup H/ and A/sup D//A/sup H/ is discussed

  1. Activity of molybdenum-containing oxide catalysts in the reaction of ethane oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, V.I.; Ehpova, T.I.; Shchukin, V.P.; Averbukh, A.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    Investigation results concerning the catalytic activity of molybdenum-containing catalysts in ethane oxidation reaction are presented. It has been found that the greatest activity in the temperature range from 450 to 600 deg C is exhibited by cobalt-molybdenum catalyst; at 600 deg C bismuth-molybdenum catalyst is the most active. Nickel-molybdenum catalyst is selective and active with respect to ethylene. Iron- and manganese-molybdenum catalysts do not show high ethane oxidation rates and their selectivity is insignificant

  2. Kinetics of reactions of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksakov, V.A.; Ershova, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr, Mo, W) reaction with hydroxylamine was studied. On the basis of kinetic data it was ascertained that as a result of the reaction CO oxidation to CO 2 and intramolecular transfer of amine formed to the central atom of metal occur. Mechanisms of M(CO) 6 reactions with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide are compared

  3. A novel tandem Betti/Ullmann oxidation reaction as an efficient route ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Betti reaction; cross-coupling reaction; oxidation; heterogeneous catalysis. Abstract. A novel tandem Betti/Ullmann/oxidation reaction was used for synthesis of new oxazepine derivatives containing kojic acid. This protocol ... This method provides a new and useful strategy for the construction of heterocycles. Also novel Betti ...

  4. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  5. Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide composite for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyitanga, Theophile; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-10-01

    Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide (GO-MoS2) composite is prepared through a wet process by using hydrolysis of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and it exhibits excellent catalytic activity of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a low overpotential of -0.47 V, which is almost two and three times lower than those of precursor MoS2 and GO. The high performance of HER of the composite attributes to the reduced GO supporting MoS2, providing a conducting network for fast electron transport from MoS2 to electrodes. The composite also shows high stability after 500 cycles, demonstrating a synergistic effect of MoS2 and GO for efficient HER.

  6. Gas-Solid Reaction Route toward the Production of Intermetallics from Their Corresponding Oxide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Near-net shape forming of metallic components from metallic powders produced in situ from reduction of corresponding pure metal oxides has not been explored to a large extent. Such a process can be probably termed in short as the “Reduction-Sintering” process. This methodology can be especially effective in producing components containing refractory metals. Additionally, in situ production of metallic powder from complex oxides containing more than one metallic element may result in in situ alloying during reduction, possibly at lower temperatures. With this motivation, in situ reduction of complex oxides mixtures containing more than one metallic element has been investigated intensively over a period of years in the department of materials science, KTH, Sweden. This review highlights the most important features of that investigation. The investigation includes not only synthesis of intermetallics and refractory metals using the gas solid reaction route but also study the reaction kinetics and mechanism. Environmentally friendly gases like H2, CH4 and N2 were used for simultaneous reduction, carburization and nitridation, respectively. Different techniques have been utilized. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to accurately control the process conditions and obtain reaction kinetics. The fluidized bed technique has been utilized to study the possibility of bulk production of intermetallics compared to milligrams in TGA. Carburization and nitridation of nascent formed intermetallics were successfully carried out. A novel method based on material thermal property was explored to track the reaction progress and estimate the reaction kinetics. This method implies the dynamic measure of thermal diffusivity using laser flash method. These efforts end up with a successful preparation of nanograined intermetallics like Fe-Mo and Ni-W. In addition, it ends up with simultaneous reduction and synthesis of Ni-WN and Ni-WC from their oxide mixtures

  7. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Overview and implications for repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, Michael J.; Arthur, Randolph C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikazu; Iwatsuki, Teruki

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a survey and review on oxidation-reduction ('redox') reactions, with particular emphasis on implications for disposal of high-level waste (HLW) in deep geological formations. As an overview, the focus is on basic principles, problems, and proposed research related specifically to the assessment of redox for a HLW repository in Japan. For a more comprehensive treatment of redox and the myriad associated issues, the reader is directed to the cited textbooks used as primary references in this report. Low redox conditions in deep geological formations is a key assumption in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan' (hereafter called H12'). The release behavior of multi-valent radioelements (e.g., Tc, Se, U, Pu, Np), as well as daughter radioelements of these radioelements, from a deep geological repository are sensitively related to redox conditions. Furthermore, the performance of certain barrier materials, such as overpack and buffer, may be impacted by redox conditions. Given this importance, this report summarizes some key topics for future technical studies supporting site characterization and repository performance as follows: To fully test the conceptual models for system Eh, it will be necessary to measure and evaluate trace element and isotopic information of both coexisting groundwater and reactive minerals of candidate rocks. Because of importance of volatile species (e.g., O 2 , H 2 etc.) in redox reactions, and given the high total pressure of a repository located 500 to 1000 meter deep, laboratory investigations of redox will necessarily require use of pressurized test devices that can fully simulate repository conditions. The stability (redox capacity) of the repository system with respect to potential changes in redox boundary condition induced by oxidizing waters intrusion should be established experimentally. An overall conceptual model that unifies

  8. Free radical reaction characteristics of coal low-temperature oxidation and its inhibition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zenghua; Kong, Biao; Wei, Aizhu; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Yinbo; Zhang, Lanzhun

    2016-12-01

    Study on the mechanism of coal spontaneous combustion is significant for controlling fire disasters due to coal spontaneous combustion. The free radical reactions can explain the chemical process of coal at low-temperature oxidation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to measure the change rules of the different sorts and different granularity of coal directly; ESR spectroscopy chart of free radicals following the changes of temperatures was compared by the coal samples applying air and blowing nitrogen, original coal samples, dry coal samples, and demineralized coal samples. The fragmentation process was the key factor of producing and initiating free radical reactions. Oxygen, moisture, and mineral accelerated the free radical reactions. Combination of the free radical reaction mechanism, the mechanical fragmentation leaded to the elevated CO concentration, fracturing of coal pillar was more prone to spontaneous combustion, and spontaneous combustion in goaf accounted for a large proportion of the fire in the mine were explained. The method of added diphenylamine can inhibit the self-oxidation of coal effectively, the action mechanism of diphenylamine was analyzed by free radical chain reaction, and this research can offer new method for the development of new flame retardant.

  9. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  10. Radiolytic oxidation of propane: Computer modeling of the reaction scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avinash K.; Hanrahan, Robert J.

    The oxidation of gaseous propane under gamma radiolysis was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25°C, at oxygen pressures from 1 to 15 torr. Major oxygen-containing products and their G-values with 10% added oxygen are as follows: acetone, 0.98; i-propyl alcohol, 0.86; propionaldehyde, 0.43; n-propyl alcohol, 0.11; acrolein, 0.14; and allyl alcohol, 0.038. Minor products include i-butyl alcohol, t-amyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, n-amyl alcohol, and i-amyl alcohol. Small yields of i-hexyl alcohol and n-hexyl alcohol were also observed. There was no apparent difference in the G-values at pressures of 50, 100 and 150 torr. When the oxygen concentration was decreased below 5%, the yields of acetone, i-propyl alcohol, and n-propyl alcohol increased, the propionaldehyde yield decreased, and the yields of other products remained constant. The formation of major oxygen-containing products was explained on the basis that the alkyl radicals combine with molecular oxygen to give peroxyl radicals; the peroxyl radicals react with one another to give alkoxyl radicals, which in turn react with one another to form carbonyl compounds and alcohols. The reaction scheme for the formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on a mechanism involving 28 reactions. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases.

  11. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Coherently Synchronized Oxidation and Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamammadova S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on this experimental researches, the complex reaction, consisting of parallel-sequential oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions, which are coherently synchronized, proceeds during the process of cyclohexane oxidation with biomimetic catalyst. Depending on the reaction parameters it is possible to deliberately adjust the direction of oxidation reaction and reaction rate.

  12. Surface oxidization-reduction reactions in Columbia Plateau basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Yee, A.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which define principal oxidation-reduction reactions expected between ground water and iron in the Umtanum and Cohassett basalt flows of south central Washington. Data include kinetics of aqueous iron speciation, rates of O 2 uptake and nature of oxyhydroxide precipitates. Such data are important in predicting behavior of radionuclides in basalt aquifers including determination of valence states, speciation, solubility, sorption, and coprecipitation on iron oxyhydroxide substrates and colloids. Analyses of the basalt by XPS indicates that ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron on the surface and that the total iron decreases as a function of pH during experimental weathering. Iron oxyhydroxide phases did not form surface coating on basalt surfaces but rather nucleated as separate plases in solution. No significant increases in Cs or Sr sorption were observed with increased weathering of the basalt. Concurrent increases in Fe(II) and decreases in Fe(III) in slightly to moderately acid solutions indicated continued oxidization of ferrous iron in the basalt. At neutral to basic pH, Fe(II) was strongly sorbed onto the basalt surface (Kd = 6.5 x 10 -3 1 x m 2 ) resulting in low dissolved concentrations even under anoxic conditions. The rate of O 2 uptake increased with decreasing pH. Diffusion rates (-- 10 -14 cm 2 x s -1 ), calculated using a one-dimensional analytical model, indicate grain boundary diffusion. Comparisons of Eh values calculated by Pt electrode, dissolved O 2 and Fe(II)/Fe(III) measurements showed considerable divergence, with the ferric-ferrous couple being the preferred method of estimating Eh

  13. Electrochemical oxidation of quaternary ammonium electrolytes : Unexpected side reactions in organic electrochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri Nigjeh, Eslam; de Vries, Marcel; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P.

    Quaternary ammonium salts are among the most widely used electrolytes in organic electrochemistry, but there is little known about their unwanted side oxidation reactions. We have, therefore, studied the constant potential oxidation products of quaternary ammonium electrolytes using mass

  14. Internal Displacement Reactions in Multicomponent Oxides: Part I. Line Compounds with Narrow Homogeneity Range

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, SNS; Leonard, DN; Wiggins, LB; Jacob, KT

    2005-01-01

    As a model of an internal displacement reaction involving a ternary oxide line compound, the following reaction was studied at 1273 K as a function of time, t: $Fe+NiTiO_3 = Ni + FeTiO_3$ Both polycrystalline and single-crystal materials were used as the starting $NiTiO_3$ oxide. During the reaction, the Ni in the oxide compound is displaced by Fe and it precipitates as a \\gamma -(Ni-Fe) alloy. The reaction preserves the starting ilmenite structure. The product oxide has a consta...

  15. Reaction kinetics of oxygen on single-phase alloys, oxidation of nickel and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalauze, Rene

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis first addresses the reaction kinetics of oxygen on alloys. It presents some generalities on heterogeneous reactions (conventional theory, theory of jumps), discusses the core reaction (with the influence of pressure), discusses the influence of metal self-diffusion on metal oxidation kinetics (equilibrium conditions at the interface, hybrid diffusion regime), reports the application of the hybrid diffusion model to the study of selective oxidation of alloys (Wagner model, hybrid diffusion model) and the study of the oxidation kinetics of an alloy forming a solid solution of two oxides. The second part reports the investigation of the oxidation of single phase nickel and niobium alloys (phase α, β and γ)

  16. Mn(II) oxidation in Fenton and Fenton type systems : Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Genuchten, C.M.; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-01-01

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced

  17. Copper-catalyzed oxidative Heck reactions between alkyltrifluoroborates and vinyl arenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwosz, Timothy W; Chemler, Sherry R

    2013-06-21

    We report herein that potassium alkyltrifluoroborates can be utilized in oxidative Heck-type reactions with vinyl arenes. The reaction is catalyzed by a Cu(OTf)2/1,10-phenanthroline with MnO2 as the stoichiometric oxidant. In addition to the alkyl Heck, amination, esterification, and dimerization reactions of alkyltrifluoroborates are demonstrated under analogous reaction conditions. Evidence for an alkyl radical intermediate is presented.

  18. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The oxidative response and viable reaction mechanism of the textile dyes by fenton reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masooda, Q.; Hijira, T.; Sitara, M.; Sehar, M.; Sundus, A.; Mohsin, A.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of the degradation of the Reactive Red 239 and Reactive Blue 19 by Fenton reagent was studied by advanced oxidation process in aqueous medium. The spectroscopic technique was adopted for the measurements of dye concentration. Moreover they were determined at 540 nm and 590 nm, respectively. Kinetics of the reaction was studied under the effect of concentration of reactive dyes, concentration of oxidant were followed under pseudo first order condition and found to influence the catalytic mechanism. The pH of the medium, vibrant response of several cations and anions and influence of ionic strength on the reaction kinetics were also monitored. Physical evidences for the degradation and mineralization of the dyes were evaluated by Lime water test, Ring Test and TLC test also confirmed the degradation of dye. Inhibitory effects of dyes were observed by CO3-, HCO3-, HPO42-, Cl-, I- Al3+ and Na+. Thermodynamic activation parameters in the oxidation reaction were studied and mode of mechanism was suggested on the basic of these parameters. This study explored the safe and eco friendly degradation of the textile dyes under Pseudo first order rate constant. It was observed that Fenton assisted degradation of the dyes under controlled conditions was found to be favorable for the treatment of textile wastewater. Moreover compared to other chemical methods it is effective and harmless to the environment. (author)

  20. Advances in the catalysts development in base of mixed oxides for control reactions of N{sub 2}O; Avances en el desarrollo de catalizadores a base de oxidos mixtos para reacciones de control de N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.A.; Perez, R.; Gomez, A.; Diaz, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The catalytic supports Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by the precipitation and coprecipitation techniques. The catalytic supports Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were characterized by several techniques for to determine texture (BET), crystallinity (XRD), chemical composition (SEM), FTIR and it was evaluated their total acidity by the reaction with 2-propanol. It was continued with the cobalt addition by Impregnation and coprecipitation and it was evaluated its catalytic activity in the N{sub 2}O decomposition reaction. Also it was realized the N{sub 2}O reduction with Co using these catalysts. (Author)

  1. [Studies on the oxidation reaction of octanol-2 with nitric acid by infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G; Zhao, G; Wang, Y; Zhang, Q; Zhang, S; Lu, F

    1998-04-01

    In this paper, the reaction process of oxidation of octanol-2 with nitric acid has been studied by IR spectroscopy. It is found that the main components of non-sapoifiable matter are different in different oxidation degrees. The relation between oxidation products and the amount of nitric acid are investigated,the reaction mechanism has also been studied. Experimental results show that the oxidation process of octanol-2 is as follows: first, octanol-2 is oxidated to octanone-2, or to nitrate, nitrite and nitrile copmpounds, then these compounds are reoxidated to caproic acid in the meantime some by-products, such as valeric, enanthic acids are also found in oxidated products.

  2. Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction at the Ni/YSZ Anode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-11-01

    By means of ab initio simulations we here provide a comprehensive scenario for hydrogen oxidation reactions at the Ni/zirconia anode of solid oxide fuel cells. The simulations have also revealed that in the presence of water chemisorbed at the oxide surface, the active region for H oxidation actually extends beyond the metal/zirconia interface unraveling the role of water partial pressure in the decrease of the polarization resistance observed experimentally.

  3. Polyol synthesis of silver nanocubes via moderate control of the reaction atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seog-Jin; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Thomas, Edwin L

    2014-12-01

    Silver nanocubes were successfully synthesized at high yield in variously controlled reaction atmospheres by balancing etching of O2/Cl(-) and reduction of glycolaldehyde. There have been efforts to control the O2 content in reaction atmospheres by purging of O2 or Ar gas for the balancing, but we found that moderate control of reaction atmosphere, just by careful timing of the opening and the capping of the reaction vial, greatly enhanced reproducibility. Enhanced reproducibility is attributed to alleviation of evaporation and condensation of glycolaldehyde (b.p.=131°C) by using capping at reaction temperatures higher than the b.p. of glycolaldehyde rather than purging with gas. The most important finding is that seeding is initiated by HNO3 induced deoxygenation reaction in the gas phase. O2 is consumed by oxidation of NO generated from the silver etching reaction by HNO3, which effectively controls the reaction atmosphere without introduction of gas. Our simple method to control reaction atmosphere reduces the overall reaction time to one fifth of the previous result and provides excellent size and distribution selectivity of the Ag nanocube product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative coupling of methane. Still a challenge for catalyst development and reaction engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaecker, R.; Arnd, S.; Beck, B. [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry] [and others

    2013-11-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane to ethylene offers great industrial potential, because it would broaden the feedstock basis for chemical industry. Because methane is the most stable hydrocarbon, its activation requires high temperatures and it is a great scientific challenge to overcome the apparent yield limit of about 25%. This barrier has never been exceeded since the beginning of OCM research more than 20 years ago. Results and Discussion: This challenge is one of the key projects of the Cluster of Excellence UNICAT and requires joined efforts and contributions from many disciplines, because this reaction shows a combined surface/gas phase reaction mechanism which results in very unusual and complex dependencies on the reaction conditions. Although dozens of materials are known to catalyze the reaction, the selection of a catalyst suitable for an industrial process is difficult, due to severe stability problems of many materials. Li/MgO was chosen by the UNICAT-team as model catalyst, because of the extended literature about it. But it shows uncontrollable deactivation, no matter what precursor and method were used for its preparation. Nevertheless, it is a suitable catalyst for fundamental studies, due to its formal chemical simplicity. A key result of the joined research activities was the disproval of the Lunsford mechanism and the elucidation of the real function of lithium as a surface modifier creating a rough and defect-rich surface. For the development of an OCM process another catalyst, Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Mn/SiO{sub 2}, was chosen from the rich literature on OCM. Although less is known about its structure and the reaction mechanism at this catalyst, its stability was the most important reason to select it for further engineering studies. Kinetic isotope measurements and studies in a TAP reactor demonstrate the similarity of the reaction mechanisms at both catalysts, despite the completely different materials. The selectivity is largely controlled by

  5. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The high temperature, high pressure wet oxidation reaction of quinoline has been studied as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature. At neutral to acidic pH, it is effective in the oxidation of quinoline at 240 degrees C and above, whereas under alkaline conditions the reaction...... is markedly slowed down. The results indicate that the reaction is an auto-catalysed, free radical chain reaction transforming 99% of quinoline to other substances. Of the quinoline. 30-50% was oxidised to CO2 and H2O depending on the initial concentration. Wet oxidation of deuterium-labelled quinoline...

  6. Partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming; Cha, Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relative importance of the reduced field intensity and the background reaction temperature in the partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor. We obtained important mechanistic insight

  7. Modelling of chalcopyrite oxidation reactions in the Outokumpu flash smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating oxidation reactions of chalcopyrite particles together with momentum, heat and mass transfer between particle and gas phase in a flash smelting furnace reaction shaft is presented. In simulation, the equations governing the gas flow are solved numerically with a commercial fluid flow package, Phoenics. The particle phase is introduced into the gas flow by a Particle Source In Cell (PSIC) - technique, where a number of discrete particles is tracked in a gas flow and the relevant source terms for momentum, mass, and heat transfer are added to the gas phase equations. The gas phase equations used are elliptic in nature and the fluid turbulence is described by the (k-{epsilon}) -model. Thermal gas phase radiation is simulated with a six-flux radiation model. The chemical reactions of concentrate particles are assumed to happen at two sharp interfaces, and a shrinking core model is applied to describe the mass transfer of chemical species through the reaction product layer. In a molten state, the oxygen consumption is controlled by a film penetration concept. The reacting concentrate particles are a mixture of chalcopyrite and silica. Also a certain amount of pure inert silica is fed to the process as flux. In the simulations the calculation domain includes the concentrate burner and a cylindrical reaction shaft of an industrial scale flash smelting furnace. Some examples about the simulations carried out by the combustion model are presented. (author)

  8. Modelling of chalcopyrite oxidation reactions in the Outokumpu flash smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokainen, T; Jokilaakso, A [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating oxidation reactions of chalcopyrite particles together with momentum, heat and mass transfer between particle and gas phase in a flash smelting furnace reaction shaft is presented. In simulation, the equations governing the gas flow are solved numerically with a commercial fluid flow package, Phoenics. The particle phase is introduced into the gas flow by a Particle Source In Cell (PSIC) - technique, where a number of discrete particles is tracked in a gas flow and the relevant source terms for momentum, mass, and heat transfer are added to the gas phase equations. The gas phase equations used are elliptic in nature and the fluid turbulence is described by the (k-{epsilon}) -model. Thermal gas phase radiation is simulated with a six-flux radiation model. The chemical reactions of concentrate particles are assumed to happen at two sharp interfaces, and a shrinking core model is applied to describe the mass transfer of chemical species through the reaction product layer. In a molten state, the oxygen consumption is controlled by a film penetration concept. The reacting concentrate particles are a mixture of chalcopyrite and silica. Also a certain amount of pure inert silica is fed to the process as flux. In the simulations the calculation domain includes the concentrate burner and a cylindrical reaction shaft of an industrial scale flash smelting furnace. Some examples about the simulations carried out by the combustion model are presented. (author)

  9. Electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction by rhenium oxides electrodeposited by pulsed-current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Uscategui, Alejandro; Mosquera, Edgar; Chornik, Boris; Cifuentes, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Rhenium oxides were produced by means of pulsed current electrodeposition over ITO. • The electrocatalytic behavior of rhenium oxides electrodeposited over ITO was studied. • Electrodeposited rhenium oxides showed electrocatalytic behavior increasing the rate of the hydrogen evolution reaction. • The electrocatalysis behavior was explained considering the relative abundance of Re species on the surface of the electrodeposited material. - Abstract: Rhenium oxides are materials of interest for applications in the catalysis of reactions such as those occurring in fuel cells and photoelectrochemical cells. This research work was devoted to the production of rhenium oxide by means of pulsed current electrodeposition for the electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Rhenium oxides were electrodeposited over a transparent conductive oxide substrate (Indium Tin-doped Oxide – ITO) in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. The electrodeposition process allowed the production of rhenium oxides islands (200–600 nm) with the presence of three oxidized rhenium species: Re"I"V associated to ReO_2, Re"V"I associated to ReO_3 and Re"V"I"I associated to H(ReO_4)H_2O. Electrodeposited rhenium oxides showed electrocatalytic behavior over the HER and an increase of one order of magnitude of the exchange current density was observed compared to the reaction taking place on the bare substrate. The electrocatalytic behavior varied with the morphology and relative abundance of oxidized rhenium species in the electrodeposits. Finally, two mechanisms of electrocatalysis were proposed to explain experimental results.

  10. Ion-molecule reactions in the binary mixture of ethylene oxide and trioxane, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Sugiura, Toshio.

    1977-01-01

    The formation mechanism of protonated molecular ions by cross-reactions in ethylene oxide-trioxane mixtures has been studied with use of a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The precursors of the product ions were determined by analysis of the fine structure of their ionization efficiency curves using deuterated ethylene oxide. Protonated ethylene oxide is formed by the hydrogen atom transfer reaction of ethylene oxide molecular ion with trioxane, and protonated trioxane by the proton transfer reaction of CHO + (from ethylene oxide) with trioxane. In the ion-molecule reactions of ethylene-d 4 oxide-trioxane mixtures, appreciable isotope effect was observed. The CHO + from ethylene oxide is an important reactant ion as compared with that from trioxane in the proton transfer reaction, and CHO + from ethylene oxide was suggested as a thermal reactive ion. The order of proton affinity could be estimated from the proton transfer reactions involving CHO + . It was found that the proton affinity of trioxane is smaller than that of ethylene oxide. (auth.)

  11. Thermogravimetric study of the reaction of uranium oxides with fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Motohiro; Sato, Nobuaki; Kirishima, Akira; Tochiyama, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Thermogravimetric study of the reaction of uranium oxides with fluorine was conducted by TG-DTA method using anti-corrosion type differential thermobalance. When UO 2 was heated from R.T. to 500 deg. C in 5% F 2 /He atmosphere, the weight increase appeared at ca. 250 deg. C with an exothermic peak. Then the weight decreased slightly with a small exothermic peak followed by the complete volatilization with a large exothermic peak at ca. 350 deg. C. At a flow rate of 15, 30, 60 ml min -1 , there seemed to be no significant change for the fluorination of UO 2 . With the different heating rates of 1, 2, 5 and 10 deg. C min -1 , the fluorination peak shifted to higher temperature with increasing heating rates. For the comparison with thermogravimetric results, phase analysis by XRD method was conducted for the products obtained at different temperatures. At 260 deg. C, the product was UO 2 with a small amount of the intermediate compound, UO 2 F. The amount of this compound increased with increasing temperature up to 320 deg. C. Then another phase of UO 2 F 2 appeared at 340 deg. C but it was immediately fluorinated to the volatile fluoride. When U 3 O 8 was used as a starting material, it was found that the steep weight decrease peak appeared at ca. 350 deg. C and the uranium volatilized completely. This result suggests that fluorination of U 3 O 8 occurs at this temperature forming UF 6 . Uranium trioxide showed the similar fluorination behavior to that of U 3 O 8

  12. Reaction products between Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-oxide thick films and alumina substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarco, J.A.; Ilushechkin, A.; Yamashita, T.; Bhargava, A.; Barry, J.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The structure and composition of reaction products between Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-oxide (BSCCO) thick films and alumina substrates have been characterized using a combination of electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Sr and Ca are found to be the most reactive cations with alumina. Sr 4 Al 6 O 12 SO 4 is formed between the alumina substrates and BSCCO thick films prepared from paste with composition close to Bi-2212 (and Bi-2212+10 wt.% Ag). For paste with composition close to Bi(Pb)-2223 +20 wt.% Ag, a new phase with f.c.c. structure, lattice parameter about a=24.5 A and approximate composition Al 3 Sr 2 CaBi 2 CuO x has been identified in the interface region. Understanding and control of these reactions is essential for growth of high quality BSCCO thick films on alumina. (orig.)

  13. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali; Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Promoting effects of Cobalt oxide on methanol electro-oxidation over Pt/MWCNTs are investigated. • Higher activity, about 2.9 times, and enhanced stability are observed on Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs. • Electrochemical active surface area of Pt nanoparticles is significantly improved upon CoO x addition. • Bi-functional mechanism is facilitated in presence of CoO x . - Abstract: The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH 4  as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoO x , Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of CO ads on Pt active sites by the participation of CoO x . Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoO x /MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the oxidation of adsorbed oxygen-containing groups

  14. Relationship between measurements of blood oxidative metabolites and skin reaction in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Takashi; Goto, Jun; Nomiya, Takuma; Nemoto, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Recently, oxidative metabolites have been able to be measured by simple small device. It has been reported that the value of oxidative metabolites increases under several conditions such as hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, etc. Radiation used in radiotherapy also causes free radicals and oxidative metabolites, and irradiation causes dermatitis and sometimes causes skin ulcer in the irradiated site. We analyzed the relationships between the value of oxidative metabolites and skin reactions. A certain doses of radiation were irradiated to the right thigh of rats, and oxidative metabolites of rat's blood from caudal vein were measured by d-reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) test using an exclusive device. Skin reactions were evaluated according to a skin-reaction grading system from the day before irradiation to day 38 after irradiation. As a results, a significant correlation was shown between irradiation dose and skin grade. And a significant correlation was also shown between the value of oxidative metabolites and irradiation dose. The increase in oxidative metabolites was seen in the Day 16 after irradiation, and that corresponded with the appearance of skin reaction. It was suggested that the value of oxidative metabolites seems to be useful for estimating degree of skin reaction and time to appear skin reaction after irradiation. (author)

  15. Thermal oxidation for air toxics control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Administration projects annual expenditures of $1.1 billion by 1995, increasing to $6.7 billion by 2005, in order to comply with the new Clean Air Act Title III hazardous air pollutant requirements. The Title III requirements include 189 hazardous air pollutants which must be reduced or eliminated by 2003. Twenty of the 189 listed pollutants account for approximately 75 percent of all hazardous air pollutant emissions. Ninety percent of these 20 pollutants can be effectively controlled through one or mote of the thermal oxidation technologies. This paper reports that the advantages and disadvantages of each thermal oxidation technology vary substantially and must be reviewed for each application in order to establish the most effective thermal oxidation solution. Effective thermal oxidation will meet MACT (maximum achievable control technology) emission standards

  16. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav, E-mail: tsori@bgu.ac.il [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  17. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  18. Study on the Attitude Control of Spacecraft Using Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Young Du

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitude determination and control of satellite is important component which determines the accomplish satellite missions. In this study, attitude control using reaction wheels and momentum dumping of wheels are considered. Attitude control law is designed by Sliding control and LQR. Attitude maneuver control law is obtained by Shooting method. Wheels momentum dumping control law is designed by Bang-Bang control. Four reaction wheels are configurated for minimized the electric power consumption. Wheels control torque and magnetic moment of magnetic torquer are limited.

  19. Association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms with leprosy reactions in northern Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Amit; Biswas, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Ekata; Chakma, Joy Kumar; Kamal, Raj; Arora, Mamta; Sagar, Harish; Natarajan, Mohan; Bhagyawant, Sameer S; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja

    2017-07-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy that affects mainly skin and nerves. Polymorphisms of certain genes are substantiated to be associated with the susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. The present investigation addressed the association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms and leprosy in a population from northern part of India. A total of 323 leprosy cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped for four NOS2 promoter variants (rs1800482, rs2779249, rs8078340 and rs2301369) using FRET technology in Real Time PCR. None of these SNPs in promoter sites was associated with susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. NOS2 rs1800482 was found to be monomorphic with GG genotype. However, NOS2-1026T allele was observed to be in higher frequency with leprosy cases (BL and LL) who were not suffering from any reactional episodes compared to cases with ENL reaction {OR=0.30, 95% CI (0.10-0.86), p=0.024}. NOS2-1026GT genotype was more prevalent in cases without reaction (BT, BB and BL) compared to RR reactional patients {OR=0.38, 95% CI (0.17-0.86), p=0.02}. Although haplotype analysis revealed that no haplotype was associated with leprosy susceptibility/resistance with statistical significance, GTG haplotype was noted to be more frequent in healthy controls. These SNPs are observed to be in linkage disequilibrium. Although, these SNPs are not likely to influence leprosy vulnerability, -1026G>T SNP was indicated to have noteworthy role in leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Control of Maillard Reactions in Foods: Strategies and Chemical Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Ray, Colin A

    2017-06-14

    Maillard reactions lead to changes in food color, organoleptic properties, protein functionality, and protein digestibility. Numerous different strategies for controlling Maillard reactions in foods have been attempted during the past decades. In this paper, recent advances in strategies for controlling the Maillard reaction and subsequent downstream reaction products in food systems are critically reviewed. The underlying mechanisms at play are presented, strengths and weaknesses of each strategy are discussed, and reasonable reaction mechanisms are proposed to reinforce the evaluations. The review includes strategies involving addition of functional ingredients, such as plant polyphenols and vitamins, as well as enzymes. The resulting trapping or modification of Maillard targets, reactive intermediates, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are presented with their potential unwanted side effects. Finally, recent advances in processing for control of Maillard reactions are discussed.

  1. Directing Reaction Pathways through Controlled Reactant Binding at Pd-TiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Bingwen; Nikolla, Eranda; Medlin, J Will

    2017-06-01

    Recent efforts to design selective catalysts for multi-step reactions, such as hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), have emphasized the preparation of active sites at the interface between two materials having different properties. However, achieving precise control over interfacial properties, and thus reaction selectivity, has remained a challenge. Here, we encapsulated Pd nanoparticles (NPs) with TiO 2 films of regulated porosity to gain a new level of control over catalyst performance, resulting in essentially 100 % HDO selectivity for two biomass-derived alcohols. This catalyst also showed exceptional reaction specificity in HDO of furfural and m-cresol. In addition to improving HDO activity by maximizing the interfacial contact between the metal and metal oxide sites, encapsulation by the nanoporous oxide film provided a significant selectivity boost by restricting the accessible conformations of aromatics on the surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A short synthesis-stuttgart of (S)-pyrrolam A via domino oxidation-witting reaction

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Shet, J.; Tilve, S.G.; Parameswaran, P.S.

    A short synthesis of (S)-pyrrolam A starting from readily available N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)-L prolinol is described that makes use of a domino primary alcohol oxidation-Witting reaction as the key step...

  3. Carbon-coated magnetic palladium: applications in partial oxidation of alcohols and coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; catalyst can be used for oxidation of alcohols, amination reaction and arylation of aryl halides (cross coupli...

  4. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  5. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  6. A cellular automata approach to chemical reactions : 1 reaction controlled systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    A direct link between the chemical reaction controlled (shrinking core) model and cellular automata, to study the dissolution of particles, is derived in this paper. Previous research on first and second order reactions is based on the concentration of the reactant. The present paper describes the

  7. Laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel: the thermodynamics of the oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J; Kaplan, A F H [Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Luleaa University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleaa (Sweden); Petring, D [Fraunhofer-Institute for Laser Technology (ILT), Steinbachstrasse 15, Aachen (Germany); Kumar, R V [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Al-Mashikhi, S O; Voisey, K T [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jpowell@laserexp.co.uk

    2009-01-07

    In a considerable proportion of the published work on the subject of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel, the details of the oxidation reaction are overlooked or confused. For example, it is not uncommon for the oxidized material to be attributed with the physical characteristics of iron rather than iron oxide. Also, the fact that the oxidation reaction cannot take place above a certain temperature limit is usually overlooked. This paper presents, for the first time, an in-depth analysis of the Iron to FeO oxidation reaction in the context of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel. The paper concludes by presenting a number of guidelines for future theoretical models.

  8. Laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel: the thermodynamics of the oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J; Kaplan, A F H; Petring, D; Kumar, R V; Al-Mashikhi, S O; Voisey, K T

    2009-01-01

    In a considerable proportion of the published work on the subject of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel, the details of the oxidation reaction are overlooked or confused. For example, it is not uncommon for the oxidized material to be attributed with the physical characteristics of iron rather than iron oxide. Also, the fact that the oxidation reaction cannot take place above a certain temperature limit is usually overlooked. This paper presents, for the first time, an in-depth analysis of the Iron to FeO oxidation reaction in the context of laser-oxygen cutting of mild steel. The paper concludes by presenting a number of guidelines for future theoretical models.

  9. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  10. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  11. Evidence concerning oxidation as a surface reaction in Baltic amber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    , obtained from pressed amber powder, were subjected to accelerated thermal ageing. Cross-sections of the pellets were analyzed by infrared micro-spectroscopy, in order to identify and quantify changes in chemical properties. The experimental results showed strong oxidation exclusively at the exterior part...... of cross-sections from samples subjected to long-term thermal ageing, confirming that oxidation of Baltic amber starts from the surface....

  12. Catalytic activity of calcium-based mixed metal oxides nanocatalysts in transesterification reaction of palm oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Noraakinah; Ismail, Kamariah Noor; Hamid, Ku Halim Ku; Hadi, Abdul

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, biodiesel has become the forefront development as an alternative diesel fuel derived from biological sources such as oils of plant and fats. Presently, the conventional transesterification of vegetable oil to biodiesel gives rise to some technological problem. In this sense, heterogeneous nanocatalysts of calcium-based mixed metal oxides were synthesized through sol-gel method. It was found that significant increase of biodiesel yield, 91.75 % was obtained catalyzed by CaO-NbO2 from palm oil compared to pure CaO of 53.99 % under transesterification conditions (methanol/oil ratio 10:1, reaction time 3 h, catalyst concentration 4 wt%, reaction temperature 60 °C, and mixing speed of 600 rpm). The phase structure and crystallinity as well as the texture properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and the textural properties were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption analysis. Sol-gel method has been known as versatile method in controlling the structural and chemical properties of the catalyst. Calcium-based mixed oxide synthesized from sol-gel method was found to exist as smaller crystallite size with high surface area.

  13. Molecular Interactions and Reaction Dynamics in Supercritical Water Oxidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, K

    1998-01-01

    .... From UV-vis spectroscopic measurements and molecular dynamics simulation of chemical equilibria, we have shown that density effects on broad classes of reactions may be explained in terms of changes...

  14. New Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction of Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisebois, Patrick P; Kuss, Christian; Schougaard, Steen B; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Siaj, Mohamed

    2016-04-18

    Graphene oxide is regarded as a major precursor for graphene-based materials. The development of graphene oxide based derivatives with new functionalities requires a thorough understanding of its chemical reactivity, especially for canonical synthetic methods such as the Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully extended with graphene oxide as a source of diene by using maleic anhydride as a dienophile, thereby outlining the presence of the cis diene present in the graphene oxide framework. This reaction provides fundamental information for understanding the exact structure and chemical nature of graphene oxide. On the basis of high-resolution (13) C-SS NMR spectra, we show evidence for the formation of new sp(3) carbon centers covalently bonded to graphene oxide following hydrolysis of the reaction product. DFT calculations are also used to show that the presence of a cis dihydroxyl and C vacancy on the surface of graphene oxide are promoting the reaction with significant negative reaction enthalpies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. CO2 as an Oxidant for High Temperature Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibudjing eKawi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the developments in catalyst technology for the reactions utilizing CO2 for high temperature applications. These include dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins, the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and finally CO2 reforming of hydrocarbon feedstock (i.e. methane and alcohols. Aspects on the various reaction pathways are also highlighted. The literature on the role of promoters and catalyst development is critically evaluated. Most of the reactions discussed in this review are exploited in industries and related to on-going processes, thus providing extensive data from literature. However some reactions, such as CO2 reforming of ethanol and glycerol which have not reached industrial scale are also reviewed owing to their great potential in terms of sustainability which are essential as energy for the future. This review further illustrates the building-up of knowledge which shows the role of support and catalysts for each reaction and the underlying linkage between certain catalysts which can be adapted for the multiple CO2-related reactions.

  16. Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of benzotriazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Shan; Fang, Yi-Xiang

    2011-03-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are high production volume chemicals with broad application in various industrial processes and in households, and have been found to be omnipresent in aquatic environments. We investigated oxidation of five benzotriazoles (BT: 1H-benzotriazole; 5MBT: 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole; DMBT: 5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzotriazole hydrate; 5CBT: 5-chloro-1H-benzotriazole; HBT: 1-hydroxybenzotriazole) by aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) to determine reaction kinetics as a function of pH (6.0-10.0), and interpreted the reaction mechanism of Fe(VI) with BTs by using a linear free-energy relationship. The pK(a) values of BT and DMBT were also determined using UV-Visible spectroscopic method in order to calculate the species-specific rate constants, and they were 8.37 ± 0.0 and 8.98 ± 0.08 respectively. Each of BTs reacted moderately with Fe(VI) with the k(app) ranged from 7.2 to 103.8 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 24 ± 1 °C. When the molar ratio of Fe(VI) and BTs increased up to 30:1, the removal rate of BTs reached about >95% in buffered milli-Q water or secondary wastewater effluent. The electrophilic oxidation mechanism of the above reaction was illustrated by using a linear free-energy relationship between pH-dependence of species-specific rate constants and substituent effects (σ(p)). Fe(VI) reacts initially with BTs by electrophilic attack at the 1,2,3-triazole moiety of BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, and at the N-OH bond of HBT. Moreover, for BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, the reactions with the species HFeO(4)(-) predominantly controled the reaction rates. For HBT, the species H(2)FeO(4) with dissociated HBT played a major role in the reaction. The results showed that Fe(VI) has the ability to degrade benzotriazoles in water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface structure-dependent pyrite oxidation in relatively dry and moist air: Implications for the reaction mechanism and sulfur evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Xian, Haiyang; Lin, Xiaoju; Tang, Hongmei; Du, Runxiang; Yang, Yiping; Zhu, Runliang; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Jingming; Teng, H. Henry; He, Hongping

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite oxidation not only is environmentally significant in the formation of acid mine (or acid rock) drainage and oxidative acidification of lacustrine sediment but also is a critical stage in geochemical sulfur evolution. The oxidation process is always controlled by the reactivity of pyrite, which in turn is controlled by its surface structure. In this study, the oxidation behavior of naturally existing {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, and {2 1 0} facets of pyrite was investigated using a comprehensive approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry with periodic density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that (i) the initial oxidation rates of both pyrite {1 1 1} and {2 1 0} are much greater than that of pyrite {1 0 0}; (ii) the initial oxidation rate of pyrite {2 1 0} is greater than that of pyrite {1 1 1} in low relative humidity, which is reversed in high relative humidity; and (iii) inner sphere oxygen-bearing sulfur species are originally generated from surface reactions and then converted to outer sphere species. The facet dependent rate law can be expressed as: r{hkl} =k{hkl}haP0.5(t + 1) - 0.5 , where r{hkl} is the orientation dependent reaction rate, k{hkl} is the orientation dependent rate constant, h is the relative humidity, P is the oxygen partial pressure, and t is the oxidation time in seconds. {1 1 1} is the most sensitive facet for pyrite oxidation. Combined with DFT theoretical investigations, water catalyzed electron transfer is speculated as the rate-limiting step. These findings disclose the structure-reactivity dependence of pyrite, which not only presents new insight into the mechanism of pyrite oxidation but also provides fundamental data to evaluate sulfur speciation evolution, suggesting that the surface structure sensitivity should be considered to estimate the reactivity at the mineral

  18. Optimization of reaction parameters for the electrochemical oxidation of lidocaine with a Design of Experiments approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, Turan; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    Identification of potentially toxic oxidative drug metabolites is a crucial step in the development of new drugs. Electrochemical methods are useful to study oxidative drug metabolism, but are not widely used to synthesize metabolites for follow-up studies. Careful optimization of reaction

  19. Concentrated Aqueous Sodium Tosylate as Green Medium for Alkene Oxidation and Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Tal; Lin, Xiaoxi; Vigalok, Arkadi

    2017-11-03

    A hydrotropic solution of highly concentrated sodium tosylate (NaOTs) can be used as a recyclable medium for the environmentally benign oxidation of conjugated alkenes with H 2 O 2 . Both uncatalyzed and metal-catalyzed reactions provided the corresponding oxidation products in higher yields than in pure water or many common organic solvents.

  20. Process for the reduction of competitive oxidant consuming reactions in the solution mining of a mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved method for the solution mining of a mineral from a subterranean formation. More specifically, the invention relates to an improved method which enhances significantly the recovery of the mineral from a subterranean formation via solution mining by reducing the oxidant consuming reactions which compete with the mineral for the oxidant injected therein

  1. Chemiluminescence from the reaction of Ba 3D with nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.A.; Solarz, R.W.; Dubrin, J.W.; Brotzmann, R.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction of laser excited Ba*( 3 D) states with nitric oxide is presented. BaO product is not detected, although the channel is thermodynamically open, and instead chemiluminescence is observed. Experiments which suggest that radiative recombination, Ba + NO → BaNO* → BaNO, is the observed reaction channel will also be presented

  2. Development of a redox-free Mitsunobu reaction exploiting phosphine oxides as precursors to dioxyphosphoranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoping; Chapman, Charlotte; Whiting, Matthew; Denton, Ross

    2014-07-14

    The development of the first redox-free protocol for the Mitsunobu reaction is described. This has been achieved by exploiting triphenylphosphine oxide--the unwanted by-product in the conventional Mitsunobu reaction--as the precursor to the active P(V) coupling reagent. Multinuclear NMR studies are consistent with hydroxyl activation via an alkoxyphosphonium salt.

  3. Controlled thermonuclear reactions and Tora Supra program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The research programs for the nuclear energy production by means of thermonuclear fusion are shown. TORA SUPRA, Joint European Torus, Next European Torus and those developed at the Atomic Energy Center are described. The controlled fusion necessary conditions, the energy and confinement balance, and the research of a better tokamak configuration are discussed. A description of TORA SUPRA, the ways of achieving the project and the expected delays are shown. The Controlled Fusion Research Department functions, concerning these programs, are described. The importance of international cooperation and the perspectives about the use of controlled fusion are underlined [fr

  4. Effect of thermal treatment conditions on properties of vanadium molybdenum oxide catalyst in acrolein oxidation reaction to acrylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkova, T.P.; Tarasova, D.V.; Olen'kova, I.P.; Andrushkevich, T.V.; Nikoro, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of thermal treatment conditions (temperature and gas medium) on properties of vanadium molybdenum oxide catalyst in acrolein oxidation reaction to acrylic acid is investigated. It is shown that active and selective catalysts are formed in the course of thermal decomposition of the drying product of ammonium metavanadate and paramolybdate under the conditions ensuring the vanadium ion reduction up to tetravalent state with conservation of molybdenum oxidation degree equal to 6. It is possible to realize it either by treatment of the catalyst calcinated in the air flow at 300 deg by the reaction mixture at the activation stage or by gas-reducer flow treatment at 280 deg. Thermal treatment in the reducing medium of the oxidized catalyst does not lead to complete regeneration of its properties

  5. Sintering uranium oxide in the reaction product of hydrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Hollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide alone or containing one or more additives such as plutonium dioxide, gadolinium oxide, titanium dioxide, silica, and alumina are heated to 900 to 1599 0 C in the presence of a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, either alone or with an inert carrier gas and held at the desired temperature in this atmosphere to sinter the pellets. The sintered pellets are then cooled in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -4 to 10 -18 atm of oxygen such as dry hydrogen, wet hydrogen, dry carbon monoxide, wet carbon monoxide, inert gases such as nitrogen, argon, helium, and neon and mixtures of ayny of the foregoing including a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The ratio of hydrogen to carbon dioxide in the gas mixture fed to the furnace is controlled to give a ratio of oxygen to uranium atoms in the sintered particles within the range of 1.98:1 to about 2.10:1. The water vapor present in the reaction products in the furnace atmosphere acts as a hydrolysis agent to aid removal of fluoride should such impurity be present in the uranium oxide. (U.S.)

  6. Reaction path of the oxidative coupling of methane over a lithium-doped magnesium oxide catalyst : Factors affecting the Rate of Total Oxidation of Ethane and Ethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, J.A.; Korf, S.J.; Veehof, R.H.J.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments using gas mixtures of O2, C2H6 or C2H4 and CH4 or He have been carried out with a Li/MgO catalyst using a well-mixed reaction system which show that the total oxidation products, CO and CO2, are formed predominantly from ethylene, formed in the oxidative coupling of methane. It is

  7. The Atmospheric Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds Through Hydrogen Shift Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian

    a radical is denoted as a H-shift reaction. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the potential energy surface of the H-shift reactions and the subsequent decomposition pathways. The transition state theory including the Eckart quantum tunneling correction have been used to calculate...... the reaction rate constants of the H-shift reactions. The autoxidation of volatile organic compounds is an important oxidation mechanism that produces secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and recycles hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The autoxidation cycle produces a second generation peroxy radical (OOQOOH) through...... a series of H-shift reactions and O2 attachments. I have investigated the H-shift reactions in two OOQOOH radicals (hydroperoxy peroxy radicals and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals). The H-shift reaction rate constants have been compared with the bimolecular reaction rate constants of the peroxy radicals...

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide as an innovative reaction medium for selective oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeker, F.; Leitner, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Although the catalytic efficiency of all catalytic oxidation processes studied in scCO{sub 2} up to now is far from being satisfactory, the principle possibility to carry out such reactions in this medium is clearly evident. Future research in our group will be directed towards the development of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts that are adopted to the special requirements of both the oxidation process and the supercritical reaction medium. Preliminary results from these studies regarding the epoxidation of olefins with molecular oxygen as oxidant will be presented on the conference poster. (orig.)

  9. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider different boundary conditions and transitions movements.We derive expressions that describe diffusion behaviors constrained to bulk restrictions and the dynamic of the particles.Finally it is important to mention that the theoretical results obtained from the models proposed in this work are compared with Monte Carlo simulations.We find, in general, excellent agreements between the theory and the simulations

  10. Microreactor as Efficient Tool for Light Induced Oxidation Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejda, S.; Drhová, Magdalena; Křišťál, Jiří; Buzek, D.; Krystyník, Pavel; Klusoň, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 255, NOV 1 (2014), s. 178-184 ISSN 1385-8947 Grant - others:GA MŠMT(CZ) MŠk:CZ.1.07/2.2.00/28.0205 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : photo microreactor * phthalocyanine * chlorophenol oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.321, year: 2014

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of reduction reactions of niobium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, C.

    1981-01-01

    Reduction processes of niobium oxides by hydrogen, carbon and aluminium are analysed thermodinamically. It is shown that reduction by hydrogen is not technically feasible. High purity of raw materials is required. In the carbothermic process impurities which react to form high stability carbides should be avoided. (Author) [pt

  12. Things fall apart: Fragmentation reactions in the oxidative aging of organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, J. H.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wilson, K. R.; Daumit, K. E.; Kessler, S. H.; Lim, C. Y.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds involves a wide array of chemical transformations, including functionalization reactions (addition of polar functional groups to the carbon skeleton), fragmentation reactions (formation of lower carbon-number products via C-C bond scission), and accretion reactions (increases in molecular weight by the combination of two chemical species). Each of these reaction classes can lead to large changes in volatility, and hence can have major implications for atmospheric organic aerosol (OA). For example, the formation of OA is predominantly driven by functionalization and accretion reactions, which generally lead to decreases in volatility. Here we describe a series of laboratory studies of the subsequent organic "aging", the multiday oxidation processes that occur after the initial OA formation and growth. In these studies, the multigenerational oxidation of organic compounds in various phases (the gas phase, the condensed OA phase, and the aqueous phase) is carried out within either an environmental chamber or a flow reactor, and monitored using various high-resolution mass spectrometric techniques. In all cases it is found that fragmentation reactions play a major role in the observed aging chemistry, dominated by the formation of small, volatile oxidation products. These results suggest that multi-day oxidative aging processes do not lead to sustained aerosol growth, but rather may serve as a chemical sink for atmospheric OA.

  13. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  14. Mars Ascent Vehicle Reaction Control System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase I NASA program, Valley Tech Systems (VTS) will develop an innovative solid Reaction Control System (RCS) architecture concept design that can...

  15. Modeling Reaction Control System Effects on Mars Odyssey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanna, Jill

    2002-01-01

    ...) simulations to determine rotational motion of the spacecraft. The main objective of this study was to assess the reaction control system models and their effects on the atmospheric flight of Odyssey...

  16. Dissolution kinetics of small amounts of oxygen in tantalum alloy T-111 and internal oxide displacement reactions during annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    Oxygen was added to T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf, wt. %) at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about 0.0003 torr. The technique employed permitted predetermined and reproducible doping of T-111 up to 3.0 at. % oxygen. Based on the temperature dependence of the doping reaction, it is concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the latter oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and of other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high-temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent affect on the doping reaction.

  17. Hysteresis in the solid oxide fuel cell cathode reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Bay, Lasse

    2001-01-01

    The oxygen electrode reaction at the Pt/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interface is investigated at 1000degreesC on Pt point electrodes on YSZ and YSZ point contacts on Pt. Linear potential sweeps show a pronounced non-linear current-voltage relation and inductive hysteresis, in particular at l...

  18. Aqueous Oxidative Heck Reaction as a Protein-Labeling Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ourailidou, Marilena; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Baas, Bert-Jan; Jeronimus-Stratingh, Catherine; Gottumukkala, Aditya L.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Dekker, Frans

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of chemical reactions are being employed for bio-orthogonal ligation of detection labels to protein-bound functional groups. Several of these strategies, however, are limited in their application to pure proteins and are ineffective in complex biological samples such as cell

  19. Epoxidation and oxidation reactions using 1,4-butanediol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and aryl halides to hydroxy compounds through a .... Epoxidation of olefins using 1,4-BDDMA-crosslinked polystyrene supported t- butyl hydroperoxide. Reaction. Isolated. Olefina timeb (h). Productc yield (%). Cinnamic acid. 39 ... aCinnamic acid; bcyclohexene; csubstrate to resin 1 : 2; solvent, dioxan, temperature, 70°C.

  20. Interface Controlled Oxidation States in Layered Cobalt Oxide Nanoislands on Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, Alexander; Fester, Jakob; Bajdich, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Layered cobalt oxides have been shown to be highly active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER; half of the catalytic “water splitting” reaction), particularly when promoted with gold. However, the surface chemistry of cobalt oxides and in particular the nature of the synergistic effect...

  1. Detection of different oxidation states of individual manganese porphyrins during their reaction with oxygen at a solid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Duncan; Li, Min; Habets, Thomas; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Speller, Sylvia; Amabilino, David B; De Feyter, Steven; Elemans, Johannes A A W

    2013-07-01

    Manganese porphyrins have been extensively investigated as model systems for the natural enzyme cytochrome P450 and as synthetic oxidation catalysts. Here, we report single-molecule studies of the multistep reaction of manganese porphyrins with molecular oxygen at a solid/liquid interface, using a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) under environmental control. The high lateral resolution of the STM, in combination with its sensitivity to subtle differences in the electronic properties of molecules, allowed the detection of at least four distinct reaction species. Real-space and real-time imaging of reaction dynamics enabled the observation of active sites, immobile on the experimental timescale. Conversions between the different species could be tuned by the composition of the atmosphere (argon, air or oxygen) and the surface bias voltage. By means of extensive comparison of the results to those obtained by analogous solution-based chemistry, we assigned the observed species to the starting compound, reaction intermediates and products.

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments from the Skagerrak (Denmark): II. Reaction-transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, A.W.; Regnier, P.; Knab, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    A steady-state reaction-transport model is applied to sediments retrieved by gravity core from two stations (S10 and S13) in the Skagerrak to determine the main kinetic and thermodynamic controls on anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The model considers an extended biomass-implicit reaction...... methane diffuses up from the SMTZ to the top of the core without being consumed. The tailing is due to bioenergetic limitation of AOM in the sulfate reduction zone, because the methane concentration is too low to engender favorable thermodynamic drive. AOM is also bioenergetically inhibited below the SMTZ...

  3. Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy for a Photoelectrochemical Reaction: Water Oxidation on a Hematite Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Young; Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2018-03-06

    To understand the pathway of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) reaction, quantitative knowledge of reaction intermediates is important. We describe here surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy for this purpose (PEC SI-SECM), where a light pulse to a photoactive semiconductor film at a given potential generates intermediates that are then analyzed by a tip generated titrant at known times after the light pulse. The improvements were demonstrated for photoelectrochemical water oxidation (oxygen evolution) reaction on a hematite surface. The density of photoactive sites, proposed to be Fe 4+ species, on a hematite surface was successfully quantified, and the photoelectrochemical water oxidation reaction dynamics were elucidated by time-dependent redox titration experiments. The new configuration of PEC SI-SECM should find expanded usage to understand and investigate more complicated PEC reactions with other materials.

  4. Criegee Intermediates: What Direct Production and Detection Can Teach Us About Reactions of Carbonyl Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Craig A.

    2017-05-01

    The carbonyl oxide intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, often known as Criegee intermediates, are potentially important reactants in Earth's atmosphere. For decades, careful analysis of ozonolysis systems was employed to derive an understanding of the formation and reactions of these species. Recently it has proved possible to synthesize at least some of these intermediates separately from ozonolysis, and hence to measure their reaction kinetics directly. Direct measurements have allowed new or more detailed understanding of each type of gas-phase reaction that carbonyl oxides undergo, often acting as a complement to highly detailed ozonolysis experiments. Moreover, the use of direct characterization methods to validate increasingly accurate theoretical investigations can enhance their impact well beyond the set of specific reactions that have been measured. Reactions that initiate particles or fuel their growth could be a new frontier for direct measurements of Criegee intermediate chemistry.

  5. Effects of (n, γ) reaction on chromium oxides (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Risio, Cecilia; Marques, Roberto

    1988-01-01

    A study of the behaviour of the recoil atom in irradiated CrO 3 has been performed. Irradiations were made in a nuclear reactor; post-irradiation analysis was performed using low voltage paper electrophoresis; an isothermal step annealing study was also conducted. Obtained values for rate constants and the activation energy for the annealing reaction are presented. A comparison with the behaviour reported for different chromates was performed. (Author) [es

  6. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  7. Characterization of interfacial reactions and oxide films on 316L stainless steel in various simulated PWR primary water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian [Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Mailbox 269, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai, 200072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steels, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Lu, Zhanpeng, E-mail: zplu@t.shu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Mailbox 269, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai, 200072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steels, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Ru, Xiangkun; Peng, Hao; Xiong, Qi; Li, Hongjuan [Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Mailbox 269, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai, 200072 (China)

    2017-06-15

    The effect of water chemistry on the electrochemical and oxidizing behaviors of 316L SS was investigated in hydrogenated, deaerated and oxygenated PWR primary water at 310 °C. Water chemistry significantly influenced the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy parameters. The highest charge-transfer resistance and oxide-film resistance occurred in oxygenated water. The highest electric double-layer capacitance and constant phase element of the oxide film were in hydrogenated water. The oxide films formed in deaerated and hydrogenated environments were similar in composition but different in morphology. An oxide film with spinel outer particles and a compact and Cr-rich inner layer was formed in both hydrogenated and deaerated water. Larger and more loosely distributed outer oxide particles were formed in deaerated water. In oxygenated water, an oxide film with hematite outer particles and a porous and Ni-rich inner layer was formed. The reaction kinetics parameters obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and oxidation film properties relating to the steady or quasi-steady state conditions in the time-period of measurements could provide fundamental information for understanding stress corrosion cracking processes and controlling parameters. - Highlights: •Long-term EIS measurements of 316L SS in simulated PWR primary water. •Highest charge-transfer resistance and oxide film resistance in oxygenated water. •Highest electric double-layer capacitance and oxide film CPE in hydrogenated water. •Similar compositions, different shapes of oxides in deaerated/hydrogenated water. •Inner layer Cr-rich in hydrogenated/deaerated water, Ni-rich in oxygenated water.

  8. Reaction mechanism for the free-edge oxidation of soot by O 2

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet; da Silva, Gabriel; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The reaction pathways for the oxidation by O 2 of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in soot particles are investigated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. For this, pyrene radical (4-pyrenyl) is chosen as the model molecule, as most soot models present in the literature employ the reactions involving the conversion of 4-pyrenyl to 4-phenanthryl by O 2 and OH to account for soot oxidation. Several routes for the formation of CO and CO 2 are proposed. The addition of O 2 on a radical site to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless and exothermic with reaction energy of 188kJ/mol. For the oxidation reaction to proceed further, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 104, 167 and 115kJ/mol relative to the peroxyl radical. The effect of the presence of H atom on a carbon atom neighboring the radical site on the energetics of carbon oxidation is assessed. Those intermediate species formed during oxidation with seven-membered rings or with a phenolic group are found to be highly stable. The rate constants evaluated using transition state theory in the temperature range of 300-3000K for the reactions involved in the mechanism are provided. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  9. Reaction mechanism for the free-edge oxidation of soot by O 2

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-11-01

    The reaction pathways for the oxidation by O 2 of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in soot particles are investigated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. For this, pyrene radical (4-pyrenyl) is chosen as the model molecule, as most soot models present in the literature employ the reactions involving the conversion of 4-pyrenyl to 4-phenanthryl by O 2 and OH to account for soot oxidation. Several routes for the formation of CO and CO 2 are proposed. The addition of O 2 on a radical site to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless and exothermic with reaction energy of 188kJ/mol. For the oxidation reaction to proceed further, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 104, 167 and 115kJ/mol relative to the peroxyl radical. The effect of the presence of H atom on a carbon atom neighboring the radical site on the energetics of carbon oxidation is assessed. Those intermediate species formed during oxidation with seven-membered rings or with a phenolic group are found to be highly stable. The rate constants evaluated using transition state theory in the temperature range of 300-3000K for the reactions involved in the mechanism are provided. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  11. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  12. Extensive Bone Reaction From Catastrophic Oxidized Zirconium Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar-Gheiti, Adrian J; Collins, Dennis; McCarthy, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty has become popular to minimize wear and increase longevity, especially in young patients. Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) femoral heads were introduced in the past decade for use in total hip arthroplasty. The advantages of oxidized zirconium include less risk of fracture compared with traditional ceramic heads. This case report describes a patient with a history of bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nonoperative management of avascular necrosis failed, and the patient was treated with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The patient was followed at regular intervals and had slow eccentric polyethylene wear during a 10-year period. After 10 years, the patient had accelerated wear, with femoral and acetabular bone changes as a result of Oxinium and ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene wear during a 6-month period. This article highlights the unusual accelerated bone changes that occurred as a result of Oxinium wear particles. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Localized temperature and chemical reaction control in nanoscale space by nanowire array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C Yan; Li, Zhiyong; Williams, R Stanley; Lee, K-Cheol; Park, Inkyu

    2011-11-09

    We introduce a novel method for chemical reaction control with nanoscale spatial resolution based on localized heating by using a well-aligned nanowire array. Numerical and experimental analysis shows that each individual nanowire could be selectively and rapidly Joule heated for local and ultrafast temperature modulation in nanoscale space (e.g., maximum temperature gradient 2.2 K/nm at the nanowire edge; heating/cooling time chemical reactions such as polymer decomposition/cross-linking and direct and localized hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nanowires were demonstrated.

  14. The application of multiple reaction monitoring to assess ApoA-I methionine oxidations in diabetes and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein N. Yassine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative modification of apolipoprotein A-I’s methionine148 (M148 is associated with defective HDL function in vitro. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM is a mass spectrometric technique that can be used to quantitate post-translational modifications. In this study, we developed an MRM assay to monitor the abundance ratio of the peptide containing oxidized M148 to the native peptide in ApoA-I. Measurement of the oxidized-to-unoxidized-M148 ratio was reproducible (CV < 5%. The extent of methionine M148 oxidation in the HDL of healthy controls, and type 2 diabetic participants with and without prior cardiovascular events (CVD were then examined. The results suggest a significant increase in the relative ratio of the peptide containing oxidized M148 to the unmodified peptide in the HDL of participants with diabetes and CVD (p < 0.001, compared to participants without CVD. Monitoring the abundance ratio of the peptides containing oxidized and unoxidized M148 by MRM provides a means of examining the relationship between M148 oxidation and vascular complications in CVD.

  15. Determining two-step control in heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, T; Silveston, P L; Hudgins, R R

    1979-10-01

    The data by Thaller and Thodos on the sec.-butanol dehydrogenation to methyl ethyl ketone on brass catalyst indicated that a dual site surface reaction was rate-controlling below 575/sup 0/K and hydrogen desorption was rate-controlling above 616/sup 0/K (Vertical BarAIChE J.

  16. Interfacial reactions between indium tin oxide and triphenylamine tetramer layers induced by photoirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toshikazu; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi; Yamamoto, Ichiro; Murasaki, Takanori; Kato, Yoshifumi

    2008-01-01

    The effects of photoirradiation on the interfacial chemical reactions between indium tin oxide (ITO) films and layers of triphenylamine tetramer (TPTE) were investigated by using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin TPTE layers deposited onto sputter-deposited ITO films were irradiated with violet light-emitting diodes (peak wavelength: 380 nm). Shifts in the peak positions of spectral components that originated in the organic layer toward the higher binding-energy side were observed in the XPS profiles during the early stages of irradiation. No further peak shifts were observed after additional irradiation. An increase in the ratio of the organic component in the O 1s spectra was also observed during the photoirradiation. The ratio of the organic component increased in proportion to the cube root of the irradiation time. These results suggest that photoirradiation induces an increase in the height of the carrier injection barrier at the interface between TPTE and ITO in the early stages of the irradiation, possibly due to the rapid diffusion controlled formation and growth of an oxidized TPTE layer, which is considered to act as a high resistance layer

  17. Vanadium oxide V2O5 reaction with calcium metavanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnenko, T.I.; Slobodin, B.V.; Zhilyaev, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Complex physicochemical studies on the V 2 O 5 Ca(VO 3 ) 2 mixtures, annealed under different conditions, were conducted. It was established that the V 2 O 5 -Ca(VO 3 ) 2 system is characterized by the following features: defective structure of initial components, which are in equilibrium state; irreversible structural transformation without changes in the macrosymmetry (530 deg C) of calcium metavanadate, deficient in calcium and oxygen; melting of eutectic mixture of components which are in equilibrium at 616+-3 deg C; Ca(VO 3 ) 2 melting with decomposition at 775+-3 deg C. Besides this, the formation of oxide vanadium bronze of β-type calcium is possible under some conditions (narrow temperature range, certain partial oxygen pressure, etc)

  18. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in DEFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, L.P.R. de; Elsheikh, A.; Silva, E. L. da; Radtke, C.; Amico, S.C.; Malfatti, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct ethanol fuel cells require the use of electrocatalysts to promote bond cleavage of the ethanol molecule in an efficient way. Currently, most electrocatalysts contain platinum, which enables improved catalytic activity and stability in acidic media. However platinum presents high cost and low availability. Based on that, novel catalysts have been developed, such as those based on palladium and its alloys, which have attained excellent results in the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. In this work, Pd, PdSn and PdNiSn catalysts supported on Vulcan XC72R carbon were synthesized via impregnation/reduction. The electrocatalysts were characterized by RBS, XRD and cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of an alloy and not the deposition of isolated elements. The synthesized catalysts displayed good catalytic activity, as observed by cyclic voltammetry, being the best electrochemical performance achieved by the ternary alloy. (author)

  19. Synthesis of porous gold nanoshells by controlled transmetallation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattabi, Manjunatha, E-mail: manjupattabi@yahoo.com; M, Krishnaprabha [Department of Materials Science, Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri-574199 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Aqueous synthesis of porous gold nanoshells in one step is carried out through controlled transmetallation (TM) reaction using a naturally available egg shell membrane (ESM) as a barrier between the sacrificial silver particles (AgNPs) and the gold precursor solution (HAuCl{sub 4}). The formation of porous gold nanoshells via TM reaction is inferred from UV-Vis spectroscopy and the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies.

  20. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, James R.; Dodson, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  1. Review on modeling development for multiscale chemical reactions coupled transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    A literature study is performed to compile the state-of-the-art, as well as future potential, in SOFC modeling. Principles behind various transport processes such as mass, heat, momentum and charge as well as for electrochemical and internal reforming reactions are described. A deeper investigation is made to find out potentials and challenges using a multiscale approach to model solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and combine the accuracy at microscale with the calculation speed at macroscale to design SOFCs, based on a clear understanding of transport phenomena, chemical reactions and functional requirements. Suitable methods are studied to model SOFCs covering various length scales. Coupling methods between different approaches and length scales by multiscale models are outlined. Multiscale modeling increases the understanding for detailed transport phenomena, and can be used to make a correct decision on the specific design and control of operating conditions. It is expected that the development and production costs will be decreased and the energy efficiency be increased (reducing running cost) as the understanding of complex physical phenomena increases. It is concluded that the connection between numerical modeling and experiments is too rare and also that material parameters in most cases are valid only for standard materials and not for the actual SOFC component microstructures.

  2. Measuring the complex behavior of the SO2 oxidation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahzad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The two step reversible chemical reaction involving five chemical species is investigated. The quasi equilibrium manifold (QEM and spectral quasi equilibrium manifold (SQEM are used for initial approximation to simplify the mechanisms, which we want to utilize in order to investigate the behavior of the desired species. They show a meaningful picture, but for maximum clarity, the investigation method of invariant grid (MIG is employed. These methods simplify the complex chemical kinetics and deduce low dimensional manifold (LDM from the high dimensional mechanism. The coverage of the species near equilibrium point is investigated and then we shall discuss moving along the equilibrium of ODEs. The steady state behavior is observed and the Lyapunov function is utilized to study the stability of ODEs. Graphical results are used to describe the physical aspects of measurements.

  3. Selection of Suitable Microorganism for Biocatalytic Oxidation Reaction of Racemic Propranolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime SONGÜR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Propranolol is one of the β-blockers which are pharmaceutically important, especially used for treatment of cardiovasculer disease. In this study, the production of enantiomerically pure propranolol was aimed via biocatalytic deracemization including tandem oxidation-reduction reactions of racemic propranolol. Within this content, firstly suitable microorganism for the oxidation of racemic propranolol was investigated. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH enzyme for oxidation of propranolol and NADH oxidase enzyme for cofactor regeneration were necessary for the oxidation reactions. For this reason, ADH and NADH oxidase enzymes activities of different microorganisms were measured to select the microorganism for using as enzyme source. These microorganisms are Lactobacillus kefir NRRL B-1839, Rhodotorula glutunis DSM 70398, Rhizopus oryzae CBS 111718, Rhizopus arhizus. The highest ADH and NADH oxidase activities were obtained for L. kefir.

  4. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartling, Stephan; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-01-01

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology

  5. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An investigation of oxidation products and SOA yields from OH + pesticide reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murschell, T.; Friedman, B.; Link, M.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Pesticides are used globally in agricultural and residential areas. After application and/or volatilization from a surface, these compounds can be transported over long distances in the atmosphere. However, their chemical fate, including oxidation and gas-particle partitioning in the atmosphere, is not well understood. We present gas and particle measurements of oxidation products from pesticide + OH reactions using a dynamic solution injection system coupled to an Oxidative Flow Reactor. Products were detected with a High Resolution Time of Flight Iodide Chemical Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) and a Size Mobility Particle Scanner (SMPS). The OFR allows pesticides to react with variable OH radical exposures, ranging from the equivalent of one day to a full week of atmospheric oxidative aging. In this work, we explore pesticide oxidation products from reaction with OH and ozone, and compare those products to photolysis reactions. Pesticides of similar chemical structures were explored, including acetochlor / metolachlor and permethrin / cypermethrin, to explore mechanistic differences. We present chemical parameters including average product oxidation state, average oxygen to carbon ratio, and potential secondary organic aerosol formation for each of these compounds.

  7. Structural and surface changes of cobalt modified manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, Wojciech; Greluk, Magdalena; Słowik, Grzegorz; Turczyniak-Surdacka, Sylwia

    2018-05-01

    Surface and structural changes of unmodified manganese and cobalt-manganese oxide during activation and ethanol steam reforming reaction conditions (ESR) were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation (TPR/TPO) and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that synthesis of cobalt manganese oxide by the redox precipitation method led to the formation of strongly dispersed cobalt ionic species within cryptomelane-based manganese oxide structure. Development of large cube-like MnO nanoparticles with spherical cobalt metallic crystallites decorated by manganese oxide on the high oxidation state and potassium species was observed during reduction. Cobalt manganese catalyst showed high initial activity and selectivity to H2 and CO2 in ethanol stem reforming reaction in the range of 390-480 °C. The drop of ethanol conversion and changes of selectivity with the time-on-stream were observed. An increase of reaction temperature led to intensification of deactivation phenomena. TEM studies evidenced coexistence of Co and CoOx nanoparticles formed under ethanol steam reforming conditions, partially covered by filamentous and encapsulating carbonaceous deposits.

  8. A combinatorial chemistry approach to the investigation of cerium oxide and plutonium oxide reactions with small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John T.; Warner, Benjamin P.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Havrilla, George J.; Morris, David E.; Buscher, C. Thomas

    2000-07-01

    We are currently investigating the potential chemistry of the 3013 Standard waste storage containers. These containers are filled with waste that is a mixture of inorganic salts and plutonium oxide that has been calcined to remove water and other volatiles. There has been concern about possible pressure buildup due to the formation of hydrogen or other gases. We are utilizing a combinatorial chemistry approach to investigate a range of possible reactions that may occur in the containers with various concentrations of metal oxides and inorganic salts.

  9. Laccase-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Assemblies as Efficient Nanobiocatalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patila, Michaela; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Stamatis, Haralambos

    Multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies were prepared through the multi-point covalent immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor (TvL) on functionalized graphene oxide (fGO). The catalytic properties of the fGO-TvL nanoassemblies were found to depend on the number of the graphene

  10. Catalytic activity of metall-like carbides in carbon oxide oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamov, A.I.; Kosolapova, T.Ya.; Rafal, A.N.; Kirillova, N.V.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of carbon oxide oxidation upon carbides of hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, zirconium and chromium is studied. Probable mechanism of the catalysts action is suggested. The established character of the change of the carbide catalytic activity is explained by the change of d-electron contribution to the metal-metal interaction

  11. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto

    2016-06-10

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  12. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto; Menendez Rodriguez, Gabriel; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Macchioni, Alceo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  13. RuO4-mediated oxidation of secondary amines 2. imines as main reaction intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Cristina A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation by RuO4 (generated in situ from RuO2 and NaIO4 of secondary amines such as Bn–NH–CH2R (1; R=H, Me gave complex reaction mixtures, but mainly amides. In the presence of cyanide, the leading products were α-aminonitriles. Comparison of the oxidation products of 1 with those from the corresponding imines PhCH=N–CH2R and Bn–N=CH–R showed that formation of the indicated imines is the first main step in the oxidation of 1. A detailed mechanism is proposed.

  14. Factors responsible for activity of catalysts of different chemical types in the reaction of hydrogen oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'chenko, N.I.; Dolgikh, L.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons of differences in the kinetics and mechanism of the H 2 oxidation on optimum metallic (Pt), carbide (WC) and oxide (Co 3 O 4 ) catalysts are discussed. These differences lead to unequal specific activity. It is shown that the catalytic activity of the catalysts in question increases with respect to reactions of isotopic exchange and hydrogen oxidation with an increasing electron-donating ability of anat of the transition metal M on which H 2 is adsorbed. The possibility is considered of increasing the transition metal activity by introduction of additions to increase the electron-donating ability of M

  15. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  16. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl{sub 4}-UO{sub 2} shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl{sub 2}) that has a good solubility in molten UCl{sub 4}. This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl{sub 4}, ZrCl{sub 4}, SiCl{sub 4}, ThCl{sub 4}) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl{sub 4}.

  17. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl 4 ) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl 4 -UO 2 shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl 2 ) that has a good solubility in molten UCl 4 . This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl 4 , ZrCl 4 , SiCl 4 , ThCl 4 ) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl 2 ) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl 4

  18. Propan-1-ol Oxidation Reaction on Au/TiO2 Catalysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-11-27

    Nov 27, 2014 ... a decomposition pathway, producing CO2 and H2O. However, the presence of gold ... complete oxidation reaction of propan-1-ol on the catalysts. Keywords: Gold Catalysis ... flowed at a rate of 30 mL min-1. Propan- o-l was.

  19. The family of berberine bridge enzyme-like enzymes: A treasure-trove of oxidative reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Bastian; Konrad, Barbara; Toplak, Marina; Lahham, Majd; Messenlehner, Julia; Winkler, Andreas; Macheroux, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Biological oxidations form the basis of life on earth by utilizing organic compounds as electron donors to drive the generation of metabolic energy carriers, such as ATP. Oxidative reactions are also important for the biosynthesis of complex compounds, i.e. natural products such as alkaloids that provide vital benefits for organisms in all kingdoms of life. The vitamin B 2 -derived cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) enable an astonishingly diverse array of oxidative reactions that is based on the versatility of the redox-active isoalloxazine ring. The family of FAD-linked oxidases can be divided into subgroups depending on specific sequence features in an otherwise very similar structural context. The sub-family of berberine bridge enzyme (BBE)-like enzymes has recently attracted a lot of attention due to the challenging chemistry catalyzed by its members and the unique and unusual bi-covalent attachment of the FAD cofactor. This family is the focus of the present review highlighting recent advancements into the structural and functional aspects of members from bacteria, fungi and plants. In view of the unprecedented reaction catalyzed by the family's namesake, BBE from the California poppy, recent studies have provided further insights into nature's treasure chest of oxidative reactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ion-molecule reactions in the binary mixture of ethylene oxide and trioxane, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Arakawa, Kazuo; Sugiura, Toshio.

    1978-01-01

    The ion-molecule reactions in the binary mixture of ethylene oxide and trioxane have been studied with use of a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. As cross-reaction product ions, C 3 H 5 O 2 + , C 3 H 6 O 2 +sup(, and C**3**H**7**O**2**)+sup( were observed under the conditions of long delay times and elevated pressure. It was found that these ions are formed by the dissociation of unstable intermediate-complex resulting from the reaction of ethylene oxide molecular ion with trioxane. It was proposed that the complex is of cyclic structure in which positive charge is delocalized. From the consideration of isotopic distribution of the product ions in ethylene-d**4** oxide-trioxane mixtures, the skeletal structures of the product ions were investigated. The rate constants of the formation reactions of C**3**H**5**O**2**)+sup(, C**3**H**6**O**2**)+sup(, and C**3**H**7**O**2**)+sup( in ethylene oxide-trioxane mixtures were found to be 2.20 x 10)-10sup(, 2.61 x 10)-10sup(, and 1.74 x 10)-10sup( cm)3sup( molecule)-1sup(s)-1 , respectively. (auth.)

  1. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  2. Atomic platinum layer coated titanium copper nitride supported on carbon nanotubes for the methanol oxidation reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheng, Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available measurements. The results confirm the core-shell structure of the prepared TiN@Pt/CNTs catalyst. More importantly, the catalyst exhibits superb mass activity and durability for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) than that of the commercial JM Pt/C catalyst...

  3. Iron(III) porphyrin-catalysed oxidation reactions by m-chloro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The notable feature in this study is that none of the kinetic traces are expo- nential. A representative plot is given in figure 1 and the quantitative spectrum of TTBP• radical in dichloromethane is given in figure 2 (bold line). In this oxidation reaction under all the conditions, non-exponential kinetic traces were always obser-.

  4. Sulfur Poisoning of the Water Gas Shift Reaction on Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke

    2013-01-01

    resistance increased both in the high and low frequency region, which indicates a strong poisoning of the water gas shift reaction and thus a lack of hydrogen fuel in addition to the poisoning of the electrochemical hydrogen oxidation. All poisoning effects are reversible under the applied operating...

  5. Methanol electrocatalytic oxidation on Pt nanoparticles on nitrogen doped graphene prepared by the hydrothermal reaction of graphene oxide with urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiao; Zhou, Yingke; Yuan, Tao; Li, Yawei

    2013-01-01

    A facile hydrothermal reaction of graphene oxide with urea was used to produce nitrogen doped graphene, and Pt nanoparticles were deposited on the obtained nitrogen doped graphene by the NaBH 4 reduction route. The morphology and microstructure of the synthesized catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while the functional groups on the surface of the catalysts were investigated by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance techniques were carried out to evaluate the methanol electrocatalytic oxidation activity and durability of Pt catalysts supported on the nitrogen doped graphene. The results showed that nitrogen doping and reduction of GO were achieved simultaneously by the facile hydrothermal reaction, which had beneficial effects for the deposition process and electrocatalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The Pt catalysts supported on the nitrogen doped graphene substrate presented excellent activity and durability of methanol oxidation reaction, which might be promising for application in direct methanol fuel cells

  6. Storage stability of cauliflower soup powder: The effect of lipid oxidation and protein degradation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitio, Riikka; Orlien, Vibeke; Skibsted, Leif H

    2011-09-15

    Soups based on cauliflower soup powders, prepared by dry mixing of ingredients and rapeseed oil, showed a decrease in quality, as evaluated by a sensory panel, during the storage of the soup powder in the dark for up to 12weeks under mildly accelerated conditions of 40°C and 75% relative humidity. Antioxidant, shown to be effective in protecting the rapeseed bulk oil, used for the powder preparation, had no effect on storage stability of the soup powder. The freshly prepared soup powder had a relatively high concentration of free radicals, as measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, which decreased during storage, and most remarkably during the first two weeks of storage, with only marginal increase in lipid hydroperoxides as primary lipid oxidation products, and without any increase in secondary lipid oxidation products. Analyses of volatiles by SPME-GC-MS revealed a significant increase in concentrations of 2-methyl- and 3-methyl butanals, related to Maillard reactions, together with an increase in 2-acetylpyrrole concentration. The soup powders became more brown during storage, as indicated by a decreasing Hunter L-value, in accord with non-enzymatic browning reactions. A significant increase in the concentrations of dimethyl disulfide in soup powder headspace indicated free radical-initiated protein oxidation. Protein degradation, including Maillard reactions and protein oxidation, is concluded to be more important than lipid oxidation in determining the shelf-life of dry cauliflower soup powder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Redox regulation of mitochondrial function with emphasis on cysteine oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria have a myriad of essential functions including metabolism and apoptosis. These chief functions are reliant on electron transfer reactions and the production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production of ATP and ROS are intimately linked to the electron transport chain (ETC). Electrons from nutrients are passed through the ETC via a series of acceptor and donor molecules to the terminal electron acceptor molecular oxygen (O2) which ultimately drives the synthesis of ATP. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain and nutrient oxidation also produces ROS. At high enough concentrations ROS can activate mitochondrial apoptotic machinery which ultimately leads to cell death. However, if maintained at low enough concentrations ROS can serve as important signaling molecules. Various regulatory mechanisms converge upon mitochondria to modulate ATP synthesis and ROS production. Given that mitochondrial function depends on redox reactions, it is important to consider how redox signals modulate mitochondrial processes. Here, we provide the first comprehensive review on how redox signals mediated through cysteine oxidation, namely S-oxidation (sulfenylation, sulfinylation), S-glutathionylation, and S-nitrosylation, regulate key mitochondrial functions including nutrient oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), apoptosis, and mitochondrial fission and fusion. We also consider the chemistry behind these reactions and how they are modulated in mitochondria. In addition, we also discuss emerging knowledge on disorders and disease states that are associated with deregulated redox signaling in mitochondria and how mitochondria-targeted medicines can be utilized to restore mitochondrial redox signaling.

  8. Interfacial Redox Reactions Associated Ionic Transport in Oxide-Based Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Shah, Abdul Hadi; Du, Haiwei; Li, Sean

    2017-01-18

    As an alternative to transistor-based flash memories, redox reactions mediated resistive switches are considered as the most promising next-generation nonvolatile memories that combine the advantages of a simple metal/solid electrolyte (insulator)/metal structure, high scalability, low power consumption, and fast processing. For cation-based memories, the unavailability of in-built mobile cations in many solid electrolytes/insulators (e.g., Ta 2 O 5 , SiO 2 , etc.) instigates the essential role of absorbed water in films to keep electroneutrality for redox reactions at counter electrodes. Herein, we demonstrate electrochemical characteristics (oxidation/reduction reactions) of active electrodes (Ag and Cu) at the electrode/electrolyte interface and their subsequent ions transportation in Fe 3 O 4 film by means of cyclic voltammetry measurements. By posing positive potentials on Ag/Cu active electrodes, Ag preferentially oxidized to Ag + , while Cu prefers to oxidize into Cu 2+ first, followed by Cu/Cu + oxidation. By sweeping the reverse potential, the oxidized ions can be subsequently reduced at the counter electrode. The results presented here provide a detailed understanding of the resistive switching phenomenon in Fe 3 O 4 -based memory cells. The results were further discussed on the basis of electrochemically assisted cations diffusions in the presence of absorbed surface water molecules in the film.

  9. Iron(III Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana L. H. Rebelo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H2TPFPP and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPPCl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPPCl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H2TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPPCl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(IIIporphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide and green solvent (ethanol. Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  10. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-04-12

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  11. A Generalizable Top-Down Nanostructuring Method of Bulk Oxides: Sequential Oxygen-Nitrogen Exchange Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lanlee; Kang, Byungwuk; Han, Suyoung; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Moo Dong; Bang, Jin Ho

    2018-05-27

    A thermal reaction route that induces grain fracture instead of grain growth is devised and developed as a top-down approach to prepare nanostructured oxides from bulk solids. This novel synthesis approach, referred to as the sequential oxygen-nitrogen exchange (SONE) reaction, exploits the reversible anion exchange between oxygen and nitrogen in oxides that is driven by a simple two-step thermal treatment in ammonia and air. Internal stress developed by significant structural rearrangement via the formation of (oxy)nitride and the creation of oxygen vacancies and their subsequent combination into nanopores transforms bulk solid oxides into nanostructured oxides. The SONE reaction can be applicable to most transition metal oxides, and when utilized in a lithium-ion battery, the produced nanostructured materials are superior to their bulk counterparts and even comparable to those produced by conventional bottom-up approaches. Given its simplicity and scalability, this synthesis method could open a new avenue to the development of high-performance nanostructured electrode materials that can meet the industrial demand of cost-effectiveness for mass production. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chemical reaction at ferromagnet/oxide interface and its influence on anomalous Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Teng, Jiao; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xi; Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions at the ferromagnet/oxide interface in [Pt/Fe] 3 /MgO and [Pt/Fe] 3 /SiO 2 multilayers before and after annealing were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that Fe atoms at the Fe/MgO interface were completely oxidized in the as-grown state and significantly deoxidized after vacuum annealing. However, only some of the Fe atoms at the Fe/SiO 2 interface were oxidized and rarely deoxidized after annealing. The anomalous Hall effect was modified by this interfacial chemical reaction. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (R xy ) was greatly increased in the [Pt/Fe] 3 /MgO multilayers after annealing and was 350% higher than that in the as-deposited film, while R xy of the [Pt/Fe] 3 /SiO 2 multilayer only increased 10% after annealing.

  13. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  14. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, A. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Cabrera L, L. I. [UNAM-UAEM, Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, 50200 San Cayetano-Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  15. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, A. L.; Cabrera L, L. I.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  16. Controlling Chemical Reactions in Confined Environments: Water Dissociation in MOF-74

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. A. Fuentes-Fernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The confined porous environment of metal organic frameworks (MOFs is an attractive system for studying reaction mechanisms. Compared to flat oxide surfaces, MOFs have the key advantage that they exhibit a well-defined structure and present significantly fewer challenges in experimental characterization. As an example of an important reaction, we study here the dissociation of water—which plays a critical role in biology, chemistry, and materials science—in MOFs and show how the knowledge of the structure in this confined environment allows for an unprecedented level of understanding and control. In particular, combining in-situ infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that the water dissociation reaction can be selectively controlled inside Zn-MOF-74 by alcohol, through both chemical and physical interactions. Methanol is observed to speed up water dissociation by 25% to 100%, depending on the alcohol partial pressure. On the other hand, co-adsorption of isopropanol reduces the speed of the water reaction, due mostly to steric interactions. In addition, we also investigate the stability of the product state after the water dissociation has occurred and find that the presence of additional water significantly stabilizes the dissociated state. Our results show that precise control of reactions within nano-porous materials is possible, opening the way for advances in fields ranging from catalysis to electrochemistry and sensors.

  17. Synthesis of propylene carbonate from urea and propylene glycol over zinc oxide: A homogeneous reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, several metal oxides and zinc salts were used to catalyze propylene carbonate (PC synthesis from urea and propylene glycol (PG. According to the results of catalytic test and characterization, the catalytic pattern of ZnO was different from that of other metal oxides such as CaO, MgO and La2O3, but similar to that of zinc salts. In fact, the leaching of Zn species took place during reaction for ZnO. And ZnO was found to be the precursor of homogenous catalyst for reaction of urea and PG. Thus, the relationship between the amount of dissolved zinc species and the catalytic performance of employed ZnO was revealed. In addition, a possible reaction mechanism over ZnO was discussed based on the catalytic runs and the characterization of XRD, FTIR, and element analysis.

  18. Magnetically Separable Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Reusable Catalyst for Imino Diels-Alder Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basavegowda, Nagaraj; Mishra, Kanchan; Lee, Yong Rok; Joh, Young-Gull [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) leaf extract as a reducing and stabilizing agent via ultrasonication. The size, morphology, crystallinity, elemental composition, weight loss, surface chemical state, and magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated. The synthe-sized nanoparticles were used as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the synthesis of a variety of 2-methyl-4-substituted-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives by the imino Diels-Alder reaction. After the reaction, the catalyst was recovered by an external magnetic field. The recovered catalyst was then reused in a subsequent reaction under identical conditions. The recycled iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were reused five times with-out any significant loss of catalytic activity.

  19. Magnetically Separable Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Reusable Catalyst for Imino Diels-Alder Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basavegowda, Nagaraj; Mishra, Kanchan; Lee, Yong Rok; Joh, Young-Gull

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) leaf extract as a reducing and stabilizing agent via ultrasonication. The size, morphology, crystallinity, elemental composition, weight loss, surface chemical state, and magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated. The synthe-sized nanoparticles were used as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the synthesis of a variety of 2-methyl-4-substituted-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives by the imino Diels-Alder reaction. After the reaction, the catalyst was recovered by an external magnetic field. The recovered catalyst was then reused in a subsequent reaction under identical conditions. The recycled iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were reused five times with-out any significant loss of catalytic activity.

  20. Electronic interactions decreasing the activation barrier for the hydrogen electro-oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Elizabeth; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    A unified model for electrochemical electron transfer reactions which explicitly accounts for the electronic structure of the electrode recently proposed by us is applied to the hydrogen oxidation reaction at different metal electrocatalysts. We focus on the changes produced in the transition state (saddle point) as a consequence of the interactions with d-bands. We discuss different empirical correlations between properties of the metal and catalytic activity proposed in the past. We show which role is played by the band structure of the different metals and its interaction with the molecule for decreasing the activation barrier. Finally, we demonstrate why some metals are better electrocatalysts for the hydrogen electro-oxidation reaction than others

  1. Effect of magnetic field on the zero valent iron induced oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-hyo; Kim, Jungwon; Choi, Wonyong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigate the zero valent iron induced oxidation in the presence of magnetic field. → The oxidative degradation of 4-chlorophenol is enhanced by the magnetic field. → ESR measurement confirms that more OH radicals are generated in the presence of magnetic field. → The magnetic field affects the mass transfer of O 2 and the recombination of radicals. - Abstract: The magnetic field (MF) effect on the zero valent iron (ZVI) induced oxidative reaction was investigated for the first time. The degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in the ZVI system was employed as the test oxidative reaction. MF markedly enhanced the degradation of 4-CP with the concurrent production of chlorides. The consumption of dissolved O 2 by ZVI reaction was also enhanced in the presence of MF whereas the competing reaction of H 2 production from proton reduction was retarded. Since the ZVI-induced oxidation is mainly driven by the in situ generated hydroxyl radicals, the production of OH radicals was monitored by the spin trap method using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. It was confirmed that the concentration of trapped OH radicals was enhanced in the presence of MF. Since both O 2 and Fe 0 are paramagnetic, the diffusion of O 2 onto the iron surface might be accelerated under MF. The magnetized iron can attract oxygen on itself, which makes the mass transfer process faster. As a result, the surface electrochemical reaction between Fe 0 and O 2 can be accelerated with the enhanced production of OH radicals. MF might retard the recombination of OH radicals as well.

  2. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the Canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. Bubbles containing reaction products enhance the rate of transfer of water from the aqueous layer to the organic layer. These bubbles are generated by the oxidation of TBP and its reaction products in the organic layer and by the oxidation of butanol in the aqueous layer. Butanol is formed by the hydrolysis of TBP in the organic layer. For aqueous-layer bubbling to occur, butanol must transfer into the aqueous layer. Consequently, the rate of oxidation and bubble generation in the aqueous layer strongly depends on the rate of transfer of butanol from the organic to the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments

  3. Strategies for catalyst development: possibilities of the ``rational approach`` illustrated with partial oxidation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W.; Schedel-Niedrig, T.; Schloegl, R. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Oberflaechenphysik

    1998-12-31

    The paper discusses two petrochemical selective oxidation reactions namely the practised formation of styrene (STY) and the desired oxidative functionalisation of propane. The present knowledge about the mode of operation of oxide catalysts is critically considered. The dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) should be described by an oxidehydration with water acting as oxidant. The potential role of the coke formed during catalytic reaction as co-catalyst will be discussed. Selective oxidation is connected with the participation of lattice oxygen mechanism which transforms unselective gas phase oxygen into selective oxygen. The atomistic description of this process is still quite unclear as well as the electron structural properties of the activated oxygen atom. The Role of solid state acidity as compared to the role of lattice oxygen is much less well investigated modern multiphase-multielement oxide (MMO) catalysts. The rationale is that the significant efforts made to improve current MMO systems by chemical modifications can be very much more fruitful when in a first step the mode of action of a catalyst is clarified on the basis of suitable experiments. Such time-consuming experiments at the beginning of a campaign for catalyst improvement pay back their investment in later stages of the project when strategies of chemical development can be derived on grounds of understanding. (orig.)

  4. Interface-modulated approach toward multilevel metal oxide nanotubes for lithium-ion batteries and oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiashen Meng; Chaojiang Niu; Xiong Liu; Ziang Liu; Hongliang Chen; Xuanpeng Wang; Jiantao Li

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide hollow structures with multilevel interiors are of great interest for potential applications such as catalysis,chemical sensing,drug delivery,and energy storage.However,the controlled synthesis of multilevel nanotubes remains a great challenge.Here we develop a facile interface-modulated approach toward the synthesis of complex metal oxide multilevel nanotubes with tunable interior structures through electrospinning followed by controlled heat treatment.This versatile strategy can be effectively applied to fabricate wire-in-tube and tubein-tube nanotubes of various metal oxides.These multilevel nanotubes possess a large specific surface area,fast mass transport,good strain accommodation,and high packing density,which are advantageous for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs)and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR).Specifically,shrinkable CoMn2O4 tube-in-tube nanotubes as a lithium-ion battery anode deliver a high discharge capacity of ~565 mAh.g-1 at a high rate of 2 A.g-1,maintaining 89% of the latter after 500 cycles.Further,as an oxygen reduction reaction catalyst,these nanotubes also exhibit excellent stability with about 92% current retention after 30,000 s,which is higher than that of commercial Pt/C (81%).Therefore,this feasible method may push the rapid development of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials.These multifunctional nanotubes have great potential in many frontier fields.

  5. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation at circumneutral pH: Reaction kinetics, mineral products, and distribution of neutrophilic iron oxidizers in wetland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizers can conserve energy from Fe(II) oxidation, however, it is still unclear how they can compete against the fast abiotic reaction at neutral pH, or to which extent these bacteria increase the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate. Similar to

  6. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled and ballistically-controlled reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of diffusion-controlled two-species annihilation, A+B → O and single-species ballistically-controlled annihilation, A+A → O are investigated. For two-species annihilation, we describe the basic mechanism that leads to the formation of a coarsening mosaic of A- and B-domains. The implications of this picture on the distribution of reactants is discussed. For ballistic annihilation, dimensional analysis shows that the concentration and rms velocity decay as c∼t -α and v∼t -β , respectively, with α+β = 1 in any spatial dimension. Analysis of the Boltzmann equation for the evolution of the velocity distribution yields accurate predictions for the kinetics. New phenomena associated with discrete initial velocity distributions and with mixed ballistic and diffusive reactant motion are also discussed. (author)

  7. Characterization of Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles Obtained by Hydrolysis Reaction of Ethylene Glycol Solution of Alkoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uekawa, N.; Endo, N.; Ishii, K.; Kojima, T.; Kakegawa, K.

    2012-01-01

    Transparent and stable sols of titanium oxide nanoparticles were obtained by heating a mixture of ethylene glycol solution of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TIP) and a NH 3 aqueous solution at 368 K for 24 h. The concentration of NH 3 aqueous solution affected the structure of the obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles. For NH 3 aqueous solution concentrations higher than 0.2 mol/L, a mixture of anatase TiO 2 nanoparticles and layered titanic acid nanoparticles was obtained. The obtained sol was very stable without formation of aggregated precipitates and gels. Coordination of ethylene glycol to Ti4+ ions inhibited the rapid hydrolysis reaction and aggregation of the obtained nanoparticles. The obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles had a large specific surface area: larger than 350 m2/g. The obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles showed an enhanced adsorption towards the cationic dye molecules. The selective adsorption corresponded to presence of layered titanic acid on the obtained anatase TiO 2 nanoparticles.

  8. Reaction-diffusion systems in intracellular molecular transport and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Siowling; Byrska, Marta; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-06-07

    Chemical reactions make cells work only if the participating chemicals are delivered to desired locations in a timely and precise fashion. Most research to date has focused on active-transport mechanisms, although passive diffusion is often equally rapid and energetically less costly. Capitalizing on these advantages, cells have developed sophisticated reaction-diffusion (RD) systems that control a wide range of cellular functions-from chemotaxis and cell division, through signaling cascades and oscillations, to cell motility. These apparently diverse systems share many common features and are "wired" according to "generic" motifs such as nonlinear kinetics, autocatalysis, and feedback loops. Understanding the operation of these complex (bio)chemical systems requires the analysis of pertinent transport-kinetic equations or, at least on a qualitative level, of the characteristic times of the constituent subprocesses. Therefore, in reviewing the manifestations of cellular RD, we also describe basic theory of reaction-diffusion phenomena.

  9. Control of lipid oxidation at the mitochondrial level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Kent

    2009-01-01

    , but the mechanisms regulating fuel preferences remain unclear. During intense exercise, oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) decreases, and the major control is likely to be at the mitochondrial level. Potential mitochondrial sites for control of lipid oxidation include transport of LCFAs into mitochondrial......-oxidation by redox state is thought to be an important mechanism for the slowing of lipid oxidation during intensive exercise....

  10. The effect of interfaces on solid-state reactions between oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.T.; Carter, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    A thin-film geometry has been used to study fundamental solid-state reaction processes occurring at interfaces in two spinel-forming oxide systems. In the first system, NiO/Al 2 O 3 , epitactic NiO films were deposited on various orientations of single-crystal α-Al 2 O 3 . In this case, the reaction kinetics were studied and correlated with the interfacial structure (or substrate orientation). In the second, In 2 O 3 /MgO, solid-state reactions were studied under the influence of an electric field. The electric field provides a driving force for mass transport that affects both the reaction process and the morphological stability of an interface

  11. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  12. Photoactivity of N-doped ZnO nanoparticles in oxidative and reductive reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jéssica A.; Nogueira, André E.; Gonçalves, Maria C. P.; Paris, Elaine C.; Ribeiro, Caue; Poirier, Gael Y.; Giraldi, Tania R.

    2018-03-01

    N-doped ZnO is a prospective material for photocatalytic reactions. However, only oxidative paths are well investigated in the literature. This paper describes a comparative study about ZnO and ZnO:N potential for oxidative and reductive reactions, probed by rhodamine B dye photodegradation and CO2 photoreduction. The materials were prepared by the polymeric precursor method, using urea as a nitrogen source, and different heat treatments were used to observe their effects on surface decontamination, crystallinity, particle sizes and shapes, and photocatalytic performance. ZnO and ZnO:N presented a wurtzite crystalline structure and nanometric-scale particles. Samples submitted to higher temperatures showed lower specific surface areas, but higher crystallinity and lower contents of species adsorbed on their surfaces. On the other hand, the photocatalysts annealed in shorter times presented smaller crystallite sizes and lower crystallinity. These factors influenced the photoactivity in both conditions, i.e., oxidation and reduction reactions, under the ultraviolet and visible light, indicating that structural factors influenced the adequate charge separation and consequent photocatalytic activity since the as-synthesized samples were versatile photocatalysts in both redox reactions.

  13. Heterogeneous reactions of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides: mechanism and kinetics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reactions of carbonyl sulfide (OCS on the typical mineral oxides in the mineral dust particles were investigated using a Knudsen cell flow reactor and a diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy. The reaction pathway for OCS on mineral dust was identified based on the gaseous products and surface species. The hydrolysis of OCS and succeeding oxidation of intermediate products readily took place on α-Al2O3, MgO, and CaO. Reversible and irreversible adsorption of OCS were observed on α-Fe2O3 and ZnO, respectively, whereas no apparent uptake of OCS by SiO2 and TiO2 was observed. The reactivity of OCS on these oxides depends on both the basicity of oxides and the decomposition reactivity of oxides for H2S. Based on the individual uptake coefficients and chemical composition of authentic mineral dust, the uptake coefficient (γBET of mineral dust was estimated to be in the range of 3.84×10−7–2.86×10−8. The global flux of OCS due to heterogeneous reactions and adsorption on mineral dust was estimated at 0.13–0.29 Tg yr−1, which is comparable to the annual flux of OCS for its reaction with ·OH.

  14. Reaction Mechanism for m- Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Sourab

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  15. Reaction Mechanism for m- Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  16. One-electron oxidation reactions of purine and pyrimidine bases in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this survey is to critically review the available information on one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases in cellular DNA with emphasis on damage induced through the transient generation of purine and pyrimidine radical cations. Since the indirect effect of ionizing radiation mediated by hydroxyl radical is predominant in cells, efforts have been made to selectively ionize bases using suitable one-electron oxidants that consist among others of high intensity UVC laser pulses. Thus, the main oxidation product in cellular DNA was found to be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine as a result of direct bi-photonic ionization of guanine bases and indirect formation of guanine radical cations through hole transfer reactions from other base radical cations. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and other purine and pyrimidine degradation products was rationalized in terms of the initial generation of related radical cations followed by either hydration or deprotonation reactions in agreement with mechanistic pathways inferred from detailed mechanistic studies. The guanine radical cation has been shown to be implicated in three other nucleophilic additions that give rise to DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-links in model systems. Evidence was recently provided for the occurrence of these three reactions in cellular DNA. There is growing evidence that one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases whose mechanisms have been characterized in model studies involving aqueous solutions take place in a similar way in cells. It may also be pointed out that the above cross-linked lesions are only produced from the guanine radical cation and may be considered as diagnostic products of the direct effect of ionizing radiation.

  17. Hyperthyroidism stimulates mitochondrial proton leak and ATP turnover in rat hepatocytes but does not change the overall kinetics of substrate oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, M E; Brand, M D

    1994-08-01

    Thyroid hormones have well-known effects on oxidative phosphorylation, but there is little quantitative information on their important sites of action. We have used top-down elasticity analysis, an extension of metabolic control analysis, to identify the sites of action of thyroid hormones on oxidative phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes. We divided the oxidative phosphorylation system into three blocks of reactions: the substrate oxidation subsystem, the phosphorylating subsystem, and the mitochondrial proton leak subsystem and have identified those blocks of reactions whose kinetics are significantly changed by hyperthyroidism. Our results show significant effects on the kinetics of the proton leak and the phosphorylating subsystems. Quantitative analyses revealed that 43% of the increase in resting respiration rate in hyperthyroid hepatocytes compared with euthyroid hepatocytes was due to differences in the proton leak and 59% was due to differences in the activity of the phosphorylating subsystem. There were no significant effects on the substrate oxidation subsystem. Changes in nonmitochondrial oxygen consumption accounted for -2% of the change in respiration rate. Top-down control analysis revealed that the distribution of control over the rates of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis and consumption, and proton leak and over mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) was similar in hepatocytes from hyperthyroid and littermate-paired euthyroid controls. The results of this study include the first complete top-down elasticity and control analyses of oxidative phosphorylation in hepatocytes from hyperthyroid rats.

  18. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya

    2015-06-11

    Fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units in refineries process heavy feedstock obtained from crude oil distillation. While cracking feed, catalysts get deactivated due to coke deposition. During catalyst regeneration by burning coke in air, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed. The increase in nitrogen content in feed over time has resulted in increased NOx emissions. To predict NOx concentration in flue gas, a reliable model for FCC regenerators is needed that requires comprehensive understanding and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics for the proposed pathways are evaluated using transition state theory. It is observed that the addition of O2 on coke is favored only when the free radical is present on the carbon atom instead of nitrogen atom. Thus, NOx formation during coke oxidation does not result from the direct attack by O2 on N atoms of coke, but from the transfer of an O atom to N from a neighboring site. The low activation energies required for NO formation indicate that it is more likely to form than NO2 during coke oxidation. The favorable pathways for NOx formation that can be used in FCC models are identified. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  19. Highly efficient oxidation of amines to imines by singlet oxygen and its application in Ugi-type reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gaoxi; Chen, Jian; Huang, Jie-Sheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2009-10-15

    A variety of secondary benzylic amines were oxidized to imines in 90% to >99% yields by singlet oxygen generated from oxygen and a porphyrin photosensitizer. On the basis of these reactions, a protocol was developed for oxidative Ugi-type reactions with singlet oxygen as the oxidant. This protocol has been used to synthesize C1- and N-functionalized benzylic amines in up to 96% yields.

  20. Computerized infrared spectroscopic study of surface reactions on selected lanthanide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellisante, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    The natures of adsorption sites on La 2 O 3 , Nd 2 O 3 , and selected praseodymium oxides were investigated by examining surface reactions of probe molecules using computerized transmission ir spectroscopy on unsupported samples. Additionally, the rehydration/dehydration behavior and crystallographic phase transitions of these oxides were examined in pretreatment temperature experiments involving rehydration of the sesquioxides to hydroxides by water exposure. Following rehydration of La 2 O 3 to La(OH) 3 , the effect of increasing vacuum pretreatment temperature (350 to 1000 0 C) is to gradually remove surface hydroxyl and carbonate entities (up to 650 0 C), and increase the degree of A-type crystallinity. Increasing crystallinity causes a concomitant decrease in surface oxide basicity. The removal of hydroxyl and carbonate species, as well as increases in oxide basicity, strongly correlated to increases in certain catalytic activities. The adsorption of NH 3 , CO 2 , mixtures of NH 3 and CO 2 , formic acid, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, and ethanol on the oxides was determined to weakly coordinate in Ln 3 + sites, and the surface reactions are discussed. Heating was found to desorb the adsorbed compounds and/or causes changes of the originally adsorbed form into other compounds. The effects of temperature on both adsorption and desorption are reported

  1. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  2. Direct gas-phase epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide through radical reactions: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilkaya, Ali Can; Fellah, Mehmet Ferdi; Onal, Isik

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase radical chain reactions which utilize O 2 as the oxidant to produce propylene oxide (PO) are investigated through theoretical calculations. The transition states and energy profiles were obtained for each path. The rate constants were also calculated. The energetics for the competing pathways indicate that PO can be formed selectively due to its relatively low activation barrier (9.3 kcal/mol) which is in a good agreement with the experimental value (11 kcal/mol) of gas-phase propylene epoxidation. The formation of the acrolein and combustion products have relatively high activation barriers and are not favored. These results also support the recent experimental findings.

  3. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi

    2013-01-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U 3 O 8 without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  4. Control of transversal instabilities in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totz, Sonja; Löber, Jakob; Totz, Jan Frederik; Engel, Harald

    2018-05-01

    In two-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems, local curvature perturbations on traveling waves are typically damped out and vanish. However, if the inhibitor diffuses much faster than the activator, transversal instabilities can arise, leading from flat to folded, spatio-temporally modulated waves and to spreading spiral turbulence. Here, we propose a scheme to induce or inhibit these instabilities via a spatio-temporal feedback loop. In a piecewise-linear version of the FitzHugh–Nagumo model, transversal instabilities and spiral turbulence in the uncontrolled system are shown to be suppressed in the presence of control, thereby stabilizing plane wave propagation. Conversely, in numerical simulations with the modified Oregonator model for the photosensitive Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, which does not exhibit transversal instabilities on its own, we demonstrate the feasibility of inducing transversal instabilities and study the emerging wave patterns in a well-controlled manner.

  5. Hantzsch Reaction Starting Directly from Alcohols through a Tandem Oxidation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Brønsted acidic ionic liquid, 3-(N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium propanesulfonic acid hydrogen sulphate ([DDPA][HSO4], has been successfully applied to catalyze sequential oxidation of aromatic alcohols with NaNO3 followed by their condensation with dicarbonyl compound and ammonium acetate. The corresponding pyridine analogues of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines could be obtained as a major product with high yields by the multicomponent reaction. The present work utilizing alcohols instead of aldehyde in Hantzsch reaction is a valid and green alternative to the classical synthesis of the corresponding pyridine analogues of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  6. Multiscale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Michael P.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Welz, Oliver; Huang, Haifeng; Antonov, Ivan O.; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Zádor, Judit; Taatjes, Craig A.; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-07-16

    We have developed a multi-scale approach (Burke, M. P.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B. Proc. Combust. Inst. 2013, 34, 547–555.) to kinetic model formulation that directly incorporates elementary kinetic theories as a means to provide reliable, physics-based extrapolation to unexplored conditions. Here, we extend and generalize the multi-scale modeling strategy to treat systems of considerable complexity – involving multi-well reactions, potentially missing reactions, non-statistical product branching ratios, and non-Boltzmann (i.e. non-thermal) reactant distributions. The methodology is demonstrated here for a subsystem of low-temperature propane oxidation, as a representative system for low-temperature fuel oxidation. A multi-scale model is assembled and informed by a wide variety of targets that include ab initio calculations of molecular properties, rate constant measurements of isolated reactions, and complex systems measurements. Active model parameters are chosen to accommodate both “parametric” and “structural” uncertainties. Theoretical parameters (e.g. barrier heights) are included as active model parameters to account for parametric uncertainties in the theoretical treatment; experimental parameters (e.g. initial temperatures) are included to account for parametric uncertainties in the physical models of the experiments. RMG software is used to assess potential structural uncertainties due to missing reactions. Additionally, branching ratios among product channels are included as active model parameters to account for structural uncertainties related to difficulties in modeling sequences of multiple chemically activated steps. The approach is demonstrated here for interpreting time-resolved measurements of OH, HO2, n-propyl, i-propyl, propene, oxetane, and methyloxirane from photolysis-initiated low-temperature oxidation of propane at pressures from 4 to 60 Torr and temperatures from 300 to 700 K. In particular, the multi-scale informed

  7. Kinetic isotope effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of tritium-labelled D-galactosamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Korsakova, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary, secondary and intramolecular kinetic isotopic effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of D-galactosamine labelled by tritium in position 6, were measured. When comparing values of the effects with previously obtained results for similar reaction D-[6- 3 H]galactose, it was ascertained that the presence of aminogroup in galactopyranosyl mainly affects kinetics of substrate-ferment complex formation stage. The possibility to use kinetic isotope effects for increase in molar activity of D-galactosamine, labelled by tritium in position 6, is shown

  8. High-performance Platinum-free oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Priji; Ghosh, Arpita; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2018-02-26

    The integration of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack into vehicles necessitates the replacement of high-priced platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalyst, which contributes to about 45% of the cost of the stack. The implementation of high-performance and durable Pt metal-free catalyst for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) could significantly enable large-scale commercialization of fuel cell-powered vehicles. Towards this goal, a simple, scalable, single-step synthesis method was adopted to develop palladium-cobalt alloy supported on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (Pd 3 Co/NG) nanocomposite. Rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) studies for the electrochemical activity towards ORR indicates that ORR proceeds via nearly four-electron mechanism. Besides, the mass activity of Pd 3 Co/NG shows an enhancement of 1.6 times compared to that of Pd/NG. The full fuel cell measurements were carried out using Pd 3 Co/NG at the anode, cathode in conjunction with Pt/C and simultaneously at both anode and cathode. A maximum power density of 68 mW/cm 2 is accomplished from the simultaneous use of Pd 3 Co/NG as both anode and cathode electrocatalyst with individual loading of 0.5 mg/cm 2 at 60 °C without any backpressure. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first of its kind of a fully non-Pt based PEM full cell.

  9. A coupled mechanical-chemical model for reflecting the influence of stress on oxidation reactions in thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yueming, Li

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a coupled mechanical-chemical model is established based on the thermodynamic framework, in which the contribution of chemical expansion to free energy is introduced. The stress-dependent chemical potential equilibrium at the gas-solid interface and the stress gradient-dependent diffusion equation as well as a so-called generalized force which is conjugate to the oxidation rate are derived from the proposed model, which could reflect the influence of stresses on the oxidation reaction. Based on the proposed coupled mechanical-chemical model, a user element subroutine is developed in ABAQUS. The numerical simulation of the high temperature oxidation in the thermal barrier coating is carried out to verify the accuracy of the proposed model, and then the influence of stresses on the oxidation reaction is investigated. In thermally grown oxide, the considerable stresses would be induced by permanent volumetric swelling during the oxidation. The stresses play an important role in the chemical potential equilibrium at the gas-solid interface and strongly affect the oxidation reaction. The gradient of the stresses, however, only occurs in the extremely thin oxidation front layer, which plays a very limited role in the oxidation reaction. The generalized force could be divided into the stress-dependent and the stress-independent parts. Comparing with the stress-independent part, the stress-dependent part is smaller, which has little influence on oxidation reaction.

  10. Diesel soot oxidation under controlled conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Haiwen

    2003-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University, 11/12/2003. In order to improve understanding of diesel soot oxidation, an experimental rig was designed and set up, in which the soot oxidation conditions, such as temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and CO2 partial pressure, could be varied independently of each other. The oxidizing gas flow in the oxidizer was under laminar condition. This test rig comprised a naturally-aspirated single ...

  11. Core-shell rhodium sulfide catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction / hydrogen oxidation reaction in hydrogen-bromine reversible fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nguyen, Trung Van

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) core-shell RhxSy catalysts for hydrogen evolution oxidation (HER)/hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in H2-Br2 fuel cell are discussed. Catalysts with RhxSy as shell and different percentages (5%, 10%, and 20%) of platinum on carbon as core materials are synthesized. Cyclic voltammetry is used to evaluate the Pt-equivalent mass specific ECSA and durability of these catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques are utilized to characterize the bulk and surface compositions and to confirm the core-shell structure of the catalysts, respectively. Cycling test and polarization curve measurements in the H2-Br2 fuel cell are used to assess the catalyst stability and performance in a fuel cell. The results show that the catalysts with core-shell structure have higher mass specific ECSA (50 m2 gm-Rh-1) compared to a commercial catalyst (RhxSy/C catalyst from BASF, 6.9 m2 gm-Rh-1). It also shows better HOR/HER performance in the fuel cell. Compared to the platinum catalyst, the core-shell catalysts show more stable performance in the fuel cell cycling test.

  12. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  13. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling of the ac...... for standard SCR. Finally, the role of a nitrate/nitrite equilibrium and the possible in uence of Cu dimers and Brønsted sites are discussed, and an explanation is offered as to how a catalyst can be effective for SCR, while being a poor catalyst for NO oxidation to NO2....... spectroscopy (FTIR). A consequence of the reaction scheme is that all intermediates in fast SCR are also part of the standard SCR cycle. The calculated activation energy by density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the oxidation of an NO molecule by O2 to a bidentate nitrate ligand is rate determining...

  14. Caryophyllene driven diversity in an one-pot rearrangement of oxidation and transanular reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao-Yu; Quan, Lu-Lu; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2018-03-01

    Diversity oriented synthesis starting from natural products is a newly coming strategy to build diverse skeletons to meet the demands of high throughput screening in drug development. Caryophyllene was being considered as an ideal starting point to build divers natural-like sesquiterpenes due to its rich sources and build-in reactivity. In this paper, six new natural-like products (2-7) were synthesized form the natural cryophyllene oxide via cascade oxidation and transannular reactions in a one-pot procedure. Their structures were elucidated by exhaustive spectra method including 2D NMR and X-ray diffraction. Of the products, compounds 6 and 7 possess very similar skeleton to natural products. Our findings demonstrated that one-pot cascade reactions on macrocyclic natural products is a concise strategy to create diverse natural-like skeletons.

  15. Performance of the periodic pulse technique--4. Periodic pulse reaction kinetics of oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, T.; Ii, M.; Murakami, Y.

    1980-07-01

    The periodic pulse method was used to study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde (IBA) by following the formation rates of methacrolein (MA), carbon monoxide and dioxide (CO/sub x/), and other products (P) as a function of pulse widths and reactant partial pressures at 350/sup 0/C over a 2:3 antimony oxide/molybdenum trioxide catalyst. The results were consistent with a mechanism according to which IBA reacts with oxygen retained by the catalyst to form MA, causing reduction of the catalyst. The IBA also adsorbed on the surface as an oxygenated species which either reacted with gas-phase oxygen to form CO/sub x/ or desorbed as an oxygenated P. The reduced catalyst surface was reoxidized by oxygen adsorption. Implications of catalyst tailoring for increased MA yields by improving the redox mechanism and inhibiting the surface reactions, are discussed.

  16. Reaction-transport simulations of non-oxidative methane conversion with continuous hydrogen removal: Homogeneous-heterogeneous methane reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lin; Borry, Richard W.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    Detailed kinetic-transport models were used to explore thermodynamic and kinetic barriers in the non-oxidative conversion of CH4 via homogeneous and homogeneous-heterogeneous pathways and the effects of continuous hydrogen removal and of catalytic sites on attainable yields of useful C2-C10 products. The homogeneous kinetic model combines separately developed models for low-conversion pyrolysis and for chain growth to form large aromatics and carbon. The H2 formed in the reaction decreases CH4 pyrolysis rates and equilibrium conversions and it favors the formation of lighter products. The removal of H2 along tubular reactors with permeable walls increases reaction rates and equilibrium CH4 conversions. C2-C10 yields reach values greater than 90 percent at intermediate values of dimensionless transport rates (delta=1-10), defined as the ratio hydrogen transport and methane conversion rates. Homogeneous reactions require impractical residence times, even with H2 removal, because of slow initiation and chain transfer rates. The introduction of heterogeneous chain initiation pathways using surface sites that form methyl radicals eliminates the induction period without influencing the homogeneous product distribution. Methane conversion, however, occurs predominately in the chain transfer regime, within which individual transfer steps and the formation of C2 intermediates become limited by thermodynamic constraints. Catalytic sites alone cannot overcome these constraints. Catalytic membrane reactors with continuous H2 removal remove these thermodynamic obstacles and decrease the required residence time. Reaction rates become limited by homogeneous reactions of C2 products to form C6+ aromatics. Higher delta values lead to subsequent conversion of the desired C2-C10 products to larger polynuclear aromatics. We conclude that catalytic methane pyrolysis at the low temperatures required for restricted chain growth and the elimination of thermodynamics constraints via

  17. Temperature dependence of carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals under atmospherically relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piansawan, Tammarat; Saccon, Marina; Laumer, Werner; Gensch, Iulia; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of the global distribution of atmospheric ethane sources and sinks by using the 13C isotopic composition requires accurate knowledge of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of its atmospheric removal reactions. The quantum mechanical prediction implies the necessity to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range by experiment. In this study, the KIE and its temperature dependence for ethane oxidation by OH radicals was investigated at ambient pressure in a temperature range of 243 K to 303 K. The chemical reactions were carried out in a 15 L PFE reaction chamber, suspended in a thermally controlled oven. The isotope ratios of the gas phase components during the course of the reactions were measured by Thermal Desorption -- Gas Chromatography -- Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). For each temperature, the KIE was derived from the temporal evolution of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of ethane using a method adapted from the relative reaction rate concept. The room temperature KIE of the ethane reaction with OH radicals was found to be 6.85 ± 0.32 ‰. This value is in agreement with the previously reported value of 8.57 ± 1.95 ‰ [Anderson et al. 2004] but has a substantially lower uncertainty. The experimental results will be discussed with the KIE temperature dependence predicted by quantum mechanical calculations. Reference: Rebecca S. Anderson, Lin Huang, Richard Iannone, Alexandra E. Thompson, and Jochen Rudolph (2004), Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase Reactions of Light Alkanes and Ethene with the OH Radical at 296 ± 4 K, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 11537--11544

  18. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, Y.

    1955-06-01

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [fr

  19. o-Iodoxybenzoic acid mediated oxidative desulfurization initiated domino reactions for synthesis of azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pramod S; Pathare, Sagar P; Akamanchi, Krishnacharaya G

    2012-04-20

    A systematic exploration of thiophilic ability of o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) for oxidative desulfurization to trigger domino reactions leading to new methodologies for synthesis of different azoles is described. A variety of highly substituted oxadiazoles, thiadiazoles, triazoles, and tetrazoles have been successfully synthesized in good to excellent yields, starting from readily accessible thiosemicarbazides, bis-diarylthiourea, 1,3-disubtituted thiourea, and thioamides. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Neural control of vascular reactions: impact of emotion and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon-Singer, Hadas; Mehnert, Jan; Hoyer, Jana; Hellrung, Lydia; Schaare, Herma Lina; Dukart, Juergen; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-19

    This study investigated the neural regions involved in blood pressure reactions to negative stimuli and their possible modulation by attention. Twenty-four healthy human subjects (11 females; age = 24.75 ± 2.49 years) participated in an affective perceptual load task that manipulated attention to negative/neutral distractor pictures. fMRI data were collected simultaneously with continuous recording of peripheral arterial blood pressure. A parametric modulation analysis examined the impact of attention and emotion on the relation between neural activation and blood pressure reactivity during the task. When attention was available for processing the distractor pictures, negative pictures resulted in behavioral interference, neural activation in brain regions previously related to emotion, a transient decrease of blood pressure, and a positive correlation between blood pressure response and activation in a network including prefrontal and parietal regions, the amygdala, caudate, and mid-brain. These effects were modulated by attention; behavioral and neural responses to highly negative distractor pictures (compared with neutral pictures) were smaller or diminished, as was the negative blood pressure response when the central task involved high perceptual load. Furthermore, comparing high and low load revealed enhanced activation in frontoparietal regions implicated in attention control. Our results fit theories emphasizing the role of attention in the control of behavioral and neural reactions to irrelevant emotional distracting information. Our findings furthermore extend the function of attention to the control of autonomous reactions associated with negative emotions by showing altered blood pressure reactions to emotional stimuli, the latter being of potential clinical relevance.

  1. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin, E-mail: Nouralishahi@ut.ac.ir [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caspian Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 43841-119, Rezvanshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Catalysis and Nanotechnology Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Ali Morad, E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Catalysis and Nanotechnology Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: Mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Abbas Ali, E-mail: Khodadad@ut.ac.ir [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155/4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi, E-mail: Choolaeimm@ripi.ir [Catalysis and Nanotechnology Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-30

    Highlights: • Promoting effects of Cobalt oxide on methanol electro-oxidation over Pt/MWCNTs are investigated. • Higher activity, about 2.9 times, and enhanced stability are observed on Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs. • Electrochemical active surface area of Pt nanoparticles is significantly improved upon CoO{sub x} addition. • Bi-functional mechanism is facilitated in presence of CoO{sub x}. - Abstract: The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH{sub 4} as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoO{sub x}, Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of CO{sub ads} on Pt active sites by the participation of CoO{sub x}. Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoO{sub x}/MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the

  2. Oxidation of β-lactam antibiotics by peracetic acid: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Zhou, Xinyan; Du, Penghui; Zhang, Tuqiao; Cai, Meiquan; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2017-10-15

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfection oxidant used in many industries including wastewater treatment. β-Lactams, a group of widely prescribed antibiotics, are frequently detected in wastewater effluents and surface waters. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven β-lactams (cefalexin (CFX), cefadroxil (CFR), cefapirin (CFP), cephalothin (CFT), ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX) and penicillin G (PG)) toward PAA were investigated to elucidate the behavior of β-lactams during PAA oxidation processes. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and is much faster at pH 5 and 7 than at pH 9 due to speciation of PAA. Reactivity to PAA follows the order of CFR ∼ CFX > AMP ∼ AMX > CFT ∼ CFP ∼ PG and is related to β-lactam's nucleophilicity. The thioether sulfur of β-lactams is attacked by PAA to generate sulfoxide products. Presence of the phenylglycinyl amino group on β-lactams can significantly influence electron distribution and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) location and energy in ways that enhance the reactivity to PAA. Reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to accurately model the decay of β-lactams by PAA in surface water matrix and only slightly overestimate the decay in wastewater matrix. Results of this study indicate that the oxidative transformation of β-lactams by PAA can be expected under appropriate wastewater treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Controlled pilot oxidizer for a gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laster, Walter R.; Bandaru, Ramarao V.

    2010-07-13

    A combustor (22) for a gas turbine (10) includes a main burner oxidizer flow path (34) delivering a first portion (32) of an oxidizer flow (e.g., 16) to a main burner (28) of the combustor and a pilot oxidizer flow path (38) delivering a second portion (36) of the oxidizer flow to a pilot (30) of the combustor. The combustor also includes a flow controller (42) disposed in the pilot oxidizer flow path for controlling an amount of the second portion delivered to the pilot.

  4. Oxidative removal of quinclorac by permanganate through a rate-limiting [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dean; Cheng, Hanyang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Sun, Huiqing; Kong, Fanyu; Liang, Rongning; Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2018-04-05

    Quinclorac, a widely used herbicide in agriculture, has been recognized as an emerging environmental pollutant owing to its long persistence and potential risk to humans. However, no related information is available on the degradation of quinclorac by employing oxidants. Herein, the reactivity of quinclorac with permanganate was systematically investigated in water by combining experimental and computational approaches. The reaction followed overall second-order kinetics pointing to a bimolecular rate-limiting step. The second-order rate constant was found to be 3.47 × 10-3 M-1 s-1 at 25 °C, which was independent of pH over the range from 5 to 9 and was dependent on temperature over the range from 19 to 35 °C. The initial product was identified by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS to be mono-hydroxylated quinclorac, which was more susceptible to further oxidation. The result could be supported by the complete simulation of the reaction process in DFT calculations, indicating the [3 + 2] cycloaddition oxidation of the benzene ring in the rate-limiting step. The plausible mechanism was then proposed, accompanied by the analysis of the HOMO indicating the hydroxylation position and of the ESP suggesting a more electron-rich moiety. Considering the high effectiveness and low toxicity, permanganate oxidation was considered to be a very promising technique for removing quinclorac from aquatic environments.

  5. Citric acid-modified Fenton's reaction for the oxidation of chlorinated ethylenes in soil solution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-06-01

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H2O2 concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H2O2 relative to iron catalysts (Fe2+/H2O2<1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelation in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  6. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-[ 14 C]palmitate to 14 CO 2 and total [ 14 C]acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO 2 and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 μM). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 μM and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine

  7. Ozonization, Amination and Photoreduction of Graphene Oxide for Triiodide Reduction Reaction: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Hongyu; Ren, Suzhen; Shi, Yantao; Song, Xuedan; Yang, Ying; Guo, Yanan; An, Yonglin; Hao, Ce

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes a mild and environmentally-friendly approach to prepare a highly efficient functional graphene (termed as AGO-hv) using methods of ozone oxidation, solvothermal synthesis, and photoreduction. The use of ozone oxidation in the first step can effectively increase the interlaminar distance between graphite oxide sheets, and create active sites for nucleophilic attack on the epoxy carbon from ammonia. The amino groups were successfully grafted on the surface of graphene as evidenced by the amidation reaction, with a maximum nitrogen content of 10.46 wt% and a C/N molar ratio of 8.46. After further photoreduction of the aminated graphite oxide (AGO), the residual oxygen functionalities, such as C-OH, were effectively removed and the conductivity of the graphene sheet was further recovered. The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.51% based on AGO-hv counter electrode (CE), close to that of Pt counterpart (7.79%). The experimental results indicated that the amidation and photoreduction processes were significantly facilitated by the initial ozonization of graphene oxide, and this process significantly improved the electrochemical activity and the conductivity of graphene oxide. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that AGO-hv had the lowest ionization energy (a better electron-donating ability) and also suitable binding energy with I atoms as well. The combination of ozonization, amination and photoreduction is an efficient route to obtain electrocatalysts with desired compositional distributions and performance for triiodide reduction reaction in DSCs.

  8. Control loop design and control performance study on direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.; Weng, S.; Su, M. [Key Laboratory of Power Machinery and Engineering of the Education Ministry, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-10-15

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack is a complicated nonlinear power system. Its system model includes a set of partial differential equations that describe species, mass, momentum and energy conservation, as well as the electrochemical reaction models. The validation and verification of the control system by experiment is very expensive and difficult. Based on the distributed and lumped model of a one-dimensional SOFC, the dynamic performance with different control loops for SOFC is investigated. The simulation result proves that the control system is appropriate and feasible, and can effectively satisfy the requirement of variable load power demand. This simulation model not only can prevent some latent dangers of the fuel cell system but also predict the distributed parameters' characteristics inside the SOFC system. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Stoichiometric control in Bi4Ti3O12 synthesis by novel hybrid solid state reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadea, C.; Phatharapeetranun, N.; Ksapabutr, B.

    2018-01-01

    The synthesis of bismuth titanate Bi4Ti3O12 (BiT) is performed via a novel solid state reaction. The reaction is designed to control the stoichiometric content of the highly volatile element, i.e. Bi. The chemical route consists in trapping bismuth oxide colloids in a stabilized titanium based sol...

  10. Correlation of serum Dickkopf-1 content with bone destruction, inflammatory response and oxidation reaction in patients with gouty arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei He

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of serum Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1 content with bone destruction, inflammatory response and oxidation reaction in patients with gouty arthritis. Methods: A total of 40 patients with acute gouty arthritis who were treated in our hospital between 2013 and 2016 were selected as the group A of the study, 56 patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia who were treated in our hospital during the same period were selected as the group B of the study, and 60 healthy volunteers who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as the control group of the study. The serum was collected to detect the contents of DKK-1, bone destruction indexes, inflammatory response indexes and oxidation reaction indexes. Results: Serum DKK-1, TRACP5b, RANKL, β-CTX, PGE2, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sCD14, MDA, 8-OHdG and 3-NT levels of group A and group B were significantly higher than those of control group while SOD and GSH-Px levels were significantly lower than those of control group; serum DKK-1, TRACP5b, RANKL, β-CTX, PGE2, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sCD14, MDA, 8-OHdG and 3-NT levels of group A were significantly higher than those of group B while SOD and GSH-Px levels were significantly lower than those of group B; serum DKK-1 level was positively correlated with TRACP5b, RANKL, β-CTX, PGE2, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sCD14, MDA, 8-OHdG and 3-NT levels, and negatively correlated with SOD and GSH-Px levels. Conclusion: Abnormally elevated DKK-1 in patients with gouty arthritis can induce articular bone destruction as well as inflammatory response and oxidative stress response activation.

  11. The effect of reaction temperature on the room temperature ferromagnetic property of sol-gel derived tin oxide nanocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthiraj, K.; Hema, M.; Balachandra Kumar, K.

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, nanocrystalline tin oxide materials were prepared using sol-gel method with different reaction temperatures (25 °C, 50 °C, 75 °C & 90 °C) and the relation between the room temperature ferromagnetic property of the sample with processing temperature has been analysed. The X-ray diffraction pattern and infrared absorption spectra of the as-prepared samples confirm the purity of the samples. Transmission electron microscopy images visualize the particle size variation with respect to reaction temperature. The photoluminescence spectra of the samples demonstrate that luminescence process in materials is originated due to the electron transition mediated by defect centres. The room temperature ferromagnetic property is observed in all the samples with different amount, which was confirmed using vibrating sample magnetometer measurements. The saturation magnetization value of the as-prepared samples is increased with increasing the reaction temperature. From the photoluminescence & magnetic measurements we accomplished that, more amount of surface defects like oxygen vacancy and tin interstitial are created due to the increase in reaction temperature and it controls the ferromagnetic property of the samples.

  12. Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Nanocarbon: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics via in Situ Experimental Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Yan, Pengqiang; Su, Dang Sheng

    2018-03-20

    Sustainable and environmentally benign catalytic processes are vital for the future to supply the world population with clean energy and industrial products. The replacement of conventional metal or metal oxide catalysts with earth abundant and renewable nonmetallic materials has attracted considerable research interests in the field of catalysis and material science. The stable and efficient catalytic performance of nanocarbon materials was discovered at the end of last century, and these materials are considered as potential alternatives for conventional metal-based catalysts. With its rapid development in the past 20 years, the research field of carbon catalysis has been experiencing a smooth transition from the discovery of novel nanocarbon materials or related new reaction systems to the atomistic-level mechanistic understanding on the catalytic process and the subsequent rational design of the practical catalytic reaction systems. In this Account, we summarize the recent progress in the kinetic and mechanistic studies on nanocarbon catalyzed alkane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions. The paper attempts to extract general concepts and basic regularities for carbon catalytic process directing us on the way for rational design of novel efficient metal-free catalysts. The nature of the active sites for ODH reactions has been revealed through microcalorimetric analysis, ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement, and in situ chemical titration strategies. The detailed kinetic analysis and in situ catalyst structure characterization suggests that carbon catalyzed ODH reactions involve the redox cycles of the ketonic carbonyl-hydroxyl pairs, and the key physicochemical parameters (activation energy, reaction order, and rate/equilibrium constants, etc.) of the carbon catalytic systems are proposed and compared with conventional transition metal oxide catalysts. The proposal of the intrinsic catalytic activity (TOF) provides the

  13. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. Oxidation mode of pyranose 2-oxidase is controlled by pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongjit, Methinee; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Palfey, Bruce A; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-02-26

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) from Trametes multicolor is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of d-glucose and other aldopyranose sugars at the C2 position by using O₂ as an electron acceptor to form the corresponding 2-keto-sugars and H₂O₂. In this study, the effects of pH on the oxidative half-reaction of P2O were investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The results showed that flavin oxidation occurred via different pathways depending on the pH of the environment. At pH values lower than 8.0, reduced P2O reacts with O₂ to form a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate, leading to elimination of H₂O₂. At pH 8.0 and higher, the majority of the reduced P2O reacts with O₂ via a pathway that does not allow detection of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin, and flavin oxidation occurs with decreased rate constants upon the rise in pH. The switching between the two modes of P2O oxidation is controlled by protonation of a group which has a pK(a) of 7.6 ± 0.1. Oxidation reactions of reduced P2O under rapid pH change as performed by stopped-flow mixing were different from the same reactions performed with enzyme pre-equilibrated at the same specified pH values, implying that the protonation of the group which controls the mode of flavin oxidation cannot be rapidly equilibrated with outside solvent. Using a double-mixing stopped-flow experiment, a rate constant for proton dissociation from the reaction site was determined to be 21.0 ± 0.4 s⁻¹.

  15. The oxidation mode of pyranose 2-oxidase is controlled by pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongjit, Methinee; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Palfey, Bruce A.; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-01-01

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) from Trametes multicolor is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of D-glucose and other aldopyranose sugars at the C2 position by using O2 as an electron acceptor to form the corresponding 2-keto-sugars and H2O2. In this study, the effects of pH on the oxidative half-reaction of P2O were investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The results showed that flavin oxidation occurred via different pathways depending on the pH of the environment. At pH values lower than 8.0, reduced P2O reacts with O2 to form a C4a-hydroperoxy-flavin intermediate, leading to elimination of H2O2. At pH 8.0 and higher, the majority of the reduced P2O reacts with O2 via a pathway which does not allow detection of the C4a-hydroperoxy-flavin, and flavin oxidation occurs with decreased rate constants upon the rise in pH. The switching between the two modes of P2O oxidation is controlled by protonation of a group which has a pKa of 7.6 ± 0.1. Oxidation reactions of reduced P2O under rapid pH change as performed by stopped-flow mixing were different from the same reactions performed with enzyme pre-equilibrated at the same specified pH values, implying that the protonation of the group which controls the mode of flavin oxidation cannot be rapidly equilibrated with outside solvent. Using a double-mixing stopped-flow experiment, a rate constant for proton dissociation from the reaction site was determined to be 21.0 ± 0.4 s-1. PMID:23356577

  16. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of the carbon oxide in contact with catalysts issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaane, Mikhail

    1966-01-01

    Addressing the study of the oxidation reaction of carbon oxide which produces carbon dioxide, this research thesis reports the study of this reaction in presence of catalysts (2NiO + Al 2 O 3 , NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO + NiAl 2 O 4 ) issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at different temperatures. The first part describes experimental techniques and the nature of materials used in this study. The second part reports the study of the catalytic activity of the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 catalyst during the oxidation of CO. Preliminary studies are also reported: structure and texture of nickel hydro-aluminate which is the raw material used to produce catalysts, activation of this compound to develop the catalytic activity in CO oxidation, chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 solid, interaction of adsorbed gases at the solid surface, and kinetic study of the oxidation reaction. The third part reports the study of the catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of CO of spinel catalysts (NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO+NiAl 2 O 4 ) obtained by calcination of nickel hydro-aluminates at high temperature. The formation of the spinel phase, the chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on NiAl 2 O 4 , and the kinetic of the oxidation reaction are herein studied

  17. 40 CFR 52.278 - Oxides of nitrogen control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen control. 52.278 Section 52.278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.278 Oxides of nitrogen control...

  18. The Effect of Temperature on Selectivity in the Oscillatory Mode of the Phenylacetylene Oxidative Carbonylation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Julie; Novakovic, Katarina

    2017-08-05

    Reaction temperature plays a major role in product selectivity in the oscillatory mode of the palladium-catalyzed phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction. At 40 °C, dimethyl (2Z)-2-phenyl-2-butenedioate is the major product whereas at 0 °C the major product is 5,5-dimethoxy-3-phenyl-2(5H)-furanone. The occurrence of oscillations in pH coincides with an increase in the rate of phenylacetylene consumption and associated product formation. Experiments were performed isothermally in a reaction calorimeter to correlate reactant consumption and product formation with the occurrence of pH oscillations and the heat released by the reaction. An increase in the size of the pH drop in a single oscillation correlates with an increase in energy, indicating that this section of a single oscillation relates to reactant consumption. Based on these observations, a reaction pathway responsible for product formation is provided. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Limonene ozonolysis in the presence of nitric oxide: Gas-phase reaction products and yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Jason E.; Harrison, Joel C.; Jackson, Stephen R.; Wells, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    The reaction products from limonene ozonolysis were investigated using the new carbonyl derivatization agent, O-tert-butylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (TBOX). With ozone (O3) as the limiting reagent, five carbonyl compounds were detected. The yields of the carbonyl compounds are discussed with and without the presence of a hydroxyl radical (OHrad) scavenger, giving insight into the influence secondary OH radicals have on limonene ozonolysis products. The observed reaction product yields for limonaketone (LimaKet), 7-hydroxyl-6-oxo-3-(prop-1-en-2-yl)heptanal (7H6O), and 2-acetyl-5-oxohexanal (2A5O) were unchanged suggesting OHrad generated by the limonene + O3 reaction does not contribute to their formation. The molar yields of 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal (IPOH) and 3-acetyl-6-oxoheptanal (3A6O) decreased by 68% and >95%; respectively, when OHrad was removed. This suggests that OHrad radicals significantly impact the formation of these products. Nitric oxide (NO) did not significantly affect the molar yields of limonaketone or IPOH. However, NO (20 ppb) considerably decreased the molar reaction product yields of 7H6O (62%), 2A5O (63%), and 3A6O (47%), suggesting NO reacted with peroxyl intermediates, generated during limonene ozonolysis, to form other carbonyls (not detected) or organic nitrates. These studies give insight into the transformation of limonene and its reaction products that can lead to indoor exposures.

  20. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamitros, M., E-mail: matkara@gmail.com [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Luan, S. [University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Allison, J. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Baldacchino, G. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, LIDYL, Radiation Physical Chemistry Group, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR3299, SIS2M, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Davidkova, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mkalles, Beirut (Lebanon); Friedland, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Ivantchenko, A. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SwHaRD s.r.l., via Buccari 9, 16153 Genova (Italy); Nieminem, P.; Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics and Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Stepan, V. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Incerti, S., E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  1. Adsorption and redox reactions of heavy metals on synthesized Mn oxide minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xionghan; Zhai Limei; Tan Wenfeng; Liu Fan; He Jizheng

    2007-01-01

    Several Mn oxide minerals commonly occurring in soils were synthesized by modified or optimized methods. The morphologies, structures, compositions and surface properties of the synthesized Mn oxide minerals were characterized. Adsorption and redox reactions of heavy metals on these minerals in relation to the mineral structures and surface properties were also investigated. The synthesized birnessite, todorokite, cryptomelane, and hausmannite were single-phased minerals and had the typical morphologies from analyses of XRD and TEM/ED. The PZCs of the synthesized birnessite, todorokite and cryptomelane were 1.75, 3.50 and 2.10, respectively. The magnitude order of their surface variable negative charge was: birnessite ≥ cryptomelane > todorokite. The hausmannite had a much higher PZC than others with the least surface variable negative charge. Birnessite exhibited the largest adsorption capacity on heavy metals Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ , while hausmannite the smallest one. Birnessite, cryptomelane and todorokite showed the greatest adsorption capacity on Pb 2+ among the tested heavy metals. Hydration tendency (pK 1 ) of the heavy metals and the surface variable charge of the Mn minerals had significant impacts on the adsorption. The ability in Cr(III) oxidation and concomitant release of Mn 2+ varied greatly depending on the structure, composition, surface properties and crystallinity of the minerals. The maximum amounts of Cr(III) oxidized by the Mn oxide minerals in order were (mmol/kg): birnessite (1330.0) > cryptomelane (422.6) > todorokite (59.7) > hausmannite (36.6). - The characteristics of heavy metal adsorption and Cr(III) oxidation on Mn oxide minerals are determined by their structure, composition, surface property and crystallinity

  2. Reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Cu2O(111): A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Zhen; Chen, Wen-Kai; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2010-10-01

    The possible reaction mechanisms for CO oxidation on the perfect Cu2O(111) surface have been investigated by performing periodic density functional theoretical calculations. We find that Cu2O(111) is able to facilitate the CO oxidation with different mechanisms. Four possible mechanisms are explored (denoted as MER1, MER2, MLH1, and MLH2, respectively): MER1 is CO(gas)+O2(ads)-->CO2(gas) MER2 is CO(gas)+O2(ads)-->CO3(ads)-->O(ads)+CO2(gas) MLH1 refers to CO(ads)+O2(ads)-->O(ads)+CO2(ads) and MLH2 refers to CO(ads)+O2(ads)-->OOCO(ads)-->O(ads)+CO2(ads). Our transition state calculations clearly reveal that MER1 and MLH2 are both viable; but MER1 mechanism preferentially operates, in which only a moderate energy barrier (60.22 kJ/mol) needs to be overcome. When CO oxidation takes place along MER2 path, it is facile for CO3 formation, but is difficult for its decomposition, thereby CO3 species can stably exist on Cu2O(111). Of course, the reaction of CO with lattice O of Cu2O(111) is also considered. However, the calculated barrier is 600.00 kJ/mol, which is too large to make the path feasible. So, we believe that on Cu2O(111), CO reacts with adsorbed O, rather than lattice O, to form CO2. This is different from the usual Mars-van Krevene mechanism. The present results enrich our understanding of the catalytic oxidation of CO by copper-based and metal-oxide catalysts.

  3. Heterogeneous Reaction of SO2 on Manganese Oxides: the Effect of Crystal Structure and Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jianghao; Ma, Qingxin; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2017-07-03

    Manganese oxides from anthropogenic sources can promote the formation of sulfate through catalytic oxidation of SO 2 . In this study, the kinetics of SO 2 reactions on MnO 2 with different morphologies (α, β, γ and δ) was investigated using flow tube reactor and in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Under dry conditions, the reactivity towards SO 2 uptake was highest on δ-MnO 2 but lowest on β-MnO 2 , with a geometric uptake coefficient (γ obs ) of (2.42 ± 0.13) ×10 -2 and a corrected uptake coefficient (γ c ) of (1.48 ± 0.21) ×10 -6 for the former while γ obs of (3.35 ± 0.43) ×10 -3 and γ c of (7.46 ± 2.97) ×10 -7 for the latter. Under wet conditions, the presence of water altered the chemical form of sulfate and was in favor for the heterogeneous oxidation of SO 2 . The maximum sulfate formation rate was reached at 25% RH and 45% for δ-MnO 2 and γ-MnO 2 , respectively, possibly due to their different crystal structures. The results suggest that morphologies and RH are important factors influencing the heterogeneous reaction of SO 2 on mineral aerosols, and that aqueous oxidation process involving transition metals of Mn might be a potential important pathway for SO 2 oxidation in the atmosphere.

  4. Iron oxide nanotube layer fabricated with electrostatic anodization for heterogeneous Fenton like reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jun-Won; Park, Jae-Woo, E-mail: jaewoopark@hanyang.ac.kr

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Iron oxide nanotube was newly fabricated with potentiostatic anodization of Fe{sup 0} foil. • Cyanide was oxidized more effectively with the iron oxide nanotube and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, resulting in fast oxidation of cyanide and cyanate. • This nanotube of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Fe{sup 0} metal can replace conventional particulate iron catalysts in Fenton-like processes. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanotubes (INT) were fabricated with potentiostatic anodization of zero valent iron foil in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing 0.5 wt% NH{sub 4}F electrolyte, holding the potential at 20, 40, and 60 V for 20 min, respectively. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to evaluate the morphology and crystalline structure of the INT film. The potential of 40 V for 20 min was observed to be optimal to produce an optimal catalytic film. Cyanide dissolved in water was degraded through the Fenton-like reaction using the INT film with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). In case of INT-40 V in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} 3%, the first-order rate constant was found to be 1.7 × 10{sup −2} min{sup −1}, and 1.2 × 10{sup −2} min{sup −1} with commercial hematite powder. Degradation of cyanide was much less with only H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Therefore, this process proposed in this work can be an excellent alternative to traditional catalysts for Fenton-like reaction.

  5. Thorium binding by biochar fibres derived from Luffa Cylindrica after controlled surface oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liatsou, Ioanna; Christodoulou, Eleni; Paschalidis, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    Controlled surface modification of biochar fibres derived from Luffa Cylindrica sponges has been carried out by nitric acid and the degree of oxidation could be controlled by changing the acid concentration or the reaction time. The extent of surface oxidation has been quantified by acid-base titration and FTIR-spectroscopy. Furthermore, thorium binding has been studied as a function of various parameters and the experimental results show that even under strong acidic conditions the relative sorption is above 70% and the sorption capacity of the biochar fibres for Th(IV) at pH 3 is qmax= 70 gṡkg-1.

  6. Visible-light photoredox catalyzed synthesis of pyrroloisoquinolines via organocatalytic oxidation/[3 + 2] cycloaddition/oxidative aromatization reaction cascade with Rose Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vila

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline alkaloids have been prepared via a visible light photoredox catalyzed oxidation/[3 + 2] cycloaddition/oxidative aromatization cascade using Rose Bengal as an organo-photocatalyst. A variety of pyrroloisoquinolines have been obtained in good yields under mild and metal-free reaction conditions.

  7. IBX-mediated oxidation of unactivated cyclic amines: application in highly diastereoselective oxidative Ugi-type and aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, C; Bensch, L; van Lint, Matthijs J; Ruijter, E; Orru, R V A

    2015-10-28

    The first o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) mediated oxidation of unactivated amines to imines is described. A range of meso-pyrrolidines were shown to be suitable substrates. The chemical space was further explored with one-pot oxidative Ugi-type and aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions, which proved to be highly diastereoselective.

  8. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Reaction of β-Keto Sulfones with Alcohols via C-S Bond Cleavage: Reaction Development and Mechanism Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bingnan; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Yang; Qi, Zhenghang; Tian, Jiaqi; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Xiaochen; Han, Jianlin; Ma, Jing; Pan, Yi

    2018-02-16

    A Cu-catalyzed cascade oxidative radical process of β-keto sulfones with alcohols has been achieved by using oxygen as an oxidant. In this reaction, β-keto sulfones were converted into sulfinate esters under the oxidative conditions via cleavage of C-S bond. Experimental and computational studies demonstrate that a new pathway is involved in this reaction, which proceeds through the formation of the key four-coordinated Cu II intermediate, O-O bond homolysis induced C-S bond cleavage and Cu-catalyzed esterification to form the final products. This reaction provides a new strategy to sulfonate esters and enriches the research content of C-S bond cleavage and transformations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 1,3-Dipolar cycloaddition reactions of nitrile oxides in the synthesis of natural compounds and their analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotyatkina, Anna I; Zhabinsky, Vladimir N; Khripach, Vladimir A

    2001-01-01

    The published data on the use of 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of nitrile oxides in the synthesis of natural compounds and their analogues are systematised and reviewed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  10. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin, E-mail: ntp@dlmu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  11. Reductive and oxidative reactions with inorganic colloids in aqueous solution initiated by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvaney, P.C.; Sostaric, J.Z.; Ashokkumar, M.; Grieser, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The absorption of ultrasound in an aqueous solution can lead to the formation of H and OH radicals which can act as redox species or react with solutes to produce secondary radicals which themselves may participate in electron transfer reactions. The radical formation occurs through the growth then rapid collapse of microbubbles a process that produces localised hot spots with an internal temperature of the order of 5000 K. We have examined two colloidal systems one involving the reductive dissolution of MnO 2 colloids and the other the oxidative dissolution of CdS colloids. In the case of MnO 2 dissolution we found that the reduction of the colloidal metal oxide was considerably enhanced in the presence of aliphatic alcohols in solution and the longer the alkyl chain length on the alcohol the greater its effect. The dissolution of CdS colloids which we ascribe to the reaction of H 2 O 2 and O 2 - with the metal sulfide lo yield Cd 2+ and S could be significantly retarded by the presence of excess S 2- in solution. The mechanisms involved in these two dissolution processes will he presented. Our results clearly show that sonochemical reactions are quite efficient in colloidal solutions and this fact needs to be considered when using sonication to disperse colloidal material in solution, a common practice among colloid chemists

  12. Practical applications of the Fenton reaction to the removal of chlorinated aromatic pollutants. Oxidative degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detomaso, Antonia; Lopez, Antonio; Lovecchio, Giangiuseppe; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Curci, Ruggero

    2003-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) constitute a group of organic pollutants that are introduced into the environment as a result of several man-made activities, such as uncontrolled use of pesticides and herbicides, and as byproducts in the paper pulp bleaching. Promising removal technologies of chlorinated aromatics consist in the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that can provide an almost total degradation of a variety of contaminants. Among these, wide application find Fenton systems based on generation of reactive species having a high oxidizing power, such as hydroxyl radical HO*. Our objective was that of determining the overall degradation efficiency of the model compound 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) by thermal Fenton-type oxidation systems with a view toward defining in more details relevant process parameters, the effect of reaction temperature and of co-catalyst Cu2+. Reaction conditions were similar to those generally adopted as optimal in many practical applications, i.e. pollutant/Fe2+ (as FeSO4) ratio ca. 20, Fe2+/Cu2+ (co-catalyst) 2:1, pH adjusted and controlled at pH 3, and H2O2 in excess (up to four-fold over the stoichiometric amount required for complete mineralization). The results demonstrate that it is advantageous to carry out the reaction at a temperature markedly higher (70 degrees C) than ambient. The stepwise addition of H2O2 in aliquots yields an efficient transformation, while allowing a convenient control of the reaction exothermicity. Under these conditions, the essentially complete removal of the initial DCP is accomplished using just one equiv of H2O2 during 15 min; excess H2O2 (5 equivalents) yields extensive substrate mineralization. Also relevant, at 70 degrees C dechlorination of the initial DCP (and of derived reaction intermediates) is remarkably extensive (3-5% residual TOX), already with the addition of 1 equiv of H2O2. At the end of the reaction, IC and IC-MS analyses of the solution reveal that only low-molecular weight

  13. The Nernst equation applied to oxidation-reduction reactions in myoglobin and hemoglobin. Evaluation of the parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroff, Harry A

    Analyses of the binding of oxygen to monomers such as myoglobin employ the Mass Action equation. The Mass Action equation, as such, is not directly applicable for the analysis of the binding of oxygen to oligomers such as hemoglobin. When the binding of oxygen to hemoglobin is analyzed, models incorporating extensions of mass action are employed. Oxidation-reduction reactions of the heme group in myoglobin and hemoglobin involve the binding and dissociation of electrons. This reaction is described with the Nernst equation. The Nernst equation is applicable only to a monomeric species even if the number of electrons involved is greater than unity. To analyze the oxidation-reduction reaction in a molecule such as hemoglobin a model is required which incorporates extensions of the Nernst equation. This communication develops models employing the Nernst equation for oxidation-reduction reactions analogous to those employed for hemoglobin in the analysis of the oxygenation (binding of oxygen) reaction.

  14. Inflight performance of the Ulysses reaction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Andrew; Berry, William; Parker, David

    1997-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been exploring the heliosphere since October 1990 in a six-year polar orbit. Despite varying operational demands, the pressure-fed monopropellant hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) has experienced few problems. The observed anomalies, having minimal operational impact, include plume impingement effects, electrical power overload effects and hydrazine gas generation effects. These anomalies are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the first observation of gas in the hydrazine propellant. The relatively low gas generation rate is attributed to: the use of high purity hydrazine; the configuration of the spin-stabilized spacecraft; the extensive use of titanium alloys; and the efficiency of the thermal control of the propellant tank which maintains a temperature of 21 C.

  15. Carbon supported ultrafine gold phosphorus nanoparticles as highly efficient electrocatalyst for alkaline ethanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tongfei; Fu, Gengtao; Su, Jiahui; Wang, Yi; Lv, Yinjie; Zou, Xiuyong; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Xu, Lin; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We develop a new kind of carbon supported gold-phosphorus (Au-P/C) electrocatalyst by a facile and novel phosphorus reduction method, and demonstrate the Au-P/C is a highly active and stable electrocatalyst for the ethanol oxidation reaction. - Highlights: • Au-P/C catalyst is synthesized by a facile and novel white-phosphorus reduce method. • AuP particles with ultrafine particle-size are uniformly dispersed on carbon support. • Au-P/C catalyst exhibits much higher content of P 0 than reported metal/P catalysts. • Au-P/C catalysts show excellent catalytic properties for ethanol oxidation reaction. - Abstract: Herein, we develop a new kind of carbon supported gold-phosphorus (Au-P/C) electrocatalyst for the alkaline ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The Au-P/C catalysts with different Au/P ratio (i.e., AuP/C, Au 3 P 2 /C and Au 4 P 3 /C) can be obtained by a facile and novel hot-reflux method with white phosphorus (P 4 ) as reductant and ethanol as solvent. The crystal structure, composition and particle-size of the Au-P/C catalysts are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), etc. The results demonstrate that Au-P/C catalysts present an alloy phase with the high content of P, ultrafine particle-size and high dispersity on carbon support, which results in excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability towards the EOR compared with that of the free-phosphorus Au/C catalyst. In addition, among the various Au-P/C catalysts with different Au/P ratio, the AuP/C sample exhibits the best electrocatalytic performance in comparison with other Au 3 P 2 /C and Au 4 P 3 /C samples.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-nichel oxides for the oxygen formation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this work the compounds of cobalt and nickel oxides and the mixtures of cobalt-nickel were prepared which were characterized and evaluated as electrocatalysts in the oxygen release reaction in alkaline media. The compounds were synthesised by the sol-gel method: heated at 400 and 500 Centigrade. The compounds characterization was realized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy. As the Co 3 O 4 and the Ni O as the mixtures Ni O/Co 3 O 4 were obtained as a porous material with a small particle size, characteristics which are presented by cause of the low temperature of synthesis. The electrocatalytic evaluation for the synthesised compounds for the oxygen release reaction was realized by cyclic volt amperometry in a 0.5M KOH solution. The oxides mixtures presented a well electrocatalytic activity to be used in the electrochemical release of oxygen. The current density and the electrochemically active area, in all the cases of mixtures is very higher to the Co 3 O 4 and Ni O ones. Observing with greater clearness the synergic effects, in the obtained mixture at 400 C. The oxides mixtures heated at 400 C were stables for the oxygen formation reaction. Therefore it is be able to say that the Ni O/Co 3 O 4 mixture counts on a great reactive area: electrocatalytic characteristic desirable to be a material used as anode in the electrolysis of water, which increases the oxygen release in the anode and so the hydrogen release in the cathode. (Author)

  17. Influence of Adsorbed Water on the Oxygen Evolution Reaction on Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    We study the interface between adsorbed water and stoichiometric, defect-free (110) rutile oxide surfaces of TiO2, RuO2, and IrO2 in order to understand how water influences the stabilities of the intermediates of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In our model the water is treated as explicitly...... molecules binding to bridging oxygens. The third chain interacts weakly and predominantly with the H2O molecules of the second layer, resembling bulk water. We find that the stability of the water layer close to the oxide surface is almost the same as the one found on flat metal surfaces, such as the Pt(111...... of RuO2 and IrO2, while it is increased by similar to 0.4 eV for TiO2....

  18. Investigation of lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in marine PL emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline P.

    Marine phospholipids (PL) have received much attention recently due to their numerous advantages. One of these advantages is their better resistance towards oxidation as compared to fish oil. In addition to the antioxidative properties of α-tocopherol and phospholipids, the better oxidative...... stability of marine PL might be attributed to antioxidative properties of pyrroles formed between oxidised lipids with amine groups from phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or residues amino acids that are present in marine PL. The main objective of this study was to investigate if the presence of amine group...... of amino acids (leucine, methionine and lysine) from 2 authentic standards (PC and PE) and 2 purified marine PL (LC and MPL) through sonication method. Emulsions were incubated at 60 ºC for 0, 2, 4 and 6 days. Non-enzymatic browning reactions were investigated through measurement of i) Strecker aldehydes...

  19. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Kayo [EcoTopia Science Institute (Japan); Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  20. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  1. Characterization of Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles Obtained by Hydrolysis Reaction of Ethylene Glycol Solution of Alkoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Uekawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and stable sols of titanium oxide nanoparticles were obtained by heating a mixture of ethylene glycol solution of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TIP and a NH3 aqueous solution at 368 K for 24 h. The concentration of NH3 aqueous solution affected the structure of the obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles. For NH3 aqueous solution concentrations higher than 0.2 mol/L, a mixture of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles and layered titanic acid nanoparticles was obtained. The obtained sol was very stable without formation of aggregated precipitates and gels. Coordination of ethylene glycol to Ti4+ ions inhibited the rapid hydrolysis reaction and aggregation of the obtained nanoparticles. The obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles had a large specific surface area: larger than 350 m2/g. The obtained titanium oxide nanoparticles showed an enhanced adsorption towards the cationic dye molecules. The selective adsorption corresponded to presence of layered titanic acid on the obtained anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

  2. The electrochemical transfer reactions and the structure of the iron|oxide layer|electrolyte interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrović, Željka; Metikoš-Huković, Mirjana; Babić, Ranko

    2012-01-01

    The thickness, barrier (protecting) and semiconducting properties of the potentiostatically formed oxide films on the pure iron electrode in an aqueous borate buffer solution were investigated by electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (EQCN), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Mott–Schottky (MS) analysis. The thicknesses of the prepassive Fe(II)hydroxide layer (up to monolayer) nucleated on the bare iron surface and the passive Fe(II)/Fe(III) layer (up to 2 nm), deposited on the top of the first one, were determined using in situ gravimetry. Electronic properties of iron prepassive and passive films as well as ionic and electronic transfer reactions at the film|solution interface were discussed on the basis of a band structure model of the surface oxide film and the potential distribution at the interface. The anodic oxide film formation and cathodic decomposition are coupled processes and their reversible inter-conversion is mediated by the availability of free charge carriers on the electrode|solution interface. The structure of the reversible double layer at the iron oxide|solution interface was discussed based on the concept of the specific adsorption of the imidazolium cation on the negatively charged electrode surface at pH > pH pzc .

  3. Theoretical study of the oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene initiated by hydroxyl radicals: the O2 addition reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroudi, A; Deleuze, M S; Canneaux, S

    2015-05-28

    Atmospheric oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct [C10H8OH]˙ (R1) by molecular oxygen in its triplet electronic ground state has been studied using density functional theory along with the B3LYP, ωB97XD, UM05-2x and UM06-2x exchange-correlation functionals. From a thermodynamic viewpoint, the most favourable process is O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, and O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, as the second, third and fourth most favourable processes. The syn modes of addition at these positions are thermodynamically favoured over the anti ones by the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and peroxy substituents. Analysis of the computed structures, bond orders and free energy profiles demonstrate that the reaction steps involved in the oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct by O2 satisfy Hammond's principle. Kinetic rate constants and branching ratios under atmospheric pressure and in the fall-off regime have been supplied, using transition state and RRKM theories. By comparison with experiment, these data confirm the relevance of a two-step reaction mechanism. Whatever the addition mode, O2 addition in C4 position is kinetically favoured over O2 addition in C2 position, in contrast with the expectations drawn from thermodynamics and reaction energies. Under a kinetic control of the reaction, and in line with the computed reaction energy barriers, the most efficient process is O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, and O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode as the second, third and fourth most rapid processes. The computed branching ratios also indicate that the regioselectivity of the reaction decreases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures.

  4. Enhanced reversibility and durability of a solid oxide Fe-air redox battery by carbothermic reaction derived energy storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Huang, Kevin

    2014-01-18

    The recently developed solid oxide metal-air redox battery is a new technology capable of high-rate chemistry. Here we report that the performance, reversibility and stability of a solid oxide iron-air redox battery can be significantly improved by nanostructuring energy storage materials from a carbothermic reaction.

  5. A study of the accelerated zircaloy-4 oxidation reaction with H2O/H2 mixture gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Cho, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    A study of the Zircaloy-4 reaction with H 2 O/H 2 mixture gas is carried out by using TGA (Thermo Gravimetric Apparatus) to estimate the hydrogen embrittlement which can possibly cause catastrophic nuclear fuel rod failure. Reaction rates are measured as a function of H 2 /H 2 O. In the experiments reaction temperature is set at 500 .deg. C and total pressure of the mixture gas is maintained at 1 atm. Experimental results reveal that hydriding and oxidation reaction are competing. In early stage, hydriding kinetics is faster than oxidation, however, oxidant in H 2 O forms oxide on the surface as steam environment is maintained, thus, this growing oxide begins to protect the zirconium base metal against hydrogen permeation. In this second stage, the total kinetic rate follows enhanced oxidation kinetics. In the final stage, it is observed that the oxide is broken down and massive hydriding takes place through the mechanical defects in the oxide, whose kinetics is similar to pure hydriding kinetics. These results are confirmed by SEM and EDX analysis along with hydrogen concentration measurements

  6. Selective oxidations in microstructured catalytic reactions - A review and an overview of own work on fuel processing for fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, V.; Kolb, G.A.; Cominos, V.; Loewe, H.; Nikolaidis, G.; Zapf, R.; Ziogas, A.; Schouten, J.C.; Delsman, E.R.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Santamaria, J.; Iglesia, de la O.; Mallada, R.

    2006-01-01

    This review is concerned about catalytic gas-phase oxidation reactions in microreactors, typically being performed in wall-coated microchannels. Not included are liquid and gas-liquid oxidations which are typically done in reactor designs different from the ones considered here. The first part of

  7. The direct oxidative diene cyclization and related reactions in natural product synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The direct oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes is a valuable synthetic method for the (diastereoselective preparation of substituted tetrahydrofurans. Closely related reactions start from 5,6-dihydroxy or 5-hydroxyalkenes to generate similar products in a mechanistically analogous manner. After a brief overview on the history of this group of transformations and a survey on mechanistic and stereochemical aspects, this review article provides a summary on applications in natural product synthesis. Moreover, current limitations and future directions in this area of chemistry are discussed.

  8. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanxuan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wan, Jinquan, E-mail: ppjqwan@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, Yongwen [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH 11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to ·OH, superoxide radical (O{sub 2}·{sup −}) was detected at pH 11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH 3.0 by GC–MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH 3.0. - Highlights: • Both SO{sub 4}{sup −}· and ·OH were found to be the major active species at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. • ·OH and ·O2– were the primary oxidants pH 11.0. • The intermediate products were investigated as well as the degradation pathway. • Dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation, H-extraction were the major mechanisms.

  9. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution; Cinetique des reactions d'oxydo-reduction des elements transuraniens en solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourisse, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [French] Une revue systematique de la cinetique des reactions d'oxydo-reduction des elements U, Np, Pu, Am, en solution perchlorique est proposee. Des considerations relatives aux grandeurs thermodynamiques d'activation associees aux actes elementaires (effet de compensation, entropie standard des complexes actives, rapidite des reactions) sont developpees. L'influence de l'acidite, de la force ionique, de l'eau lourde et de la polarite des solvants mixtes sur la vitesse des reactions est decrite. Enfin l'influence des differents anions sur la vitesse des reactions est expliquee par les variations de l'enthalpie libre standard de la reaction et de l'enthalpie libre d'activation (travail des forces electrostatiques) resultant de la complexation des especes dissoutes dans la solution. (auteur)

  10. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution; Cinetique des reactions d'oxydo-reduction des elements transuraniens en solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourisse, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [French] Une revue systematique de la cinetique des reactions d'oxydo-reduction des elements U, Np, Pu, Am, en solution perchlorique est proposee. Des considerations relatives aux grandeurs thermodynamiques d'activation associees aux actes elementaires (effet de compensation, entropie standard des complexes actives, rapidite des reactions) sont developpees. L'influence de l'acidite, de la force ionique, de l'eau lourde et de la polarite des solvants mixtes sur la vitesse des reactions est decrite. Enfin l'influence des differents anions sur la vitesse des reactions est expliquee par les variations de l'enthalpie libre standard de la reaction et de l'enthalpie libre d'activation (travail des forces electrostatiques) resultant de la complexation des especes dissoutes dans la solution. (auteur)

  11. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, S., E-mail: rajagopalan78@hotmail.com [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Materials Science Group (India); Asthalter, T., E-mail: t.asthalter@web.de [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Germany); Rabe, V.; Laschat, S. [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) in pyridine solution, Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe{sup (III)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup +} and Fe{sup (II)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 4}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  12. Oxidative degradation of triclosan by potassium permanganate: Kinetics, degradation products, reaction mechanism, and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Pan, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we systematically investigated the potential applicability of potassium permanganate for removal of triclosan (TCS) in water treatment. A series of kinetic experiments were carried out to study the influence of various factors, including the pH, oxidant doses, temperature, and presence of typical anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-)), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA) on triclosan removal. The optimal reaction conditions were: pH = 8.0, [TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5, and T = 25 °C, where 20 mg/L of TCS could be completely degraded in 120 s. However, the rate of TCS (20 μg/L) oxidation by KMnO4 ([TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5) was 1.64 × 10(-3) mg L(-1)·h(-1), lower than that at an initial concentration of 20 mg/L (2.24 × 10(3) mg L(-1)·h(-1)). A total of eleven products were detected by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) analysis, including phenol and its derivatives, benzoquinone, an organic acid, and aldehyde. Two main reaction pathways involving CO bond cleavage (-C(8)O(7)-) and benzene ring opening (in the less chlorinated benzene ring) were proposed, and were further confirmed based on frontier electron density calculations and point charges. Furthermore, the changes in the toxicity of the reaction solution during TCS oxidation by KMnO4 were evaluated by using both the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum and the water flea Daphnia magna. The toxicity of 20 mg/L triclosan to D. magna and P. phosphoreum after 60 min was reduced by 95.2% and 43.0%, respectively. Phenol and 1,4-benzoquinone, the two representative degradation products formed during permanganate oxidation, would yield low concentrations of DBPs (STHMFP, 20.99-278.97 μg/mg; SHAAFP, 7.86 × 10(-4)-45.77 μg/mg) after chlorination and chloramination. Overall, KMnO4 can be used as an effective oxidizing agent for TCS removal in water and wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  14. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  15. No evidence found for Diels-Alder reaction products in soybean oil oxidized at the frying temperature by NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been generally accepted that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ratio showed 36.1% polymer peak area in g...

  16. IL-23 Promotes Myocardial I/R Injury by Increasing the Inflammatory Responses and Oxidative Stress Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation and oxidative stress play an important role in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury. We hypothesized that IL-23, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, could promote myocardial I/R injury by increasing the inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into sham operated control (SO group, ischemia and reperfusion (I/R group, (IL-23 + I/R group and (anti-IL-23 + I/R group. At 4 h after reperfusion, the serum concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and the tissue MDA concentration and SOD activity were measured. The infarcte size was measured by TTC staining. Apoptosis in heart sections were measured by TUNEL staining. The expression of HMGB1 and IL-17A were detected by Western Blotting and the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 were detected by Elisa. Results: After 4 h reperfusion, compared with the I/R group, IL-23 significantly increased the infarct size, the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and the levels of LDH and CK (all P 0.05. All these effects were abolished by anti-IL-23 administration. Conclusion: The present study suggested that IL-23 may promote myocardial I/R injury by increasing the inflammatory responses and oxidative stress reaction.

  17. Redox reaction between graphene oxide and In powder to prepare In2O3/reduced graphene oxide hybrids for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Wu, Tao; Xia, Fengling; Li, Yi; Zhang, Congcong; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Mingxi; Li, Xichuan; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yu; Gao, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    A facile and quick route for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using In powder as a reductant has been established. The reduction of GO by In powder is traced by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and the obtained reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is analyzed. The In3+ ions produced during the reaction between the GO and the In powder are chemically transformed to In2O3 and then form In2O3/rGO hybrids. The In2O3/rGO hybrids are used as electrode materials and their electrochemical performance are studied using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge. The In2O3/rGO hybrids demonstrate excellent electrochemical performance and their highest specific capacitance is 178.8 F g-1 which is much higher than that of either In2O3 or rGO. In addition, the In2O3/rGO hybrids are also very stable.

  18. Hydrogen incorporation and radiation induced dynamics in metal-oxide-silicon structures. A study using nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briere, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Resonant nuclear reaction analysis, using the 1 H( 15 N, αγ) 12 C reaction at 6.4 MeV, has been successfully applied to the investigation of hydrogen incorporation and radiation induced migration in metal-oxide-silicon structures. A preliminary study of the influence of processing parameters on the H content of thermal oxides, with and without gate material present, has been performed. It is found that the dominant source of hydrogen in Al gate devices and dry oxides is often contamination, likely in the form of adsorbed water vapor, formed upon exposure to room air after removal from the oxidation furnace. Concentrations of hydrogen in the bulk oxide as high as 3 10 20 cm -3 (Al gate), and as low as 1 10 18 cm -3 (poly Si-gate) have been observed. Hydrogen accumulation at the Si-SiO 2 interface has been reproducibly demonstrated for as-oxidized samples, as well as for oxides exposed to H 2 containing atmospheres during subsequent thermal processing. The migration of hydrogen, from the bulk oxide to the silicon-oxide interface during NRA, has been observed and intensively investigated. A direct correlation between the hydrogen content of the bulk oxide and the radiation generated oxide charges and interface states is presented. These data provide strong support for the important role of hydrogen in determining the radiation sensitivity of electronic devices. (orig.)

  19. Study of the dynamics of the MoO2-Mo2C system for catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuba Torres, Christian Martin

    On a global scale, the energy demand is largely supplied by the combustion of non-renewable fossil fuels. However, their rapid depletion coupled with environmental and sustainability concerns are the main drivers to seek for alternative energetic strategies. To this end, the sustainable generation of hydrogen from renewable resources such as biodiesel would represent an attractive alternative solution to fossil fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen's lower environmental impact and greater independence from foreign control make it a strong contender for solving this global problem. Among a wide variety of methods for hydrogen production, the catalytic partial oxidation offers numerous advantages for compact and mobile fuel processing systems. For this reaction, the present work explores the versatility of the Mo--O--C catalytic system under different synthesis methods and reforming conditions using methyl oleate as a surrogate biodiesel. MoO2 exhibits good catalytic activity and exhibits high coke-resistance even under reforming conditions where long-chain oxygenated compounds are prone to form coke. Moreover, the lattice oxygen present in MoO2 promotes the Mars-Van Krevelen mechanism. Also, it is introduced a novel beta-Mo2C synthesis by the in-situ formation method that does not utilize external H2 inputs. Herein, the MoO 2/Mo2C system maintains high catalytic activity for partial oxidation while the lattice oxygen serves as a carbon buffer for preventing coke formation. This unique feature allows for longer operation reforming times despite slightly lower catalytic activity compared to the catalysts prepared by the traditional temperature-programmed reaction method. Moreover, it is demonstrated by a pulse reaction technique that during the phase transformation of MoO2 to beta-Mo2C, the formation of Mo metal as an intermediate is not responsible for the sintering of the material wrongly assumed by the temperature-programmed method.

  20. REACTION PRODUCTS AND CORROSION OF MOLYBDENUM ELECTRODE IN GLASS MELT CONTAINING ANTIMONY OXIDES AND SODIUM SULFATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIŘÍ MATĚJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The products on the interface of a molybdenum electrode and glass melt were investigated primarily at 1400°C in three model glass melts without ingredients, with 1 % Sb2O3 and with 1 % Sb2O3 and 0.5 % SO3 (wt. %, both under and without load by alternating current. Corrosion of the molybdenum electrode in glass melt without AC load is higher by one order of magnitude if antimony oxides are present. The corrosion continues to increase if sulfate is present in addition to antimony oxides. Isolated antimony droplets largely occur on the electrode-glass melt interface, and numerous droplets are also dissipated in the surrounding glass if only antimony oxides are present in the glass melt. A comparatively continuous layer of antimony occurs on the interface if SO3 is also present, antimony being always in contact with molybdenum sulfide. Almost no antimony droplets are dissipated in the glass melt. The total amount of precipitated antimony also increases. The presence of sulfide on the interface likely facilitates antimony precipitation. The reaction of molybdenum with antimony oxides is inhibited in sites covered by an antimony layer. The composition of sulfide layers formed at 1400°C approximates that of Mo2S3. At 1100°C, the sulfide composition approximates that of MoS4. Corrosion multiplies in the glass melt without additions through the effect of AC current, most molybdenum being separated in the form of metallic particles. Corrosion also increases in the glass melt containing antimony oxides. This is due to increased corrosion in the neighborhood of the separated antimony droplets. This mechanism also results in the loosening of molybdenum particles. The amount of precipitated antimony also increases through the effect of the AC current. AC exerts no appreciable effect on either corrosion, the character of the electrode-glass interface, or antimony precipitation in the glass melt containing SO3.

  1. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micić, Darko; Šljukić, Biljana; Zujovic, Zoran; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO 2 − oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  2. Hydrogen poisoning of the CO oxidation reaction on Pt and Pd under ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strozier, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The poisoning by hydrogen of the catalyzed oxidation of CO on Pt and Pd under ultrahigh vacuum conditions was investigated. ac pulsing techniques are used in which the pressure of the reactant CO in the reaction chamber is modulated periodically by means of a fast piezoelectric ultrahigh vacuum valve, and the ac component of the product CO 2 is recorded mass spectroscopically by phase-sensitive techniques. The ac CO 2 production rate is measured as a function of hydrogen pressure (1 - 10 x 10 -9 toor) at constant CO and O 2 pressures (approximately equal to 5 x 10 -8 torr), and constant temperature (approximately equal to 700 K). Exact theoretical calculations of CO 2 production rates were carried out employing several models, i.e., oxygen burn-off by hydrogen, incorporating both the Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms. From a comparison with the experimental results, the probable reaction is of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type and the relevant rate constant is also determined. These results are compared with other results in the literature on hydrogen oxidation on the surface of Pt

  3. S-Nitroglutathione, a product of the reaction between peroxynitrite and glutathione that generates nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazy, M; Kaminski, P M; Mao, K; Tan, J; Wolin, M S

    1998-11-27

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO-) has been shown in studies on vascular relaxation and guanylate cyclase activation to react with glutathione (GSH), generating an intermediate product that promotes a time-dependent production of nitric oxide (NO). In this study, reactions of ONOO- with GSH produced a new substance, which was characterized by liquid chromatography, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometric data provided evidence that the product of this reaction was S-nitroglutathione (GSNO2) and that S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) was not a detectable product of this reaction. Further evidence was obtained by comparison of the spectral and chromatographic properties with synthetic standards prepared by reaction of GSH with nitrosonium or nitronium borofluorates. Both the synthetic and ONOO-/GSH-derived GSNO2 generated a protonated ion, GSNO2H+, at m/z 353, which was unusually resistant to decomposition under collision activation, and no fragmentation was observed at collision energy of 25 eV. In contrast, an ion at m/z 337 (GSNOH+), generated from the synthetic GSNO, readily fragmented with the abundant loss of NO at 9 eV. Reactions of ONOO- with GSH resulted in the generation of NO, which was detected by the head space/NO-chemiluminescence analyzer method. The generation of NO was inhibited by the presence of glucose and/or CO2 in the buffers employed. Synthetic GSNO2 spontaneously generated NO in a manner that was not significantly altered by glucose or CO2. Thus, ONOO- reacts with GSH to form GSNO2, and GSNO2 decomposes in a manner that generates NO.

  4. Oxidative modification of methionine80 in cytochrome c by reaction with peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheni, Ari Dwi; Ren, Chunguang; Matsumoto, Yorifumi; Nagao, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Hirota, Shun

    2018-05-01

    The Met80-heme iron bond of cytochrome c (cyt c) is cleaved by the interaction of cyt c with cardiolipin (CL) in membranes. The Met80 dissociation enhances the peroxidase activity of cyt c and triggers cyt c release from mitochondrion to the cytosol at the early stage of apoptosis. This paper demonstrates the selective oxidation of Met80 for the reaction of ferric cyt c with a peroxide, meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA), in the presence of CL-containing liposomes by formation of a ferryl species (Compound I). After the reaction of cyt c with mCPBA in the presence of 1,2-dioloeyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes containing CL, the electrospray ionization mass spectrum of the peptide fragments, obtained by digestion of cyt c with lysyl endopeptidase, exhibited a peak at m/z = 795.45; whereas, this peak was not observed for the peptide fragments obtained after the reaction in the presence of DOPC liposomes not containing CL. According to the tandem mass spectrum of the m/z = 795.45 peptide fragment, Met80 was modified with a 16 Da mass increase. The purified Met80-modified cyt c exhibited a peroxidase activity more than 5-fold higher than that of the unmodified protein. Transient absorption bands around 650 nm were generated by the reactions with mCPBA for ferric wild-type cyt c in the presence of CL-containing DOPC liposomes and ferric Y67F cyt c in the absence of liposomes. The formation and decomposition rates of the 650-nm absorption species increased and decreased, respectively, by increasing the mCPBA concentration in the reaction, indicating transient formation of Compound I. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxidative Stress Control by Apicomplexan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya S. Bosch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites cause infectious diseases that are either a severe public health problem or an economic burden. In this paper we will shed light on how oxidative stress can influence the host-pathogen relationship by focusing on three major diseases: babesiosis, coccidiosis, and toxoplasmosis.

  6. Direct synthesis of bimetallic PtCo mesoporous nanospheres as efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts for both oxygen reduction reaction and methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjing; Yu, Hongjie; Li, Yinghao; Yin, Shuli; Xue, Hairong; Li, Xiaonian; Xu, You; Wang, Liang

    2018-04-01

    The engineering of electrocatalysts with high performance for cathodic and/or anodic catalytic reactions is of great urgency for the development of direct methanol fuel cells. Pt-based bimetallic alloys have recently received considerable attention in the field of fuel cells because of their superior catalytic performance towards both fuel molecule electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction. In this work, bimetallic PtCo mesoporous nanospheres (PtCo MNs) with uniform size and morphology have been prepared by a one-step method with a high yield. The as-made PtCo MNs show superior catalytic activities for both oxygen reduction reaction and methanol oxidation reaction relative to Pt MNs and commercial Pt/C catalyst, attributed to their mesoporous structure and bimetallic composition.

  7. Synthesizing new types of ultrathin 2D metal oxide nanosheets via half-successive ion layer adsorption and reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Linjie; Li, Yaguang; Xiao, Mu; Wang, Shufang; Fu, Guangsheng; Wang, Lianzhou

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) metal oxide nanosheets have demonstrated their great potential in a broad range of applications. The existing synthesis strategies are mainly preparing 2D nanosheets from layered and specific transition metal oxides. How to prepare the other types of metal oxides as ultrathin 2D nanosheets remains unsolved, especially for metal oxides containing alkali, alkaline earth metal, and multiple metal elements. Herein, we developed a half-successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, which could synthesize those types of metal oxides as ultrathin 2D nanosheets. The synthesized 2D metal oxides nanosheets are within 1 nm level thickness and 500 m2 · g-1 level surface area. This method allows us to develop many new types of ultrathin 2D metal oxides nanosheets that have never been prepared before.

  8. Synthesis of highly active and dual-functional electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Geng; Xu, Guangran; Li, Yingjun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Liu, Baocang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Inner Mongolia Key Lab of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Gong, Xia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Zheng, Dafang [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Jun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Inner Mongolia Key Lab of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Wang, Qin, E-mail: qinwang@imu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Inner Mongolia Key Lab of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities (NDs) catalysts, are successfully synthesized by using a facile method. The as-obtained ternary catalysts manifest superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities toward the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions, as compared to the binary catalysts and the commercial Pt/C catalysts. - Highlights: • Ternary RuMPt catalysts are synthesized by using a facile method. • The catalysts manifest superior catalytic activity towards the MOR and ORR. • High activities are attributed to enhanced electron density and synergistic effects. - Abstract: The promising Pt-based ternary catalyst is crucial for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to improving catalytic activity and durability for both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a facile strategy is used for the synthesis ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities catalysts. The ternary RuMPt alloys exhibit enhanced specific and mass activity, positive half-wave potential, and long-term stability, compared with binary Pt-based alloy and the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which is attributed to the high electron density and upshifting of the d-band center for Pt atoms, and synergistic catalytic effects among Pt, M, and Ru atoms by introducing a transition metal. Impressively, the ternary RuCoPt catalyst exhibits superior mass activity (801.59 mA mg{sup −1}) and positive half-wave potential (0.857 V vs. RHE) towards MOR and ORR, respectively. Thus, the RuMPt nanocomposite is a very promising material to be used as dual electrocatalyst in the application of PEMFCs.

  9. Metallic oxides for desulphurization catalyst reaction; Oxidos metalicos mistos como catalisadores para reacoes de dessulfurizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.L.B.A.; Melo, D.M.A.; Melo, M.A.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Souza, K.S.G.M. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba - Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, PB (Brazil); Barros, J.M.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande - Campos Cuite, PB (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The mixed metal oxides constitute an important class of catalytic materials widely investigated in different fields of applications. Studies of rare earth nickelates have been carried by several researchers in order to investigate the structural stability afforded by oxide formed and the existence of catalytic properties at room temperature. So, this study aims synthesize the nano sized catalyst of nickelate of lanthanum doped with strontium (La(1- x)Sr{sub x}NiO4-{sigma}; x = 0,2 and 0,3), through the Pechini method and your characterization for subsequent application in the desulfurization of thiophene reaction. The precursor solutions were calcined at 300 degree C/2h for pyrolysis of polyester and later calcinations occurred at temperatures of 500 - 1000 degree C. The resulting powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TG / DTG), surface area for adsorption of N{sub 2} by BET method, Xray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (HR{sub S}EM) and spectrometry dispersive energy (EDS). The results of XRD had show that the perovskites obtained consist of two phases (LSN and NiO) and from 700 degree C have crystalline structure. The results of SEM evidenced the obtainment of nano metric powders. The results of BET show that the powders have surface area within the range used in catalysis (5-50m{sup 2}/g). The characterization of active sites was performed by reaction of desulfurization of thiophene at room temperature and 200 degree C, the relation F/W equal to 0,7 mol h{sup -1}m{sub c}at {sup -1}. The products of the reaction were separated by gas chromatography and identified by the selective detection PFPD sulfur. All samples had presented conversion above 95%. (author)

  10. Changes in oxidative potential of soil and fly ash after reaction with gaseous nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ying; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Shafer, Martin M.; Rudich, Yinon; Pardo, Michal; Katra, Itzhak; Katoshevski, David; Schauer, James J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of simulated atmospheric aging on the oxidative potential of inorganic aerosols comprised primarily of crustal materials. Four soil samples and one coal fly ash sample were artificially aged in the laboratory through exposure to the vapor from 15.8 M nitric acid solution for 24 h at room temperature. Native and acid-aged samples were analyzed with a cellular macrophage and acellular dithionthreitol assays to determine oxidative potential. Additionally, the samples were analyzed to determine the concentration of 50 elements, both total and the water-soluble fraction of these elements by Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICMS) and crystalline mineral composition using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results show that reactions with gaseous nitric acid increase the water-soluble fraction of many elements, including calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and lead. The mineral composition analysis documented that calcium-rich minerals present in the soils (e.g., calcite) are converted into different chemical forms, such as calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2). The nitric acid aging process, which can occur in the atmosphere, leads to a 200-600% increase in oxidative potential, as measured by cellular and acellular assays. This laboratory study demonstrates that the toxic effects of aged versus freshly emitted atmospheric dust may be quite different. In addition, the results suggest that mineralogical analysis of atmospheric dust may be useful in understanding its degree of aging.

  11. Ethanol Oxidation Reaction Using PtSn/C+Ce/C Electrocatalysts: Aspects of Ceria Contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, R.F.B.; Silva, J.C.M.; Assumpção, M.H.M.T.; Neto, A.O.; Santos, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) was investigated using PtSn/C + Ce/C electrocatalysts in different mass ratios (58:42, 53:47, and 42:58) prepared using the polymeric precursor method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments showed particles sizes in the range of 3 to 7 nm. Changes in the net parameters observed for Pt suggest the incorporation of Sn into the Pt crystalline network with the formation of an alloy mixture with the SnO 2 phase. Among the PtSn/C + Ce/C catalysts investigated, the 53:47 composition showed the highest activity towards the EOR. In this case, the j versus t curves obtained in the presence of ethanol in acidic media exhibited a current density 90% higher than that observed with the commercial PtSn/C (ETEK). Correspondingly, during the experiments performed on single direct ethanol fuel cells, the maximum power density obtained using PtSn/C + Ce/C (53:47) as the anode was approximately 60% higher than that obtained using the commercial catalyst. FTIR data showed that the observed behavior for ethanol oxidation may be explained in terms of a synergic effect of bifunctional mechanism with electronic effects, in addition to a chemical effect of ceria that provides oxygen-containing species to oxidize acetaldehyde to acetic acid

  12. Iron-Induced Activation of Ordered Mesoporous Nickel Cobalt Oxide Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Öztürk, Secil; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Tüysüz, Harun

    2017-06-28

    Herein, ordered mesoporous nickel cobalt oxides prepared by the nanocasting route are reported as highly active oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts. By using the ordered mesoporous structure as a model system and afterward elevating the optimal catalysts composition, it is shown that, with a simple electrochemical activation step, the performance of nickel cobalt oxide can be significantly enhanced. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that charge transfer resistance increases for Co 3 O 4 spinel after an activation process, while this value drops for NiO and especially for CoNi mixed oxide significantly, which confirms the improvement of oxygen evolution kinetics. The catalyst with the optimal composition (Co/Ni 4/1) reaches a current density of 10 mA/cm 2 with an overpotential of a mere 336 mV and a Tafel slope of 36 mV/dec, outperforming benchmarked and other reported Ni/Co-based OER electrocatalysts. The catalyst also demonstrates outstanding durability for 14 h and maintained the ordered mesoporous structure. The cyclic voltammograms along with the electrochemical measurements in Fe-free KOH electrolyte suggest that the activity boost is attributed to the generation of surface Ni(OH) 2 species that incorporate Fe impurities from the electrolyte. The incorporation of Fe into the structure is also confirmed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  13. Reaction modelling of Iron Oxide Bromination in the UT-3 thermochemical cycle for Hydrogen production from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir-Rusli

    1996-01-01

    Analysis modelling of the iron oxide bromination had been carried out using experiment data from the iron oxide bromination in the UT-3 thermochemical cycle. Iron oxide in the form of pellets were made of the calcination of the mixture of iron oxide, silica, graphite and cellulose at 1473 K. Thermobalance reactor was used to study the kinetic reactions of the iron oxide bromination at a temperature of 473 K for 2 - 6 hours. The data collected from the experiments were used as input for the common models. However, none of these models could not explain the result of the experiments. A new model, a combination of two kinetic reactions : exposed particle and coated particle was created and worked successfully

  14. CO oxidation on PtSn nanoparticle catalysts occurs at the interface of Pt and Sn oxide domains formed under reaction conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.

    2014-04-01

    The barrier to CO oxidation on Pt catalysts is the strongly bound adsorbed CO, which inhibits O2 adsorption and hinders CO2 formation. Using reaction studies and in situ X-ray spectroscopy with colloidally prepared, monodisperse ∼2 nm Pt and PtSn nanoparticle catalysts, we show that the addition of Sn to Pt provides distinctly different reaction sites and a more efficient reaction mechanism for CO oxidation compared to pure Pt catalysts. To probe the influence of Sn, we intentionally poisoned the Pt component of the nanoparticle catalysts using a CO-rich atmosphere. With a reaction environment comprised of 100 Torr CO and 40 Torr O2 and a temperature range between 200 and 300 C, Pt and PtSn catalysts exhibited activation barriers for CO2 formation of 133 kJ/mol and 35 kJ/mol, respectively. While pure Sn is readily oxidized and is not active for CO oxidation, the addition of Sn to Pt provides an active site for O2 adsorption that is important when Pt is covered with CO. Sn oxide was identified as the active Sn species under reaction conditions by in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. While chemical signatures of Pt and Sn indicated intermixed metallic components under reducing conditions, Pt and Sn were found to reversibly separate into isolated domains of Pt and oxidic Sn on the nanoparticle surface under reaction conditions of 100 mTorr CO and 40 mTorr O2 between temperatures of 200-275 C. Under these conditions, PtSn catalysts exhibited apparent reaction orders in O2 for CO 2 production that were 0.5 and lower with increasing partial pressures. These reaction orders contrast the first-order dependence in O 2 known for pure Pt. The differences in activation barriers, non-first-order dependence in O2, and the presence of a partially oxidized Sn indicate that the enhanced activity is due to a reaction mechanism that occurs at a Pt/Sn oxide interface present at the nanoparticle surface. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The influence of oscillations on product selectivity during the palladium-catalysed phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Katarina; Grosjean, Christophe; Scott, Stephen K; Whiting, Andrew; Willis, Mark J; Wright, Allen R

    2008-02-07

    This paper reports on the influence of oscillations on product selectivity as well as the dynamics of product formation during the palladium-catalysed phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction in a catalytic system (PdI2, KI, Air, NaOAc in methanol). The occurrence of the pH oscillations is related to PdI2 granularity and the initial pH drop after phenylacetylene addition. To achieve pH and reaction exotherm oscillations regulation of the amount of PdI2 is required, ensuring that the initial pH does not fall significantly below 1 after phenylacetylene addition. Experiments in both oscillatory and non-oscillatory pH regimes were performed in an HEL SIMULAR reaction calorimeter with the concentration-time profiles measured using a GC-MS. It is demonstrated that when operating in an oscillatory pH regime product formation may be suppressed until oscillations occur after which there is a steep increase in the formation of Z-2-phenyl-but-2-enedioic acid dimethyl ester. When operating in non-oscillatory pH mode the products are formed steadily over time with the main products being Z-2-phenyl-but-2-enedioic acid dimethyl ester, 2-phenyl-acrylic acid methyl ester and E-3-phenyl-acrylic acid methyl ester.

  16. Degradation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid and Perfluoroctane Sulfonate by Enzyme Catalyzed Oxidative Humification Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are alkyl based chemicals having multiple or all hydrogens replaced by fluorine atoms, and thus exhibit high thermal and chemical stability and other unusual characteristics. PFASs have been widely used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer products, and tend to be environmentally persistent. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are two representative PFASs that have drawn particular attention because of their ubiquitous presence in the environment, resistance to degradation and toxicity to animals. This study examined the decomposition of PFOA and PFOS in enzyme catalyzed oxidative humification reactions (ECOHR), a class of reactions that are ubiquitous in the environment involved in natural organic humification. Reaction rates and influential factors were examined, and high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify possible products. Fluorides and partially fluorinated compounds were identified as likely products from PFOA and PFOS degradation, which were possibly formed via a combination of free radical decomposition, rearrangements and coupling processes. The findings suggest that PFOA and PFOS may be transformed during humification, and ECOHR can potentially be used for the remediation of these chemicals.

  17. High resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of styrene oxide adsorption and reaction on Ag(1 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, H.; Enever, M. C. N.; Adib, K.; Hrbek, J.; Barteau, M. A.

    2004-11-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the adsorption and reaction of styrene oxide on Ag(1 1 1). When adsorption is carried out at 250 K or above, ring opening of styrene oxide forms a stable surface oxametallacycle intermediate which eventually reacts at 485 K to regenerate styrene oxide. High resolution XPS is capable of distinguishing the oxametallacycle from molecularly adsorbed and condensed styrene oxide on the basis of different C1s peak separations. The observed separations are well accounted for by the results of DFT calculations.

  18. Unravelling how plants benefit from ROS and NO reactions, while resisting oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Michael J; Sandalio, Luisa Maria; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2015-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitric oxide (NO), play crucial roles in the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant growth, development and defence responses, providing a nexus of reduction/oxidation (redox) control that impacts on nearly every aspect of plant biology. Here we summarize current knowledge and concepts that lay the foundations of a new vision for ROS/RNS functions – particularly through signalling hubs – for the next decade. Plants have mastered the art of redox control using ROS and RNS as secondary messengers to regulate a diverse range of protein functions through redox-based, post-translational modifications that act as regulators of molecular master-switches. Much current focus concerns the impact of this regulation on local and systemic signalling pathways, as well as understanding how such reactive molecules can be effectively used in the control of plant growth and stress responses. The spectre of oxidative stress still overshadows much of our current philosophy and understanding of ROS and RNS functions. While many questions remain to be addressed – for example regarding inter-organellar regulation and communication, the control of hypoxia and how ROS/RNS signalling is used in plant cells, not only to trigger acclimation responses but also to create molecular memories of stress – it is clear that ROS and RNS function as vital signals of living cells.

  19. The Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Reaction Studies of Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles in Mesoporous Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Robert M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst design program was implemented in which Pt nanoparticles, either of monodisperse size and/or shape were synthesized, characterized and studied in a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The novel preparation of these materials enables exquisite control over their physical and chemical properties that could be controlled (and therefore rationally tuned) during synthesis. The ability to synthesize rather than prepare catalysts followed by thorough characterization enable accurate structure-function relationships to be elucidated. This thesis emphasizes all three aspects of catalyst design: synthesis, characterization and reactivity studies. The precise control of metal nanoparticle size, surface structure and composition may enable the development of highly active and selective heterogeneous catalysts.

  20. Controlling nitrous oxide emissions from grassland livestock production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.; Gebauer, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Sapek, A.; Jarvis, S.C.; Corré, W.J.; Yamulki, S.

    1998-01-01

    There is growing awareness that grassland livestock production systems are major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O). Controlling these emissions requires a thorough understanding of all sources and controlling factors at the farm level. This paper examines the various controlling factors and proposes

  1. Partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relative importance of the reduced field intensity and the background reaction temperature in the partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor. We obtained important mechanistic insight from studying high-temperature and low-pressure conditions with similar reduced field intensities. In the tested range of background temperatures (297 < T < 773 K), we found that the conversion of methane and oxygen depended on both the electron-induced chemistry and the thermo-chemistry, whereas the chemical pathways to the products were overall controlled by the thermo-chemistry at a given temperature. We also found that the thermo-chemistry enhanced the plasma-assisted partial oxidation process. Our findings expand our understanding of the plasma-assisted partial oxidation process and may be helpful in the design of cost-effective plasma reformers. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  2. Tailoring galvanic replacement reaction for the preparation of Pt/Ag bimetallic hollow nanostructures with controlled number of voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqing; Yang, Jizheng; Lu, Xianmao

    2012-08-28

    Here we report the synthesis of Pt/Ag bimetallic nanostructures with controlled number of void spaces via a tailored galvanic replacement reaction (GRR). Ag nanocubes (NCs) were employed as the template to react with Pt ions in the presence of HCl. The use of HCl in the GRR caused rapid precipitation of AgCl, which grew on the surface of Ag NCs and acted as a removable secondary template for the deposition of Pt. The number of nucleation sites for AgCl was tailored by controlling the amount of HCl added to the Ag NCs or by introducing PVP to the reaction. This strategy led to the formation of Pt/Ag hollow nanoboxes, dimers, multimers, or popcorn-shaped nanostructures consisting of one, two, or multiple hollow domains. Due to the presence of large void space and porous walls, these nanostructures exhibited high surface area and improved catalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction.

  3. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro, E-mail: uchida@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kawasaki, Toshiyuki [Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nippon Bunri University, Oita, Oita 870-0397 (Japan); Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  4. Evaluation of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of oxidation reaction in biodiesel from a quaternary mixture of raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gomes Angilelli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of vegetable oil and animal fat as raw materials was optimized by simplex-centroid mixture design to produce a type of biodiesel with good oxidative stability, flow properties and reaction yield. Further, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of oxidation reaction were determined by the accelerated method at different temperatures. Biodiesel produced with sodium methoxide as catalyst presented 6.5°C of cloud point, 2.0°C of pour point, and oxidative stability at 110°C equal to 8.98h, with a reaction yield of 96.04%. Activation energy of the oxidation reaction was 81.03 kJ mol-1 for biodiesel produced with sodium hydroxide and 90.51 kJ mol-1 for sodium methoxide. The positive values for DH‡ and DG‡ indicate that the oxidation process is endothermic and endergonic. The less negative DS‡ for biodiesel produced with sodium methoxide (-28.87 JK-1 mol-1 showed that the process of degradation of this biofuel was slower than that produced with NaOH. The mixture of raw materials proposed, transesterified with the methoxide catalyst, resulted in a biofuel that resisted oxidation for longer periods, making unnecessary the addition of antioxidant

  5. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. Part I. An integral reaction scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, B.F.M.

    1971-01-01

    The homogeneous oxidn. of D-glucose and D-fructose with O in aq., alk. solns. is studied, and a reaction scheme proposed to account for the obsd. reaction products. Formation of enolate anions is followed by non-oxidative reactions (involving double-bond migration and cleavage) and by oxidative

  6. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  7. Methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured Ruthenium-Palladium nanoparticles: Relationship between structure and electrochemical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Markus; Jurzinsky, Tilman; Ziegenbalg, Dirk; Cremers, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    In this work the relationship between structural composition and electrochemical characteristics of Palladium(Pd)-Ruthenium(Ru) nanoparticles during alkaline methanol oxidation reaction is investigated. The comparative study of a standard alloyed and a precisely Ru-core-Pd-shell structured catalyst allows for a distinct investigation of the electronic effect and the bifunctional mechanism. Core-shell catalysts benefit from a strong electronic effect and an efficient Pd utilization. It is found that core-shell nanoparticles are highly active towards methanol oxidation reaction for potentials ≥0.6 V, whereas alloyed catalysts show higher current outputs in the lower potential range. However, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) experiments reveal that the methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured catalysts proceeds via the incomplete oxidation pathway yielding formaldehyde, formic acid or methyl formate. Contrary, the alloyed catalyst benefits from the Ru atoms at its surface. Those are found to be responsible for high methanol oxidation activity at lower potentials as well as for complete oxidation of CH3OH to CO2 via the bifunctional mechanism. Based on these findings a new Ru-core-Pd-shell-Ru-terrace catalyst was synthesized, which combines the advantages of the core-shell structure and the alloy. This novel catalyst shows high methanol electrooxidation activity as well as excellent selectivity for the complete oxidation pathway.

  8. Optimal control of bond selectivity in unimolecular reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shenghua; Rabitz, H.

    1991-01-01

    The optimal control theory approach to designing optimal fields for bond-selective unimolecular reactions is presented. A set of equations for determining the optimal fields, which will lead to the achievement of the objective of bond-selective dissociation is developed. The numerical procedure given for solving these equations requires the repeated calculation of the time propagator for the system with the time-dependent Hamiltonian. The splitting approximation combined with the fast Fourier transform algorithm is used for computing the short time propagator. As an illustrative example, a model linear triatomic molecule is treated. The model system consists of two Morse oscillators coupled via kinetic coupling. The magnitude of the dipoles of the two Morse oscillators are the same, the fundamental frequencies are almost the same, but the dissociation energies are different. The rather demanding objective under these conditions is to break the stronger bond while leaving the weaker one intact. It is encouraging that the present computational method efficiently gives rise to the optimal field, which leads to the excellent achievement of the objective of bond selective dissociation. (orig.)

  9. Fuel-sodium reaction product formation in breached mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, J.H.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Strain, R.V.; Ukai, S.; Shibahara, S.

    1988-01-01

    The run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) operation of mixed-oxide LMR fuel pins has been studied for six years in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as part of a joint program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The formation of fuel-sodium reaction product (FSRP), Na 3 MO 4 , where M = U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/, in the outer fuel regions is the major phenomenon governing RBCB behavior. It increases fuel volume, decreases fuel stoichiometry, modifies fission-product distributions, and alters thermal performance of a pin. This paper describes the morphology of Na 3 MO 4 observed in 5.84-mm diameter pins covering a variety of conditions and RBCB times up to 150 EFPD's. 8 refs., 1 fig

  10. Transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes focusing on heat transfer related to chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navasa, M; Andersson, M; Yuan, J; Sundén, B

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are widely studied for their advantages especially at high temperatures. However, operating at high temperatures represents a high cost due to the strict requirements the materials are expected to fulfill. Thus, the main goal in SOFC research has been to decrease the operating temperature so that the range of available materials is widened and hence, the operating cost can be reduced. In this paper, the different heat sources that contribute to the cell energy balance are presented with strong emphasis on the chemical reactions that take place in SOFCs. The knowledge of which heat sources or sinks taking place and their locations within the SOFC can provide useful information for further design and efficiency improvements.

  11. Graphene oxide for acid catalyzed-reactions: Effect of drying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, H. P.; Hua, W. M.; Yue, Y. H.; Gao, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxides (GOs) were prepared by Hummers method through various drying processes, and characterized by XRD, SEM, FTIR, XPS and N2 adsorption. Their acidities were measured using potentiometric titration and acid-base titration. The catalytic properties were investigated in the alkylation of anisole with benzyl alcohol and transesterification of triacetin with methanol. GOs are active catalysts for both reaction, whose activity is greatly affected by their drying processes. Vacuum drying GO exhibits the best performance in transesterification while freezing drying GO is most active for alkylation. The excellent catalytic behavior comes from abundant surface acid sites as well as proper surface functional groups, which can be obtained by selecting appropriate drying process.

  12. PET-modified red mud as catalysts for oxidative desulfurization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, Nayara T; Heitmann, Ana P; Mansur, Herman S; Mansur, Alexandra A; Oliveira, Luiz C A; de Castro, Cinthia S

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the synthesis of catalysts based on red mud/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composites and their subsequent heat treatment under N 2 atmosphere. The materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and N 2 adsorption/desorption. The catalysts were evaluated in the oxidative desulfurization reaction of dibenzothiophene (DBT) in a biphasic system. The results indicated that the PET impregnation on red mud increased the affinity of the catalyst with the nonpolar phase (fuel), in which the contaminant was dissolved, allowing a higher conversion (up to 80%) and selectivity to the corresponding dibenzothiophene sulfone. The sulfone compound is more polar than DBT and diffused into the polar solvent as indicated by the data obtained via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Coherent diffractive imaging of solid state reactions in zinc oxide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Steven J.; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the doping of zinc oxide (ZnO) microcrystals with iron and nickel via in situ coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) in vacuum. Evaporated thin metal films were deposited onto the ZnO microcrystals. A single crystal was selected and tracked through annealing cycles. A solid state reaction was observed in both iron and nickel experiments using CXDI. A combination of the shrink wrap and guided hybrid-input-output phasing methods were applied to retrieve the electron density. The resolution was 33 nm (half order) determined via the phase retrieval transfer function. The resulting images are nevertheless sensitive to sub-angstrom displacements. The exterior of the microcrystal was found to degrade dramatically. The annealing of ZnO microcrystals coated with metal thin films proved an unsuitable doping method. In addition the observed defect structure of one crystal was attributed to the presence of an array of defects and was found to change upon annealing.

  14. Phosphine-functionalized graphene oxide, a high-performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Golbon Haghighi, Mohsen; Jafari-Asl, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    Here, a new approach for the synthesis of phosphine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PPh2) was developed. Using a simple method, diphenylphosphine group was linked to the hydroxyl group of OH-functionalized graphene that existing at the graphene surface. The electrochemical activity of GO-PPh2 for electrochemical oxygen reduction was checked. The results demonstrated that the new carbon hybrid material has a powerful potential for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, GO-PPh2 as an electrocatalyst for ORR exhibited tolerance for methanol or ethanol as a result of crossover effect. In comparison with commercial Pt/C and Pt/rGO electrocatalysts, results showed that GO-PPh2 has a much higher selectivity, better durability, and much better electrochemical stability towards the ORR. The proposed method based on GO-PPh2 introduce an efficient electrocatalyst for further application in fuel cells.

  15. Controlled reactions between chromia and coating on alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conducting Sr-doped lanthanum chromite (LSC) coating has been produced by reacting a coating of fine particles of La oxide and Sr oxide with chromia formed as an external scale on a metallic alloy. In addition to the formation of LSC the coating also resulted in much reduced...... buckling of the underlying chromia layer compared with a non-coated alloy....

  16. A novel differential electrochemical mass spectrometry method to determine the product distribution from parasitic Methanol oxidation reaction on oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurzinsky, Tilman; Kurzhals, Philipp; Cremers, Carsten

    2018-06-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction is in research focus since several decades due to its importance for the overall fuel cell performance. In direct methanol fuel cells, the crossover of methanol and its subsequent parasitic oxidation are main issues when it comes to preventing fuel cell performance losses. In this work, we present a novel differential electrochemical mass spectrometry method to evaluate oxygen reduction reaction catalysts on their tolerance to methanol being present at the cathode. Besides this, the setup allows to measure under more realistic fuel cell conditions than typical rotating disc electrode measurements, because the oxygen reduction reaction is evaluated in gaseous phase and a gas diffusion electrode is used as working electrode. Due to the new method, it was possible to investigate the oxygen reduction reaction on two commonly used catalysts (Pt/C and Pt3Co/C) in absence and presence of methanol. It was found, that Pt3Co/C is less prone to parasitic current losses due to methanol oxidation reaction. By connecting a mass spectrometer to the electrochemical cell, the new method allows to determine the products formed on the catalysts due to parasitic methanol electrooxidation.

  17. Kinetics of solid-gas reactions characterized by scanning AC nano-calorimetry with application to Zr oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Kechao; Lee, Dongwoo; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    Scanning AC nano-calorimetry is a recently developed experimental technique capable of measuring the heat capacity of thin-film samples of a material over a wide range of temperatures and heating rates. Here, we describe how this technique can be used to study solid-gas phase reactions by measuring the change in heat capacity of a sample during reaction. We apply this approach to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of thin-film samples of zirconium in air. The results confirm parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 0.59 ± 0.03 eV. The nano-calorimetry measurements were performed using a device that contains an array of micromachined nano-calorimeter sensors in an architecture designed for combinatorial studies. We demonstrate that the oxidation kinetics can be quantified using a single sample, thus enabling high-throughput mapping of the composition-dependence of the reaction rate.

  18. Continuous Flow Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Reactions Using a Heterogeneous Ru(OH)x/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ru(OH)x/Al2O3 is among the more versatile catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation and dehydrogenation of nitrogen heterocycles. Here, we describe the translation of batch reactions to a continuous-flow method that enables high steady-state conversion and single-pass yields in the oxidation of benzylic alcohols and dehydrogenation of indoline. A dilute source of O2 (8% in N2) was used to ensure that the reaction mixture, which employs toluene as the solvent, is nonflammable throughout the process. A packed bed reactor was operated isothermally in an up-flow orientation, allowing good liquid–solid contact. Deactivation of the catalyst during the reaction was modeled empirically, and this model was used to achieve high conversion and yield during extended operation in the aerobic oxidation of 2-thiophene methanol (99+% continuous yield over 72 h). PMID:25620869

  19. The adsorption and reaction of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) on metal oxides. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, D.W.; Haw, J.F.; Lunsford, J.

    1998-01-01

    'The goal of the research is to elucidate the properties of the materials responsible for the activation of halocarbons and the nature of the intermediates formed in the dissociative adsorption of this class of compounds. This information is essential for interpreting and predicting stoichiometric and catalytic pathways for the safe destruction of halocarbon pollutants. The specific objectives are: (1) to study the adsorption and reactivity of chloromethanes and chloroethanes on metal oxides; (2) to identify the reaction intermediates using spectroscopic methods; and (3) to develop kinetic models for the reaction of these halocarbons with oxide surfaces. This report summarizes work after 20 months of a 36-month project. Emphasis has been placed understanding the surfaces phases, as well as the bulk phases that are present during the reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons with strongly basic metal oxides. Most of the research has been carried out with carbon tetrachloride.'

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by ZnO-reduced graphene oxide composite synthesized via microwave-assisted reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv Tian [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Pan Likun, E-mail: lkpan@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Liu Xinjuan; Lu Ting; Zhu Guang; Sun Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062 (China)

    2011-10-13

    Highlights: > ZnO-reduced graphene oxide composite is synthesized via microwave assisted reaction. > The method allows a facile, safe and rapid reaction in aqueous media. > A high dye degradation efficiency is achieved under UV light irradiation. - Abstract: A quick and facile microwave-assisted reaction is used to synthesize ZnO-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) hybrid composites by reducing graphite oxide dispersion with zinc nitrate using a microwave synthesis system. Their photocatalytic performance in degradation of methylene blue is investigated and the results show that the RGO plays an important role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance and the ZnO-RGO composite with 1.1 wt. % RGO achieves a maximum degradation efficiency of 88% in a neutral solution under UV light irradiation for 260 min as compared with pure ZnO (68%) due to the increased light absorption, the reduced charge recombination with the introduction of RGO.

  1. Evaluation of prolidase activity and oxidative stress in patients with oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid contact reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batu, Şule; Ofluoğlu, Duygu; Ergun, Sertan; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Uslu, Ezel; Güven, Yegane; Tanyeri, Hakkı

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prolidase activity and oxidative stress in patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid contact reactions (OLCR) using serum and salivary samples and to compare these biomarkers with each other as well as with a group of healthy subjects in order to be able to opine their role in the estimation of OLP and OLCR. Eighteen recently diagnosed patients with OLP, 32 patients with OLCR and 18 healthy controls with matched periodontal status were recruited to the study. Prolidase activity, lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA), sialic acid (SA), and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) levels in both serum and saliva were determined. Additionally, salivary flow rate and its buffering capacity were estimated. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-square test, t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient. No statistically significant differences were observed between the study groups and the control group regarding to the basic characteristics and the periodontal status (P > 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between OLP and OLCR groups regarding to the distribution of lesions' type, severity, and location (P > 0.05). No significant differences were found between the two study groups with regard to Prolidase activity, MDA, SA, and AOPPs (P ˃ 0.05), whereas statistically significant differences were found between the two study groups and the control group with regard to all evaluated parameters except of serum prolidase (P ˂ 0.01). Moderate correlation was found between salivary MDA and the OLP/OLCR lesion severity, whereas a weak correlation was observed between serum SA and the OLP/OLCR lesion severity (P ˂ 0.05). The findings of this study suggest an increased prolidase activity and oxidative stress and imbalance in the antioxidant defense system in biological fluids of patients with OLP and OLCR when compared with the healthy subjects

  2. Oxygen reduction reaction catalysts of manganese oxide decorated by silver nanoparticles for aluminum-air batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Miao, He; Xue, Yejian; Wang, Qin; Li, Shihua; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the hybrid catalysts of manganese oxide decorated by silver nanoparticles (Ag-MnO x ) are fully investigated and show the excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. The Ag-MnO 2 is synthesized by a facile strategy of the electroless plating of silver on the manganese oxide. The catalysts are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Then, the ORR activities of the catalysts are systematically investigated by the rotating disk electrode (RDE) and aluminum-air battery technologies. The Ag nanoparticles with the diameters at about 10 nm are anchored on the surface of α-MnO 2 and a strong interaction between Ag and MnO 2 components in the hybrid catalyst are confirmed. The electrochemical tests show that the activity and stability of the 50%Ag-MnO 2 composite catalyst (the mass ratio of Ag/MnO 2 is 1:1) toward ORR are greatly enhanced comparing with single Ag or MnO 2 catalyst. Moreover, the peak power density of the aluminum-air battery with 50%Ag-MnO 2 can reach 204 mW cm −2 .

  3. Nitric oxide reduction in coal combustion: role of char surface complexes in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ana; Rubiera, Fernando; Pis, José J

    2002-12-15

    Nitrogen oxides are one of the major environmental problems arising from fossil fuel combustion. Coal char is relatively rich in nitrogen, and so this is an important source of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. However, due to its carbonaceous nature, char can also reduce NO through heterogeneous reduction. The objectives of this work were on one hand to compare NO emissions from coal combustion in two different types of equipment and on the other hand to study the influence of char surface chemistry on NO reduction. A series of combustion tests were carried out in two different scale devices: a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer and an FTIR (TG-MS-FTIR) and a fluidized bed reactor with an on line battery of analyzers. The TG-MS-FTIR system was also used to perform a specific study on NO heterogeneous reduction reactions using chars with different surface chemistry. According to the results obtained, it can be said that the TG-MS-FTIR system provides valuable information about NO heterogeneous reduction and it can give good trends of the behavior in other combustion equipments (i.e., fluidized bed combustors). It has been also pointed out that NO-char interaction depends to a large extent on temperature. In the low-temperature range (800 degrees C), a different mechanism is involved in NO heterogeneous reduction, the nature of the carbon matrix being a key factor.

  4. Electrocatalytic performance evaluation of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt oxide thin films for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, P. T.; Lokhande, A. C.; Pawar, B. S.; Gang, M. G.; Jo, Eunjin; Go, Changsik; Suryawanshi, M. P.; Pawar, S. M.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2018-01-01

    The development of an inexpensive, stable, and highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for the practical application of water splitting. Herein, we have synthesized an electrodeposited cobalt hydroxide on nickel foam and subsequently annealed in an air atmosphere at 400 °C for 2 h. In-depth characterization of all the films using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) techniques, which reveals major changes for their structural, morphological, compositional and electrochemical properties, respectively. The cobalt hydroxide nanosheet film shows high catalytic activity with 290 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm-2 and 91 mV dec-1 Tafel slope and robust stability (24 h) for OER in 1 M KOH electrolyte compared to cobalt oxide (340 mV). The better OER activity of cobalt hydroxide in comparison to cobalt oxide originated from high active sites, enhanced surface, and charge transport capability.

  5. Tuning the two-dimensional electron liquid at oxide interfaces by buffer-layer-engineered redox reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Green, Robert J.; Sutarto, Ronny

    2017-01-01

    Polar discontinuities and redox reactions provide alternative paths to create two-dimensional electron liquids (2DELs) at oxide interfaces. Herein, we report high mobility 2DELs at interfaces involving SrTiO3 (STO) achieved using polar La7/8Sr1/8MnO3 (LSMO) buffer layers to manipulate both...... polarities and redox reactions from disordered overlayers grown at room temperature. Using resonant x-ray reflectometry experiments, we quantify redox reactions from oxide overlayers on STO as well as polarity induced electronic reconstruction at epitaxial LSMO/STO interfaces. The analysis reveals how...... these effects can be combined in a STO/LSMO/disordered film trilayer system to yield high mobility modulation doped 2DELs, where the buffer layer undergoes a partial transformation from perovskite to brownmillerite structure. This uncovered interplay between polar discontinuities and redox reactions via buffer...

  6. Stereoselectivity in catalytic reactions: CO oxidation on Pd(100) by rotationally aligned O2 molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattuone, L.; Gerbi, A.; Savio, L.; Cappelletti, D.; Pirani, F.; Rocca, M.

    2010-05-01

    We report on stereodynamical effects in heterogeneous catalytic reactions as measured by molecular beam-surface experiments. Specifically for CO oxidation on Pd(100) we find that the rotational alignment of the incoming O2 at low (Θ = 0.04 ML) and at intermediate (ΘCO = 0.17 ML) CO pre-coverage, causes a higher reactivity of molecules in high and in low helicity states, respectively (corresponding to helicoptering and cartwheeling motion of O2). In first approximation, at low CO pre-coverage the difference in reactivity is determined by the different location of the O atoms generated in the dissociation process by the different parent molecules, while at intermediate CO pre-coverage the reactivity is influenced also by the different ability of cartwheeling and helicoptering O2 to penetrate through the CO adlayer. In accord with this the total amount of CO2 produced is always largest for helicopters which generate supersurface O atoms at least in the low CO pre-coverage limit. A deeper inspection of the data indicates, however, that the dynamics is more complex, two different pathways being present for the reaction with O generated by helicopters and one for O generated by cartwheels. Moreover, cartwheels generated oxygen influences the reactivity of subsequently arriving helicopters.

  7. Effect of surface functionalisation on the interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysan, Ayse Beyza; Knejzlík, Zdeněk; Ulbrich, Pavel; Šoltys, Marek; Zadražil, Aleš; Štěpánek, František

    2017-05-01

    The combination of nanoparticles with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can have benefits such as easier sample handling or higher sensitivity, but also drawbacks such as loss of colloidal stability or inhibition of the PCR. The present work systematically investigates the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) with the PCR in terms of colloidal stability and potential PCR inhibition due to interaction between the PCR components and the nanoparticle surface. Several types of MIONs with and without surface functionalisation by sodium citrate, dextran and 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) were prepared and characterised by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Colloidal stability in the presence of the PCR components was investigated both at room temperature and under PCR thermo-cycling. Dextran-stabilized MIONs show the best colloidal stability in the PCR mix at both room and elevated temperatures. Citrate- and APTES-stabilised as well as uncoated MIONs show a comparable PCR inhibition near the concentration 0.1mgml -1 while the inhibition of dextran stabilized MIONs became apparent near 0.5mgml -1 . It was demonstrated that the PCR could be effectively carried out even in the presence of elevated concentration of MIONs up to 2mgml -1 by choosing the right coating approach and supplementing the reaction mix by critical components, Taq DNA polymerase and Mg 2+ ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Solvent 1H/2H isotopic effects in the reaction of the L-Tyrosine oxidation catalyzed by Tyrosinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowska, M.; Kanska, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosinase is well known catalyst in the oxidation of L-Tyrosine to L-DOPA and following oxidation of L-DOPA to dopachinone. The aim of communication is to present the results of studies on the solvent isotopic effects (SIE) in the above reactions for the 1 H/ 2 H in the 3',5' and 2',6' substituted tyrosine. Obtained dependence of the reaction rate on the substrate concentration were applied for optimization of the kinetic parameters, k cat and k cat /K m , in the Michaelis-Menten equation. As a result - better understanding of the L-DOPA creation can be achieved

  9. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Bruheim, I.; Haugsgjerd, B.O.

    2014-01-01

    was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature......The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40°C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil...

  10. Preparation of Cu@Cu2O Nanocatalysts by Reduction of HKUST-1 for Oxidation Reaction of Catechol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongwan Jang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available HKUST-1, a copper-based metal organic framework (MOF, has been investigated as a catalyst in various reactions. However, the HKUST-1 shows low catalytic activity in the oxidation of catechol. Therefore, we synthesized Fe3O4@HKUST-1 by layer-by layer assembly strategy and Cu@Cu2O by reduction of HKUST-1 for enhancement of catalytic activity. Cu@Cu2O nanoparticles exhibited highly effective catalytic activity in oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Through this method, MOF can maintain the original core-shell structure and be used in various other reactions with enhanced catalytic activity.

  11. Preparation of Cu@Cu₂O Nanocatalysts by Reduction of HKUST-1 for Oxidation Reaction of Catechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seongwan; Yoon, Chohye; Lee, Jae Myung; Park, Sungkyun; Park, Kang Hyun

    2016-11-02

    HKUST-1, a copper-based metal organic framework (MOF), has been investigated as a catalyst in various reactions. However, the HKUST-1 shows low catalytic activity in the oxidation of catechol. Therefore, we synthesized Fe₃O₄@HKUST-1 by layer-by layer assembly strategy and Cu@Cu₂O by reduction of HKUST-1 for enhancement of catalytic activity. Cu@Cu₂O nanoparticles exhibited highly effective catalytic activity in oxidation of 3,5-di- tert -butylcatechol. Through this method, MOF can maintain the original core-shell structure and be used in various other reactions with enhanced catalytic activity.

  12. Effect of strain on bond-specific reaction kinetics during the oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokce, Bilal; Aspnes, David E.; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    Although strain is used in semiconductor technology for manipulating optical, electronic, and chemical properties of semiconductors, the understanding of the microscopic phenomena that are affected or influenced by strain is still incomplete. Second-harmonic generation data obtained during the air oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si reveal the effect of compressive strain on this chemical reaction. Even small amounts of strain manipulate the reaction kinetics of surface bonds significantly, with tensile strain enhancing oxidation and compressive strain retarding it. This dramatic change suggests a strain-driven charge transfer mechanism between Si-H up bonds and Si-Si back bonds in the outer layer of Si atoms.

  13. Control of manganese dioxide particles resulting from in situ chemical oxidation using permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Michelle; Ko, Saebom

    2009-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate is an approach to organic contaminant site remediation. Manganese dioxide particles are products of permanganate reactions. These particles have the potential to deposit in the subsurface and impact the flow-regime in/around permanganate injection, including the well screen, filter pack, and the surrounding subsurface formation. Control of these particles can allow for improved oxidant injection and transport and contact between the oxidant and contaminants of concern. The goals of this research were to determine if MnO(2) can be stabilized/controlled in an aqueous phase, and to determine the dependence of particle stabilization on groundwater characteristics. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to study the ability of four stabilization aids (sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP), Dowfax 8390, xanthan gum, and gum arabic) in maintaining particles suspended in solution under varied reaction conditions and time. Variations included particle and stabilization aid concentrations, ionic content, and pH. HMP demonstrated the most promising results, as compared to xanthan gum, gum arabic, and Dowfax 8390 based on results of spectrophotometric studies of particle behavior, particle filtration, and optical measurements of particle size and zeta potential. HMP inhibited particle settling, provided for greater particle stability, and resulted in particles of a smaller average size over the range of experimental conditions evaluated compared to results for systems that did not include HMP. Additionally, HMP did not react unfavorably with permanganate. These results indicate that the inclusion of HMP in a permanganate oxidation system improves conditions that may facilitate particle transport.

  14. Valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shijing; Zhang Boping; Zhao Cuihua; Li Songjie; Zhang Meixia; Yan Liping

    2011-01-01

    The cobalt oxide (CoO and Co 3 O 4 ) thin films were successfully prepared using a spin-coating technique by a chemical solution method with CH 3 OCH 2 CH 2 OH and Co(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O as starting materials. The grayish cobalt oxide films had uniform crystalline grains with less than 50 nm in diameter. The phase structure is able to tailor by controlling the annealing atmosphere and temperature, in which Co 3 O 4 thin film was obtained by annealing in air at 300-600, and N 2 at 300, and transferred to CoO thin film by raising annealing temperature in N 2 . The fitted X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the Co2p electrons are distinguishable from different valence states of cobalt oxide especially for their satellite structure. The valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere contributes to the tailored optical absorption property.

  15. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Environmental Quality Engineering.). Gardner State Hospital, Gardner. Grafton State Hospital... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Massachusetts § 52.1126 Control...

  16. 40 CFR 52.65 - Control Strategy: Nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Strategy: Nitrogen oxides. 52.65 Section 52.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Alabama § 52.65 Control Strategy: Nitrogen...

  17. ¹⁹F magnetic resonance probes for live-cell detection of peroxynitrite using an oxidative decarbonylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, Kevin J; Merrikhihaghi, Sara; Lollar, Christina T; Morris, Siti Nur Sarah; Bauer, Johannes H; Lippert, Alexander R

    2014-10-21

    We report a newly discovered oxidative decarbonylation reaction of isatins that is selectively mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) to provide anthranilic acid derivatives. We have harnessed this rapid and selective transformation to develop two reaction-based probes, 5-fluoroisatin and 6-fluoroisatin, for the low-background readout of ONOO(-) using (19)F magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 5-fluoroisatin was used to non-invasively detect ONOO(-) formation in living lung epithelial cells stimulated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ).

  18. Surface-Controlled Metal Oxide Resistive Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Ke, Jr-Jian; Namura, Kyoko; Duran Retamal, Jose Ramon; Ho, Chin-Hsiang; Minamitake, Haruhiko; Wei, Tzu-Chiao; Tsai, Dung-Sheng; Lin, Chun-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; He, Jr-Hau

    2015-01-01

    be attributed to the stable oxygen adatoms under various ambience conditions. The findings validate the surface-controlled stability and uniformity of ReRAM and can serve as the guideline for developing practical device applications.

  19. Effect of Thermal Processing towards Lipid Oxidation and Non-enzymatic Browning Reactions of Antartic Krill (Euphausia superba) Meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanzi; Cong, Peixu; Li, Beijia; Song, Yu; Liu, Yanjun; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu

    2018-04-13

    Antarctic krill is a huge source of biomass and prospective high-quality lipid source. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), nutritionally important lipid components with poor oxidative stability, were used as markers of oxidation during thermal processing of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) meal by evaluating the lipolysis, lipid oxidation, and non-enzymatic browning reactions. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of the phospholipids (PLs) and the main oxidation products of free fatty acids (FFAs) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) was effective for evaluating the oxidation of EPA and DHA. During boiling, oxidation of EPA and DHA in the FFA and PC fractions and hydrolysis of the fatty acids at the sn-2 position of the PLs were predominant. The changes in PC during drying were mainly attributed to the oxidation of EPA and DHA. Heat treatment increased the oxidation products and concentration of hydrophobic pyrrole owing to pyrrolization between phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and the lipid oxidation products. The lipid oxidation level of Antarctic krill increased after drying, owing to prolonged heating under the severe conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. CO oxidation on PtSn nanoparticle catalysts occurs at the interface of Pt and Sn oxide domains formed under reaction conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.; Krier, James M.; Alayoglu, Selim; Shin, Jae-Yoon; An, Kwangjin; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Liu, Zhi; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2014-01-01

    The barrier to CO oxidation on Pt catalysts is the strongly bound adsorbed CO, which inhibits O2 adsorption and hinders CO2 formation. Using reaction studies and in situ X-ray spectroscopy with colloidally prepared, monodisperse ∼2 nm Pt and PtSn

  1. Optimization of reaction conditions in selective oxidation of styrene over fine crystallite spinel-type CaFe2O4 complex oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardeshi, Satish K.; Pawar, Ravindra Y.

    2010-01-01

    The CaFe 2 O 4 spinel-type catalyst was synthesized by citrate gel method and well characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of the spinel particle prepared by citrate gel method was 600 o C which was lower than that of ferrite prepared by other methods. CaFe 2 O 4 catalysts prepared by citrate gel method show better activity for styrene oxidation in the presence of dilute H 2 O 2 (30%) as an oxidizing agent. In this reaction the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bond of styrene takes place selectively with 38 ± 2 mol% conversion. The major product of the reaction is benzaldehyde up to 91 ± 2 mol% and minor product phenyl acetaldehyde up to 9 ± 2 mol%, respectively. The products obtained in the styrene oxidation reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst, reaction time, temperature, amount of catalyst, styrene/H 2 O 2 molar ratio and solvents on the conversion and product distribution were studied.

  2. Agmatine attenuates intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Inci; Ozacmak, Hale Sayan; Ozacmak, V Haktan; Barut, Figen; Araslı, Mehmet

    2017-11-15

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are major factors causing several tissue injuries in intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Agmatine has been reported to attenuate I/R injury of various organs. The present study aims to analyze the possible protective effects of agmatine on intestinal I/R injury in rats. Four groups were designed: sham control, agmatine-treated control, I/R control, and agmatine-treated I/R groups. IR injury of small intestine was induced by the occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for half an hour to be followed by a 3-hour-long reperfusion. Agmatine (10mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally before reperfusion period. After 180min of reperfusion period, the contractile responses to both carbachol and potassium chloride (KCl) were subsequently examined in an isolated-organ bath. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured in intestinal tissue. Plasma cytokine levels were determined. The expression of the intestinal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. The treatment with agmatine appeared to be significantly effective in reducing the MDA content and MPO activity besides restoring the content of GSH. The treatment also attenuated the histological injury. The increases in the I/R induced expressions of iNOS, IFN-γ, and IL-1α were brought back to the sham control levels by the treatment as well. Our findings indicate that the agmatine pretreatment may ameliorate reperfusion induced injury in small intestine mainly due to reducing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Controlling Oxygen Mobility in Ruddlesden–Popper Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkyu Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new energy materials is a key step toward satisfying the needs for next-generation energy conversion and storage devices. Among the various types of oxides, Ruddlesden–Popper (RP oxides (A2BO4 are promising candidates for electrochemical energy devices, such as solid oxide fuel cells, owing to their attractive physicochemical properties, including the anisotropic nature of oxygen migration and controllable stoichiometry from oxygen excess to oxygen deficiency. Thus, understanding and controlling the kinetics of oxygen transport are essential for designing optimized materials to use in electrochemical energy devices. In this review, we first discuss the basic mechanisms of oxygen migration in RP oxides depending on oxygen nonstoichiometry. We then focus on the effect of changes in the defect concentration, crystallographic orientation, and strain on the oxygen migration in RP oxides. We also briefly review their thermal and chemical stability. Finally, we conclude with a perspective on potential research directions for future investigation to facilitate controlling oxygen ion migration in RP oxides.

  4. Demonstration of a Non-Toxic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Turpin, Alicia A.; Veith, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    T:hree non-toxic demonstration reaction control engines (RCE) were successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The demonstration engine utilized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol as propellants to produce 870 lbf thrust. The Aerojet RCE's were successfully acceptance tested over a broad range of operating conditions. Steady state tests evaluated engine response to varying chamber pressures and mixture ratios. In addition to the steady state tests, a variety of pulsing tests were conducted over a wide range of electrical pulse widths (EPW). Each EPW condition was also tested over a range of percent duty cycles (DC), and bit impulse and pulsing specific impulse were determined for each of these conditions. Subsequent to acceptance testing at Aerojet, these three engines were delivered to the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in April 2005 for incorporation into a cryogenic Auxiliary Propulsion System Test Bed (APSTB). The APSTB is a test article that will be utilized in an altitude test cell to simulate anticipated mission applications. The objectives of this APSTB testing included evaluation of engine performance over an extended duty cycle map of propellant pressure and temperature, as well as engine and system performance at typical mission duty cycles over extended periods of time. This paper provides acceptance test results and a status of the engine performance as part of the system level testing.

  5. Titanium Oxide/Platinum Catalysis: Charge Transfer from a Titanium Oxide Support Controls Activity and Selectivity in Methanol Oxidation on Platinum

    KAUST Repository

    Hervier, Antoine

    2011-11-24

    Platinum films of 1 nm thickness were deposited by electron beam evaporation onto 100 nm thick titanium oxide films (TiOx) with variable oxygen vacancy concentrations and fluorine (F) doping. Methanol oxidation on the platinum films produced formaldehyde, methyl formate, and carbon dioxide. F-doped samples demonstrated significantly higher activity for methanol oxidation when the TiOx was stoichiometric (TiO 2), but lower activity when it was nonstoichiometric (TiO 1.7 and TiO1.9). These results correlate with the chemical behavior of the same types of catalysts in CO oxidation. Fluorine doping of stoichiometric TiO2 also increased selectivity toward partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde and methyl formate, but had an opposite effect in the case of nonstoichiometric TiOx. Introduction of oxygen vacancies and fluorine doping both increased the conductivity of the TiO x film. For oxygen vacancies, this occurred by the formation of a conduction channel in the band gap, whereas in the case of fluorine doping, F acted as an n-type donor, forming a conduction channel at the bottom of the conduction band, about 0.5-1.0 eV higher in energy. The higher energy electrons in F-doped stoichiometric TiOx led to higher turnover rates and increased selectivity toward partial oxidation of methanol. This correlation between electronic structure and turnover rate and selectivity indicates that the ability of the support to transfer charges to surface species controls in part the activity and selectivity of the reaction. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Reaction of CO2 with propylene oxide and styrene oxide catalyzed by a chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca K; Devaine-Pressing, Katalin; Dawe, Louise N; Kozak, Christopher M

    2013-07-07

    A diamine-bis(phenolate) chromium(III) complex, {CrCl[O2NN'](BuBu)}2 catalyzes the copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The synthesis of this metal complex is straightforward and it can be obtained in high yields. This catalyst incorporates a tripodal amine-bis(phenolate) ligand, which differs from the salen or salan ligands typically used with Cr and Co complexes that have been employed as catalysts for the synthesis of such polycarbonates. The catalyst reported herein yields low molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities when the reaction is performed at room temperature. Performing the reaction at elevated temperatures causes the selective synthesis of propylene carbonate. The copolymerization activity for propylene oxide and carbon dioxide, as well as the coupling of carbon dioxide and styrene oxide to give styrene carbonate are presented.

  7. Miniature Reaction Wheel for Small Satellite Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to design, develop, demonstrate, and deliver a miniature, high torque, low-vibration reaction wheel for use on small satellites....

  8. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  9. Oxygen dependency of neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix differs from abiotic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizing microorganisms are found in many natural environments. It has been hypothesized that, at low oxygen concentrations, microbial iron oxidation is favored over abiotic oxidation. Here, we compare the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation to oxidation in the presence of

  10. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Basic principles for the design and stability of a spacecraft on-orbit attitude control system employing on-off Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters are presented. Both vehicle dynamics and the control system actuators are inherently nonlinear, hence traditional linear control system design approaches are not directly applicable. This paper has two main aspects: It summarizes key RCS design principles from earlier NASA vehicles, notably the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduces advances in the linear modelling and analyses of a phase plane control system derived in the initial development of the NASA's next upper stage vehicle, the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). Topics include thruster hardware specifications, phase plane design and stability, jet selection approaches, filter design metrics, and RCS rotational maneuver logic.

  11. A comparative DFT study on CO oxidation reaction over Si-doped BC2N nanosheet and nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Parisa; Neyts, Erik C.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate different reaction mechanisms of CO oxidation catalyzed by the Si atom embedded defective BC2N nanostructures as well as the analysis of the structural and electronic properties. The structures of all the complexes are optimized and characterized by frequency calculations at the M062X/6-31G∗ computational level. Also, The electronic structures and thermodynamic parameters of adsorbed CO and O2 molecules over Si-doped BC2N nanostructures are examined in detail. Moreover, to investigate the curvature effect on the CO oxidation reaction, all the adsorption and CO oxidation reactions on a finite-sized armchair (6,6) Si-BC2NNT are also studied. Our results indicate that there can be two possible pathways for the CO oxidation with O2 molecule: O2(g) + CO(g) → O2(ads) + CO(ads) → CO2(g) + O(ads) and O(ads) + CO(g) → CO2(g). The first reaction proceeds via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism while the second goes through the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism. On the other hand, by increasing the tube diameter, the energy barrier increases due to the strong adsorption energy of the O2 molecule which is related to its dissociation over the tube surface. Our calculations indicate that the two step energy barrier of the oxidation reaction over Si-BC2NNS is less than that over the Si-BC2NNT. Hence, Si-BC2NNS may serve as an efficient and highly activated substrate to CO oxidation rather than (4,4) Si-BC2NNT.

  12. The lithiation and acyl transfer reactions of phosphine oxides, sulfides and boranes in the synthesis of cyclopropanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Celia; Fox, David J; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer

    2009-01-01

    Phosphine oxides are lithiated much faster than phosphine sulfides and phosphine boranes. Phosphine sulfides are in turn lithiated much more readily than phosphine boranes. It was possible to trap a phosphine sulfide THF in one case which upon treatment with t-BuOK gave cyclopropane, showing...... that phosphine sulfides readily undergo both phosphinoyl transfer and cyclopropane ring closure just like their phosphine oxide counterparts. The obtained data show that phosphine oxides are easily lithiated and undergo phosphoryl transfer much more readily and faster than phosphine sulfides and phosphine...... boranes. The observations suggest that it would be possible to perform reactions involving phosphine oxides in the presence of phosphine boranes or phosphine sulfides, potentially allowing regioselective alkylation of phosphine oxides in the presence of phosphine boranes or phosphine sulfides....

  13. Origin of stabilization and destabilization in solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakayama, Masanobu; Takeuchi, Mitsue; Komaba, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Yu; Mukai, Takahiro; Shiiba, Hiromasa; Sato, Kei; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nakao, Aiko; Yonemura, Masao; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Mitsuhara, Kei; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2016-12-23

    Further increase in energy density of lithium batteries is needed for zero emission vehicles. However, energy density is restricted by unavoidable theoretical limits for positive electrodes used in commercial applications. One possibility towards energy densities exceeding these limits is to utilize anion (oxide ion) redox, instead of classical transition metal redox. Nevertheless, origin of activation of the oxide ion and its stabilization mechanism are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of formation of superoxide-like species on lithium extraction results in reversible redox for oxide ions, which is stabilized by the presence of relatively less covalent character of Mn 4+ with oxide ions without the sacrifice of electronic conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we report an electrode material, whose metallic constituents consist only of 3d transition metal elements. The material delivers a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g -1 based on solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions.

  14. Origin of stabilization and destabilization in solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakayama, Masanobu; Takeuchi, Mitsue; Komaba, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Yu; Mukai, Takahiro; Shiiba, Hiromasa; Sato, Kei; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nakao, Aiko; Yonemura, Masao; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Mitsuhara, Kei; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Further increase in energy density of lithium batteries is needed for zero emission vehicles. However, energy density is restricted by unavoidable theoretical limits for positive electrodes used in commercial applications. One possibility towards energy densities exceeding these limits is to utilize anion (oxide ion) redox, instead of classical transition metal redox. Nevertheless, origin of activation of the oxide ion and its stabilization mechanism are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of formation of superoxide-like species on lithium extraction results in reversible redox for oxide ions, which is stabilized by the presence of relatively less covalent character of Mn4+ with oxide ions without the sacrifice of electronic conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we report an electrode material, whose metallic constituents consist only of 3d transition metal elements. The material delivers a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g−1 based on solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions. PMID:28008955

  15. Myotoxic reactions to lipid-lowering therapy are associated with altered oxidation of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Paul S; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Dong-Lim; Verity, M Anthony; Wolfson, Tanya; Henry, Robert R

    2009-02-01

    Despite exceptional efficacy and safety, fear of muscle toxicity remains a major reason statins are underutilized. Evidence suggests that statin muscle toxicity may be mediated by abnormalities in lipid metabolism. To test the hypothesis that myotubes from patients intolerant of lipid-lowering therapies have abnormal fatty acid oxidation (FAO) responses we compared muscle from 11 subjects with statin intolerance (Intolerant) with muscle from seven statin-naive volunteers undergoing knee arthroplasty (Comparator). Gross muscle pathology was graded and skeletal muscle cell cultures were produced from each subject. FAO was assessed following treatment with increasing statin concentrations. There was no difference in muscle biopsy myopathy scores between the groups. Basal octanoate oxidation was greater in Intolerant than in Comparator subjects (P = 0.03). Lovastatin-stimulated palmitate oxidation tended to be greater for Intolerant compared to Control subjects' myotubes (P = 0.07 for 5 microM and P = 0.06 for 20 microM lovastatin). In conclusion abnormalities in FAO of Intolerant subjects appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of these subjects that can be measured in their cultured myotubes.

  16. Electro-oxidation of methanol on gold in alkaline media: Adsorption characteristics of reaction intermediates studied using time resolved electro-chemical impedance and surface plasmon resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiongbon, K. A.; Roy, D.

    2005-12-01

    Electro-catalytic oxidation of methanol is the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells. We have studied the adsorption characteristics of the intermediate reactants of this multistep reaction on a gold film electrode in alkaline solutions by combining surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements with Fourier transform electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (FT-EIS). Methanol oxidation in this system shows no significant effects of "site poisoning" by chemisorbed CO. Our results suggest that OH - chemisorbed onto Au acts as a stabilizing agent for the surface species of electro-active methanol. Double layer charging/discharging and adsorption/desorption of OH - show more pronounced effects than adsorption/oxidation of methanol in controlling the surface charge density of the Au substrate. These effects are manifested in both the EIS and the SPR data, and serve as key indicators of the surface reaction kinetics. The data presented here describe the important role of adsorbed OH - in electro-catalysis of methanol on Au, and demonstrate how SPR and FT-EIS can be combined for quantitative probing of catalytically active metal-solution interfaces.

  17. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... hemoglobin at different constant oxygen tensions that generate the full range of physiological relevant oxygen saturations. Carp is a hypoxia-tolerant species with very high hemoglobin oxygen affinity, and the high R-state character and low redox potential of the hemoglobin is hypothesized to promote...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  18. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High molecular weight (300–650 Da naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16 oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC. The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3 and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7–1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4 (Hyytiälä and C3F5O2 (JPAC. The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4–5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1–1 ppt (~10

  19. Microwave-irradiation polyol synthesis of PVP-protected Pt–Ni electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, Ntombizodwa R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ://doi.org/10.1007/s12678-017-0441-3 Microwave-Irradiation Polyol Synthesis of PVP-Protected Pt–Ni Electrocatalysts for Methanol Oxidation Reaction Ntombizodwa R. Mathe Manfred R. Scriba Rirhandzu S. Rikhotso Neil J. Coville ABSTRACT: Bimetallic Pt...

  20. Non-noble metal graphene oxide-copper (II) ions hybrid electrodes for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Muralikrishna, S.; Ravishankar, T.N.; Ramakrishnappa, T.; Nagaraju, Doddahalli H.; Krishna Pai, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Non-noble metal and inexpensive graphene oxide-copper (II) ions (GO-Cu2+) hybrid catalysts have been explored for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We were able to tune the binding abilities of GO toward the Cu2+ ions and hence their catalytic

  1. The reaction of 1-tetralones with thallium trinitrate supported on clay: ring contraction vs a-oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraz Helena M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of a series of 1-tetralones with thallium trinitrate supported on Montmorillonite K-10 clay led to products of ring contraction (methyl indan-1-carboxylates and/or alpha-oxidation (2-methoxy-1-tetralones, in variable yields.

  2. Diverse Reactions of Thiophenes, Selenophenes, and Tellurophenes with Strongly Oxidizing I(III) PhI(L)2 Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalahewa, Sathsara; Albayer, Mohammad; Aprile, Antonino; Dutton, Jason L

    2017-02-06

    We report the outcomes of the reactions of aromatic group 16 thiophene, selenophene, and tellurophene rings with the I(III) oxidants PhI(OAc)(OTf) and [PhI(Pyr) 2 ][OTf] 2 (Pyr = pyridine). In all reactions, oxidative processes take place, with generation of PhI as the reduction product. However, with the exception of tellurophene with PhI(OAc)(OTf), +4 oxidation state complexes are not observed, but rather a variety of other processes occur. In general, where a C-H unit is available on the 5-membered ring, an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction of either -IPh or pyridine onto the ring occurs. When all positions are blocked, reactions with PhI(OAc)(OTf) give acetic and triflic anhydride as the identifiable oxidative byproducts, while [PhI(Pyr) 2 ][OTf] 2 gives pyridine electrophilic aromatic substitution onto the peripheral rings. Qualitative mechanistic studies indicate that the presence of the oxidizable heteroatom is required for pyridine to act as an electrophile in a substantial manner.

  3. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  4. Kinetics and reaction mechanism for aminolysis of benzyl 4-pyridyl carbonate in H2O: Effect of modification of nucleofuge from 2-pyridyl oxide to 4-pyridyl oxide on reactivity and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Sun; Um, Ikhwan

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-first-order rate constants k amine have been measured spectrophotometrically for the reactions of benzyl 4-pyridyl carbonate 6 with a series of alicyclic secondary amines in H 2 O at 25.0.deg.C. The plots of k amine vs. [amine] curve upward, indicating that the reactions proceed through a stepwise mechanism with two intermediates, a zwitterionic tetrahedral intermediate T ± and its deprotonated form T - . This contrasts to the report that the corresponding reactions of benzyl 2-pyridyl carbonate 5 proceed through a forced concerted pathway. The k amine values for the reactions of 6 have been dissected into the second-order rate constant Kk 2 and the third order rate constant Kk 3 . The Brφnsted-type plots are linear with β nuc = 0.94 and 1.18 for Kk 2 and Kk 3 , respectively. The Kk 2 for the reaction of 6 is smaller than the second-order rate constant k N for the corresponding reaction of 5, although 4-pyridyl oxide in 6 is less basic and a better nucleofuge than 2-pyridyl oxide in 5

  5. Mechanisms of LiCoO2 Cathode Degradation by Reaction with HF and Protection by Thin Oxide Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbe, Jonathon L; Holder, Aaron M; Musgrave, Charles B

    2015-11-04

    Reactions of HF with uncoated and Al and Zn oxide-coated surfaces of LiCoO2 cathodes were studied using density functional theory. Cathode degradation caused by reaction of HF with the hydroxylated (101̅4) LiCoO2 surface is dominated by formation of H2O and a LiF precipitate via a barrierless reaction that is exothermic by 1.53 eV. We present a detailed mechanism where HF reacts at the alumina coating to create a partially fluorinated alumina surface rather than forming AlF3 and H2O and thus alumina films reduce cathode degradation by scavenging HF and avoiding H2O formation. In contrast, we find that HF etches monolayer zinc oxide coatings, which thus fail to prevent capacity fading. However, thicker zinc oxide films mitigate capacity loss by reacting with HF to form a partially fluorinated zinc oxide surface. Metal oxide coatings that react with HF to form hydroxyl groups over H2O, like the alumina monolayer, will significantly reduce cathode degradation.

  6. Reaction mechanisms and evaluation of effective process operation for catalytic oxidation and coagulation by ferrous solution and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Moon, H.J.; Kim, Y.M. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Sangmyung Univ., Cheonan (Korea); Bae, W.K. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Ansan, Kyounggi (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate the removal efficiencies of COD{sub cr} and colour for the dyeing wastewater by ferrous solution and the different dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in Fenton process. In the case of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} divided dosage, 7:3 was more effective than 3:7 to remove COD{sub cr} and colour. The results showed that COD was mainly removed by Fenton coagulation, where the ferric ions are formed in the initial step of Fenton reaction. On the other hand colour was removed by Fenton oxidation rather than Fenton coagulation. This paper also aims at pursuing to investigate the effective removal mechanisms using ferrous ion coagulation, ferric ion coagulation and Fenton oxidation process. The removal mechanism of COD{sub cr} and colour was mainly coagulation by ferrous ion, ferric ion and Fenton oxidation. The removal efficiencies were dependent on the ferric ion amount at the beginning of the reaction. However the final removal efficiency of COD and colour was in the order of Fenton oxidation, ferric ion coagulation and ferrous ion coagulation. The reason of the highest removal efficiency by Fenton oxidation can be explained by the chain reactions with ferrous solution, ferric ion and hydrogen peroxide. (orig.)

  7. Synergistic reaction between SO2 and NO2 on mineral oxides: a potential formation pathway of sulfate aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-02-07

    Sulfate is one of the most important aerosols in the atmosphere. A new sulfate formation pathway via synergistic reactions between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides was proposed. The heterogeneous reactions of SO(2) and NO(2) on CaO, α-Fe(2)O(3), ZnO, MgO, α-Al(2)O(3), TiO(2), and SiO(2) were investigated by in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS) at ambient temperature. Formation of sulfate from adsorbed SO(2) was promoted by the coexisting NO(2), while surface N(2)O(4) was observed as the crucial oxidant for the oxidation of surface sulfite. This process was significantly promoted by the presence of O(2). The synergistic effect between SO(2) and NO(2) was not observed on other mineral particles (such as CaCO(3) and CaSO(4)) probably due to the lack of the surface reactive oxygen sites. The synergistic reaction between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides resulted in the formation of internal mixtures of sulfate, nitrate, and mineral oxides. The change of mixture state will affect the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles and therefore further influence their environmental and climate effects.

  8. Ultrafine Iridium Oxide Nanorods Synthesized by Molten Salt Method toward Electrocatalytic Oxygen and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafine iridium oxide nanorods were synthesized by a molten salt method at 650 °C. • They show enhanced electrocatalytic activity to oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions. • These results are comparable with, and in most cases, higher than reported data in the literature. • This study reports a novel synthetic process for IrO_2 but also a high efficient IrO_2 nanostructure. • These IrO_2 NRs are expected to serve as a benchmark to develop active electrocatalysts. - Abstract: Ultrafine iridium oxide nanorods (IrO_2 NRs) were successfully synthesized using a molten salt method at 650 °C. The structural and morphological characterizations of these IrO_2 NRs were carried out by powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopic techniques. Compared to commercial IrO_2 nanoparticles (IrO_2 NPs) and previous reports, these IrO_2 NRs show enhanced electrocatalytic activity to oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions by passing either N_2 or O_2 gas in a 0.5 M KOH electrolyte before electrochemical measurements, including cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Specifically, the current densities from the as-synthesized IrO_2 NRs and commercial IrO_2 NPs were measured in 0.5 M KOH electrolyte to be 70 and 58 (OER, deaerated, at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl), 71 and 61 (OER, O_2, from −0.10 to 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl at 50 mV/s), and 25 and 14 (HER, deaerated, at −1.4 V versus Ag/AgCl) mA/cm"2, respectively. These results are comparable with, and in most cases, higher than reported data in the literature. Therefore, the current study reports not only a novel synthetic process for IrO_2 but also a high efficient IrO_2 nanostructure, and it is expected that these IrO_2 NRs can serve as a benchmark in the development of active OER and HER (photo)electrocatalysts for various applications.

  9. Toluene removal by oxidation reaction in spray wet scrubber: experimental, modeling and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumporn Nikom

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Toluene, an important volatile organic compound (VOC, is used in many kinds of industries, such as painting, printing, coating, and petrochemical industries. The emission of toluene causes serious air pollution, odor problem, flammability problem and affects human health. This paper proposes the removal of toluene from waste air using a spray wet scrubber combining the absorption and oxidation reaction. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl solution was used as the scrubbing liquid in the system. NaOCl, the strongest oxidative agent, presents an effective toluene removal. As the scrubbed toluene is reacted, recirculation of the scrubbing liquid could be operated with a constant removal efficiency throughout the operting time. The investigated variables affecting the removal efficiency were air flow rate, inlet toluene concentration, NaOCl concentration, scrubbing liquid flow rate and size of spray nozzle. Influence of the scrubbing parameters was experimentally studied to develop a mathematical model of the toluene removal efficiency. The removal model reveals that the increase of scrubbing liquid flow rate, toluene concentration, and NaOCl concentration together with the decrease of air flow rate and size of spray nozzle can increase the toluene removal efficiency. Optimization problem with an objective function and constraints was set to provide the maximum toluene removal efficiency and solved by Matlab optimization toolbox. The optimization constraints were formed from the mathematical model and process limitation. The solution of the optimization was an air flow rate of 100 m3/h, toluene concentration of 1500 ppm, NaOCl concentration of 0.02 mol/l, NaOCl solution feed rate of 0.8 m3/h, and spray nozzle size of 0.5 mm. Solution of the optimization gave the highest toluene removal efficiency of 91.7%.

  10. Copper-assisted shape control in colloidal synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selishcheva, Elena; Parisi, Juergen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.kolny@uni-oldenburg.de [University of Oldenburg, Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Institute of Physics (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Indium oxide is an important n-type transparent semiconductor, finding application in solar cells, sensors, and optoelectronic devices. We present here a novel non-injection synthesis route for the preparation of colloidal indium oxide nanocrystals by using oleylamine (OLA) as ligand and as solvent. Indium oxide with cubic crystallographic structure is formed in a reaction between indium acetate and OLA, the latter is converted to oleylamide during the synthesis. The shape of the nanocrystals can be influenced by the addition of copper ions. When only indium (III) acetate is used as precursor flower-shaped indium oxide nanoparticles are obtained. Addition of copper salts such as copper (I) acetate, copper (II) acetate, copper (II) acetylacetonate, or copper (I) chloride, under otherwise identical reaction conditions changes the shape of nanoparticles to quasi-spherical or elongated. The anions, except for chloride, do not influence the shape of the resulting nanocrystals. This finding suggests that adsorption of copper ions on the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface during the nanoparticles growth is responsible for shape control, whereas changes in the reactivity of the In cations caused by the presence of different anions play a secondary role. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and UV-Vis-absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the samples.

  11. Copper-assisted shape control in colloidal synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selishcheva, Elena; Parisi, Jürgen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Indium oxide is an important n-type transparent semiconductor, finding application in solar cells, sensors, and optoelectronic devices. We present here a novel non-injection synthesis route for the preparation of colloidal indium oxide nanocrystals by using oleylamine (OLA) as ligand and as solvent. Indium oxide with cubic crystallographic structure is formed in a reaction between indium acetate and OLA, the latter is converted to oleylamide during the synthesis. The shape of the nanocrystals can be influenced by the addition of copper ions. When only indium (III) acetate is used as precursor flower-shaped indium oxide nanoparticles are obtained. Addition of copper salts such as copper (I) acetate, copper (II) acetate, copper (II) acetylacetonate, or copper (I) chloride, under otherwise identical reaction conditions changes the shape of nanoparticles to quasi-spherical or elongated. The anions, except for chloride, do not influence the shape of the resulting nanocrystals. This finding suggests that adsorption of copper ions on the In 2 O 3 surface during the nanoparticles growth is responsible for shape control, whereas changes in the reactivity of the In cations caused by the presence of different anions play a secondary role. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and UV–Vis-absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the samples.

  12. Redox regulation and pro-oxidant reactions in the physiology of circadian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Isabel; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Valente-Godínez, Héctor; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    Rhythms of approximately 24 h are pervasive in most organisms and are known as circadian. There is a molecular circadian clock in each cell sustained by a feedback system of interconnected "clock" genes and transcription factors. In mammals, the timing system is formed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, in coordination with a collection of peripheral oscillators. Recently, an extensive interconnection has been recognized between the molecular circadian clock and the set of biochemical pathways that underlie the bioenergetics of the cell. A principle regulator of metabolic networks is the flow of electrons between electron donors and acceptors. The concomitant reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions directly influence the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. This review summarizes and discusses recent findings concerning the mutual and dynamic interactions between the molecular circadian clock, redox reactions, and redox signaling. The scope includes the regulatory role played by redox coenzymes (NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H, GSH/GSSG), reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide), antioxidants (melatonin), and physiological events that modulate the redox state (feeding condition, circadian rhythms) in determining the timing capacity of the molecular circadian clock. In addition, we discuss a purely metabolic circadian clock, which is based on the redox enzymes known as peroxiredoxins and is present in mammalian red blood cells and in other biological systems. Both the timing system and the metabolic network are key to a better understanding of widespread pathological conditions such as the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Subsystem Thruster Fuel Valve Pilot Seal Extrusion: A Failure Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2003-01-01

    Pilot operated valves (POVs) are used to control the flow of hypergolic propellants monomethylhydrazine (fuel) and nitrogen tetroxide (oxidizer) to the Shuttle orbiter Primary Reaction Control Subsystem (PRCS) thrusters. The POV incorporates a two-stage design: a solenoid-actuated pilot stage, which in turn controls a pressure-actuated main stage. Isolation of propellant supply from the thruster chamber is accomplished in part by a captive polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) pilot seal retained inside a Custom 455.1 stainless steel cavity. Extrusion of the pilot seal restricts the flow of fuel around the pilot poppet, thus impeding or preventing the main valve stage from opening. It can also prevent the main stage from staying open with adequate force margin, particularly if there is gas in the main stage actuation cavity. During thruster operation on-orbit, fuel valve pilot seal extrusion is commonly indicated by low or erratic chamber pressure or failure of the thruster to fire upon command (Fail-Off). During ground turnaround, pilot seal extrusion is commonly indicated by slow gaseous nitrogen (GN2) main valve opening times (greater than 38 ms) or slow water main valve opening response times (greater than 33 ms). Poppet lift tests and visual inspection can also detect pilot seal extrusion during ground servicing; however, direct metrology on the pilot seat assembly provides the most quantitative and accurate means of identifying extrusion. Minimizing PRCS fuel valve pilot seal extrusion has become an important issue in the effort to improve PRCS reliability and reduce associated life cycle costs.

  14. Dynamics of activity free radical oxidation reactions in students with cerebral palsy results over the course of the educational process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova E.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of changes activity of reactions is studied freely radical oxidize for students with the consequences of child's cerebral paralysis. 20 students took part in an experiment. Found that the course of study they have more active free radical oxidation reactions and decreases the activity of antiradical protection. Given the use of additional physical activity in aerobic training indicators intracellular antioxidant defense system increased, decreased content of reaction products of lipid peroxidation. However, increased rates of maximum oxygen consumption and increased tolerance of students with cerebral palsy to the consequences of physical activity. It is set that the pathological changes of metabolism for students ground the necessity of application of the differentiated physical loadings. The optimum forms of physical rehabilitation of the aerobic training is the dosed walking, medical swimming, dosed after distance, sometimes and by the corner of getting up pedestrian ascents. Loading is increased due to a volume, but not intensity of exercises.

  15. Surface-Controlled Metal Oxide Resistive Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Ke, Jr-Jian

    2015-10-28

    To explore the surface effect on resistive random-access memory (ReRAM), the impact of surface roughness on the characteristics of ZnO ReRAM were studied. The thickness-independent resistance and the higher switching probability of ZnO ReRAM with rough surfaces indicate the importance of surface oxygen chemisorption on the switching process. Furthermore, the improvements in switching probability, switching voltage and resistance distribution observed for ReRAM with rough surfaces can be attributed to the stable oxygen adatoms under various ambience conditions. The findings validate the surface-controlled stability and uniformity of ReRAM and can serve as the guideline for developing practical device applications.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of the reactions between neutral vanadium oxide clusters and ethane, ethylene, and acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Heinbuch, Scott; Xie, Yan; Rocca, Jorge J; Bernstein, Elliot R; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Deng, Ke; He, Sheng-Gui

    2008-02-13

    Reactions of neutral vanadium oxide clusters with small hydrocarbons, namely C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2, are investigated by experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Single photon ionization through extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 46.9 nm, 26.5 eV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 118 nm, 10.5 eV) lasers is used to detect neutral cluster distributions and reaction products. The most stable vanadium oxide clusters VO2, V2O5, V3O7, V4O10, etc. tend to associate with C2H4 generating products V(m)O(n)C2H4. Oxygen-rich clusters VO3(V2O5)(n=0,1,2...), (e.g., VO3, V3O8, and V5O13) react with C2H4 molecules to cause a cleavage of the C=C bond of C2H4 to produce (V2O5)(n)VO2CH2 clusters. For the reactions of vanadium oxide clusters (V(m)O(n)) with C2H2 molecules, V(m)O(n)C2H2 are assigned as the major products of the association reactions. Additionally, a dehydration reaction for VO3 + C2H2 to produce VO2C2 is also identified. C2H6 molecules are quite stable toward reaction with neutral vanadium oxide clusters. Density functional theory calculations are employed to investigate association reactions for V2O5 + C2H(x). The observed relative reactivity of C2 hydrocarbons toward neutral vanadium oxide clusters is well interpreted by using the DFT calculated binding energies. DFT calculations of the pathways for VO3+C2H4 and VO3+C2H2 reaction systems indicate that the reactions VO3+C2H4 --> VO2CH2 + H2CO and VO3+C2H2 --> VO2C2 + H2O are thermodynamically favorable and overall barrierless at room temperature, in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. The Reaction Microscope: Imaging and Pulse Shaping Control in Photodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenborg, A.; Lehmann, C.S.; Irimia, D.; Roeterdink, W.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we review the current capabilities and potential of advanced single-particle imaging techniques to study photodynamics in isolated molecules. These reaction microscopes are able to measure the full three-dimensional energy and angular distribution of (correlated) particles such as electrons

  18. Kinetics of Several Oxygen-Containing Carbon-Centered Free Radical Reactions with Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Ihlenborg, Marvin; Pekkanen, Timo T; Timonen, Raimo S

    2015-07-16

    Kinetics of four carbon-centered, oxygen-containing free radical reactions with nitric oxide (NO) were investigated as a function of temperature at a few Torr pressure of helium, employing flow tube reactors coupled to a laser-photolysis/resonance-gas-discharge-lamp photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-RPIMS). Rate coefficients were directly determined from radical (R) decay signals under pseudo-first-order conditions ([R]0 ≪ [NO]). The obtained rate coefficients showed negative temperature dependences, typical for a radical-radical association process, and can be represented by the following parametrizations (all in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO) = (4.76 × 10(-21)) × (T/300 K)(15.92) × exp[50700/(RT)] (T = 266-363 K, p = 0.79-3.44 Torr); k(CH3CHOH + NO) = (1.27 × 10(-16)) × (T/300 K)(6.81) × exp[28700/(RT)] (T = 241-363 K, p = 0.52-3.43 Torr); k(CH3OCH2 + NO) = (3.58 ± 0.12) × 10(-12) × (T/300 K)(-3.17±0.14) (T = 221-363 K, p = 0.50-0.80 Torr); k(T)3 = 9.62 × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-5.99) × exp[-7100/(RT)] (T = 221-473 K, p = 1.41-2.95 Torr), with the uncertainties given as standard errors of the fits and the overall uncertainties estimated as ±20%. The rate of CH3OCH2 + NO reaction was measured in two density ranges due to its observed considerable pressure dependence, which was not found in the studied hydroxyalkyl reactions. In addition, the CH3CO + NO rate coefficient was determined at two temperatures resulting in k298K(CH3CO + NO) = (5.6 ± 2.8) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). No products were found during these experiments, reasons for which are briefly discussed.

  19. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-04-26

    With the increasing production of natural gas as a result of the advancement in the technology, methane conversion to more valuable products has become a must. One of the most attractive processes which allow the utilization of the world’s most abundant hydrocarbon is the oxidative coupling. The main advantage of this process is the ability of converting methane into higher paraffins and olefins (primarily C2) in a direct way using a single reactor. Nevertheless, low C2+ yields have prevented the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized in improving the catalysts’ performance. The reaction involves the formation of methyl radicals that undergo gas-phase radical reactions. CH4 activation is believed to be done the surface oxygen species. However, recent studies showed that, in addition to the surface oxygen mediated pathway, an OH radical mediated pathway have a large contribution on the CH4 activation. The experiments of Li/MgO, Sr/La2O3 and NaWO4/SiO2 catalysts revealed variation of behavior in activity and selectivity. In addition, water effect analysis showed that Li/MgO deactivate at the presence of water due to sintering phenomena and the loss of active sites. On the other hand, negative effect on the C2 yield and CH4 conversion rate was observed with Sr/La2O3 with increasing the water partial pressure. Na2WO4/SiO2 showed a positive behavior with water in terms of CH4 conversion and C2 yield. In addition, the increment in CH4 conversion rate was found to be proportional with PO2 ¼ PH2O ½ which is consistent with the formation of OH radicals and the OH-mediated pathway. Experiments of using ring-dye laser, which is used to detect OH in combustion experiments, were tried in order to detect OH radicals in the gas-phase of the catalyst. Nevertheless

  20. A General Strategy for Nanohybrids Synthesis via Coupled Competitive Reactions Controlled in a Hybrid Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rongming; Yang, Wantai; Song, Yuanjun; Shen, Xiaomiao; Wang, Junmei; Zhong, Xiaodi; Li, Shuai; Song, Yujun

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology based on core alloying and shell gradient-doping are developed for the synthesis of nanohybrids, realized by coupled competitive reactions, or sequenced reducing-nucleation and co-precipitation reaction of mixed metal salts in a microfluidic and batch-cooling process. The latent time of nucleation and the growth of nanohybrids can be well controlled due to the formation of controllable intermediates in the coupled competitive reactions. Thus, spatiotemporal-resolved synthesi...

  1. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Investigation of thermal conductivity and oxidation behaviour of reaction bonded aluminum nitride (RBAN) ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahi, E; Moztarzadeh, F.; Margoosian, V.; Heinrich, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    AlN samples have been produced by reaction bonding process using AlN and aluminum powders as starting materials. Different aluminum nitride and aluminum powders ratios were mixed in ethanol media, dried, isostatically and nitrided in (N 2 )atmosphere. Results showed that conversion of to AlN depends strongly on the amount of aluminum starting powder and decreased with increasing after a maximum at 25 Al wt %. Changing the particle size and morphology of the aluminum starting powder leads to change in the conversion ratio and microstructure of RBAN ceramics. Typical scanning electron micrographs of RBAN sample indicating primary and secondary aluminum nitride morphology and pore structure. The oxidation behavior of RABN samples showed the weight gain depends on the average particle size, morphology and amount of Al in starting mixture and pore structure. Samples have been manufactured with equi-axed morphology of Al starting powder have thermal conductivity higher than the samples have been manufactured with flake-like morphology. These differences were directly related to the different microstructure of RBAN samples

  3. New method for monitoring nitric oxide in vivo using microdialysis sampling and chemiluminescence reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dachun; Evmiridis, Nick P.; Zhou, Yikai; Xu, Shunqing; Zhou, Huarong

    2001-09-01

    A new method employing a combination of micro dialysis sampling and chemiluminescence reaction was developed to monitor nitric oxide (NO) in vivo. A special probe was designed with an interference-free membrane to achieve a very high selectivity for NO. High sensitivity was achieved by optimizing the working system and improving the NO sampling time. This system was used in vivo to monitor blood and brain tissue in rats and rabbits. We have established that this system is sensitive enough to detect variations in NO production in difference physiological state. The system can detect NO in the linear range of 5nM-1(mu) M, with a detection limit of 1nM, and real NO concentrations in our experimental animals were found to be in the range of 1-5 nM or even less. Finally, the effects of body temperature, NO donors, Viagra, NO activators, NO cofactors, NO interference were investigated carefully in different physiological situations.

  4. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-02-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2-based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology.

  5. Reactions of metal oxides with molten NaPO3 + NaCl mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarskaya, E.N.; Mityakhina, V.S.; Rodionov, Yu.I.; Silin, M.Yu.

    1988-01-01

    We consider the dissolution mechanism for iron (III), europium(III), and tin(IV) oxides in molten NaPO 3 + NaCl that are responsible for the peak solubilities. We chose Fe 2 O 3 as the basic material since this occurs in large amounts around damaged metal structures in rock salt mines in a proposed zone for storing vitrified radioactive wastes. Solubility measurement and paper chromatography show that Fe 2 O 3 dissolves in molten NaPO 3 + NaCl in air by reaction with the solvent to give double iron and sodium diphosphates and monophosphates in accordance with the initial solution-in-the-melt composition, the degree of equilibration, and the temperature. The elevated solubilities for initial NaCl contents close to 30 mole % are due to sodium triphosphates and tricyclophosphates present in these melts. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirms that double iron, europium and tin diphosphates and monophosphates containing sodium occur in these chloride-polyphosphate melts

  6. Design of an embedded inverse-feedforward biomolecular tracking controller for enzymatic reaction processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Mathias; Kim, Jongrae; Sawlekar, Rucha; Bates, Declan G

    2017-04-06

    Feedback control is widely used in chemical engineering to improve the performance and robustness of chemical processes. Feedback controllers require a 'subtractor' that is able to compute the error between the process output and the reference signal. In the case of embedded biomolecular control circuits, subtractors designed using standard chemical reaction network theory can only realise one-sided subtraction, rendering standard controller design approaches inadequate. Here, we show how a biomolecular controller that allows tracking of required changes in the outputs of enzymatic reaction processes can be designed and implemented within the framework of chemical reaction network theory. The controller architecture employs an inversion-based feedforward controller that compensates for the limitations of the one-sided subtractor that generates the error signals for a feedback controller. The proposed approach requires significantly fewer chemical reactions to implement than alternative designs, and should have wide applicability throughout the fields of synthetic biology and biological engineering.

  7. Controls of nitrous oxide emission after simulated cattle urine deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baral, Khagendra Raj; Thomsen, Anton Gårde; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    Urine deposited during grazing is a significant source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential for N2O emissions from urine patches is high, and a better understanding of controls is needed. This study investigated soil nitrogen (N) dynamics and N2O emissions from cattle urine...

  8. Oxidation Characteristics and Electrical Properties of Doped Mn-Co Spinel Reaction Layer for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Metal Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingyi Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To prevent Cr poisoning of the cathode and to retain high conductivity during solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC operation, Cu or La doped Co-Mn coatings on a metallic interconnect is deposited and followed by oxidation at 750 °C. Microstructure and composition of coatings after preparation and oxidation is analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. High energy micro arc alloying process, a low cost technique, is used to prepare Cu or La doped Co-Mn coatings with the metallurgical bond. When coatings oxidized at 750 °C in air for 20 h and 100 h, Co3O4 is the main oxide on the surface of Co-38Mn-2La and Co-40Mn coatings, and (Co,Mn3O4 spinel continues to grow with extended oxidation time. The outmost scales of Co-33Mn-17Cu are mainly composed of cubic MnCo2O4 spinel with Mn2O3 after oxidation for 20 h and 100 h. The average thickness of oxide coatings is about 60–70 μm after oxidation for 100 h, except that Co-40Mn oxide coatings are a little thicker. Area-specific resistance of Cu/La doped Co-Mn coatings are lower than that of Co-40Mn coating. (Mn,Co3O4/MnCo2O4 spinel layer is efficient at blocking the outward diffusion of chromium and iron.

  9. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  10. Reaction of low-molecular-mass organoselenium compounds (and their sulphur analogues) with inflammation-associated oxidants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, L.; Davies, Michael J.; Pattison, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in mammals, with the majority specifically encoded as seleno-L-cysteine into a range of selenoproteins. Many of these proteins play a key role in modulating oxidative stress, via either direct detoxification of biological oxidants, or repair of oxidised...... the chemistry of low-molecular-mass organoselenium compounds (e.g. selenoethers, diselenides and selenols) with inflammatory oxidants, with a particular focus on the reaction kinetics and product studies, with the differences in reactivity between selenium and sulphur analogues described in the selected...... examples. These data provide insight into the therapeutic potential of low-molecular-mass selenium-containing compounds to modulate the activity of both radical and molecular oxidants and provide protection against inflammation-induced damage. Progress in their therapeutic development (including modulation...

  11. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya; Raj, Abhijeet; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics

  12. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  13. Reaction-diffusion controlled growth of complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorduin, Willem; Mahadevan, L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how the emergence of complex forms and shapes in biominerals came about is both of fundamental and practical interest. Although biomineralization processes and organization strategies to give higher order architectures have been studied extensively, synthetic approaches to mimic these self-assembled structures are highly complex and have been difficult to emulate, let alone replicate. The emergence of solution patterns has been found in reaction-diffusion systems such as Turing patterns and the BZ reaction. Intrigued by this spontaneous formation of complexity we explored if similar processes can lead to patterns in the solid state. We here identify a reaction-diffusion system in which the shape of the solidified products is a direct readout of the environmental conditions. Based on insights in the underlying mechanism, we developed a toolbox of engineering strategies to deterministically sculpt patterns and shapes, and combine different morphologies to create a landscape of hierarchical multi scale-complex tectonic architectures with unprecedented levels of complexity. These findings may hold profound implications for understanding, mimicking and ultimately expanding upon nature's morphogenesis strategies, allowing the synthesis of advanced highly complex microscale materials and devices. WLN acknowledges the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for financial support

  14. Fabrication of dendritic silver-coated copper powders by galvanic displacement reaction and their thermal stability against oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yu-Seon [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Farad Materials Co., Ltd., Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); An, Chang Yong; Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Seo, Nary [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Zhuo, Kai [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Farad Materials Co., Ltd., Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Tae Kyong [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chan-Hwa, E-mail: chchung@skku.edu [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Farad Materials Co., Ltd., Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The dendritic silver-coated copper powders with high specific surface area have been prepared using a simple wet chemical reduction process at room temperature. • It is found that the Cu starts to be oxidized into Cu{sub 2}O followed by CuO at elevated temperatures. • The more amount of Ag-coating provides the less oxidation, which confirms that the Ag-shell prevents the Cu-core from oxidation. • The resistivity of dendritic 33.27 wt.% Ag-coated Cu powders was measured to 25.67 μΩ cm after the annealing at 150 °C for 30 min. - Abstract: Two steps of wet chemical processes have been developed for the preparation of core-shell nanostructures of copper and silver, which is a facile and low cost method for the production of large quantity of dendritic powders. First step involves a galvanic displacement reaction with hydrogen evolution which is the motive force of spontaneous electrochemical reaction. To achieve the core-shell structure, silver has been coated on the dendritic copper using the galvanic displacement reaction. The dendritic silver-coated copper powders exhibit high surface-area, excellent conductivity, and good oxidation resistance. It has been found that silver-coated copper powders maintain the electrical conductivity even after annealing at 150 °C for several to tens of minutes, thus it is a promising material and an alternative to pure silver powders in printed electronics application.

  15. Fabrication of dendritic silver-coated copper powders by galvanic displacement reaction and their thermal stability against oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yu-Seon; An, Chang Yong; Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Seo, Nary; Zhuo, Kai; Yoo, Tae Kyong; Chung, Chan-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The dendritic silver-coated copper powders with high specific surface area have been prepared using a simple wet chemical reduction process at room temperature. • It is found that the Cu starts to be oxidized into Cu_2O followed by CuO at elevated temperatures. • The more amount of Ag-coating provides the less oxidation, which confirms that the Ag-shell prevents the Cu-core from oxidation. • The resistivity of dendritic 33.27 wt.% Ag-coated Cu powders was measured to 25.67 μΩ cm after the annealing at 150 °C for 30 min. - Abstract: Two steps of wet chemical processes have been developed for the preparation of core-shell nanostructures of copper and silver, which is a facile and low cost method for the production of large quantity of dendritic powders. First step involves a galvanic displacement reaction with hydrogen evolution which is the motive force of spontaneous electrochemical reaction. To achieve the core-shell structure, silver has been coated on the dendritic copper using the galvanic displacement reaction. The dendritic silver-coated copper powders exhibit high surface-area, excellent conductivity, and good oxidation resistance. It has been found that silver-coated copper powders maintain the electrical conductivity even after annealing at 150 °C for several to tens of minutes, thus it is a promising material and an alternative to pure silver powders in printed electronics application.

  16. Nitric oxide reduction in coal combustion: role of char surface complexes in heterogeneous reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-12-15

    Nitrogen oxides are one of the major environmental problems arising from fossil fuel combustion. Coal char is relatively rich in nitrogen, and so this is an important source of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. However, due to its carbonaceous nature, char can also reduce NO through heterogeneous reduction. The objectives of this work were on one hand to compare NO emissions from coal combustion in two different types of equipment and on the other hand to study the influence of char surface chemistry on NO reduction. A series of combustion tests were carried out in two different scale devices: a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer and an FTIR (TG-MS-FTIR) and a fluidized bed reactor with on-line battery of analyzers. According to the results obtained, it can be said that the TG-MS-FTIR system provides valuable information about NO heterogeneous reduction and it can give good trends of the behaviour in other combustion equipments, i.e. fluidized bed combustors. It has been also pointed out that NO-char interaction depends to a large extent on temperature. In the low-temperature range NO heterogeneous reduction seems to be controlled by the evolution of surface complexes. In the high-temperature range a different mechanism is involved in NO heterogeneous reduction, the nature of the carbon matrix being a key factor. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Electrochemical Deposition of Platinum and Palladium on Gold Nanoparticles Loaded Carbon Nanotube Support for Oxidation Reactions in Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surin Saipanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pt and Pd sequentially electrodeposited Au nanoparticles loaded carbon nanotube (Au-CNT was prepared for the electrocatalytic study of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid oxidations. All electrochemical measurements were carried out in a three-electrode cell. A platinum wire and Ag/AgCl were used as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. Suspension of the Au-CNT, phosphate buffer, isopropanol, and Nafion was mixed and dropped on glassy carbon as a working electrode. By sequential deposition method, PdPtPt/Au-CNT, PtPdPd/Au-CNT, and PtPdPt/Au-CNT catalysts were prepared. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs of those catalysts in 1 M H2SO4 solution showed hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen desorption reactions. CV responses for those three catalysts in methanol, ethanol, and formic acid electrooxidations studied in 2 M CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and HCOOH in 1 M H2SO4 show characteristic oxidation peaks. The oxidation peaks at anodic scan contribute to those organic substance oxidations while the peaks at cathodic scan are related with the reoxidation of the adsorbed carbonaceous species. Comparing all those three catalysts, it can be found that the PdPtPt/Au-CNT catalyst is good at methanol oxidation; the PtPdPt/Au-CNT effectively enhances ethanol oxidation while the PtPdPd/Au-CNT exceptionally catalyzes formic acid oxidation. Therefore, a different stoichiometry affects the electrochemical active surface area of the catalysts to achieve the catalytic oxidation reactions.

  18. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  19. Effects of reaction temperature and inlet oxidizing gas flow rate on IG-110 graphite oxidation used in HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ximing; Dong Yujie; Zhou Yangping; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Zhang Zuoyi; Li Zhengcao

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a selected nuclear graphite (IG-110) used in Pebble-bed Module High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor was investigated under the condition of air ingress accident. The oblate rectangular specimen was oxidized by oxidant gas with oxygen mole fraction of 20% and flow rates of 125–500 ml/min at temperature of 400–1200°C. Experiment results indicate that the oxidation behavior can also be classified into three regimes according to temperature. The regime I at 400–550°C has lower apparent activation energies of 75.57–138.59 kJ/mol when the gas flow rate is 125–500 ml/min. In the regime II at 600–900°C, the oxidation rate restricted by the oxygen supply to graphite is almost stable with the increase of temperature. In the regime III above 900°C, the oxidation rate increases obviously with the increase of temperature.With the increase of inlet gas flow from 125 to 500 ml/min, the apparent activation energy in regime I is increased and the stableness of oxidation rate in regime II is reduced. (author)

  20. Reaction of oxygen with γ, δ-ethylenic phenylhydrazones. Model reaction of end-group behavior in phenylhydrazine-accelerated oxidation of natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hamdaoui, A.; Reyx, D.; Campistron, I.

    1995-01-01

    An accurate definition of terminal groups of chains in the liquid polymers obtained by the phenylhydrazine-accelerated oxidation of natural rubber is needed. The object of the work was to use model molecules to explore the behavior of γ,δ-ethylenic methylketone phenylhydrazone end-groups in oxidation conditions. We have investigated the synthesis and characterization of models of these hypothetical end-groups, methylketones and phenones 1, their phenylhydrazones 2, the α-(phenyldiazenyl)hydroperoxides 3 resulting from reaction of 2 with oxygen, and the α-(phenyldiazenyl)alcohols 4 as characteristic derivatives of 3 or as models of possible reduced structures in oxidized liquid natural rubber. Three original syntheses of γ,δ-ethylenic ketones were carried out. In the case of γ,δ-ethylenic phenylhydrazones, the oxidation led to the expected α-(phenyldiazenyl)hydroperoxides and to epoxide derivatives of α-(phenyldiazenyl)alcohols 5 and ketones 6. An intramolecular mechanism is proposed. The results are used to predict the possibilities of identification of the corresponding end-groups in liquid rubbers produced in this way. (authors). 16 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study on the chlorination of uranium oxide by gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.; Park, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine the operating condition of an uranium chlorination process with U 3 O 8 -C-Cl 2 system, the experimental conditions have been evaluated preliminarily by the thermochemical analysis and experimentally confirmed in this study. The dry-type chlorination of U 3 O 8 occurs as irreversible and exothermic reaction and produces many kinds of chloride compounds such as UCl 3 , UCl 4 , UCl 5 , and UCl 6 in the air and humidity controlled argon environment. Taking account of Gibbs free energy and vapor pressure for various chloride compounds, the proper temperature range of chlorination appears to be 863 to 953 K in aspects of increasing reaction rate and the yield of nonvolatile product. In the course of the experimental confirmation the powder of U 3 O 8 is perfectly converted into uranium chlorides within 4 hours above 863 K, and then the maximum fraction of uranium chloride remaining in the reactor is about 30% of total conversion mass. (author)

  2. Pt-Richcore/Sn-Richsubsurface/Ptskin Nanocubes As Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, Rubén; Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Padgett, Elliot; Muller, David A; Lázaro, Ma Jesús; Solla-Gullón, José; Feliu, Juan M; Pastor, Elena; Abruña, Héctor D

    2018-03-14

    Direct ethanol fuel cells are one of the most promising electrochemical energy conversion devices for portable, mobile and stationary power applications. However, more efficient and stable and less expensive electrocatalysts are still required. Interestingly, the electrochemical performance of the electrocatalysts toward the ethanol oxidation reaction can be remarkably enhanced by exploiting the benefits of structural and compositional sensitivity and control. Here, we describe the synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical behavior of cubic Pt-Sn nanoparticles. The electrochemical activity of the cubic Pt-Sn nanoparticles was found to be about three times higher than that obtained with unshaped Pt-Sn nanoparticles and six times higher than that of Pt nanocubes. In addition, stability tests indicated the electrocatalyst preserves its morphology and remains well-dispersed on the carbon support after 5000 potential cycles, while a cubic (pure) Pt catalyst exhibited severe agglomeration of the nanoparticles after a similar stability testing protocol. A detailed analysis of the elemental distribution in the nanoparticles by STEM-EELS indicated that Sn dissolves from the outer part of the shell after potential cycling, forming a ∼0.5 nm Pt skin. This particular atomic composition profile having a Pt-rich core, a Sn-rich subsurface layer, and a Pt-skin surface structure is responsible for the high activity and stability.

  3. Effects of grain boundaries at the electrolyte/cathode interfaces on oxygen reduction reaction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Gi; Koo, Ja Yang; Ahn, Min Woo; Lee, Won Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    We systematically investigated the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) at the electrolyte/cathode interface of two conventional electrolyte materials, i.e., yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC). We deposited additional layers by pulsed laser deposition to control the GB density on top of the polycrystalline substrates, obtaining significant improvements in peak power density (two-fold for YSZ and three-fold for GDC). The enhanced performance at high GB density in the additional layer could be ascribed to the accumulation of oxygen vacancies, which are known to be more active sites for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) than grain cores. GDC exhibited a higher enhancement than YSZ, due to the easier formation, and thus higher concentration, of oxygen vacancies for ORR. The strong relation between the concentration of oxygen vacancies and the surface exchange characteristics substantiated the role of GBs at electrolyte/cathode interfaces on ORR kinetics, providing new design parameters for highly performing solid oxide fuel cells.

  4. Synthesis of a highly active carbon-supported Ir-V/C catalyst for the hydrogen oxidation reaction in PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bing; Qiao Jinli; Yang Daijun; Zheng Junsheng; Ma Jianxin; Zhang Jiujun; Wang Haijiang

    2009-01-01

    The active, carbon-supported Ir and Ir-V nanoclusters with well-controlled particle size, dispersity, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized via an ethylene glycol method using IrCl 3 and NH 4 VO 3 as the Ir and V precursors. The nanostructured catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The catalytic activities of these carbon-supported nanoclusters were screened by applying on-line cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques, which were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of fuel cells using several anode Ir/C and Ir-V/C catalysts. It was found that Ir/C and Ir-V/C catalysts affect the performance of electrocatalysts significantly based on the discharge characteristics of the fuel cell. The catalyst Ir-V/C at 40 wt.% displayed the highest catalytic activity to hydrogen oxidation reaction and, therefore, high cell performance is achieved which results in a maximum power density of 563 mW cm -2 at 0.512 V and 70 deg. C in a real H 2 /air fuel cell. This performance is 20% higher as compared to the commercial available Pt/C catalyst. Fuel cell life test at a constant current density of 1000 mA cm -2 in a H 2 /O 2 condition shows good stability of anode Ir-V/C after 100 h of continuous operation.

  5. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yuefei [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Kong, Deyang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Nanjing 210042 (China); Lu, Junhe, E-mail: jhlu@njau.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A. • Phenolic moiety was the reactive site for sulfate radical attack. • Pathways include β-scission, oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. • Brominated disinfection by-products were found during TBBPA degradation. • Humic acid inhibited TBBPA degradation but promoted DBPs formation. - Abstract: Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27 × 10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}. Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6–10 h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health.

  6. OXIDATIVE-REFORMING OF METHANE AND PARTIAL OXIDATION OF METHANE REACTIONS OVER NiO/PrO2/ZrO2 CATALYSTS: EFFECT OF NICKEL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. O. Asencios

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work the behavior of NiO-PrO2-ZrO2 catalysts containing various nickel loadings was evaluated in the partial oxidation of methane and oxidative-reforming reactions of methane. The catalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction Analysis (in situ-XRD, Temperature Programmed Reduction (H2-TPR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDX and Adsorption-Desorption of nitrogen (BET area. The reactions were carried out at 750 °C and 1 atm for 5 hours. The catalysts were studied with different nickel content: 0, 5, 10 and 15% (related to total weight of catalyst, wt%. In both reactions, the catalyst containing the mixture of the three oxides (NiO/PrO2/ZrO2 with 15% nickel (15NiPrZr catalyst showed the best activity for the conversion of the reactants into Syngas and showed high selectivity for H2 and CO. The results suggest that the promoter PrO2 and the Niº centers are in a good proportion in the catalyst with 15% Ni. Our results showed that low nickel concentrations in the catalyst led to high metallic dispersion; however, very low nickel concentrations did not favor the methane transformation into Syngas. The catalyst containing only NiO/ZrO2 in the mixture was not sufficient for the catalysis. The presence of the promoter PrO2 was very important for the catalysis of the POM.

  7. Use of high temperature thermogravimetry for the determination of oxidation, reduction, corrosion-type reactions kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, Luc; Bancel, Fabrice; Setaram

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Thermogravimetry is a very powerful technique for the investigation of gas-solid interactions, by measuring the amount of gas adsorbed on the sample or desorbed from the sample. According to the type of interaction, this amount of gas can be very small, that means that the detection of the mass variation can be very difficult to achieve. This is especially the case for certain types of oxidation, reduction and corrosion reactions in the field of metallic and ceramic materials. The good configuration for such kinetic studies is a hanged up sample, to get every face of the sample in contact with the atmosphere. In order to improve the thermogravimetric measurement, two ways can be used: increase the sample mass and especially its area, second use a symmetrical balance. As the gas-solid interaction is adsorption or desorption-type, the area of the sample is one very important parameter. For such a determination, it is important to increase as much as possible this area, that means increasing the sample size and mass. By increasing the contact area for the gas interaction, the accuracy of such a thermogravimetric measurement is largely improved. This design is very convenient for any metallic or ceramic sample that can be directly hung to the balance, without using any container. The second way of improving the test is to use a symmetrical thermogravimetric design. If the variation of mass is too weak to be measured (some micrograms for example), a symmetrical design has to be used. In such a system, a sample and a reference are hung at each beam of the balance, in two identical furnaces. Such a symmetrical technique allows to compensate the buoyancy effect that is identical on both sides. The limit of detection of the thermogravimetric measure is largely improved, allowing accurate measurements on very small variations of mass for long term basis experiments. An example of oxidation of a plate of steel at 500 celsius degree, with a slow mass gain of 1.5

  8. Insights into the Halogen Oxidative Addition Reaction to Dinuclear Gold(I) Di(NHC) Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Baron, Marco

    2016-06-14

    Gold(I) dicarbene complexes [Au2(MeIm-Y-ImMe)2](PF6)2(Y=CH2(1), (CH2)2(2), (CH2)4(4), MeIm=1-methylimidazol-2-ylidene) react with iodine to give the mixed-valence complex [Au(MeIm-CH2-ImMe)2AuI2](PF6)2(1 aI) and the gold(III) complexes [Au2I4(MeIm-Y-ImMe)2](PF6)2(2 cIand 4 cI). Reaction of complexes 1 and 2 with an excess of ICl allows the isolation of the tetrachloro gold(III) complexes [Au2Cl4(MeIm-CH2-ImMe)2](PF6)2(1 cCl) and [Au2Cl4(MeIm-(CH2)2-ImMe)2](Cl)2(2 cCl-Cl) (as main product); remarkably in the case of complex 2, the X-ray molecular structure of the crystals also shows the presence of I-Au-Cl mixed-sphere coordination. The same type of coordination has been observed in the main product of the reaction of complexes 3 or 4 with ICl. The study of the reactivity towards the oxidative addition of halogens to a large series of dinuclear bis(dicarbene) gold(I) complexes has been extended and reviewed. The complexes react with Cl2, Br2and I2to give the successive formation of the mixed-valence gold(I)/gold(III) n aXand gold(III) n cX(excluding compound 1 cI) complexes. However, complex 3 affords with Cl2and Br2the gold(II) complex 3 bX[Au2X2(MeIm-(CH2)3-ImMe)2](PF6)2(X=Cl, Br), which is the predominant species over compound 3 cXeven in the presence of free halogen. The observed different relative stabilities of the oxidised complexes of compounds 1 and 3 have also been confirmed by DFT calculations. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Three Rate-Constant Kinetic Model for Permanganate Reactions Autocatalyzed by Colloidal Manganese Dioxide: The Oxidation of L-Phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F; Ferrando, Jordi

    2014-12-26

    The reduction of permanganate ion to MnO(2)-Mn(2)O(3) soluble colloidal mixed oxide by l-phenylalanine in aqueous phosphate-buffered neutral solutions has been followed by a spectrophotometric method, monitoring the decay of permanganate ion at 525 nm and the formation of the colloidal oxide at 420 nm. The reaction is autocatalyzed by the manganese product, and three rate constants have been required to fit the experimental absorbance-time kinetic data. The reaction shows base catalysis, and the values of the activation parameters at different pHs have been determined. A mechanism including both the nonautocatalytic and the autocatalytic reaction pathways, and in agreement with the available experimental data, has been proposed. Some key features of this mechanism are the following: (i) of the two predominant forms of the amino acid, the anionic form exhibits a stronger reducing power than the zwitterionic form; (ii) the nonautocatalytic reaction pathway starts with the transfer of the hydrogen atom in the α position of the amino acid to permanganate ion; and (iii) the autocatalytic reaction pathway involves the reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) by the amino acid and the posterior reoxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV) by permanganate ion.

  10. Preparation, Characterization and NO-CO Redox Reaction Studies over Palladium and Rhodium Oxides Supported on Manganese Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Fal Desai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of PdO/MnO2 and Rh2O3/MnO2 is investigated for NO-CO redox reaction. Supported catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation method. Among the tested catalysts, PdO/MnO2 shows higher activity for this reaction. Active metal dispersion on MnO2 enhances the selectivity for N2 over N2O in this reaction. The XRD substantiate the formation of MnO2 monophasic phase. SEM images show the formation of elongated particles. TEM images indicate nano-size rod-like morphologies. An increase in the catalytic activity is observed on supported Pd and Rh oxides on MnO2. Temperature programed desorption studies with NO and CO are undertaken to investigate the catalytic surface studies. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 22nd November 2014; Revised: 31st December 2014; Accepted: 2nd January 2015How to Cite: Fal Desai, M.S., Kunkalekar, R.K., Salker, A.V. (2015. Preparation, Characterization and NO-CO Redox Reaction Studies over Palladium and Rhodium Oxides Supported on Manganese Dioxide. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 98-103. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7802.98-103Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7802.98-103 

  11. Rapid Synthesis of Lead Oxide Nanorods by One-step Solid-state Chemical Reaction at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO, Ya-Li(曹亚丽); JIA, Dian-Zeng(贾殿赠); LIU, Lang(刘浪); LUO, Jian-Min(骆建敏)

    2004-01-01

    A simple and facile method was reported to synthesize lead oxide nanorods. Nanorods of lead oxide were obtained directly from grinding solid metal salt and sodium hydroxide in agate mortar with the assistance of a suitable nonionic surfactant in only one step, which is different from the result of hydroxide in solution. The product has been characterized by XRD, TEM and SEM. The formation mechanism of rod-like morphology is discussed and the surfactant plays an important soft-template role in modifying the interface of solid-state reaction and according process of rod-formation.

  12. Preparation of Cu@Cu2O Nanocatalysts by Reduction of HKUST-1 for Oxidation Reaction of Catechol

    OpenAIRE

    Seongwan Jang; Chohye Yoon; Jae Myung Lee; Sungkyun Park; Kang Hyun Park

    2016-01-01

    HKUST-1, a copper-based metal organic framework (MOF), has been investigated as a catalyst in various reactions. However, the HKUST-1 shows low catalytic activity in the oxidation of catechol. Therefore, we synthesized Fe3O4@HKUST-1 by layer-by layer assembly strategy and Cu@Cu2O by reduction of HKUST-1 for enhancement of catalytic activity. Cu@Cu2O nanoparticles exhibited highly effective catalytic activity in oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Through this method, MOF can maintain the ...

  13. A Fluorescent Molecular Probe for the Detection of Hydrogen Based on Oxidative Addition Reactions with Crabtree-Type Hydrogenation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Pavlo; Plenio, Herbert

    2015-11-02

    A Crabtree-type Ir(I) complex tagged with a fluorescent dye (bodipy) was synthesized. The oxidative addition of H2 converts the weakly fluorescent Ir(I) complex (Φ=0.038) into a highly fluorescent Ir(III) species (Φ=0.51). This fluorogenic reaction can be utilized for the detection of H2 and to probe the oxidative addition step in the catalytic hydrogenation of olefins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Assessment of nitric oxide (NO) redox reactions contribution to nitrous oxide (N2 O) formation during nitrification using a multispecies metabolic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Chandran, Kartik; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-05-01

    Over the coming decades nitrous oxide (N2O) is expected to become a dominant greenhouse gas and atmospheric ozone depleting substance. In wastewater treatment systems, N2O is majorly produced by nitrifying microbes through biochemical reduction of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitric oxide (NO). However it is unknown if the amount of N2O formed is affected by alternative NO redox reactions catalyzed by oxidative nitrite oxidoreductase (NirK), cytochromes (i.e., P460 [CytP460] and 554 [Cyt554 ]) and flavohemoglobins (Hmp) in ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and NOB, respectively). In this study, a mathematical model is developed to assess how N2O formation is affected by such alternative nitrogen redox transformations. The developed multispecies metabolic network model captures the nitrogen respiratory pathways inferred from genomes of eight AOB and NOB species. The performance of model variants, obtained as different combinations of active NO redox reactions, was assessed against nine experimental datasets for nitrifying cultures producing N2O at different concentration of electron donor and acceptor. Model predicted metabolic fluxes show that only variants that included NO oxidation to NO2(-) by CytP460 and Hmp in AOB gave statistically similar estimates to observed production rates of N2O, NO, NO2(-) and nitrate (NO3(-)), together with fractions of AOB and NOB species in biomass. Simulations showed that NO oxidation to NO2(-) decreased N2O formation by 60% without changing culture's NO2(-) production rate. Model variants including NO reduction to N2O by Cyt554 and cNor in NOB did not improve the accuracy of experimental datasets estimates, suggesting null N2O production by NOB during nitrification. Finally, the analysis shows that in nitrifying cultures transitioning from dissolved oxygen levels above 3.8 ± 0.38 to <1.5 ± 0.8 mg/L, NOB cells can oxidize the NO produced by AOB through reactions catalyzed by oxidative NirK. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sensitivity of nitrogen dioxide concentrations to oxides of nitrogen controls in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, J.

    2001-01-01

    There is a possibility of further controls on emissions to the atmosphere of nitrogen dioxides to meet air quality objectives in the UK. Data in the National Air Quality Archive were used to calculate the likely sensitivity of hourly concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in ambient urban air to changes in the total oxides of nitrogen. Since the role of atmospheric chemical reactions is to make the responses non-linearly dependent on the emissions control, we seek to establish the magnitude and sign of the effects that this non-linearity might cause. We develop a quantitative approach to analysing the non-linearity in the data. Polynomial fits have been developed for the empirical ratio NO 2 :NO x (the 'yield'). They describe nitrogen dioxide concentrations using total oxides of nitrogen. The new functions have the important feature of increased yield in winter episodes. Simpler functions tend to omit this feature of the yields at the highest hourly concentrations. Based on this study, the hourly nitrogen dioxide objective in the UK may require emissions control of no more than about 50% on total oxides of nitrogen at the most polluted sites: other sites require less or even no control. (Author)

  16. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  17. A sustainable process to utilize ferrous sulfate waste from titanium oxide industry by reductive decomposition reaction with pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Penghui; Deng, Shaogang; Zhang, Zhiye; Wang, Xinlong; Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Xiushan; Yang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A newly developed treating process of ferrous sulfate was proposed. • The reaction process was discussed by thermodynamic analysis. • Thermodynamic analysis was compared with experiments results. • The kinetic model of the decomposition reaction was determined. • The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions was explored. - Abstract: Ferrous sulfate waste has become a bottleneck in the sustainable development of the titanium dioxide industry in China. In this study, we propose a new method for the reductive decomposition of ferrous sulfate waste using pyrite. Thermodynamics analysis, tubular reactor experiments, and kinetics analysis were performed to analyze the reaction process. The results of the thermodynamic simulation showed that the reaction process and products were different when molar ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was changed. The suitable molar ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was 8–12. The reaction temperature of ferrous sulfate with pyrite was 580–770 K and the main products were Fe_3O_4 and SO_2. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results. The desulphurization rate reached 98.55% and main solid products were Fe_3O_4 at 823.15 K when mole ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was 8. Nano-sized magnetite was obtained at this condition. The kinetic model was investigated by isoconversional methods. The average E value was 244.34 kJ mol"−"1. The ferrous sulfate decomposition process can be treated as autocatalytic reaction mechanism, which corresponded to the expanded Prout–Tompson (Bna) model. The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions during the process of ferrous sulfate decomposition were explored, the products of Fe oxide substances are the catalyst components.

  18. Development of New Oxidation Reactions and Their Application to Natural Product Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-ichi Matsuo

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction In recent years, the structures of target molecules in organic synthesis are becoming more complicated, so betterfunctional compatibility and higher selectivity are required for the efficient oxidation. In this regard,conventional oxidants do not always satisfy such requirements; therefore, exploration of new oxidizing agents is worth challenging.

  19. Pulse radiolysis investigations on oxidation reactions of bilirubin in aqueous solutions (Preprint No. RC-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Hari; Gopinathan, C.

    1988-02-01

    The oxidation of bilirubin in aqueous solutions have been investigated by different oxidizing species such as CH 3 I.OH, Br 2 - and CO 3 - . The rate constant for the oxidation of bilirubin has been determined from the formation kinetics of bilirubin cations. (author). 3 refs

  20. Geochemical controls on shale groundwaters: Results of reaction path modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.; VandenBrook, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The EQ3NR/EQ6 geochemical modeling code was used to simulate the reaction of several shale mineralogies with different groundwater compositions in order to elucidate changes that may occur in both the groundwater compositions, and rock mineralogies and compositions under conditions which may be encountered in a high-level radioactive waste repository. Shales with primarily illitic or smectitic compositions were the focus of this study. The reactions were run at the ambient temperatures of the groundwaters and to temperatures as high as 250/degree/C, the approximate temperature maximum expected in a repository. All modeling assumed that equilibrium was achieved and treated the rock and water assemblage as a closed system. Graphite was used as a proxy mineral for organic matter in the shales. The results show that the presence of even a very small amount of reducing mineral has a large influence on the redox state of the groundwaters, and that either pyrite or graphite provides essentially the same results, with slight differences in dissolved C, Fe and S concentrations. The thermodynamic data base is inadequate at the present time to fully evaluate the speciation of dissolved carbon, due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for organic compounds. In the illitic cases the groundwaters resulting from interaction at elevated temperatures are acid, while the smectitic cases remain alkaline, although the final equilibrium mineral assemblages are quite similar. 10 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  1. Carbon monoxide gas sensing using zinc oxide deposited by successive ionic layer adhesion and reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florido, E. A.; Dagaas, N. A. C.

    2017-05-01

    This study was aimed to determine the carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing capability of zinc oxide (ZnO) film fabricated by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) on glass substrate. Films consisting of a mixture of flower-like clusters of ZnO nanorods and nanowires were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Current-voltage characterization of the samples showed an average resistivity of 13.0 Ω-m. Carbon monoxide gas was synthesized by mixing the required amount of formic acid and excess sulfuric acid to produce CO gas concentrations of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 parts per million (ppm) v/v with five trials for each concentration. Two sets of data were obtained. One set consisted of the voltage response of the single film sensor while the other set were obtained from the double film sensor. The voltage response for the single film sensor and the double film sensor showed an average sensitivity of 0.0038 volts per ppm and 0.0024 volts per ppm, respectively. The concentration the single film can detect with a 2V output is 526 ppm while the double film sensor can detect up to 833 ppm with a 2V output. This shows that using the double film sensor is advantageous compared to single film sensor, because of its higher concentration range due to the larger surface area for the gas to interact. Moreover, the measured average resistance for the single film sensor was 10 MΩ while for the double film sensor the average resistance was 5 MΩ.

  2. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela; Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Qureshi, Muhammad; Dhawale, Dattatray Sadashiv; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER

  3. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nano-crystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nano-crystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nano-crystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nano-dots (ca. 4 nm) and nano-rods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised. (authors)

  4. Valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shijing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Boping, E-mail: bpzhang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao Cuihua; Li Songjie; Zhang Meixia; Yan Liping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The cobalt oxide (CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were successfully prepared using a spin-coating technique by a chemical solution method with CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH and Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O as starting materials. The grayish cobalt oxide films had uniform crystalline grains with less than 50 nm in diameter. The phase structure is able to tailor by controlling the annealing atmosphere and temperature, in which Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin film was obtained by annealing in air at 300-600, and N{sub 2} at 300, and transferred to CoO thin film by raising annealing temperature in N{sub 2}. The fitted X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the Co2p electrons are distinguishable from different valence states of cobalt oxide especially for their satellite structure. The valence control of cobalt oxide thin films by annealing atmosphere contributes to the tailored optical absorption property.

  5. Controlled synthesis and electrochemical properties of vanadium oxides with different nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yifu; Zhou, Min; Huang, Chi; Chen, Chongxue; Cao, Yuliang; Fan, Meijuan; Li, Houbin; Liu, Xinghai; Xie, Guangyong

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium oxides (V 3 O 7 .H 2 O and VO 2 ) with different morphologies have been selectively synthesized by a facile hydrothermal approach using glucose as the reducing and structure-directing reagent. The as-obtained V 3 O 7 .H 2 O nanobelts have a length up to several tens of micrometers, width of about 60-150 nm and thickness of about 5-10 nm, while the as-prepared VO 2 (B) nanobelts have a length of about 1.0- 7 μm, width, 80-140 nm and thickness, 2-8 nm. It was found that the quantity of glucose, the reaction temperature and the reaction time had significant influence on the compositions and morphologies of final products. Vanadium oxides with different morphologies were easily synthesized by controlling the concentration of glucose. The formation mechanism was also briefly discussed, indicating that glucose played different roles in synthesizing various vanadium oxides. The phase transition from VO 2 (B) to VO 2 (M) were investigated and the phase transition temperature of the VO 2 (M) appeared at around 68 deg C. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of V 3 O 7 .H 2 O nanobelts, VO 2 (B) nanobelts and VO 2 (B) nanosheets were investigated and they exhibited a high initial discharge capacity of 296, 247 and 227 mAh/g, respectively. (author)

  6. On the nature of organic and inorganic centers that bifurcate electrons, coupling exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John W; Beratan, David N; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W

    2018-04-19

    Bifurcating electrons to couple endergonic and exergonic electron-transfer reactions has been shown to have a key role in energy conserving redox enzymes. Bifurcating enzymes require a redox center that is capable of directing electron transport along two spatially separate pathways. Research into the nature of electron bifurcating sites indicates that one of the keys is the formation of a low potential oxidation state to satisfy the energetics required of the endergonic half reaction, indicating that any redox center (organic or inorganic) that can exist in multiple oxidation states with sufficiently separated redox potentials should be capable of electron bifurcation. In this Feature Article, we explore a paradigm for bifurcating electrons down independent high and low potential pathways, and describe redox cofactors that have been demonstrated or implicated in driving this unique biochemistry.

  7. Electrochemical characterization of Pt-Ru-Pd catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction in direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M; Han, C; Kim, I T; An, J C; Lee, J J; Lee, H K; Shim, J

    2011-01-01

    PtRuPd nanoparticles on carbon black were prepared and characterized as electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation reaction in direct methanol fuel cells. Nano-sized Pd (2-4 nm) particles were deposited on Pt/C and PtRu/C (commercial products) by a simple chemical reduction process. The structural and physical information of the PtRuPd/C were confirmed by TEM and XRD, and their electrocatalytic activities were measured by cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry. The catalysts containing Pd showed higher electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction than the other catalysts. This might be attributed to an increase in the electrochemical surface area of Pt, which is caused by the addition of Pd; this results in increased catalyst utilization.

  8. A DFT study on the enthalpies of thermite reactions and enthalpies of formation of metal composite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-ying; Wang, Meng-jie; Chang, Chun-ran; Xu, Kang-zhen; Ma, Hai-xia; Zhao, Feng-qi

    2018-05-01

    The standard thermite reaction enthalpies (ΔrHmθ) for seven metal oxides were theoretically analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) under five different functional levels, and the results were compared with experimental values. Through the comparison of the linear fitting constants, mean error and root mean square error, the Perdew-Wang functional within the framework of local density approximation (LDA-PWC) and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation functional within the framework of generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PBE) were selected to further calculate the thermite reaction enthalpies for metal composite oxides (MCOs). According to the Kirchhoff formula, the standard molar reaction enthalpies for these MCOs were obtained and their standard molar enthalpies of formation (ΔfHmθ) were finally calculated. The results indicated that GGA-PBE is the most suitable one out of the total five methods to calculate these oxides. Tungstate crystals present the maximum deviation of the enthalpies of thermite reactions for MCOs and these of their physical metal oxide mixtures, but ferrite crystals are the minimum. The correlation coefficients are all above 0.95, meaning linear fitting results are very precise. And the molar enthalpies of formation for NiMoO4, CuMoO4, PbZrO3 (Pm/3m), PbZrO3 (PBA2), PbZrO3 (PBam), MgZrO3, CdZrO3, MnZrO3, CuWO4 and Fe2WO6 were first obtained as -1078.75, -1058.45, -1343.87, -1266.54, -1342.29, -1333.03, -1210.43, -1388.05, -1131.07 and - 1860.11 kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  9. Durability of carbon-supported manganese oxide nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roche, I.; Chainet, E.; Chatenet, M.; Vondrák, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 9 (2008), s. 1195-1201 ISSN 0021-891X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4813302; GA ČR GA104/02/0731 Grant - others:CNRS(FR) 18105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : oxygen reduction reaction * rotating ring-disc electrode * carbon-supported manganese oxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.540, year: 2008

  10. Factors Controlling the Redox Activity of Oxygen in Perovskites: From Theory to Application for Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzhen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Triggering the redox reaction of oxygens has become essential for the development of (electro catalytic properties of transition metal oxides, especially for perovskite materials that have been envisaged for a variety of applications such as the oxygen evolution or reduction reactions (OER and ORR, respectively, CO or hydrocarbons oxidation, NO reduction and others. While the formation of ligand hole for perovskites is well-known for solid state physicists and/or chemists and has been widely studied for the understanding of important electronic properties such as superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, magnetoresistance, ferroelectrics, redox properties etc., oxygen electrocatalysis in aqueous media at low temperature barely scratches the surface of the concept of oxygen ions oxidation. In this review, we briefly explain the electronic structure of perovskite materials and go through a few important parameters such as the ionization potential, Madelung potential, and charge transfer energy that govern the oxidation of oxygen ions. We then describe the surface reactivity that can be induced by the redox activity of the oxygen network and the formation of highly reactive surface oxygen species before describing their participation in catalytic reactions and providing mechanistic insights and strategies for designing new (electro catalysts. Finally, we give a brief overview of the different techniques that can be employed to detect the formation of such transient oxygen species.

  11. A Nonlinear Fuel Optimal Reaction Jet Control Law

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breitfeller, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We derive a nonlinear fuel optimal attitude control system (ACS) that drives the final state to the desired state according to a cost function that weights the final state angular error relative to the angular rate error...

  12. Mems Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat beyond LEO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project further develops a multi-functional SmallSat technology for low-power attitude control of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit. The film-evaporation...

  13. Treatment of uranium turning with the controllable oxidizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Bingyi; Zhang Yonggang; Zhen Huikuan

    1989-02-01

    The concept, procedure and safety measures of the controllable oxidizing for uranium turning is described. The feasibility study on technological process has been made. The process provided several advantages such as: simplicity of operation, no pollution environment, safety, high efficiency and low energy consumption. The process can yield nuclear pure uranium dioxide under making no use of a great number of chemical reagent. It may supply raw material for fluoration and provide a simply method of treatment for safe store of uranium turning

  14. Femtosecond laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Results from experiments aimed at bimolecular chemical reaction control of CO and H2 at room temperature and pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses are presented. A stable reaction product (CO2) was measured after...

  15. Catalytic Activity of μ-Carbido-Dimeric Iron(IV) Octapropylporphyrazinate in the 3,5,7,2',4'-Pentahydroxyflavone Oxidation Reaction with tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurin, D. V.; Zaitseva, S. V.; Kudrik, E. V.

    2018-05-01

    It is found for the first time that μ-carbido-dimeric iron(IV) octapropylporphyrazinate displays catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of natural flavonol morin with tert-butyl hydroperoxide, with the catalyst being stable under conditions of the reaction. The kinetics of this reaction are studied. It is shown the reaction proceeds via tentative formation of a complex between the catalyst and the oxidant, followed by O‒O bond homolytic cleavage. The kinetics of the reaction is described in the coordinates of the Michaelis-Menten equation. A linear dependence of the apparent reaction rate constant on the concentration of the catalyst is observed, testifying to its participation in the limiting reaction step. The equilibrium constants and rates of interaction are found. A mechanism is proposed for the reaction on the basis of the experimental data.

  16. Compositional evolution of particle-phase reaction products and water in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of model aqueous organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Chim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds present at or near the surface of aqueous droplets can be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase OH radicals, which alter the molecular distribution of the reaction products within the droplet. A change in aerosol composition affects the hygroscopicity and leads to a concomitant response in the equilibrium amount of particle-phase water. The variation in the aerosol water content affects the aerosol size and physicochemical properties, which in turn governs the oxidation kinetics and chemistry. To attain better knowledge of the compositional evolution of aqueous organic droplets during oxidation, this work investigates the heterogeneous OH-radical-initiated oxidation of aqueous methylsuccinic acid (C5H8O4 droplets, a model compound for small branched dicarboxylic acids found in atmospheric aerosols, at a high relative humidity of 85 % through experimental and modeling approaches. Aerosol mass spectra measured by a soft atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer reveal two major products: a five carbon atom (C5 hydroxyl functionalization product (C5H8O5 and a C4 fragmentation product (C4H6O3. These two products likely originate from the formation and subsequent reactions (intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and carbon–carbon bond scission of tertiary alkoxy radicals resulting from the OH abstraction occurring at the methyl-substituted carbon site. Based on the identification of the reaction products, a kinetic model of oxidation (a two-product model coupled with the Aerosol Inorganic–Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC model is built to simulate the size and compositional changes of aqueous methylsuccinic acid droplets during oxidation. Model results show that at the maximum OH exposure, the droplets become slightly more hygroscopic after oxidation, as the mass fraction of water is predicted to increase from

  17. Reaction mechanisms at 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface during wet SiC oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Toru; Hori, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Masashi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    The reaction processes at the interface between SiC with 4H structure (4H-SiC) and SiO2 during wet oxidation are investigated by electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory. Our calculations for 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces with various orientations demonstrate characteristic features of the reaction depending on the crystal orientation of SiC: On the Si-face, the H2O molecule is stable in SiO2 and hardly reacts with the SiC substrate, while the O atom of H2O can form Si-O bonds at the C-face interface. Two OH groups are found to be at least necessary for forming new Si-O bonds at the Si-face interface, indicating that the oxidation rate on the Si-face is very low compared with that on the C-face. On the other hand, both the H2O molecule and the OH group are incorporated into the C-face interface, and the energy barrier for OH is similar to that for H2O. By comparing the calculated energy barriers for these reactants with the activation energies of oxide growth rate, we suggest the orientation-dependent rate-limiting processes during wet SiC oxidation.

  18. Measurements of acetone yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of terpenes by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisthaler, A.; Lindinger, W.; Jensen, N.R.; Winterhalter, R.; Hjorth, J.

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) are known to be emitted in large quantities from vegetation exceeding largely global emissions of anthropogenic VOCs. Monoterpenes (C 10 H 16 ) are important constituents of biogenic VOC emissions. The atmospheric oxidation of Monoterpenes appears to be a potentially relevant source of acetone in the atmosphere. Acetone is present as a significant trace gas in the whole troposphere and influences in particular the atmospheric chemistry in the upper troposphere by substantially contributing to the formation of HO x radicals and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Acetone is formed promptly, following attack by the OH-radical on the terpene, via a series of highly unstable radical intermediates, but it is also formed slowly via the degradation of stable non-radical intermediates such as pinonaldehyde and nopinone. In order to investigate the relative importance of these processes, the OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene and β-pinene was investigated in a chamber study, where the concentrations of monoterpenes, acetone, pinonaldehyde and nopinone were monitored by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). It was found that significant amounts of acetone are formed directly, whenα-pinene and β-pinene are oxidized by the OH radical, but also secondary chemistry (degradation of primary reaction products) gives a significant contribution to the formation of acetone from monoterpenes. It can be concluded that atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes contributes a significant fraction to the global acetone source strength. (nevyjel)

  19. Electrochemically reduced graphene-oxide supported bimetallic nanoparticles highly efficient for oxygen reduction reaction with excellent methanol tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Sabina; Cho, Sung; Jeon, Seungwon

    2018-03-01

    We report a simple and facile method for the fabrication of bimetallic nanoparticles on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO) for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. First, reduced graphene oxide supported palladium and manganese oxide nanoparticle (rGO/Pd-Mn2O3) catalyst was synthesized via a simple chemical method at room temperature; then, it was electrochemically reduced for oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The chemical composition and morphological properties of ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TEM images reveals that, nano-sized Pd and Mn2O3 particles were disperse on the ErGO sheet without aggregation. The as-prepared ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 was employed for ORR in alkaline media which shows higher ORR activity with more positive onset and half-wave potential, respectively. Remarkably, ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 reduced oxygen via four-electron transfer pathway with negligible amount of intermediate peroxide species (HO2-). Furthermore, the higher stability and excellent methanol tolerance of the ErGO/Pd-Mn2O3 compared to commercial Pt/C (20 wt%) catalyst, indicating its suitability for fuel cells.

  20. Multiphoton control of the 1,3-cyclohexadiene ring-opening reaction in the presence of competing solvent reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; White, James L; Florean, Andrei C; Bucksbaum, Philip H; Sension, Roseanne J

    2008-07-31

    Although physical chemistry has often concentrated on the observation and understanding of chemical systems, the defining characteristic of chemistry remains the direction and control of chemical reactivity. Optical control of molecular dynamics, and thus of chemical reactivity provides a path to use photon energy as a smart reagent in a chemical system. In this paper, we discuss recent research in this field in the context of our studies of the multiphoton optical control of the photo-initiated ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) to form 1,3,5- cis-hexatriene (Z-HT). Closed-loop feedback and learning algorithms are able to identify pulses that increase the desired target state by as much as a factor of two. Mechanisms for control are discussed through the influence of the intensity dependence, the nonlinear power spectrum, and the projection of the pulses onto low orders of polynomial phase. Control measurements in neat solvents demonstrate that competing solvent fragmentation reactions must also be considered. In particular, multiphoton excitation of cyclohexane alone is capable of producing hexatriene. Statistical analyses of data sets obtained in learning algorithm searches in neat cyclohexane and for CHD in hexane and cyclohexane highlight the importance of linear and quadratic chirp, while demonstrating that the control features are not so easily defined. Higher order phase components are also important. On the basis of these results the involvement of low-frequency ground-state vibrational modes is proposed. When the population is transferred to the excited state, momentum along the torsional coordinate may keep the wave packet localized as it moves toward the conical intersections controlling the yield of Z-HT.

  1. Hydrogen oxidation mechanisms on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia anodes: Separation of reaction pathways by geometry variation of pattern electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, M. C.; Fleig, J.; Bram, M.; Opitz, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrodes are affecting the overall performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in general and strongly contribute to the cell resistance in case of novel metal supported SOFCs in particular. The electrochemical fuel conversion mechanisms in these electrodes are, however, still only partly understood. In this study, micro-structured Ni thin film electrodes on YSZ with 15 different geometries are utilized to investigate reaction pathways for the hydrogen electro-oxidation at Ni/YSZ anodes. From electrodes with constant area but varying triple phase boundary (TPB) length a contribution to the electro-catalytic activity is found that does not depend on the TPB length. This additional activity could clearly be attributed to a yet unknown reaction pathway scaling with the electrode area. It is shown that this area related pathway has significantly different electrochemical behavior compared to the TPB pathway regarding its thermal activation, sulfur poisoning behavior, and H2/H2O partial pressure dependence. Moreover, possible reaction mechanisms of this reaction pathway are discussed, identifying either a pathway based on hydrogen diffusion through Ni with water release at the TPB or a path with oxygen diffusion through Ni to be a very likely explanation for the experimental results.

  2. Effect of Reaction Temperature on Structure, Appearance and Bonding Type of Functionalized Graphene Oxide Modified P-Phenylene Diamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Juan Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, graphene oxides with different functionalization degrees were prepared by a facile one-step hydrothermal reflux method at various reaction temperatures using graphene oxide (GO as starting material and p-phenylenediamine (PPD as the modifier. The effects of reaction temperature on structure, appearance and bonding type of the obtained materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that when the reaction temperature was 10–70 °C, the GO reacted with PPD through non-covalent ionic bonds (–COO−H3+N–R and hydrogen bonds (C–OH…H2N–X. When the reaction temperature reached 90 °C, the GO was functionalized with PPD through covalent bonds of C–N. The crystal structure of products became more ordered and regular, and the interlayer spacing (d value and surface roughness increased as the temperature increased. Furthermore, the results suggested that PPD was grafted on the surface of GO through covalent bonding by first attacking the carboxyl groups and then the epoxy groups of GO.

  3. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herklotz, A. [ORNL, Materials Science and Technology Division, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6056 (United States); Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Dörr, K. [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G. [ORNL, Materials Science and Technology Division, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6056 (United States); Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D. [ORNL, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6496 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  4. Electrocatalysis of oxygen electrode reactions by some perovskite oxides based on lanthanum manganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, I.A.; Rao, K.V.; Venkatesan, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, several electrocatalyst materials based on platinum, silver, tungsten bronzes, spinels, metal chelates, etc., have been studied for use as oxygen diffusion electrodes in alkaline fuel cells, secondary metal-air batteries, and water electrolyzers. However, virtually all catalysts of commercial importance are semiconducting transition metal oxides. The various oxide catalysts that have been studied can be grouped under mixed oxides, spinels, and perovskites

  5. Using H2O2 as oxidant in leaching of uranium ores. The new research on the reaction of H2O2 with Fe2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xizhen

    1997-05-01

    The new research on the reaction of H 2 O 2 with Fe 2+ has been studied. Through determining the electric potential, pH and O 2 release during the mutual titration between H 2 O 2 solution and FeSO 4 solution, deduced the chemical equations of H 2 O 2 (without free hydroxyl) oxidizing FeSO 4 and Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 oxidizing H 2 O 2 . The research results show that acid is a catalytic agent for decomposing H 2 O 2 to be O 2 and H 2 O besides iron ions. The maximum oxidizing potential is up to about 640 mV. While using H 2 O 2 as an oxidant in uranium heap leaching and in-situ leaching, controlling electric potential can be regarded as a method for adjusting the feeding speed of H 2 O 2 to keep the electric potential below 500 mV, thus the H 2 O 2 decomposition can be reduced. (13 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.)

  6. Controlling photo-oxidation processes of a polyfluorene derivative: The effect of additives and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, G.R. [Laboratory of Polymers and Electronic Properties of Materials – UFOP, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Nowacki, B. [Paulo Scarpa Polymer Laboratory – UFPR, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Magalhães, A. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Azevedo, E.R. de [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo – USP, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Sá, E.L. de [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Akcelrud, L.C. [Paulo Scarpa Polymer Laboratory – UFPR, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Bianchi, R.F., E-mail: bianchi@iceb.ufop.br [Laboratory of Polymers and Electronic Properties of Materials – UFOP, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    The control of the photo degradation of a fluorene–vinylene–phenylene based-polymer, poly(9,9-di-hexylfluorenediylvinylene-alt-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (LaPPS16) was achieved by addition of a radical scavenger (RS) (enhancing photo resistance) or a radical initiator (RI) (reducing photo resistance). Photoluminescence, UV–Vis absorption, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopies and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) revealed that the incorporating small amounts of RS or RI is an efficient way to control the rates of the photo-oxidation reactions, and thus to obtain the conjugated polymer with foreseeable degradation rates for applications in blue-light sensitive detectors for neonatal phototherapy. - Highlights: • Photo degradation control of a fluorene–vinylene–phenylene based polymer was achieved. • A radical scavenger enhanced photo resistance and radical initiator decreased it. • Color change rate with irradiation dose provided a basis for dosimeter construction.

  7. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, L-A; Wang, Y-C; Wang, Y-J; Yang, C-S; Tsai, P-J; Lo, L-W

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications.

  8. Kinetics of Np(4) oxidation reaction by persulphate in nitric acid solution in the presence of ferric ions as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltunov, V S; Marchenko, V I

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction Np(IV) + Fe(III) = Np(V) + Fe(II)was investigated by a spectrophotometric method according to observation of the consumption of Np(IV) at 720 nm in a solution of HNO/sub 3/ + NaNO/sub 3/ in the concentration range; (F(III))equal (5.12-102.4).10/sup -3/ M, (H+) equal 0.14-1 M, (NO/sub 3//sup -/) = 0.5-2 M at an ionic strength of the solution ..mu.. = 0.2-2 and temperatures of 25-46/sup 0/C. To exclude the reverse reaction, (3-6).10/sup -2/ M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, which rapidly oxidizes Fe(II), was added to the solution. The possible oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI) was prevented by the addition of small quantities of N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. It was shown that the reaction rate is described by the equation -d(Np(IV))/dt=k(Np(IV))(Fe(III))/(H/sup +/)/sup 3/. where k = 0.490 +- 0.026 M/sup 2/.min/sup -1/ at 25/sup 0/ and ..mu.. = 1. The No/sub 3//sup -/ ions inhibit the reaction in the interval (NO/sub 3//sup -/) = 0-1 M and do not influence it at (NO/sub 3//sup -/) > 1 M. On the basis of an investigation of the dependence of k on the temperature, the energy (E = 32.5 kcal/mole), free energy (..delta..F* = 20.3 kcal/mole), and entropy (..delta..S* = 39 entropy units) of activation of the reaction were calculated. The reaction mechanism is discussed.

  9. Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Oxidation of Dimethylamine: The Reaction Pathway and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kachina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO and thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO of dimethylamine (DMA on titanium dioxide was studied in a continuous flow simple tubular reactor. Volatile PCO products of DMA included ammonia, formamide, carbon dioxide, and water. Ammonia was further oxidized in minor amounts to nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Effective at 573 K, TCO resulted in the formation of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. The PCO kinetic data fit well to the monomolecular Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, whereas TCO kinetic behaviour matched the first-order process. No deactivation of the photocatalyst during the multiple long-run experiments was observed.

  10. Blockage-induced condensation controlled by a local reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Colangeli, Matteo; Muntean, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    We consider the setup of stationary zero range models and discuss the onset of condensation induced by a local blockage on the lattice. We show that the introduction of a local feedback on the hopping rates allows us to control the particle fraction in the condensed phase. This phenomenon results in a current versus blockage parameter curve characterized by two nonanalyticity points.

  11. Dogs' reaction to inequity is affected by inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucks, Désirée; Range, Friederike; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah

    2017-11-17

    Inequity aversion is thought to act as a mechanism to ensure cooperation and has been studied in many different species, consistently revealing inter-individual variation. Inhibitory control has been proposed to act as one factor responsible for this variation since individuals need to inhibit performing the required action and/or refuse rewards in order to exhibit inequity aversion. Here, we investigated if dogs' sensitivity to inequity is affected by their capacity for inhibitory control, assessed in a test battery and questionnaire. Overall, dogs showing high compulsivity scores (i.e. repetitive behaviours independent of feedback) were more motivated to participate in the inequity task independent of the rewarding scheme. Dogs were more sensitive to inequity and individual contrast if they exhibited a slower decision speed in the inhibition tasks. Furthermore, less persistent and more impulsive dogs were more sensitive to reward inequity, potentially due to having a lower tolerance level for frustration. Results indicate that aspects of inhibitory control can explain the variation in dogs' inequity response, highlighting one of the mechanisms underlying responses to inequity. Emphasising the importance to design paradigms, which allow us to disentangle capacities to recognise inequity from the inability to react to it due to poor inhibitory control abilities.

  12. Control of lipid oxidation in extruded salmon jerky snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Perkins, L Brian; Dougherty, Michael P; Camire, Mary Ellen

    2011-01-01

    A shelf-life study was conducted to evaluate the effect of antioxidants on oxidative stability of extruded jerky-style salmon snacks. Deterioration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) due to lipid oxidation is a major concern for this healthy snack. A control jerky with no added antioxidants and 4 jerkies with antioxidants (rosemary, mixed tocopherols, tertiary butylhydroquinone, and ascorbyl palmitate) added as 0.02% of the lipid content were extruded in duplicate in a Coperion ZSK-25 twin screw extruder. Salmon jerkies from each formulation were placed in 3 mil barrier pouches, flushed with nitrogen, and stored at 35 °C and 75% relative humidity. Lipid oxidation was evaluated as by peroxide value and malonaldehyde content. Other chemical analyses included total fatty acid composition, lipid content, moisture, water activity, pH, and salt. Astaxanthin and CIE L*, a*, b* color were also analyzed at 4-wk intervals. Rosemary inhibited peroxide formation better than did other antioxidants at week 8; no treatment inhibited malonaldehyde levels. All jerkies had lower astaxanthin levels after 8 wk, but rosemary-treated jerky had higher pigment concentrations than did the control at weeks 4 and 8. Protection of omega-3 lipids in these extruded jerkies must be improved to offer consumers a convenient source of these healthful lipids. Practical Application: Salmon flesh can be extruded to produce a jerky that provides 410 mg of omega-3 lipids per serving. Natural antioxidants such as rosemary should be added at levels over 0.02% of the lipid content to help control lipid oxidation. Astaxanthin and CIE a* values correlated well with lipid stability and could be used to monitor quality during storage if initial values are known.

  13. Study of reactions between uranium-plutonium mixed oxide and uranium nitride and between uranium oxide and uranium nitride; Etude des reactions entre l`oxyde mixte d`uranium-plutonium et le nitrure d`uranium et entre l`oxyde d`uranium et le nitrure d`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecraz, C

    1993-06-11

    A new type of combustible elements which is a mixture of uranium nitride and uranium-plutonium oxide could be used for Quick Neutrons Reactors. Three different studies have been made on the one hand on the reactions between uranium nitride (UN) and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (U,Pu)O{sub 2}, on the other hand on these between UN and uranium oxide UO{sub 2}. They show a sizeable reaction between nitride and oxide for the studied temperatures range (1573 K to 1973 K). This reaction forms a oxynitride compound, MO{sub x} N{sub y} with M=U or M=(U,Pu), whose crystalline structure is similar to oxide`s. Solubility of nitride in both oxides is studied, as the reaction kinetics. (TEC). 32 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. Utilization of oxidation reactions for the spectrophotometric determination of captopril using brominating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Didamony, Akram M.; Erfan, Eman A. H.

    2010-03-01

    Three simple, accurate and sensitive methods (A-C) for the spectrophotometric assay of captopril (CPL) in bulk drug, in dosage forms and in the presence of its oxidative degradates have been described. The methods are based on the bromination of captopril with a solution of excess brominating mixture in hydrochloric acid medium. After bromination, the excess brominating mixture is followed by the estimation of surplus bromine by three different reaction schemes. In the first method (A), the determination of the residual bromine is based on its ability to bleach the indigo carmine dye and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm. Method B, involves treating the unreacted bromine with a measured excess of iron(II) and the remaining iron(II) is complexed with 1,10-phenanthroline and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. In method (C), the surplus bromine is treated with excess of iron(II) and the resulting iron(III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance is measured at 478 nm. In all the methods, the amount of bromine reacted corresponds to the drug content. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the color are carefully studied and optimized. Beer's law is valid within a concentration range of 0.4-6.0, 0.4-2.8 and 1.2-4.8 μg mL -1 for methods A, B and C, respectively. The calculated apparent molar absorptivity was found to be 5.16 × 10 4, 9.95 × 10 4 and 1.74 × 10 5 L mol -1 cm -1, for methods A, B and C, respectively. Sandell's sensitivity, correlation coefficients, detection and quantification limits are also reported. No interference was observed from common additives found in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods are successfully applied to the determination of CPL in the tablet formulations with mean recoveries of 99.94-100.11% and the results were statistically compared with those of a reference method by applying Student's t- and F-test.

  15. How Pt nanoparticles affect TiO2-induced gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters, B.D.; Amrollahi Buky, Rezvaneh; Mul, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Pt nanoparticles on the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation activity of TiO2 is shown to be largely dependent on the molecular functionality of the substrate. We demonstrate that Pt nanoparticles decrease rates in photocatalytic oxidation of propane, whereas a strong beneficial effect

  16. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  17. Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-03-15

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl

  18. Investigation of oxidative degradation and non‐enzymatic browning reactions in krill and fish oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Haugsgjerd, Bjørn Ole; Griinari, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    conditions using the Oxipres™ at 90°C. The results from analysis of PV, AV, TBARS, conjugated dienes and trienes, and the antioxidant content suggested that krill oil was more oxidatively stable than fish oil. However, the color or other constituents of the krill oil might affect the result......The aim of this research was to investigate the oxidation progress and pathways of krill and fish oil during 21 days of incubation at 40°C. The oxidative stability of the oils was investigated through: (i) classical methods such as peroxide value (PV), anisidine value (AV), thiobarbituric reactive...... substance (TBARS), conjugated dienes and trienes, and antioxidant content, and (ii) advanced methods such as determination of volatiles content by dynamic headspace (DHS)‐GC/MS, lipid classes, and pyrrole content. In addition, the oxidative stability of the oils was evaluated under accelerated oxidation...

  19. Methanol oxidation in a flow reactor: Implications for the branching ratio of the CH3OH+OH reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Wassard, K.H.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of methanol in a flow reactor has been studied experimentally under diluted, fuel-lean conditions at 650-1350 K, over a wide range of O-2 concentrations (1%-16%), and with and without the presence of nitric oxide. The reaction is initiated above 900 K, with the oxidation rate...... decreasing slightly with the increasing O-2 concentration. Addition of NO results in a mutually promoted oxidation of CH3OH and NO in the 750-1100 K range. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of a revised chemical kinetic model. Owing to the high sensitivity of the mutual sensitization of CH3OH...... and NO oxidation to the partitioning of CH3O and CH2OH, the CH3OH + OH branching fraction could be estimated as alpha = 0.10 +/- 0.05 at 990 K. Combined with low-temperature measurements, this value implies a branching fraction that is largely independent of temperature. It is in good agreement with recent...

  20. Selective catalytic oxidation of NO as a process stage in NOx separation from power plant and production systems off-gases. Catalyst development and reaction kinetics. Final report. Die selektive katalytische Oxidation des NO als Prozess-Stufe bei der Stickoxidabscheidung aus Abgasen von Kraftwerken und Produktionsanlagen. Katalysatorentwicklung und Reaktionskinetik. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emig, G.; Seifert, J.

    1989-06-01

    The research project was to investigate the heterogeneously catalyzed oxidation of NO in flue gas using 1. metal oxide catalysts (commonly on a MnO{sub 2} basis), 2. ZSM5 zeolites (pentasil), and 3. noble metal catalysts. Apart from the reaction kinetics, also the activity and resistance to typical catalyst poisons (SO{sub 2}, HCl, HF, heavy metals) were investigated. A fully automatic, computer-controlled experimental apparatus was developed which apart from the analysis of reaction products permitted also dynamic experiments with time constants in the seconds range and experiments with cyclic variation of concentration, temperature, and time of residue. (RB).