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Sample records for oxide mercuric chloride

  1. Mercuric chloride poisoning

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002474.htm Mercuric chloride poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It ...

  2. Peripheral markers of oxidative stress in chronic mercuric chloride intoxication

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    Gutierrez L.L.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the time course changes in peripheral markers of oxidative stress in a chronic HgCl2 intoxication model. Twenty male adult Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously daily for 30 days and divided into two groups of 10 animals each: Hg, which received HgCl2 (0.16 mg kg-1 day-1, and control, receiving the same volume of saline solution. Blood was collected at the first, second and fourth weeks of Hg administration to evaluate lipid peroxidation (LPO, total radical trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP, and superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, and catalase (CAT. HgCl2 administration induced a rise (by 26% in LPO compared to control (143 ± 10 cps/mg hemoglobin in the second week and no difference was found at the end of the treatment. At that time, GST and GPx were higher (14 and 24%, respectively in the Hg group, and Cu,Zn-SOD was lower (54% compared to control. At the end of the treatment, Cu,Zn-SOD and CAT were higher (43 and 10%, respectively in the Hg group compared to control (4.6 ± 0.3 U/mg protein; 37 ± 0.9 pmol/mg protein, respectively. TRAP was lower (69% in the first week compared to control (43.8 ± 1.9 mM Trolox. These data provide evidence that HgCl2 administration is accompanied by systemic oxidative damage in the initial phase of the process, which leads to adaptive changes in the antioxidant reserve, thus decreasing the oxidative injury at the end of 30 days of HgCl2 administration. These results suggest that a preventive treatment with antioxidants would help to avoid oxidative damage in subjects with chronic intoxication.

  3. Exposure to mercuric chloride induces developmental damage, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in zebrafish embryos-larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun-Fang; Li, Ying-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a widespread environmental pollutant that can produce severe negative effects on fish even at very low concentrations. However, the mechanisms underlying inorganic Hg-induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the early development stage of fish still need to be clarified. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to different concentrations of Hg 2+ (0, 1, 4 and 16μg/L; added as mercuric chloride, HgCl 2 ) from 2h post-fertilization (hpf) to 168hpf. Developmental parameters and total Hg accumulation were monitored during the exposure period, and antioxidant status and the mRNA expression of genes related to the innate immune system were examined at 168hpf. The results showed that increasing Hg 2+ concentration and time significantly increased total Hg accumulation in zebrafish embryos-larvae. Exposure to 16μg/L Hg 2+ caused developmental damage, including increased mortality and malformation, decreased body length, and delayed hatching period. Meanwhile, HgCl 2 exposure (especially in the 16μg/L Hg 2+ group) induced oxidative stress affecting antioxidant enzyme (CAT, GST and GPX) activities, endogenous GSH and MDA contents, as well as the mRNA levels of genes (cat1, sod1, gstr, gpx1a, nrf2, keap1, hsp70 and mt) encoding antioxidant proteins. Moreover, the transcription levels of several representative genes (il-1β, il-8, il-10, tnfα2, lyz and c3) involved in innate immunity were up-regulated by HgCl 2 exposure, suggesting that inorganic Hg had the potential to induce immunotoxicity. Taken together, the present study provides evidence that waterborne HgCl 2 exposure can induce developmental impairment, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the early development stage of fish, which brings insights into the toxicity mechanisms of inorganic Hg in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies on the mercuric chloride resistance of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Vaczi, L; Fodor, M; Milch, H; Rethy, A

    1962-01-01

    Among 409 pathogenic Staph. aureus strains 34% have been found to be sensitive, and 66% resistant, to mercuric chloride. The incidence of mercuric chloride resistant cultures among antibiotic sensitive staphylococci was 20%; among strains resistant to penicillin or to more than one antibiotic, 70%. Mercuric chloride resistant organisms occurred chiefly among phage group I and untypable strains; they were especially common among the so called epidemic strains of phage group I, and among cultures resistant to 4-6 antibiotics. In mercuric chloride sensitivity a thirtyfold, in merthiolate sensitivity only a two-fold difference has been revealed among the strains. The sulfydryl group content of mercuric chloride resistant organisms was only 1 1/2 times higher than that of sensitive bacteria. As to p-chlor mercuric benzoate binding capacity, a twofold difference was found between mercuric chloride sensitive and resistant staphylococci. The differences in the mercuric chloride resistance of various staphylococcal strains might be due to differences in the chemical structure of the cell surface. 9 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  5. Zingiber officinale and 6-gingerol alleviate liver and kidney dysfunctions and oxidative stress induced by mercuric chloride in male rats: A protective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepmala; Srivastav, Sunil Kumar; Belemkar, Sateesh; Dixit, Vaibhav A

    2017-07-01

    Mercury toxicity is an emerging problem in the world as its concentration is rising continuously due to increased industrial, medicinal and domestic uses. Exposure to mercury represents a serious challenge to humans and other living biomes. The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of natural products as Zingiber officinale extract and its active compound (6-gingerol) against mercuric chloride-induced hepatorenal toxicity and oxidative stress in male rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (150±10g, n=6 per group) were administered HgCl 2 (12μmol/kg, ip; once only) the treatment of Zingiber officinale Rosc. extract (ZO: 125mg/kg, po) and 6-gingerol (GG: 50mg/kg, po) for three days after 24h of HgCl 2 administration. Acute HgCl 2 administration altered various biochemical parameters, including transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, bilirubin, gamma-glutamyl transferase, triglycerides and cholesterol, urea, creatinine, uric acid and blood urea nitrogen contents with a concomitant decline in protein and albumin concentration in serum. In addition, a significant rise in lipid peroxidation level with concomitant decrease in reduced glutathione content and the antioxidant enzymes activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase after acute HgCl 2 exposure. Results of the present investigation clearly showed that both treatments as Zingiber officinale extract and 6-gingerol provide protection against acute mercuric chloride-intoxication by preventing oxidative degradation of a biological membrane from metal mediated free radical attacks. Biochemical data were well supported by histopathological findings. In conclusion, natural products may be an ideal choice against oxidative damage induced by mercury poisoning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prenatal Mercuric Chloride Exposure Causes Developmental Deficits in Rat Cortex

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    Tayebeh Rastegar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Environmental pollution with heavy metals such as mercury is a major health problem. Growing studies on the field have shown the deleterious effects of mercury on human and nonhuman nervous system, especially in infants, however the effects of prenatal exposure to mercuricchloride on cortical development are not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prenatal exposure to mercuric chloride on morphological characteristics of brain cortex. Methods: Mercuric chloride (2 mg/kg or normal saline were injected (I.P. to 36 Sprague – dawley rats in the 8th, 9th or 10th day of gestation. The embryos were surgically removed in the 15th day of gestation, and brain cortices were studied by histological techniques. Results: Histological studies showed that embryos of mercuric chloride treated rats hadcortical neuronal disarrangement withdifferent orientations of nuclei, increased diameter of cortex, increased mitosis of cells, increased cell death, decreased cellular density and increased intracellular space. Conclusion: These findings suggest some micro structural abnormalities in cortical regions after prenatal exposure to mercuric chloride. These structural abnormalities may underliesome neurologic disturbances following mercury intoxication.

  7. INNA for interelement correlations in rats after mercuric chloride exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, L.; Ehmann, W.D.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY

    1992-01-01

    In an animal model study, we exposed rats to mercuric chloride through drinking water continuously for eight to ten months. A group of these rats were then taken off mercuric chloride water and fed distilled water. A control group of rats was given distilled water. Rat brain, spinal cord, and kidney were analyzed to determine Hg and nine other elements by INAA. Significant imbalances were detected among the groups. Most of the mercury (Hg) was found to be eliminated from the tissues studied within the first thirty days. Implications of the data are discussed in light of observed trace element imbalances in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. (author) 25 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  8. Hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of mercuric chloride following subchronic exposure through drinking water in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujbiha, Mohamed Ali; Ben Salah, Ghada; Ben Feleh, Abdelraouf; Saoudi, Mongi; Kamoun, Hassen; Bousslema, Ali; Ommezzine, Asma; Said, Khaled; Fakhfakh, Faiza; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2012-07-01

    Erythrocytes are a convenient model to understand the subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules in metal toxicities. The present study examined the variation of hematoxic and genotoxic parameters following subchronic exposure of mercuric chloride via drinking water and their possible association with oxidative stress. Male rats were exposed to 50 ppm (HG1) and 100 ppm (HG2) of mercuric chloride daily for 90 days. A significant dose-dependent decrease was observed in red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and mean cell hemoglobin concentration in treated groups (HG1 and HG2) compared with controls. A significant dose-dependent increase was observed in lipid peroxidation; therefore, a significant variation was found in the antioxidant enzyme activities, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Interestingly, mercuric chloride treatment showed a significant dose-dependent increase in frequency of total chromosomal aberration and in percentage of aberrant bone marrow metaphase of treated groups (p mercury treatment may be the major cause for chromosomal aberration as free radicals lead to DNA damage. These data will be useful in screening the antioxidant activities of natural products, which may be specific to the bone marrow tissue.

  9. Localization of gastrointestinal deposition of mercuric chloride studied in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.B.; Andersen, H.L.; Soerensen, J.A.; Andersen, O.

    1992-01-01

    During the last 5 years, the site of gastrointestinal absorption of inorganic mercury has been attempted identified mainly by experiments using perfused intestinal segments in vitro or in situ. The present investigation will discuss the localization of the absorption site for mercuric chloride based on a completely undisturbed in vivo experimental model in mice. As the mice were allowed to eat their normal diet during the experimental period, the present results would independently add to existing knowledge on intestinal absorption sites for inorganic mercury. The mice were given 203 Hg labelled mercuric chloride orally, either through stomach tube or in the drinking water, and were killed after various time intervals. Mercury was localized and quantified in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract by gamma-counting. Time course analysis of the segmental deposition of mercury demonstrated that the deposition mainly takes place in the proximal jejunum and suggested that a larger part of the jejunum than previously reported is involved in absorption of mercury. Using this in vivo model, tetraethylthiuram disulfide was demonstrated to increase the intestinal deposition and absorption without changing the site of deposition. (au)

  10. Methylation of mercuric chloride by human intestinal bacteria

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    Rowland, I R; Grasso, P; Davies, M J

    1975-01-01

    There is now evidence that ingested mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/) may be methylated, in vivo, in the rat intestine and, in vitro, by human feces. However, one cannot infer from these experiments that the microbial flora of the intestine is responsible for the methylation reaction, since the gut contents contain several sources of metabolic activity other than bacteria. Data are presented on the ability of pure cultures of bacteria and yeasts, isolated from human feces, to convert HgCl/sub 2/ to methylmercury. Strains of Escherichia coli, streptococci, staphylococci, bacteriodes and bifidobacteria were inoculated into a medium containing 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, Bacto-tryptone, yeast extract and D-glucose, each at 0.5% (w/v). Results indicate that most strains of staphylococci, streptococci, yeasts and E. coli isolated from human feces, could synthesize methylmercury compounds. In contrast, few strains of obligate anaerobes could do so. Up to 6 ng methylmercury/ml were formed in 44 h from 2 ..mu..g mercuric chloride.

  11. Curcuma longa Linn. extract and curcumin protect CYP 2E1 enzymatic activity against mercuric chloride-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress: A protective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepmala; Mittal, Deepak Kumar; Shukla, Sangeeta; Srivastav, Sunil Kumar; Dixit, Vaibhav A

    2017-07-05

    The present investigation has been conducted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of Curcuma longa (200mgkg -1 , po) and curcumin (80mgkg -1 , po) for their hepatoprotective efficacy against mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 : 12μmolkg -1 , ip; once only) hepatotoxicity. The HgCl 2 administration altered various biochemical parameters, including transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, bilirubin, gamma-glutamyl transferase, triglycerides and cholesterol contents with a concomitant decline in protein and albumin concentration in serum which were restored towards control by therapy of Curcuma longa or curcumin. On the other hand, both treatments showed a protective effect on drug metabolizing enzymes viz. aniline hydroxylase (AH) and amidopyrine-N-demethylase (AND), hexobarbitone induced sleep time and BSP retention. Choleretic, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH)-free radical scavenging activities and histological studies also supported the biochemical findings. The present study concludes that Curcuma longa extract or curcumin has the ability to alleviate the hepatotoxic effects caused by HgCl 2 in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Antioxidant effect of Arabic gum against mercuric chloride-induced nephrotoxicity

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    Gado AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ali M Gado,1 Badr A Aldahmash21Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology Department, College of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 2Medical Laboratory Department, College of Health Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: The effects of Arabic gum (AG against nephrotoxicity of mercury (Hg, an oxidative-stress inducing substance, in rats were investigated. A single dose of mercuric chloride (5 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection induced renal toxicity, manifested biochemically by a significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite production in kidney tissues. In addition, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase enzymes in renal tissues were significantly decreased. Pretreatment of rats with AG (7.5 g/kg/day per oral administration, starting 5 days before mercuric chloride injection and continuing through the experimental period, resulted in a complete reversal of Hg-induced increase in creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite to control values. Histopathologic examination of kidney tissues confirmed the biochemical data; pretreatment of AG prevented Hg-induced degenerative changes of kidney tissues. These results indicate that AG is an efficient cytoprotective agent against Hg-induced nephrotoxicity by a mechanism related at least in part to its ability to decrease oxidative and nitrosative stress and preserve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney tissues.Keywords: mercury, acacia gum, oxidative stress, lipid per oxidation, kidney toxicity

  13. Antioxidant effect of Arabic gum against mercuric chloride-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gado, Ali M; Aldahmash, Badr A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Arabic gum (AG) against nephrotoxicity of mercury (Hg), an oxidative-stress inducing substance, in rats were investigated. A single dose of mercuric chloride (5 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection) induced renal toxicity, manifested biochemically by a significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite production in kidney tissues. In addition, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase enzymes in renal tissues were significantly decreased. Pretreatment of rats with AG (7.5 g/kg/day per oral administration), starting 5 days before mercuric chloride injection and continuing through the experimental period, resulted in a complete reversal of Hg-induced increase in creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite to control values. Histopathologic examination of kidney tissues confirmed the biochemical data; pretreatment of AG prevented Hg-induced degenerative changes of kidney tissues. These results indicate that AG is an efficient cytoprotective agent against Hg-induced nephrotoxicity by a mechanism related at least in part to its ability to decrease oxidative and nitrosative stress and preserve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney tissues.

  14. INAA for interelement correlations in rats after mercuric chloride exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, L.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Ehmann, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Motor neurons in rat spinal cord have been shown to have a selective affinity for Hg in a study by Moeller-Madsen and Dansher (1986). In a related animal model study the authors have exposed seventeen rats to mercuric chloride through drinking water continuously for eight months. A control group of rats was given regular water. Rat brain, spinal cord, and kidney were irradiated with thermal neutrons for determination of Hg and 16 other elements by INAA. As expected, Hg was increased in all tissues from treated rats. Cs was significantly elevated in spinal cord of Hg-dosed rats. Kidney had a significant decrease in As, Co, and K with a significant increase in Br and Se in Hg-dosed rats. These results in rats are contrasted with data (Khare, et al., 1990) from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to determine if the elemental imbalances in this neurodegenerative disease are primary alterations, or merely secondary effects related to Hg levels

  15. A Vegetable, Launaea taraxacifolia, Mitigated Mercuric Chloride Alteration of the Microanatomy of Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olatunde; Arinola, Ganiyu O

    2017-11-02

    Mercuric chloride is an environmental pollutant that affects the nervous systems of mammals. Oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms of its toxicity, and antioxidants should mitigate this effect. A vegetable with antioxidant activity is Launaea taraxacifolia, whose ethanolic extract (EELT) was investigated in this experiment to determine its effect against mercuric chloride (MC) intoxication in rat brain. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into five groups (n = 6) as follows: control; propylene glycol; EELT (400 mg/kg bwt) for 19 days; MC (HgCl 2 ) (4 mg/bwt) for 5 days from day 15 of the experiment; EELT+ MC, EELT (400 mg/kg bwt) for 14 days + MC (4 mg/bwt) for 5 days from day 15 of the experiment. All treatments were administered orally by gastric gavage. Behavioral tests were conducted on the 20th day, and rats were euthanized the same day. Blood and brain tissue were examined with regard to microanatomical parameters. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance with statistical significance set at p cerebral cortex, dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis 3, and cerebellum of rats. Treatment with EELT prior to MC administration significantly reduced the effect of MC on the hematological, behavioral, and ameliorated histological alterations of the brain. These findings may be attributed partially to the antioxidant property of EELT, which demonstrated protective effects against MC-induced behavioral parameters and alteration of microanatomy of rats' cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. In conclusion, EELT may be a valuable agent for further investigation in the prevention of acute neuropathy caused by inorganic mercury intoxication.

  16. The effect of mercuric chloride treatment as biocide for herbaria on the indoor air quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, J.B.G.A.; Dekker, R.; Sportel, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most previous conservation treatments for plant specimen in herbarium collections was mercuric chloride (HgCl2). However, due time HgCl2 may decompose and it may cause (metallic) mercury (Hg) emission. Hg vapour in indoor air should be avoided as mercury poisoning can already occur at

  17. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal injury. I. Direct effects of in vitro mercuric chloride on renal cortical mitochondrial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    Increasing data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important early component of nephrotoxin-induced changes in renal cell function and viability. This study was designed to obtain more detailed information about the effects on several basic bioenergetic parameters of the direct interaction of Hg/sup 2 +/ with renal cortical mitochondria in vitro as a necessary prelude to studies of mitochondrial functional changes after treatment with mercuric chloride in vivo. Beginning at a threshhold level of 2 nmol of Hg/sup 2 +//mg of mitochondrial protein Hg/sup 2 +/ induced marked stimulation of State 4 respiration, mild inhibition of State 3 respiration, and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration, a striking increase in atractyloside-insensitive ADP uptake and stimulation of both basal- and Mg/sup 2 +/-activated oligomycin-sensitive mitochondrial ATPase activity. These effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ could be prevented and reversed by the sulfhydryl reagent dithioerythritol and by albumin but were not affected by Mg/sup 2 +/. Detailed studies on the addition of HgCl/sub 2/ to the preparation at different stages of the mitochondrial isolation procedure demonstrated that the presence of other proteins decreased mitochondrial Hg/sup 2 +/ binding, that the Hg/sup 2 +/ was not readily washed off the mitochondria by nonprotein-containing solutions, and that prolonged exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ during the isolation procedure did not markedly alter its functional effects on their reversibility as assessed on the final mitochondrial preparation. These data provide an important basis for critically assessing the changes in function of mitochondria isolated after in vivo treatment with mercuric chloride.

  18. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Dhanapriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months.

  19. Complexo-potentiometric determination of mercury (II) in chlormerodrin and mercuric chloride labelled with radioactive mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duek, E.E.

    1976-09-01

    A method is described for determining the amount of mercury (II) in radioactively labelled chlormerodrin and mercuric chloride. By measuring the absolute activity in an ionization chamber, the specific activity is therefore immediately obtained. The determination of Hg (II) is based on a complexometric titration. Because of method characteristics and speed convenience, the end point is observed by means of a pH-meter. A comparison is made with a determination performed by detecting the end point with color-change indicators. The error is estimated, and the results are statistically interpreted. (author) [es

  20. Effect of mercuric chloride intoxication on urinary. gamma. -glutamyl transpeptidase excretion in the sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, F D

    1976-01-01

    The activity of the enzyme ..gamma..-glutamyl transpeptidase (..gamma..-GT) was measured in the urine of sheep. In clinically normal animals the mean value was 6.3 +/- 0.6 mU/ml. In sheep with kidney damage induced by the administration of mercuric chloride there were marked increases in urinary concentrations of ..gamma..-GT, in some cases values in excess of 1000 mU/ml were recorded. This enzyme may be of value in the diagnosis of certain forms of renal disease. 13 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  1. Mercury chloride-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... Mercury can exist in the environment as metal, as monovalent and divalent salts and as organomercurials, one of the most important of which is mercuric chloride (HgCl2). It has been shown to induce oxidative stress in erythrocytes through the generation of free radicals and alteration of the.

  2. Effect of tubular damage by mercuric chloride on kidney function and some urinary enzymes in the dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, B G; Price, R G; Topham, J C

    1973-01-01

    Alkaline and acid phosphatases, ..beta..-glucosidase, ..beta..-galactosidase, N-acetyl-..beta..-glucosaminidase and lactate dehydrogenase were monitored in the urine and serum of dogs with renal tubular damage induced by a series of increasing doses of mercuric chloride. Evidence is presented that the assay of urinary alkaline and acid phosphatase is the most sensitive method of detecting renal tubular damage in the dog. The clearance of (/sup 14/C)-propranolol was compared before and after the administration of mercuric chloride. In the presence of tubular damage the blood half-life of propranolol and the rate of excretion of metabolites in the urine were increased. 35 references, 7 tables.

  3. Renal effects of in utero exposure to mercuric chloride in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, A.M.; Collette, C.; Lauwerys, R. (Catholic Univ. of Louvain, Industrial Toxicology and Occupational Medicine Unit, Brussels (Belgium))

    1992-08-01

    The transplacental nephrotoxicity of mercuric chloride has been studied in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Mercuric chloride was injected s.c. to rats at the dose of 1 mg/kg during the last 8 gestational days or the whole pregnancy. Both mothers and newborns developed a transient renal dysfunction resulting in an increased urinary excretion of beta[sub 2]-microglobulin and albumin. In mothers and their female offspring, these effects were completely reversible and did not influence the subsequent evolution of the renal function. In the male offspring, however, transitory changes in protein excretion were again observed a few months later, concomitantly with an enhanced accumulation of alpha[sub 2u]-globulin in the kidney. The transfer of mercury from maternal to fetal tissues was very small. The kidney concentrations of mercury in newborns were more than 300 times lower than in mothers. The barrier role of the placenta is not sufficient to prevent the occurrence of renal effects in the offspring of rats treated with inorganic mercury during pregnancy. (orig.).

  4. Hepatoprotective and Antioxidant Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaf Extracts against Mercuric Chloride-induced Liver Toxicity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppanan, Muthupillai; Krishnan, Manigandan; Padarthi, Pavankumar; Namasivayam, Elangovan

    2014-01-01

    To explore the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of ethanolic Mangifera indica (EMI) and methanolic Mangifera indica (MMI) leaf extracts in mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) induced toxicity in Swiss albino mice. Toxicity in mice was induced with HgCl 2 (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by oral intervention with EMI and MMI extracts (25 mg and 50 mg/kg. body wt.) for 30 days. The extent of liver damage was assessed from the extents of histopathological, morphological, antioxidant and liver enzymes. Mercuric chloride-induced mice showed an increased cellular damage whereas leaf extracts of EMI and MMI-treated mice showed recovery of damaged hepatocytes. Mercuric chloride intoxicated mice exhibited a significant (p Mangifera indica extract remarkably reduces hepatotoxicity in mice possibly through its antioxidant potentials. How to cite this article: Karuppanan M, Krishnan M, Padarthi P, Namasivayam E. Hepatoprotec-tive and Antioxidant Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaf Extracts against Mercuric Chloride-induced Liver Toxicity in Mice. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2014;4(1):18-24.

  5. Mercury toxicity in the shark (Squalus acanthias) rectal gland: apical CFTR chloride channels are inhibited by mercuric chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Martha A; Decker, Sarah E; Aller, Stephen G; Weber, Gerhard; Forrest, John N

    2006-03-01

    In the shark rectal gland, basolateral membrane proteins have been suggested as targets for mercury. To examine the membrane polarity of mercury toxicity, we performed experiments in three preparations: isolated perfused rectal glands, primary monolayer cultures of rectal gland epithelial cells, and Xenopus oocytes expressing the shark cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. In perfused rectal glands we observed: (1) a dose-dependent inhibition by mercury of forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-stimulated chloride secretion; (2) inhibition was maximal when mercury was added before stimulation with forskolin/IBMX; (3) dithiothrietol (DTT) and glutathione (GSH) completely prevented inhibition of chloride secretion. Short-circuit current (Isc) measurements in monolayers of rectal gland epithelial cells were performed to examine the membrane polarity of this effect. Mercuric chloride inhibited Isc more potently when applied to the solution bathing the apical vs. the basolateral membrane (23 +/- 5% and 68 +/- 5% inhibition at 1 and 10 microM HgCl2 in the apical solution vs. 2 +/- 0.9% and 14 +/- 5% in the basolateral solution). This inhibition was prevented by pre-treatment with apical DTT or GSH; however, only the permeant reducing agent DTT reversed mercury inhibition when added after exposure. When the shark rectal gland CFTR channel was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and chloride conductance was measured by two-electrode voltage clamping, we found that 1 microM HgCl2 inhibited forskolin/IBMX conductance by 69.2 +/- 2.0%. We conclude that in the shark rectal gland, mercury inhibits chloride secretion by interacting with the apical membrane and that CFTR is the likely site of this action. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal activity. II. Functional alterations of renal cortical mitochondria isolated after mercuric chloride treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mitochondrial functional defects occurring in the early stages of nephrotoxic renal injury secondary to mercuric chloride have been characterized. No loss of cellular integrity or major mitochondrial structural alterations occurred within the first 3 hr after a subcutaneous injection of 5 mg/kg of HgCl/sub 2/. At 3 h, levels of Hg/sup 2 +/ in renal cortex and isolated renal cortical mitochondria were 1.87 and 0.72 nmol/mg of protein, respectively. Much evidence suggested that this Hg/sup 2 +/ had reached the mitochondria in situ and not during the isolation process. Mitochondria isolated beginning 1 h after treatment with HgCl/sub 2/ showed depressed ADP uptake. At 2 h, inhibitions of State 3 and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration were detected. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrophenol-activated mitochondrial ATPase activity was present when measured on mitochondria isolated at 3 h. These effects were not reversed by 2 mM dithioerythritol, 50 mg/ml of albumin or 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/. Analysis of the data in the context of information available on the in vitro effects of HgCl/sub 2/ (Weinberg, J.M., Harding, P.G., and Humes, H.D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 60-67) indicated that the mitochondrial functional effects could not be attributed to interaction of the mitochondria with Hg/sup 2 +/ during their isolation. These studies implicate compromised mitochondrial bioenergetic function as one of the earliest intracellular effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ in the production of nephrotoxicity but suggest that the intracellular process involves events in addition to those seen with direct exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ in vitro.

  7. Technical note: Could benzalkonium chloride be a suitable alternative to mercuric chloride for preservation of seawater samples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloël, J.; Robinson, C.; Tilstone, G. H.; Tarran, G.; Kaiser, J.

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental equipment unsuitable or unavailable for fieldwork as well as lack of ship space can necessitate the preservation of seawater samples prior to analysis in a shore-based laboratory. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is routinely used for such preservation, but its handling and subsequent disposal incur environmental risks and significant expense. There is therefore a strong motivation to find less hazardous alternatives. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been used previously as microbial inhibitor for freshwater samples. Here, we assess the use of BAC for marine samples prior to the measurement of oxygen-to-argon (O2 / Ar) ratios, as used for the determination of biological net community production. BAC at a concentration of 50 mg dm-3 inhibited microbial activity for at least 3 days in samples tested with chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations up to 1 mg m-3. BAC concentrations of 100 and 200 mg dm-3 were no more effective than 50 mg dm-3. With fewer risks to human health and the environment, and no requirement for expensive waste disposal, BAC could be a viable alternative to HgCl2 for short-term preservation of seawater samples, but is not a replacement for HgCl2 in the case of oxygen triple isotope analysis, which requires storage over weeks to months. In any event, further tests on a case-by-case basis should be undertaken if use of BAC was considered, since its inhibitory activity may depend on concentration and composition of the microbial community.

  8. Distribution of biotransformation of methyl mercuric chloride in different tissues of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehra, M.; Choi, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of 203 Hg radioactivity has been studied in various organs of adult male and female mice from one hour to 21 days after treating with 203 Hg-labeled methyl mercuric chloride (MMC). The amount of methyl mercury (MeHg) and inorganic mercury (Hg) has also beam determined by injecting single doses of non-radioactive MMC, and subsequently measuring total, organic and inorganic Hg content by atomic absorption technique. In addition, photoemulsion histochemical method (PEHM) was used to demonstrate localization of Hg grains in various cellular compartments of organs and tissues. The highest levels of radioactivity were attained at 7 hours post-treatment on all organs except for brain and testis. The testis showed the highest radioactivity at one day and the brain at two days post-treatment. MeHg persisted in brain over a longer period though the level was not as high. The content of MeHg and inorganic Hg was maximum in kidneys as compared to other organs. The brain and the reproductive organs contained the least amoun of inorganic Hg. By PEHM, Hg grains were most prominently observed in the sinusoids, Kupfer cells, hepatic cells and bile duct epithelium of liver; in the lumen of blood vessels, convoluted and collecting tubules of kidneys; and in the gastrointestinal epithelium. The pattern of uptake and distribution of MeHg correlated well with the morphological demonstration of Hg grains in tissue sections. (author)

  9. Mercury Disposition in Suckling Rats: Comparative Assessment Following Parenteral Exposure to Thiomersal and Mercuric Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanuša, Maja; Orct, Tatjana; Vihnanek Lazarus, Maja; Sekovanić, Ankica; Piasek, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Due to the facts that thiomersal-containing vaccine is still in use in many developing countries, and all forms of mercury have recognised neurotoxic, nephrotoxic, and other toxic effects, studies on disposition of ethylmercury and other mercury forms are still justified, especially at young age. Our investigation aimed at comparing mercury distribution and rate of excretion in the early period of life following exposure to either thiomersal (TM) or mercuric chloride (HgCl2) in suckling rats. Three experimental groups were studied: control, TM, and HgCl2, with 12 to18 pups in each. Both forms of mercury were administered subcutaneously in equimolar quantities (0.81 μmol/kg b.w.) three times during the suckling period (on the days of birth 7, 9, and 11) to mimic the vaccination regimen in infants. After the last administration of TM or HgCl2, total mercury retention and excretion was assessed during following six days. In TM-exposed group mercury retention was higher in the brain, enteral excretion was similar, and urinary excretion was much lower compared to HgCl2-exposed sucklings. More research is still needed to elucidate all aspects of toxicokinetics and most harmful neurotoxic potential of various forms of mercury, especially in the earliest period of life. PMID:22899883

  10. Mechanism of inhibition of rat brain adenosine triphosphatase by mercuric chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, C.S.; Rajanna, B.; Rajanna, S.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric Chloride (Hg), a neurotoxic compound inhibited ATPase system of rat brain microsomes. Membrane bound enzymes, Na + -K + ATPase (IC 50 = 2.35 x 10 -7M ) and K-paranitrophenyl phosphatase (K-PNPPase) (IC 50 = 2.7 x 10 -7M ) and 3 H-Ouabain binding (IC 50 = 3.3 x 10 -7M ) were inhibited by Hg at micromolar concentrations in a dose dependent manner. Hydrolysis of ATP was linear with time with or without Hg in the reaction mixtures. Altered pH or temperature versus enzyme activity showed higher inhibition by Hg at basic pH (8.0-9.0) and at lower temperatures (17-32 degree C). Activation energy (ΔE) values were increased at 27-37 degree C in the presence of Hg. Kinetic studies of cationic-substrate activation of Na + -K + ATPase and K-PNPPase in the presence of Hg showed significant changes in kinetic constant (K m and V max ). Inhibition of Na + -K + ATPase was partially restored by repeated washings of microsomes. Preincubation with sulfhydryl agents protected Na + -K + ATPase from Hg inhibition. Cumulative inhibition studies with Hg and ouabain indicated possible interaction between the two inhibitors of Na + -K + ATPase by interacting at Na + and K + sites

  11. Effect of mercuric chloride feeding on sexual maturity, egg production and fertility in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1973-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 8, 16 or 32 p.p.m. of mercury as mercuric chloride from 3 days of age through 20 weeks of age. The onset of egg production generally occurred earlier for hens fed HgCl2. Average age in days at first oviposition for the control, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m. and 32 p.p.m. was 48.4, 50.9, 46.9 and 44.0 respectively. The average rate of egg productivity from first oviposition to attainment of full growth (9 weeks of age) correlated positively with in increased dietary mercury (controls, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m., 32 p.p.m. ? 75.2, 69.3, 86.1 and 93.3% respectively). By 20 weeks of age productivity was 81.0, 80.6, 87.5 and 92.9% for control, 8, 16 and 32 p.p.m. groups respectively. Fertility was depressed when hens were fed HgCl2. At 9 weeks of age average control fertility was 59% contrasted with 25% for the 32 p.p.m. group. At 12 weeks fertility increased to 89% and 57% for these groups. From this study it is apparent. that the onset and rate of egg production was stimulated by HgCl2, but fertility was adversely affected.

  12. Histochemical demonstration of mercury in the olfactory system of salmon (Salmo salar L.) following treatments with dietary methylmercuric chloride and dissolved mercuric chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Døving, K B

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of organic and inorganic mercury compounds was studied histochemically in the salmon (Salmo salar L.) olfactory system. One group of salmon was given fodder pellets containing methylmercuric chloride (CH3HgCl, 99 micrograms Hg/g) for 4 weeks. Other groups of fish were exposed...... to dissolved mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 270 micrograms Hg/liter) for 2, 6, and 12 hr, respectively. In both series of experiments, the radioisotope 203Hg was included in order to determine the accumulation of mercury in the olfactory system. Gamma-spectrometry showed that both mercury compounds accumulated...... in the olfactory rosettes and their nerves. Tissue sections from the rosettes and olfactory nerves were subjected to autometallographic silver enhancement, thereby rendering mercury deposits visible for light and electron microscopy. Microscopic analysis demonstrated an intense and comprehensive Hg deposition...

  13. Mechanism of mercuric chloride resistance in microorganisms. II. NADPH-dependent reduction of mercuric chloride and vaporization of mercury from mercuric chloride by a multiple drug resistant strain of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, I; Funaba, T; Izaki, K

    1971-01-01

    The activity to vaporize a /sup 203/Hg compound from /sup 203/HgCl/sub 2/ was demonstrated in crude cell-free extracts of a strain of Escherichia coli W2252, which had acquired the multiple drug resistance. NADPH was essential for the vaporization, while NADH had only a slight stimulating effect and NADP/sup +/ had no effect. The oxidation of NADPH dependent on HgCl/sub 2/ was also demonstrated in the crude extracts, but the HgCl/sub 2/-dependent NADH oxidation could be demonstrated only when a partially purified enzyme preparation was used. The rate of NADH oxidation was much slower than that of NADPH oxidation. It was concluded that NADPH, and to a lesser extent NADH, act as electron donors for the enzymatic reduction of HgCl/sub 2/ and the vaporization occurs after this reduction. This reduction and subsequent vaporization seem to provide a mechanism of resistance to HgCl/sub 2/ in E. coli strains having the multiple drug resistance. 15 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Distribution of mercury in the eggs of the false melon beetle, Atrachya menetriesi Faldermann (coleoptera: chrysomeridae), treated with mercuric chloride for breaking diapause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Y

    1971-01-01

    Mercuric chloride was effective in breaking diapause in the egg of Atrachya menetriesi. The distribution of mercury in treated eggs was examined quantitatively. To break diapause eggs were dipped in an aqueous solution of mercuric chloride (0.125mM) for 5 min. About 20 ..mu..g of mercury per 100 mg of eggs was found in the chorion and none in other parts. Only a negligible amount was found in the larvae that hatched from treated eggs. Almost all the mercury was removed when eggs were washed in a dilute solution of cysteine hydrochloride or glutathione (reduced). It seems that breaking of diapause is effected even when mercury does not penetrate the chorion.

  15. The Effects of Chronic Ingestion of Mercuric Chloride on Fertility and Testosterone Levels in Male Sprague Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Heath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although male infertility is well researched, the effects of inorganic mercury on male reproduction and fertility are less well known. Studies pertaining to mercury and male fertility identified reduced concentration of testosterone in the serum of male workers, a toxic influence on fertility of organic mercury compounds within concentrations at the workplace, and increased days to pregnancy. We evaluated the effect of chronic mercuric chloride (HgCl2 exposure in male rats on reproductive endpoints. Thirty-day old male Sprague Dawley rats (n=31 were exposed to 0.0, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg/day of HgCl2 via gavage. After 60 days exposure, they were housed with nonexposed females for 21 days. A survivor analysis revealed the exposed animals took longer to impregnate the females and had a lower rate of impregnation. Further statistical analysis revealed a lower correlation between testicular testosterone levels and days to impregnate, and also lower sperm counts in the epididymis head and body of the exposed males. The results indicate that HgCl2 exposure had significant adverse effects on male rat reproduction endpoints including fertility at a dose that was not clinically toxic.

  16. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Copan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users’ homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m3 of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m3. Mercury contamination of cream users’ homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment.

  17. Mercury uptake in vivo by normal and acatalasemic mice exposed to metallic mercury vapor (203Hg degrees) and injected with metallic mercury or mercuric chloride (203HgCl2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Meguro, T.; Aikoh, H.

    1985-01-01

    Levels of mercury in the brain and liver of acatalasemic mice immediately following exposure to metallic mercury vapor or injection of metallic mercury were higher than those found in normal mice. Acatalasemic mice had decreased levels of mercury in the blood and kidneys when the levels were compared with those of normal mice, which indicated that catalase plays a role in oxidizing and taking up mercury. Thus, the brain/blood or liver/blood ratio of mercury concentration in acatalasemic mice was significantly higher than that of normal mice. These results suggest that metallic mercury in the blood easily passed through the blood-brain or blood-liver barrier. The levels of mercury distribution to the kidneys of normal and acatalasemic mice, 1 hr after injection of mercuric chloride solution, were higher than that of normal and acatalasemic mice, respectively, 1 hr after injection of metallic mercury

  18. Effects of dietary [alpha]-tocopherol and [beta]-carotene on lipid peroxidation induced by methyl mercuric chloride in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raun Andersen, H; Andersen, O [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Odense, Odense (Denmark)

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of male CBA mice to methyl mercuric chloride, CH[sub 3]HgCl, (10-40 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 weeks resulted in dose-related Hg deposition and enhanced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. Mice were fed well-defined semisynthetic diets containing different levels of [alpha]-tocopherol (10, 100 or 1000 mg/kg) or [beta]-carotene (1000, 10,000 or 100,000 IU/kg) for four weeks, two groups on each diet. The concentration of [alpha]-tocopherol and [beta]-carotene used corresponded to deficient, normal and high levels. During the last two weeks, one group on each diet was given 40 mg CH[sub 3]HgCl/l of drinking water. High dietary [alpha]-tocopherol protected against CH[sub 3]HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation, whereas the [alpha]-tocopherol deficient diet further enhanced CH[sub 3]HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation. Similar, though statistically non-significant effects occurred in the kidneys, [alpha]-tocopherol did not protect against CH[sub 3]HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. Excess dietary [beta]-carotene further enhanced CH[sub 3]HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. CH[sub 3]HgCl significantly decreased the activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) in the kidneys in all dietary groups. High dietary [alpha]-tocopherol enhanced the activity of Se-GSH-Px in liver and kidney compared to the activity in mice fed the normal level of [alpha]-tocopherol. This occurred in mice exposed to CH[sub 3]-HgCl as well as in unexposed mice, and the difference between CH[sub 3]HgCl exposed and unexposed mice was not diminished. High dietary [alpha]-tocopherol increased the activity of both Se-GSH-Px and T-GSH-Px in the brain of CH[sub 3]HgCl-exposed mice. The dietary level of [beta]-carotene did not affect the activity of the two enzymes in the organs investigated. (au) (43 refs.).

  19. Effects of dietary α-tocopherol and β-carotene on lipid peroxidation induced by methyl mercuric chloride in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raun Andersen, H.; Andersen, O.

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of male CBA mice to methyl mercuric chloride, CH 3 HgCl, (10-40 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 weeks resulted in dose-related Hg deposition and enhanced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. Mice were fed well-defined semisynthetic diets containing different levels of α-tocopherol (10, 100 or 1000 mg/kg) or β-carotene (1000, 10,000 or 100,000 IU/kg) for four weeks, two groups on each diet. The concentration of α-tocopherol and β-carotene used corresponded to deficient, normal and high levels. During the last two weeks, one group on each diet was given 40 mg CH 3 HgCl/l of drinking water. High dietary α-tocopherol protected against CH 3 HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation, whereas the α-tocopherol deficient diet further enhanced CH 3 HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation. Similar, though statistically non-significant effects occurred in the kidneys, α-tocopherol did not protect against CH 3 HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. Excess dietary β-carotene further enhanced CH 3 HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. CH 3 HgCl significantly decreased the activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) in the kidneys in all dietary groups. High dietary α-tocopherol enhanced the activity of Se-GSH-Px in liver and kidney compared to the activity in mice fed the normal level of α-tocopherol. This occurred in mice exposed to CH 3 -HgCl as well as in unexposed mice, and the difference between CH 3 HgCl exposed and unexposed mice was not diminished. High dietary α-tocopherol increased the activity of both Se-GSH-Px and T-GSH-Px in the brain of CH 3 HgCl-exposed mice. The dietary level of β-carotene did not affect the activity of the two enzymes in the organs investigated. (au) (43 refs.)

  20. Mercuric chloride-induced alterations of levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine esterase activity in different regions of rat brain during postnatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmana, M.K. (Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India)); Desiraju, T. (Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India)); Raju, T.R. (Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India))

    1993-07-01

    Wistar rats were fed mercuric chloride, 4 mg/kg body weight per day chronically from postnatal day 2 to 60 by gastric intubation. Mercury consumption was then discontinued until 170 days to allow time for recovery. Since mercury caused reduction in body weight, an underweight group was also included besides the normal saline group. Levels of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) were assayed in various brain regions in different age groups. By 60 days of age, the mercury group showed elevations of NA levels in olfactory bulb (OB), visual cortex (VC) and brain stem (BS) but not in striatumaccumbens (SA) and hippocampus (HI). DA levels were also increased in OB, HI, VC and BS but not in SA. AChE activity was decreased in the mercury group only in HI and VC at 20 days of age. The Mercury group showed no behavioural abnormality outwardly; however, operant conditioning relevated a dificiency in performance. Nevertheless, all these changes disappeared after discontinuation of mercury intake. Thus the changes occurring in the brain at this level of oral mercuric chloride intake seem to reflect adaptive neural mechanisms rather than pathological damage. (orig.)

  1. Histopathological changes induced by acute toxicity of mercuric chloride on the air-breathing organ (branchial diverticulum) of the life-fish Heteropneustes (= Saccobranchus) fossilis (BLOCH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, M.T. (Histochemistry and Histopathology Lab., Dept. of Zoology, Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)); Banerjee, T.K. (Histochemistry and Histopathology Lab., Dept. of Zoology, Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India))

    1993-01-01

    Toxicity induced by 0.3 ppm (96 h LC[sub 50] value) mercuric chloride solution on the histomorphology of the innerlining of the air breathing organ (branchial diverticulum) of Heteropneustes fossilis has been described. The outer cell layers of the epithelial lining show cyclic necrosis leading to shedding with ultimate haemorrhage and drainage of blood into the lumen causing decrease in the number of blood islets. Simultaneously the epithelium regenerates causing hyperplasia of its cells and increased gas diffusion distance impairing normal aerial respiration. Also the number of foldings decreases and the secondary lamella like structures fuse together. This results in smoothening of the inner lining of the air sac. Later reappearance of the blood islets, secondary lamellae and foldings of the inner lining are observed along with the repair of the epithelium. Damage of the repaired inner lining follows again. (orig.)

  2. Catalytic Oxidation of Cyanogen Chloride over a Monolithic Oxidation Catalyst

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of cyanogen chloride was evaluated over a monolithic oxidation catalyst at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg C in air employing feed concentrations between 100 and 10,000 ppm...

  3. The effect of selenium on the biliary excretion and organ distribution of mercury in the rat after exposure to methyl mercuric chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.; Norseth, T.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of selenium compounds on the biliary excretion and the organ distribution of mercury after injection of methyl mercuric chloride(4μmol/kg) have been tested. Selenite, seleno-di-N-acetylglycine and seleno-methionine strongly inhibited the biliary excretion of mercury. Selenite even in a molar dose of 1/40 of the methyl mercury dose inhibited the biliary excretion of mercury. The loss toxic seleno-di-N-acetylglycine was needed in larger molar doses and did not act as rapidly as selenite. Biliary excreted methyl mercury is known to be partly reabsorbed in the gut. Subsequently a part of it is deposited in the kidneys since drainage of the bile lowered the kidney content of mercury. Rats given selenium compounds in combination with bile drainage showed further reduction of the kidney mercury content than bile duct drainage alone. Thus the demonstrated lowering effect of selenium compounds on the kidney mercury content cannot be completely explained by an inhibition of biliary excretion of mercury. The mercury concentration in the brain was increased by the selenium compounds; the effect being dependent of the selenium dose reaching a maximum at an equimolar selenite - to methyl mercury dose ratio. The mechanisms by which selenium influences the methyl mercury kinetics are discussed. (author)

  4. Differential patterns of injury to the proximal tubule of renal cortical slices following in vitro exposure to mercuric chloride, potassium dichromate, or hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, C E; Gandolfi, A J; Nagle, R B; Brendel, K

    1987-09-15

    The innate susceptibility of renal cell types to these agents was investigated using precision-cut rabbit renal cortical slices made perpendicular to the cortical-papillary axis. Slices were incubated in DME/F12 medium containing 10 microM, 100 microM, or 1 mM concentrations of either metal for 12 hr or in Krebs-Hepes buffer gassed with nitrogen (100%) for 0.75 to 5 hr of hypoxic exposure. To simulate postischemic reperfusion, some slices were transferred to vessels gassed with oxygen after an initial hypoxic period. Mercuric chloride (100 microM) exposure resulted in damage to the straight regions of proximal tubules by 12 hr leaving convoluted regions unaffected. Hypoxia (2.25 hr) and potassium dichromate (100 microM for 12 hr) both caused injury to the convoluted proximal tubules without affecting straight proximal tubular regions. Mercury concentrations of 10 microM and 1 mM had no effect or injured all cell types within the slice, respectively. Similar results were observed for hypoxic periods less than 1.5 hr or greater than 3 hr of exposure. Potassium dichromate had no measurable affect at 10 microM, but at 1 mM focal lesions were observed after 4 hr of exposure, and by 12 hr all cell types within the slice were affected. Intracellular potassium content normalized to DNA correlated well, but always preceded the pathological lesions observed. These results demonstrate that injury to specific regions of the proximal tubule by these agents relates to an innate susceptibility of the intoxicated cell type independent of physiologic feedback or blood delivery patterns proposed as mechanisms of selective injury from in vivo studies.

  5. Morphologic and functional alterations induced by low doses of mercuric chloride in the kidney OK cell line: ultrastructural evidence for an apoptotic mechanism of damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Said-Fernandez, Salvador; Sepulveda-Saavedra, Julio; Cruz-Vega, Delia E.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2005-01-01

    Mercury produces acute renal failure in experimental animal models, but the mechanism of tubular injury has not completely been clarified. There is an increased interest in the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of renal diseases that result primarily from injury to renal tubular epithelial cells. However, detailed studies of morpho-functional alterations induced by mercuric chloride in kidney cell lines are scarce. This work characterizes these alterations in OK cell cultures. Morphological alterations were profiled using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy, as well as mitochondrial functional assays in the cells exposed to low concentrations of HgCl 2 . At concentrations of 1 and 10 μM of HgCl 2 there were no morphological or ultrastructural alterations, but the mitochondrial function (MTT assay) and intracellular ATP content was increased, especially at longer incubation times (6 and 9 h). At 15 μM HgCl 2 , both the mitochondrial activity and the endogenous ATP decreased significantly. At this concentration the OK cells rounded up, had increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, and detached from the cell monolayer. At 15 μM HgCl 2 ultrastructural changes were characterized by dispersion of the ribosomes, dilatation of the cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, increase of number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, chromatin condensation, invaginations of the nuclear envelope, presence of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, and alterations in the size and morphology of mitochondria. At 15 μM HgCl 2 apoptotic signs included membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial alterations, apoptotic bodies, and nuclear envelope rupture. Using confocal microscopy and the mitochondrial specific dye MitoTracker Red, it was possible to establish qualitative changes induced by mercury on the mitochondrial membrane potential after incubation of the cells for 6 and 9 h with 15 μM HgCl 2 . This effect was not observed at short times

  6. Interaction of calcium oxide with molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, A.V.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Ermakov, D.S.; Magurina, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium oxide solubility in molten lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium chlorides and their binary mixtures is determined in a temperature range of 973-1173 K by the method of isothermal saturation. Mechanisms of calcium oxide interaction with molten alkali metal chlorides are proposed

  7. On barium oxide solubility in barium-containing chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2016-01-01

    Oxide solubility in chloride melts depends on temperature and composition of molten solvent. The solubility of barium oxide in the solvents with barium chloride content is essentially higher than that in molten alkali chlorides. Spectral data demonstrate the existence of oxychloride ionic groupings in such melts. This work presents the results of the BaO solubility in two molten BaCl 2 -NaCl systems with different barium chloride content. The received data together with earlier published results revealed the main regularities of BaO solubility in molten BaO-BaCl 2 -MCl systems.

  8. Mercuric oxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Essentials of Toxicology. 3rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill Medical; 2015:chap 23. Theobald JL, Mycyk ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  9. A Comparison of growth on mercuric chloride for three Lemnaceae species reveals differences in growth dynamics that effect their suitability for use in either monitoring or remediating ecosystems contaminated with mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjing; Li, Gaojie; Bishopp, Anthony; Heenatigala, P. P. M.; Hu, Shiqi; Chen, Yan; Wu, Zhigang; Kumar, Sunjeet; Duan, Pengfei; Yao, Lunguang; Hou, Hongwei

    2018-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that can alter the ecological balance when it contaminates aquatic ecosystems. Previously, researchers have used various Lemnaceae species either to monitor and/or remove heavy metals from freshwater systems. As Hg contamination is a pressing issue for aquatic systems worldwide, we assessed its impact on the growth of three commonly species of Lemnaceae - Lemna gibba 6745, Lemna minor 6580 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5543. We exposed plants to different concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and monitored their growth, including relative growth rate, frond number, and fresh weight. These data were coupled with measurements of starch content, levels of photosynthetic pigment and the activities of antioxidant substances. The growth of all three lines showed significant negative correlations with Hg concentrations, and starch content, photosynthetic pigment, soluble protein and antioxidant enzymes levels were all clearly affected. Our results indicate that the L. gibba line used in this study was the most suitable of the three for biomonitoring of water contaminated with Hg. Accumulation of Hg was highest in the S. polyrhiza line with a bioconcentration factor over 1000, making this line the most suitable of the three tested for use in an Hg bioremediation system.

  10. A Comparison of Growth on Mercuric Chloride for Three Lemnaceae Species Reveals Differences in Growth Dynamics That Effect Their Suitability for Use in Either Monitoring or Remediating Ecosystems Contaminated With Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a toxic heavy metal that can alter the ecological balance when it contaminates aquatic ecosystems. Previously, researchers have used various Lemnaceae species either to monitor and/or remove heavy metals from freshwater systems. As Hg contamination is a pressing issue for aquatic systems worldwide, we assessed its impact on the growth of three commonly species of Lemnaceae- Lemna gibba 6745, Lemna minor 6580 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5543. We exposed plants to different concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 and monitored their growth, including relative growth rate, frond number (FN, and fresh weight (FW. These data were coupled with measurements of starch content, levels of photosynthetic pigment and the activities of antioxidant substances. The growth of all three lines showed significant negative correlations with Hg concentrations, and starch content, photosynthetic pigment, soluble protein and antioxidant enzymes levels were all clearly affected. Our results indicate that the L. gibba line used in this study was the most suitable of the three for biomonitoring of water contaminated with Hg. Accumulation of Hg was highest in the S. polyrhiza line with a bioconcentration factor over 1,000, making this line the most suitable of the three tested for use in an Hg bioremediation system.

  11. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  12. Transformation of zinc hydroxide chloride monohydrate to crystalline zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Amir; Cortie, Michael; McDonagh, Andrew

    2016-04-25

    Thermal decomposition of layered zinc hydroxide double salts provides an interesting alternative synthesis for particles of zinc oxide. Here, we examine the sequence of changes occurring as zinc hydroxide chloride monohydrate (Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O) is converted to crystalline ZnO by thermal decomposition. The specific surface area of the resultant ZnO measured by BET was 1.3 m(2) g(-1). A complicating and important factor in this process is that the thermal decomposition of zinc hydroxide chloride is also accompanied by the formation of volatile zinc-containing species under certain conditions. We show that this volatile compound is anhydrous ZnCl2 and its formation is moisture dependent. Therefore, control of atmospheric moisture is an important consideration that affects the overall efficiency of ZnO production by this process.

  13. Metallic oxide reduction in molten chlorides: electrochemical solvent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2005-11-01

    We consider the reaction MeO 2 + 2 Ca → Me + 2 CaO in CaCl 2 at 850 C. We want to re-use the molten media, which is a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at the end of the reaction. For that we want to de-oxidize it. When we electrolyse CaO we obtain Ca and O 2 ; it presents three difficult points that we want to solve: (1) it is difficult to oxidize O 2 - without oxidizing Cl - because their oxidation potential are very closed, (2) the chemical or electrochemical anodic corrosion, (3) the anodically produced gas dissolution in the mell One way of avoiding chlorine gas evolution is to prevent chloride ions from reaching the anode, for example using a selective membrane. Furthermore, the best prevention of the anodically produced gas dissolution in the melt can be done with a compartment, physically separating the anode from the rest of the reactional media. Thus in this work we have used an yttria stabilized zirconia membrane as a selective membrane for the deoxidation of a CaO-CaCl 2 melt at 850 C. (author)

  14. Mercuric iodide sensor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.B.; Anderson, R.J.; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the improvement in the performance and the manufacturing yield of mercuric iodide detectors achieved by identifying the dominant impurities, carrier traps, and processing steps limiting device performance. Theoretical studies of electron and hole transport in this material set fundamental limits on detector performance and provided a standard against which to compare experimental results. Spectroscopy techniques including low temperature photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current spectroscopy were applied to characterize the deep level traps in this material. Traps and defects that can be introduced into the detector during growth, from the contact, and during the various steps in detector fabrication were identified. Trap energy levels and their relative abundances were determined. Variations in material quality and detector performance at the micron scale were investigated to understand the distribution in electric field in large volume detectors suitable for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Surface aging and contact degradation was studied extensively by techniques including atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Preferred handling and processing procedures for maximizing detector performance and yield were established. The manufacturing yield of high resolution gamma-ray detectors was improved from a few percent to more than 30%

  15. Anodic oxidation of chloride ions in 1-butyl-3-methyl-limidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qibo; Hua, Yixin; Wang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The anodic oxidation of Cl − in BMIMBF 4 is electrochemically irreversible with diffusion controlled. • The oxidation of Cl − in BMIMBF 4 is more likely to form tri-chloride ion, Cl 3 − but not chlorine, Cl 2 . • The minute amount of Cl 2 detected after electrolysis forms according to the equilibrium of Cl 2 + Cl − ⇌ Cl 3 − . -- Abstract: The oxidation behavior of chloride ions on platinum electrodes was investigated in a natural ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl-limidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF 4 ) in the presence of high concentrations of 1-butyl-3-methyl-limidazolium chloride (BMIMCl). Analysis of the electrode reaction was explored using cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry with a platinum micro-disk electrode, and bulk potentiostatic electrolysis and UV–vis spectroscopy. The anodic oxidation of chloride ions on the platinum micro-disk electrode in the mixture was considered to be an irreversible process with diffusion controlled as revealed by cyclic voltammetry. The diffusion coefficient, D, and the number of electrons transferred, n, for anodic oxidation of Cl − in BMIMBF 4 derived from results of chronoamperometry revealed that the oxidation of chloride ions was more likely to form tri-chloride ion, Cl 3 − but not chlorine, Cl 2 . Bulk electrolysis and UV–vis spectroscopy further confirmed that the tri-chloride ion was the main product from the overall oxidation of the chloride ion

  16. Two-electron oxidation of cobalt phthalocyanines by thionyl chloride: Implications for lithium/thionyl chloride batteries. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, P.A.; Lever, A.B.

    1989-10-20

    Cyclic voltammetry, DPV and electronic spectroscopy are used to study the reaction between thionyl chloride and cobalt phthalocyanine. SOCl2 reacts with (Co(I)Tn Pc(2-)) and Co(II)Tn Pc(2-) to give two-electron oxidized species. Implications for Li/SOCl2 batteries are discussed. Thionyl chloride also forms a mono SOCl2 adduct with Co(II)TnPc(2-). Driving forces (Delta E values) were calculated for CoTnPc comproportionation and CoTnPc + SOCl2 reactions. Rest potential measurements of a Li/SOCl2 cells show that addition of AlCl3 stabilizes the LiCl product as LiAlCl4. A catalytic two-electron mechanism is indicated for the reduction of thionyl chloride in a Li/SOCl2/(CoTnPc,C) battery.

  17. Oxidative addition of aryl chlorides to monoligated palladium(0): A DFT-SCRF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative addition of aryl chlorides to palladium has been investigated by hybrid density functional theory methods (B3LYP), including a continuum model describing the solvent implicitly. A series of para-substituted aryl chlorides were studied to see the influence of electronic effects...

  18. Photooxidation of chloride by oxide minerals: implications for perchlorate on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D; Sambur, Justin B; Gelwicks, Melissa; Eggleston, Carrick M; Parkinson, B A

    2011-11-09

    We show that highly oxidizing valence band holes, produced by ultraviolet (UV) illumination of naturally occurring semiconducting minerals, are capable of oxidizing chloride ion to perchlorate in aqueous solutions at higher rates than other known natural perchlorate production processes. Our results support an alternative to atmospheric reactions leading to the formation of high concentrations of perchlorate on Mars.

  19. Attenuation by methyl mercury and mercuric sulfide of pentobarbital induced hypnotic tolerance in mice through inhibition of ATPase activities and nitric oxide production in cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Huang, Zih-Ning; Yu, Hsun-Hsin; Chang, Liang-Hao [College of Engineering, Southern Taiwan University, Institute of Biotechnology, Tainan (China); Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn [College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei (China)

    2008-06-15

    This study is aimed at exploring the possible mechanism of hypnosis-enhancing effect of HgS or cinnabar (a traditional Chinese medicine containing more than 95% HgS) in mice treated with pentobarbital. We also examined whether the effect of HgS is different from that of the well-known methyl mercury (MeHg). After a short period (7 days) of oral administration to mice, a nontoxic dose (0.1 g/kg) of HgS not only significantly enhanced pentobarbital-induced hypnosis but also attenuated tolerance induction; while a higher dose (1 g/kg) of HgS or cinnabar exerted an almost irreversible enhancing effect on pentobarbital-hypnosis similar to that of MeHg (2 mg/kg) tested, which was still effective even after 10 or 35 days cessation of administration. To study comparatively the effects of different mercury forms from oral administration of MeHg and HgS on membrane ATPase activities of experimental mice, analysis of the Hg content in the cerebral cortex revealed that correlated with the decrease of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities. Furthermore, NO levels of blood but not that of cerebral cortex were also decreased by mercuric compounds. Although pentobarbital alone enhanced cytochrome p450-2C9 in time dependent manner, all of mercurial compounds tested had no such effect. All of these findings indicated that the mercurial compounds including cinnabar, HgS and MeHg exert a long-lasting enhancing hypnotic activity without affecting pentobarbital metabolism, which provides evidence-based sedative effect of cinnabar used in Chinese traditional medicine for more than 2,000 years. The nontoxic HgS dosing (0.1 g/kg/day) for consecutive 7 days is perhaps useful for delaying or preventing pentobarbital-tolerance. (orig.)

  20. Mercury chloride-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... ... role in the protection of cell membranes aganist oxidative damage .... Differences were calculated using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) .... via the formation of reactive oxygen species and the perturbation of ...

  1. Metal chloride-treated graphene oxide to produce high-performance polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Su; Noh, Yong-Jin; Kwon, Sung-Nam; Na, Seok-In, E-mail: nsi12@jbnu.ac.kr [Professional Graduate School of Flexible and Printable Electronics and Polymer Materials Fusion Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 664-14, Deokjin-dong, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ye-Jin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok-Soon, E-mail: sskim@kunsan.ac.kr [Department of Nano and Chemical Engineering, Kunsan National University, Kunsan, Jeollabuk-do 753-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Wook [Soft Innovative Materials Research Center, Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, San 101, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 565-905 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-13

    We introduce a simple but effective graphene oxide (GO) modification with metal chloride treatments to produce high-performance polymer solar cells (PSCs). The role of various metal chlorides on GO and their effects on device performances of PSCs was investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, and current-voltage measurement studies demonstrated that metal chloride can induce a p-doping effect and increase the GO work-function, thus resulting in an improved built-in potential and interfacial resistance in PSCs. The resultant PSCs with metal chloride exhibited improved device efficiency than those with the neat GO. Furthermore, with the metal chloride-doped GO, we finally achieved an excellent PSC-efficiency of 6.58% and a very desirable device stability, which constitute a highly similar efficiency but much better PSC life-time to conventional device with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). This study could be a valuable way to produce various PEDOT:PSS alternatives and beneficial for producing high-performance and cost-efficient polymeric devices.

  2. Radiation-induced oxidative degradation of poly(vinyl chloride)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, E.S.A.; Seguchi, T.; Machi, S.

    1981-01-01

    Gas evolution and oxygen consumption in the γ-irradiation of PVC were studied. The gas evolution and the oxidative degradation are retarded by the presence of plasticizers and stabilizers. The G(HCl) and G(H 2 ) are 8 and 0.24 for the irradiation of pure PVC under vacuum and 0.02 and 0.14 for that of plasticized PVC, respectively. Gas evolution increases in the presence of oxygen, specially for the pure PVC. The G(-O 2 ) values for the pure and plasticized PVC are 30 and 12, respectively. The dependence of gas evolution and oxygen consumption on the oxygen pressure is more pronounced for the plasticized PVC than pure PVC because the oxygen diffusion is controlled

  3. The influence of nitric oxide and mercury chloride on leaf mesophyll structure under natural drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola M. Musiyenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is established that under natural drought conditions starch was accumulated in the central part of chloroplasts of mesophyll cells and chloroplasts were localized on the periphery of cells at plasmalemma. After treatment wheat plants by nitric oxide donor the decreasing of starch deposits number and close contacts between chloroplasts were indicated, elongated nucleus was localized in the centre of cells. After treatment wheat plant by mercury chloride chloroplasts in the cells lost their oval shape and contacts, increased eventually deposition of starch, indicating the acceleration of aging tissues. Thus, nitric oxide in drought conditions reduced the destructive effect of drought on mesophyll cells, and mercury chloride caused deformation of the membrane cell.

  4. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Skipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay. The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05 increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05 was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells.

  5. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Nouveaux supraconducteurs à haute température critique à base de mercure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C.; Hervieu, M.; Martin, C.; Maignan, A.; Pelloquin, D.; Goutenoire, F.; Huvé, M.; Raveau, B.

    1994-11-01

    Structural and superconducting properties of new cations substituted mercury based oxides are described. They are mainly characterized by [ Hg{1-x}MxOδ] infty monolayers, however a compound with doubled [ Hg{1-x}MxOδ] infty layer is described for the first time. Critical temperatures vary in a large range 0leqslant T_cleqslant 130 K, but they are lower than those of related to pure mercury oxides. The influence of annealings in various atmospheres upon T_c is discussed. Les caractéristiques structurales et supraconductrices de nouveaux oxydes à base de mercure, dans lesquels le mercure est partiellement remplacé par un autre cation, sont décrites. Dans la majorité des cas, ces oxydes sont caractérisés par une monocouche [ Hg{1-x}MxOδ] infty ; cependant, pour la première fois un composé contenant une double couche majoritaire en mercure est isolé. Les températures critiques varient dans un large domaine (0-130 K) mais restent inférieures à celles des oxydes parents ll tout mercure gg. L'influence des recuits sous des atmosphères diverses est discutée.

  7. Modulation of vasodilator response via the nitric oxide pathway after acute methyl mercury chloride exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanwar, S; Saidullah, B; Ravi, K; Fahim, M

    2013-01-01

    Mercury exposure induces endothelial dysfunction leading to loss of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation due to decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability via increased oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate whether acute treatment with methyl mercury chloride changes the endothelium-dependent vasodilator response and to explore the possible mechanisms behind the observed effects. Wistar rats were treated with methyl mercury chloride (5 mg/kg, po.). The methyl mercury chloride treatment resulted in an increased aortic vasorelaxant response to acetylcholine (ACh). In methyl-mercury-chloride-exposed rats, the % change in vasorelaxant response of ACh in presence of Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 10(-4) M) was significantly increased, and in presence of glybenclamide (10(-5) M), the response was similar to that of untreated rats, indicating the involvement of NO and not of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) + catalase treatment increased the NO modulation of vasodilator response in methyl-mercury-chloride-exposed rats. Our results demonstrate an increase in the vascular reactivity to ACh in aorta of rats acutely exposed to methyl mercury chloride. Methyl mercury chloride induces nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and increases the NO production along with inducing oxidative stress without affecting the EDHF pathway.

  8. Modulation of Vasodilator Response via the Nitric Oxide Pathway after Acute Methyl Mercury Chloride Exposure in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Omanwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exposure induces endothelial dysfunction leading to loss of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation due to decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability via increased oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate whether acute treatment with methyl mercury chloride changes the endothelium-dependent vasodilator response and to explore the possible mechanisms behind the observed effects. Wistar rats were treated with methyl mercury chloride (5 mg/kg, po.. The methyl mercury chloride treatment resulted in an increased aortic vasorelaxant response to acetylcholine (ACh. In methyl-mercury-chloride-exposed rats, the % change in vasorelaxant response of ACh in presence of Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 10-4 M was significantly increased, and in presence of glybenclamide (10-5 M, the response was similar to that of untreated rats, indicating the involvement of NO and not of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD + catalase treatment increased the NO modulation of vasodilator response in methyl-mercury-chloride-exposed rats. Our results demonstrate an increase in the vascular reactivity to ACh in aorta of rats acutely exposed to methyl mercury chloride. Methyl mercury chloride induces nitric oxide synthase (NOS and increases the NO production along with inducing oxidative stress without affecting the EDHF pathway.

  9. Pourbaix diagrams of actinides in molten chlorides using an indicating electrode for oxide ion activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, D.; Lacquement, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pyrochemical separation methods using high temperature molten salt media could emerge as promising and valuable routes compared with aqueous methods for separation and transmutation strategies for long-lived radionuclides. A good knowledge of the molten salt chemistry is essential for controlling these separations, and elementary data are required for molten halide salts, which can be readily provided by electrochemical methods. Applying the chemical principles of aqueous solutions to the molten salt media, Pourbaix diagrams - called in this case potential-oxo-acidity (pO 2- ) - can be plotted. They offer a rapid and comprehensive view of the thermodynamic properties of selected elements in a solvent of interest. Two methods are available for preparing these diagrams. The first is based on available thermodynamic data on pure element oxide (and oxychloride) compounds and on element chloride activity coefficients in melt (which can be electrochemically determined). In this method, we consider the oxide anion exchange reactions between the pure compounds, water and hydrogen chloride. The second method is a direct and experimental determination of the oxo-acidic properties of the studied element chlorides in melts. Use of an Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia Membrane (YSZM) electrode (oxide anion selective electrode) helps determine the nature of the stable oxide compounds in melts as well as their stabilities. The YSZM is used with a silver/silver chloride reference system, and was developed 25 years ago. Two examples of Potential-acidity diagrams. Employing the first method and the determination of the standard potential of plutonium in LiCl-KCl and NaCl-KCl eutectic mixtures, potential-oxo-acidity diagrams were plotted for these melts at various temperatures. It was found that the stability domain for plutonium chloride depends on the melt composition (influence of oxide anion solvation). We also used the Omega acidity function - based on reaction (1) - which is a

  10. Highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane with supported molten chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.A.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2011-07-01

    Ethene production is one of the most important transformations in chemical industry, given that C{sub 2}H{sub 4} serves as building block for many mass-market products. Besides conventional thermal processes like steam cracking of ethane, ethane can be produced selectively by catalytic processes. One of the classes of catalysts that have been reported in literature as active and highly selective for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane is that of supported molten chloride catalysts, containing an alkali chloride overlayer on a solid support. This work deals with fundamental aspects of the catalytic action in latter class of catalysts. Results from kinetic reaction studies are related to observations in detailed characterization and lead to a comprehensive mechanistic understanding. Of fundamental importance towards mechanistic insights is the oxygen storage capacity of the catalysts that has been determined by transient step experiments. (orig.)

  11. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E; Beyerle, A G; Dolin, R C; Ortale, C [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Operations

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented. (orig.).

  12. Chloride secretion induced by rotavirus is oxidative stress-dependent and inhibited by Saccharomyces boulardii in human enterocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Buccigrossi

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV infection causes watery diarrhea via multiple mechanisms, primarily chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cell. The chloride secretion largely depends on non-structural protein 4 (NSP4 enterotoxic activity in human enterocytes through mechanisms that have not been defined. Redox imbalance is a common event in cells infected by viruses, but the role of oxidative stress in RV infection is unknown. RV SA11 induced chloride secretion in association with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS in Caco-2 cells. The ratio between reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione was decreased by RV. The same effects were observed when purified NSP4 was added to Caco-2 cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a potent antioxidant, strongly inhibited the increase in ROS and GSH imbalance. These results suggest a link between oxidative stress and RV-induced diarrhea. Because Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb has been effectively used to treat RV diarrhea, we tested its effects on RV-infected cells. Sb supernatant prevented RV-induced oxidative stress and strongly inhibited chloride secretion in Caco-2 cells. These results were confirmed in an organ culture model using human intestinal biopsies, demonstrating that chloride secretion induced by RV-NSP4 is oxidative stress-dependent and is inhibited by Sb, which produces soluble metabolites that prevent oxidative stress. The results of this study provide novel insights into RV-induced diarrhea and the efficacy of probiotics.

  13. Chloride secretion induced by rotavirus is oxidative stress-dependent and inhibited by Saccharomyces boulardii in human enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Laudiero, Gabriella; Russo, Carla; Miele, Erasmo; Sofia, Morena; Monini, Marina; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Guarino, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infection causes watery diarrhea via multiple mechanisms, primarily chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cell. The chloride secretion largely depends on non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) enterotoxic activity in human enterocytes through mechanisms that have not been defined. Redox imbalance is a common event in cells infected by viruses, but the role of oxidative stress in RV infection is unknown. RV SA11 induced chloride secretion in association with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caco-2 cells. The ratio between reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione was decreased by RV. The same effects were observed when purified NSP4 was added to Caco-2 cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, strongly inhibited the increase in ROS and GSH imbalance. These results suggest a link between oxidative stress and RV-induced diarrhea. Because Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) has been effectively used to treat RV diarrhea, we tested its effects on RV-infected cells. Sb supernatant prevented RV-induced oxidative stress and strongly inhibited chloride secretion in Caco-2 cells. These results were confirmed in an organ culture model using human intestinal biopsies, demonstrating that chloride secretion induced by RV-NSP4 is oxidative stress-dependent and is inhibited by Sb, which produces soluble metabolites that prevent oxidative stress. The results of this study provide novel insights into RV-induced diarrhea and the efficacy of probiotics.

  14. Chlorination of uranium oxides in melts of alkali metal chlorides and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobej, M.P.; Bevz, A.S.; Skiba, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    Chlorination of UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , and UO 3 in melts of chlorides of alkali metals and of their mixtures has been studied by thermogravimetric, X-ray phase, and spectrophotometric methods. The thermogravimetric method has been proposed for evaluating the state of uranylcation in the melt; the effect of the composition of the oxide being chlorinated and of the salt-solvent on the composition of the chlorination products has been studied. The effect of the composition of the chlorination products on the stoichiometry of the electrolytic uranium dioxide has been shown

  15. The radiolytic reduction of mercuric chloride in aqueous sugar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    The reduction of HgCl 2 has been measured in Co-60 γ-irradiated aqueous glucose, fructose and sucrose solutions. G-values for reduction, G(R), are substantially greater than 6 molecules per 100 eV in all systems from 1% by weight sugar to greater than 50%. Chain reduction occurs in glucose and fructose solutions with maximum G(R) values of 18-20 molecules per 100 eV occurring at 24% (1.0 M) sugar. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which HgCl radicals react with the organic solute to produce chain propagating free radicals. A dose rate independence of the chain length, after a brief ''induction'' period, is explained in terms of a chain termination by the incorporation of HgCl in growing Hg 2 Cl 2 particles. Reduction of Ag(I) and Cu(II) in aqueous sucrose and fructose systems took place with G(R) < 6 indicating the absence of reaction chains in these cases. (author)

  16. The study of chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine and calcium chloride in the presence of active additives

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Ilija; Krstev, Boris; Stopic, Srecko; Cerovic, K

    1997-01-01

    Chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine and calcium chloride in the presence of C, BaS and S were studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine was carried out in the temperature range 573-873 K and by calcium chloride in the temperature range 1023-1223 K. The results obtained of the chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine showed that C has the strongest and S the weakest effect on the process. Addition of BaS has a favorable effect on the chlorina...

  17. Identification of chlorinated oligomers formed during anodic oxidation of phenol in the presence of chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Linxi; Campo, Pablo; Kupferle, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • By-products from anodic oxidation of phenol in the presence of chloride are investigated. • Chlorinated oligomer formation is demonstrated by LC-QTOF-MS. • They have structures similar to triclosan and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins. - Abstract: Chlorinated oligomer intermediates formed during the anodic electrochemical oxidation of phenol with a boron-doped diamond electrode were studied at two different concentrations of chloride (5 mM and 50 mM). Under the same ionic strength, with sodium sulfate being the make-up ion, a 10-fold increase in Cl − led to removal rates 10.8, 1.5, and 1.4 times higher for phenol, TOC, and COD, respectively. Mono-, di- and trichlorophenols resulting from electrophilic substitution were the identified by-products. Nevertheless, discrepancies between theoretical and measured TOC values along with gaps in the mass balance of chlorine-containing species indicated the formation of unaccounted-for chlorinated by-products. Accurate mass measurements by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and MS-MS fragmentation spectra showed that additional compounds formed were dimers and trimers of phenol with structures similar to triclosan and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

  18. Identification of chlorinated oligomers formed during anodic oxidation of phenol in the presence of chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Linxi; Campo, Pablo; Kupferle, Margaret J., E-mail: margaret.kupferle@uc.edu

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • By-products from anodic oxidation of phenol in the presence of chloride are investigated. • Chlorinated oligomer formation is demonstrated by LC-QTOF-MS. • They have structures similar to triclosan and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins. - Abstract: Chlorinated oligomer intermediates formed during the anodic electrochemical oxidation of phenol with a boron-doped diamond electrode were studied at two different concentrations of chloride (5 mM and 50 mM). Under the same ionic strength, with sodium sulfate being the make-up ion, a 10-fold increase in Cl{sup −} led to removal rates 10.8, 1.5, and 1.4 times higher for phenol, TOC, and COD, respectively. Mono-, di- and trichlorophenols resulting from electrophilic substitution were the identified by-products. Nevertheless, discrepancies between theoretical and measured TOC values along with gaps in the mass balance of chlorine-containing species indicated the formation of unaccounted-for chlorinated by-products. Accurate mass measurements by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and MS-MS fragmentation spectra showed that additional compounds formed were dimers and trimers of phenol with structures similar to triclosan and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins.

  19. New Aptes Cross-linked Polymers from Poly(ethylene oxide)s and Cyanuric Chloride for Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Kinder, James D.; Bennett, William R.

    2005-01-01

    A new series of polymer electrolytes for use as membranes for lithium batteries are described. Electrolytes were made by polymerization between cyanuric chloride and diamino-terminated poly(ethylene oxide)s, followed by cross-linking via a sol-gel process. Thermal analysis and lithium conductivity of freestanding polymer films were studied. The effects of several variables on conductivity were investigated, such as length of backbone PEO chain, length of branching PEO chain, extent of branching, extent of cross-linking, salt content, and salt counterion. Polymer films with the highest percentage of PEO were found to be the most conductive, with a maximum lithium conductivity of 3.9 x 10(exp -5) S/cm at 25 C. Addition of plasticizer to the dry polymers increased conductivity by an order of magnitude.

  20. Effect of mercuric ions on growth and respiration of two coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynecka, Z; Szymona, O

    1966-01-01

    Sensitivity toward HgCl/sub 2/ of two coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus strains has been studied. Strain 15 proved to be over 10 times more resistant to HgCl/sub 2/ in the growth test than strain 31. The former showed also higher rates of endogenous respiration and more actively oxidized glucose in presence of HgCl/sub 2/. Strain 31 grew better in absence of HgCl/sub 2/ but readily underwent inhibition both in the growth and glucose oxidation experiment. Strain 31 was, however, less sensitive to HgCl/sub 2/, as detected by methylene blue reduction in presence of malate and succinate as substrates. Cysteine largely reversed the inhibitory effect of mercuric ions. Experiments with radioactive Hg/sup 203/Cl/sub 2/ did not prove the sensitive strain 31 to bind more mercuric ions than strain 15. 12 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Actinide oxides synthesis in molten chloride. Structural studies and reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigier, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes are studied as potential alternatives to hydrochemical processes for spent nuclear fuel treatment. The CEA pyrochemical process led to a molten LiCl-CaCl 2 (30-70% mol) salt at 700 C with solubilized actinides at the oxidation state (III). The study developed in this thesis concerns actinide oxides synthesis in this media for nuclear fuel re-fabrication. This synthesis was done by wet argon sparging. First, this conversion method is described for neodymium (III) and cerium (III) co-conversion. The conversion rates are around 99.9%. The obtained powders contain mixed oxychloride Ce 1-x Nd x OCl as main component, with a small amount of mixed oxide Ce 1-x Nd x O 2-0,5x for the high cerium ratio. A second oxychloride CeIV(Nd 0.7 Ce 0.3 ) III O 3 Cl is obtained in specific conditions and in very low quantity. The structure of this oxychloride is described in this study. The partially oxidative property of the conversion method induces the oxidation of a part of cerium (III) to oxidation state (IV). In the case of uranium (III) conversion by wet argon sparging, all the uranium is oxidized and give the oxide UO 2 as single compound. The conversion rate for this element is over 99.9% in the molten chloride, but significant amount of uranium is lost by volatilization during the conversion. The study shows the oxygen sensitivity of uranium during the conversion, inducing oxidation over the oxidation state (IV), and giving UO 2+x or uranate CaUO 4 . As a consequence, oxygen led to calcium pollution in the precipitate. Finally, the U(III) and Pu(III) co-conversion study shows the highest precipitation sensitivity of uranium (III) in comparison with plutonium (III), responsible of a successive conversion of the two elements, giving an oxide mixture of UO 2 et PuO 2 with quantitative conversion rate. Surprisingly, the conversion of Pu(III) in the same conditions led to a mixture of PuO 2 and PuOCl, characteristic of a partial oxidation from Pu (III) to Pu

  2. Oxidation promotes insertion of the CLIC1 chloride intracellular channel into the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Sophia C; Howell, Michael W; Cordina, Nicole M; Littler, Dene R; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Members of the chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) family exist primarily as soluble proteins but can also auto-insert into cellular membranes to form ion channels. While little is known about the process of CLIC membrane insertion, a unique feature of mammalian CLIC1 is its ability to undergo a dramatic structural metamorphosis between a monomeric glutathione-S-transferase homolog and an all-helical dimer upon oxidation in solution. Whether this oxidation-induced metamorphosis facilitates CLIC1 membrane insertion is unclear. In this work, we have sought to characterise the role of oxidation in the process of CLIC1 membrane insertion. We examined how redox conditions modify the ability of CLIC1 to associate with and insert into the membrane using fluorescence quenching studies and a sucrose-loaded vesicle sedimentation assay to measure membrane binding. Our results suggest that oxidation of monomeric CLIC1, in the presence of membranes, promotes insertion into the bilayer more effectively than the oxidised CLIC1 dimer.

  3. Environmental and energy gains from using molten magnesium–sodium–potassium chlorides for electro-metallisation of refractory metal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molten eutectic mixture of magnesium, sodium and potassium chlorides (MgCl2–NaCl–KCl has inappreciable solubility for oxide ions, and can help disengage a carbon anode from the oxide ions generated at a metal oxide cathode, and effectively avoid carbon dioxide formation. This “disengaging strategy” was successfully demonstrated in electro-reduction of solid oxides of zirconium and tantalum. It has led to significantly higher current efficiency (93%, and lower energy consumption (1.4 kW h kg−1 in electrolysis of tantalum oxide to tantalum metal compared to the conventional electrolysis in molten calcium chloride (e.g. 78% and 2.4 kW h/kg-Ta.

  4. Role of Nrf2 in preventing oxidative stress induced chloride current alteration in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canella, Rita; Benedusi, Mascia; Martini, Marta; Cervellati, Franco; Cavicchio, Carlotta; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2018-08-01

    The lung tissue is one of the main targets of oxidative stress due to external sources and respiratory activity. In our previous work, we have demonstrated in that O 3 exposure alters the Cl - current-voltage relationship, with the appearance of a large outward rectifier component mainly sustained by outward rectifier chloride channels (ORCCs) in human lung epithelial cells (A549 line). In the present study, we have performed patch clamp experiments, in order to identify which one of the O 3 byproducts (4hydroxynonenal (HNE) and/or H 2 O 2 ) was responsible for chloride current change. While 4HNE exposition (up to 25 μM for 30' before electrophysiological analysis) did not reproduce O 3 effect, H 2 O 2 produced by glucose oxidase 10 mU for 24 hr before electrophysiological analysis mimicked O 3 response. This result was confirmed treating the cell with catalase (CAT) before O 3 exposure (1,000 U/ml for 2 hr): CAT was able to rescue Cl - current alteration. Since CAT is regulated by Nrf2 transcription factor, we pre-treated the cells with the Nrf2 activators, resveratrol and tBHQ. Immunochemical and immunocytochemical results showed Nrf2 activation with both substances that lead to prevent OS effect on Cl - current. These data bring new insights into the mechanisms involved in OS-induced lung tissue damage, pointing out the role of H 2 O 2 in chloride current alteration and the ability of Nfr2 activation in preventing this effect. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Oxidative Esterification of Aldehydes with Urea Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sin-Ae; Kim, Yoon Mi; Lee, Jong Chan [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a new, environmentally benign and highly efficient oxidative preparation of methyl esters by the reaction of various aldehydes with UHP in methanol catalyzed by readily accessible aluminum(III) chloride hexahydrate. This new greener and cost effective direct esterification method can serve as a useful alternative to existing protocols. Esters are some of the most important functional groups in organic chemistry and have been found in the sub-structure of a variety of natural products, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. Numerous methods have been reported for the preparation of various esters. In particular, this method gives low yields for both aldehydes containing electron donating substituents in aromatic rings and heterocyclic aldehydes. Therefore, development of a more general, efficient, and greener protocol for the esterification of aldehydes with readily available catalyst is still desirable.

  6. Direct versus indirect electrochemical oxidation of pesticide polluted drainage water containing sodium chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muff, Jens; Erichsen, Rasmus; Damgaard, Christian

    2008-01-01

    the treatment. Indirect electrochemical treatment, where a highly oxidized brine solution was added to the drainage water, revealed immediately reduction in COD, and similar to the direct treatment, degradation of all of the pesticide pollutants was obtained except for the O,O,O-triethyl-phosphoric acid......Drainage water from a depot of chemical waste, polluted with a mixture of organophosphates and degradation products was treated by a direct as well as an indirect electrochemical method using a Ti/Pt-Ir anode and Stainless Steel 304 cathode. With a concentration of 0.7%, sodium chloride...... concentrations. Analyses of the actual pollutants, Me-Parathion, parathion, malathion and degradation products, confirmed that the concentrations of all initial pollutants were eliminated during the treatment. The only exception was O,O,O-triethyl-phosphoric acid, a degradation product which was formed during...

  7. Direct versus indirect electrochemical oxidation of pesticide polluted drainage water containing sodium chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muff, Jens; Erichsen, Rasmus; Damgaard, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Drainage water from a depot of chemical waste, polluted with a mixture of organophosphates and degradation products was treated by a direct as well as an indirect electrochemical method using a Ti/Pt-Ir anode and Stainless Steel 304 cathode. With a concentration of 0.7%, sodium chloride...... the treatment. Indirect electrochemical treatment, where a highly oxidized brine solution was added to the drainage water, revealed immediately reduction in COD, and similar to the direct treatment, degradation of all of the pesticide pollutants was obtained except for the O,O,O-triethyl-phosphoric acid...... concentrations. Analyses of the actual pollutants, Me-Parathion, parathion, malathion and degradation products, confirmed that the concentrations of all initial pollutants were eliminated during the treatment. The only exception was O,O,O-triethyl-phosphoric acid, a degradation product which was formed during...

  8. Oxidation of Borneol to Camphor Using Oxone and Catalytic Sodium Chloride: A Green Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patrick T.; Harned, Andrew M.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    A new green oxidation procedure was developed for the undergraduate organic teaching laboratories using Oxone and a catalytic quantity of sodium chloride for the conversion of borneol to camphor. This simple 1 h, room temperature reaction afforded high quality and yield of product, was environmentally friendly, and produced negligible quantities…

  9. Influence of chloride ion concentration on the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AM50 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of a silicate- and a phosphate-based plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AM50 magnesium alloy obtained using a pulsed DC power supply was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in NaCl solutions of different chloride ion concentrations viz., 0.01 M, 0.1 M, 0.5 M and 1 M. The surface of the PEO coated specimens after 50 h of immersion/EIS testing was examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the corrosion deterioration of PEO coated magnesium alloy in NaCl solutions was significantly influenced by chloride ion concentration. The silicate-based coating was found to offer a superior corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate than the phosphate-based coatings in lower chloride ion concentration NaCl solutions (0.01 M and 0.1 M NaCl). On the other hand both these PEO coatings were found to be highly susceptible to localized damage, and could not provide an effective corrosion protection to Mg alloy substrate in solutions containing higher chloride concentrations (0.5 M and 1 M). The extent of localized damage was observed to be more with increase in chloride concentration in both the cases.

  10. Cerium concentrate and mixed rare earth chloride by the oxidative decomposition of bastnaesite in molten sodium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Toshio; Kato, Kazuhiro; Kuno, Toyohiko; Okuwaki, Akitsugu; Umetsu, Yoshiaki; Okabe, Taijiro

    1993-01-01

    Bastnaesite was treated in molten NaOH at 623-777 K for 10-60 min under atmosphere. Cerium-(III) in the ore was easily oxidized 95% or more within 30 min to give an oxidation product composed of solid solutions of CeO 2 -rich and CeO 2 -lean phases and Ce-free rare earth oxide phase. Simultaneously fluoride ion was removed 97% or more. Cerium concentrate was prepared from the oxidation product by leaching with 0.1-3 M HCl solution. The yield of cerium concentrate and the CeO 2 content reached 55-57% and 70-72%, respectively. Mixed rare earth chloride is composed of about 90% rare earth chloride and 10% alkaline earth chloride, and the contents of CeCl 3 , LaCl 3 , NdCl 3 , and PrCl 3 are 11.5, 58.5, 14.4, and 5.4%, respectively. The particle size of resulting cerium concentrate was fairly uniform and about 0.1 μm

  11. Potentiometric study of samarium oxides formation from its chloride in a molten eutectic mixture of sodium and cesium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Bove, A.L.; Del'mukhamedov, R.D.; Borodina, N.P.; Gavrilov, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of trivalent samarium cations with oxide-ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt at 973 K has been studied by potentiometric method using electrochemical cell with two platinum-oxygen electrodes with a solid electrolyte membrane. The mechanism of the interaction and composition of the reaction products, depending on the medium oxyacidity, have been considered. Certain thermodynamic characteristics of the process have been calculated

  12. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of arbutin, whitening agent through oxidation by periodate and complexation with ferric chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoom, B. N.; Abdelsamad, A. M. E.; Adib, N. M.

    2006-07-01

    A simple and accurate spectrophotometric method for the determination of arbutin (glycosylated hydroquinone) is described. It is based on the oxidation of arbutin by periodate in presence of iodate. Excess periodate causes liberation of iodine at pH 8.0. The unreacted periodate is determined by measurement of the liberated iodine spectrophotometrically in the wavelength range (300-500 nm). A calibration curve was constructed for more accurate results and the correlation coefficient of linear regression analysis was -0.9778. The precision of this method was better than 6.17% R.S.D. ( n = 3). Regression analysis of Bear-Lambert plot shows good correlation in the concentration range 25-125 ug/ml. The identification limit was determined to be 25 ug/ml a detailed study of the reaction conditions was carried out, including effect of changing pH, time, temperature and volume of periodate. Analyzing pure and authentic samples containing arbutin tested the validity of the proposed method which has an average percent recovery of 100.86%. An alternative method is also proposed which involves a complexation reaction between arbutin and ferric chloride solution. The produced complex which is yellowish-green in color was determined spectophotometrically.

  13. Electrical conductivity of molten carbonate and carbonate-chloride systems coexisting with aluminium oxide powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V. [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural State Economic Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Bovet, Andrey L.; Zakiryanova, Irina D. [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2018-04-01

    The electrical properties of composite electrolytes (suspensions) composed of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder and molten carbonate eutectic (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut} or molten carbonate-chloride mixture 0.72(Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut}-0.28NaCl have been investigated by AC impedance method. This system shows a dependence of the electrical conductivity upon the temperature and the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The specific electrical conductivity of the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/(Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut} system can be adequately described by the Maxwell equation for two-phase heterogeneous materials. The regression equation for the dependence of the specific conductivity of the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/(Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sub eut} composite on the aluminium oxide concentration and temperature was obtained.

  14. Reductive mineralization of cellulose with vanadium, iron and tungsten chlorides and access to MxOy metal oxides and MxOy/C metal oxide/carbon composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Aurélien; Hesemann, Peter; Alauzun, Johan G; Boury, Bruno

    2017-10-15

    M x O y and M x O y /C composites (M=V, Fe and W) were obtained by mineralization of cellulose with several metal chlorides. Cellulose was used both as a templating agent and as an oxygen and a carbon source. Soluble chloride molecules (VOCl 3 and WCl 6 ) and a poorly soluble ionic chloride compound (FeCl 3 ) were chosen as metal oxide precursors. In a first time, primary metal oxide/cellulose composites were obtained via a thermal treatment by reacting urea impregnated filter paper with the corresponding metal chlorides in an autoclave at 150°C after 3days. After either pyrolysis or calcination steps of these intermediate materials, interesting metal oxides with various morphologies were obtained (V 2 O 5, V 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 , WO 3, H 0.23 WO 3 ), composites (V 2 O 3 /C) as well as carbides (hexagonal W 2 C and WC, Fe 3 C) This result highlight the reductive role that can play cellulose during the pyrolysis step that allows to tune the composition of M x O y /C composites. The materials were characterized by FTIR, Raman, TGA, XRD and SEM. This study highlights that cellulose can be used for a convenient preparation of a variety of highly demanded M x O y and M x O y /C composites with original shapes and morphologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of beryllium chloride and oxide on the sexual function in female rats and development of offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selivanova, L.N.; Savinova, T.B.

    1989-11-01

    A translation is given of a Russian article on the influence of beryllium chloride and oxide on the sexual cycle in female rats and on their capacity to conceive; another aim was to identify any embryotoxic and teratogenic effect of these compounds and to identify the exposure period values for pregnant females and the capacity of beryllium to penetrate the placenta and to accumulate in the foetus. (UK)

  16. A Novel Practical Synthesis of Phenanthrenes Using Iron(Ⅲ) Chloride Involved Intramolecular Oxidative Coupling at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U),Mao-Yun; WANG,Kai-Liang; CAI,Fei; WANG,Hai-Ying; WANG,Qing-Min

    2008-01-01

    Iron(Ⅲ) chloride has been used to prepare the polymethoxy substituted phenanthrene derivatives via in-tramolecular oxidative coupling of (E or Z)-2,3-di(substituted phenyl)acrylate at room temperature in excellent yields. Mild reaction conditions and the use of inexpensive and nontoxic FeCI3 provide a novel practical and large-scaled viable route for the synthesis of the important phenanthrene rings.

  17. Mechanistic understanding and kinetic studies of highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over novel supported molten chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Ethene is one of the most important feedstocks for chemical industry, nowadays mainly produced via steam cracking. However, oxidative dehydrogenation becomes a more important process route, allowing to produce ethene selectively and at lower temperatures. Supported alkali chloride catalysts are promising materials. However, the ODH mechanism of this class of catalysts is not well investigated so far. The investigation of the reaction mechanism is thus the aim of this contribution. (orig.)

  18. Synthetic and structural investigations of mercurous and mercuric organophosphonates and phenylarsonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalwar, Nitin Balkrushna; Vidyasagar, Kanamaluru

    2016-11-15

    The following twelve mercurous and mercuric organophosphomates, bis/diphosphonates and phenylarsonates have been isolated and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, {sup 13}C-and {sup 31}P NMR, infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods: Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(1), Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}P(C{sub 6}H{sub 4})PO{sub 3}H)(2), Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}P(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}PO{sub 3}H)(3), Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}PO{sub 3}H)(4), Hg{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(5), (Hg{sub 2}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}PO{sub 3})(6), (Hg{sub 2}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PO{sub 3})(7), Hg(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(8), Hg(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(9), Hg(O{sub 3}AsC{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(10), Hg{sub 3}(O{sub 3}AsC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(HO{sub 3}AsC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(11) and (Hg{sub 2})Hg{sub 3}(O{sub 3}P(C{sub 6}H{sub 4})PO{sub 3}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O(12). Compounds 1–7 are the first examples of mercurous phosphonates and di/bisphosphonates. They contain Hg{sub 2}O{sub 6} units, which consist of Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+} cations with Hg-Hg bond of ~2.5 Å length. Phenylphosphonates 1 and 5 are layered compounds, whereas bis/diphosphonates 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 have pillared-layered and three-dimensional structures. Compounds 8–11 are layered mercuric phosphonates and phenylarsonates. Compound 12 is a three-dimensional mixed-valent mercury phenylenebisphosphonate. - Graphical abstract: The first examples of mercurous organophosphonates and organodiphosphonates have layered, pillared-layered and three-dimensional structures.

  19. Behavior of molybdenum in pyrochemical reprocessing: A spectroscopic study of the chlorination of molybdenum and its oxides in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovicha, Vladimir A.; Griffiths, Trevor R.; Thied, Robert C.; Lewin, Bob

    2003-01-01

    The high temperature reactions of molybdenum and its oxides with chlorine and hydrogen chloride in molten alkali metal chlorides were investigated between 400 and 700 deg. C. The melts studied were LiCl-KCl, NaCl-CsCl and NaCl-KCl and the reactions were followed by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy measurements. In these melts Mo reacts with Cl 2 and initially produces MoCl 6 2- and then a mixture of Mo(III) and Mo(V) chlorocomplexes, the final proportion depending on the reaction conditions. The Mo(V) content can be removed as MoCl 5 from the melt under vacuum or be reduced to Mo(III) by Mo metal. The reaction of Mo when HCl gas is bubbled into alkali chloride melts yields only MoCl 6 3- . MoO 2 reacts in these melts with chlorine to form soluble MoOCl 5 2- and volatile MoO 2 Cl 2 . MoO 3 is soluble in chloride melts and then decomposes into the oxychloride MoO 2 Cl 2 , which sublimes or can be sparged from the melt, and molybdate. Pyrochemical reprocessing can thus be employed for molybdenum since, after various intermediates, the end-products are chloride melts containing chloro and oxychloro anions of molybdenum plus molybdate, and volatile chlorides and oxychlorides that can be readily separated off. The reactions were fastest in the NaCl-KCl melt. The X-ray diffraction pattern of MoO 2 Cl 2 is reported for the first time

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of synthetic tannery wastewater in chloride-free aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Carla Regina; Montilla, Francisco; Morallon, Emilia; Olivi, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical treatment of a synthetic tannery wastewater, prepared with several compounds used by finishing tanneries, was studied in chloride-free media. Boron-doped diamond (Si/BDD), antimony-doped tin dioxide (Ti/SnO 2 -Sb), and iridium-antimony-doped tin dioxide (Ti/SnO 2 -Sb-Ir) were evaluated as anode. The influence of pH and current density on the treatment was assessed by means of the parameters used to measure the level of organic contaminants in the wastewater; i.e., total phenols, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), and absorbance. Results showed that faster decrease in these parameters occurred when the Si/BDD anode was used. Good results were obtained with the Ti/SnO 2 -Sb anode, but its complete deactivation was reached after 4 h of electrolysis at 25 mA cm -2 , indicating that the service life of this electrode is short. The Ti/SnO 2 -Sb-Ir anode is chemically and electrochemically more stable than the Ti/SnO 2 -Sb anode, but it is not suitable for the electrochemical treatment under the studied conditions. No significant changes were observed for electrolyses performed at different pH conditions with Si/BDD, and this electrode led to almost complete mineralization after 4 h of electrolysis at 100 mA cm -2 . The increase in current density resulted in faster wastewater oxidation, with lower current efficiency and higher energy consumption. Si/BBD proved to be the best electrodic material for the direct electrooxidation of tannery wastewaters.

  1. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  2. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of tetraphosphorus in the presence of copper(II) chloride modified by humic (fulvo-) acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov; Dina Akbayeva; Zh. Eshova

    2012-01-01

    It was established that in mild conditions (50-70 oC, РО2= 1 atm) white phosphorus effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water-toluene solutions of copper(II) chloride modified by humic (fulvo-) acid to give mainly phosphoric acid. Humic (fulvo-) acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, intermediate and final ...

  3. Effects of pH, Chloride, and Bicarbonate on Cu(I) Oxidation Kinetics at Circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X.; Pham, A.; Waite, T.; Xing, G.; Rose, A.

    2012-12-01

    The redox chemistry of copper species in the upper water column plays a significant role in its speciation, transport and bioavailability. Most previous studies have focused primarily on Cu(II), principally because Cu(I) is easily oxidized to Cu(II) by oxygen or other oxidants. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that a number of potentially important reactions may lead to Cu(I) formation and result in a significant steady-state concentration of Cu(I) in natural waters. Redox reactions of Cu(I) could result in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical, that may subsequently induce a cascade of radical-promoted reactions with other constituents in natural waters. As such, a better understanding of copper-catalysed processes that produce and consume O2- is important in furthering our insight into factors contributing to global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, the oxidation kinetics of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(I) in NaCl solutions have been investigated over the pH range 6.5-8.0.The overall apparent oxidation rate constant was strongly affected by chloride, moderately by bicarbonate and, and to a lesser extent, by pH. In the absence of bicarbonate, an equilibrium-based speciation model indicated that Cu+ and CuClOH- were the most kinetically reactive species, while the contribution of other Cu(I) species to the overall oxidation rate was minor. A kinetic model based on recognized key redox reactions for these two species further indicated that oxidation of Cu(I) by oxygen and superoxide were important reactions at all pH values and [Cl-] considered, but back reduction of Cu(II) by superoxide only became important at relatively low chloride concentrations. Bicarbonate concentrations from 2-5 mM substantially accelerated Cu(I) oxidation. Kinetic analysis over a range of bicarbonate concentrations revealed that this was due to the formation of CuCO3-, which reacts relatively rapidly with oxygen, and not

  4. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of tetraphosphorus in the presence of copper(II chloride modified by humic (fulvo- acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It was established that in mild conditions (50-70 oC, РО2= 1 atm white phosphorus effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water-toluene solutions of copper(II chloride modified by humic (fulvo- acid to give mainly phosphoric acid. Humic (fulvo- acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, intermediate and final products, optimum conditions of new catalytic reaction of P4 oxidation by oxygen in water medium were defined by kinetics, volumometry, redox-potentiometry, 31Р{1Н} NMR spectroscopy and  titration. 

  5. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of sodium hypophosphite in the presence of copper (II chloride modified by humic (fulvo- acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It was established that in soft conditions (50-70oC, PO2 = 1 atm sodium hypophosphite effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water solutions of copper(II chloride  to give mainly a phosphorous acid. Humic (fulvo- acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, the intermediate and final products, optimal conditions of new catalytic reaction of NaH2PO2 oxidation by oxygen in water solution were defined by kinetics, volumometry, redox-potentiometry and a titration.

  6. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H. M.; Iedema, M.; Yu, X.-Y.; Cowin, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium chloride (brine) particles was studied by utilizing a cross flow mini-reactor. The reaction kinetics were followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely CCSEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry's law solubility of H2O2 in brine solutions to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to, eventually, a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted using established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the dependence of the Henry's law constant of H2O2 on ionic strength.

  7. Pomegranate Alleviates Oxidative Damage and Neurotransmitter Alterations in Rats Brain Exposed to Aluminum Chloride and/or Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; EL-Tahawey, N.A.; Elassal, A.A.; Elsayed, E.M.; Shousha, W.Gh.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum and gamma radiation, both are potent neurotoxins and have been implicated in many human neuro degenerative diseases. The present study was designed to investigate the role of pomegranate in alleviating oxidative damage and alteration of neurotransmitters in the brain of rats exposed to aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ), and/or gamma radiation (IR). The results revealed that rats whole body exposed to γ- rays, (1 Gy/week up to 4 Gy), and/or administered aluminum chloride (35 mg/kg body weight), via gavages for 4 weeks, resulted in brain tissue damage, featuring by significant increase of the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), associated with significant decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as glutathione (GSH) content indicating occurrence of oxidative stress. A significant decrease of serotonin (5-HT) level associated with a significant increase of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), in addition to a significant decrease in dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) contents recorded at the 1st, 7th and 14th day post-irradiation, indicating alterations in the metabolism of brain monoamines. On the other hand, the results exhibited that, supplementation of rats with pomegranate, via gavages, at a dose of 3 ml /kg body weight/ day, for 4 weeks along with AlCl 3 with or without radiation has significantly ameliorated the changes occurred in the mentioned parameters and the values returned close to the normal ones. It could be concluded that pomegranate, by its antioxidant constituents might antagonize brain oxidative damage and minimize the severity of aluminum (Al), and/or radiation-induced neurotransmitters disorders

  8. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr). Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and ...

  9. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr) Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and finally mer operon ...

  10. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%–99% pure) neptunium metal.

  11. Effect of graphite loading on the electrical and mechanical properties of Poly (Ethylene Oxide)/Poly (Vinyl Chloride) polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, M. D. S.; Supri, A. G.; Hanif, M. P. M.; Yazid, M. I. M.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, films consisting of a blend of poly (ethylene oxide)/poly (vinyl chloride) (PEO/PVC) and a conductive filler, graphite were prepared and characterized for their mechanical and electrical properties. Solid polymer blend films based on PEO/PVC (50/50 wt%/wt%) with different graphite loading were prepared by using solution casting technique. Electrical conductivity results discovered the conductivity increased with increasing of filler loading. However, increasing amount of graphite loading led to a decreased in tensile strength and young’s modulus of PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films. The dispersion of graphite and mechanism of conductive path in the polymer films were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of the PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films shows that agglomeration occurred to complete the connection of conductive path, thus improving the conductivity behavior of the polymer films.

  12. Furnace System Testing to Support Lower-Temperature Stabilization of High Chloride Plutonium Oxide Items at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Elmore, Monte R.

    2003-01-01

    High chloride content plutonium (HCP) oxides are impure plutonium oxide scrap which contains NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and/or CaCl2 salts at potentially high concentrations and must be stabilized at 950 C per the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000. The chlorides pose challenges to stabilization because volatile chloride salts and decomposition products can corrode furnace heating elements and downstream ventilation components. Thermal stabilization of HCP items at 750 C (without water washing) is being investigated as an alternative method for meeting the intent of DOE STD 3013-2000. This report presents the results from a series of furnace tests conducted to develop material balance and system operability data for supporting the evaluation of lower-temperature thermal stabilization

  13. Low levels of nitryl chloride at ground level: nocturnal nitrogen oxides in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, Hans D.; Odame-Ankrah, Charles A.; Taha, Youssef M.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Schiller, Corinne L.; Haga, Donna; Jones, Keith; Vingarzan, Roxanne

    2018-05-01

    The nocturnal nitrogen oxides, which include the nitrate radical (NO3), dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), and its uptake product on chloride containing aerosol, nitryl chloride (ClNO2), can have profound impacts on the lifetime of NOx ( = NO + NO2), radical budgets, and next-day photochemical ozone (O3) production, yet their abundances and chemistry are only sparsely constrained by ambient air measurements. Here, we present a measurement data set collected at a routine monitoring site near the Abbotsford International Airport (YXX) located approximately 30 km from the Pacific Ocean in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV) on the west coast of British Columbia. Measurements were made from 20 July to 4 August 2012 and included mixing ratios of ClNO2, N2O5, NO, NO2, total odd nitrogen (NOy), O3, photolysis frequencies, and size distribution and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (PM1). At night, O3 was rapidly and often completely removed by dry deposition and by titration with NO of anthropogenic origin and unsaturated biogenic hydrocarbons in a shallow nocturnal inversion surface layer. The low nocturnal O3 mixing ratios and presence of strong chemical sinks for NO3 limited the extent of nocturnal nitrogen oxide chemistry at ground level. Consequently, mixing ratios of N2O5 and ClNO2 were low ( formation of ClNO2 in the nocturnal residual layer aloft than at the surface and the breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer structure in the morning. When quantifiable, production of ClNO2 from N2O5 was efficient and likely occurred predominantly on unquantified supermicron-sized or refractory sea-salt-derived aerosol. After sunrise, production of Cl radicals from photolysis of ClNO2 was negligible compared to production of OH from the reaction of O(1D) + H2O except for a short period after sunrise.

  14. Behaviour of electroinsulating polyethylene and polyvinil-chloride-based materials in the contact with nitrogen oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.M.; Koroleva, G.N.; Il'yukhina, Ya.A.

    1987-01-01

    The compatibility of electric cable sheaths on polyethylene and polyvinylchloride base with nitrogen tetroxide has been studied. It is shown, that the cables with polyethylene sheaths are compatible with N 2 O 4 and can be used in the conditions of the contact with it within 5 hours. Polyvinylchloride is incompatible with nitrogen oxide and polyvinylchloride based cables can be used only with oxides concentraton don't exceeding 0,5 g/l. Under the effect of high concentrations before dismounting or conducting works after accidents, these cables need special treatment for eliminating impact sensitivity acquired in the conditions of contamination

  15. An MCM modeling study of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) impacts on oxidation, ozone production and nitrogen oxide partitioning in polluted continental outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, T. P.; Wolfe, G. M.; Danas, K. T.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D. M.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B.; Brown, S. S.; Thornton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) is produced at night by reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on chloride containing surfaces. ClNO2 is photolyzed during the morning hours after sunrise to liberate highly reactive chlorine atoms (Cl·). This chemistry takes place primarily in polluted environments where the concentrations of N2O5 precursors (nitrogen oxide radicals and ozone) are high, though it likely occurs in remote regions at lower intensities. Recent field measurements have illustrated the potential importance of ClNO2 as a daytime Cl· source and a nighttime NOx reservoir. However, the fate of the Cl· and the overall impact of ClNO2 on regional photochemistry remain poorly constrained by measurements and models. To this end, we have incorporated ClNO2 production, photolysis, and subsequent Cl· reactions into an existing master chemical mechanism (MCM version 3.2) box model framework using observational constraints from the CalNex 2010 field study. Cl· reactions with a set of alkenes and alcohols, and the simplified multiphase chemistry of N2O5, ClNO2, HOCl, ClONO2, and Cl2, none of which are currently part of the MCM, have been added to the mechanism. The presence of ClNO2 produces significant changes to oxidants, ozone, and nitrogen oxide partitioning, relative to model runs excluding ClNO2 formation. From a nighttime maximum of 1.5 ppbv ClNO2, the daytime maximum Cl· concentration reaches 1 × 105 atoms cm-3 at 07:00 model time, reacting mostly with a large suite of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to produce 2.2 times more organic peroxy radicals in the morning than in the absence of ClNO2. In the presence of several ppbv of nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2), these perturbations lead to similar enhancements in hydrogen oxide radicals (HOx = OH + HO2). Neglecting contributions from HONO, the total integrated daytime radical source is 17% larger when including ClNO2, which leads to a similar enhancement in integrated ozone production of 15%. Detectable

  16. Graphene supported silver@silver chloride & ferroferric oxide hybrid, a magnetically separable photocatalyst with high performance under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Suting; Jiang, Wei, E-mail: superfine_jw@126.com; Han, Mei; Liu, Gongzong; Zhang, Na; Lu, Yue

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The composites were synthesized via a facile and effective process. • Plenty of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Ag@AgCl nanoparticles are deposited on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets. • The catalyst exhibited an enhanced photocatalytic performance and magnetic property. • The catalyst is stable under the visible light irradiation. - Abstract: A stable magnetic separable plasmonic photocatalyst was successfully fabricated by grafting silver@silver chloride (Ag@AgCl) and ferroferric oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles on graphene sheets. The composite exhibited high activity degrading methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RB) under visible light irradiation: decomposition 97.4% of MB in 100 min and 97.9% of RB in 120 min. The enhanced photocatalytic activities can be attributed to synergistic effect between Ag@AgCl and graphene: the effective charge transfer from Ag@AgCl to graphene thus promotes the separation of electron–hole pairs. Moreover, the excellent magnetic property gives a more convenient way to recycle the photocatalysts.

  17. Hippocampal Dysfunction Provoked by Mercury Chloride Exposure: Evaluation of Cognitive Impairment, Oxidative Stress, Tissue Injury and Nature of Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walessa Alana Bragança Aragão

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a highly toxic metal, which can be found in its inorganic form in the environment. This form presents lower liposolubility and lower absorption in the body. In order to elucidate the possible toxicity of inorganic Hg in the hippocampus, we investigated the potential of low doses of mercury chloride (HgCl2 to promote hippocampal dysfunction by employing a chronic exposure model. For this, 56 rats were exposed to HgCl2 (0.375 mg/kg/day via the oral route for 45 days. After the exposure period, the animals were submitted to the cognitive test of fear memory. The hippocampus was collected for the measurement of total Hg levels, analysis of oxidative stress, and evaluation of cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and tissue injury. It was observed that chronic exposure to inorganic Hg promotes an increase in mercury levels in this region and damage to short- and long-term memory. Furthermore, we found that this exposure model provoked oxidative stress, which led to cytotoxicity and cell death by apoptosis, affecting astrocytes and neurons in the hippocampus. Our study demonstrated that inorganic Hg, even with its low liposolubility, is able to produce deleterious effects in the central nervous system, resulting in cognitive impairment and hippocampal damage when administered for a long time at low doses in rats.

  18. Tributyltin chloride induces renal dysfunction by inflammation and oxidative stress in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, João V S; Freitas-Lima, Leandro C; Freitas, Frederico F C T; Freitas, Flávia P S; Podratz, Priscila L; Magnago, Rafaella P L; Porto, Marcella L; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Vasquez, Elisardo C; Brandão, Poliane A A; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Paiva-Melo, Francisca D; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Silva, Ian V; Gava, Agata L; Graceli, Jones B

    2016-10-17

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an organometallic pollutant that is used as a biocide in antifouling paints. TBT induces several toxic and endocrine-disrupting effects. However, studies evaluating the effects of TBT on renal function are rare. This study demonstrates that TBT exposure is responsible for improper renal function as well as the development of abnormal morphophysiology in mammalian kidneys. Female rats were treated with TBT, and their renal morphophysiology was assessed. Morphophysiological abnormalities such as decreased glomerular filtration rate and increased proteinuria levels were observed in TBT rats. In addition, increases in inflammation, collagen deposition and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein expression were observed in TBT kidneys. A disrupted cellular redox balance and apoptosis in kidney tissue were also observed in TBT rats. TBT rats demonstrated reduced serum estrogen levels and estrogen receptor-α (ERα) protein expression in renal cortex. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that TBT is toxic to normal renal function and that these effects may be associated with renal histopathology complications, such as inflammation and fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  20. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  1. Growth of mercuric iodide single crystals from dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlston, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide is used as a solvent for the growth of red mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) crystals for use in radiation detectors. The hygroscopic property of the solvent allows controlled amounts of water to enter into the solvent phase and diminish the large solubility of HgI 2 so that the precipitating solid collects as well-defined euhedral crystals which grow into a volume of several cc

  2. Mechanism of mercuric chloride resistance in microorganisms. I. Vaporization of a mercury compound from mercuric chloride by multiple drug resistant strains of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, I; Izaki, K

    1971-01-01

    Three strains of Escherichia coli possessing the multiple drug resistance were found to be resistant also to HgCl/sub 2/, though they were sensitive to other heavy metal ions such as nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc ions. Like the resistance to drugs such as chloramphenicol and tetracycline, the HgCl/sub 2/ resistance could be transferred from a resistant strain of E. coli to sensitive strains of E. coli and Aerobacter aerogenes. The resistant strains could grow in the presence of 0.02 mM HgCl/sub 2/, whereas a sensitive strain failed to grow in the presence of 0.01 mM HgCl/sub 2/. During cultivation in the presence of HgCl/sub 2/, the cells of resistant strain vaporized a form of radioactive mercury when incubated with /sup 203/HgCl/sub 2/, glucose and NaCl in phosphate buffer while the cells of sensitive strain showed no such activity. This phenomenon seemed to explain the HgCl/sub 2/ resistance of the resistant strains.

  3. Interaction between nanoparticles generated by zinc chloride treatment and oxidative responses in rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzouz I

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inès Azzouz, Hamdi Trabelsi, Amel Hanini, Soumaya Ferchichi, Olfa Tebourbi, Mohsen Sakly, Hafedh AbdelmelekLaboratory of Integrative Physiology, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, Carthage University, TunisiaAbstract: The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction of zinc chloride (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [ip] in rat liver in terms of the biosynthesis of nanoparticles. Zinc treatment increased zinc content in rat liver. Analysis of fluorescence revealed the presence of red fluorescence in the liver following zinc treatment. Interestingly, the co-exposure to zinc (3 mg/kg, ip and selenium (0.20 mg/L, per os [by mouth] led to a higher intensity of red fluorescence compared to zinc-treated rats. In addition, X-ray diffraction measurements carried out on liver fractions of zinc-treated rats point to the biosynthesis of zinc sulfide and/or selenide nanocomplexes at nearly 51.60 nm in size. Moreover, co-exposure led to nanocomplexes of about 72.60 nm in size. The interaction of zinc with other mineral elements (S, Se generates several nanocomplexes, such as ZnS and/or ZnSe. The nanocomplex ZnX could interact directly with enzyme activity or indirectly by the disruption of mineral elements' bioavailability in cells. Subacute zinc or selenium treatment decreased malondialdehyde levels, indicating a drop in lipid peroxidation. In addition, antioxidant enzyme assays showed that treatment with zinc or co-treatment with zinc and selenium increased the activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Consequently, zinc complexation with sulfur and/or selenium at nanoscale level could enhance antioxidative responses, which is correlated to the ratio of number of ZnX nanoparticles (X=sulfur or X=selenium to malondialdehyde level in rat liver.Keywords: nanocomplexes biosynthesis, antioxidative responses, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence microscopy, liver

  4. Oxidant-stimulated chloride secretion in rat jejunum in vitro is mediated by eicosanoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, L.S.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Specific effects of the cytotoxic secondary lipid oxidation product, 4- hydroxynonenal (10(-8) - 10(-4) M), on intact sheets of rat jejunum were measured as changes in short circuit current (DeltaI(sc)) following cumulative addition to either the mucosal or serosal side, using the analogous...... (4- hydroxynonenal: 88.9 +/- 3.0%, N = 6, p piroxicam (10 μM), while 4......- hydroxynonenal- induced &UDelta;I-sc, was abolished by piroxicam (N = 8, P

  5. Low levels of nitryl chloride at ground level: nocturnal nitrogen oxides in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Osthoff

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The nocturnal nitrogen oxides, which include the nitrate radical (NO3, dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5, and its uptake product on chloride containing aerosol, nitryl chloride (ClNO2, can have profound impacts on the lifetime of NOx ( =  NO + NO2, radical budgets, and next-day photochemical ozone (O3 production, yet their abundances and chemistry are only sparsely constrained by ambient air measurements.Here, we present a measurement data set collected at a routine monitoring site near the Abbotsford International Airport (YXX located approximately 30 km from the Pacific Ocean in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV on the west coast of British Columbia. Measurements were made from 20 July to 4 August 2012 and included mixing ratios of ClNO2, N2O5, NO, NO2, total odd nitrogen (NOy, O3, photolysis frequencies, and size distribution and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (PM1.At night, O3 was rapidly and often completely removed by dry deposition and by titration with NO of anthropogenic origin and unsaturated biogenic hydrocarbons in a shallow nocturnal inversion surface layer. The low nocturnal O3 mixing ratios and presence of strong chemical sinks for NO3 limited the extent of nocturnal nitrogen oxide chemistry at ground level. Consequently, mixing ratios of N2O5 and ClNO2 were low ( <  30 and  <  100 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv and median nocturnal peak values of 7.8 and 7.9 pptv, respectively. Mixing ratios of ClNO2 frequently peaked 1–2 h after sunrise rationalized by more efficient formation of ClNO2 in the nocturnal residual layer aloft than at the surface and the breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer structure in the morning. When quantifiable, production of ClNO2 from N2O5 was efficient and likely occurred predominantly on unquantified supermicron-sized or refractory sea-salt-derived aerosol. After sunrise, production of Cl radicals from photolysis of ClNO2 was negligible compared to production of OH

  6. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-02

    Highlights: • A strategy for extraction of protein based on DES-coated magnetic graphene oxide. • The deep eutectic solvents were based on choline chloride. • Bovine serum albumin was used as the analyte. • The material prepared works for the acidic but not the basic or the neutral proteins. - Abstract: Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO) to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES. The UV–vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES performs better than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L{sup −1} Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} contained 1 mol L{sup −1} NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled.

  7. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2017-09-12

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  8. Indium Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films Deposited by Ultrasonic Chemical Spray Technique, Starting from Zinc Acetylacetonate and Indium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Biswal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The physical characteristics of ultrasonically sprayed indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In thin films, with electrical resistivity as low as 3.42 × 10−3 Ω·cm and high optical transmittance, in the visible range, of 50%–70% is presented. Zinc acetylacetonate and indium chloride were used as the organometallic zinc precursor and the doping source, respectively, achieving ZnO:In thin films with growth rate in the order of 100 nm/min. The effects of both indium concentration and the substrate temperature on the structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characteristics were measured. All the films were polycrystalline, fitting well with hexagonal wurtzite type ZnO. A switching in preferential growth, from (002 to (101 planes for indium doped samples were observed. The surface morphology of the films showed a change from hexagonal slices to triangle shaped grains as the indium concentration increases. Potential applications as transparent conductive electrodes based on the resulting low electrical resistance and high optical transparency of the studied samples are considered.

  9. Silver-choline chloride modified graphene oxide: Novel nano-bioelectrochemical sensor for celecoxib detection and CCD-RSM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaee, Zohreh; Karachi, Nima; Abrishamifar, Seyyed Milad; Kahkha, Mohammad Reza Rezaei; Razavi, Razieh

    2018-07-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles modified choline chloride functionalized graphene oxide (AgNPs-ChCl-GO) was synthesized using sonochemical method and utilized as a bioelectrochemical sensor for detection of celecoxib (CEL). The characterization studies were ultimately performed in order to acheive a more complete understanding of the morphological and structural features of the AgNPs-ChCl-GO using different techniques including FT-IR, AFM, FE-SEM, EDX, and XRD. AgNPs-ChCl-GO demonstrated a significant improvement in the reduction activity of CEL due to the enhancement in the current response compared to the bare carbon paste electrode (CPE). The optimum experimental conditions, were optimized using central composite design (CCD) methodology. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPVs) showed an expanded linear dynamic ranges of 9.6 × 10 -9 -7.4 × 10 -7  M for celecoxib in Britton-Robinson buffer in pH 5.0 with. LOD (S/N = 3) and LOQ (S/N = 10) were obtained 2.51 × 10 -9  M and 6.58 × 10 -9  M respectively. AgNPs-ChCl-GO-carbon paste electrode exhibited suitable properties and high accuracy determination of celecoxib in the human plasma sample. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, S.; McGregor Elsa; Ariesanti Bridget Corcoran

    2004-01-01

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers

  11. Mercury resistance and mercuric reductase activities and expression among chemotrophic thermophilic Aquificae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng; Barkay, Tamar

    2012-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg.

  12. Dosage du mercure dans le gaz naturel par absorption atomique sans flammes Mercury Titration in Natural Gas by Flameless Atomic Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Villa F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente la méthode mise au point par l'Institut Français du Pétrole pour déterminer par absorption atomique sans flamme, les traces de mercure métallique contenu dans un gaz naturel. La méthode d'analyse nécessite une extraction du mercure soit sous forme d'ion mercurique en faisant passer le gaz dans une solution oxydante, soit sous forme d'amalgame avec de l'or ou de l'argent. Le premier mode opératoire s'applique aux échantillons dont la concentration en mercure est supérieure à I ttg/Nm3, le second pour des concentrations inférieures à 5 pg/Nm3. Les seuils de détection sont respectivement 10 ng (en solution et 0,3 ng (en amalgame. La répétabilité pour 100 ng de mercure (en amalgame est de ± 7% pour une probabilité de.95 %. En conclusion, dans un échantillon de gaz naturel, compte tenu du volume des prélèvements effectués, il est possible de détecter des concentrations de l'ordre du nanogramme de mercure par mètre cube de gaz. This article describes the method developed by IFP using flameless atomic absorption to determine metallic mercury traces in a natural gas. The analyst method requires a mercury extraction either in the form of mercuric ions by making the gas pass through an oxidizing solution or in the form of an amalgam with gold or silver. The former operating method applies ta samples having a mercury concentration greater than I !ag/Nm3, and the latter for concentrations smaller than 5 (-Lg/Nm3. Detection thresholds are respectively 10 ng (in solution and 0.3 ng (in amalgam. The repeatability for 100 ng of mercury (in amalgam is ± 7 % with a probability of 95%. To conclude, in a sample of natural gas, considering the volume of the samples taken, it is possible ta detect concentrations in the vicinity of one nanogrom of mercury per cubic meter of gas.

  13. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic acidosis ) or when a person hyperventilates (causing respiratory alkalosis ). A decreased level of blood chloride (called hypochloremia) ... disease , emphysema or other chronic lung diseases (causing respiratory ... metabolic alkalosis). An increased level of urine chloride can indicate ...

  14. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-02

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO) to form Fe3O4@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe3O4@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4@GO-DES. The UV-vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe3O4@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe3O4@GO and Fe3O4@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe3O4@GO-DES performs better than Fe3O4@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4 contained 1 mol L(-1) NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of sodium chloride and cadmium on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsheng; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6% NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory effect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  16. Investigation into the role of sodium chloride deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sodium chloride is deposited on the surface of alumina substrates and exposed to air containing 1% SO2 at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C. In all cases the sodium chloride was converted to sodium sulfate. The volatilization of sodium chloride from the original salt particles was responsible for the development of a uniform coating of sodium sulfate on the alumina substrate. At temperatures above 625 C, a liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 autectic was formed on the substrate. The mechanisms for these reactions are given. One of the main roles of NaCl in low temperature hot corrosion lies in enabling a corrosive liquid to form.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride...

  18. Study and modeling of the reduction of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrogen chloride by dry injection technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wuyin

    1997-05-01

    The potential and mechanism to reduce acid gases, such as sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), by dry Ca-based sorbents have been studied to improve the efficiency of the process and sorbent utilization. Several natural limestones were tested for SO{sub 2} removal. Calcium conversion as high as 45 % was achieved in the first 0.3 s at 1000 deg C, 1000 ppm SO{sub 2} and Ca/S=1. A SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of 95 % was reached at Ca/S=2. Two models for estimating the sulfation of CaO at high temperature are presented. Short-residence-time sulfation is described by a pore size distribution model and long-residence-time sulfation by a particle expansion model. The pore size distribution model explains the effects of particle size, pore size distribution and partial pressure of SO{sub 2}, suggesting these three factors be the most important for CaO conversion. For particles larger than 1-2 {mu}m in furnace sorbent injection, pore diameters of 50-300 Aa are desirable. When large particles or long residence times are used, as in fluidized bed combustion, the particle expansion model shows the particle size and the sorbent type to be the main factors affecting the reaction. By using the selected limestone and additives the simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal was also measured. Several ammonium salts as well as urea were tested. Urea was found to give the highest NO{sub x} removal efficiency. To fully utilize the unreacted Ca-based sorbents, the spent sorbents from SO{sub 2} reduction processes were tested in a fixed-bed reactor to measure the capacity for HCl removal at 150-600 deg C. The results showed that all spent materials could react with HCl to some extent. After being calcined and slaked, they even showed the same reactivity as pure Ca(OH){sub 2}. A shrinking core model was derived for fixed-bed reactor. For the best sorbent tested, the multiple sorbent utilization reached about 80 %. 100 refs, 42 figs, 12 tabs

  19. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Genotoxic potency of mercuric chloride in gill cells of marine gastropod Planaxis sulcatus using comet assay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhagat, J.; Ingole, B.S.

    in Thane Creek area Mumbai. Chemosphere 69 (6):972-978 Mitchelmore CL, Birmelin C, Chipman JK, Livingstone DR (1998) Evidence for cytochrome P-450 catalysis and free radical involvement in the production of DNA strand breaks by benzo[ a... mechanisms through which mercury can cause DNA damage. One of them are production of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide anion radical (O2 –), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (OH●) (Tsuzuki et al., 1994). The antioxidant mechanism...

  1. DNA Repair Inhibition by Mercuric Chloride in Earthworms after Exposure to Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain); An, Kwang Guk [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    All organisms are being exposed to harmful factors present in the environment. Ionizing radiation can damage DNA through a series of molecular events depending on the radiation energy. The biological effects due to the combined action of ionizing radiation with the other factor are hard to estimate and predict in advance. Recently International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on non-human biota for the radiological protection of the environment. Earthworms have been identified by the ICRP as one of the reference animals and plants to be used in environmental radiation protection. Particularly, the earthworm Eisenia fetida can be used as a bio-indicator of pollution in soil. This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of radiation and the synergistic effects between radiation and mercury in earthworm, E. fetida

  2. Differential Toxicities of Intraneurally Injected Mercuric Chloride for Sympathetic and Somatic Motor Fibers: An Ultrastructural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Jung Cheng

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated an undue susceptibility of sympathetic fibers to mercury intoxication. The mechanisms that underlie the selective reaction of sympathetic fibers to mercury warrant further investigation.

  3. Reproductive responses of white leghorn hens to graded concentrations of mercuric chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1974-01-01

    White Leghorn hens were maintained on diets containing 0, 4, 12 or 36 p.p.m. Hg as HgCl2 from hatching in an effort to confirm (with a second species) our previously reported effects on Japanese quail reproduction. In the quail study both onset of laying and rate of egg production were accelerated by 16 and 32 p.p.m. Hg as HgCl2, but ferti ity was depressed. After 1 year on diets containing HgCl2 none of the Leghorn hens manifested any observed signs of Hg poisoning. Hens fed 4 or 12 p.p.m. Hg began ovipositing an average of 10 days earlier than the controls (P < 0.05). Young hens (< 9 months old) fed 4 or 12 p.p.m. Hg laid significantly more eggs per hen-day than did either controls or those fed 36 p.p.m. Hg. Beyond 9 months of age there were no perceptible differences in rate of egg production among the treatments. These findings support our quail results. When the hens were inseminated with pooled semen from untreated roosters fertility, embryonic development and hatchability appeared to be unaffected by the treatments. This contrasts with our previous experiment with quail in which both sexes were fed HgCl2.

  4. DNA Repair Inhibition by Mercuric Chloride in Earthworms after Exposure to Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; Nili, Mohammad; An, Kwang Guk

    2011-01-01

    All organisms are being exposed to harmful factors present in the environment. Ionizing radiation can damage DNA through a series of molecular events depending on the radiation energy. The biological effects due to the combined action of ionizing radiation with the other factor are hard to estimate and predict in advance. Recently International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on non-human biota for the radiological protection of the environment. Earthworms have been identified by the ICRP as one of the reference animals and plants to be used in environmental radiation protection. Particularly, the earthworm Eisenia fetida can be used as a bio-indicator of pollution in soil. This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of radiation and the synergistic effects between radiation and mercury in earthworm, E. fetida

  5. Mercure IV code application to the external dose computation from low and medium level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomassini, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the present work the external dose from low and medium level wastes is calculated using MERCURE IV code. The code utilizes MONTECARLO method for integrating multigroup line of sight attenuation Kernels

  6. Placental and Fetal Disposition of Mercuric Ions in Rats Exposed to Methylmercury: Role of Mrp2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C.; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury is a prevalent environmental toxicant that can have deleterious effects on a developing fetus. Previous studies indicate that the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) is involved in renal and hepatic export of mercuric ions. Therefore, we hypothesize that Mrp2 is also involved in export of mercuric ions from placental trophoblasts and fetal tissues. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the disposition of mercuric ions in pregnant Wistar and TR– (Mrp2-deficient) rats exposed to a single dose of methylmercury. The amount of mercury in renal tissues (cortex and outer stripe of outer medulla), liver, blood, amniotic fluid, uterus, placentas and fetuses was significantly greater in TR– rats than in Wistar rats. Urinary and fecal elimination of mercury was greater in Wistar dams than in TR– dams. Thus, our findings suggest that Mrp2 may be involved in the export of mercuric ions from maternal and fetal organs following exposure to methylmercury. PMID:23059061

  7. Formation of titanium diboride coatings during the anodic polarization of titanium in a chloride melt with a low boron oxide content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshina, L. A.; Malkov, V. B.; Molchanova, N. G.

    2015-02-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of titanium in a molten eutectic mixture of cesium and sodium chlorides containing up to 1 wt % boron oxide is studied in the temperature range 810-870 K in an argon atmosphere. The potential, the current, and the rate of titanium corrosion are determined. The optimum conditions of forming a dense continuous titanium diboride coating on titanium with high adhesion to the metallic base are found for the anodic activation of titanium in the molten electrolyte under study.

  8. Mercuric iodide crystals obtained by solvent evaporation using ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugucioni, J.C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-01-01

    Millimeter-sized mercuric iodide crystals were fabricated by the solvent evaporation technique using pure ethanol as a solvent. Three different conditions for solution evaporation were tested: (i) in the dark at room temperature; (ii) in the presence of light at room temperature and (iii) in an oven at 40 deg. C. Morphology, structure, optical and electrical properties were investigated using several techniques. Crystals fabricated in the dark show better properties and stability than others, possibly because the larger the energy of the system, the larger the number of induced growth defects. The crystals fabricated in the dark have adequate structure for higher resistivity and activation energy close to half the optical band-gap, as desired. With proper encapsulation these crystals might be good candidates for the development of ionizing radiation sensors.

  9. Electrical and photomechanical effects of plastic deformation of mercuric iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, J.; Milstein, F.; Gerrish, V.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of bulk plastic deformation of mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ), upon some of the electronic properties relevant to the performance of HgI 2 as a radiation detector were examined experimentally. Hole lifetimes, as well as hole and electron mobilities, were measured at various stages of sample deformation. Hole lifetimes were found to decrease by a factor of 2 under strains of several percent; carrier mobilities varied within experimental error, except during creep loading where electron and hole mobilities decreased by about 65 % and 25 %, respectively. Additionally, dark current measurements were made on specimens with varying degrees of accumulated plastic damage caused by c plane shear. Dark current values did not strongly reflect the extent of bulk plastic damage in deformed specimens. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Determination of HCl and VOC Emission from Thermal Degradation of PVC in the Absence and Presence of Copper, Copper(II Oxide and Copper(II Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad J. Jafari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl chloride (PVC has played a key role in the development of the plastic industry over the past 40 years. Thermal degradation of PVC leads to formation of many toxic pollutants such as HCl, aromatic and volatile organic carbon vapors. Thermal degradation of PVC and PVC in the present of copper, cupric oxide and copper(II chloride were investigated in this study using a laboratory scale electrical furnace. HCl and Cl- ion were analyzed by a Dionex ion chromatograph and VOCs compounds were analyzed using GC or GC-MS. The results showed that HCl plus Cl- ion and benzene formed about 99% and 80% respectively in the first step of thermal degradation under air atmosphere. The presence of cupric oxide increases the percentage of short chain hydrocarbons more than 184% and decreases the amount of the major aromatic hydrocarbon and HCl plus Cl- ion to 90% and 65% respectively. The total aromatic hydrocarbon emitted less than when atmosphere was air and difference was statistically significant (Pvalue<0.000

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of 1-hydroxymethyl-eta/sup 3/-allypalladium chloride by p-benzoquinone in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, A.P.; Kalabin, S.M.; Statsenko, O.N.

    1988-03-01

    /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was used to show that the primary product of the oxidation of the eta/sup 3/-allyl complex of palladium, (based on 1,3-butadiene-1-hydroxymethyl-eta/sup 3/-allylpalladium chloride), by the action of p-benzoquinone in acid aqueous solutions is 4-chloro-2-buten-1-o1. The reaction kinetics were studied colorimetrically. It was found that the rate of reaction is described by a kinetic equation of the second order (first with respect to each of the reagents). It was shown that the second order rate constant increases nonlinearly with increase in the concentration of the chloride ions and hydrogen ions, and tends to a constant value in the region of high concentrations of these ions. The values of the activation parameters and the isotopic kinetic effect were determined. The kinetic equation and the mechanism of the reaction studied were compared with those of the oxidation processes of unsubstituted eta/sup 3/-allyl complexes of palladium.

  12. Metal Fluorides, Metal Chlorides and Halogenated Metal Oxides as Lewis Acidic Heterogeneous Catalysts. Providing Some Context for Nanostructured Metal Fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, David; Winfield, John M

    2017-01-28

    Aspects of the chemistry of selected metal fluorides, which are pertinent to their real or potential use as Lewis acidic, heterogeneous catalysts, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to β-aluminum trifluoride, aluminum chlorofluoride and aluminas γ and η, whose surfaces become partially fluorinated or chlorinated, through pre-treatment with halogenating reagents or during a catalytic reaction. In these cases, direct comparisons with nanostructured metal fluorides are possible. In the second part of the review, attention is directed to iron(III) and copper(II) metal chlorides, whose Lewis acidity and potential redox function have had important catalytic implications in large-scale chlorohydrocarbons chemistry. Recent work, which highlights the complexity of reactions that can occur in the presence of supported copper(II) chloride as an oxychlorination catalyst, is featured. Although direct comparisons with nanostructured fluorides are not currently possible, the work could be relevant to possible future catalytic developments in nanostructured materials.

  13. Radiation damage resistance in mercuric iodide X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E; Dolin, R C; Devore, T M; Markakis, J M [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA); Iwanczyk, J S; Dorri, N [Xsirius, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA (USA); Trombka, J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1990-12-20

    Mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) radiation detectors show great potential as ambient-temperature solid-state detectors for X-rays, gamma rays and visible light, with parameters that are competitive with existing technologies. In a previous experiment, HgI{sub 2} detectors irradiated with 10 MeV protons/cm{sup 2} exhibited no damage. The 10 MeV protons represent only the low range of the spectrum of energies that are important. An experiment has been conducted at the Saturne accelerator facility at Saclay, France, to determine the susceptibility of these detectors to radiation damage by high-energy (1.5 GeV) protons. The detectors were irradiated to a fluence of 10{sup 8} protons/cm{sup 2}. This fluence is equivalent to the cosmic radiation expected in a one-year period in space. The resolution of the detectors was measured as a function of the integral dose. No degradation in the response of any of the detectors or spectrometers was seen. It is clear from this data that HgI{sub 2} has extremely high radiation-damage resistance, exceeding that of most other semiconductor materials used for radiation detectors. Based on the results shown to date, HgI{sub 2} detectors are suitable for applications in which they may be exposed to high integral dose levels. (orig.).

  14. Mechanisms involved in the transport of mercuric ions in target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury exists in the environment in various forms, all of which pose a risk to human health. Despite guidelines regulating the industrial release of mercury into the environment, humans continue to be exposed regularly to various forms of this metal via inhalation or ingestion. Following exposure, mercuric ions are taken up by and accumulate in numerous organs, including brain, intestine, kidney, liver, and placenta. In order to understand the toxicological effects of exposure to mercury, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that facilitate entry of mercuric ions into target cells must first be obtained. A number of mechanisms for the transport of mercuric ions into target cells and organs have been proposed in recent years. However, the ability of these mechanisms to transport mercuric ions and the regulatory features of these carriers have not been characterized completely. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current findings related to the mechanisms that may be involved in the transport of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in target tissues and organs. This review will describe mechanisms known to be involved in the transport of mercury and will also propose additional mechanisms that may potentially be involved in the transport of mercuric ions into target cells. PMID:27422290

  15. Importance of poly(ethylene oxide)-modification and chloride anion for the electron transfer reaction of cytochrome c in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Chiiko; Fujita, Kyoko

    2006-01-01

    Horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c) was chemically modified with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) to dissolve it in room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([emim][TFSI]). The redox response of the modified cyt c, hereafter PEO-cyt c, was analyzed in [emim][TFSI]. PEO modification to the surface of cyt c, which exceeded 60% of the total mass of the PEO-cyt c, was an effective method to solubilize the cyt c. In spite of the high ion density and sufficient ionic conductivity of [emim][TFSI], no redox response of pure PEO-cyt c was detected. However, a reversible redox response of PEO-cyt c was observed after adding a simple electrolyte such as KCl to [emim][TFSI]. The redox response of PEO-cyt c was sensitive to the anion radius of the added salt, and the chloride anion was found to be the best anion species to produce a redox response of PEO-cyt c in [emim][TFSI]. However, above a certain salt concentration, the resulting increase in solution viscosity would suppress the redox reaction. The results strongly indicate that the chloride anions, because of their mobility in the polypeptide matrix, compensate the charge change of heme during the electron transfer reaction. Larger anions did not show such an effect due to sterical restrictions on the migration through the protein shell to the heme pocket of cyt c

  16. Niobium(v) chloride and imidazolium bromides as efficient dual catalyst systems for the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Wilhelm, Michael E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Reich, Robert M.; D'Elia, Valerio; Basset, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, Wolfgang A.; Cokoja, Mirza; Kü hn, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    The application of niobium(v) chloride and several imidazolium bromides as catalyst systems for the cycloaddition of propylene oxide (PO) with carbon dioxide to propylene carbonate (PC) is reported. A set of 31 different imidazolium bromides has been synthesized with varying substituents at all five imidazolium ring atoms, of which 17 have not been reported before. The impact of different substitution patterns (steric and electronic changes and solubility in PO) at the imidazolium ring on the catalytic activity was investigated. The optimisation of the catalyst structure allows for the valorisation of carbon dioxide under mild reaction conditions with high reaction rates in very good yield and selectivity for PC. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  17. Niobium(v) chloride and imidazolium bromides as efficient dual catalyst systems for the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Wilhelm, Michael E.

    2014-02-19

    The application of niobium(v) chloride and several imidazolium bromides as catalyst systems for the cycloaddition of propylene oxide (PO) with carbon dioxide to propylene carbonate (PC) is reported. A set of 31 different imidazolium bromides has been synthesized with varying substituents at all five imidazolium ring atoms, of which 17 have not been reported before. The impact of different substitution patterns (steric and electronic changes and solubility in PO) at the imidazolium ring on the catalytic activity was investigated. The optimisation of the catalyst structure allows for the valorisation of carbon dioxide under mild reaction conditions with high reaction rates in very good yield and selectivity for PC. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  18. Synthesis and Properties of High Strength Thin Film Composites of Poly(ethylene Oxide and PEO-PMMA Blend with Cetylpyridinium Chloride Modified Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saleem Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion-conducting thin film composites of polymer electrolytes were prepared by mixing high MW poly(ethylene oxide (PEO, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as a polymer matrix, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC modified MMT as filler, and different content of LiClO4 by using solution cast method. The crystallinity, ionic conductivity (σ, and mechanical properties of the composite electrolytes and blend composites were evaluated by using XRD, AC impedance, and UTM studies, respectively. The modification of clay by CPC showed enhancement in the d-spacing. The loading of clay has effect on crystallinity of PEO systems. Blend composites showed better mechanical properties. Young’s modulus and elongation at break values showed increase with salt and clay incorporation in pure PEO. The optimum composition composite of PEO with 3.5 wt% of salt and 3.3 wt% of CPMMT exhibited better performance.

  19. Electrodeposition of a Au-Dy2O3 Composite Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalyst from Eutectic Urea/Choline Chloride Ionic Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Mele

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this research we have fabricated and tested Au/Dy2O3 composites for applications as Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC electrocatalysts. The material was obtained by a process involving electrodeposition of a Au-Dy alloy from a urea/choline chloride ionic liquid electrolyte, followed by selective oxidation of Dy to Dy2O3 in air at high temperature. The electrochemical kinetics of the electrodeposition bath were studied by cyclic voltammetry, whence optimal electrodeposition conditions were identified. The heat-treated material was characterised from the morphological (scanning electron microscopy, compositional (X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and structural (X-ray diffractometry points of view. The electrocatalytic activity towards H2 oxidation and O2 reduction was tested at 650 °C by electrochemical impedance spectrometry. Our composite electrodes exhibit an anodic activity that compares favourably with the only literature result available at the time of this writing for Dy2O3 and an even better cathodic performance.

  20. Radiochemical determination of methylmercury chloride Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stary, J.; Prasilova, J.

    1976-01-01

    The isotope exchange between methylmercury species and an excess of inorganic radiomercury in sulphuric acid medium has been used for the simple determination of methylmercury chloride down to 0.01 ppm. The determination is not influenced by the presence of a great excess of other metals, however, chlorides, bromides and iodides interfere in higher concentrations. It has been found that the isotope exchange between CH 3 HgCl and 203 HgCl 4 2- (or 203 HgCl 2 ) in 0.01-3M hydrochloric acid is extremely slow, for the bimolecular reaction the rate constant is lower than 10 -3 mol -1 s -1 at 25 deg C. The isotope exchange rate between methylmercury chloride and mercuric-nitrate 0n on 0.5M sulphuric acid is higher. The isotope exchange is a bimolecular reaction with a rate constant k=0.050+-0.004 mol -1 s -1 at 25 deg C. (T.I.)

  1. Chemiluminescence from an oxidation reaction of rhodamine B with cerium(IV) in a reversed micellar medium of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanin, Tamer H A; Tsunemine, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2011-01-01

    The chemiluminescence (CL) emission, observed when rhodamine B (RB) in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane was mixed with cerium(IV) sulfate in sulfuric acid dispersed in a reversed micellar medium of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water, was investigated using a flow-injection system. The CL emission from the oxidation reaction of RB with Ce(IV) was found to be stronger in the CTAC reversed micellar solution compared with an aqueous solution. Bearing on the enhancement effect of the CTAC reverse micelles on the RB-Ce(IV) CL, several studies including stopped-flow, fluorescence and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometries were performed. Rapid spectral changes of an intermediate in the RB-Ce(IV) reaction in the aqueous and reversed micellar solutions were successfully observed using a stopped-flow method. The effect of the experimental variables, i.e., oxidant concentration, sulfuric acid concentration, the mole fraction of 1-hexanol, water-to-surfactant molar concentration ratio, flow rate, upon the CL intensity was evaluated. Under the experimental conditions optimized for a flow-injection determination of RB based on the new reversed micellar-mediated CL reaction with Ce(IV), a detection limit of 0.08 µmol dm(-3) RB was achieved, and a linear calibration graph was obtained with a dynamic range from 0.5 to 20 µmol dm(-3). The relative standard deviation (n = 6) obtained at an RB concentration of 3 µmol dm(-3) was 3%.

  2. Crystal structure and luminescence properties of the first hydride oxide chloride with divalent europium. LiEu{sub 2}HOCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Daniel; Schleid, Thomas [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Enseling, David; Juestel, Thomas [Department of Chemical Engineering, Muenster University of Applied Sciences, Steinfurt (Germany)

    2017-11-17

    The mixed-anionic hydride oxide chloride LiEu{sub 2}HOCl{sub 2} with divalent europium was synthesized by the reduction of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} with LiH in a LiCl flux at 750 C for 4 d in silica-jacketed niobium capsules. According to structure determination by single-crystal X-ray diffraction the yellow compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (a = 1492.30(11) pm, b = 570.12(4) pm, c = 1143.71(8) pm, Z = 8) with a crystal structure closely related to that one of the quaternary hydride oxide LiLa{sub 2}HO{sub 3} and the hydride nitride LiSr{sub 2}H{sub 2}N. On the other hand it can also be derived from the PbFCl-type structure of EuHCl showing astonishingly short Eu{sup 2+}..Eu{sup 2+} contacts of 326 and 329 pm. Both crystallographically different Eu{sup 2+} cations have nine anionic neighbors, while all other ions (Li{sup +}, H{sup -}, O{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}) reside in six-membered coordination spheres. LiEu{sub 2}OCl{sub 2}H exhibits a bright yellow luminescence with an emission maximum at 581 nm upon excitation at 440 nm. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Scrubbing of iodine from gas streams with mercuric nitrate-conversion of mercuric iodate product to barium iodate for fixation in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, G.C.; Moore, J.G.; Morgan, M.T.

    1980-06-01

    A bench-scale model of a mercuric nitrate scrubber for removal of iodine from off-gas streams was constructed and operated in conjunction with a mercuric iodate-to-barium iodate conversion system to determine the feasibility of total recycle of all processing solutions. The two main aspects of the system examined were (1) the extent of contamination of the barium iodate product, and (2) the effect of cross-contamination of various process solutions on the efficiency of the process. The experimental evidence obtained indicates that, with appropriate control, all solutions can be recycled without significant contamination of the product that would be harmful to the host concrete or to the environment. Mercury contamination was found to be less than or equal to 0.5 wt % of the barium iodate product. The most significant effect on system efficiency was determined to be barium hydroxide contamination of the sodium hydroxide solution used to convert mercuric iodate to sodium iodate. A mole ratio of barium hydroxide to sodium hydroxide of about 1:225 caused a decrease in conversion efficiency of about 45%.

  4. Teneurs en Plomb, Cadmium, Mercure et Zinc relevées dans la ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arsenic (As) et du titane (Ti)[1]. D'autres éléments traces tel que le mercure (Hg), le ..... tels que la modification du cycle biogéochimique et de la biodisponibilité des métaux [23-34,13,5 ] l'apparition des teneurs maximales en métaux (Cd, Pb, Cu.

  5. Synthesis of inherently chiral calixarenes via direct mercuration of the partial cone conformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, P.; Kohout, M.; Böhm, S.; Eigner, Václav; Lhoták, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 11 (2016), s. 2366-2369 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12653S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : calix[4]arene * mercuration * brigding * X-ray crystallography * Jana2006 Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  6. Determination of chloride in water. A comparison of three methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, P.J.

    1978-09-01

    The presence of chloride in the water circuits of nuclear reactors, power stations and experimental rigs is undesirable because of the possibility of corrosion. Three methods are considered for the determination of chloride in water in the 0 to 10 μg ml -1 range. The potentiometric method, using a silver-silver chloride electrode, is capable of determining chloride above the 0.1μg ml -1 level, with a standard deviation of 0.03 to 0.12 μg ml -1 in the range 0.1 to 6.0 μg ml -1 chloride. Bromide, iodide and strong reducing agents interfere but none of the cations likely to be present has an effect. The method is very susceptible to variations in temperature. The turbidimetric method involves the production of suspended silver chloride by the addition of silver nitride solution to the sample. The method is somewhat unreliable and is more useful as a rapid, routine limit-testing technique. In the third method, chloride in the sample is pre-concentrated by co-precipitation on lead phosphate, redissolved in acidified ferric nitrate solution and determined colorimetrically by the addition of mercuric thiocyanate solution. It is suitable for determining chloride in the range 0 to 50 μg, using a sample volume of 100 to 500 ml. None of the chemical species likely to be present interferes. In all three methods, chloride contamination can occur at any point in the determination. Analyses should be carried out in conditions where airborne contamination is minimised and a high degree of cleanliness must be maintained. (author)

  7. A systemic study of stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc2O3 to Lu2O3 mediated by alkaline chlorides as complex former

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yanhui; He Peng; Chen Huani

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study has been carried out for the stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport (SC-CVT) characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc 2 O 3 to Lu 2 O 3 mediated by the vapor complexes KLnCl 4 and NaLnCl 4 (Ln = Sc, Y and La-Lu) used NaCl and KCl as complex former, respectively. The results showed that the SC-CVT characteristics are similarly for NaCl and KCl as complex former, the main deposition temperature of the rare earth chlorides LnCl 3 is in the increasing order ScCl 3 3 3 , and then with a systematically decreasing trend from the early lanthanide chlorides to the end one. The results also showed that the total transported amount of the produced chlorides is YCl 3 > ScCl 3 , and they are much higher than that of most lanthanoid chlorides. For lanthanoids, the total transported amount of chloride increases systematically from the early lanthanoid chlorides to the end one except for EuCl 3 and GdCl 3 mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, respectively, which showed the divergence effect of Gd in the total transport efficiency. But there are some differences in SC-CVT characteristics of pure rare earth oxide mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, that is the main deposition temperature region for the same rare earth element was lower for KCl than that for NaCl as complex former except for LaCl 3 , CeCl 3 , YbCl 3 and LuCl 3 , while the total transport amount of rare earth chloride for KCl as complex former is higher than that for NaCl except for LaCl 3 and EuCl 3 . More over, the discussion was carried out for Sc and Y on the one hand and the lanthanides contain 4f electron as another hand based on the 4f electron hybridization assumption. Further more, the transport characteristics of rare earth oxides with alkaline chlorides as complex former in this study were compared to that with AlCl 3 as complex former

  8. Characterization of Microbes Capable of Using Vinyl Chloride and Ethene as Sole Carbon and Energy Sources by Anaerobic Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    NaOH to a 40 mM solution of FeCl3 until the pH reached 7. The solution was then allowed to settle in the beaker, followed by subsequent...of developing sulfate reducing conditions; and the amount of MgCl2·6H2O was increased to maintain the same concentration of magnesium . For both...oxidized to 14CO2 and then trapped in 3 mL of 0.5 M NaOH in a 10 mL glass test tube. Multiple test tubes were used, corresponding to the elution times

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of acid black 210 dye on the boron-doped diamond electrode in the presence of phosphate ions: Effect of current density, pH, and chloride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Carla Regina; Montilla, Francisco; Morallon, Emilia; Olivi, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of acid black 210 dye (AB-210) on the boron-doped diamond (BDD) was investigated under different pH conditions. The best performance for the AB-210 oxidation occurred in alkaline phosphate solution. This is probably due to oxidizing agents such as phosphate radicals and peroxodiphosphate ions, which can be electrochemically produced with good yields on the BDD anode, mainly in alkaline solution. Under this condition, the COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal was higher than that obtained from the model proposed by Comninellis. Electrolyses performed in phosphate buffer and in the presence of chloride ions resulted in faster COD and color removals in acid and neutral solutions, but in alkaline phosphate solution, a better performance in terms of TOC removal was obtained in the absence of chloride. Moreover, organochloride compounds were detected in all electrolyses performed in the presence of chloride. The AB-210 electrooxidation on BDD using phosphate as supporting electrolyte proved to be interesting since oxidizing species generated from phosphate ions were able to completely degrade the dye without producing organochloride compounds.

  10. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce2O3 and CeO2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  11. Arsenic removal from a high-arsenic wastewater using in situ formed Fe-Mn binary oxide combined with coagulation by poly-aluminum chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kun; Wang Hongjie; Liu Ruiping; Zhao Xu; Liu Huijuan; Qu Jiuhui

    2011-01-01

    In this study, in situ formed Fe-Mn binary oxide (FMBO) was applied to treat a practical high-arsenic wastewater (5.81 mg/L). FMBO exhibited a remarkable removal capacity towards both As(III) and As(V), achieving a removal efficiency over 99.5%. However, the FMBO-As particles could not be sufficiently separated by gravitational sedimentation due to their low sizes and negative charges, as being indicated from laser particle size and zeta-potential analysis. Thus, poly-aluminum chloride (PACl) was introduced as a coagulant to facilitate the solid-liquid separation, and it remarkably improved As removal efficiencies. Results of scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that PACl contributed to the formation of precipitates with larger sizes and compact surfaces, which was favorable to sedimentation. Moreover, residual soluble As was removed by PACl hydroxides. The optimum dosages of FMBO and PACl were determined to be 60 mg/L and 80 mg/L, respectively. Additionally, the secondary pollution was minimized in FMBO-PACl process. Based on these bench-scale results, a full-scale treatment process was proposed to successfully treat 40,000 m 3 of high-arsenic wastewater in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP). The average As concentration in the effluent was about 0.015 mg/L. FMBO-PACl process showed the advantages of high effectiveness, low cost, safety, and ease for operation.

  12. Treatment of palm oil mill effluent by electrocoagulation with presence of hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent and polialuminum chloride as coagulant-aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nasrullah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of operating parameters, such as electrode material, current density, percentage of hydrogen peroxide and amount of polialuminum chloride (PAC on chemical oxygen demand (COD removal of palm oil mill effluent (POME. The current density was varied between 30–80 mA cm−2, PAC (1–3 g L−1 as coagulant-aid and 1 and 2% of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent. As for the performance of electrode type, iron was more effective than aluminum. It appeared that the removal of COD increased with the increased of current density. When PAC and H2O2 increased, the percent of COD removal was increasing as well. The overall results demonstrate that electrocoagulation is very efficient and able to achieve more than 70% COD removal in 180 min at current density 30–80 mA cm−2 reliant upon the concentration of H2O2 and PAC.

  13. Structures and heats of formation of simple alkaline earth metal compounds: fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides for Be, Mg, and Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Feller, David; Gole, James L; Dixon, David A

    2010-09-02

    Geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are predicted for the simple alkaline earth (Be, Mg and Ca) fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] level including core-valence correlation with the aug-cc-pwCVnZ basis sets up to n = 5 in some cases. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic effects, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were necessary to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation. The calculated geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are compared with the available experimental data. For a number of these alkaline earth compounds, the experimental geometries and energies are not reliable. MgF(2) and BeF(2) are predicted to be linear and CaF(2) is predicted to be bent. BeOH is predicted to be bent, whereas MgOH and CaOH are linear. The OBeO angle in Be(OH)(2) is not linear, and the molecule has C(2) symmetry. The heat of formation at 298 K for MgO is calculated to be 32.3 kcal/mol, and the bond dissociation energy at 0 K is predicted to be 61.5 kcal/mol.

  14. Structures and Heats of Formation of Simple Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds II: Fluorides, Chlorides, Oxides, and Hydroxides for Ba, Sr, and Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2018-01-11

    Geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, heats of formation, bond dissociation energies, cohesive energies, and selected fluoride affinities (difluorides) are predicted for the late alkaline earth (Sr, Ba, and Ra) oxides, fluorides, chlorides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory CCSD(T) level. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic and pseudopotential corrections, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were included to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation following the Feller-Peterson-Dixon methodology. The calculated values are compared to the experimental data where available. In some cases, especially for Ra compounds, there are no experimental results, or the experimental energetics and geometries are not reliable or have very large error bars. All of the Sr, Ba, and Ra difluorides, dichlorides, and dihydroxides are bent structures with the OMO bond angles decreasing going down the group. The cohesive energies of bulk Be dihalides are predicted to be quite low, while those of Ra are relatively large. The fluoride affinities show that the difluorides are moderately strong Lewis acids and that such trifluorides may form under the appropriate experimental conditions.

  15. Synthesis of silver/silver chloride/graphene oxide composite and its surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity and self-cleaning property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Fei, Xiao; Cheng, Xiaonong; Yang, Juan

    2017-09-01

    Recently, silver nanoparticles decorated with graphene and graphene oxide (GO) sheets can be employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. However, their SERS activity on macromolecular compound detection is all one-time process. In order to solve this issue and decrease the cost of routine SERS detection, silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) with photocatalytic activity under visible light was introduced. In this study, a novel, simple and clean approach is carried out for synthesis of the Ag/AgCl/GO composite. The Ag/AgCl colloidal solution is obtained by hydrothermal method and then mixed with GO solution to obtain the Ag/AgCl/GO composite using a facile electrostatic self-assembly method. Results showed that the Ag/AgCl/GO composite has the optimized SERS activity to Rhodamine 6G molecules with the maximum enhancement factor value of 3.8×107. Furthermore, the Ag/AgCl particles with high efficient and stable photocatalytic activity under visible light lead to an outstanding self-cleaning property of the Ag/AgCl/GO composite.

  16. Impact of diatomite on the slightly polluted algae-containing raw water treatment process using ozone oxidation coupled with polyaluminum chloride coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenchao; Wu, Chunde; Jia, Aiyin; Zhang, Zhilin; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    The impact of adding diatomite on the treatment performance of slightly polluted algae-containing raw water using ozone pre-oxidation and polyaluminum chloride (PAC) coagulation was investigated. Results demonstrated that the addition of diatomite is advantageous due to reduction of the PAC dose (58.33%) and improvement of the removal efficiency of algae, turbidity, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in raw water. When the ozone concentration was 1.0 mg L⁻¹ and the PAC dosage was 2.5 mg L⁻¹, the removal rates of algae, turbidity, UV254, and TOC were improved by 6.39%, 7.06%, 6.76%, and 4.03%, respectively, with the addition of 0.4 g L⁻¹ diatomite. It has been found that the DOM presented in the Pearl River raw water mainly consisted of small molecules ( 50 kDa). After adding diatomite (0.4 g L⁻¹), the additional removal of 5.77% TOC and 14.82% UV254 for small molecules (50 kDa) could be achieved, respectively, at an ozone concentration of 1.0 mg L⁻¹ and a PAC dose of 2.5 mg L⁻¹. The growth of anabaena flos-aquae (A.F.) was observed by an atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after adding diatomite. AFM images demonstrate that diatomite may have a certain adsorption on A.F.

  17. Polyvinyl chloride resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Jae

    1976-06-01

    This book contains polyvinyl chloride resin industry with present condition such as plastic industry and polyvinyl chloride in the world and Japan, manufacture of polyvinyl chloride resin ; suspension polymerization and solution polymerization, extruding, injection process, hollow molding vinyl record, vacuum forming, polymer powders process, vinyl chloride varnish, vinyl chloride latex, safety and construction on vinyl chloride. Each chapter has descriptions on of process and kinds of polyvinyl chloride resin.

  18. Comparison between micro- and nanosized copper oxide and water soluble copper chloride: interrelationship between intracellular copper concentrations, oxidative stress and DNA damage response in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Bettina Maria; Niemand, Rebecca Katharina; Winkelbeiner, Nicola Lisa; Hartwig, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Nano- and microscale copper oxide particles (CuO NP, CuO MP) are applied for manifold purposes, enhancing exposure and thus the potential risk of adverse health effects. Based on the pronounced in vitro cytotoxicity of CuO NP, systematic investigations on the mode of action are required. Therefore, the impact of CuO NP, CuO MP and CuCl 2 on the DNA damage response on transcriptional level was investigated by quantitative gene expression profiling via high-throughput RT-qPCR. Cytotoxicity, copper uptake and the impact on the oxidative stress response, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis were further analysed on the functional level. Cytotoxicity of CuO NP was more pronounced when compared to CuO MP and CuCl 2 in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Uptake studies revealed an intracellular copper overload in the soluble fractions of both cytoplasm and nucleus, reaching up to millimolar concentrations in case of CuO NP and considerably lower levels in case of CuO MP and CuCl 2 . Moreover, CuCl 2 caused copper accumulation in the nucleus only at cytotoxic concentrations. Gene expression analysis in BEAS-2B and A549 cells revealed a strong induction of uptake-related metallothionein genes, oxidative stress-sensitive and pro-inflammatory genes, anti-oxidative defense-associated genes as well as those coding for the cell cycle inhibitor p21 and the pro-apoptotic Noxa and DR5. While DNA damage inducible genes were activated, genes coding for distinct DNA repair factors were down-regulated. Modulation of gene expression was most pronounced in case of CuO NP as compared to CuO MP and CuCl 2 and more distinct in BEAS-2B cells. GSH depletion and activation of Nrf2 in HeLa S3 cells confirmed oxidative stress induction, mainly restricted to CuO NP. Also, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction were most distinct for CuO NP. The high cytotoxicity and marked impact on gene expression by CuO NP can be ascribed to the strong intracellular copper ion release, with subsequent

  19. Physico-chemical characterization of terbium-161-chloride (161TbCl3) radioisotope from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmairit Aziz; Nana Suherman

    2015-01-01

    Currently cancer patients are increasing every year in Indonesia and become the third leading cause of death after heart disease and high blood pressure. Terbium-161 ( 161 Tb) is a low β- emitter (E β - = 0.155 MeV, T 1/2 = 6.9 d) and very similar to 177 Lu in terms of half-life, E β - energy and chemical properties.However, 161 Tb also ejects internal conversion electrons and Auger electrons which can provide a greater therapeutic effect than 177 Lu. Radioisotope of 161 Tb can be produced as a carrier-free for use in labeling of biomolecules as a targeted radiopharmaceutical for cancer therapy. 161 Tb was obtained through 160 Gd(n,γ) 161 Tb nuclear reaction by thermal neutron bombardment on 100 mg of natural gadolinium oxide target in RSG-G.A. Siwabessy at a thermal neutron flux of ~10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and followed by radiochemical separation of 161 Tb from Gd isotopes using extraction chromatography method. The physico-chemical characterization of 161 TbCl 3 solution was studied by determination of its radionuclide purity by means of a γ-rays spectrometry with HP-Ge detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Radiochemical purity was determined using paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis methods. The results showed that 161 TbCl 3 radioisotope has a pH of 2, radiochemical purity of 99.64 ± 0.34%, radionuclide purity of 99.69 ± 0.20%, specific activity and radioactive concentration at the end of irradiation (EOI) of 2.26 – 5.31 Ci/mg and 3.84 – 9.03 mCi/mL, respectively. 161 TbCl 3 solution stable for 3 weeks at room temperature with a radiochemical purity of 98.41 ± 0.42%. 161 TbCl 3 solution from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target has the physico-chemical characteristic that meets the requirements for use as a precursor in preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  20. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niroumandrad, S. [Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostami, M. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Flaky aluminum pigments were modified with cerium nitrate salt. • pH value of 3.0 was chosen as the optimized pH for the cerium solution. • Corrosion resistance of the pigment significantly increased after modification. • Alkaline pre-treatment prior to modification affected the cerium layer performance. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  1. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Flaky aluminum pigments were modified with cerium nitrate salt. • pH value of 3.0 was chosen as the optimized pH for the cerium solution. • Corrosion resistance of the pigment significantly increased after modification. • Alkaline pre-treatment prior to modification affected the cerium layer performance. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce 2 O 3 and CeO 2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  2. Nitric oxide signaling pathway regulates potassium chloride cotransporter-1 mRNA expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fulvio, M; Lauf, P K; Adragna, N C

    2001-11-30

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) express at least two mRNAs for K-Cl cotransporters (KCC): KCC1 and KCC3. cGMP-dependent protein kinase I regulates KCC3 mRNA expression in these cells. Here, we show evidence implicating the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling pathway in the expression of KCC1 mRNA, considered to be the major cell volume regulator. VSMCs, expressing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and PKG-I isoforms showed a time- and concentration-dependent increase in KCC1 mRNA levels after treatment with sodium nitroprusside as demonstrated by semiquantitative RT-PCR. sGC-dependent regulation of KCC1 mRNA expression was confirmed using YC-1, a NO-independent sGC stimulator. The sGC inhibitor LY83583 blocked the effects of sodium nitroprusside and YC-1. Moreover, 8-Br-cGMP increased KCC1 mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The 8-Br-cGMP effect was partially blocked by KT5823 but not by actinomycin D. However, actinomycin D and cycloheximide increased basal KCC1 mRNA in an additive manner, suggesting different mechanisms of action for both drugs. These findings suggest that in VSMCs, the NO/cGMP-signaling pathway participates in KCC1 mRNA regulation at the post-transcriptional level.

  3. Effects of sodium chloride on heat resistance, oxidative susceptibility, motility, biofilm and plaque formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumirat, Pornpan; Vanaporn, Muthita; Boonyuen, Usa; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Rungruengkitkun, Amporn; Chantratita, Narisara

    2017-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an environmental saprophyte and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infectious disease prevalent in tropical areas, including southeast Asia and northern Australia. In Thailand, the highest incidence of melioidosis is in the northeast region, where saline soil and water are abundant. We hypothesized that B. pseudomallei develops an ability to thrive in saline conditions and gains a selective ecological advantage over other soil-dwelling microorganisms. However, little is known about how an elevated NaCl concentration affects survival and adaptive changes in this pathogen. In this study, we examined the adaptive changes in six isolates of B. pseudomallei after growth in Luria-Bertani medium containing different concentrations of NaCl at 37°C for 6 hr. The bacteria were then investigated for resistance to heat at 50°C and killing by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). In addition, flagellar production, biofilm formation, and the plaque formation efficiency of B. pseudomallei after culture in saline conditions were observed. In response to exposure to 150 and 300 mmol L -1 NaCl, all B. pseudomallei isolates showed significantly increased thermal tolerance, oxidative resistance, and plaque-forming efficiency. However, NaCl exposure notably decreased the number of B. pseudomallei flagella. Taken together, these results provide insight into the adaptations of B. pseudomallei that might be crucial for survival and persistence in the host and/or endemic environments with high salinity. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cobalt chloride decreases fibroblast growth factor-21 expression dependent on oxidative stress but not hypoxia-inducible factor in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanlong [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Wang, Chunhong [Second Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Wang, Yuhua [College of Food Science and Engineering, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Ma, Zhenhua [First Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY (United States); Li, Xiaokun [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Feng, Wenke, E-mail: wenke.feng@louisville.edu [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a potential metabolic regulator with multiple beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. FGF21 is mainly expressed in the liver, but is also found in other tissues including the intestine, which expresses β-klotho abundantly. The intestine is a unique organ that operates in a physiologically hypoxic environment, and is responsible for the fat absorption processes including triglyceride breakdown, re-synthesis and absorption into the portal circulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and the chemical hypoxia inducer, cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), on FGF21 expression in Caco-2 cells and the consequence of fat accumulation. Physical hypoxia (1% oxygen) and CoCl{sub 2} treatment decreased both FGF21 mRNA and secreted protein levels. Gene silence and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIFα) did not affect the reduction of FGF21 mRNA and protein levels by hypoxia. However, CoCl{sub 2} administration caused a significant increase in oxidative stress. The addition of n-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed CoCl{sub 2}-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and completely negated CoCl{sub 2}-induced FGF21 loss. mRNA stability analysis demonstrated that the CoCl{sub 2} administration caused a remarkable reduction in FGF21 mRNA stability. Furthermore, CoCl{sub 2} increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, along with a reduction in mRNA levels of lipid lipase, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and an increase of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (SCD1). Addition of both NAC and recombinant FGF21 significantly attenuated the CoCl{sub 2}-induced TG accumulation. In conclusion, the decrease of FGF21 in Caco-2 cells by chemical hypoxia is independent of HIFα, but dependent on an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. The regulation of FGF21 by hypoxia may contribute to intestinal lipid metabolism and

  5. Cobalt chloride decreases fibroblast growth factor-21 expression dependent on oxidative stress but not hypoxia-inducible factor in Caco-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanlong; Wang, Chunhong; Wang, Yuhua; Ma, Zhenhua; Xiao, Jian; McClain, Craig; Li, Xiaokun; Feng, Wenke

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a potential metabolic regulator with multiple beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. FGF21 is mainly expressed in the liver, but is also found in other tissues including the intestine, which expresses β-klotho abundantly. The intestine is a unique organ that operates in a physiologically hypoxic environment, and is responsible for the fat absorption processes including triglyceride breakdown, re-synthesis and absorption into the portal circulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and the chemical hypoxia inducer, cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), on FGF21 expression in Caco-2 cells and the consequence of fat accumulation. Physical hypoxia (1% oxygen) and CoCl 2 treatment decreased both FGF21 mRNA and secreted protein levels. Gene silence and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIFα) did not affect the reduction of FGF21 mRNA and protein levels by hypoxia. However, CoCl 2 administration caused a significant increase in oxidative stress. The addition of n-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed CoCl 2 -induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and completely negated CoCl 2 -induced FGF21 loss. mRNA stability analysis demonstrated that the CoCl 2 administration caused a remarkable reduction in FGF21 mRNA stability. Furthermore, CoCl 2 increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, along with a reduction in mRNA levels of lipid lipase, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and an increase of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (SCD1). Addition of both NAC and recombinant FGF21 significantly attenuated the CoCl 2 -induced TG accumulation. In conclusion, the decrease of FGF21 in Caco-2 cells by chemical hypoxia is independent of HIFα, but dependent on an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. The regulation of FGF21 by hypoxia may contribute to intestinal lipid metabolism and absorption. -- Graphical abstract: Physical

  6. A thermophilic bacterial origin and subsequent constraints by redox, light and salinity on the evolution of the microbial mercuric reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkay, Tamar; Kritee, K; Boyd, Eric; Geesey, Gill

    2010-11-01

    Mercuric reductase (MerA) is central to the mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) system, catalyzing the reduction of ionic Hg to volatile Hg(0). A total of 213 merA homologues were identified in sequence databases, the majority of which belonged to microbial lineages that occupy oxic environments. merA was absent among phototrophs and in lineages that inhabit anoxic environments. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MerA indicate that (i) merA originated in a thermophilic bacterium following the divergence of the Archaea and Bacteria with a subsequent acquisition in Archaea via horizontal gene transfer (HGT), (ii) HGT of merA was rare across phylum boundaries and (iii) MerA from marine bacteria formed distinct and strongly supported lineages. Collectively, these observations suggest that a combination of redox, light and salinity conditions constrain MerA to microbial lineages that occupy environments where the most oxidized and toxic form of Hg, Hg(II), predominates. Further, the taxon-specific distribution of MerA with and without a 70 amino acid N-terminal extension may reflect intracellular levels of thiols. In conclusion, MerA likely evolved following the widespread oxygenation of the biosphere in a thermal environment and its subsequent evolution has been modulated by the interactions of Hg with the intra- and extracellular environment of the organism. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. 15-(para-[123I]iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid obtained using mercuration and subsequent [123I] radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, H.; Vincent, J.S.; Lyster, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The present work explores the basic reactions necessary for the preparation of [ 123 I] 15-(paraiodophenyl)-pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) from organo mercury compounds. It was found that the essential reactions occur readily and with good yield. The steps were as follows: phenyl pentadecanoic acid or its ethyl ester may be mercurated using Hg(TFA) 2 in TFA solvent, and the para-chloromercury compounds may be recovered. [ 123 I] radioiodination may be carried out in a variety of solvents in the presence of chloramine T. When radioiodination was conducted at room temperature the isomeric purity of the ester or fatty acid was found to be 99.9% para. The results indicate that poor solubility of certain mercurated pentadecanoic acid compounds will limit the development of a kit for [ 123 I]IPPA. (author) 16 refs.; 2 tabs

  8. Nano-assemblies consisting of Pd/Pt nanodendrites and poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-coated reduced graphene oxide on glassy carbon electrode for hydrogen peroxide sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Di; Ma, Min; Wang, Weizhen; Chen, Qiang, E-mail: qiangchen@nankai.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensors were fabricated on the basis of glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with palladium (Pd) core-platinum (Pt) nanodendrites (Pt-NDs) and poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO). A facile wet-chemical method was developed for preparing Pd core-Pt nanodendrites. In this approach, the growth of Pt NDs was directed by Pd nanocrystal which could be regarded as seed. The PDDA-coated rGO could form uniform film on the surface of GC electrode, which provided a support for Pd core- Pt NDs adsorption by self-assembly. The morphologies of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (spectrum). Electrocatalytic ability of the nanocomposites was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric methods. The sensor fabricated by Pd core-Pt NDs/PDDA-rGO/GCE exhibited high sensitivity (672.753 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}), low detection limit (0.027 μM), wider linear range (0.005–0.5 mM) and rapid response time (within 5 s). Besides, it also exhibited superior reproducibility, excellent anti-interference performance and long-term stability. The present work could afford a viable method and efficient platform for fabricating all kinds of amperometric sensors and biosensors. - Highlights: • A facial wet-chemical method was developed for preparing Pd core-Pt nanodendrites. • The morphologies of graphene and Pd core-Pt nanodendrites were characterized. • A novel H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor was fabricated by nano-assembly. • The performance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric methods.

  9. Crystal growth and applications of mercuric iodide. Report S-242-TP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, M.; Roth, M.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    A brief summary is given of a paper which discusses the crystal growth of mercuric iodide, a high-Z wide bandgap semiconductor suitable as a low noise, room temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detector. The paper summarized also reviews the state-of-the-art of the synthesis and purification of the starting material, mechanical properties and dislocation structure of HgI 2 , and recent success in the development of thick HgI 2 spectrometers

  10. Réduction globale des émissions de mercure dans les exploitations ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 avr. 2016 ... La Convention de Minamata sur le mercure constitue le fer de lance des efforts déployés à l'échelle mondiale pour réduire les émissions. Elle fournit des mécanismes de contrôle et de réduction des émissions visant tous les processus de production et de transformation ainsi que toutes les industries ...

  11. Estimation de l\\'apport en mercure à partir de la consommation de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sur la base des concentrations et de la consommation annuelle de poissons estimée à 16 kg/habitant en Côte d\\'Ivoire, l\\'apport moyen calculé est égal à 73 μg de mercure par semaine; soit 25% de la dose hebdomadaire tolérable provisoire (DHTP) fixée à 300 μg par le comité mixte FAO/OMS. Cependant, pour une ...

  12. Brain uptake of Se 75-selenomethionine after damage to blood-brain barrier by mercuric ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwall, O

    1969-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have indicated that perfusing the vessels of the brain with mercuric ions may not only cause damage to the blood-brain barrier in allowing the extravasation of acid dyes, but also have the ostensibly contrary effect of diminishing the uptake of radioactive tracers for important nutrients. These observations were based on the direct comparison of the two hemispheres of the same animal, one perfused with mercuric ions and the other serving as a control. The present paper reports the results of a corresponding investigation with Se75-L-selenomethionine. This methionine analogue seems to be transported and metabolized in much the same way as natural methionine and is conveniently assayed due to the labelling into a ..gamma..-emitting isotope. In addition, as in this study, a check as to whether or not the mercuric ions caused asymmetry of the blood flow was desired, and the similar ..gamma..-emitting I 131-iodoantipyrine was used for this purpose. The long half-life of Se75 made it easy to distinguish in the same specimens its activity from that of the blood flow indicator.

  13. Adrenomedullin increased the short-circuit current in the pig oviduct through chloride channels via the CGRP receptor: mediation by cAMP and calcium ions but not by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S B; Cheung, K H; Cheung, M P L; To, Y T; O, W S; Tang, F

    2013-10-01

    The oviduct serves as a site for the fertilization of the ovum and the transport of the conceptus down to the uterus for implantation. In this study, we investigated the presence of adrenomedullin (ADM) and its receptor component proteins in the pig oviduct. The effect of ADM on oviductal secretion, the specific receptor, and the mechanisms involved were also investigated. The presence of ADM and its receptor component proteins in the pig oviduct were confirmed using immunostaining. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) technique was employed to study chloride ion secretion in the oviductal epithelium. ADM increased I(sc) through cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride channels, and this effect could be inhibited by the CGRP receptor antagonist, hCGRP8-37. In contrast, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), could not block the effect of ADM on I(sc). In summary, ADM may increase oviductal fluid secretion via chloride secretion independent of the nitric oxide pathway for the transport of sperm and the conceptus.

  14. Effects of dietary alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene on lipid peroxidation induced by methyl mercuric chloride in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1993-01-01

    -Tocopherol did not protect against CH3HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. Excess dietary beta-carotene further enhanced CH3HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. CH3HgCl significantly decreased the activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px) and Se-dependent glutathione...

  15. Histochemical demonstration of two mercury pools in trout tissues: mercury in kidney and liver after mercuric chloride exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatrup, E.; Nielsen, M.G.; Danscher, G.

    1986-01-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were exposed to 100 ppb mercury (as HgCl 2 ) in the water for 14 days. Concentrations of mercury in water and fish organs were monitored using radiolabeled mercury. Tissues from kidney and liver were fixed, and sections were developed by autometallography, a method whereby accumulations of mercury sulfides and/or mercury selenides are silver amplified. In the kidney, mercury was found within lysosomes and extracellularly in the basal lamina of proximal tubules. In the liver, mercury was found within lysosomes of the hepatocytes. Additional groups of mercury-exposed trout were subjected to selenium (as Na 2 SeO 3 ), administered intraperitoneally 2 hr before fixation. Following this treatment, additional mercury could be visualized in the kidney circulatory system, including glomeruli, and in the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells. It is suggested that the mercury visualized prior to selenium treatment represents inorganic mercury, while additional mercury visualized after selenium administration represents an organic form

  16. Histochemical demonstration of two mercury pools in trout tissues: mercury in kidney and liver after mercuric chloride exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Nielsen, M G; Danscher, G

    1987-01-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were exposed to 100 ppb mercury (as HgCl2) in the water for 14 days. Concentrations of mercury in water and fish organs were monitored using radiolabeled mercury. Tissues from kidney and liver were fixed, and sections were developed by autometallography......, a method whereby accumulations of mercury sulfides and/or mercury selenides are silver amplified. In the kidney, mercury was found within lysosomes and extracellularly in the basal lamina of proximal tubules. In the liver, mercury was found within lysosomes of the hepatocytes. Additional groups of mercury......-exposed trout were subjected to selenium (as Na2SeO3), administered intraperitoneally 2 hr before fixation. Following this treatment, additional mercury could be visualized in the kidney circulatory system, including glomeruli, and in the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells. It is suggested...

  17. Effect of mercuric chloride on cellular morphology and acid phosphatase of tissue culture cells cultivated in suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M F; Traxler, G S

    1974-01-01

    Cells exposed to HgCl/sub 2/ (0.5 mg/liter) increased dramatically in size and stained poorly with May-Grunwald Giemsa stain and exhibited incompleteness in cell division. When the cell DNA was stained by the Feulgen technique, many multinucleated cells were apparent in the cultures treated with HgCl/sub 2/. Additionally, enlargement and alteration of the nucleoli were evident. Electron-micrographs of the experimental cells revealed that microvilli, ribosomes, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticula were abundant in the control cells, but in contrast a scarcity of these organelles was observed together with notable cytoplasmic vacuolation in the HgCl/sub 2/-treated cells. In addition the nucleolini of the treated cells were enlarged and had begun to fuse, producing a mulberry appearance. Electronmicroscopic detection of acid phosphatase activity in the cells indicated that the periplasmic enzyme activity was present in control cells, but not in the cells exposed to HgCl/sub 2/. The possible reaction of Hg/sup + +/ with deoxyribonucleic acid and disulfides is discussed with respect to the observed cytopathic effect and impaired enzyme activity. 10 references, 5 figures.

  18. Investigations on the formation of mercuric thiotungstate and pH-metric determination of the thiotungstate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1981-10-01

    The reaction between mercuric and thiotungstate ions has been followed by means of direct and reverse pH and conductometric titrations in aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic media. The end-points obtained from the sharp inflectons in titration curves occur when molecular ratio of Hg/sup 2 +/ : WS/sub 4//sup 2 -/ is 1 : 1 and correspond to the formation and precipitation of normal mercuric thiotungstate HgS.WS/sub 3/ in the neighbourhood of pH 4.5. The precipitation of this compound has been found to be almost quantitative and the accuracy and reproducibility of the electrometric results are excellent even at low concentrations (1 x 10/sup -3/ M) of the reactants. The pH titrations offer a simple, rapid and accurate method for the determination of the thiotungstate anion as mercuric thiotungstate.

  19. Investigations on the formation of mercuric thiotungstate and pH-metric determination of the thiotungstate anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.

    1981-01-01

    The reaction between mercuric and thiotungstate ions has been followed by means of direct and reverse pH and conductometric titrations in aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic media. The end-points obtained from the sharp inflectons in titration curves occur when molecular ratio of Hg 2+ : WS 4 2- is 1 : 1 and correspond to the formation and precipitation of normal mercuric thiotungstate HgS.WS 3 in the neighbourhood of pH 4.5. The precipitation of this compound has been found to be almost quantitative and the accuracy and reproducibility of the electrometric results are excellent even at low concentrations (1 x 10 -3 M) of the reactants. The pH titrations offer a simple, rapid and accurate method for the determination of the thiotungstate anion as mercuric thiotungstate. (Author) [pt

  20. Mercuric dichloride induces DNA damage in human salivary gland tissue cells and lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Katharina; Kroemer, Susanne [University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Sassen, Andrea [University of Regensburg, Department of Pathology, Regensburg (Germany); Staudenmaier, Rainer [Technical University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Reichl, Franz-Xaver [University of Munich, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Harreus, Ulrich [University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Amalgam is still one of the most frequently used dental filling materials. However, the possible adverse effects especially that of the mercuric component have led to continued controversy. Considering that mercury may be released from amalgam fillings into the oral cavity and also reach the circulating blood after absorption and resorption, it eventually may contribute to tumorigenesis in a variety of target cells. The present investigation focuses on genotoxic effects below a cytotoxic dose level of mercuric dichloride (HgCl{sub 2}) in human samples of salivary glands and lymphocytes to elucidate a possible role in tumor initiation. DNA migration due to single strand breaks, alkali labile sites and incomplete excision repair was quantified with the aid of the single cell microgel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. The concepts of Olive Tail Moment, percentage of DNA in the Tail and Tail Length were used as measures of DNA damage. To control for cytotoxic effects, the trypan blue exclusion test was applied. Human samples of the parotid salivary gland and lymphocytes of ten donors were exposed to HgCl{sub 2} concentrations from 1 to 50 {mu}M. N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) served as controls. Increasing dose-dependent DNA migration could be demonstrated after exposure to HgCl{sub 2} in cells of the salivary glands and lymphocytes. In both cell types a significant increase in DNA migration could be shown starting from HgCl{sub 2} concentrations of 5 {mu}M in comparison to the negative control. The viability of the cell systems was not affected except at the highest concentration (50 {mu}M) tested. These data indicate genotoxic effects of mercuric dichloride in human salivary glands and lymphocytes at concentrations not leading to cytotoxic effects or cell death. Consequently, a contributory role in oral salivary gland tumor initiation warrants further investigation. (orig.)

  1. Introduction to fifth international workshop on mercuric iodide nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a wide bandgap semiconductor, with Eg approx. = 2.14 eV at room temperature. Therefore, HgI 2 is totally different from the well-studied, narrower gap, elemental semiconductors such as Si and Ge, and also different in its physical and chemical properties from the known semiconductor binary zinc-blend compounds such as GaAs or InP. The purpose of studies in the last decade was to further our understanding of HgI 2 ; recent progress is reported

  2. Chloride test - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum chloride test ... A greater-than-normal level of chloride is called hyperchloremia. It may be due to: Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (used to treat glaucoma) Diarrhea Metabolic acidosis Respiratory alkalosis (compensated) Renal ...

  3. Chloride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002417.htm Chloride in diet To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chloride is found in many chemicals and other substances ...

  4. Mercuric iodide semiconductor detectors encapsulated in polymeric resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Joao F. Trencher; Santos, Robinson A. dos; Ferraz, Caue de M.; Oliveira, Adriano S.; Velo, Alexandre F.; Mesquita, Carlos H. de; Hamada, Margarida M., E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disch, Christian; Fiederle, Michael [Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg - UniFreibrug, Freiburg Materials Research Center - FMF, Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The development of new semiconductor radiation detectors always finds many setback factors, such as: high concentration of impurities in the start materials, poor long term stability, the surface oxidation and other difficulties discussed extensively in the literature, that limit their use. In this work was studied, the application of a coating resin on HgI2 detectors, in order to protect the semiconductor crystal reactions from atmospheric gases and to isolate electrically the surface of the crystals. Four polymeric resins were analyzed: Resin 1: 50% - 100%Heptane, 10% - 25% methylcyclohexane, <1% cyclohexane; Resin 2: 25% - 50% ethanol, 25% - 50% acetone, <2,5% ethylacetate; Resin 3: 50% - 100% methylacetate, 5% - 10% n-butylacetate; Resin 4: 50% - 100% ethyl-2-cyanacrylat. The influence of the polymeric resin type used on the spectroscopic performance of the HgI{sub 2} semiconductor detector is, clearly, demonstrated. The better result was found for the detector encapsulated with Resin 3. An increase of up to 26 times at the stability time was observed for the detectors encapsulated compared to that non-encapsulated detector. (author)

  5. Calculation of gamma-rays and fast neutrons fluxes with the program Mercure-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Dupont, C.; Totth, B.

    1978-01-01

    The program MERCURE-4 evaluates gamma ray or fast neutron attenuation, through laminated or bulky three-dimensionnal shields. The method used is that of line of sight point attenuation kernel, the scattered rays being taken into account by means of build-up factors for γ and removal cross sections for fast neutrons. The integration of the point kernel over the range of sources distributed in space and energy, is performed by the Monte-Carlo method, with an automatic adjustment of the importance functions. Since it is operationnal the program MERCURE-4 has been intensively used for many various problems, for example: - the calculation of gamma heating in reactor cores, control rods and shielding screens, as well as in experimental devices and irradiation loops; - the evaluation of fast neutron fluxes and corresponding damage in structural materials of reactors (vessel steels...); - the estimation of gamma dose rates on nuclear instrumentation in the reactors, around the reactor circuits and around spent fuel shipping casks

  6. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  7. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox trademark process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200 degrees C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl 3 liquid + H 2 O → FeOCl solid + 2 HCl gas During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl solid + H 2 O → Fe 2 O 3 solid + 2 HCl gas . The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way

  8. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Acqueous Chloride mission is to recover plutonium and americium from pyrochemical residues (undesirable form for utilization and storage) and generate plutonium oxide and americium oxide. Plutonium oxide is recycled into Pu metal production flowsheet. It is suitable for storage. Americium oxide is a valuable product, sold through the DOE-OS isotope sales program.

  9. Process for making rare earth metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruesi, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    An uncombined metal or a metal compound such as a sulfide, oxide, carbonate or sulfate is converted in a liquid salt bath to the corresponding metal chloride by reacting it with chlorine gas or a chlorine donor. The process applies to metals of groups 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4a, 5a and 8 of the periodic table and to the rare earth metals. The chlorine donor may be ferric or sulfur chloride. The liquid fused salt bath is made up of chlorides of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, ammonia, zinc and ferric iron. Because the formed metal chlorides are soluble in the liquid fused salt bath, they can be recovered by various conventional means

  10. Mercuric iodide composite films using polyamide, polycarbonate and polystyrene fabricated by casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugucioni, J.C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) composite films were obtained by using the casting technique. Insulator polymers such as polyamide, polycarbonate and polystyrene were mixed to HgI 2 crystallites forming a final sub-millimeter thick self-standing film. Fabrication temperature varied from 10 to 100 o C, and total fabrication time reached at most 5 min. The larger the fabrication temperature, the thinner the film and the smaller its electrical resistivity. Electrical characterization was performed in the dark, under UV illumination and under mammographic X-ray exposure. The final properties of the films are discussed and related to fabrication conditions. The optimized composite film might be a better candidate for use as X-ray detector for medical imaging, in place of the single HgI 2 crystalline device.

  11. Magnetic detection of mercuric ion using giant magnetoresistance-based biosensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Klein, Todd; Feng, Yinglong; Li, Qin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a novel sensing strategy employing a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor and DNA chemistry for the detection of mercuric ion (Hg(2+)). This assay takes advantages of high sensitivity and real-time signal readout of GMR biosensor and high selectivity of thymine-thymine (T-T) pair for Hg(2+). The assay has a detection limit of 10 nM in both buffer and natural water, which is the maximum mercury level in drinking water regulated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The magnitude of the dynamic range for Hg(2+) detection is up to three orders (10 nM to 10 μM). Herein, GMR sensing technology is first introduced into a pollutant monitoring area. It can be foreseen that the GMR biosensor could become a robust contender in the areas of environmental monitoring and food safety testing.

  12. Expressing a bacterial mercuric ion binding protein in plant for phytoremediation of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ju-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chein, Mei-Fang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Endo, Ginro; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2009-01-30

    A specific mercuric ion binding protein (MerP) originating from transposon TnMERI1 of Bacillus megaterium strain MB1 isolated from Minamata Bay displayed good adsorption capability for a variety of heavy metals. In this study, the Gram-positive MerP protein was expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis to create a model system for phytoremediation of heavy metals. Under control of an actin promoter, the transgenic Arabidpsis showed higher tolerance and accumulation capacity for mercury, cadium and lead when compared with the control plant. Results from confocal microscopy analysis also indicate that MerP was localized at the cell membrane and vesicles of plant cells. The developed transgenic plants possessing excellent metal-accumulative ability could have potential applications in decontamination of heavy metals.

  13. A review of recent measurements of optical and thermal properties of α-mercuric iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.H.; Silberman, E.; Nason, D.; Cheng, A.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The knowledge of the physical properties of a crystal and their relation to the nature and content of defects are essential for both applications and fundamental reasons. Alpha-mercuric iodide (α-HgI 2 ) is a material which was found important applications as room temperature X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Some recent thermal and optical measurements of this material, using the samples of improved crystallinity which are now available, are reviewed below. Heretofore, these properties have received less attention than the mechanical and electrical properties, particularly at elevated temperatures. In the technology of α-HgI 2 where there is a continuing motivation to obtain larger single crystals without compromising the material quality, a better knowledge of the thermal and optical properties may lead to improvements in the processes of material purification, crystal growth and device fabrication

  14. The electrophilic lodi nation with 125 I/ 131 I of gamma globulin: Comparison between a solid-phase oxidizing agent (Iodogen), chloramine-T, iodine mono chloride and N-Bromo succinimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wetery, A.S.; Ayyoub, S.; El-Mohty, A.A.; Raieh, M.; Ghonaim, A.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    A new available oxidizing agent, 1, 3, 4, 6-tetra chloro-3α, diphenyl glycoluril(iodogen) was compared with chloramine-T (Ch-T), Iodine-mono chloride (I Cl) and N-Bromo succinimide (NBS) in the radio-iodination of gamma-globulin (γ-G) with 'no-carrier-added' (nca) Na 131 I (T 1/2=8 d). In Phosphate and acetate buffer solution, the optimum reaction conditions with respect to PH, concentration of oxidizing agent, reaction time and concentration of γ-G were determined. The optimum conditions which were found require 100μ l of buffer (pH 7.4, 0.025 M), 500μg γ-G (0.003 μmol), (10-40) μg of oxidizing agent and the desired amount of carrier-free radioiodine. Highest radiochemical yield (>85-90%) were obtained at pH 7.4. Separation and identification of the labelled products were achieved by means of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). 8 figs., 1 tab

  15. Kinetics of mercury reduction by Serratia marcescens mercuric reductase expressed by pseudomonas putida strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Deckwer, W.D. [GBF-Gesellschaft fuer Biotechnologische Forschung mbH, Abteilung TU-BCE, Mascheroder Weg 1, D-38124 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance is widespread among microorganisms and is based on the intracellular transformation of Hg(II) to less toxic elemental Hg(0). The use of microbial consortia to demercurize polluted wastewater streams and environments has been demonstrated. To develop efficient and versatile microbial cleanup strategies requires detailed knowledge of transport and reaction rates. This study focuses on the kinetics of the key enzyme of the microbial transformation, e.g., the mercuric reductase (MerA) under conditions closely resembling the cell interior. To this end, previously constructed and characterized Pseudomonas putida strains expressing MerA from Serratia marcescens were applied. Of the P. putida strains considered in this study P. putida KT2442::mer73 constitutively expressing broad spectrum mercury resistance (merTPAB) yielded the highest mercuric reductase (MerA) activity directly after cell disruption. MerA in the raw extract was further purified (about 100 fold). Reduction rates were measured for various substrates (HgCl{sub 2}, Hg{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and phenyl mercury acetate) up to high concentrations dependent on the purification grade. In all cases, a pronounced substrate inhibition was found. The kinetic constants determined for the cell raw extract are in agreement with those measured for intact cells. However, the rate data exhibit reduced affinity and inhibition with rising purification grade (specific activity). Therefore, the findings seemingly point to reactions preceding the catalytic reduction. Based on simplified assumptions, a kinetic model is suggested which reasonably describes the experimental findings and can advantageously be applied to the bioreactor design. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Effect of sulfide, selenite and mercuric mercury on the growth and methylation capacity of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoang-Yen T. [Department of Biology, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Chen, Yu-Wei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Belzile, Nelson, E-mail: nbelzile@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Cultures of the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were grown under anoxic conditions to study the effect of added sulfide, selenite and mercuric ions. A chemical trap consisting in a CuSO{sub 4} solution was used to control the poisoning effect induced by the bacterial production of hydrogen sulfide via the precipitation of CuS. Following the addition of Hg{sup 2+}, the formation of methylmercury (MeHg) was correlated to bacterial proliferation with most of MeHg found in the culture medium. A large fraction (50–80%) of added Hg{sup 2+} to a culture ended up in a solid phase (Hg{sup 0} and likely HgS) limiting its bioavailability to cells with elemental Hg representing ∼ 40% of the solid. Following the addition of selenite, a small fraction was converted into Se(0) inside the cells and, even though the conversion to this selenium species increased with the increase of added selenite, it never reached more than 49% of the added amount. The formation of volatile dimethylselenide is suggested as another detoxification mechanism. In cultures containing both added selenite and mercuric ions, elemental forms of the two compounds were still produced and the increase of selenium in the residual fraction of the culture suggests the formation of mercuric selenite limiting the bioavailability of both elements to cells. - Highlights: ► Detoxification mechanisms of D. desulfuricans were studied in presence of added sulfide, selenite and mercuric ions. ► The poisoning effect of H{sub 2}S added to or generated by cultures of D. desulfuricans can be controlled with a chemical trap. ► The addition of selenite to cultures triggered the formation of elemental Se and other forms of volatile and non-volatile Se. ► The addition of mercuric ions to cultures led to the production of methylmercury, volatile Hg and solid mercuric sulfide. ► With both Se and Hg added to cultures, fractionation of species in solid and liquid phases suggests the formation of HgSe.

  17. Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide synthesized using alkali chloride flux: morphology and performance as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongseon

    2012-05-01

    Li(Ni(0.8)Co(0.1)Mn(0.1))O(2) (NCM811) was synthesized using alkali chlorides as a flux and the performance as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries was examined. Primary particles of the powder were segregated and grown separately in the presence of liquid state fluxes, which induced each particle to be composed of one primary particle with well-developed facet planes, not the shape of agglomerates as appears with commercial NCMs. The new NCM showed far less gas emission during high temperature storage at charged states, and higher volumetric capacity thanks to its high bulk density. The material is expected to provide optimal performances for pouch type lithium ion batteries, which require high volumetric capacity and are vulnerable to deformation caused by gas generation from the electrode materials.

  18. Study of the protective effect of ascorbic acid against the toxicity of stannous chloride on oxidative damage, antioxidant enzymes and biochemical parameters in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, M I; Awad, T I; Elhag, F A; Khaled, F A

    2007-06-25

    Stannous chloride (SnCl2) is a reducing chemical agent used in several man-made products. SnCl2 can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, the present study has been carried out to investigate the antioxidant action of l-ascorbic acid (AA) in minimizing SnCl2 toxicity on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme, and biochemical parameters in male New Zealand white rabbits. Animals were assigned to one of four treatment groups: 0mg AA and 0mg SnCl2/kg BW (control); 40 mg AA/kg BW; 20mg SnCl2/kg BW; 20mg SnCl2 plus 40 mg AA/kg BW. Rabbits were orally administered the respective doses every other day for 12 weeks. Results obtained showed that SnCl2 significantly (Pacid-reactive substances (TBARS; the marker of lipid peroxidation) in plasma, while the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the level of sulfhydryl groups (SH-group) were decreased (Pacid phosphatase (AcP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were decreased (Pcholesterol, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), glucose, urea and total bilirubin. On the other hand, the level of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL), total protein (TP), albumin (A) and globulin (G) were significantly (PAscorbic acid alone significantly decreased the levels of TBARS, lipids and urea, and increased the activities of GST, SOD and CAT, and the levels of SH-group and proteins. While the rest of the tested parameters were not affected. Also, the presence of AA with SnCl2 alleviated its harmful effects on most of the tested parameters. Therefore, the present results revealed that treatment with AA could minimize the toxic effects of stannous chloride.

  19. Chloride ingress prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jens Mejer; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of chloride ingress into concrete is an important part of durability design of reinforced concrete structures exposed to chloride containing environment. This paper presents experimentally based design parameters for Portland cement concretes with and without silica fume and fly ash...... in marine atmospheric and submersed South Scandinavian environment. The design parameters are based on sequential measurements of 86 chloride profiles taken over ten years from 13 different types of concrete. The design parameters provide the input for an analytical model for chloride profiles as function...... of depth and time, when both the surface chloride concentration and the diffusion coefficient are allowed to vary in time. The model is presented in a companion paper....

  20. Corrosion behavior of oxide-covered Cu47Ti34Zr11Ni8 (Vitreloy 101) in chloride-containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baca, N.; Conner, R.D.; Garrett, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Enrichment of Ti/Zr (as TiO 2 /ZrO 2 ) and depletion of Cu/Ni due to thermodynamically driven segregation. • Dominant corrosion mechanism is pitting. • Pit interiors were depleted of Ti and Zr due to equilibrium solubilization of oxide layer. • Corrosion can be explained by equilibrium and metal nobility arguments. - Abstract: The corrosion resistance of oxides that form in air on Vitreloy 101 (Cu 47 Ti 34 Zr 11 Ni 8 ) metallic glass ribbons in NaCl and HCl solutions was studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization. The air-exposed alloy was covered by a TiO 2 /ZrO 2 layer overlying a Cu-enriched region beneath. Ni was absent at the surface. Segregation of Ti and Zr was driven by exothermic oxide formation. Immersion in NaCl or HCl caused pitting corrosion by local Galvanic reactions that depleted less noble Ti, Zr and Ni from the pit interiors, leaving them rich in more noble Cu. Corrosion products containing Ti and Zr accumulated around the pit. Pits were most numerous in 1.0 M HCl due to TiO 2 (s)/Ti 3+ (aq) equilibrium that resulted in rapid solubilization of the oxide, creating local weaknesses and an increased rate of pit formation. On average, Ti preferentially dissolved from the oxide in accord with metal nobility arguments

  1. Plutonium oxides analysis. Sulfur potentiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Total sulfur determination (sulfur, sulfates, sulfides ...) in plutonium oxides, suitable for sulfate ion content between 0.003 percent to 0.2 percent, by dissolution in nitric hydrofluoric acid, nitrates elimination, addition of hydrochloric acid and reduction in hydrogen sulfide which is carried by an inert gas and neutralized by sodium hydroxide. Sodium sulfide is titrated with mercuric acetate by constant intensity potentiometry [fr

  2. Gamma spectroscopy modelization intercomparison of the modelization results using two different codes (MCNP, and Pascalys-mercure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneville, L.; Chiron, M.; Toubon, H.; Dogny, S.; Huver, M.; Berger, L.

    2001-01-01

    The research performed in common these last 3 years by the French Atomic Commission CEA, COGEMA and Eurisys Mesures had for main subject the realization of a complete tool of modelization for the largest range of realistic cases, the Pascalys modelization software. The main purpose of the modelization was to calculate the global measurement efficiency, which delivers the most accurate relationship between the photons emitted by the nuclear source in volume, punctual or deposited form and the germanium hyper pure detector, which detects and analyzes the received photons. It has been stated since long time that experimental global measurement efficiency becomes more and more difficult to address especially for complex scene as we can find in decommissioning and dismantling or in case of high activities for which the use of high activity reference sources become difficult to use for both health physics point of view and regulations. The choice of a calculation code is fundamental if accurate modelization is searched. MCNP represents the reference code but its use is long time calculation consuming and then not practicable in line on the field. Direct line-of-sight point kernel code as the French Atomic Commission 3-D analysis Mercure code can represent the practicable compromise between the most accurate MCNP reference code and the realistic performances needed in modelization. The comparison between the results of Pascalys-Mercure and MCNP code taking in account the last improvements of Mercure in the low energy range where the most important errors can occur, is presented in this paper, Mercure code being supported in line by the recent Pascalys 3-D modelization scene software. The incidence of the intrinsic efficiency of the Germanium detector is also approached for the total efficiency of measurement. (authors)

  3. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultra low energy x-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, A.J.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Barton, J.B.; Huth, G.C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T.E.; Turkevich, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide x-ray spectrometers has been recently improved through new fabrication techniques and further development of low noise associated electronic systems. This progress has extended the range of measurements to the ultra low energy x-ray region at room temperature. This paper reports the study of the effect of contact material on the performance of HgI 2 detectors in the low energy x-ray region

  4. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asha, E-mail: arana5752@gmail.com [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Bhagat Phool Singh Mahilla Vishwavidyalaya, Khanpur Kalan, Sonipat-131305 (India); Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar-125001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  5. C-Phycocyanin protects against acute tributyltin chloride neurotoxicity by modulating glial cell activity along with its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory property: A comparative efficacy evaluation with N-acetyl cysteine in adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2015-08-05

    Spirulina is a widely used health supplement and is a dietary source of C-Phycocyanin (CPC), a potent anti-oxidant. We have previously reported the neurotoxic potential of tributyltin chloride (TBTC), an environmental pollutant and potent biocide. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of CPC against TBTC induced neurotoxicity. To evaluate the extent of neuroprotection offered by CPC, its efficacy was compared with the degree of protection offered by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (a well known neuroprotective drug, taken as a positive control). Male Wistar rats (28 day old) were administered with 20mg/kg TBTC (oral) and 50mg/kg CPC or 50mg/kg NAC (i.p.), alone or in combination, and various parameters were evaluated. These include blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage; redox parameters (ROS, GSH, redox pathway associated enzymes, oxidative stress markers); inflammatory, cellular, and stress markers; apoptotic proteins and in situ cell death assay (TUNEL). We observed increased CPC availability in cortical tissue following its administration. Although BBB associated proteins like claudin-5, p-glycoprotein and ZO-1 were restored, CPC/NAC failed to protect against TBTC induced overall BBB permeability (Evans blue extravasation). Both CPC and NAC remarkably reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. NAC effectively modulated redox pathway associated enzymes whereas CPC countered ROS levels efficiently. Interestingly, CPC and NAC were equivalently capable of reducing apoptotic markers, astroglial activation and cell death. This study illustrates the various pathways involved in CPC mediated neuroprotection against this environmental neurotoxicant and highlights its capability to modulate glial cell activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The impedance properties of the oxide film on the Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy-22 in neutral concentrated sodium chloride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakupi, P.; Zagidulin, D.; Noel, J.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A-3K7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A-3K7 (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The oxide film properties on Alloy-22 in the applied potential (E) range -600 mV to 600 mV (vs. saturated KCl, Ag/AgCl reference electrode) were characterized by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in near neutral pH, 5 M NaCl solutions, at 30 deg. C. The impedance properties of the film were compared to the chromium content of the film determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxide film properties on Alloy-22 may be divided into three applied potential (E) ranges: -600 mV {<=} E < -300 mV, -300 mV {<=} E {<=} 300 mV, and E > 300 mV. For the range -600 mV {<=} E < -300 mV the film resistance (R{sub film}) increases with potential accompanied by an increase in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} content; in the range -300 mV {<=} E {<=} 300 mV, R{sub film} values and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the oxide film achieve their maximum values; for E > 300 mV, a decrease in both R{sub film} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is observed accompanied by a significant increase in Cr(OH){sub 3}. Comparison of the impedance properties for Alloy-22 to those of Ni-Cr alloys indicate that the barrier layer oxide on Alloy-22 contains a lower number of less mobile defects, most likely Cr interstitials. Destruction of the barrier layer for E > 300 mV leads to the formation of a thicker, less protective bilayer, which is high in Mo content.

  7. Behaviour of nickel and nickel oxide thin films in chloride media; Comportamiento de peliculas delgadas de niquel y oxido de niquel en NaCl al 3%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magana, C. R.; Angeles, M. E.; Rodriguez, F. J.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behaviour of both: a nickel thin film deposited on steel AISI 1018 (UNS G 10180) and a superior nickel oxide electrochemically obtained on the film; with the purpose of decreasing the corrosion rate of low carbon steel immersed in a solution of NaCl 3% wt, thus efficient anti corrosive protection could be obtained. Two film deposition techniques were used, electrochemical and magnetron DC sputtering; and the protective properties of deposited films exposed to the aggressive media, were evaluated. The characterization of different films was carried out by using electrochemical techniques: polarization curves and electrochemical impedance. (Author)

  8. Gabor zone-plate apertures for imaging with the mercuric iodide gamma-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA); Meyyappan, A; Cai, A; Wade, G [California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1990-12-20

    Gabor zone-plate (GZP) apertures have been developed for use in EG and G EM's mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma-ray camera. The purpose of such an aperture is to increase efficiency, while maintaining good resolution. The GZP is similar to the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) but it has continuous transitions between opaque and transparent regions. Because there are no sharp transitions in the transmission, the inherent interference noise in GZP imaging is lower than that in FZP imaging. GZP parameters were chosen by considering the effects of constraints such as detector pixel size, number of pixels, minimum field of view required, maximum angle of incidence tolerated, and the Nyquist criterion for the minimum sampling rate. As a result an aperture was designed and fabricated with eight zones and a diameter of 3 cm. Lead was chosen as the aperture medium due to its high attenuation coefficient. Experimental data were obtained from the camera with the above GZP aperture. The point-spread function was determined and compared to the calculated response. Excellent agreement was obtained. The reconstruction process involves simulating, by computer, planar-wave illumination of a scaled transparency of the image and recording the intensity pattern at the focal plane. (orig.).

  9. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  10. Improved yield of high resolution mercuric iodide gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrish, V.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) exhibits properties which make it attractive for use as a solid state nuclear radiation detector. The wide bandgap (E g = 2.1 eV) and low dark current allow room temperature operation, while the high atomic number provides a large gamma-ray cross section. However, poor hole transport has been a major limitation in the routine fabrication of high-resolution spectrometers using this material. This paper presents the results of gamma-ray response and charge transport parameter measurements conducted during the past year at EG ampersand G/EM on 96 HgI 2 spectrometers. The gamma-ray response measurements reveal that detector quality is correlated with the starting material used in the crystal growth. In particular, an increased yield of high-resolution spectrometers was obtained from HgI 2 which was synthesized by precipitation from an aqueous solution, as opposed to using material from commercial vendors. Data are also presented which suggest that better spectrometer performance is tied to improved hole transport. Finally, some initial results on a study of detector uniformity reveal spatial variations which may explain why the correlation between hole transport parameters and spectrometer performance is sometimes violated. 6 refs., 3 figs

  11. MERCURE-3, Gamma Attenuation by Line-of-Flight in 3-D Heterogeneous Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Szondi, Egon J.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: MERCURE-3/PC performs three- dimensional gamma shielding calculations around extended gamma sources. These may be even non-homogeneous. 2 - Method of solution: The algorithm of the code is the point kernel integration model combined with buildup calculations. The geometry can be described analytically using linear and quadratic surfaces of any type. A standard gamma cross section library is provided with the code. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: To make possible the solution of large problems, all the problem size-dependent arrays are declared using symbolic constants. The default values are sufficient for most of the practical problems (e.g. 100 space elements; 100 equations; 300 surface elements; 40 materials; 25 energy groups, etc.); the code uses in this case only 200-250 Kbytes of memory, depending on the compiler used. If the problem is very large, the symbolic constants have to be modified, and the code has to be compiled using the Lahey F77L3 (protected mode) compiler

  12. Synthesis of Zirconium Lower Chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaviria, Juan P.

    2002-01-01

    This research is accurately related to the Halox concept of research reactor spent fuel element treatment.The aim of this project is to work the conditioning through selected chlorination of the element that make the spent fuel element. This research studied the physical chemistry conditions which produce formation of the lower zirconium chlorides through the reaction between metallic Zr and gaseous ZrCl 4 in a silica reactor.This work focused special attention in the analysis and confrontation of the published results among the different authors in order to reveal coincidences and contradictions.Experimental section consisted in a set of synthesis with different reaction conditions and reactor design. After reaction were analyzed the products on Zr shavings and the deposit growth on wall reactor.The products were strongly dependent of reactor design. It was observed that as the distance between Zr and wall reactor increased greater was tendency to lower chlorides formation.In reactors with small distance the reaction follows other way without formation of lower chlorides.Analysis on deposit growth on reactor showed that may be formed to a mixture of Si x Zr y intermetallics and zirconium oxides.Presence of oxygen in Zr and Zr-Si compounds on wall reactor reveals that there is an interaction between quartz and reactants.This interaction is in gaseous phase because contamination is observed in experiences where Zr was not in contact with reactor.Finally, it was made a global analysis of all experiences and a possible mechanism that interprets reaction ways is proposed

  13. Lithium Chloride Dependent Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Links Oxidative DNA Damage, Hypertrophy and Senescence in Human Articular Chondrocytes and Reproduces Chondrocyte Phenotype of Obese Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Guidotti

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that GSK3 activity is chondroprotective in osteoarthritis (OA, but at the same time, its inactivation has been proposed as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic option. Here we evaluated the extent of GSK3β inactivation in vivo in OA knee cartilage and the molecular events downstream GSK3β inactivation in vitro to assess their contribution to cell senescence and hypertrophy.In vivo level of phosphorylated GSK3β was analyzed in cartilage and oxidative damage was assessed by 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine staining. The in vitro effects of GSK3β inactivation (using either LiCl or SB216763 were evaluated on proliferating primary human chondrocytes by combined confocal microscopy analysis of Mitotracker staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS production (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. Downstream effects on DNA damage and senescence were investigated by western blot (γH2AX, GADD45β and p21, flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and light scattering properties, quantitative assessment of senescence associated β galactosidase activity, and PAS staining.In vivo chondrocytes from obese OA patients showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β, oxidative damage and expression of GADD45β and p21, in comparison with chondrocytes of nonobese OA patients. LiCl mediated GSK3β inactivation in vitro resulted in increased mitochondrial ROS production, responsible for reduced cell proliferation, S phase transient arrest, and increase in cell senescence, size and granularity. Collectively, western blot data supported the occurrence of a DNA damage response leading to cellular senescence with increase in γH2AX, GADD45β and p21. Moreover, LiCl boosted 8-oxo-dG staining, expression of IKKα and MMP-10.In articular chondrocytes, GSK3β activity is required for the maintenance of proliferative potential and phenotype. Conversely, GSK3β inactivation, although preserving chondrocyte survival, results in functional impairment via

  14. Lithium Chloride Dependent Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Links Oxidative DNA Damage, Hypertrophy and Senescence in Human Articular Chondrocytes and Reproduces Chondrocyte Phenotype of Obese Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Serena; Minguzzi, Manuela; Platano, Daniela; Cattini, Luca; Trisolino, Giovanni; Mariani, Erminia; Borzì, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that GSK3 activity is chondroprotective in osteoarthritis (OA), but at the same time, its inactivation has been proposed as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic option. Here we evaluated the extent of GSK3β inactivation in vivo in OA knee cartilage and the molecular events downstream GSK3β inactivation in vitro to assess their contribution to cell senescence and hypertrophy. In vivo level of phosphorylated GSK3β was analyzed in cartilage and oxidative damage was assessed by 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine staining. The in vitro effects of GSK3β inactivation (using either LiCl or SB216763) were evaluated on proliferating primary human chondrocytes by combined confocal microscopy analysis of Mitotracker staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining). Downstream effects on DNA damage and senescence were investigated by western blot (γH2AX, GADD45β and p21), flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and light scattering properties, quantitative assessment of senescence associated β galactosidase activity, and PAS staining. In vivo chondrocytes from obese OA patients showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β, oxidative damage and expression of GADD45β and p21, in comparison with chondrocytes of nonobese OA patients. LiCl mediated GSK3β inactivation in vitro resulted in increased mitochondrial ROS production, responsible for reduced cell proliferation, S phase transient arrest, and increase in cell senescence, size and granularity. Collectively, western blot data supported the occurrence of a DNA damage response leading to cellular senescence with increase in γH2AX, GADD45β and p21. Moreover, LiCl boosted 8-oxo-dG staining, expression of IKKα and MMP-10. In articular chondrocytes, GSK3β activity is required for the maintenance of proliferative potential and phenotype. Conversely, GSK3β inactivation, although preserving chondrocyte survival, results in functional impairment via induction of

  15. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid by Metal Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beixiao Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl3, FeCl3 and CuCl2 and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl3, exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 °C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  16. A novel mercuric reductase from the unique deep brine environment of atlantis II in the red sea

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Ahmed Anazadeh

    2013-11-26

    Aunique combination of physicochemical conditions prevails in the lower convective layer (LCL) of the brine pool at Atlantis II (ATII) Deep in the Red Sea. With a maximum depth of over 2000 m, the pool is characterized by acidic pH (5.3), high temperature (68 °C), salinity (26%), low light levels, anoxia, and high concentrations of heavy metals. We have established a metagenomic dataset derived from the microbial community in the LCL, and here we describe a gene for a novel mercuric reductase, a key component of the bacterial detoxification system for mercuric and organomercurial species. The metagenome-derived gene and an ortholog from an uncultured soil bacterium were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The properties of their products show that, in contrast to the soil enzyme, the ATII-LCL mercuric reductase is functional in high salt, stable at high temperatures, resistant to high concentrations of Hg2+, and efficiently detoxifies Hg2+ in vivo. Interestingly, despite the marked functional differences between the orthologs, their amino acid sequences differ by less than 10%. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes, in conjunction with three-dimensional modeling, have identified distinct structural features that contribute to extreme halophilicity, thermostability, and high detoxification capacity, suggesting that these were acquired independently during the evolution of this enzyme. Thus, our work provides fundamental structural insights into a novel protein that has undergone multiple biochemical and biophysical adaptations to promote the survival of microorganisms that reside in the extremely demanding environment of the ATII-LCL. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Toxicological Significance of Renal Bcrp: Another Potential Transporter in the Elimination of Mercuric Ions from Proximal Tubular Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Joshee, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Secretion of inorganic mercury (Hg2+) from proximal tubular cells into the tubular lumen has been shown to involve the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2). Considering similarities in localization and substrate specificity between Mrp2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), we hypothesize that Bcrp may also play a role in the proximal tubular secretion of mercuric species. In order to test this hypothesis, the uptake of Hg2+ was examined initially using inside-out membrane vesicles containing Bcrp. The results of these studies suggest that Bcrp may be capable of transporting certain conjugates of Hg2+. To further characterize the role of Bcrp in the handling of mercuric ions and in the induction of Hg2+-induced nephropathy, Sprague-Dawley and Bcrp knockout (bcrp−/−) rats were exposed intravenously to a non-nephrotoxic (0.5 μmol • kg−1), a moderately nephrotoxic (1.5 μmol • kg−1) or a significantly nephrotoxic (2.0 μmol • kg−1) dose of HgCl2. In general, the accumulation of Hg2+ was greater in organs of bcrp−/− rats than in Sprague-Dawley rats, suggesting that Bcrp may play a role in the export of Hg2+ from target cells. Within the kidney, cellular injury and necrosis was more severe in bcrp−/− rats than in controls. The pattern of necrosis, which was localized in the inner cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla was significantly different from that observed in Mrp2-deficient animals. These findings suggest that Bcrp may be involved in the cellular export of select mercuric species and that its role in this export may differ from that of Mrp2. PMID:25868844

  18. MRP2 and the Handling of Mercuric Ions in Rats Exposed Acutely to Inorganic and Organic Species of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C.; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2011-01-01

    Mercuric ions accumulate preferentially in renal tubular epithelial cells and bond with intracellular thiols. Certain metal-complexing agents have been shown to promote extraction of mercuric ions via the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2). Following exposure to a non-toxic dose of inorganic mercury (Hg2+), in the absence of complexing agents, tubular cells are capable of exporting a small fraction of intracellular Hg2+ through one or more undetermined mechanisms. We hypothesize that MRP2 plays a role in this export. To test this hypothesis, Wistar (control) and TR− rats were injected intravenously with a non-nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2 (0.5 μmol/kg) or CH3HgCl (5 mg/kg), containing [203Hg], in the presence or absence of cysteine (Cys; 1.25 μmol/kg or 12.5 mg/kg, respectively). Animals were sacrificed 24 h after exposure to mercury and the content of [203Hg] in blood, kidneys, liver, urine and feces was determined. In addition, uptake of Cys-S-conjugates of Hg2+ and methylmercury (CH3Hg+) was measured in inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from either control Sf9 cells or Sf9 cells transfected with human MRP2. The amount of mercury in the total renal mass and liver was significantly greater in TR− rats than in controls. In contrast, the amount of mercury in urine and feces was significantly lower in TR− rats than in controls. Data from membrane vesicles indicate that Cys-S-conjugates of Hg2+ and CH3Hg+ are transportable substrates of MRP2. Collectively, these data indicate that MRP2 plays a role in the physiological handling and elimination of mercuric ions from the kidney. PMID:21134393

  19. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys 135 Cys 140 , catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 140 ), Cys 14 (Cys 135 Ala 140 ), or both (Ala 135 Ala 140 ). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 140 ) or Cys 140 (Cys 135 Cys 139 Ala 140 ) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly 139 with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH 2 redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 14 mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala 135 Cys 140 protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys 135 and Cys 140 thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate

  20. A novel mercuric reductase from the unique deep brine environment of atlantis II in the red sea

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Ahmed Anazadeh; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Ferreira, Ari José Scattone; Setú bal, Joã o Carlos; Chambergo, Felipe Santiago; Ouf, Amged; Adel, Mustafa; Dawe, Adam Sean; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Siam, Rania; El-Dorry, Hamza A A

    2013-01-01

    Aunique combination of physicochemical conditions prevails in the lower convective layer (LCL) of the brine pool at Atlantis II (ATII) Deep in the Red Sea. With a maximum depth of over 2000 m, the pool is characterized by acidic pH (5.3), high temperature (68 °C), salinity (26%), low light levels, anoxia, and high concentrations of heavy metals. We have established a metagenomic dataset derived from the microbial community in the LCL, and here we describe a gene for a novel mercuric reductase, a key component of the bacterial detoxification system for mercuric and organomercurial species. The metagenome-derived gene and an ortholog from an uncultured soil bacterium were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The properties of their products show that, in contrast to the soil enzyme, the ATII-LCL mercuric reductase is functional in high salt, stable at high temperatures, resistant to high concentrations of Hg2+, and efficiently detoxifies Hg2+ in vivo. Interestingly, despite the marked functional differences between the orthologs, their amino acid sequences differ by less than 10%. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes, in conjunction with three-dimensional modeling, have identified distinct structural features that contribute to extreme halophilicity, thermostability, and high detoxification capacity, suggesting that these were acquired independently during the evolution of this enzyme. Thus, our work provides fundamental structural insights into a novel protein that has undergone multiple biochemical and biophysical adaptations to promote the survival of microorganisms that reside in the extremely demanding environment of the ATII-LCL. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. A novel mercuric reductase from the unique deep brine environment of Atlantis II in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Ferreira, Ari J S; Setubal, João C; Chambergo, Felipe S; Ouf, Amged; Adel, Mustafa; Dawe, Adam S; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B; Siam, Rania; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-17

    A unique combination of physicochemical conditions prevails in the lower convective layer (LCL) of the brine pool at Atlantis II (ATII) Deep in the Red Sea. With a maximum depth of over 2000 m, the pool is characterized by acidic pH (5.3), high temperature (68 °C), salinity (26%), low light levels, anoxia, and high concentrations of heavy metals. We have established a metagenomic dataset derived from the microbial community in the LCL, and here we describe a gene for a novel mercuric reductase, a key component of the bacterial detoxification system for mercuric and organomercurial species. The metagenome-derived gene and an ortholog from an uncultured soil bacterium were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The properties of their products show that, in contrast to the soil enzyme, the ATII-LCL mercuric reductase is functional in high salt, stable at high temperatures, resistant to high concentrations of Hg(2+), and efficiently detoxifies Hg(2+) in vivo. Interestingly, despite the marked functional differences between the orthologs, their amino acid sequences differ by less than 10%. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes, in conjunction with three-dimensional modeling, have identified distinct structural features that contribute to extreme halophilicity, thermostability, and high detoxification capacity, suggesting that these were acquired independently during the evolution of this enzyme. Thus, our work provides fundamental structural insights into a novel protein that has undergone multiple biochemical and biophysical adaptations to promote the survival of microorganisms that reside in the extremely demanding environment of the ATII-LCL.

  2. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaathaug, E.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  3. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanoparticles using one step green approach and their application as mercuric ion sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshni, V.; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been evolved as a promising candidate for the metal sensing applications due to their synthesis from naturally occurring and easily available non-toxic molecular precursors by green chemistry. A simple and one step procedure is reported here for the synthesis of CNPs from coconut milk by thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 120–150 °C for 2–5 min without using any carbonizing or passivating agent. On pyrolysis the coconut oil is separated from the carbon rich residue and the residue when dissolved in water showed blue fluorescence under UV light. The CNPs produced are found to show an emission maximum at 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. Synthesis by green approach makes CNPs a promising substitute for the metal sensing applications. Series of metal ions which have a hazardous impact on the ecological system have been taken for the analysis and it is observed that the fluorescence of CNPs gets remarkably quenched by mercuric ions. Fluorescence quenching was studied using standard Stern–Volmer quenching model. Limit of detection was found to be 16.5 nM Hg{sup 2+} concentration. - Highlights: • Green and economical synthesis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) from naturally abundant material. • Coconut milk is used as molecular precursor, which on thermal pyrolysis at 120 °C yielded CNPs. • Highly fluorescent CNPs show an emission maxima of 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. • Application of CNPs for metal ion sensing using fluorescence quenching phenomena. • Hg{sup 2+} is most effectively sensed with a detection limit of 16.5 nM.

  5. L-cysteine protected copper nanoparticles as colorimetric sensor for mercuric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Razium A; Nafady, Ayman; Sirajuddin; Memon, Najma; Sherazi, Tufail H; Kalwar, Nazar H

    2014-12-01

    This report demonstrates a novel, simple and efficient protocol for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles in aqueous solution using L-cysteine as capping or protecting agent. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy was employed to monitor the LSPR band of L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles (Cyst-Cu NPs) based on optimizing various reaction parameters. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provided information about the surface interaction between L-cysteine and Cu NPs. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of fine spherical, uniformly distributed Cyst-Cu NPs with average size of 34 ± 2.1 nm. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) illustrated the formation of pure metallic phase crystalline Cyst-Cu NPs. As prepared Cyst-Cu NPs were tested as colorimetric sensor for determining mercuric (Hg(2+)) ions in an aqueous system. Cyst-Cu NPs demonstrated very sensitive and selective colorimetric detection of Hg(2+) ions in the range of 0.5 × 10(-6)-3.5 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) based on decrease in LSPR intensity as monitored by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The developed sensor is simple, economic compared to those based on precious metal nanoparticles and sensitive to detect Hg(2+) ions with detection limit down to 4.3 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The sensor developed in this work has a high potential for rapid and on-site detection of Hg(2+) ions. The sensor was successfully applied for assessment of Hg(2+) ions in real water samples collected from various locations of the Sindh River. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanoparticles using one step green approach and their application as mercuric ion sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshni, V.; Ottoor, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been evolved as a promising candidate for the metal sensing applications due to their synthesis from naturally occurring and easily available non-toxic molecular precursors by green chemistry. A simple and one step procedure is reported here for the synthesis of CNPs from coconut milk by thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 120–150 °C for 2–5 min without using any carbonizing or passivating agent. On pyrolysis the coconut oil is separated from the carbon rich residue and the residue when dissolved in water showed blue fluorescence under UV light. The CNPs produced are found to show an emission maximum at 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. Synthesis by green approach makes CNPs a promising substitute for the metal sensing applications. Series of metal ions which have a hazardous impact on the ecological system have been taken for the analysis and it is observed that the fluorescence of CNPs gets remarkably quenched by mercuric ions. Fluorescence quenching was studied using standard Stern–Volmer quenching model. Limit of detection was found to be 16.5 nM Hg 2+ concentration. - Highlights: • Green and economical synthesis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) from naturally abundant material. • Coconut milk is used as molecular precursor, which on thermal pyrolysis at 120 °C yielded CNPs. • Highly fluorescent CNPs show an emission maxima of 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. • Application of CNPs for metal ion sensing using fluorescence quenching phenomena. • Hg 2+ is most effectively sensed with a detection limit of 16.5 nM

  7. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  8. The medical sodium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the institute was investigated the chemical composition of rock salt of some deposits of Tajikistan and was show the presence in it admixture of ions of Ca 2 + , Mg 2 + a nd SO 2 - a nd absence of heavy metals, ammonium salts, iron, potassium and arsenic. Was elaborated the fundamental instrument-technologic scheme of sodium chloride receiving

  9. High resolution diffraction imaging of mercuric iodide: Demonstration of the necessity for alternate crystal processing techniques for highly purified material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, B.; Berg, L. van den; Laor, U.

    1995-01-01

    The overall crystalline lattice uniformity in recently available, highly purified mercuric iodide single crystals has been shown to be impacted by crystal handling techniques that were previously satisfactory. High resolution diffraction imaging of the surface regularity of crystals of various levels of purity and growth orientation shows: (1) that the newer materials have a generally lower level of precipitates, (2) that the incidence of these precipitates is now closely correlated with growth direction, and (3) that the deformation resistance and resulting sensitivity to crystal handling procedures are also closely correlated with these factors in this soft material. As a result, gentler cutting and polishing procedures have been developed and are shown to be effective in preserving overall lattice regularity in the new material. The polishing required to remove residual surface scratches affect the lattice orientation of the softer, precipitate-free regions, while not affecting those regions with detectable levels of precipitates. These results correlate closely with the electrical properties of devices made from these crystals. Mercuric iodide single crystals have proved to be particularly useful for x and γ ray detectors because their room temperature operation allow for simple, efficient, and compact instrumentation

  10. Pourbaix diagrams of actinides in molten chlorides using an indicating electrode for oxide ion activity; Etablissement de diagrammes de Pourbaix des actinides dans les chlorures fondus au moyen d'une electrode indicatrice de l'activite des ions oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertin, D.; Lacquement, J. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SPHA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    Pyrochemical separation methods using high temperature molten salt media could emerge as promising and valuable routes compared with aqueous methods for separation and transmutation strategies for long-lived radionuclides. A good knowledge of the molten salt chemistry is essential for controlling these separations, and elementary data are required for molten halide salts, which can be readily provided by electrochemical methods. Applying the chemical principles of aqueous solutions to the molten salt media, Pourbaix diagrams - called in this case potential-oxo-acidity (pO{sup 2-}) - can be plotted. They offer a rapid and comprehensive view of the thermodynamic properties of selected elements in a solvent of interest. Two methods are available for preparing these diagrams. The first is based on available thermodynamic data on pure element oxide (and oxychloride) compounds and on element chloride activity coefficients in melt (which can be electrochemically determined). In this method, we consider the oxide anion exchange reactions between the pure compounds, water and hydrogen chloride. The second method is a direct and experimental determination of the oxo-acidic properties of the studied element chlorides in melts. Use of an Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia Membrane (YSZM) electrode (oxide anion selective electrode) helps determine the nature of the stable oxide compounds in melts as well as their stabilities. The YSZM is used with a silver/silver chloride reference system, and was developed 25 years ago. Two examples of Potential-acidity diagrams. Employing the first method and the determination of the standard potential of plutonium in LiCl-KCl and NaCl-KCl eutectic mixtures, potential-oxo-acidity diagrams were plotted for these melts at various temperatures. It was found that the stability domain for plutonium chloride depends on the melt composition (influence of oxide anion solvation). We also used the Omega acidity function - based on reaction (1) - which is a

  11. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

  12. Toxicological significance of renal Bcrp: Another potential transporter in the elimination of mercuric ions from proximal tubular cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridges, Christy C., E-mail: bridges_cc@mercer.edu; Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Joshee, Lucy

    2015-06-01

    Secretion of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) from proximal tubular cells into the tubular lumen has been shown to involve the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2). Considering similarities in localization and substrate specificity between Mrp2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), we hypothesize that Bcrp may also play a role in the proximal tubular secretion of mercuric species. In order to test this hypothesis, the uptake of Hg{sup 2+} was examined initially using inside-out membrane vesicles containing Bcrp. The results of these studies suggest that Bcrp may be capable of transporting certain conjugates of Hg{sup 2+}. To further characterize the role of Bcrp in the handling of mercuric ions and in the induction of Hg{sup 2+}-induced nephropathy, Sprague–Dawley and Bcrp knockout (bcrp{sup −/−}) rats were exposed intravenously to a non-nephrotoxic (0.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}), a moderately nephrotoxic (1.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}) or a significantly nephrotoxic (2.0 μmol·kg{sup −1}) dose of HgCl{sub 2}. In general, the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} was greater in organs of bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in Sprague–Dawley rats, suggesting that Bcrp may play a role in the export of Hg{sup 2+} from target cells. Within the kidney, cellular injury and necrosis was more severe in bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in controls. The pattern of necrosis, which was localized in the inner cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla, was significantly different from that observed in Mrp2-deficient animals. These findings suggest that Bcrp may be involved in the cellular export of select mercuric species and that its role in this export may differ from that of Mrp2. - Highlights: • Bcrp may mediate transport of mercury out of proximal tubular cells. • Hg-induced nephropathy was more severe in Bcrp knockout rats. • Bcrp and Mrp2 may differ in their ability to transport Hg.

  13. Waste-water assay with continuous algal cultures: the effect of mercuric acetate on the growth of some marine dinoflagellates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, H.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of mercuric acetate was studied in culture experiments with the dinoflagellates Scrippsiella faeroense (Paulsen) Balech et Soares, Prorocentrum micans Ehrenberg and Gymnodinium splendens Lebour. Impairment of growth rates, in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, maximum cell densities and morphological changes served as criteria for assessing sublethal influences. Tests were made using the batch- and continuous-culture techniques. Addition of Hg at concentrations of 0.001 mg.1/sup -1/ and higher resulted in reduction of relative growth rates. In a few cases populations recovered from the initial decline and showed new growth. Cell counts corresponded very closely to in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Morphological variations were observed in S. faeroense, which responded (even in sublethal concentrations) by bursting its thecae, releasing naked motile cells and forming vegetative resting stages. The problems of optimal algal-bioassay methods are discussed also, in the light of results obtained by other authors.

  14. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  15. Studies on the rare earth complexes with pyridine derivatives and their N-oxide(II) - Synthesis and properties of fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minyu, T.; Ning, T.; Yingli, Z.; Jiyuan, B.

    1985-01-01

    The solid complexes of rare earth nitrates perchlorates and thiocyanates with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (bipyO/sub 2/) have been reported. However, the corresponding complexes of other rear earth chlorides have not been investigated except lanthanum, cerium and yttrium. As an extension of our previous work on the synthesis of complexes of praseodymium and neodymium chlorides wiht bipoyO/sub 2/, the authors have now prepared fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with biphyO/sub 2/, using methanol as a reaction medium. The new synthesized compounds have been identified by means of elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry, conductometry, differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG) and X-ray powder diffraction

  16. Chloride Transport in Heterogeneous Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Holt, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) is a commonly-used method for estimating groundwater recharge. Observations of the vertical distribution of pore-water chloride are related to the groundwater infiltration rates (i.e. recharge rates). In CMB method, the chloride distribution is attributed mainly to the assumption of one dimensional piston flow. In many places, however, the vertical distribution of chloride will be influenced by heterogeneity, leading to horizontal movement of infiltrating waters. The impact of heterogeneity will be particularly important when recharge is locally focused. When recharge is focused in an area, horizontal movement of chloride-bearing waters, coupled with upward movement driven by evapotranspiration, may lead to chloride bulges that could be misinterpreted if the CMB method is used to estimate recharge. We numerically simulate chloride transport and evaluate the validity of the CMB method in highly heterogeneous systems. This simulation is conducted for the unsaturated zone of Ogallala, Antlers, and Gatuna (OAG) formations in Andrews County, Texas. A two dimensional finite element model will show the movement of chloride through heterogeneous systems. We expect to see chloride bulges not only close to the surface but also at depths characterized by horizontal or upward movement. A comparative study of focused recharge estimates in this study with available recharge data will be presented.

  17. Oxygen titration in sodium. The mercury method and its use for very low values; Dosage de l'oxygene dans le sodium. La methode au mercure : son utilisation dans le cas de tres faibles teneurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champeix, L; Darras, R; Duflo, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The mercury method for the oxygen titration in sodium has now been known for ten years and is probably the more frequently used. In this text, precision are given to what extent it is valuable when used in microanalysis. Details are given on the apparatus, its manipulation and its calibration. After testing, we have decided to use flame spectroscopy to titrate the sodium hydroxide formed. Discussions are exposed on the errors due to the presence of sodium chloride and calcium. Results are examined from the point of view of their reproducibility and accuracy. If great care is taken, this method allows oxygen titration in sodium even for values below 10 ppm with satisfactory precision. (author) [French] La methode au mercure pour le dosage de l'oxygene dans le sodium est connue depuis une dizaine d'annees, elle est probablement la plus utilisee. Nous avons voulu preciser dans quelle mesure elle etait valable dans le domaine des faibles teneurs avec une precision acceptable. Nous decrivons en detail l'appareil utilise pour l'analyse, le mode operatoire et la methode d'etalonnage. Nos essais nous ont conduit a adopter la spectrographie de flamme pour le dosage de la soude formee, les erreurs introduites par la presence de chlorure de sodium et de calcium sont discutes. Les resultats obtenus sont examines du point de vue de la reproductibilite, de la justesse. Moyennant un mode operatoire tres soigne, cette methode permet le dosage de l'oxygene dans le sodium, meme a des teneurs inferieures a 10 ppm avec une precision satisfaisante. (auteur)

  18. Visual test of subparts per billion-level mercuric ion with a gold nanoparticle probe after preconcentration by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Jing-fu

    2010-05-15

    With the combination of the gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based visual test with hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) extraction, a highly sensitive and selective method was developed for field detection of mercuric ion (Hg(2+)) in environmental waters. Hg(2+) in water samples was extracted through HFSLM and trapped in the aqueous acceptor and then visually detected based on the red-to-blue color change of 3-mercaptopropionic acid-functionalized AuNP (MPA-AuNP) probe. The highest extraction efficiency of Hg(2+) was obtained by using a 600 mL sample (pH 8.0, 2.0% (w/v) NaCl), approximately 35 microL of acceptor (10 mM of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, pH 4.0) filled in the lumen of a polypropylene hollow fiber tubing (55 cm in length, 50 microm wall thickness, 280 microm inner diameter), a liquid membrane of 2.0% (w/v) trioctycphosphine oxide in undecane, and a shaking rate of 250 rpm. The chromegenic reaction was conducted by incubating the mixture of MPA-AuNP stock solution (12 microL, 15 nM), Tris-borate buffer solution (18 microL, 0.2 M, pH 9.5), and acceptor (30 microL) at 30 degrees C for 1 h. The detection limit can be adjusted to 0.8 microg/L Hg(2+) (corresponding to an enrichment factor of approximately 1000 in the HFSLM) and 2.0 microg/L Hg(2+) (the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit of [Hg(2+)] for drinkable water) by using extraction times of 3 and 1 h, respectively. The proposed method is extremely specific for Hg(2+) with tolerance to at least 1000-fold of other environmentally relevant heavy and transition metal ions and was successfully applied to detect Hg(2+) in a certified reference water sample, as well as real river, lake, and tap water samples.

  19. Protective effects of curcumin against mercury-induced hepatic injuries in rats, involvement of oxidative stress antagonism, and Nrf2-ARE pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Xu, Z; Li, H; Guo, M; Yang, T; Feng, S; Xu, B; Deng, Yu

    2017-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) represents a ubiquitous environmental heavy metal that could lead to severe toxic effects in a variety of organs usually at a low level. The present study focused on the liver oxidative stress, one of the most important roles playing in Hg hepatotoxicity, by evaluation of different concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) administration. Moreover, the protective potential of curcumin against Hg hepatotoxic effects was also investigated. Eighty-four rats were randomly divided into six groups for a three-days experiment: control, dimethyl sulfoxide control, HgCl 2 treatment (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mg kg -1 day -1 ), and curcumin pretreatment (100 mg kg -1 day -1 ) groups. Exposure of HgCl 2 resulted in acute dose-dependent hepatotoxic effects. Administration of 2.4 mg kg -1 HgCl 2 significantly elevated total Hg, nonprotein sulfhydryl, reactive oxygen species formation, malondialdehyde, apoptosis levels, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and alanine transaminase activities, with an impairment of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the liver. Moreover, HgCl 2 treatment activated nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2-antioxidant response element (Nrf2-ARE) signaling pathway in further investigation, with a significant upregulation of Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase heavy subunit expression, relative to control. Pretreatment with curcumin obviously prevented HgCl 2 -induced liver oxidative stress, which may be due to its free radical scavenging or Nrf2-ARE pathway-inducing properties. Taking together these data suggest that curcumin counteracts HgCl 2 hepatotoxicity through antagonizing liver oxidative stress.

  20. Chronic dietary mercury exposure causes oxidative stress, brain lesions, and altered behaviour in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berntssen, Marc H.G.; Aatland, Aase; Handy, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) parr were fed for 4 months on fish meal based diets supplemented with mercuric chloride (0, 10, or 100 mg Hg kg -1 DW) or methylmercury chloride (0, 5, or 10 mg Hg kg -1 DW) to assess the effects of inorganic (Hg) and organic dietary mercury on brain lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Lipid peroxidative products, endogenous anti oxidant enzymes, brain histopathology, and overall behaviour were measured. Methylmercury accumulated significantly in the brain of fish fed 5 or 10 mg kg -1 by the end of the experiment, and inorganic mercury accumulated significantly in the brain only at 100 mg kg -1 exposure levels. No mortality or growth reduction was observed in any of the exposure groups. Fish fed 5 mg kg -1 methylmercury had a significant increase (2-fold) in the antioxidant enzyme super oxide dismutase (SOD) in the brain. At dietary levels of 10 mg kg -1 methylmercury, a significant increase (7-fold) was observed in lipid peroxidative products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and a subsequently decrease (1.5-fold) in anti oxidant enzyme activity (SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px). Fish fed 10 mg kg -1 methylmercury also had pathological damage (vacoulation and necrosis), significantly reduced neural enzyme activity (5-fold reduced monoamine oxidase, MAO, activity), and reduced overall post-feeding activity behaviour. Pathological injury started in the brain stem and became more widespread in other areas of the brain at higher exposure levels. Fish fed 100 mg Hg kg -1 inorganic mercury had significant reduced neural MAO activity and pathological changes (astrocyte proliferation) in the brain, however, neural SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activity, lipid peroxidative products (TBARS), and post feeding behaviour did not differ from controls. Compared with other organs, the brain is particular susceptible for dietary methylmercury induced lipid peroxidative stress at relative low exposure concentrations. Doses of dietary

  1. Valyl benzyl ester chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Dutkiewicz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound (systematic name: 1-benzyloxy-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-aminium chloride, C12H18NO2+·Cl−, the ester group is approximately planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.040 (2 Å from the least-squares plane, and makes a dihedral angle of 28.92 (16° with the phenyl ring. The crystal structure is organized by N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds which join the two components into a chain along the b axis. Pairs of chains arranged antiparallel are interconnected by further N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, forming eight-membered rings. Similar packing modes have been observed in a number of amino acid ester halides with a short unit-cell parameter of ca 5.5 Å along the direction in which the chains run.

  2. Chloride on the Move

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo

    2017-01-09

    Chloride (Cl−) is an essential plant nutrient but under saline conditions it can accumulate to toxic levels in leaves; limiting this accumulation improves the salt tolerance of some crops. The rate-limiting step for this process – the transfer of Cl− from root symplast to xylem apoplast, which can antagonize delivery of the macronutrient nitrate (NO3−) to shoots – is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and is multigenic. Until recently the molecular mechanisms underpinning this salt-tolerance trait were poorly defined. We discuss here how recent advances highlight the role of newly identified transport proteins, some that directly transfer Cl− into the xylem, and others that act on endomembranes in ‘gatekeeper’ cell types in the root stele to control root-to-shoot delivery of Cl−.

  3. Advanced radiation detector development mercuric iodide, silicon with internal gain, hybrid scintillator/semiconductor detectors. Comprehensive summary report, 1976-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huth, G.C.; Dabrowski, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are reported in the development of a compound semi-insulator mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) for nuclear radiation detection and spectroscopy, early lung cancer detection and localization in the uranium miner/worker population, computer digital image processing and image reconstruction research, and a concept for multiple, filtered x-ray computed tomography scanning to reveal chemical compositional information. Another area of interest is the study of new advances in the area of silicon detectors with internal gain (''avalanche'')

  4. Kinetic Investigations on Pd(II) Catalyzed Oxidation of Some Amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic investigations on Pd(II) catalyzed oxidation of dl-serine and dl-threonine by acidic solution of potassium bromate in the presence of mercuric acetate, as a scavenger have been made in the temperature range of 30–45°C. The rate shows zero order kinetics in bromate [BrO3‾] and order of reaction is one with respect ...

  5. Anodic and cathodic reactions in molten calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fray, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Calcium chloride is a very interesting electrolyte in that it is available, virtually free, in high purity form as a waste product from the chemical industry. It has a very large solubility for oxide ions, far greater than many alkali halides and other divalent halides and has the same toxicity as sodium chloride and also a very high solubility in water. Intuitively, on the passage of current, it is expected that calcium would be deposited at the cathode and chlorine would evolve at the anode. However, if calcium oxide is added to the melt, it is possible to deposit calcium and evolve oxygen containing gases at the anode, making the process far less polluting than when chlorine is evolved. This process is discussed in terms of the addition of calcium to molten lead. Furthermore, these reactions can be altered dramatically depending upon the electrode materials and the other ions dissolved in the calcium chloride. As calcium is only deposited at very negative cathodic potentials, there are several interesting cathodic reactions that can occur and these include the decomposition of the carbonate ion and the ionization of oxygen, sulphur, selenium and tellurium. For example, if an oxide is used as the cathode in molten calcium chloride, the favoured reaction is shown to be the ionization of oxygen O + 2e - → O 2- rather than Ca 2+ + 2 e- → Ca. The oxygen ions dissolve in the salt leaving the metal behind, and this leads to the interesting hypothesis that metal oxides can be reduced directly to the metal purely by the use of electrons. Examples are given for the reduction of titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, chromium oxide and niobium oxide and by mixing oxide powders together and reducing the mixed compact, alloys and intermetallic compounds are formed. Preliminary calculations indicate that this new process should be much cheaper than conventional metallothermic reduction for these elements. (author)

  6. Cerium(terbium, erbium)chloride-choline chloride aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Bikbaeva, G.G.; Domrachev, V.N.; Vanskova, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    To clarify the effect of rare earth nature on mutual solubility of rare earth salts and amines the solubility of solid phases in the systems, consisting of choline chloride, water and cerium, terbium, erbium chlorides, has been studied. It is established, that solubility isotherms of all the systems, testify to the formation of new solid phases of the composition: Ce(Tb, Er)xCl 3 x2C 5 H 14 ONClx3H 2 O. Individuality of new solid phases is proved by DTA method, the composition is confirmed by chemical analysis and data of PMR spectra, for choline chloride and its complexes with rare earth chlorides of the given composition PMR and IR spectra are studied

  7. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg 2+ ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn 2+ ); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg 2+ causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn 2+ release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn 2+ or Hg 2+ . Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg 2+ -induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg 2+ that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  8. Thermogravimetry for optimization of chloride pyro hydrolytic separations in zirconia-magnesia matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Dantas, E.S.K.

    1992-08-01

    A fast and accurate method for chloride ion determination in zirconia-magnesia matrix was studied the method consists in the pyro hydrolysis of the oxides at 900 o C, using a quartz apparatus, during thirty minutes and further determination of the chloride ion collected by means of either ion-selective electrode or ion chromatography. The thermogravimetric curves (TG curves) of the metal oxides and oxychlorides provide all the information about the chloride ion evolution temperature and the influence of pyro hydrolytic accelerators (U 3 O 8 ) on ion evolution. (author)

  9. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of chloride induced .... represents the protective barrier moderating the chloride attack which ... inhibitors and their influence on the physical properties of. Portland ...

  10. Calcium Channels, Rho-Kinase, Protein Kinase-C, and Phospholipase-C Pathways Mediate Mercury Chloride-Induced Myometrial Contractions in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Swati; Prakash, Atul; Choudhury, Soumen; Mandil, Rajesh; Garg, Satish K

    2018-05-21

    Adverse effects of mercury on female reproduction are reported; however, its effect on myogenic activity of uterus and mechanism thereof is obscure. Present study was undertaken to unravel the mechanistic pathways of mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 )-induced myometrial contraction in rats. Isometric tension in myometrial strips of rats following in vitro exposure to HgCl 2 was recorded using data acquisition system-based physiograph. HgCl 2 produced concentration-dependent (10 nM-100 μM) uterotonic effect which was significantly (p Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract depicting the mechanism of mercury-induced myometrial contraction in rats. M receptor: Muscarinic receptor; PIP2: phospho-inositol bisphosphate; PLC: phospholipase-C; DAG: diacyl glycerol; IP3: inositol triphosphate; IP3R: inositol triphosphate receptor; PKC; protein kinase-C; MLCP: myosin light chain phosphatise; MYPT: myosin phosphatase; SR: sarco-endoplasmic reticulum.

  11. Optimization of the lithium/thionyl chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ralph E.

    1989-01-01

    A 1-D math model for the lithium/thionyl chloride primary cell is used in conjunction with a parameter estimation technique in order to estimate the electro-kinetic parameters of this electrochemical system. The electro-kinetic parameters include the anodic transfer coefficient and exchange current density of the lithium oxidation, alpha sub a,1 and i sub o,i,ref, the cathodic transfer coefficient and the effective exchange current density of the thionyl chloride reduction, alpha sub c,2 and a sup o i sub o,2,ref, and a morphology parameter, Xi. The parameter estimation is performed on simulated data first in order to gain confidence in the method. Data, reported in the literature, for a high rate discharge of an experimental lithium/thionyl chloride cell is used for an analysis.

  12. Dynamic electrochemical measurement of chloride ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement,

  13. Producing ammonium chloride from coal or shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, O L

    1921-02-25

    Process of producing ammonium chloride consists of mixing the substance to be treated with a chloride of an alkali or alkaline earth metal, free silica, water and free hydrochloric acid, heating the mixture until ammonium chloride distills off and collecting the ammonium chloride.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The...

  15. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375... CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No....1666 of this chapter, at a concentration of 1.5 times that of cetylpyridinium chloride. (c) The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... hydrochloric acid solution and crystallizing out magnesium chloride hexahydrate. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  18. Mercuric ion reduction and resistance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing a modified bacterial merA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, C L; Wilde, H D; Stack, N M; Thompson, D M; Summers, A O; Meagher, R B

    1996-01-01

    With global heavy metal contamination increasing, plants that can process heavy metals might provide efficient and ecologically sound approaches to sequestration and removal. Mercuric ion reductase, MerA, converts toxic Hg2+ to the less toxic, relatively inert metallic mercury (Hg0) The bacterial merA sequence is rich in CpG dinucleotides and has a highly skewed codon usage, both of which are particularly unfavorable to efficient expression in plants. We constructed a mutagenized merA sequence, merApe9, modifying the flanking region and 9% of the coding region and placing this sequence under control of plant regulatory elements. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seeds expressing merApe9 germinated, and these seedlings grew, flowered, and set seed on medium containing HgCl2 concentrations of 25-100 microM (5-20 ppm), levels toxic to several controls. Transgenic merApe9 seedlings evolved considerable amounts of Hg0 relative to control plants. The rate of mercury evolution and the level of resistance were proportional to the steady-state mRNA level, confirming that resistance was due to expression of the MerApe9 enzyme. Plants and bacteria expressing merApe9 were also resistant to toxic levels of Au3+. These and other data suggest that there are potentially viable molecular genetic approaches to the phytoremediation of metal ion pollution. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8622910

  19. Picomolar selective detection of mercuric ion (Hg{sup 2+}) using a functionalized single plasmonic gold nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyeon Don; Choi, Inhee; Yang, Young In; Hong, Surin; Lee, Suseung; Yi, Jongheop [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Processes, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Taewook, E-mail: xinly601@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: iniini79@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: netmo00@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: pell2004@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jazz1863@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: twkang@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: jyi@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-09

    A highly sensitive method for the selective detection and quantification of mercuric ions (Hg{sup 2+}) using single plasmonic gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based dark-field microspectroscopy (DFMS) is demonstrated. The method is based on the scattering property of a single GNP that is functionalized with thiolated molecules, which is altered when analytes bind to the functionalized GNP. The spectral resolution of the system is 0.26 nm and a linear response to Hg{sup 2+} was found in the dynamic range of 100 pM-10 {mu}M. The method permits Hg{sup 2+} to be detected at the picomolar level, which is a remarkable reduction in the detection limit, considering the currently proscribed Environmental Protection Agency regulation level (10 nM, or 2 ppb) and the detection limits of other optical methods for detecting Hg{sup 2+} (recently approx. 1-10 nM). In addition, Hg{sup 2+} can be sensitively detected in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}, which do not interfere with the analysis. Based on the findings reported herein, it is likely that single-nanoparticle-based metal ion sensing can be extended to the development of other chemo- and biosensors for the direct detection of specific targets in an intracellular environment as well as in environmental monitoring.

  20. Voltammetric behavior, biocidal effect and synthesis of some new nanomeric fused cyclic thiosemicarbazones and their mercuric(II salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.T. Makki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available New nanomeric 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6-methyl-9-unsubstituted/substituted-1,2,4-triazino[5,6-b]indoles (2a–c and 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,4-triaino[5,6]-cyclobut-6-ene (3 were prepared via reaction of thiosemicarbazide with 5-unsubstitutedand/substituted-indol-2,3-diones and/or 3,4-dihydroxycyclobutane-1,2-dione in methanol–concentrated HCl at room temperature. A series of mercury(II–ligand salts e.g. compound 4b and Hg(II complexes 5a,b and 6 of cyclic Schiff base were prepared. Structures of these compounds were established by elemental analysis and spectral measurements. The redox characteristics of selected compounds were studied for use as chelating agents for stripping voltammetric determination of mercuric(II ions in aqueous media. The compounds were also screened for their use as molluscicidal agents against Biomophalaria Alexandrina Snails responsible for Bilhariziasis.

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34... chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a) Copper, aluminum, magnesium, mercury, silver, and their alloys shall... equipment that may come in contact with vinyl chloride liquid or vapor. (b) Valves, flanges, and pipe...

  2. 40 CFR 61.65 - Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants. 61.65 Section 61.65 Protection of Environment... AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.65 Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of an ethylene dichloride...

  3. On the analysis of mercuric nitrate in flue gas by GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Sharma, Ramesh K.; Pavlish, John H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that in a simulated flue gas stream containing NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} elemental mercury is initially captured on a carbon or manganese oxide sorbent. After approximately an hour, however, mercury breaks through relatively rapidly, and the volatile form of mercury emitted is an oxidized species. The volatile mercury species emitted from a granular MnO{sub 2} sorbent was trapped in an impinger containing cold acetonitrile. Subsequent evaporation of 95% of the acetonitrile in a Kuderna-Danish apparatus and gas chromatography (GC) of the concentrate resulted in a single mercury-containing GC peak at 5.5 min; the retention time and mass spectrum of this compound matched exactly those of a standard mercury(II) nitrate hydrate, Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O dissolved in acetonitrile. The volatile mercury component analyzed from injection of this standard solution was shown to be a form of methylmercury that is produced in the GC column by reaction of the highly reactive mercury nitrate with the methylsiloxane GC phase. Because the on-column derivatization reaction seems to be unique to mercury nitrate, the GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectroscopic) analysis provides strong evidence for identification of the trapped oxidized mercury species as mercury nitrate although, because the nitrate becomes detached from the mercury atom in the on-column reaction, the identity is not proven. (orig.)

  4. Preparation of pure anhydrous rare earth chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kova, N.L.; Slastenova, N.M.; Batyaev, I.M.; Solov'ev, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been suggested for obtaining extra-pure anhydrous REE chlorides by chloridizing corresponding oxalates by chlorine in a fluid bed, the chloridizing agents being diluted by an inert gas in a ratio of 2-to-1. The method is applicable to the manufacture of quality chlorides not only of light, but also of heavy REE. Neodymium chloride has an excited life of tau=30 μs, this evidencing the absence of the damping impurities

  5. A spectroscopic study of uranium species formed in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Bhatt, Anand I.; May, Iain; Griffiths, Trevor R.; Thied, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    The chlorination of uranium metal or uranium oxides in chloride melts offers an acceptable process for the head-end of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The reactions of uranium metal and ceramic uranium dioxide with chlorine and with hydrogen chloride were studied in the alkali metal chloride melts, NaCl-KCl at 973K, NaCl-CsCl between 873 and 923K and LiCl-KCl at 873K. The uranium species formed therein were characterized from their electronic absorption spectra measured in situ. The kinetic parameters of the reactions depend on melt composition, temperature and chlorinating agent used. The reaction of uranium dioxide with oxygen in the presence of alkali metal chlorides results in the formation of alkali metal uranates. A spectroscopic study, between 723 and 973K, on their formation and their solutions was undertaken in LiCl, LiCl-KCl eutectic and NaCl-CsCl eutectic melts. The dissolution of uranium dioxide in LiCl-KCl eutectic at 923K containing added aluminium trichloride in the presence of oxygen has also been investigated. In this case, the reaction leads to the formation of uranyl chloride species. (author)

  6. Reaction of calcium chloride with alkali metal chlorides in melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, V.D.; Mikhajlova, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Thermochemical characteristics of CaCl 2 reaction with sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium chlorides in melts at 890 deg C are determined. The values of formation enthalpies of infinitely diluted by CaCl 2 solutions (ΔH) in the chloride row increase from -22 in NaCl to -47 kJ/mol of CaCl 2 in CsCl. With increasing the concentration of calcium chloride in the solution the ΔH values decrease. The regularities of separation from the solution of the CaCl 2 -CsCl system at 890 deg C of the CaCl 2 x CsCl in solid are studied. Formation enthalpies under the given conditions constitutes -70+-3 kJ/mol

  7. Surface speciation and interactions between adsorbed chloride and water on cerium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland-Harper, Sophie; Taylor, Robin; Hobbs, Jeff; Pimblott, Simon; Pattrick, Richard; Sarsfield, Mark; Denecke, Melissa; Livens, Francis; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark; Waters, John; Pearce, Carolyn

    2018-06-01

    Ceria particles with different specific surface areas (SSA) were contaminated with chloride and water, then heat treated at 500 and 900 °C to investigate sorption behaviour of these species on metal oxides. Results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed chloride and water adsorption onto particles increased with surface area and that these species were mostly removed on heat treatment (from 6.3 to 0.8 at% Cl- on high SSA and from 1.4 to 0.4 at% on low SSA particles). X-ray diffraction revealed that chloride was not incorporated into the bulk ceria structure, but crystal size increased upon contamination. Ce LIII-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed that chloride was not present in the first co-ordination sphere around Ce(IV) ions, so was not bonded to Ce as chloride in the bulk structure. Sintering of contaminated high SSA particles occurred with heat treatment at 900 °C, and they resembled low SSA particles synthesised at this temperature. Physical chloride-particle interactions were investigated using electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, showing that chloride was homogeneously distributed on ceria and that reduction of porosity did not trap surface-sorbed chloride inside the particles as surface area was reduced during sintering. This has implications for stabilisation of chloride-contaminated PuO2 for long term storage.

  8. Mechanism of immunotoxicological effects of tributyltin chloride on murine thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neelima; Kumar, Anoop

    2014-04-01

    Tributyltin-chloride, a well-known organotin compound, is a widespread environmental toxicant. The immunotoxic effects of tributyltin-chloride on mammalian system and its mechanism is still unclear. This study is designed to explore the mode of action of tributyltin-induced apoptosis and other parallel apoptotic pathways in murine thymocytes. The earliest response in oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-3 activation has been observed. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine and buthionine sulfoximine effectively inhibited the tributyltin-induced apoptotic DNA and elevated the sub G1 population, respectively. Caspase inhibitors pretreatment prevent tributyltin-induced apoptosis. Western blot and flow cytometry indicate no translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G in the nuclear fraction from mitochondria. Intracellular Ca(2+) levels are significantly raised by tributyltin chloride. These results clearly demonstrate caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway and support the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 activation, and calcium during tributyltin-chloride (TBTC)-induced thymic apoptosis.

  9. Electrochemical Chloride extraction using external electrodes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical methods for the removal of chloride from concrete have been developed and the methods are primarily designed for situations where corrosion has started due to an increased chloride concentration in the vicinity of the reinforcement. In these methods the reinforcement is used...... as the cathode. However, some unwanted side effects can occur, including alkali-silica reaction and in some cases hydrogen embrittlement. It is also suggested also to use electrochemical chloride extraction in a preventive way in constructions where chloride induced corrosion is likely to be a problem after...... a period of time, i.e. remove the chlorides before the chloride front reaches the reinforcement. If the chlorides are removed from outer few centimetres from the surface, the chloride will not reach the reinforcement and cause damage. By using the electrochemical chloride removal in this preventive way...

  10. Development of advanced solid state radiation detectors: mercuric iodide and high gain silicon avalanche structures. Annual progress report, December 1, 1984-November 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huth, G.C.; Dabrowski, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the period from December 1984 through November 1985 for this research project sponsored by the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Dept. of Energy. This work has two primary research objectives. The first is continuing development of the material mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) and its applications to energy dispersive x-ray analysis and gamma ray spectrometry. The second task involves investigation of silicon ''avalanche'' (internal electron gain) radiation detector structures fabricated from new neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon single crystal

  11. Study of low noise preamplifier systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Del Duca, A.; Schenpple, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of different preamplification systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide x-ray detectors has been performed. Resistor-, drain-, and light-feedback preamplifiers have been studied. Energy resolution of 295 eV (FWHM) for Fe-55 source (5.9 keV) and 225 eV (FWHM) for the pulser have been obtained with both the detector and the input FET at room temperature using the pulsed-light feedback preamplifier. It has been shown that cooling the input FET using a small Peltier element allows the energy resolution to be improved up to 25%

  12. Development of mercury porosimeter. Application to nuclear graphite studies (1961); Mise au point d'un porosimetre a mercure. Application a l'etude des graphites nucleaires (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquet, M; Genisson, J; Sailleau, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A mercury porosimeter, model IFP-CEA, has been developed for application to nuclear graphite studies. The apparatus is based on the capillary depression phenomenon. The relationship between the radius of a pore and the pressure at which mercury fills it is pr = -2 {sigma} cos {theta} ( {sigma} is the surface tension, {theta} the angle of contact of the mercury). After some theoretical consideration, the apparatus is described. The mercury pressure is increased step-wise from 0 to 1000 kg/cm{sup 2} thus yielding the complete distribution of pores from 92 {mu} to 75 A. Results are, then presented concerning nuclear graphites which show the evolution of the porous structure under the effect of bitumen impregnation. In general, the volume of the large pores decreases while that of the small pores increases. The structure of impregnated products appears to depend to a certain extent on that of the starting materials. It has also been possible to study other products with this porosimeter; the range of measurements possible is such that it may be used for the study of the majority of porous materials. (authors) [French] Un porosimetre a mercure modele IFP-CEA a ete mis au point en vue de son application a l'etude de graphites nucleaires. Le fonctionnement de l'appareil repose sur le phenomene de depression capillaire. On etablit la relation existant entre le rayon r d'un pore et la pression p pour laquelle le mercure peut y penetrer: pr = -2 {sigma} cos {theta} ( {sigma} tension superficielle, {theta} angle de contact du mercure). Apres quelques considerations theoriques, l'appareil utilise est decrit. Il permet de faire varier par palier la pression du mercure entre 0 et 1000 kg/cm{sup 2} et d'etablir ainsi la distribution complete des rayons de pores compris entre 92 {mu} et 75 A. Les resultats d'une etude faite sur des graphites nucleaires sont alors presentes faisant apparaitre l'evolution de la structure poreuse sous l'effet des impregnations au brai. D'une facon

  13. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  14. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    : On the basis of five included studies, the ED10 values of aqueous cobalt chloride ranged between 0.0663 and 1.95 µg cobalt/cm(2), corresponding to 30.8-259 ppm. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis provides an overview of the doses of cobalt that are required to elicit allergic cobalt contactdermatitis in sensitized...

  15. Surface Chloride Levels in Colorado Structural Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This project focused on the chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in structural concrete. The primary goal of this project is to analyze the surface chloride concentration level of the concrete bridge decks throughout Colorado. The study in...

  16. Pharmacokinetics of vinyl chloride in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.M.; Laib, R.J.; Kappus, H.; Buchter, A.

    1977-01-01

    When rats are exposed to [ 14 C]vinyl chloride in a closed system, the vinyl chloride present in the atmosphere equilibrates with the animals' organism within 15 min. The course of equilibration could be determined using rats which had been given 6-nitro-1,2,3-benzothiadiazole. This compound completely blocks metabolism of vinyl chloride. The enzymes responsible for metabolism of vinyl chloride are saturated at an atmospheric concentration of vinyl chloride of 250 ppm. Pharmacokinetic analysis shows that no significant cumulation of vinyl chloride or its major metabolites is to be expected on repeated administration of vinyl chlorides. This may be consistent with the theory that a reactive, shortly living metabolite which occurs in low concentration only, may be responsible for the toxic effects of vinyl chloride

  17. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  18. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Nannhein, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Altos, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  19. S-Mercuration of rat sorbitol dehydrogenase by methylmercury causes its aggregation and the release of the zinc ion from the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hironori; Toyama, Takashi; Shinohara-Kanda, Azusa; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kikushima, Makoto; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2012-11-01

    We previously developed a screening method to identify proteins that undergo aggregation through S-mercuration by methylmercury (MeHg) and found that rat arginase I is a target protein for MeHg (Kanda et al. in Arch Toxicol 82:803-808, 2008). In the present study, we characterized another S-mercurated protein from a rat hepatic preparation that has a subunit mass of 42 kDa, thereby facilitating its aggregation. Two-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that the 42 kDa protein was NAD-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). With recombinant rat SDH, we found that MeHg is covalently bound to SDH through Cys44, Cys119, Cys129 and Cys164, resulting in the inhibition of its catalytic activity, release of zinc ions and facilitates protein aggregation. Mutation analysis indicated that Cys44, which ligates the active site zinc atom, and Cys129 play a crucial role in the MeHg-mediated aggregation of SDH. Pretreatment with the cofactor NAD, but not NADP or FAD, markedly prevented aggregation of SDH. Such a protective effect of NAD on the aggregation of SDH caused by MeHg is discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food... Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following conditions: (a) In spice oleoresins as a residue from...

  1. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  8. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color...

  9. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must be...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the Food...

  14. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a...

  15. Carbonate and Chloride Scavenging in H2O2/S2O82-/Fe2+ Oxidation of PCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2009-01-01

    , and natural attenuation. In the 1990s the first report on in situ chemical oxidation were published. Modified Fenton's reagent was the first technique investigated and used in full scale. Shortly after ozone and permanganate came into use. In the past few years persulfate has provided yet another option...

  16. Carbonate and Chloride Scavenging in S2O82-/Fe2+/Citric Acid Oxidation of PCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Mortensen, Lars

    , and natural attenuation. In the 1990s the first report on in situ chemical oxidation were published. Modified Fenton's reagent was the first technique investigated and used in full scale. Shortly after ozone and permanganate came into use. In the past few years persulfate has provided yet another option...

  17. Hot corrosion behaviour of austenitic steel-303 in molten chloride and carbonate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Misbahul Amin; Shamsul Baharin Jamaludin; Che Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali; Khairel Rafezi Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    The investigations are presented for the hot corrosion behaviors of Austenitic Steel-303, under influence of the molten chloride and carbonate salts viz KCl and K 2 CO 3 , oxidised at 1123 K for the period of 60 hour at atmospheric condition. The oxidation kinetic are effect of molten chloride and carbonate salts deposition on the oxidation rate were determined. The susceptibility to suffer a deleterious attack on the alloy by internal corrosion increases with increasing the time. In general, the corrosion resistance austenitic steel-303 in molten carbonate salts is much higher than chloride melt, being an active oxidizing agent providing oxygen during fluxing reaction. However, due to profuse evolution of CO/ CO 2 heavy mass losses are observed during corrosion and scales are porous. The test included mass change monitoring and surface layers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. (author)

  18. Metallothermic reduction of rare earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Rare earth oxides can be reduced to rare earth metals by a novel, high yield, metallothermic process. The oxides are dispersed in a suitable, molten, calcium chloride bath along with sodium metal. The sodium reacts with the calcium chloride to produce calcium metal which reduces the rare earth oxides to rare earth metals. The metals are collected in a discrete layer in the reaction vessel

  19. Experimental investigations on chloride effects on EAC of LAS under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, M.; Roth, A.; Widera, M.

    2015-01-01

    This program was devoted to examine the principle effects of permanent and temporary chloride contaminations on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS). Particular focus was laid on deriving a better understanding with regard to the effects of chloride on the general corrosion behavior of LAS in oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms for crack initiation and propagation due to chloride assisted EAC. Therefore, systematic investigations on the effect of chloride on the EAC behavior of LAS were performed to understand and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The overall project was therefore divided into three phases, focusing on the effect of chloride on: 1) general corrosion, 2) crack initiation, and 3) crack growth of low-alloy steels in oxygenated high-temperature water. Studies on the effect of chloride on the general corrosion behaviour were performed by immersion tests that were evaluated using electrochemical monitoring techniques and different post-test investigation methods like SEM, ToF-SIMS, and others. From the performed investigations it is concluded that the presence of small amounts of chloride in oxygenated HTW causes an incorporation of chloride into the oxide layer, a thinning of the oxide layer thickness, and pronounced pitting. The crack initiation susceptibility of LAS was investigated using CERT tests. These tests showed an increased number of crack initiation locations and a decrease of the elongation at fracture with increasing chloride concentrations. Crack growth rate tests clearly demonstrated that not the increase in the chloride concentration per se, but the conjoint occurrence of an active or dormant crack and increased chloride concentration causes an increase in the observed crack growth rates. For practical applications of LAS in oxygenated HTW the results obtained in the frame of this project clearly indicate that short term transients, as simulated in this

  20. Kinetics and thermodynamics of aluminium dissolution in 1.0M sulphuric acid containing chloride ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Gaber, A.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P.O. Box 426, Ibrahimia, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt)]. E-mail: ashrafmoustafa@yahoo.com; Abd-El-Nabey, B.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P.O. Box 426, Ibrahimia, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt); Sidahmed, I.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P.O. Box 426, Ibrahimia, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt); El-Zayady, A.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P.O. Box 426, Ibrahimia, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt); Saadawy, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P.O. Box 426, Ibrahimia, Alexandria 21321 (Egypt)

    2006-08-01

    The dissolution of aluminium in 1M sulphuric acid solutions containing different chloride ion concentrations (0.01-0.06M) were studied at 25, 30, 35 and 40deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique and polarization curves measurements. The kinetic rate equation, under the experimental condition described, was derived and found to verify the following relationship:V=k{sub obs}K{sub 2}C{sub Cl{sup -}}{sup n}1+K{sub 2}C{sub Cl{sup -}}{sup n}where V is the corrosion rate, k{sub obs} and K{sub 2} are the dissolution rate constant of aluminium oxide-chloride complex and the equilibrium constant of chloride ions adsorbed at aluminium oxide surface, respectively. The kinetic and thermodynamic energy parameters were calculated and their values indicate that chloride ions are chemisorbed onto the aluminium oxide surface and the formation of oxide-chloride complex is the rate-determining step.

  1. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  2. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure

  4. Removal of chloride from MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Fang-Chih; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Tsai, Min-Shing; Ko, Chun-Han

    2012-10-30

    The high levels of alkali chloride and soluble metal salts present in MSWI fly ash is worth noting for their impact on the environment. In addition, the recycling or reuse of fly ash has become an issue because of limited landfill space. The chloride content in fly ash limits its application as basis for construction materials. Water-soluble chlorides such as potassium chloride (KCl), sodium chloride (NaCl), and calcium chloride hydrate (CaCl(2) · 2H(2)O) in fly ash are easily washed away. However, calcium chloride hydroxide (Ca(OH)Cl) might not be easy to leach away at room temperature. The roasting and washing-flushing processes were applied to remove chloride content in this study. Additionally, air and CO(2) were introduced into the washing process to neutralize the hazardous nature of chlorides. In comparison with the water flushing process, the roasting process is more efficient in reducing the process of solid-liquid separation and drying for the reuse of Cl-removed fly ash particles. In several roasting experiments, the removal of chloride content from fly ash at 1050°C for 3h showed the best results (83% chloride removal efficiency). At a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10 the water-flushing process can almost totally remove water-soluble chloride (97% chloride removal efficiency). Analyses of mineralogical change also prove the efficiency of the fly ash roasting and washing mechanisms for chloride removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface chloride salt formation on Space Shuttle exhaust alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Wakelyn, N. T.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum oxide samples from the exhaust of Space Shuttle launches STS-1, STS-4, STS-5, and STS-6 were collected from surfaces on or around the launch pad complex and chemically analyzed. The results indicate that the particulate solid-propellant rocket motor (SRM) alumina was heavily chlorided. Concentrations of water-soluble aluminum (III) ion were large, suggesting that the surface of the SRM alumina particles was rendered soluble by prior reactions with HCl and H2O in the SRM exhaust cloud. These results suggest that Space Shuttle exhaust alumina particles are good sites for nucleation and condensation of atmospheric water. Laboratory experiments conducted at 220 C suggest that partial surface chloriding of alumina may occur in hot Space Shuttle exhaust plumes.

  6. Dehydration of aluminum chloride hexahydrate: a technical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    Physical and chemical properties of aluminum chloride hexahydrate, ACH, and related compounds are noted as well as the relation of these properties to the problem of dehydration of ACH to form anhydrous aluminum chloride. Several approaches to the dehydration of ACH are discussed and a rationale or each approach is given: solvent extraction, ligand exchange, azeotropic distillation, chemical dehydration, and energy specific direct heating. While the thermodynamics of dehydration are frequently favorable, the rate of reaction and the mechanisms of reaction are more frequently unfavorable. However, each approach requires experimentation to test its effectiveness. The stability of the aluminum-oxygen bond in the hydrate is such that dehydration without decomposition to the oxide will be very difficult

  7. Hydrolysis of cupric chloride in aqueous ammoniacal ammonium chloride solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limpo, J. L.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Cupric solubility in the CuCl2-NH4Cl-NH3-H2O system for chloride concentrations lower than 4 molal in the temperature range 25-60 °C was studied. The experimental results show that for chloride concentration between 3.0 and 1.0 molal the cupric solubility is determined by the solubility of the cupric hydroxychloride Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5. For a chloride concentration value of 4.0 molal, there are two cupric compounds, the hydroxychloride Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5 or the diammine chloride Cu(NH32Cl2, on which the solubility of Cu(II depends, according to the temperature and the value of the ratio [NH3]Total/[Cu]Total.

    Se estudia la solubilidad del Cu(II en el sistema CuCl2-NH4Cl-NH3-H2O para concentraciones de cloruro inferiores a 4 molal en el intervalo de temperaturas 25-60 °C. Los resultados experimentales muestran que, para concentraciones de cloruros comprendidas entre 3,0 y 1,0 molal, la solubilidad cúprica viene determinada por la solubilidad del hidroxicloruro cúprico, Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5. Para concentraciones de cloruro 4,0 molal, existen dos compuestos cúpricos, el hidroxicloruro, Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5 o el cloruro de diamina, Cu(NH32Cl2, de los que, de acuerdo con la temperatura y con el valor de la relación [NH3]Total/[Cu]Total depende la solubilidad del Cu(II.

  8. Effects of chloride ions on corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel in soil environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yarong; Jiang, Guangming; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Yimei

    2017-07-31

    Chloride is reported to play a significant role in corrosion reactions, products and kinetics of ferrous metals. To enhance the understanding of the effects of soil environments, especially the saline soils with high levels of chloride, on the corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel, a 3-month corrosion test was carried out by exposing ferrous metals to soils of six chloride concentrations. The surface morphology, rust compositions and corrosion kinetics were comprehensively studied by visual observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), weight loss, pit depth measurement, linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. It showed that chloride ions influenced the characteristics and compositions of rust layers by diverting and participating in corrosion reactions. α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and iron oxides were major corrosion products, while β-Fe 8 O 8 (OH) 8 Cl 1.35 rather than β-FeOOH was formed when high chloride concentrations were provided. Chloride also suppressed the decreasing of corrosion rates, whereas increased the difficulty in the diffusion process by thickening the rust layers and transforming the rust compositions. Carbon steel is more susceptible to chloride attacks than ductile iron. The corrosion kinetics of ductile iron and carbon steel corresponded with the probabilistic and bilinear model respectively.

  9. Electrochemical reduction of lanthanum trichloride in a molten equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolevskaya, A.L.; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Polyakov, E.G.; Stangrit, P.T.

    1987-09-20

    The authors used linear voltamperometry for the investigation of the mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum. The mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride in molten equimolar NaCl-KCl may be seen as consisting of a slow irreversible electrode reaction with a subsequent rapid irreversible chemical reaction. Lanthanum ions in a lower oxidation state were not found upon the prolonged maintenance of metallic lanthanum in molten NaCl-KCl-LaCl/sub 3/. Only an increase in the concentration of lanthanum(III) chloride in the melt was noted. The appearance of oxygen anions in the melt does not lead to a change in the mechanism of the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride but reduces the concentration of this chloride due to the formation of lanthanum oxochloride which is insoluble in the melt.

  10. Melting in trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; Scamehorn, C.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-11-01

    We report a neutron diffraction study of the liquid structure of YCl 3 and combine the structural data with macroscopic melting and transport data to contrast the behaviour of this molten salt with those of SrCl 2 , ZnCl 2 and AlCl 3 as prototypes of different melting mechanisms for ionic materials. A novel melting mechanism for trivalent metal chlorides, leading to a loose disordered network of edge-sharing octahedral units in the liquid phase, is thereby established. The various melting behaviours are related to bonding character with the help of Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale. (author). 25 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Implementation of a micro-physical scheme for warm clouds in the meteorological model 'MERCURE': Application to cooling tower plumes and to orographic precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzereau, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    A two-moment semi-spectral warm micro-physical scheme has been implemented inside the meteorological model 'MERCURE'. A new formulation of the buoyancy flux () is proposed, which is coherent with the corrigendum of Mellor (1977) but differs from Bougeault (1981). The non-precipitating cloud microphysics is validated by comparing the numerical simulations of fifteen cases of cooling tower plumes with data from a measurement campaign in Bugey in 1980. Satisfactory results are obtained on the plumes shape, on the temperature and vertical velocity fields and on the droplets spectrums, although the liquid water contents tend to be overestimated. The precipitating cloud microphysics is tested by reproducing the academical cases of orographic precipitation of Chaumerliac et al. (1987) and Richard and Chaumerliac (1989). The simulations allow a check of the action of different micro-physical terms. (author) [fr

  12. An electrochemical investigation of the corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys in chloride containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Filho, Jorge Eustaquio de

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum alloys have been used as cladding materials for nuclear fuel in research reactors due to its corrosion resistance. Aluminum owes its good corrosion resistance to a protective barrier oxide film formed and strongly bonded to its surface. In pool type TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor, located at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear in Belo Horizonte, previous immersion coupon tests revealed that aluminum alloys suffer from pitting corrosion, in spite of high quality of water control. Corrosion attack is initiated by breaking the protective oxide film on aluminum alloy surface. Chloride ions can break this oxide film and stimulate metal dissolution. In this study the aluminum alloys 1050, 5052 and 6061 were used to evaluate their corrosion behavior in chloride containing solutions. The electrochemical techniques used were potentiodynamic anodic polarization and cyclic polarization. Results showed that aluminum alloys 5052 and 6061 present similar corrosion resistance in low chloride solutions (0,1 ppm NaCl) and in reactor water but both alloys are less resistant in high chloride solution (1 ppm NaCl). Aluminum alloy 1050 presented similar behavior in the three electrolytes used, regarding to pitting corrosion, indicating that the concentration of the chloride ions was not the only variable to influence its corrosion susceptibility. (author)

  13. CFTR-dependent chloride efflux in cystic fibrosis mononuclear cells is increased by ivacaftor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Lorenzo; D'Oria, Susanna; Favia, Maria; Castellani, Stefano; Santostasi, Teresa; Polizzi, Angela M; Mariggiò, Maria A; Gallo, Crescenzio; Casavola, Valeria; Montemurro, Pasqualina; Leonetti, Giuseppina; Manca, Antonio; Conese, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) potentiator ivacaftor (Kalydeco®) improves clinical outcome in G551D cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we have investigated whether ivacaftor has a clinical impact on non-G551D gating mutations and function of circulating leukocytes as well. Seven patients were treated with ivacaftor and evaluated at baseline, and at 1-3 and 6 months. Besides clinical and systemic inflammatory parameters, circulating mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for CFTR-dependent chloride efflux by spectrofluorimetry, neutrophils for oxidative burst by cytofluorimetry and HVCN1 mRNA expression by real time PCR. Ivacaftor determined a significant decrease in sweat chloride concentrations at all time points during treatment. Body mass index (BMI), FEV 1 , and FVC showed an increasing trend. While C-reactive protein decreased significantly at 2 months, the opposite behavior was noticed for circulating monocytes. CFTR activity in MNC was found to increase significantly at 3 and 6 months. Neutrophil oxidative burst peaked at 2 months and then decreased to baseline. HVCN1 mRNA expression was significantly higher than baseline at 1-3 months and decreased after 6 months of treatment. The chloride efflux in MNC correlated positively with both FEV 1 and FVC. On the other hand, sweat chloride correlated positively with CRP and WBC, and negatively with both respiratory function tests. A cluster analysis confirmed that sweat chloride, FEV 1 , FVC, BMI, and MNC chloride efflux behaved as a single entity over time. In patients with non-G551D mutations, ivacaftor improved both chloride transport in sweat ducts and chloride efflux in MNC, that is, functions directly imputed to CFTR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Renal abnormalities in congenital chloride diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamad, Nadia M.; Al-Eisa, Amal A.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea CLD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the chloride/ bicarbonate exchange in the ileum and colon. It is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal distension, hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with high fecal content of chloride >90 mmol/l. We report 3 patients with CLD associated with various renal abnormalities including chronic renal failure secondary to renal hypoplasia, nephrocalcinosis and congenital nephrotic syndrome. (author)

  15. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled ethyl chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanski, R.

    1976-01-01

    A new efficient method of synthesis of ethyl chloride (1,2- 14 C), based on the Ba 14 CO 3 and dry hydrogen chloride as starting materials has been developed and described. Addition of the hydrogen chloride to ethylene (1,2- 14 C), obtained from Ba 14 CO 3 , has been carried out in the presence of the AlCl 3 as catalyst. The outlined method leads to ethyl chloride (1,2- 14 C) of high specific activity. The radiochemical yield of the reaction based on the activity of barium carbonate used was 72%. (author)

  17. Method of processing chloride waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Tsunashima, Mikiyasu; Horie, Masaaki; Koyama, Masafumi; Sudo, Minoru; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Ogasawara, Tadashi.

    1991-01-01

    In a method of applying molten salt electrolysis to chloride wastes discharged from a electrolytic refining step of a dry reprocessing step for spent fuels, and removed with transuranium elements of long half-decaying time, metals capable of alloying with alkali and alkaline earth metals under melting by electrolysis are used as a cathode material, and an electrolytic temperature is made higher than the melting point of salts in a molten salt electrolysis bath, to recover Li, Ca and Na as alloys with the cathode material in a first electrolysis step. Then, the electrolytic temperature is made higher than the melting point of the chloride salts remained in the bath after the electrolysis step described above by using the cathode material, to recover Ba, Rb, Sr and Cs of nuclear fission products also as alloys with the cathode material in a second electrolysis step. Accordingly, the amount of wastes formed can be reduced, and the wastes contain no heat generating nuclear fission elements. (T.M.)

  18. Benzotriazole as an inhibitor of brass corrosion in chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosec, Tadeja; Milosev, Ingrid; Pihlar, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The current research explores the formation of protective layers on copper, zinc and copper-zinc (Cu-10Zn and Cu-40Zn) alloys in chloride solution containing benzotriazole (BTAH), by use of electrochemical techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical reactions and surface products formed at the open circuit potential and as a function of the potential range are discussed. The addition of benzotriazole to aerated, near neutral 0.5 M NaCl solution affects the dissolution of copper, zinc, Cu-10Zn and Cu-40Zn alloys. The research also compares the inhibition efficiency and Gibbs adsorption energies of the investigated process. Benzotriazole, generally known as an inhibitor of copper corrosion is also shown to be an efficient inhibitor for copper-zinc alloys and zinc metal. The surface layer formed on alloys in BTAH-inhibited solution comprised both oxide and polymer components, namely Cu 2 O and ZnO oxides, and Cu(I)-BTA and Zn(II)-BTA polymers. The formation of this mixed copper-zinc oxide polymer surface film provides an effective barrier against corrosion of both metal components in chloride solution

  19. Electrochemical chloride extraction of a beam polluted by chlorides after 40 years in the sea

    OpenAIRE

    BOUTEILLER, Véronique; LAPLAUD, André; MALOULA, Aurélie; MORELLE, René Stéphane; DUCHESNE, Béatrice; MORIN, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    A beam element, naturally polluted by chlorides after 40 years of a marine tidal exposure, has been treated by electrochemical chloride extraction. The chloride profiles, before and after treatment, show that free chlorides are extrated with an efficiency of 70 % close to the steel, 50 % in the intermediate cover and only 5 % at the concrete surface. From the electrochemical characterizations (before, after, 1, 2 and 17 months after treatment), the steel potential values can, semehow, indicat...

  20. Thermochemistry of alkali chloride - lanthanoide(III) chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachnik, R.; Selle, D.

    1979-01-01

    The phase diagrams of the mixtures KCl + GdCl 3 resp. DyCl 3 and of CsCl + PrCl 3 (DyCl 3 , ErCl 3 , and YbCl 3 ) were investigated by differential thermal analysis. In the mixtures of lanthanoide(III) chlorides with CsCl resp. KCl three different stoichiometries of the compounds were found, namely A 3 MCl 6 , A 2 MCl 5 , and AM 2 Cl 7 . Debyeograms of the compounds A 3 MCl 6 and AM 2 Cl 7 reveal, that in the case of the latter type all compounds with the same alkali halide have identical structure, whereas in the A 3 MCl 6 compounds three different types of X-ray patterns were observed. The stabilities of the congruently melting compounds can be estimated by comparing the melting point of the compound with the temperature of an extrapolated eutectic point. (author)

  1. Structural studies of precursor and partially oxidized conducting complexes. 19. Synthesis and crystal structure of Cs2[Pt(CN)4]Cl/sub 0.30, the first anhydrous one-dimensional tetracyanoplatinate chloride complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.K.; Williams, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The preparation and single-crystal x-ray structural characterization of a new, partially oxidized tetracyanoplatinate (POTCP), Cs 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ]Cl/sub 0.30/, CsCP(Cl), has been carried out. This one-dimensional conducting salt crystallizes with four formula units in the tetragonal unit cell I4/mcm, with cell constants a = 13.176 (2) A, c = 5.718 (1) A, and V = 992.7 A 3 . A total of 3112 observed data were averaged to yield 427 independent reflections. The structure was solved by standard heavy-atom methods and was refined by full-matrix least squares to a final R(F 0 2 ) = 0.045 and R/sub w/(F 0 2 ) = 0.059. Pertinent structural features include perfectly linear chains of Pt atoms with Pt-Pt separations crystallographically constrained to a value of (c/2) = 2.859 (2) A and interchain Pt-Pt distances of 9.317 A. Separations between the Cs + and Cl - ions are significantly shorter than the sum of the ionic radii. A discussion of these unusually short interionic distances and the absence of hydration as determined from the structural study and themogravimetric analyses is given. 2 figures, 2 tables

  2. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  3. Breaking the sensitivity limitations of cytochrome P450 oxidation product: dansyl chloride derivatisation of 4-OH mephenytoin, a CYP2C19 metabolite and its application to in vitro CYP inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayabhaskar, V; Srivastava, Pratima; Rajagopal, Sriram

    2015-05-01

    A rapid selective and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the quantitative determination of derivatised cytochrome P450-2C19 oxidation product (dansyl-4-OH mephenytoin) and its underivatised form (4-OH mephenytoin). Samples were anaysed on C18 column (Waters Xbridge, 50 mm×4.6 mm, 3.5 μm particle size) with the mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile. A gradient method with a short run time of 2.5 min and 3.5 min was developed for the analysis of dansyl-4-OH mephenytoin and 4-OH mephenytoin, respectively. The standard curve was linear (r(2)=0.9972 for 4-OH mephenytoin; r(2)=0.9946 for dansyl-4-OH mephenytoin) over the concentration range of 0.16 to 40 ng/mL for both derivatised and underivatised forms. The CV (%) and relative error (RE) for inter and intraassay at three QC levels for dansyl-4-OH mephenytoin was 0.97-5.85% and -9.80 to 2.51%, respectively. Whereas, for 4-OH mephenytoin the CV (%) and RE (%) at three QC levels was 0.82-3.47% and -6.69 to -0.01%, respectively. The developed method was validated for various parameters such as linearity, precision & accuracy, extraction recovery, matrix effect, autosampler stability and was proved to be consistent across three QC levels with overall CV (%) less than 15. Dansylation helped in increasing the sensitivity of hydroxy mephenytoin by 100-200 fold. Given the simplicity involved in derivatisation process, we believe that this novel methodology will change the current approaches used for the enhancing the detection sensitivity of 4-OH mephenytoin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrolysis of acidic sodium chloride solution with a graphite anode. I. Graphite electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    A graphite anode evolving Cl from a chloride soln. is slowly oxidized to CO and CO2. This oxidn. causes a change in the characteristics of the electrode in aging, comprising a change of the nature of the graphite surface and an increase of the surface area. It appears that a new graphite electrode

  5. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  6. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  7. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  8. Synthesis of 14C-dehydrocorydaline chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rui; Wang Ding

    1988-01-01

    A method for synthesis of 14 C-dehydrocorydaline chloride is described. In the presence of sodium hydroxide, acetonylpalmatine is reacted with 14 C-methyl iodide in sealed glass ampoule to give 14 C-13-methylpalmatine iodide which is then converted to chloride. The radiochemical purity of 14 C-dehydrocorydaline determined by TLC is over 98% and the labelling efficiency is 54%

  9. Chronopotentiometric chloride sensing using transition time measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, D.B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Detection of chloride ions is crucial to accurately access the concrete structure durability[1]. The existing electrochemical method of chloride ions detection in concrete, potentiometry[1], is not suitable for in-situ measurement due to the long term stability issue of conventional reference

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction employment under this section are...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those...

  14. Properties of silver chloride track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.D.; Kocherov, N.P.; Novikova, N.R.; Perfilov, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    The experiments on preparation of silver chloride track detectors and their properties are described. The results of X-ray structural analysis and data on sensitivity to charged particles and actinic light of silver chloride crystals, doped with several elements, are presented. (orig.) [de

  15. Dechlorinating reaction of organic chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahata, Taneaki; Kihara, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ohuchi, Misao

    1996-06-01

    Dechlorination has been examined by the reaction between iron, aluminum powder or CaO and organic chlorides such as C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Progress of the reaction was analyzed with mass spectrometer. The reaction between iron and organic chloride was rapidly occurred at the temperature between 350 and 440degC in an atmosphere of argon. Above 380degC, more than 99.5% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, approximately 60% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed by the reaction with aluminium powder within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, reaction between C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CaO powder were occurred rapidly in an atmosphere of argon to form CaCl{sub 2} and free carbon. Also in an atmosphere of air, nearly the same result was obtained. In this reaction, CaCl{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} were formed. CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was also decomposed by the reaction with iron at the temperature between 380 and 440degC. In the reaction, FeCl{sub 2}, carbon and hydrogen were formed. CH{sub 3}{sup +} and CH{sub 4} were observed during the dechlorinating reaction of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Variation in particle size of iron powder such as 100, 150 and 250 mesh did not affect the reaction rate. (author)

  16. Reprocessing fuel from the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Campbell, T.G.

    1985-11-01

    The irradiated fuel, reject fuel tubes, and fuel fabrication scrap from the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor (SEFOR) were transferred to the Savannah River Plant (SRP) for uranium and plutonium recovery. The unirradiated material was declad and dissolved at SRP; dissolution was accomplished in concentrated nitric acid without the addition of fluoride. The irradiated fuel was declad at Atomics International and repacked in aluminum. The fuel and aluminum cans were dissolved at SRP using nitric acid catalyzed by mercuric nitrate. As this fuel was dissolved in nongeometrically favorable tanks, boron was used as a soluble neutron poison

  17. Chloride Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/chloridebloodtest.html Chloride Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Chloride Blood Test? A chloride blood test measures the ...

  18. Effects of platinic chloride on Tetrahymena pyrifromis GL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jytte R.

    1992-01-01

    Cellebiologi, platinum(IV)chloride, endocytosis, detoxification, cell proliferation, fine structure, cisplatin......Cellebiologi, platinum(IV)chloride, endocytosis, detoxification, cell proliferation, fine structure, cisplatin...

  19. Sulfation of Condensed Potassium Chloride by SO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, Louise With; Hansen, Troels Bruun; Bartolomé, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between alkali chloride and sulfur oxides has important implications for deposition and corrosion in combustion of biomass. In the present study, the sulfation of particulate KCl (90–125 μm) by SO2 was studied in a fixed bed reactor in the temperature range 673–1023 K and with rea......The interaction between alkali chloride and sulfur oxides has important implications for deposition and corrosion in combustion of biomass. In the present study, the sulfation of particulate KCl (90–125 μm) by SO2 was studied in a fixed bed reactor in the temperature range 673–1023 K...... and with reactant concentrations of 500–3000 ppm SO2, 1–20% O2, and 4–15% H2O. The degree of sulfation was monitored by measuring the formation of HCl. Analysis of the solid residue confirmed that the reaction proceeds according to a shrinking core model and showed the formation of an eutectic at higher...... temperatures. On the basis of the experimental results, a rate expression for the sulfation reaction was derived. The model compared well with literature data for sulfation of KCl and NaCl, and the results indicate that it may be applied at even higher SO2 concentrations and temperatures than those...

  20. Differential susceptibility of brain regions to tributyltin chloride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2015-12-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a well-known endocrine disruptor, is an omnipresent environmental pollutant and is explicitly used in many industrial applications. Previously we have shown its neurotoxic potential on cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. As the effect of TBT on other brain regions is not known, we planned this study to evaluate its effect on four brain regions (cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and striatum). Four-week-old male Wistar rats were gavaged with a single dose of TBT-chloride (TBTC) (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) and sacrificed on days 3 and 7, respectively. Effect of TBTC on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and tin (Sn) accumulation were measured. Oxidative stress indexes such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation were analyzed as they play an imperative role in various neuropathological conditions. Since metal catalyzed reactions are a major source of oxidant generation, levels of essential metals like iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and calcium (Ca) were estimated. We found that TBTC disrupted BBB and increased Sn accumulation, both of which appear significantly correlated. Altered metal homeostasis and ROS generation accompanied by elevated lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation indicated oxidative damage which appeared more pronounced in the striatum than in cerebellum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. This could be associated to the depleted GSH levels in striatum. These results suggest that striatum is more susceptible to TBTC induced oxidative damage as compared with other brain regions under study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chloride Transport in Undersea Concrete Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on water penetration in unsaturated concrete of underwater tunnel, a diffusion-advection theoretical model of chloride in undersea concrete tunnel was proposed. The basic parameters including porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, chloride diffusion coefficient, initial water saturation, and moisture retention function of concrete specimens with two water-binder ratios were determined through lab-scale experiments. The variation of chloride concentration with pressuring time, location, solution concentration, initial saturation, hydraulic pressure, and water-binder ratio was investigated through chloride transport tests under external water pressure. In addition, the change and distribution of chloride concentration of isothermal horizontal flow were numerically analyzed using TOUGH2 software. The results show that chloride transport in unsaturated concrete under external water pressure is a combined effect of diffusion and advection instead of diffusion. Chloride concentration increased with increasing solution concentration for diffusion and increased with an increase in water pressure and a decrease in initial saturation for advection. The dominant driving force converted with time and saturation. When predicting the service life of undersea concrete tunnel, it is suggested that advection is taken into consideration; otherwise the durability tends to be unsafe.

  2. Factors influencing chloride deposition in a coastal hilly area and application to chloride deposition mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chloride is commonly used as an environmental tracer for studying water flow and solute transport in the environment. It is especially useful for estimating groundwater recharge based on the commonly used chloride mass balance (CMB method. Strong spatial variability in chloride deposition in coastal areas is one difficulty encountered in appropriately applying the method. A high-resolution bulk chloride deposition map in the coastal region is thus needed. The aim of this study is to construct a chloride deposition map in the Mount Lofty Ranges (MLR, a coastal hilly area of approximately 9000 km2 spatial extent in South Australia. We examined geographic (related to coastal distance, orographic, and atmospheric factors that may influence chloride deposition, using partial correlation and regression analyses. The results indicate that coastal distance, elevation, as well as terrain aspect and slope, appear to be significant factors controlling chloride deposition in the study area. Coastal distance accounts for 70% of spatial variability in bulk chloride deposition, with elevation, terrain aspect and slope an additional 15%. The results are incorporated into a de-trended residual kriging model (ASOADeK to produce a 1 km×1 km resolution bulk chloride deposition and concentration maps. The average uncertainty of the deposition map is about 20–30% in the western MLR, and 40–50% in the eastern MLR. The maps will form a useful basis for examining catchment chloride balance for the CMB application in the study area.

  3. The use of immobilized form of benzalkonium chloride and metronidazole in the treatment of purulent wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasia S. Gorohova; Arsen Yu. Grigoryan; Alexander I. Bezhin; Tatyana A. Pankrusheva; Boris S. Sukovatykh; Ludmila V. Zhilyaeva; Ekaterina S. Mishina; Elena V. Kobzareva

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the wound-healing effect of the immobilized form of benzalkonium chloride and metronidazole based on the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose (Na-CMC) or polyethylene oxide (PEO) in the treatment of an experimental purulent wound.Materials and methods. The following compositions were studied, %. Combination 1: benzalkonium chloride – 0.02; Metronidazole – 1,0; Sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) – 4,0; Purified water – up to 100,0. Combination 2: ...

  4. Study of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate purification on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, L.V.; Knyazeva, A.N.; Fakeev, A.A.; Belyaeva, N.A.; Morozov, V.I.; Kucherova, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate from iron, chromium, manganese and cobalt impurities by sorption on some inorganic collectors are considered in this article. Study was conducted by means of radioactive-tracer technique at concurrent use of several γ-radioactive isotopes. As a collectors were used hydrated aluminium and zirconium oxides. Dependence of effectiveness of precipitation by collectors on ph-value of medium, quantity of collector, nature and concentration of components is studied. Optimal parameters of purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are defined.

  5. Lithium-thionyl chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D.; Bowden, W.; Hamilton, N.; Cubbison, D.; Dey, A. N.

    1981-04-01

    The main objective is to develop, fabricate, test, and deliver safe high rate lithium-thionyl chloride batteries for various U.S. Army applications such as manpack ratios and GLLD Laser Designators. We have devoted our efforts in the following major areas: (1) Optimization of the spirally wound D cell for high rate applications, (2) Development of a 3 inch diameter flat cylindrical cell for the GLLD laser designator application, and (3) Investigation of the reduction mechanism of SOCl2. The rate capability of the spirally wound D cell previously developed by us has been optimized for both the manpack radio (BA5590) battery and GLLD laser designator battery application in this program. A flat cylindrical cell has also been developed for the GLLD laser designator application. It is 3 inches in diameter and 0.9 inch in height with extremely low internal cell impedance that minimizes cell heating and polarization on the GLLD load. Typical cell capacity was found to be 18.0-19.0 Ahr with a few cells delivering up to about 21.0 Ahr on the GLLD test load. Study of the reduction mechanism of SOCl2 using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques has also been carried out in this program which may be directly relevant to the intrinsic safety of the system.

  6. Thermogravimetric method of estimation of uranyl cation state in melts of alkali metal chlorides and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobej, M.P.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    The thermogravimetric method was used to study the chloridizing of uranium oxides in molten media. The study of the uranium oxide chloridizing served as a basis for evaluating comparatively, using the DTA method, the uranyl-cation state in a melt. Using the alkali metals as example, it was shown that the decomposition of the frozen uranium oxychlorides proceeds with the formation of intermediate chlorouranates. The final product of the thermolysis are uranates Me 2 U 2 O 7 (Me-Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs). The time and the conditions of the change of uranium oxides to the oxyanion [UO 2 Cl 4 ] 2- were determined as a function of the chloridizing agent. The method can be employed for evaluating uranyl-ions in molten media where they are used as electrolytes in the extraction of uranium dioxide

  7. Direct oxide reducing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium oxides and magnetic oxides as wastes generated upon direct reduction are subjected to molten salt electrolysis, and reduced metallic calcium and magnesium are separated and recovered. Then calcium and magnesium are used recyclically as the reducing agent upon conducting direct oxide reduction. Even calcium oxides and magnesium oxides, which have high melting points and difficult to be melted usually, can be melted in molten salts of mixed fluorides or chlorides by molten-salt electrolysis. Oxides are decomposed by electrolysis, and oxygen is removed in the form of carbon monoxide, while the reduced metallic calcium and magnesium rise above the molten salts on the side of a cathode, and then separated. Since only carbon monoxide is generated as radioactive wastes upon molten salt electrolysis, the amount of radioactive wastes can be greatly reduced, and the amount of the reducing agent used can also be decreased remarkably. (N.H.)

  8. Corneal Neurotoxicity Due to Topical Benzalkonium Chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Joy; Chaudhary, Shweta; Namavari, Abed; Ozturk, Okan; Chang, Jin-Hong; Yco, Lisette; Sonawane, Snehal; Khanolkar, Vishakha; Hallak, Joelle; Jain, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Topical application of benzalkonium chloride (BAK) to the eye causes dose-related corneal neurotoxicity. Corneal inflammation and reduction in aqueous tear production accompany neurotoxicity. Cessation of BAK treatment leads to recovery of corneal nerve density.

  9. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  10. Lithium thionyl chloride high rate discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinedinst, K. A.

    1980-04-01

    Improvements in high rate lithium thionyl chloride power technology achieved by varying the electrolyte composition, operating temperature, cathode design, and cathode composition are discussed. Discharge capacities are plotted as a function of current density, cell voltage, and temperature.

  11. Chloride Ingress into Concrete under Water Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou; Sander, Lotte Braad; Grelk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    The chloride ingress into concrete under water pressures of 100 kPa and 800 kPa have been investigated by experiments. The specimens were exposed to a 10% NaCl solution and water mixture. For the concrete having w/c = 0.35 the experimental results show the chloride diffusion coefficient at 800 k......Pa (~8 atm.) is 12 times greater than at 100 kPa (~1 atm.). For w/c = 0.45 and w/c = 0.55 the chloride diffusion coefficients are 7 and 3 times greater. This means that a change in pressure highly influences the chloride ingress into the concrete and thereby the life length models for concrete structures....

  12. Inert Reassessment Document for Cerous Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rare earth chlorides have a wide variety of scientific applications. They a re used in superconductors, lasers, magnets, catalytic converters, fertilizes, supper alloys, cigarette lighters and as catalysts in the production of petroleum products.

  13. Influence of Chloride-Ion Adsorption Agent on Chloride Ions in Concrete and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Fei Peng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a chloride-ion adsorption agent (Cl agent in short, composed of zeolite, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium nitrite, on the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and mortar has been experimentally studied. The permeability of concrete was measured, and the chloride ion content in mortar was tested. The experimental results reveal that the Cl agent could adsorb chloride ions effectively, which had penetrated into concrete and mortar. When the Cl agent was used at a dosage of 6% by mass of cementitious materials in mortar, the resistance to the penetration of chloride ions could be improved greatly, which was more pronounced when a combination of the Cl agent and fly ash or slag was employed. Such an effect is not the result of the low permeability of the mortar, but might be a result of the interaction between the Cl agent and the chloride ions penetrated into the mortar. There are two possible mechanisms for the interaction between the Cl agent and chloride ion ingress. One is the reaction between calcium aluminate hydrate in the Cl agent and chloride ions to form Friedel’s salt, and the other one is that calcium aluminate hydrate reacts with calcium nitrite to form AFm during the early-age hydration of mortar and later the NO2− in AFm is replaced by chloride ions, which then penetrate into the mortar, also forming Friedel’s salt. More research is needed to confirm the mechanisms.

  14. De-mercurization of wastewater by Bacillus cereus (JUBT1): Growth kinetics, biofilm reactor study and field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoshal, Sanjukta; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Chowdhury, Ranjana

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The assembly of biofilm reactor, based on attached growth of Bacillus cereus (JUBT1) on rice husk packing, and an activated carbon filter has been able to ensure the removal of mercury up to near-zero level. Highlights: → A new mercury resistant bacterial strain, Bacillus cereus (JUBT1), has been isolated. → Growth kinetics has been determined. → Biofilm reactor using attached growth of bacteria ensures near-zero level of mercury. → Confinement of mercury is confirmed through energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. - Abstract: Removal of mercuric ions by a mercury resistant bacteria, called Bacillus cereus (JUBT1), isolated from the sludge of a local chlor-alkali industry, has been investigated. Growth kinetics of the bacteria have been determined. A multiplicative, non-competitive relationship between sucrose and mercury ions has been observed with respect to bacterial growth. A combination of biofilm reactor, using attached growth of Bacillus cereus (JUBT1) on rice husk packing, and an activated carbon filter has been able to ensure the removal of mercury up to near-zero level. Energy dispersive spectrometry analysis of biofilm and the activated carbon has proved the transformation of Hg 2+ to Hg 0 and its confinement in the system.

  15. The evaluation of organic inhibitors for the protection of grade 5 titanium in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion failures of titanium and titanium alloys are inevitably associated with the non-observance of environmental limits prescribed in corrosion handbooks, such as its use in solutions chloride. Titanium alloys are often used in the thermal transfer technology especially in the heat exchangers cooled with sea cooled water. However, it is not indicated its use in strong oxidant and any concentrated chloride environments. For the evaluation of grade 5 titanium alloy samples behaviour in solutions containing chloride ions in presence, respectively, absence of some organic inhibitors were performed by potentiodynamic polarization method. On the basis of our experimental results we consider that the most adequate inhibitor for the system Ti- 5 alloys/0 .083 M NaCl solution is the resorcinol. (authors)

  16. LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, J.E.

    1963-01-29

    A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

  17. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sterile pralidoxime chloride. 522.1862 Section 522....1862 Sterile pralidoxime chloride. (a) Chemical name. 2-Formyl-1-methylpyridinium chloride oxime. (b) Specifications. Sterile pralidoxime chloride is packaged in vials. Each vial contains 1 gram of sterile...

  18. Radiation-chemical reaction of 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride in liquid and solid state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    In pulse radiolysis of 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) at around 360 nm fast formation of intermediate tetrazolium radical was observed under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. In the latter case bimolecular formation of formazan, absorbing at around 480 nm, was observed. This rea......In pulse radiolysis of 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) at around 360 nm fast formation of intermediate tetrazolium radical was observed under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. In the latter case bimolecular formation of formazan, absorbing at around 480 nm, was observed...

  19. Atmospheric chloride: Its implication for foliar uptake and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, E. L.; Sealy, R. L.

    Atmospheric chloride is inversely related to distance from the Texas coast; r2 = 0.86. Levels of atmospheric chloride are higher in the early summer than in the winter because of salt storms. Leaf chloride l'evels of Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) reflect the atmospheric chloride levels; r2 = 0.78. The importance of considering the effect of atmospheric chloride on leaf damage to horticultural crops is discussed.

  20. The effect of chloride on general corrosion and crack initiation of low-alloy steels in oxygenated high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Matthias; Roth, Armin; Widera, Martin; Kuester, Karin; Huettner, Frank; Nowak, Erika

    2012-01-01

    The effect of chloride on the general corrosion and its potential impact on EAC crack initiation of low-alloy steel (German reactor pressure vessel steel 22 NiMoCr 3 7) in oxygenated high-temperature water were investigated. The general corrosion behavior was analyzed by exposure tests with either permanently increased chloride concentration levels or temporary chloride transients. The potential effect on EAC crack initiation was analyzed with pre-strained C-ring specimens and in SSRT (CERT) tests with slowly rising strain. Both kinds of tests were performed under simulated BWR conditions and with different chloride levels. The chloride concentrations of 5 to 50 ppb were chosen according to the action levels of the German water chemistry guideline for the reactor coolant of BWRs (VGB R401J, 2006). In all exposure tests, none of the pre-strained C-ring specimens showed crack initiation during up to 1000 hours of exposure time with up to 50 ppb chloride. Investigations of the oxide layer thickness after immersion testing revealed a decrease with increasing chloride concentration. As shown by post-test chemical analysis of the oxide layer composition by TOF-SIMS, this effect is most likely primarily due to adsorption of chloride on the oxide layer surface, since only very limited penetration of chloride into the oxide was detected. In contrast to the tests with C-ring specimens, where no crack initiation occurred, slightly accelerated crack initiation at lower elongation levels was observed at increasing chloride concentrations in SSRT tests under simulated BWR conditions using actively loaded specimens. In addition, SSRT specimens that were cyclically loaded at the oxide fracture elongation level were used to generate a continuous, exposure of bare metal to the environment by repeated fracture of the oxide. This loading pattern did not cause crack initiation at all chloride concentrations applied (up to 50 ppb). From these results, it may be concluded that at least

  1. The effect of N-acetylated DL-penicillamin and DL-homocysteine thiolactone on the mercury distribution in adult rats, rat foetuses and macaca monkeys after exposure to methyl mercuric chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaseth, J.; Wannag, A.; Norseth, T.; Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway)

    1976-01-01

    The distribution and excretion of mercury was studied in pregnant rats, given a single intravenous dose of 2 μmol/kg of CH 3 203 HgCl on the 13th day of pregnancy. Oral treatment for one week with N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (4 mmol/kg per day) increased the mercury excretion in faces (from 45 to 120 nmol) and urine (from 9 to 160 nmol). Such treatment mobilized mercury from all the organs tested and the foetal and maternal brain levels of mercury were decreased to 1/5 and 1/3 of the controls, respectively. A four-day period of treatment with N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine started three days after the injection of methyl mercury reduced the foetal and maternal brain levels to 1/2 and 2/3 of the controls, respectively. The rapid removal of metal deposits following treatment with N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine is attributed to a free penetration of the complexing thiol into the tissue cells in question. No signs of toxicity were detected in monkeys given an effective daily dose of the agent (4 mmol/kg) for 6 days. In contrast N-acetyl-DL-homocysteine thiolactone was found to be toxic in the monkeys. In addition, the latter agent was ineffective in increasing the mercury elimination from the brains of monkeys, rats and rat foetuses. (author)

  2. Determination of chloride in MOX samples using chloride ion selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindan, R; Das, D K; Mallik, G K; Sumathi, A; Patil, Sangeeta; Raul, Seema; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India). Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility

    1997-09-01

    The chloride present in the MOX fuel is separated from the matrix by pyrohydrolysis at a temperature of 950 {+-} 50 degC and is then analyzed by chloride ion selective electrode (Cl-ISE). The range covered is 0.4-4 ppm with a precision of better than {+-}5% R.S.D. (author). 4 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Study on the chloride migration coefficient obtained following different Rapid Chloride Migration (RCM) test guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Uzoegbo, H.C.; Schmidt, W.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the differences in the available Rapid Chloride Migration (RCM) test guidelines, and their influence on the values of the chloride migration coefficients DRCM, obtained following these guidelines. It is shown that the differences between the guidelines are significant and concern

  4. Laboratory investigation of electro-chemical chloride extraction from concrete with penetrated chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Hondel, A.W.M. van den

    2002-01-01

    Chloride extraction of concrete is a short-term electrochemical treatment against corrosion of reinforcing steel. The aim is to remove chloride ions from the concrete cover in order to reinstate passive behaviour. Physically sound concrete is left in place. To make this method more predictable and

  5. Amine and Titanium (IV Chloride, Boron (III Chloride or Zirconium (IV Chloride-Promoted Baylis-Hillman Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Cong Cui

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The Baylis-Hillman reactions of various aryl aldehydes with methyl vinyl ketone at temperatures below -20oC using Lewis acids such as titanium (IV chloride, boron (III chloride or zirconium (IV chloride in the presence of a catalytic amount of selected amines used as a Lewis bases afford the chlorinated compounds 1 as the major product in very high yields. Acrylonitrile can also undergo the same reaction to give the corresponding chlorinated product in moderate yield. A plausible reaction mechanism is proposed. However, if the reaction was carried out at room temperature (ca. 20oC, then the Z-configuration of the elimination product 3, derived from 1, was formed as the major product.

  6. Temperature dependence of diffusion coefficients of trivalent uranium ions in chloride and chloride-fluoride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.E.; Borodina, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of U 3+ ions are measured by chronopotentiometric method in chloride 3LiCl-2KCl and in mixed chloride fluoride 3LiCl(LiF)-2KCl melts in the temperature range 633-1235 K. It is shown It is shown that experimental values of diffusion-coefficients are approximated in a direct line in lg D-1/T coordinate in chloride melt in the whole temperature range and in chloride-fluoride melt in the range of 644-1040 K. Experimental values of diffusion coefficients diviate from Arrhenius equation in the direction of large values in chloride-fluoride melt at further increase of temperature up to 1235 K. Possible causes of such a diviation are considered [ru

  7. Condensation mechanisms of tetravalent technetium in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, F.

    2004-10-01

    In deep storage technetium can exist in degree IV or III. Recent studies on Tc(IV) have shown that Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ , Tc IV (μ-O) 2 Tc IV structure, is a precursor for precipitation of TcO 2 . Few data are available on Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ Subject of this thesis is the mechanism of condensation of Tc(IV) leading to this form. Kinetic studies have shown that the condensation of Tc IV Cl 5 (H 2 O) - in chloride media leads to a dimer. XAS studies resulted in a linear structure Tc IV -O-Tc IV . This compound, formulated as Tc 2 OCl 10 4- , is stable at pH = 0.3, it undergoes cyclization to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH =1.5 and is oxidized to TcO 4 - under α radiation. In 3 M chloride media, TcO 2 lead to formation Tc 2 OCl 10 4- at pH = 0.3 and to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH = 1.5. An electrochemical cell permitting 'in situ' XAS measurement was developed. XANES studies have shown that the reduction of Tc(VII) lead to a Tc(IV)/Tc(III) mixture. (author)

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate (BTMACI), in the presence of zinc chloride, leads to the formation of carbon dioxide. The reaction is first order with respect to BTMACI, zinc chloride and organic acid. Oxidation of deuteriated formic acid indicates the presence of a kinetic ...

  9. Chloride equilibrium potential in salamander cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryson Eric J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GABAergic inhibition and effects of intracellular chloride ions on calcium channel activity have been proposed to regulate neurotransmission from photoreceptors. To assess the impact of these and other chloride-dependent mechanisms on release from cones, the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl was determined in red-sensitive, large single cones from the tiger salamander retinal slice. Results Whole cell recordings were done using gramicidin perforated patch techniques to maintain endogenous Cl- levels. Membrane potentials were corrected for liquid junction potentials. Cone resting potentials were found to average -46 mV. To measure ECl, we applied long depolarizing steps to activate the calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca and then determined the reversal potential for the current component that was inhibited by the Cl- channel blocker, niflumic acid. With this method, ECl was found to average -46 mV. In a complementary approach, we used a Cl-sensitive dye, MEQ, to measure the Cl- flux produced by depolarization with elevated concentrations of K+. The membrane potentials produced by the various high K+ solutions were measured in separate current clamp experiments. Consistent with electrophysiological experiments, MEQ fluorescence measurements indicated that ECl was below -36 mV. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that ECl is close to the dark resting potential. This will minimize the impact of chloride-dependent presynaptic mechanisms in cone terminals involving GABAa receptors, glutamate transporters and ICl(Ca.

  10. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  11. Simple chloride sensors for continuous groundwater monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorn, Paul; Mortensen, John

    2012-01-01

    The development of chloride sensors which can be used for continuous, on-line monitoring of groundwater could be very valuable in the management of our coastal water resources. However, sensor stability, drift, and durability all need to be addressed in order for the sensors to be used in continu......The development of chloride sensors which can be used for continuous, on-line monitoring of groundwater could be very valuable in the management of our coastal water resources. However, sensor stability, drift, and durability all need to be addressed in order for the sensors to be used...... in continuous application. This study looks at the development of a simple, inexpensive chloride electrode, and evaluates its performance under continuous use, both in the laboratory and in a field test in a monitoring well. The results from the study showed a consistent response to changing chloride...... concentrations over longer periods. The signal was seen to be stable, with regular drift in both laboratory and field test. In the field application, the sensor signal was corrected for drift, and errors were observed to be under 7% of that of conductivity measurements. The study also found that the chloride...

  12. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of chloride induced .... decrease of pH value by MeOx, a synergism of acidic and chloride ... inhibitors and their influence on the physical properties of. Portland ...

  13. Redox reactions in rare earth chloride molten electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, V.A.; Novoselova, A.V.; Nikolaeva, E.V.; Tkacheva, O.Yu.; Salyulev, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Rare earth (REM, Ln) solutions in chloride melts including MCI+LnCl 3 mixtures, where M - alkali metals, were investigated by potentiometry, voltammetry, conductometry in wide concentration and temperature intervals. Findings present complete and trusty information on the valent state of rare earths, structure and composition of complex ions affecting essentially on properties of electrolytes. It is demonstrated that the coexistence of rare earth ions with different oxidation level formed as a result of possible redox reactions: 2Ln 3+ + Ln ↔3Ln 2+ , Ln 2+ + Ln↔2Ln + and nM + + Ln↔nM + Ln n+ appears sharply in thermodynamic and transport properties of molten Ln-LnCl 3 and Ln-LnCl 3 -MCl systems [ru

  14. Determination of chloride content in crystalline silicotitanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) is one of three options under evaluation to replace the In-Tank Precipitation process. This Salt Disposition Alternatives team identified three options for pretreatment of High Level Waste supernate: non-elutable ion exchange, precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate or direct disposal in grout. The ion exchange option would use crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Researchers at Texas A and M and Sandia National Laboratory developed CST. The engineered form of CST was procured from UOP LLC under the trade name IONSIVreg s ign IE-911. Review of vendor literature and discussions with UOP personnel led to speculation concerning the fate of chloride ion during the manufacture process of IE-911. Walker proposed tests to examine the chloride content of CST and removal methods. This report describes the results of tests to determine the chloride levels in as received CST and washed CST

  15. Mutagenicity of vinyl chloride after metabolic activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rannug, U; Johansson, A; Ramel, C; Wachtmeister, C A

    1974-01-01

    Vinyl chloride has recently been shown to cause a malignant liver tumor disease in man after occupational exposure in PVC plants. This actualizes the problem of whether such hazards could be avoided or at least diminished in the future by a screening for mutagenicity of chemicals used in industries. The basis for such a screening procedure is the close correlation between carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of chemicals. Experiments with Salmonella bacteria showed that the carcinogenic hazard of vinyl chloride could have been traced by means of mutagenicity tests. The data indicate that vinyl chloride is not mutagenic per se but becomes mutagenic after a metabolic activation in the liver. 24 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. Chloride migration in concrete with superabsorbent polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2015-01-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) can be used as a means for internal curing of concrete. In the present study, the development of transport properties of concrete with SAP is investigated. The chloride migration coefficient according to NT BUILD 492 is used as a measure of this. Twenty concrete...... contribute to increase the degree of hydration. No matter if SAP is added with or without extra water, it appears that the so-called gel space ratio can be used as a key parameter to link age and mixture proportions (water-to-cement ratio and SAP dosage) to the resulting chloride migration coefficient......; the higher the volume of gel solid relative to the space available for it, the lower the chloride migration coefficient, because the pore system becomes more tortuous and the porosity becomes less....

  17. Study of electrochemical behaviour of tantalum in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajmakov, A.N.; Ezrokhina, A.M.; Sashinina, O.A.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Equilibrium potentials of metallic tantalum in the melt TaCl 5 +KCl-NaCl are studied. Are average degree of tantalum ion oxidation, which are in equilibrium with metallic tantalum, is determined. Anodic behaviour of tantalum in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodium chlorides with Ta and F ion additions is considered. An average degree of oxidation of Ta ions, which transfer into the melt, depending on current density, is determined. It is established that tantalum is dissolved in the regime of diffusional kinetics. It is shown that tantalum corrodes in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodiUm chlorides, at that, corrosion rate increases with introdUction of Ta and F ions into solution. The corrosion is of electrochemical nature and it proceeds in the regime of diffusional kinetics

  18. Chloride corrosion in biomass-fired boilers – Fe-O-Cl system thermodynamic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarczyk Robert

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of chloride-induced corrosion in the Fe-O-Cl system. The ranges of the metallic, oxide and chloride phase stability are determined within the temperature range T = 750-1000 K. Based on the parametric equations the equilibrium concentration of gaseous phase determined by Deacon reaction are presented. The effect of H2O concentration in the gaseous phase on high-temperature corrosion process and gaseous NaCl influence on NaFeO2 formation in the passive oxide scale layer (FeO/Fe3O4/Fe2O3 are discussed as well. The results are correlated with available in the literature laboratory experimental data and industrial corrosion process observations. Presented thermodynamic analysis is compared with assumptions of “active oxidation” model. The results may be used for experimental research prediction and a corrosion prevention in the industry.

  19. Alkali metal and ammonium chlorides in water and heavy water (binary systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Adad, R

    1991-01-01

    This volume surveys the data available in the literature for solid-fluid solubility equilibria plus selected solid-liquid-vapour equilibria, for binary systems containing alkali and ammonium chlorides in water or heavy water. Solubilities covered are lithium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, rubidium chloride, caesium chloride and ammonium chloride in water and heavy water.

  20. Hazards of lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Two different topics which only relate in that they are pertinent to lithium thionyl chloride battery safety are discussed. The first topic is a hazards analysis of a system (risk assessment), a formal approach that is used in nuclear engineering, predicting oil spills, etc. It is a formalized approach for obtaining assessment of the degree of risk associated with the use of any particular system. The second topic is a small piece of chemistry related to the explosions that can occur with lithium thionyl chloride systems. After the two topics are presented, a discussion is generated among the Workshop participants.

  1. Surface adsorption in strontium chloride ammines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Andreas L.; Lysgaard, Steen; Klukowska, Agata

    2013-01-01

    An adsorbed state and its implications on the ab- and desorption kinetics of ammonia in strontium chloride ammine is identified using a combination of ammonia absorption measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, and density functional theory calculations. During thermogravimetric analysis, ammonia...... desorption originating from the adsorbed state is directly observed below the bulk desorption temperature, as confirmed by density functional theory calculations. The desorption enthalpy of the adsorbed state of strontium chloride octa-ammine is determined with both techniques to be around 37-39 k...

  2. Solubility of metallic mercury in organic solvents; Solubilite du mercure metallique dans les solvants organiques; Rastvorimost' metallicheskoj rtuti v organicheskikh rastvoritelyakh; Solubilidad del mercurio metalico en solventes organicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klehr, E H; Voigt, A F [Institute for Atomic Research and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    1962-03-15

    The solubilities of metallic mercury at 25{sup o}C in the solvents carbon tetrachloride, 2, 2, 4-trimethylpentane, n-decane, benzene, toluene, nitrobenzene, chlorobenzene and bromobenzene have been determined by the use of Hg{sup 203} tracer. Measurements were made either by shaking mercury metal of known specific activity with the solvent, or by measuring the distribution coefficient of the metal between the solvent and water and combining this measurement with the solubility of mercury in water, or by both methods. Radioactivity was measured by counting precipitated samples with a GM counter or liquid aliquots with a well-type scintillator counter. All solubilities were in the range (4.6 to 16) x 10{sup -6} g atoms/l. For n-decane, toluene and chlorobenzene, the temperature dependence of the solubility was determined over the range 0 to 45{sup o}C. The Hildebrand-Scott theory of solubility has been applied to these systems for comparison. For the aliphatic hydrocarbons, the solubilities predicted by theory are within 35% of those observed, but for the other solvents, the predicted values are 4 to 18 times larger than those observed. Modification of the theory gives better agreement for some solvents but poorer agreement for others. Curves of log G (solubility) vs. 1/T were straight lines with slopes similar to those obtained from the Hildebrand-Scott theory but displaced from those curves. The slopes of the curves were used for the calculation of heats and entropies of solution. Entropies were also calculated from curves of log G vs. log T. The two sets of entropy values were in agreement with each other and were within one to four entropy units of the ideal entropies of mixing. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont determine la solubilite du mercure metallique a 25{sup o}C dans les solvants suivants: tetrachlorure de carbone, trimethylpentane 2, 2, 4, n-decane, benzene, toluene, nitrobenzene, chlorobenzene et bromobenzene en utilisant le mercure-203 comme

  3. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (merA) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance Região conservada do gene da mercúrio redutase (merA) como marcador molecular da resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Sotero-Martins; Michele Silva de Jesus; Michele Lacerda; Josino Costa Moreira; Ana Luzia Lauria Filgueiras; Paulo Rubens Guimarães Barrocas

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains.O mecanismo de resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio mais comum é baseada na redução do Hg(II) a Hg0, através da ativida...

  4. Crystal field influence on vibration spectra: anhydrous uranyl chloride and dihydroxodiuranyl chloride tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Andre; Caillet, Paul

    1976-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of anhydrous uranyl chloride UO 2 Cl 2 and so called basic uranyl chloride: dihydroxodiuranyl chloride tetrahydrate /UO 2 (OH) 2 UO 2 /Cl 2 (H 2 O) 4 are reported. Factor group method analysis leads for the first time to complete and comprehensive interpretation of their spectra. Two extreme examples of crystal field influence on vibrational spectra are pointed out: for UO 2 Cl 2 , one is unable to explain spectra without taking into account all the elements of primitive crystalline cell, whilst for dihydroxodiuranyl dichloride tetrahydrate the crystal packing has very little effect on vibrational spectra [fr

  5. Chloride Ingress in Concrete with Different Age at Time of First Chloride Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Østergaard; Iskau, Martin Riis; Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    Concrete structures cast in spring have longer time to hydrate and are therefore denser and more resistant to chloride ingress when first subjected to deicing salts in winter than structures cast in autumn. Consequently, it is expected that a spring casting will have a longer service life....... This hypothesis is investigated in the present study by testing drilled cores from concrete cast in 2012 and 2013 on the Svendborgsund Bridge. The cores are subject to petrographic examination and mapping of chloride profiles. Moreover, chloride migration coefficients have been measured. The study shows...

  6. Method for preparation of melts of alkali metal chlorides with highly volatile polyvalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1990-01-01

    A method for production of alkali metal (Cs, Rb, K) chloride melts with highly volatile polyvalent metal chlorides is suggested. The method consists, in saturation of alkali metal chlorides, preheated to the melting point, by volatile component vapours (titanium tetrachloride, molybdenum or tantalum pentachloride) in proportion, corresponding to the composition reguired. The saturation is realized in an evacuated vessel with two heating areas for 1-1.5 h. After gradual levelling of temperature in both areas the product is rapidly cooled. 1 fig.; 1 tab

  7. An Efficient Synthesis of Substituted Quinolines via Indium(III) Chloride Catalyzed Reaction of Imines with Alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Mei; Fu, Weijun; Xun, Chen; Zou, Guanglong

    2012-01-01

    An efficient synthetic method for the preparation of quinolines through indium(III) chloride-catalyzed tandem addition-cyclization-oxidation reactions of imines with alkynes was developed. The processes can provide a diverse range of quinoline derivatives in good yields from simple imines and alkynes

  8. Sulfate radical-based degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls: Effects of chloride ion and reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Guo-Dong [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Dionysiou, Dionysios D. [Environmental Engineering and Science Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0071 (United States); Wang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A kinetic model was used to predict the radical species and their distributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The generated radical species were identified by EPR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined. - Abstract: Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}{center_dot}{sup -}) have been recently used for soil and groundwater remediation. The presence of chloride ion in natural or wastewater decreases the reactivity of sulfate radical system, but explanations for this behavior were inconsistent, and the mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, in this paper we investigated the effect of chloride ion on the degradation of 2,4,4 Prime -CB (PCB28) and biphenyl (BP) by persulfate, based on the produced SO{sub 4}{center_dot}{sup -}. The results showed that the presence of chloride ion greatly inhibited the transformation of PCB28 and BP. Transformation intermediates of BP were monitored, suggesting that the chloride ion can react with SO{sub 4}{center_dot}{sup -} to produce chlorine radical, which reacts with BP to generate chlorinated compounds. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these processes, a kinetic model was developed for predicting the effect of chloride ion on the types of radical species and their distributions. The results showed that chloride ion could influence the selectivity of radical species and their distribution, and increase the concentration of the sum of radical species. In addition, the second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined, and quantum-chemical descriptors were introduced to predict the rate constants of other PCBs based on our experimental data.

  9. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  10. Detection of chloride ion concentration using chronopotentiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is reported for the electrochemical measurement of chloride ions using chronopotentiometry. A current pulse is applied at the Ag/AgCl working electrode and the potential change is measured with respect to another identical Ag/AgCl electrode in the bulk electrolyte.

  11. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of Commission determination... China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will proceed with a full review pursuant to... antidumping duty order on barium chloride from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  12. Thermal Decomposition of Aluminium Chloride Hexahydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Trnka, Otakar; Šolcová, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 17 (2005), s. 6591-6598 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aluminum chloride hexahydrate * thermal decomposition * reaction kinetics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.504, year: 2005

  13. Reliability-Based Planning of Chloride Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Engelund, S.

    1996-01-01

    In reinforced concrete structures corrosion is initiated when the chloride concentration around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. If corrosion starts then expensive repairs can be necessary. The estimation of the probability that corrosion has been initiated in a given structure is bas...

  14. Commercial production of thallium-201 chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.V.; Volkova, N.M.; Skokov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    Thallium-201 chloride pharmaceuticals production practice at the Medradiopreparat factory under USSR Ministry of Public Health is described. The factory is carried out series-produced supplies of the compound prepared according to a new practice from September, 1985. Thallium-201 extraction from cyclotron targets irradiated is carried out by the extraction method

  15. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-149 (Third Review)] Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject review. DATES: Effective Date: April 9, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy Sherman (202-205-3289...

  16. 75 FR 33824 - Barium Chloride From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... China Determination On the basis of the record\\1\\ developed in the subject five-year review, the United... China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the... contained in USITC Publication 4157 (June 2010), entitled Barium Chloride from China: Investigation No. 731...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employee exposure to vinyl chloride (chloroethene), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 75014. (2) This section applies to the manufacture, reaction, packaging, repackaging, storage, handling or use of vinyl... this section by engineering, work practice, and personal protective controls as follows: (1) Feasible...

  18. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  19. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO3, a solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO3, solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N as 500 nM.

  20. Chloride concentration affects soil microbial community

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryndler, Milan; Rohlenová, Jana; Kopecký, Jan; Matucha, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 7 (2008), s. 1401-1408 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : soil chloride * terminal restriction fragments * soil microorganisms Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.054, year: 2008

  1. An improved calcium chloride method preparation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transformation is one of the fundamental and essential molecular cloning techniques. In this paper, we have reported a modified method for preparation and transformation of competent cells. This modified method, improved from a classical protocol, has made some modifications on the concentration of calcium chloride ...

  2. Analysis of the Rapid Chloride Migration test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiesz, P.R.; Ballari, M.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Ferreira, R. M.; Gulikers, J.; Andrade, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study the Rapid Chloride Migration test (RCM) standardized as NT Build 492 and BAW-Merkblatt is reviewed. Since the traditional natural diffusion tests are laborious, time consuming and costly, they are not always preferred from a practical point of view. To overcome these disadvantages,

  3. Oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B; Svendsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is known to alleviate acute toxicity due to injection of cadmium salts. However, when cadmium chloride was administered by the oral route, DDC enhanced rather than alleviated the acute toxicity; both oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DDC had this effect...

  4. Chloride diffusion in partially saturated cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erik Pram; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2003-01-01

    The paper proposes a combined application of composite theory and Powers' model for microstructural development for the estimation of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the moisture content of a defect-free cementitious material. Measurements of chloride diffusion in mortar samples (440 kg...

  5. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2008-01-01

    Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO3, a solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N) for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO3, solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV) we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N) as 500 nM. PMID:27873832

  6. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2008-09-15

    Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO₃, a solution of AgNO₃ and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N) for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO₃, solution of AgNO₃ and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV) we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N) as 500 nM.

  7. Binary nucleation of water and sodium chloride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Tomáš; Maršík, František; Palmer, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 4 (2006), 0445091-0445096 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/2536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : binary nucleation * sodium chloride * water Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  8. Performance of high molybdenum superaustenitic stainless steel welds in harsh chloride environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvall, P.; Liljas, M.; Wallen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Superaustenitic steels are normally welded with nickel-based alloys as filler materials. To clarify the understanding of weld behavior in superaustenitic stainless steels this paper presents the development history of 6Mo and 7Mo steels, and results of laboratory tests and field tests on welds of UNS S31254 (6Mo) and UNS S32654 (7 Mo) in different types of chloride containing environments. The laboratory tests consisted of the well known ferric chloride test (ASTM G 48 Method A). Shielded metal arc welds, gas tungsten arc welds and submerged arc welds in both grades were tested. The critical pitting temperatures were determined and the locations of the attack were noted. Some specimens were sectioned at the position of the attack followed by studies using light optical microscopy. The critical pitting temperatures of the welds in S31254 and S32654 were at normal levels for both grades, i.e., 40--50 C for S31254 and 60--75 C for S32654. The locations of the attack differed depending on the welding process. In shielded metal arc welds the attack was mostly located in the weld metal. In gas tungsten arc welds the attack was predominantly located next to the fusion line. The field tests showed that the behavior of welds and parent metal of superaustenitic stainless steels, as well as of nickel-based alloys, is much dependent on the corrosive environment. In oxidizing chloride solutions, similar results to those of the ferric chloride test, are observed. However, crevice corrosion in the parent material is at a greater risk than pitting corrosion in the welds. In very oxidizing solutions of low chloride concentrations, welds made of nickel-based fillers may corrode faster than the stainless steel base metal due to transpassive uniform corrosion. The opposite situation exists when active uniform corrosion prevails, i.e., welds made of nickel-based fillers corrode less than the stainless steel parent material

  9. Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

  10. Improved electrolyte for lithium-thionyl chloride battery. [Patent application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipman, W.H.; McCartney, J.F.

    1980-12-17

    A lithium, thionyl chloride battery is provided with an electrolyte which makes it safe under a reverse voltage condition. The electrolyte is niobium pentachloride which is dissolved in the thionyl chloride.

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Vinyl Chloride (Final Report, 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Vinyl Chloride: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Vinyl Chloride and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  12. Thallium-201 chloride dynamic analysis using thallium-201 chloride and sodium iodide-131 thyroid subtraction scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Setsuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Togami, Izumi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1984-10-01

    The mechanism of /sup 201/Tl chloride accumulation is unclear in thyroid gland and thyroid tumor. This report examines 108 patients that received thyroid scintigraphy examinations with both /sup 201/Tl chloride and sodium /sup 131/I. The patients were diagnosed clinically and histologically whenever possible. The ROI were obtained by subtraction imaging with both isotopes and by subtraction positive and negative areas of imaging. Dynamic curves were obtained for /sup 201/Tl chloride per square unit of each ROI. The dynamic curve in the radioiodide-accumulated area was examined. The data indicate that the clearance rate of /sup 201/Tl chloride (T/sub 15/) was correlated with the sodium /sup 131/I uptake rate at 24 h (r=0.70).

  13. A reactive distillation process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing rare earth chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, H.C., E-mail: ehc2004@kaeri.re.kr; Choi, J.H.; Kim, N.Y.; Lee, T.K.; Han, S.Y.; Lee, K.R.; Park, H.S.; Ahn, D.H.

    2016-11-15

    The pyrochemical process, which recovers useful resources (U/TRU metals) from used nuclear fuel using an electrochemical method, generates LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing radioactive rare earth chlorides (RECl{sub 3}). It is necessary to develop a simple process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt in a hot-cell facility. For this reason, a reactive distillation process using a chemical agent was achieved as a method to separate rare earths from the LiCl-KCl waste salt. Before conducting the reactive distillation, thermodynamic equilibrium behaviors of the reactions between rare earth (Nd, La, Ce, Pr) chlorides and the chemical agent (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) were predicted using software. The addition of the chemical agent was determined to separate the rare earth chlorides into an oxide form using these equilibrium results. In the reactive distillation test, the rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were decontaminated at a decontamination factor (DF) of more than 5000, and were mainly converted into oxide (Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or oxychloride (LaOCl, PrOCl) forms. The LiCl-KCl was purified into a form with a very low concentration (<1 ppm) for the rare earth chlorides.

  14. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: Sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  15. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  16. Investigations on chloride-induced high temperature corrosion of iron-, nickel-, cobalt-base alloys by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microspot analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.; Umland, F.

    1984-01-01

    The direct oxidation at 900 0 C in air and the corrosion of alloys in air after short exposure to chloride have been compared under identical conditions. Chloride destroys the original oxide layers by recristallisation and modifies the following scale growing in such a manner that no firmly sticking layers can be rebuilt. After a chloride induction therefore all other following corrosions will be enhanced. Experiments in a closed system, a so called transport furnace, showed that the chloride also acts as a gas phase carrier transporting firstly the oxide layer, under reducing conditions metals, too, as volatile chloro metal gas complexes in this case from hot to cold region of the furnace. Cobalt base alloys are less attacked than iron or nickel base alloys. As chloride is not found implicitly on the treated surface the identification of the chloride induced corrosion is difficult. However the scanning electron microscopy combined with quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis has been proved as an appropriate method for early detection. As the phenomena depend on the type of alloy, respectively, an illustration and interpretation catalogue is necessary. (orig.) [de

  17. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures exposed to chlorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Ekman, Tom; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1999-01-01

    is used as environmental load. The chloride penetration is characterized both qualitatively (UV-test) and quantitatively (chloride profile) and by microscopy. The test programme involves three different concrete qualities. Both steel fibres and polypropylene fibres are used in the concrete beams as well...... as main reinforcement. The effect of the cracks, the fibres and the concrete quality on the chloride penetration is studied....

  18. 21 CFR 177.1950 - Vinyl chloride-ethylene copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vinyl chloride-ethylene copolymers. 177.1950... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1950 Vinyl chloride-ethylene copolymers. The vinyl chloride-ethylene copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely...

  19. Accelerated testing for chloride threshold of reinforcing steel in concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Put, M. van; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2017-01-01

    Testing for the chloride threshold (also called critical chloride content) for corrosion initiation of steel in concrete has been found difficult and, at best, time consuming. Nevertheless, the chloride threshold is an important parameter in service life design of new structures and for evaluation

  20. Potentiometric Determination of Free Chloride in Cement Paste – an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cement paste.16 The accuracy and reliability of this analytical technique has been checked against a certified reference material, Merck sodium chloride solution. Confidence levels (CL0.95), of 0.03 and relative standard deviations of 0.2 % for chloride were determined for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) chloride binding ...

  1. Removal of iron contaminant from zirconium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voit, D.O.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for eliminating iron contaminant from an aqueous zirconium chloride solution that has been contaminated with FeCl 3 in a plant in which zirconium and hafnium chloride solutions are separated by a main MINK solvent extraction system and the FeCl 3 is normally removed from the zirconium chloride solution by a secondary MINK solvent extraction system

  2. Chloride sensing by WNK1 kinase involves inhibition of autophosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piala, Alexander T.; Moon, Thomas M.; Akella, Radha; He, Haixia; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    WNK1 [with no lysine (K)] is a serine-threonine kinase associated with a form of familial hypertension. WNK1 is at the top of a kinase cascade leading to phosphorylation of several cotransporters, in particular those transporting sodium, potassium, and chloride (NKCC), sodium and chloride (NCC), and potassium and chloride (KCC). The responsiveness of NKCC, NCC, and KCC to changes in extracellular chloride parallels their phosphorylation state, provoking the proposal that these transporters are controlled by a chloride-sensitive protein kinase. Here, we found that chloride stabilizes the inactive conformation of WNK1, preventing kinase autophosphorylation and activation. Crystallographic studies of inactive WNK1 in the presence of chloride revealed that chloride binds directly to the catalytic site, providing a basis for the unique position of the catalytic lysine. Mutagenesis of the chloride binding site rendered the kinase less sensitive to inhibition of autophosphorylation by chloride, validating the binding site. Thus, these data suggest that WNK1 functions as a chloride sensor through direct binding of a regulatory chloride ion to the active site, which inhibits autophosphorylation. PMID:24803536

  3. Electrochemical degradation of diuron in chloride medium using DSA® based anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipi, Angelo R. F.; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Andrade, Adalgisa R. de

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study of the electrochemical degradation of the herbicide diuron using Ti/Ru x Ti (1-x) O 2 and Ti/Ir x Ti (1-x) O 2 (x 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7) anodes. The investigation of the degradation was conducted in the presence and in the absence of chloride. The study of the herbicide removal as a function of the current density in the absence of chloride yielded 41 and 49% COD (chemical oxygen demand) removals and 10 and 14% TOC (total organic carbon) removal at 100 mA cm -2 , respectively. By keeping the electrolysis time constant (4 h), Ti/Ru 0.7 Ti 0.3 O 2 anode composition was determined as the most active for removal of diuron and its byproduct. The maximum removal value achieved after 4 h was 58%. Addition of chloride doubled the removal ratio, and 100% COD removal was obtained for Ti/Ru 0.3 Ti 0.7 O 2 . High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed the total removal of the herbicide in chloride medium and indicated the formation of byproducts. The generated byproducts presented as function of the applied current density and the anode composition. Ir-based anodes promoted milder oxidation and furnished more byproducts in aqueous medium. (author)

  4. Electrochemical degradation of diuron in chloride medium using DSA Registered-Sign based anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipi, Angelo R. F.; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Andrade, Adalgisa R. de, E-mail: ardandra@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    This work presents a study of the electrochemical degradation of the herbicide diuron using Ti/Ru{sub x}Ti{sub (1-x)}O{sub 2} and Ti/Ir{sub x}Ti{sub (1-x)}O{sub 2} (x 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7) anodes. The investigation of the degradation was conducted in the presence and in the absence of chloride. The study of the herbicide removal as a function of the current density in the absence of chloride yielded 41 and 49% COD (chemical oxygen demand) removals and 10 and 14% TOC (total organic carbon) removal at 100 mA cm{sup -2}, respectively. By keeping the electrolysis time constant (4 h), Ti/Ru{sub 0.7}Ti{sub 0.3}O{sub 2} anode composition was determined as the most active for removal of diuron and its byproduct. The maximum removal value achieved after 4 h was 58%. Addition of chloride doubled the removal ratio, and 100% COD removal was obtained for Ti/Ru{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 2} . High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed the total removal of the herbicide in chloride medium and indicated the formation of byproducts. The generated byproducts presented as function of the applied current density and the anode composition. Ir-based anodes promoted milder oxidation and furnished more byproducts in aqueous medium. (author)

  5. Transformation of benzalkonium chloride under nitrate reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2009-03-01

    The effect and transformation potential of benzalkonium chlorides (BAC) under nitrate reducing conditions were investigated at concentrations up to 100 mg/L in batch assays using a mixed, mesophilic (35 degrees C) methanogenic culture. Glucose was used as the carbon and energy source and the initial nitrate concentration was 70 mg N/L Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) and to dinitrogen (DNRN) were observed at BAC concentrations up to 25 mg/L At and above 50 mg BAC/L, DNRA was inhibited and DNRN was incomplete resulting in accumulation of nitrous oxide. Long-term inhibition of methanogenesis and accumulation of volatile fatty acids were observed at and above 50 mg BAC/L Over 99% of the added BAC was recovered from all cultures except the one amended with 100 mg BAC/L where 37% of the initially added BAC was transformed during the 100 day incubation period. Abiotic and biotic assays performed with 100 mg/L of BAC and 5 mM (in the liquid phase) of either nitrate, nitrite, or nitric oxide demonstrated that BAC transformation was abiotic and followed the modified Hofmann degradation pathway, i.e., bimolecular nucleophilic substitution with nitrite. Alkyl dimethyl amines (tertiary amines) were produced at equamolar levels to BAC transformed, but were not further degraded. This is the first report demonstrating the transformation of BAC under nitrate reducing conditions and elucidating the BAC transformation pathway.

  6. Heterogeneous electro-Fenton catalyst for 1-butylpyridinium chloride degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Jessica; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, Maria Ángeles

    2017-10-15

    The application of the electro-Fenton process for organic compound mineralisation has been widely reported over the past years. However, operational problems related to the use of soluble iron salt as a homogeneous catalyst involve the development of novel catalysts that are able to operate in a wide pH range. For this purpose, polyvinyl alcohol-alginate beads, containing goethite as iron, were synthesised and evaluated as heterogeneous electro-Fenton catalyst for 1-butylpyridinium chloride mineralisation. The influence of catalyst dosage and pH solution on ionic liquid degradation was analysed, achieving almost total oxidation after 60 min under optimal conditions (2 g/L catalyst concentration and pH 3). The results showed good catalyst stability and reusability, although its effectiveness decreases slightly after three successive cycles. Furthermore, a plausible mineralisation pathway was proposed based on the oxidation byproducts determined by chromatographic techniques. Finally, the Microtox® test revealed notable detoxification after treatment which demonstrates high catalyst ability for pyridinium-based ionic liquid degradation by the electro-Fenton process.

  7. Adsorption of water, sulfates and chloride on arsenopyrite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Juliana C. M.; dos Santos, Egon C.; de Oliveira, Aline; Heine, Thomas; De Abreu, Heitor A.; Duarte, Hélio A.

    2018-03-01

    Arsenopyrite is one of the sulfide minerals responsible for acid rock drainage (ARD) and is one of the most hazardous in regions affected by mining activities. This phenomenon involves complex reaction mechanism. Although it is intensely investigated, there is a lack of consensus concerning the reaction mechanisms and more information is still necessary. In this work, the adsorption of water, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid on arsenopyrite (001) surface was investigated by means of Density Functional calculations and the results compared to other sulfides aiming to understand the mineral/water interface. The interaction of the chemical species with the (001) FeAsS surface is the first step to understand the intricate oxidation mechanism of arsenopyrite. Molecular water adsorption on (001) FeAsS is more favored than the adsorption of sulfate favoring the dissolution of sulfates and enhancing its oxidation. The estimated adsorption energies of water, sulfates and chloride on other sulfide minerals are compared with the estimated values for arsenopyrite and the chemical reactivity differences discussed in detail.

  8. Relation between chloride exchange diffusion and a conductive chloride pathway across the isolated skin of the toad (Bufo bufo)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    1978-01-01

    Substitution of chloride in the outside bathing medium of the toad skin with bromide, iodide, nitrate and sulphate leads to a reduction in the apparent exchange diffusion of chloride across this tissue, and also to a reduction of the chloride current recorded during hyperpolarization. A series...

  9. Determination of Chloride Content in Cementitious Materials : From Fundamental Aspects to Application of Ag/AgCl Chloride Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pargar, F.; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the advantages and drawbacks of available test methods for the determination of chloride content in cementitious materials in general, and the application of Ag/AgCl chloride sensors in particular. The main factors that affect the reliability of a chloride sensor are presented.

  10. A thermodynamic analysis of chloride corrosion in biomass-fired boilers for Fe-O-Cl-S system

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarczyk Robert; Mlonka-Mędrala Agata; Gurgul Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of chlorideinduced corrosion in the Fe-O-Cl-S system. The influence of steam concentration in the gas phase on chloride-induced corrosion process was presented. Based on the parametric equations the equilibrium concentration of the gas phase was determined. The effect of alkali metals chlorides in gas phase (Na,K)Cl on formation of (Na,K)FeO2 in the passive oxide scale layer (FeO/Fe3O4/Fe2O3) was analysed. Condensation of (Na,K)Cl vapors, formation ...

  11. Influence of chloride admixtures on cement matrix durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, I.A.; Zamorani, E.; Serrini, G.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of various inorganic salts, as chloride admixtures to Portland cement, on the mechanical properties and the durability of the matrix has been studied. The salts used in this study are chromium, nickel and cadmium chlorides. Improved compressive strength values are obtained which have been correlated to the stable metal hydroxide formation in high pH environment. Under static water conditions at 50 0 C, hydrolyzed chloride ions exhibit adverse effects on the matrix durability through rapid release of calcium as calcium chloride in the initial period of leaching. On the contrary, enhanced matrix durability is obtained on long term leaching in the case of cement containing chromium chloride

  12. Thermochemistry of certain rare earth and ammonium double chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usubaliev, D.U.; Abramtsev, V.A.; Kydynov, M.K.; Vilyaev, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    In a calorimeter with isothermal casing at 25 deg C dissolution enthalpies of double chlorides of rare earths and ammonium LnCl 3 x2NH 4 Cl (Ln=La, Sm) and LnCl 3 x3NH 4 Cl (Ln=Gd, Tb, Ho) in water, as well as dissolution enthalpy of rare earth chlorides in solution of ammonium chloride and NH 4 Cl in solution of rare earth chloride, have been measured. Formation enthalpies, standard formation enthalpies, dissociation enthalpies of the above-mentioned double chlorides are calculated

  13. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  14. Lewis acidity dependency of the electrochemical window of zinc chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiu, S-I; Huang, J.-F.; Sun, I-W.; Yuan, C.-H.; Shiea, Jantaie

    2002-01-01

    Negative ion fast atom bombardment mass spectra (FAB-MS) recorded for ZnCl 2 -1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (ZnCl 2 -EMIC) ionic liquids with various compositions indicate that various Lewis acidic chlorozincate clusters (ZnCl 3 - , Zn 2 Cl 5 - and Zn 3 Cl 7 - ) are present in ZnCl 2 -EMIC ionic liquids depending on the percentage of ZnCl 2 used in preparing the ionic liquids; higher ZnCl 2 percentage favors the larger clusters. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that the potential limits for a basic 1:3 ZnCl 2 -EMIC melt correspond to the cathodic reduction of EMI + and anodic oxidation of Cl - , giving an electrochemical window of approximately 3.0 V which is the same as that observed for basic AlCl 3 -EMIC ionic liquids. For acidic ionic liquids that have a ZnCl 2 /EMIC molar ratio higher than 0.5:1, the negative potential limit is due to the deposition of metallic zinc, and the positive potential limit is due to the oxidation of the chlorozincate complexes. All the acidic ionic liquids exhibit an electrochemical window of approximately 2 V, although the potential limits shifted in the positive direction with increasing ZnCl 2 mole ratio. Underpotential deposition of zinc was observed on Pt and Ni electrodes in the acidic ionic liquids. At proper temperatures and potentials, crystalline zinc electrodeposits were obtained from the acidic ionic liquids

  15. Magnetic interactions in iron (III) porphyrin chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, J.; Subramanian, Japyesan; Fuhrhop, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Intermolecular exchange interactions in iron(III) porphyrin chlorides (porphyrin = OEP, proto, TPP) have been studied by X-ray structure, EPR and magnetic susceptibility studies. The crystal structure of Fe(III)OEP-Cl was found to be different from that of the other two. Different types of exchange broadened EPR-spectra are obtained which are attributable to the arrangement in the crystals. The EPR results correlate well with magnetic susceptibility data. (orig.) [de

  16. Synthesis and functionalisation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Mundell, VJ

    2013-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles including calcium oxide, gold, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) were synthesised using a range of techniques including reduction, co-precipitation and spinning disc technology. SPIOs were primarily synthesised via a co-precipitation method using iron (II) chloride, iron (III) chloride and ammonia; a spinning disc reactor and gaseous ammonia were trialled successfully for scale up, producing spherical particles of 10-40 nm in diameter a...

  17. Chloride regulates afferent arteriolar contraction in response to depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Jensen, B L; Skott, O

    1998-01-01

    -Renal vascular reactivity is influenced by the level of dietary salt intake. Recent in vitro data suggest that afferent arteriolar contractility is modulated by extracellular chloride. In the present study, we assessed the influence of chloride on K+-induced contraction in isolated perfused rabbit...... afferent arterioles. In 70% of vessels examined, K+-induced contraction was abolished by acute substitution of bath chloride. Consecutive addition of Cl- (30, 60, 80, 100, 110, and 117 mmol/L) restored the sensitivity to K+, and half-maximal response was observed at 82 mmol/L chloride. The calcium channel...... antagonist diltiazem (10(-6) mol/L) abolished K+-induced contractions. Bicarbonate did not modify the sensitivity to chloride. Norepinephrine (10(-6) mol/L) induced full contraction in depolarized vessels even in the absence of chloride. Iodide and nitrate were substituted for chloride with no inhibitory...

  18. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  19. Electrochemistry of vanadium(II and the electrodeposition of aluminum-vanadium alloys in the aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of vanadium(II was examined in the 66.7-33.3 mole percent aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt containing dissolved VCl2 at 353 K. Voltammetry experiments revealed that V(II could be electrochemically oxidized to V(III and V(IV. However at slow scan rates the V(II/V(III electrode reaction is complicated by the rapid precipitation of V(III as VCl3. The reduction of V(II occurs at potentials considerably negative of the Al(III/Al electrode reaction, and Al-V alloys cannot be electrodeposited from this melt. However electrodeposition experiments conducted in VCl2-saturated melt containing the additive, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, resulted in Al-V alloys. The vanadium content of these alloys increased with increasing cathodic current density or more negative applied potentials. X-ray analysis of Al-V alloys that were electrodeposited on a rotating copper wire substrate indicated that these alloys did not form or contain an intermetallic compound, but were non-equilibrium or metastable solid solutions. The chloride-pitting corrosion properties of these alloys were examined in aqueous NaCl by using potentiodynamic polarization techniques. Alloys containing ~10 a/o vanadium exhibited a pitting potential that was 0.3 V positive of that for pure aluminum.

  20. Analysis of lithium/thionyl chloride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukul

    The lithium/thionyl chloride battery (Li/SOClsb2) has received considerable attention as a primary energy source due to its high energy density, high operating cell voltage, voltage stability over 95% of the discharge, large operating temperature range (-55sp°C to 70sp°C), long storage life, and low cost of materials. In this dissertation, a one-dimensional mathematical model of a spirally wound lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery has been developed. Mathematical models can be used to tailor a battery design to a specific application, perform accelerated testing, and reduce the amount of experimental data required to yield efficient, yet safe cells. The Model was used in conjunction with the experimental data for parameter estimation and to obtain insights into the fundamental processes occurring in the battery. The diffusion coefficient and the kinetic parameters for the reactions at the anode and the cathode are obtained as a function of temperature by fitting the simulated capacity and average cell voltage to experimental data over a wide range of temperatures (-55 to 49sp°C) and discharge loads (10 to 250 ohms). The experiments were performed on D-sized, cathode-limited, spirally wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells at Sandia National Laboratories. The model is also used to study the effect of cathode thickness and current and temperature pulsing on the cell capacity. Thionyl chloride reduction in the porous cathode is accompanied with a volume reduction. The material balance used previously in one-dimensional mathematical models of porous electrodes is invalid when the volume occupied by the reactants and the products is not equal. It is shown here how the material balance has to be modified to either account for the loss in volume, or to account for the inflow of electrolyte from the header into the active pores. The one-dimensional mathematical model of lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery is used to illustrate the effect of this material balance

  1. The measurement of metallic uranium solubility in lithium chloride molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Choi, I. K.; Yeon, J. W.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.

    2002-01-01

    For the purpose of more precise solubility measurement of metallic uranium in lithium chloride melt, the effect of lithium chloride on uranium determination and and the change of oxidation state of metallic uranium in the media were investigated. Uranium of higher than 10 μg/g could be directly determined by ICP-AES. In the case of the lower concentration, the separation and concentration of uranium by anion exchanger was followed by ICP-AES, thereby extending the measurable concentration to 0.1 μg/g. The effects of lithium oxide, uranium oxides(UO 2 or U 3 O 8 ) and metallic lithium on the solubility of metallic uranium were individually investigated in glassy carbon or stainless steel crucibles under argon gas atmosphere. Since metallic uranium is oxidized to uranium(III) in the absence of metallic lithium, causing an increase in the solubility, metallic lithium as reducing agent should be present in the reaction media to obtain the more precise solubility. The metallic uranium solubilities measured at 660 and 690 .deg. C were both lower than 10 μg/g

  2. Propane-1,3-diammonium bis[aquachlorido(4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato-κ3O2,N,O6mercurate(II] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Aghabozorg

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of mercury(II chloride dihydrate, propane-1,3-diamine and 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid in a 1:1:1 molar ratio in aqueous solution, resulted in the formation of the title compound, (C3H12N2[Hg(C7H3NO5Cl(H2O]2·4H2O or (pnH2[Hg(hypydcCl(H2O]2·4H2O (where pn is propane-1,3-diamine and hypydcH2 is 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. The metal atom is coordinated by one chloride group, one water molecule cis to the chloride ligand and one (hypydc2− ligand. The coordinated water molecule is almost perpendicular to the plane of the aromatic ring of (hypydc2−. The geometry of the resulting HgClNO3 coordination can be described as distorted square-pyramidal. This structure also contains propane-1,3-diammonium (site symmetry 2 as a counter-ion and four uncoordinated water molecules. There is a wide range of non-covalent interactions consisting of hydrogen bonding [of the types O—H...O, N—H...O and C—H...O, with D...A ranging from 2.548 (5 to 3.393 (6 Å] and ion pairing.

  3. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, M; Pedersen, N B

    2012-01-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho-specific antib......The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho......-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidative stress-response kinases (SPAK and OSR1) were not able to phosphorylate NCC at S124. Protein kinase arrays identified multiple kinases that were able to bind to the region surrounding S124. Four of these kinases (IRAK2, CDK6/Cyclin D1, NLK and m...

  4. Transition-metal chlorides as conversion cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ting; Chen, Zhong X.; Cao, Yu L.; Ai, Xin P.; Yang, Han X.

    2012-01-01

    Insoluble AgCl and soluble CuCl 2 were selected and investigated as model compounds of transition-metal chlorides for electrochemical conversion cathode materials. The experimental results demonstrated that the AgCl nanocrystals can convert reversibly to metallic Ag with nearly full utilization of its one-electron redox capacity (187 mAh g −1 ). Similarly, the CuCl 2 -filled mesoporous carbon can realize a reversible two-electron transfer reaction, giving a very high reversible capacity of 466 mAh g −1 after 20 cycles. These data imply that the metal chlorides can undergo complete electrochemical conversion utilizing their full oxidation states for electrical energy storage as previously reported metal fluorides, possibly being used as high capacity cathode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  5. Sulphate analysis in uranium leach iron(III) chloride solutions by inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Lakhani, S.; Yunus, M.Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    Inductively coupled Argon Plasma Spectrometry is used for the indirect determination of sulphate in iron(III) chloride leach solution of Elliot Lake uranium ores via addition of a known amount of barium ions and analyzing for excess of barium. The ore contains ∼ 7 wt% pyrite, FeS 2 , as the major mineral which oxidizes to generate sulphate during leaching with Fe(III). The effects of pH, the concentrations of Fe(III) and chloride ions and for presence of ethanol in the test samples on the accuracy of analysis are studied. It is found that unlike the Rhodizonate method, removal of iron(III) from or addition of ethanol to the test sample prior to analysis are not required. Linear calibration curves are obtained. (author)

  6. Crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride and its copper(II) and cobalt(III) chloride complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Bocelli, G.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Shova, S. G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride hydrate hemiethanol solvate (I), salicylideneguanylhydrazinium trichloroaquacuprate(II) (II), and bis(salicylideneguanylhydrazino)cobalt(III) chloride trihydrate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. The structures of compounds I, II, and III are solved by direct methods and refined using the least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms to the final factors R = 0.0597, 0.0212, and 0.0283, respectively. In the structure of compound I, the monoprotonated molecules and chlorine ions linked by hydrogen bonds form layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. In the structure of compound II, the salicylaldehyde guanylhydrazone cations and polymer chains consisting of trichloroaquacuprate(II) anions are joined by an extended three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds. In the structure of compound III, the [Co(LH) 2 ] + cations, chloride ions, and molecules of crystallization water are linked together by a similar network

  7. Growth and characterization of magnesium chloride and lanthanum chloride doped strontium tartrate crystals - gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaiarasi, S.; Jaikumar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Growth of single crystals of doped strontium tartrate by controlled diffusion of strontium chloride into the silica gel charged with tartaric acid at room temperature is narrated. In this study, we synthesized magnesium chloride (5% and 10%) doped strontium tartrate crystals and Lanthanum chloride (5%, 10% and 15%) doped strontium tartrate crystals are grown. The crystal structure of the compound crystals was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of pure and doped crystals are recorded and analyzed. The UV-Vis-NIR spectrum analysis reveals that the optical study of the grown crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency was measured by using Kurtz powder technique with Nd:YAG laser of wavelength 1064 nm. (author)

  8. Sorption of sulphur dioxide in calcium chloride and nitrate chloride liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzepierczynska, I.; Gostomczyk, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Flue gas desulphurization via application of suspensions has one inherent disadvantage: fixation of sulphur dioxide is very poor. This should be attributed to the low content of calcium ions which results from the solubility of the sorbing species. The solubility of sparingly soluble salts (CaO, CaCO 3 ) may be increased by decreasing the pH of the solution; yet, there is a serious limitation in this method: the corrosivity of the scrubber. The objective of this paper was to assess the sorbing capacity of two soluble calcium salts, calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, as a function of calcium ion concentration in the range of 20 to 82 kg/m 3 . It has been found that sorbing capacity increases with the increasing calcium ion concentration until the calcium concentration in the calcium chloride solution reaches the level of 60 kg/m 3 which is equivalent to the chloride ion content of ∼ 110 kg/m 3 . Addition of calcium hydroxide to the solutions brings about an increase in the sorbing capacity up to 1.6 kg/m 3 and 2.2 kg/m 3 for calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, respectively, as a result of the increased sorbent alkalinity. The sorption capacity of the solutions is considerably enhanced by supplementing them by acetate ions (2.8 to 13.9 kg/m 3 ). Increase in the sorption capacity of calcium nitrate solutions enriched with calcium acetate was approximately 30% as high as that of the chloride solutions enriched with calcium acetate was approximately 30% as high as that of the chloride solutions supplemented in the same way. (author). 12 refs, 7 refs, 4 tabs

  9. NuLYTELY (PEG 3350, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride for oral solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, M L

    1992-02-01

    NuLYTELY (PEG 3350, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Bicarbonate, and Potassium Chloride for Oral Solution), a product from Braintree Laboratories, Inc. is a modification of GoLYTELY (PEG 3350 and Electrolytes for Oral Solution) that has been found to have the same therapeutic advantages in terms of safety, efficacy, speed and patient acceptance. This product was developed to improve upon the taste of GoLYTELY. NuLYTELY represents an effective alternative for bowel cleansing prior to colonoscopy that may be more acceptable to some patients.

  10. Synergistic Effect of Quercetin and α-Lipoic Acid on Aluminium Chloride Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooad Saud Al-Otaibi

    2018-01-01

    tendency towards normalization of most of the parameters. Conclusions. Quercetin and α-lipoic acid complemented each other in protecting the rat brain against oxidative stress induced by aluminium chloride.

  11. Remediation of cadmium- and lead-contaminated agricultural soil by composite washing with chlorides and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-jiao; Hu, Peng-jie; Zhao, Jie; Dong, Chang-xun

    2015-04-01

    Composite washing of cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contaminated agricultural soil from Hunan province in China using mixtures of chlorides (FeCl3, CaCl2) and citric acid (CA) was investigated. The concentrations of composite washing agents for metal removal were optimized. Sequential extraction was conducted to study the changes in metal fractions after soil washing. The removal of two metals at optimum concentration was reached. Using FeCl3 mixed with CA, 44% of Cd and 23% of Pb were removed, and 49 and 32% by CaCl2 mixed with CA, respectively. The mechanism of composite washing was postulated. A mixture of chlorides and CA enhanced metal extraction from soil through the formation of metal-chloride and metal-citrate complexes. CA in extract solutions promoted the formation of metal-chloride complexes and reduced the solution pH. Composite washing reduced Cd and Pb in Fe-Mn oxide forms significantly. Chlorides and CA exerted a synergistic effect on metal extraction during composite washing.

  12. Mapping the spatial distribution of chloride deposition across Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P. J.; Crosbie, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    The high solubility and conservative behaviour of chloride make it ideal for use as an environmental tracer of water and salt movement through the hydrologic cycle. For such use the spatial distribution of chloride deposition in rainfall at a suitable scale must be known. A number of authors have used point data acquired from field studies of chloride deposition around Australia to construct relationships to characterise chloride deposition as a function of distance from the coast; these relationships have allowed chloride deposition to be interpolated in different regions around Australia. In this paper we took this a step further and developed a chloride deposition map for all of Australia which includes a quantification of uncertainty. A previously developed four parameter model of chloride deposition as a function of distance from the coast for Australia was used as the basis for producing a continental scale chloride deposition map. Each of the four model parameters were made spatially variable by creating parameter surfaces that were interpolated using a pilot point regularisation approach within a parameter estimation software. The observations of chloride deposition were drawn from a literature review that identified 291 point measurements of chloride deposition over a period of 80 years spread unevenly across all Australian States and Territories. A best estimate chloride deposition map was developed from the resulting surfaces on a 0.05 degree grid. The uncertainty in the chloride deposition map was quantified as the 5th and 95th percentile of 1000 calibrated models produced via Null Space Monte Carlo analysis and the spatial variability of chloride deposition across the continent was consistent with landscape morphology. The temporal variability in chloride deposition on a decadal scale was investigated in the Murray-Darling Basin, this highlighted the need for long-term monitoring of chloride deposition if the uncertainty of the continental scale map is

  13. Passivation Characteristics of Alloy Corrosion-Resistant Steel Cr10Mo1 in Simulating Concrete Pore Solutions: Combination Effects of pH and Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhiyong; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Jinyang; Song, Dan; Ma, Han; Zhang, Jianchun; Wang, Danqian

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical behaviour for passivation of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 immersed in alkaline solutions with different pH values (13.3, 12.0, 10.5, and 9.0) and chloride contents (0.2 M and 1.0 M), was investigated by various electrochemical techniques: linear polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and capacitance measurements. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were determined by XPS. The morphological features and surface composition of the immersed steel were evaluated by SEM together with EDS chemical analysis. The results evidence that pH plays an important role in the passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel and the effect is highly dependent upon the chloride contents. In solutions with low chloride (0.2 M), the corrosion-resistant steel has notably enhanced passivity with pH falling from 13.3 to 9.0, but does conversely when in presence of high chloride (1.0 M). The passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer enriched in Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer, rich in Cr species. The film composition varies with pH values and chloride contents. As the pH drops, more Cr oxides are enriched in the film while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Increasing chloride promotes Cr oxides and Fe oxides to transform into their hydroxides with little protection, and this is more significant at lower pH (10.5 and 9.0). These changes annotate passivation characteristics of the corrosion-resistant steel in the solutions of different electrolyte.

  14. Buried chloride stereochemistry in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2014-09-23

    Despite the chloride anion is involved in fundamental biological processes, its interactions with proteins are little known. In particular, we lack a systematic survey of its coordination spheres. The analysis of a non-redundant set (pairwise sequence identity chloride anion shows that the first coordination spheres of the chlorides are essentially constituted by hydrogen bond donors. Amongst the side-chains positively charged, arginine interacts with chlorides much more frequently than lysine. Although the most common coordination number is 4, the coordination stereochemistry is closer to the expected geometry when the coordination number is 5, suggesting that this is the coordination number towards which the chlorides tend when they interact with proteins. The results of these analyses are useful in interpreting, describing, and validating new protein crystal structures that contain chloride anions.

  15. Silver release from nanocomposite Ag/alginate hydrogels in the presence of chloride ions: experimental results and mathematical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostic, Danijela, E-mail: dkostic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Innovation Center of the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy (Serbia); Vidovic, Srđan, E-mail: srdjanhi@gmail.com; Obradovic, Bojana, E-mail: bojana@tmf.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy (Serbia)

    2016-03-15

    A stepwise experimental and mathematical modeling approach was used to assess silver release from nanocomposite Ag/alginate microbeads in wet and dried forms into water and into normal saline solution chosen as a simplified model for certain biological fluids (e.g., blood plasma, wound exudates, sweat, etc). Three phenomena were connected and mathematically described: diffusion of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) within the alginate hydrogel, AgNP oxidation/dissolution and reaction with chloride ions, and diffusion of the resultant silver-chloride species. Mathematical modeling results agreed well with the experimental data with the AgNP diffusion coefficient estimated as 1.3 × 10{sup −18} m{sup 2} s{sup −1}, while the first-order kinetic rate constant of AgNP oxidation/dissolution and diffusivity of silver-chloride species were shown to be inversely related. In specific, rapid rehydration and swelling of dry Ag/alginate microbeads induced fast AgNP oxidation/dissolution reaction with Cl{sup −} and AgCl precipitation within the microbeads with the lowest diffusivity of silver-chloride species compared to wet microbeads in normal saline. The proposed mathematical model provided an insight into the phenomena related to silver release from nanocomposite Ca-alginate hydrogels relevant for use of antimicrobial devices and established, at the same time, a basis for further in-depth studies of AgNP interactions in hydrogels in the presence of chloride ions.

  16. Inland Sea Spray Aerosol Transport and Incomplete Chloride Depletion: Varying Degrees of Reactive Processing Observed during SOAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondy, Amy L. [Department; Wang, Bingbing [Environmental; Laskin, Alexander [Environmental; Craig, Rebecca L. [Department; Nhliziyo, Manelisi V. [Department; Bertman, Steven B. [Department; Pratt, Kerri A. [Department; Shepson, Paul B. [Departments; Ault, Andrew P. [Department; Department

    2017-08-08

    Multiphase reactions involving sea spray aerosol (SSA) impact trace gases budgets in coastal regions by acting as a reservoir for oxidized nitrogen and sulfur species, as well as a source of halogen gases (HCl, ClNO2, etc.). While most studies of multiphase reactions on SSA have focused on marine environments, far less is known about SSA transported inland. Herein, single particle measurements of SSA are reported at a site > 320 km from the Gulf of Mexico, with transport times of 7-68 h. Samples were collected during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in June-July 2013 near Centreville, Alabama. SSA was observed in 93% of 42 time periods analyzed. During two marine air mass periods, SSA represented significant number fractions of particles in the accumulation (0.2-1.0 μm, 11%) and coarse (1.0-10.0 μm, 35%) modes. Chloride content of SSA particles ranged from full to partial depletion, with 24% of SSA particles containing chloride (mole fraction of Cl/Na > 0.1, 90% chloride depletion). Both the frequent observation of SSA at an inland site and the range of chloride depletion observed, suggest that SSA may represent an underappreciated inland sink for NOx/SO2 and source of halogen gases.

  17. Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22 in Calcium Chloride and in Calcium Chloride Plus Calcium Nitrate Brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.J.; Day, S.D.; Ilevbare, G.O.; Whalen, M.T.; King, K.J.; Hust, G.A.; Wong, L.L.; Estill, J.C.; Rebak, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is a nickel-based alloy, which is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) brines and to evaluate the inhibitive effect of nitrate, especially to localized corrosion. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion potential of Alloy 22 was approximately -360 mV in the silver-silver chloride (SSC) scale and independent of the tested temperature. Cyclic polarization tests showed that Alloy 22 was mainly susceptible to localized attack in 5 M CaCl 2 at 75 C and higher temperatures. The addition of nitrate in a molar ratio of chloride to nitrate equal to 10 increased the onset of localized corrosion to approximately 105 C. The addition of nitrate to the solution also decreased the uniform corrosion rate and the passive current of the alloy

  18. Chloride channels as tools for developing selective insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2003-12-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels underlie inhibition in excitable membranes and are proven target sites for insecticides. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(1)) receptor/chloride ionophore complex is the primary site of action for a number of currently used insecticides, such as lindane, endosulfan, and fipronil. These compounds act as antagonists by stabilizing nonconducting conformations of the chloride channel. Blockage of the GABA-gated chloride channel reduces neuronal inhibition, which leads to hyperexcitation of the central nervous system, convulsions, and death. We recently investigated the mode of action of the silphinenes, plant-derived natural compounds that structurally resemble picrotoxinin. These materials antagonize the action of GABA on insect neurons and block GABA-mediated chloride uptake into mouse brain synaptoneurosomes in a noncompetitive manner. In mammals, avermectins have a blocking action on the GABA-gated chloride channel consistent with a coarse tremor, whereas at longer times and higher concentrations, activation of the channel suppresses neuronal activity. Invertebrates display ataxia, paralysis, and death as the predominant signs of poisoning, with a glutamate-gated chloride channel playing a major role. Additional target sites for the avermectins or other chloride channel-directed compounds might include receptors gated by histamine, serotonin, or acetylcholine.The voltage-sensitive chloride channels form another large gene family of chloride channels. Voltage-dependent chloride channels are involved in a number of physiological processes including: maintenance of electrical excitability, chloride ion secretion and resorption, intravesicular acidification, and cell volume regulation. A subset of these channels is affected by convulsants and insecticides in mammals, although the role they play in acute lethality in insects is unclear. Given the wide range of functions that they mediate, these channels are also potential targets for

  19. Interpretation of postmortem vitreous concentrations of sodium and chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilg, B; Alkass, K; Berg, S; Druid, H

    2016-06-01

    Vitreous fluid can be used to analyze sodium and chloride levels in deceased persons, but it remains unclear to what extent such results can be used to diagnose antemortem sodium or chloride imbalances. In this study we present vitreous sodium and chloride levels from more than 3000 cases. We show that vitreous sodium and chloride levels both decrease with approximately 2.2mmol/L per day after death. Since potassium is a well-established marker for postmortem interval (PMI) and easily can be analyzed along with sodium and chloride, we have correlated sodium and chloride levels with the potassium levels and present postmortem reference ranges relative the potassium levels. We found that virtually all cases outside the reference range show signs of antemortem hypo- or hypernatremia. Vitreous sodium or chloride levels can be the only means to diagnose cases of water or salt intoxication, beer potomania or dehydration. We further show that postmortem vitreous sodium and chloride strongly correlate and in practice can be used interchangeably if analysis of one of the ions fails. It has been suggested that vitreous sodium and chloride levels can be used to diagnose drowning or to distinguish saltwater from freshwater drowning. Our results show that in cases of freshwater drowning, vitreous sodium levels are decreased, but that this mainly is an effect of postmortem diffusion between the eye and surrounding water rather than due to the drowning process, since the decrease in sodium levels correlates with immersion time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of temperature and benzalkonium chloride on nitrate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaya, Malek G; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2011-04-01

    The effect of temperature and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on nitrate reduction was investigated in batch assays using a mixed nitrate reducing culture. Nitrate was transformed completely, mainly through denitrification, to dinitrogen at 5, 10, 15 and 22 °C. In the absence of BAC, reduction of individual nitrogen oxides had different susceptibility to temperature and transient nitrite accumulation was observed at low temperatures. When the effect of BAC was tested up to 100 mg/L from 5 to 22 °C, denitrification was inhibited at and above 50mg BAC/L with transient nitrite accumulation at all temperatures. The effect of BAC was described by a competitive inhibition model. Nitrite reduction was the denitrification step most susceptible to BAC, especially at low temperatures. BAC was not degraded during the batch incubation and was mostly biomass-adsorbed. Overall, this study shows that low temperatures exacerbate the BAC inhibitory effect, which in turn is controlled by adsorption to biomass. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of chloride in the mechanism of O(2) activation at the mononuclear nonheme Fe(II) center of the halogenase HctB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratter, Sarah M; Light, Kenneth M; Solomon, Edward I; Straganz, Grit D

    2014-07-02

    Mononuclear nonheme Fe(II) (MNH) and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dependent halogenases activate O2 to perform oxidative halogenations of activated and nonactivated carbon centers. While the mechanism of halide incorporation into a substrate has been investigated, the mechanism by which halogenases prevent oxidations in the absence of chloride is still obscure. Here, we characterize the impact of chloride on the metal center coordination and reactivity of the fatty acyl-halogenase HctB. Stopped-flow kinetic studies show that the oxidative transformation of the Fe(II)-α-KG-enzyme complex is >200-fold accelerated by saturating concentrations of chloride in both the absence and presence of a covalently bound substrate. By contrast, the presence of substrate, which generally brings about O2 activation at enzymatic MNH centers, only has an ∼10-fold effect in the absence of chloride. Circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic CD (MCD) studies demonstrate that chloride binding triggers changes in the metal center ligation: chloride binding induces the proper binding of the substrate as shown by variable-temperature, variable-field (VTVH) MCD studies of non-α-KG-containing forms and the conversion from six-coordinate (6C) to 5C/6C mixtures when α-KG is bound. In the presence of substrate, a site with square pyramidal five-coordinate (5C) geometry is observed, which is required for O2 activation at enzymatic MNH centers. In the absence of substrate an unusual trigonal bipyramidal site is formed, which accounts for the observed slow, uncoupled reactivity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the binding of chloride to the metal center of HctB leads to a conformational change in the enzyme that makes the active site more accessible to the substrate and thus facilitates the formation of the catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex. Results are discussed in relation to other MNH dependent halogenases.

  2. Fault locator of an allyl chloride plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savković-Stevanović Jelenka B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Process safety analysis, which includes qualitative fault event identification, the relative frequency and event probability functions, as well as consequence analysis, was performed on an allye chloride plant. An event tree for fault diagnosis and cognitive reliability analysis, as well as a troubleshooting system, were developed. Fuzzy inductive reasoning illustrated the advantages compared to crisp inductive reasoning. A qualitative model forecast the future behavior of the system in the case of accident detection and then compared it with the actual measured data. A cognitive model including qualitative and quantitative information by fuzzy logic of the incident scenario was derived as a fault locator for an ally! chloride plant. The obtained results showed the successful application of cognitive dispersion modeling to process safety analysis. A fuzzy inductive reasoner illustrated good performance to discriminate between different types of malfunctions. This fault locator allowed risk analysis and the construction of a fault tolerant system. This study is the first report in the literature showing the cognitive reliability analysis method.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of potassium chloride aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezin, Denis; Driesner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Potassium chloride is a ubiquitous salt in natural fluids, being the second most abundant dissolved salt in many geological aqueous solutions after sodium chloride. It is a simple solute and strong electrolyte easily dissociating in water, however the thermodynamic properties of KCl aqueous solutions were never correlated with sufficient accuracy for a wide range of physicochemical conditions. In this communication we propose a set of parameters for a Pitzer-type model which allows calculation of all necessary thermodynamic properties of KCl solution, namely excess Gibbs free energy and derived activity coefficient, apparent molar enthalpy, heat capacity and volume, as well as osmotic coefficient and activity of water in solutions. The system KCl-water is one of the best studied aqueous systems containing electrolytes. Although extensive experimental data were collected for thermodynamic properties of these solutions over the years, the accurate volumetric data became available only recently, thus making possible a complete thermodynamic formulation including a pressure dependence of excess Gibbs free energy and derived properties of the KCl-water liquids. Our proposed model is intended for calculation of major thermodynamic properties of KCl aqueous solutions at temperatures ranging from freezing point of a solution to 623 K, pressures ranging from saturated water vapor up to 150 MPa, and concentrations up to the salt saturation. This parameterized model will be further implemented in geochemical software packages and can facilitate the calculation of aqueous equilibrium for reactive transport codes.

  4. The DELTA 181 lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ralph M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Leigh, A. P.

    In 1986, the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) undertook the development of a sensor module for the DELTA 181 spacecraft, a low earth orbit (LEO) mission of less than two months duration. A large lithium thionyl chloride battery was developed as the spacecraft's primary power source, the first known such use for this technology. The exceptionally high energy density of the lithium thionyl chloride cell was the primary driver for its use, resulting in a completed battery with a specific energy density of 120 Wh/lb. Safety requirements became the primary driver shaping all aspects of the power system design and development due to concerns about the potential hazards of this relatively new, high-energy technology. However, the program was completed without incident. The spacecraft was launched on February 8, 1988, from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with over 60,000 Wh of battery energy. It reentered on April 2, 1988, still operating after 55 days, providing a successful, practical, and visible demonstration of the use of this technology for spacecraft applications.

  5. Different Methods for Conditioning Chloride Salt Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Fedeli, C.; Capone, M.; Marzo, G.A.; Mariani, M.; Da Ros, M.; Giacobbo, F.; Macerata, E.; Giola, M.

    2015-01-01

    Three different methods have been used to condition chloride salt wastes coming from pyro-processes. Two of them allow to synthesise sodalite, a naturally occurring mineral containing chlorine: the former, starting from Zeolite 4A, which transforms the zeolite into sodalite; the latter, which starts from kaolinite, giving sodalite as well. In addition, a new matrix, termed SAP (SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 ), has been synthesised. It is able to form different mineral phases which occlude fission metals. The products from the different processes have been fully characterised. In particular the chemical durability of the final waste forms has been determined using the standard product consistency test. According to the results obtained, SAP seems to be a promising matrix for the incorporation of chloride salt wastes from pyro-processes. Financial support from the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Union (projects ACSEPT, contract FP7-CP-2007- 211 267, and SACSESS, Collaborative Project 323282), as well as from Italian Ministry for Economic Development (Accordo di Programma: Piano Annuale di Realizzazione 2008-2009) is gratefully acknowledged. (authors)

  6. Total gastrectomy due to ferric chloride intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, A Mesut; Abramson, Leonardo; Vera, Raúl A; Duza, Guillermo E; Palermo, Mariano

    2015-09-01

    The ferric chloride intoxication is frequently caused by accident. Its toxicity is generally underrated, which can lead to fatal evolution or irreversible consequences. In this case, the caustic condition of the substance is related to the toxic properties of iron. A 36-year-old male patient arrives by ambulance indicating sensory deterioration. He presents erosive injuries in the buccal cavity and in the oropharynx, brownish teeth and metabolic acidosis. Toxicology tests and ferritin blood dosage are requested, which show a result from 1400 mg/dl. The symptoms are interpreted as acute iron intoxication. Due to the unfavorable evolution of his condition, an abdominal and pelvic CT scan are performed, which show extensive pneumoperitoneum and free fluid in the abdominal cavity. An exploratory laparotomy, a total gastrectomy with esophagostomy and feeding jejunostomy, washing and drainage due to perforated gastric necrosis caused by caustic ingestion are performed. In our country, there is a high rate of intoxication caused by iron compounds, although it is not statistically measured. Nevertheless, the ferric chloride intoxication is extremely infrequent. The ingestion of this product leads to complications, which are associated with the iron concentration and its condition as a caustic agent. The surgical indications in the presence of intoxication caused by iron compounds are: stomach evacuation of iron, gastric necrosis, perforation or peritonitis and stenosis. Early or prophylactic gastrectomy is contraindicated. However, if complications that require immediate surgical intervention arise, there should be no hesitation and the corresponding procedure should be performed.

  7. Catalytic Oxidation of Benzophenone Hydrazone with Alumina-supported KMnO4 under Oxygen Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Hyeok; Ko, Kwang Youn

    2006-01-01

    KMnO 4 /alumina reagent, which is cheap and environmentally safe, can serve as a catalytic oxidant under O 2 atmosphere for the oxidation of benzophenone hydrazone. To the best of our knowledge, the present works are the first example where KMnO 4 /alumina reagent acts as a catalytic oxidant under O 2 atmosphere. Diphenyldiazomethane (Ph 2 CN 2 ) is widely used for the protection of carboxylic acids by conversion to their diphenylmethyl (dpm) esters since dpm group can be easily deprotected by mild acidic condition or hydrogenolysis, especially in the field of b-lactams and peptides. Diphenyldiazomethane has been prepared by the oxidation of benzophenone hydrazone with reagents such as active manganese dioxide, mercuric oxide, peracetic acid, iodosobenzene diacetate or OXONE. However, some methods suffer from a disadvantage such as toxic nature of reagent, strong oxidative conditions or incompatibility with certain functional groups. For example, OXONE may not be employed for the in situ protection of carboxylic acid containing sulfide group due to the possibility of the concomitant oxidation of sulfide group

  8. Protective effects of Curcuma longa against neurobehavioral and neurochemical damage caused by cerium chloride in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Yamina; Nciri, Riadh; Brahmi, Noura; Saidi, Saber; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Alwasel, Saleh; Aldahmash, Waleed; El Feki, Abdelfatteh; Allagui, Mohamed Salah

    2018-05-07

    Cerium chloride (CeCl 3 ) is considered an environmental pollutant and a potent neurotoxic agent. Medicinal plants have many bioactive compounds that provide protection against damage caused by such pollutants. Curcuma longa is a bioactive compound-rich plant with very important antioxidant properties. To study the preventive and healing effects of Curcuma longa on cerium-damaged mouse brains, we intraperitoneally injected cerium chloride (CeCl 3 , 20 mg/kg BW) along with Curcuma longa extract, administrated by gavage (100 mg/kg BW), into mice for 60 days. We then examined mouse behavior, brain tissue damage, and brain oxidative stress parameters. Our results revealed a significant modification in the behavior of the CeCl 3 -treated mice. In addition, CeCl 3 induced a significant increment in lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein (PCO), and advanced oxidation protein product levels, as well as a significant reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remarkably increased in the brain of CeCl 3 -treated mice. Histopathological observations confirmed these results. Curcuma longa attenuated CeCl 3 -induced oxidative stress and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes. It also decreased AChE activity in the CeCl 3 -damaged mouse brain that was confirmed by histopathology. In conclusion, this study suggests that Curcuma longa has a neuroprotective effect against CeCl 3 -induced damage in the brain.

  9. Desulfurization of oxidized diesel using ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfred, Cecilia D.; Salleh, M. Zulhaziman M.; Mutalib, M. I. Abdul

    2014-10-01

    The extraction of oxidized sulfur compounds from diesel were carried out using ten types of ionic liquids consisting of different cation and anion i.e. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoium thiocyanate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoium dicyanamide, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumhexafluorophosphate, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate, trioctylmethylammonium chloride, 1-propionitrile-3-butylimidazolium thiocyanate, 1-propionitrile-3-butylimidazolium dicyanamide and 1-butyl-6-methylquinolinium dicyanamide. The oxidation of diesel was successfully done using phosphotungstic acid as the catalyst, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the oxidant and trioctylmethylammonium chloride as the phase transfer agent. The oxidation of diesel changes the sulfur compounds into sulfone which increases its polarity and enhances the ionic liquid's extraction performance. Result showed that ionic liquid [C4mquin][N(CN)2] performed the highest sulfur removal (91% at 1:5 diesel:IL ratio) compared to the others.

  10. Formation of glutathione conjugates by reactive metabolites of vinylidene chloride in microsomes and isolated hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebler, D.C.; Meredith, M.J.; Guengerich, F.P.

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation of the vinyl halide carcinogen and hepatotoxin vinylidene chloride (VDC) by microsomal cytochrome P-450 yields 2,2-dichloroacetaldehyde, 2-chloroacetyl chloride, 2-chloroacetic acid, and 1,1-dichloroethylene oxide. The roles of these metabolites in covalent modification of proteins and reduced glutathione (GSH) were examined. 2-Chloroacetyl chloride reacted with model thiols at least 10(3)-fold faster than did 1,1-dichloroethylene oxide and at least 10(5)-fold faster than did 2,2-dichloroacetaldehyde or 2-chloroacetic acid. Microsomal covalent binding of [ 14 C]VDC was inhibited by GSH but not by lysine, suggesting that protein thiols, rather than amino groups, are major targets. Liver microsomes catalyzed the formation of three GSH:VDC metabolite conjugates, identified as S-(2,2-dichloro-1-hydroxy)ethylglutathione, 2-(S-glutathionyl)acetate, and S-(2-glutathionyl)acetylglutathione, a novel conjugate containing both stable (thioether) and labile (thioester) linkages. The latter two conjugates also were formed in isolated rat hepatocytes and measurable amounts of 2-(S-glutathionyl)acetate were released into the incubation medium. Both 2-(S-glutathionyl)acetate and S-(2-glutathionyl)acetylglutathione were formed with [ 35 S]GSH added to the hepatic medium, indicating that reactive VDC metabolites are capable of crossing the plasma membrane to react with extracellular targets. Unlabeled S-(2-glutathionyl)-acetylglutathione underwent carbonyl substitution with added [ 35 S]GSH, suggesting that this conjugate may participate in modification of protein thiols. This conjugate also underwent hydrolysis with a half-life of approximately 3 hr. GSH:VDC metabolite conjugates may serve as accessible models for labile covalent adducts formed between VDC metabolites and protein thiols

  11. Cadmium induced oxidative stress in Dunaliella salina | Moradshahi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unicellular green algae Dunaliella salina contains various antioxidants which protect the cell from oxidative damage due to environmental stresses such as heavy metal stress. In the present study, the response of D. salina at the stationary growth phase to oxidative stress generated by cadmium chloride was ...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of zinc oxide thin films prepared by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zinc oxide thin films were prepared with ammonia/ammonium chloride buffer as the reaction moderating agent in the chemical bath deposition technique. An observable color change during the reaction due to variations in the reactants concentration indicated the existence of the cupric (CuO) and cuprous (Cu2O) oxides ...

  13. Degradation of fly ash concrete under the coupled effect of carbonation and chloride aerosol ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jun; Qiu, Qiwen; Chen, Xiaochi; Wang, Xiaodong; Xing, Feng; Han, Ningxu; He, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbonation affects the chloride profile in concrete under chloride aerosol attack. • The chloride binding capacity can be reduced by the presence of carbonation. • Carbonation increases the rate of chloride diffusion for chloride aerosol ingress. • Chloride aerosol ingress reduces the carbonation depth and increases the pH value. • The use of fly ash in concrete enhances the resistance of chloride aerosol ingress. - Abstract: This paper presents an experimental investigation regarding the coupled effect of carbonation and chloride aerosol ingress on the durability performance of fly ash concrete. Test results demonstrate that carbonation significantly affects the chloride ingress profile, reduces the chloride binding capacity, and accelerates the rate of chloride ion diffusion. On the other hand, the carbonation rate of fly ash concrete is reduced by the presence of chlorides aerosol. The interaction nature between concrete carbonation and chloride aerosol ingress is also demonstrated by the microscopic analysis results obtained from scanning electron microscope and mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  14. Passive film formation on metals in thionyl-chloride electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, W. R.; Delnick, F. M.; Peebles, D. E.; Rogers, J. W., Jr.

    We have studied the anodic behavior of Pt, Mo, Ni, and stainless steel (SS) electrodes in 1.5M LiAlCl/SOCl solution in order to determine the mechanisms by which these metals resist corrosion. Polarization and complex impedance indicate that Pt and Mo behave as inert electrodes, while Ni and SS form passive films in this electrolyte. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the lack of oxidized metal species on the Pt and Mo surfaces following anodic polarization. XPS results also show that the Ni and SS do form passive layers, and identifies these layers as predominantly metal chlorides.

  15. Passive film formation on metals in thionyl-chloride electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Delnick, F.M.; Peebles, D.E.; Rogers, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the anodic behavior of Pt, Mo, Ni, and stainless steel (SS) electodes in 1.5M LiAlCl/sub 4//SOCl/sub 2/ solution in order to determine the mechanisms by which these metals resist corrosion. Polarization and complex impedance indicate that Pt and Mo behave as inert electrodes, while Ni and SS form passive films in this electrolyte. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the lack of oxidized metal species on the Pt and Mo surfaces following anodic polarization. XPS results also show that the Ni and SS do form passive layers, and identifies these layers as predominantly metal chlorides.

  16. Passive film formation on metals in thionyl-chloride electrolytes for lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Delnick, F.M.; Peebles, D.E.; Rogers, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied the anodic behavior of Pt, Mo, Ni, and stainless steel (SS) electrodes in 1.5M LiAlCl/sub 4//SOCl/sub 2/ solution in order to determine the mechanisms by which these metals resist corrosion. Polarization and complex impedance indicate that Pt and Mo behave as inert electrodes, while Ni and SS form passive films in this electrolyte. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the lack of oxidized metal species on the Pt and Mo surfaces following anodic polarization. XPS results also show that the Ni and SS do form passive layers, and identifies these layers as predominantly metal chlorides

  17. Scientific Basis for Paint Stripping: Elucidated Combinatorial Mechanism of Methylene Chloride and Phenol Based Paint Removers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-22

    TiO2 9.5 Isobutyl ketone 0.1 Iron oxide hydrate 2.5 n-Butyl acid phosphate 0.1 Carbazole dioxazine violet ɘ.1 Bentone 0.5 Table 3: MIL-PRF-85285...partial formulation films, with pigments and no fillers, and full formulation films of current military polyurethane coatings were analyzed in this...time of the solvents. 22-01-2014 Memorandum Report Paint stripper Methylene chloride Phenol Polyurethane 7 June 2012 – 6 June 2013 SERDP WP-2244

  18. Comparison of molten chloride and fluoride salts potentialities for An/Ln separation by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, A.; Peron, F.; Marrot, F.; Lacquement, J. [DRCP/SCPS/LPP - CEA/CEN Valrho - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this paper is the comparison of molten fluoride and chloride salts potentialities for Am/Nd separation by electrodeposition on inert cathode, on a purely thermodynamic point of view. The molten LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic (77-23 mol.%, at 780 deg. C) was considered for this study. Cyclic voltammetry showed a one step Am(III)/Am reduction at a potential of {approx_equal}+0.5 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. A potential difference of 290 mV between Am and Nd metallic deposition was estimated by square-wave voltammetry. This Am/Nd potential difference is more important than in molten chlorides (220 mV in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 500 deg. C). Moreover in molten fluoride salt, the americium and neodymium (+II) oxidation state is not stable contrary to the molten chloride one where corrosion of deposited Am would be potential. However this larger potential difference in molten fluorides is quite balanced by the higher working temperature. (authors)

  19. Corrosion of Dental Au-Ag-Cu-Pd Alloys in 0.9 % Sodium Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Atsushi; Kusayanagi, Yukiharu

    2005-01-01

    Two Au-Ag-Cu-Pd dental casting alloys (Au:12% and 20%) used. The test solutions used 0.9 % NaCl solution (isotonic sodium chloride solution), 0.9 % NaCl solution containing 1 % lactic acid, and 0.9 % NaCl solution containing 1 % lactic acid and 0.1 mol dm -3 Na 2 S. The surface of two samples in three sample solutions was not natural discoloration during one year. The alloy containing 12 % gold was easily alloyed and the composition was uniform comparing with the alloy containing 20 % gold. The rest potentials have not a little effect after three months. The kinds of metals could not definitely from the oxidation and reduction waves of metal on the cyclic voltammograms. The dissolutions of gold and palladium were 12 % Au sample in the 0.9 % NaCl solution containing 1 % lactic acid and 0.1 mol dm -3 Na 2 S. The pH of solution had an affect on dissolution of copper, and sulfur ion had an affect on dissolution of silver. The copper dissolved amount from 20 % gold sample was about 26 times comparing with that of 12 % gold sample in the 0.9 % solution containing 1 % lactic acid. Corrosion products were silver chloride and copper chloride in NaCl solution, and silver sulfide and copper sulfide in NaCl solution containing Na 2 S

  20. The influence of sodium salts (iodide, chloride and sulfate) on the formation efficiency of sulfamerazine nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hao; Liu, Min; Qu, Wen; Johnson, James; Brunson, Ed; Almoazen, Hassan

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of sodium iodide, sodium chloride and sodium sulfate on the formation efficiency of sulfamerazine nanocrystals by wet ball milling. Sulfamerazine was milled using zirconium oxide beads in a solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and a sodium salt (iodide, chloride or sulfate). Particle size distributions were evaluated by light diffraction before and after milling. High-performance liquid chromatography was utilized to determine the amount of PVP adsorbed onto sulfamerazine surface. Lyophilized nanocrystals were further characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and dissolution testing. Sulfate ion had more profound effect on reducing particle size via milling than iodide or chloride. We linked our findings to Hofmeister ion series, which indicates that sulfate ions tends to break the water structure, increases the surface tension and lowers the solubility of hydrocarbons in water. We hypothesized that the addition of sulfate ions dehydrated the PVP molecules and enhanced its adsorption onto the sulfamerazine particle surfaces. Consequently, the adsorbed PVP helped to stabilize of the nanosuspension. The nanocrystals that were obtained from the lyophilized milled suspensions exhibited a notable increase in dissolution rate. The addition of sodium sulfate enhanced the formation efficiency of sulfamerazine nanocrystals.