WorldWideScience

Sample records for oxidation products leads

  1. Secondary lead production

    Hollis, R.G.

    1990-10-16

    This invention is concerned with the efficient recovery of soft lead from the paste component of used automobile lead-acid storage batteries. According to the invention, a scrap which contains lead oxide, lead sulfate, and antimony in an oxidized state is processed in the following steps to recover lead. A refractory lined reaction vessel is continuously charged with the scrap, along with a reductant effective for reducing lead oxide. The charged material is melted and agitated by means of a submerged lance at 900-1150{degree}C whereby some of the lead oxide of the scrap is reduced to form molten lead. A slag layer is then formed above the molten lead, and an amount of lead oxide is maintained in the slag layer. The molten lead, now containing under 0.5 wt % of antimony, is removed, and the antimony oxide in the scrap is concentrated as oxide in the slag layer. Preferred embodiments of the invention result in the production, in a single step, of a soft lead substantially free of antimony. The slag may be subsequently treated to reduce the antimony oxide and produce a valuable antimony-lead product. Further advantages of the process are that a wet battery paste may be used as the feed without prior drying, and the process can be conducted at a temperature 100-150{degree}C lower than in previously known methods. In addition, a smaller reactor can be employed which reduces both capital cost and fuel costs. The process of the invention is illustrated by descriptions of pilot plant tests. 1 fig.

  2. Apparatus and methods for recovery of lead oxide from production and application wastes of lead storage battery production or of lead storage batteries themselves. Verfahren und Anordnung zur Rueckgewinnung von Bleioxyd aus Produktions- und Anwendungsabfaellen der Bleiakkumulatorherstellung beziehungsweise der Bleiakkumulatoren

    Szalay, G; Gyoeroek, A; Orgovan, G

    1982-11-04

    For reasons of economy and pollution control, aqueous lead-oxide-containing wastes from the various steps of lead storage battery production are reprocessed involving e.g. a vibrating screen for separating foreign matter and particles larger than 0.2 mm, dewatering of the residual paste by centrifuging for recycling the thickened product to the production process at an H/sub 2/O content of some 20 wt%. Largish particles separated by the screen can be re-used after being finely ground; the water may be recycled just as well or be discharged following neutralisation.

  3. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion production in monocytes from children exposed to arsenic and lead in region Lagunera, Mexico

    Pineda-Zavaleta, Ana Patricia; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Vera Aguilar, Eunice; Gomez-Munoz, Aristides; Cebrian, Mariano E.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated in Mexican children environmentally exposed to arsenic and lead monocyte nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion production in response to direct activation with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) + lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The integrity of Th1-regulated cellular immune response when monocytes were indirectly activated was also evaluated. Most children lived near a primary lead smelter. Lead and arsenic contamination in soil and dust by far exceeded background levels. As levels in water were between 10 and 30 ppb. Most children (93%) had urinary arsenic (AsU) concentrations above 50 μg/l (range 16.75-465.75) and 65% had lead blood levels (PbB) above 10 μg/dl (range 3.47-49.19). Multivariate analyses showed that NO production in monocytes activated indirectly was negatively associated with both PbB and AsU. Superoxide production in directly activated monocytes was negatively associated with AsU but positively associated with PbB. The models including the interaction term for AsU and PbB suggested the possibility of a negative interaction for NO production and a positive interaction for superoxide. There were indications of differential gender-based associations, NO production in indirectly activated monocytes obtained from girls was negatively associated with AsU but not with PbB. Superoxide production was positively associated with PbB in both directly and indirectly activated monocytes from boys but the latter was negatively associated with AsU. These effects are consistent with immune system abnormalities observed in human populations exposed to Pb or As. Further studies in larger populations are required to characterize As and Pb interactions and the mechanism(s) underlying the observed effects

  4. Lead paste recycling based on conversion into battery grade oxides. Electrochemical tests and industrial production of new batteries

    Fusillo, G.; Rosestolato, D.; Scura, F.; Cattarin, S.; Mattarozzi, L.; Guerriero, P.; Gambirasi, A.; Brianese, N.; Staiti, P.; Guerriero, R.; La Sala, G.

    2018-03-01

    We present the preparation and characterization of pure lead monoxide obtained through recycling of the lead paste recovered from exhausted lead acid batteries. The recycling is based on a hydrometallurgical procedure reported in a STC Patent, that includes simple chemical operations (desulphurisation, leaching, precipitation, filtration) and a final thermal conversion. Materials obtained by treatment at 600 °C consist predominantly of β-PbO. The electrochemical behaviour of Positive Active Mass (PAM) prepared from different materials (or mixtures) is then investigated and compared. An optimized oxide material, obtained by prolonged (8 h) thermal treatment at 600 °C, consists of pure β-PbO and appears suitable for preparation of battery elements, alone or in mixture with a small fraction (10%-30%) of traditional industrial leady oxide. The resulting battery performances are similar to those obtained from pure leady oxide. In comparison with traditional recycling processes, the proposed method guarantees lower energy consumption, limited environmental impact and reduced operating risk for industry workers.

  5. Leading co-production

    Tortzen, Anne

    leadership styles executed by public managers affect the quality and public value of co-production processes? The paper argues that publicly initiated co-production initiatives are influenced by conflicting governance logics placing public managers in an institutional cross pressure (Lowndes & Roberts, 2013...... of building networks and relations, developing trust and focusing on empowerment and on the participants' resources to develop innovative solutions Drawing on three qualitative case studies of ‘most likely' co-production cases in Danish municipalities, the study identifies three different leadership styles...... and increase public value (Bovaird & Löffler, 2012; Osborne, 2010). The paper argues that a deeper understanding of the dynamics of co-production can be gained from analyzing the leadership dimension of co-production processes, which has hitherto not been given much attention by co-production researchers...

  6. Fatty Acid Incubation of Myotubues from Humans with Type 2 Diabetes Leads to Enhanced Release of Beta Oxidation Products Due to Impaired Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Wensaas, Andreas J; Rustan, Arild C; Just, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Increased availability of fatty acids is important for accumulation of intracellular lipids and development of insulin resistance in human myotubes. It is unknown whether different types of fatty acids like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) influence...... these processes. Research Design and Methods: We examined fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and gene expression in cultured human skeletal muscle cells from control and T2D individuals after four days preincubation with EPA or TTA. Results: T2D myotubes exhibited reduced formation of CO(2) from palmitic acid (PA....... EPA markedly enhanced TAG accumulation in myotubes, more pronounced in T2D cells. TAG accumulation and fatty acid oxidation were inversely correlated only after EPA preincubation, and total level of acyl-CoA was reduced. Glucose oxidation (CO(2) formation) was enhanced and lactate production decreased...

  7. Protective role of flaxseed oil against lead acetate induced oxidative ...

    Even though the toxic effects of lead compounds had been studied over many years, inconsistent results have been obtained about their oxidative stress in the testes of adult rats. Lead acetate (20 mg/kg) alters the histology of testes as well as enhances lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide production in both serum and testes ...

  8. Copper, lead and zinc production

    Ayers, J.; Ternan, S.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter provides information on the by-products and residues generated during the production of copper, lead and zinc. The purpose of this chapter is to describe by-products and residues which are generated, how these may be avoided or minimised, and available options for the utilization and management of residues. (author)

  9. Leading Hadron Production at HERA

    Buniatyan Armen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Data from the recent measurements of very forward baryon and photon production with the H1 and ZEUS detectors at electron-proton collider HERA are presented and compared to the theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo models. Results are presented of the production of leading protons, neutrons and photons in deep inelastic scattering (ep → e' pX, ep → e'nX, ep → e'γX as well as the leading neutron production in the photoproduction of dijets (ep → ejjXn. The forward baryon and photon results from the H1 and ZEUS Experiments are compared also with the models of the hadronic interactions of high energy Cosmic Rays. The sensitivity of the HERA data to the differences between the models is demonstrated.

  10. A green lead hydrometallurgical process based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell.

    Pan, Junqing; Sun, Yanzhi; Li, Wei; Knight, James; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    The automobile industry consumed 9 million metric tons of lead in 2012 for lead-acid batteries. Recycling lead from spent lead-acid batteries is not only related to the sustainable development of the lead industry, but also to the reduction of lead pollution in the environment. The existing lead pyrometallurgical processes have two main issues, toxic lead emission into the environment and high energy consumption; the developing hydrometallurgical processes have the disadvantages of high electricity consumption, use of toxic chemicals and severe corrosion of metallic components. Here we demonstrate a new green hydrometallurgical process to recover lead based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell. High-purity lead, along with electricity, is produced with only water as the by-product. It has a >99.5% lead yield, which is higher than that of the existing pyrometallurgical processes (95-97%). This greatly reduces lead pollution to the environment.

  11. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Leading Baryon Production at HERA

    Dodonov, V.; Schmitt, S.

    2009-01-01

    The production of highly energetic forward neutrons has been studied in deep-inelastic scattering. The data were taken with the H1 detector at HERA in the years 2006-2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 117 pb -1 . Semi-inclusive cross sections have been measured in the kinematic region 4 2 2 , 0.7*10 -4 -1 and the fractional momentum of the neutron 0.3 L T and compared to the predictions of models of leading neutron production. Differential cross sections for dijet photoproduction and in association with a leading neutron have been measured in the reaction e + p → e + jet jet X n with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 40pb -1 . The data are consistent with a simple pion exchange model. The ratio of the neutron-tagged and dijet cross sections show violations of factorization of the lepton and photon vertices which can be explained by kinematic effects constraining the phase space for neutron production. Normalised double-differential leading-neutron cross sections have been measured in dijet photoproduction for the first time. The distributions can be fully characterised by only two energy dependent parameters extracted from fits to the data. Absorption effects were studied by comparing the dijet photoproduction measurements and similar results in deep inelastic scattering. No clear effect, not related to kinematics, was observed. In a resolved-enriched dijet photoproduction sample, significantly fewer neutrons were seen than for direct. This depletion can also be accounted for by kinematic constraints. The semi-inclusive reaction e + p → e + X p was studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 12.8 pb -1 . The final state proton, which was detected with the ZEUS leading proton spectrometer, carried a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, x L > 0.32, and its transverse momentum squared satisfied p T 2 2 ; the exchanged photon virtuality, Q 2 , was greater than 3 GeV 2 and the range of

  13. Challenging Tasks Lead to Productive Struggle!

    Livy, Sharyn; Muir, Tracey; Sullivan, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Productive struggle leads to productive classrooms where students work on complex problems, are encouraged to take risks, can struggle and fail yet still feel good about working on hard problems (Boaler, 2016). Teachers can foster a classroom culture that values and promotes productive struggle by providing students with challenging tasks. These…

  14. Production LHC HTS power lead test results

    Tartaglia, M; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D F; Pischalnikov, Y; Rabehl, Roger Jon; Sylvester, C D; Zbasnik, J

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet test facility has built and operated a test stand to characterize the performance of HTS power leads. We report here the results of production tests of 20 pairs of 7.5 kA HTS power leads manufactured by industry for installation in feed boxes for the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole strings. Included are discussions of the thermal, electrical, and quench characteristics under "standard" and "extreme" operating conditions, and the stability of performance across thermal cycles.

  15. Production LHC HTS power lead test results

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Carcagno, R.H.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rabehl, R.J.; Sylvester, C.; Zbasnik, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet test facility has built and operated a test stand to characterize the performance of HTS power leads. We report here the results of production tests of 20 pairs of 7.5 kA HTS power leads manufactured by industry for installation in feed boxes for the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole strings. Included are discussions of the thermal, electrical, and quench characteristics under ''standard'' and ''extreme'' operating conditions, and the stability of performance across thermal cycles

  16. Comparative toxicity of tetra ethyl lead and lead oxide to earthworms, Eisenia fetida (Savigny)

    Venkateswara Rao, J.; Kavitha, P.; Padmanabha Rao, A.

    2003-01-01

    Leaded gasoline contains tetra ethyl lead (TEL) as an antiknocking agent, which produces major amounts of lead oxide in automobile exhaust along with traces of TEL. To minimize the lead contamination, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is used as a substitute for producing unleaded gasoline. It has become increasingly apparent that young children are highly susceptible to the harmful effects of lead. Hence, a study was carried out to monitor lead toxicity in soil, using adult earthworms (Eisenia fetida, Savigny). Leaded gasoline (TEL) and lead oxide are 383- and 211-fold more toxic than unleaded gasoline (MTBE) in 7 days of exposure and 627- and 290-fold more toxic in 14 days, respectively. Results indicate that the presence of TEL in leaded gasoline and lead oxide has a significant effect on behavior, morphology, and histopathology of earthworms. Absorption of TEL into the tissues is comparatively less than that of lead oxide but toxic effects were severe. Rupture of the cuticle, extrusion of coelomic fluid and inflexible metameric segmentation were observed, causing desensitization of the posterior region leading to fragmentation in earthworms

  17. Investigation on life cycle assessment of lead and zinc production

    Sabere Nazari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lead and zinc production is one of the main predisposing factors of excessive greenhouse gases emissions, air pollution and water consumption. In this paper, the environmental problems of lead and zinc production in Calcimin plant are expressed and life cycle assessment of this plant is assessed. The data regarding the amount of induced global warming and pollution, acidification, and depletion of water resources were collected and discussed. It was concluded that depletion of water resources affected the environment and this was the main issue of the lead and zinc production of this plant. According to the results, in the global warming’s impact category, the proportion of carbon dioxide is more than that of methane. The results also showed that in the acidification’s impact category, the nitrogen oxide proportion is greater compared to that of the sulfur dioxide.

  18. Lead Oxide- PbO Humidity Sensor

    Sk. Khadeer Pasha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol thermal route has been used to synthesize nanocrystalline PbO at a low temperature of 75 oC using lead acetate. The synthesized PbO (P75 was annealed in the temperatures ranging from 200-500 oC for 2 h to study the effect of crystal structure and phase changes and were labeled as P200, P300, P400 and P500, respectively. X-Ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy were carried out to identify the structural phases and vibrational stretching frequencies respectively. The TEM images revealed the porous nature of P75 sample which is an important criterion for the humidity sensor. The dc resistance measurements were carried out in the relative humidity (RH range 5-98 %. Among the different prepared, P75 possessed the highest humidity sensitivity of 6250, while the heat treated sample P500 have a low sensitivity of 330. The response and recovery characteristics of the maximum sensitivity sample P75 were 170 s and 40 s respectively.

  19. Oxidative damage of DNA in subjects occupationally exposed to lead.

    Pawlas, Natalia; Olewińska, Elżbieta; Markiewicz-Górka, Iwona; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Januszewska, Lidia; Lundh, Thomas; Januszewska, Ewa; Pawlas, Krystyna

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) in environmental and occupational settings continues to be a serious public health problem and may pose an elevated risk of genetic damage. The aim of this study was to assess the level of oxidative stress and DNA damage in subjects occupationally exposed to lead. We studied a population of 78 male workers exposed to lead in a lead and zinc smelter and battery recycling plant and 38 men from a control group. Blood lead levels were detected by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and plasma lead levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The following assays were performed to assess the DNA damage and oxidative stress: comet assay, determination of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant status (TAS). The mean concentration of lead in the blood of the exposed group was 392 ± 103 μg/L and was significantly higher than in the control group (30.3 ± 29.4 μg/L, p lead exposure [lead in blood, lead in plasma, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP)] and urine concentration of 8-OHdG. The level of oxidative damage of DNA was positively correlated with the level of lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and negatively with total anti-oxidative status (TAS). Our study suggests that occupational exposure causes an increase in oxidative damage to DNA, even in subjects with relatively short length of service (average length of about 10 years). 8-OHdG concentration in the urine proved to be a sensitive and non-invasive marker of lead induced genotoxic damage.

  20. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  1. Structure and high-piezoelectricity in lead oxide solid solutions

    Noheda, B.

    2002-01-01

    A review of the recent advances in the understanding of piezoelectricity in lead oxide solid solutions is presented, giving special attention to the structural aspects. It has now become clear that the very high electromechanical response in these materials is directly related to the existence of

  2. Peroxometal-mediated oxidation of bromine leading to ...

    Administrator

    Peroxometal-mediated oxidation of bromine leading to environmentally favourable protocol for selective bromination of organic substrates: Implications for vanadium bromo peroxidase (VBrPO). SIDDHARTHA D DHAR and MIHIR K CHAUDHURI. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology,. Guwahati 781 001 ...

  3. Effect of thermal annealing of lead oxide film

    Hwang, Oh Hyeon; Kim, Sang Su; Suh, Jong Hee; Cho, Shin Hang; Kim, Ki Hyun; Hong, Jin Ki; Kim, Sun Ung

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen partial pressure in a growth process of lead oxide determines chemical and physical properties as well as crystalline structure. In order to supply oxygen, two ring-shape suppliers have been installed in a growth chamber. Films have been deposited using vacuum thermal evaporation from a raw material of yellow lead oxide powder (5N). Growth rate is controlled to be about 400 A/s, and film thickness more than 50 μm has been achieved. After deposition, the film is annealed at various temperatures under an oxygen atmosphere. In this study, an optimum growth condition for a good X-ray detector has been achieved by fine control of oxygen flow-rate and by thermal treatment. An electrical resistivity of 4.5x10 12 Ω cm is measured, and is comparable with the best data of PbO.

  4. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  5. Oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers.

    Dobrakowski, M; Pawlas, N; Kasperczyk, A; Kozłowska, A; Olewińska, E; Machoń-Grecka, A; Kasperczyk, S

    2017-07-01

    There are many discrepancies among the results of studies on the genotoxicity of lead. The aim of the study was to explore lead-induced DNA damage, including oxidative damage, in relation to oxidative stress intensity parameters and the antioxidant defense system in human leukocytes. The study population consisted of 100 male workers exposed to lead. According to the blood lead (PbB) levels, they were divided into the following three subgroups: a group with PbB of 20-35 μg/dL (low exposure to lead (LE) group), a group with a PbB of 35-50 µg/dL (medium exposure to lead (ME) group), and a group with a PbB of >50 μg/dL (high exposure to lead (HE) group). The control group consisted of 42 healthy males environmentally exposed to lead (PbB lead exposure induces DNA damage, including oxidative damage, in human leukocytes. The increase in DNA damage was accompanied by an elevated intensity of oxidative stress.

  6. Oxide layer stability in lead-bismuth at high temperature

    Martín, F. J.; Soler, L.; Hernández, F.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2004-11-01

    Materials protection by 'in situ' oxidation has been studied in stagnant lead-bismuth, with different oxygen levels (H 2/H 2O ratios of 0.3 and 0.03), at temperatures from 535 °C to 600 °C and times from 100 to 3000 h. The materials tested were the martensitic steels F82Hmod, EM10 and T91 and the austenitic stainless steels, AISI 316L and AISI 304L. The results obtained point to the existence of an apparent threshold temperature above which corrosion occurs and the formation of a protective and stable oxide layer is not possible. This threshold temperature depends on material composition, oxygen concentration in the liquid lead-bismuth and time. The threshold temperature is higher for the austenitic steels, especially for the AISI 304L, and it increases with the oxygen concentration in the lead-bismuth. The oxide layer formed disappear with time and, after 3000 h all the materials, except AISI 304L, suffer corrosion, more severe for the martensitic steels and at the highest temperature tested.

  7. Heavy flavour production in proton-lead and lead-lead collisions with LHCb

    Winn, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The LHCb experiment offers the unique opportunity to study heavy-ion interactions in the forward region (2 kinematic domain complementary to the other 3 large experiments at the LHC. The detector has excellent capabilities for reconstructing quarkonia and open charm states, including baryons, down to zero pT. It can separate the prompt and displaced charm components. In pPb collisions, both forward and backward rapidities are covered thanks to the possibility of beam reversal. Results include measurements of the nuclear modification factor and forward-backward ratio for charmonium, open charm and bottomonium states. These quantities are sensitive probes for nuclear effects in heavy flavour production. Perspectives are given with the large accumulated luminosity during the 2016 pPb run at the LHC. In 2015, LHCb participated successfully for the first time in the PbPb data-taking. The status of the forward prompt J/ψ nuclear modification factor measurement in lead-lead collisions is discussed.

  8. Lead induced oxidative stress: beneficial effects of Kombucha tea.

    Dipti, P; Yogesh, B; Kain, A K; Pauline, T; Anju, B; Sairam, M; Singh, B; Mongia, S S; Kumar, G Ilavazhagan Devendra; Selvamurthy, W

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral administration of Kombucha tea (K-tea) on lead induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley rats were administered 1 mL of 3.8% lead acetate solution daily alone or in combination with K-tea orally for 45 d, and the antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation were evaluated. Oral administration of lead acetate to rats enhanced lipid peroxidation and release of creatine phosphokinase and decreased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GPx). Lead treatment did not alter humoral immunity, but inhibited DTH response when compared to the control. Lead administration also increased DNA fragmentation in liver. Oral administration of Kombucha tea to rats exposed to lead decreased lipid peroxidation and DNA damage with a concomitant increase in the reduced glutathione level and GPx activity. Kombucha tea supplementation relieved the lead induced immunosuppression to appreciable levels. The results suggest that K-tea has potent antioxidant and immunomodulating properties.

  9. Production Planning with Load Dependent Lead Times

    Pahl, Julia

    2005-01-01

    Lead times impact the performance of the supply chain significantly. Although there is a large literature concerning queuing models for the analysis of the relationship between capacity utilization and lead times, and there is a substantial literature concerning control and order release policies...... that take lead times into consideration, there have been only few papers describing models at the aggregate planning level that recognize the relationship between the planned utilization of capacity and lead times. In this paper we provide an in-depth discussion of the state-of-the art in this literature......, with particular attention to those models that are appropriate at the aggregate planning level....

  10. When municipalities lead co-production

    Tortzen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    from research in governance and leadership, the paper analyses a critical case of co-production in the Danish Municipality of Holbæk. The main focus is on exploring how leadership interventions are enacted by civil servants and politicians, and how these shape the co-production process. The analysis...... points to the significant role played by municipalities as hands-off leaders of co-production processes, and identifies leadership dynamics which merit further exploration....

  11. Effect of Glycine on Lead Mobilization, Lead-Induced Oxidative Stress, and Hepatic Toxicity in Rats

    Yolanda Alcaraz-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of glycine in treating experimental lead intoxication was examined in rats. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 3 g/L lead acetate in drinking water for 5 weeks and treated thereafter with glycine (100 and 500 mg/kg, orally once daily for 5 days or glycine (1000 mg/kg, orally once daily for 28 days. The effect of these treatments on parameters indicative of oxidative stress (glutathione and malondialdehyde levels, the activity of blood -aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, and lead concentration in blood, liver, kidney, brain, and bone were investigated. Liver samples were observed for histopathological changes. Glycine was found to be effective in (1 increasing glutathione levels; (2 reducing malondialdehyde levels; (3 decreasing lead levels in bone with the highest dose. However, glycine had no effect on lead mobilization when 100 and 500 mg/kg glycine were administered. In microscopic examination, glycine showed a protective effect against lead intoxication.

  12. Leading Particle Production in Light Flavour Jets

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boeriu, O; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couchman, J; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; Davis, R; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J I; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, I; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trefzger, T M; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    2000-01-01

    The energy distribution and type of the particle with the highest momentum in quark jets are determined for each of the five quark flavours making only minimal model assumptions. The analysis is based on a large statistics sample of hadronic Z0 decays collected with the OPAL detector at the LEP e+e- collider. These results provide a basis for future studies of light flavour production at other centre-of-mass energies. We use our results to study the hadronisation mechanism in light flavour jets and compare the data to the QCD models JETSET and HERWIG. Within the JETSET model we also directly determine the suppression of strange quarks to be gamma_s=0.422+-0.049 (stat.)+-0.059 (syst.) by comparing the production of charged and neutral kaons in strange and non-strange light quark events. Finally we study the features of baryon production.

  13. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    of the short-term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. On a large scale, gut denitrification in, for instance, Chironomus plumosus larvae can increase the overall nitrous oxide emission of lake sediment by a factor of eight. We...... screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  14. Transport of electrons in lead oxide studied by CELIV technique

    Semeniuk, O; Juska, G; Oelerich, J O; Jandieri, K; Baranovskii, S D; Reznik, A

    2017-01-01

    Although polycrystalline lead oxide (PbO) has a long history of application in optoelectronics and imaging, the transport mechanism for electrons in this material has not yet been clarified. Using the photo-generated charge extraction by linear increasing voltage (photo-CELIV) technique, we provide the temperature- and field-dependences of electron mobility in poly-PbO. It is found that electrons undergo dispersive transport, i.e. their mobility decreases in the course of time. Multiple trapping of electrons from the conduction band into the developed band tail is revealed as the dominant transport mechanism. This differs dramatically from the dispersive transport of holes in the same material, dominated by topological factors and not by energy disorder. (paper)

  15. Oxide production program monthly report - December 2014

    Kelley, Evelyn A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lloyd, Jane Alexandria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hampton, David Earl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Benavidez, Amelia A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A summary of the major activities, accomplishments, milestones, financial summary, project performance and issues facing the ARIES Oxide Production Program for the month of December 2014 is presented in this Executive Summary.

  16. Spin dependent structure functions with leading-hadron productions

    Peng, J.C.; Xu, G.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of using high-mass dihadron production to probe polarized gluon distribution in the nucleon is examined. Taking into account all hard subprocesses involved in leading-order dihadron production, we obtain good agreement between calculations and the CCOR π 0 -pair production data. We predict the π 0 -pair production cross sections and double-helicity asymmetry at RHIC energies. (author)

  17. Nucleation and growth of lead oxide particles in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic.

    Gladinez, Kristof; Rosseel, Kris; Lim, Jun; Marino, Alessandro; Heynderickx, Geraldine; Aerts, Alexander

    2017-10-18

    Liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is an important candidate to become the primary coolant of future, generation IV, nuclear fast reactors and Accelerator Driven System (ADS) concepts. One of the main challenges with the use of LBE as a coolant is to avoid its oxidation which results in solid lead oxide (PbO) precipitation. The chemical equilibria governing PbO formation are well understood. However, insufficient kinetic information is currently available for the development of LBE-based nuclear technology. Here, we report the results of experiments in which the nucleation, growth and dissolution of PbO in LBE during temperature cycling are measured by monitoring dissolved oxygen using potentiometric oxygen sensors. The metastable region, above which PbO nucleation can occur, has been determined under conditions relevant for the operation of LBE cooled nuclear systems and was found to be independent of setup geometry and thus thought to be widely applicable. A kinetic model to describe formation and dissolution of PbO particles in LBE is proposed, based on Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) combined with mass transfer limited growth and dissolution. This model can accurately predict the experimentally observed changes in oxygen concentration due to nucleation, growth and dissolution of PbO, using the effective interfacial energy of a PbO nucleus in LBE as a fitting parameter. The results are invaluable to evaluate the consequences of oxygen ingress in LBE cooled nuclear systems under normal operating and accidental conditions and form the basis for the development of cold trap technology to avoid PbO formation in the primary reactor circuit.

  18. Correlations in particle production in proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the LHC

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00361447

    In high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a hot and dense state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is formed. The initial collision geometry and the subsequent expansion during the QGP stage result in the correlations of produced particles, through which the properties of the QGP can be investigated. Two analyses based on the geometrical correlations of produced particles, one in proton-lead (p–Pb) collisions and the other in lead-lead (Pb–Pb) collisions, are presented in this thesis. The data analyzed in this thesis were collected with the ALICE detector at the LHC in p– Pb collisions at a nucleon–nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV, and Pb–Pb collisions at a nucleon–nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV. In the forward-central two-particle correlation analysis in p–Pb collisions, two-particle an- gular correlations between trigger particles in the forward pseudorapidity range (2.5 < |η| < 4.0) and associated particles in the central ran...

  19. Nano lead oxide and epdm composite for development of polymer based radiation shielding material: Gamma irradiation and attenuation tests

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Akbay, I. K.; Uzun, H.; Babucçuoglu, Y.

    2018-03-01

    It is important to have a shielding material that is not easily breaking in order to have a robust product that guarantee the radiation protection of the patients and radiation workers especially during the medical exposure. In this study, nano sized lead oxide (PbO) particles were used, for the first time, to obtain an elastomeric composite material in which lead oxide nanoparticles, after the surface modification with silane binding agent, was used as functional material for radiation shielding. In addition, the composite material including 1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% weight percent nano sized lead oxide was irradiated with doses of 81, 100 and 120 kGy up to an irradiation period of 248 days in a gamma ray source with an initial dose rate of 21.1 Gy/h. Mechanical, thermal properties of the irradiated materials were investigated using DSC, DMA, TGA and tensile testing and modifications in thermal and mechanical properties of the nano lead oxide containing composite material via gamma irradiation were reported. Moreover, effect of bismuth-III oxide addition on radiation attenuation of the composite material was investigated. Nano lead oxide and bismuth-III oxide particles were mixed with different weight ratios. Attenuation tests have been conducted to determine lead equivalent values for the developed composite material. Lead equivalent thickness values from 0.07 to 0.65 (2-6 mm sample thickness) were obtained.

  20. Recent advances in Phytosterol Oxidation Products.

    O'Callaghan, Yvonne; McCarthy, Florence O; O'Brien, Nora M

    2014-04-11

    Phytosterols and their oxidation products have become increasingly investigated in recent years with respect to their roles in diet and nutrition. We present a comprehensive review of recent literature on Phytosterol Oxidation Products (POP) identifying critical areas for future investigation. It is evident that POP are formed on food storage/preparation; are absorbed and found in human serum; do not directly affect cholesterol absorption; have evidence of atherogenicity and inflammation; have distinct levels of cytotoxicity; are implicated with high levels of oxidative stress, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated caspase activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Next to leading order three jet production at hadron colliders

    Kilgore, W.

    1997-01-01

    Results from a next-to-leading order event generator of purely gluonic jet production are presented. This calculation is the first step in the construction of a full next-to-leading order calculation of three jet production at hadron colliders. Several jet algorithms commonly used in experiments are implemented and their numerical stability is investigated. A numerical instability is found in the iterative cone algorithm which makes it inappropriate for use in fixed order calculations beyond leading order. (author)

  2. Numerical Modeling of Lead Oxidation in Controlled Lead Bismuth Eutectic Systems: Chemical Kinetics and Hydrodynamic Effects

    Wu, Chao; Kanthi Kiran Dasika; Chen, Yitung; Moujaes, Samir

    2002-01-01

    Using liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) as coolant in nuclear systems has been studied for more than 50 years. And LBE has many unique nuclear, thermo physical and chemical attributes which are attractive for practical application. But, corrosion is one of the greatest concerns in using liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) as spallation target in the Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program. Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed and built the Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop (MTL) to study the materials behavior in a flow of molten LBE. A difference of 100 deg. C was designed between the coldest and the hottest parts at a nominal flow rate of 8.84 GPM. Liquid LBE flow was activated by a mechanical sump pump or by natural convection. In order to maintain a self-healing protective film on the surface of the stainless steel pipe, a certain concentration of oxygen has to be maintained in the liquid metal. Therefore, it is of importance to understand what the oxygen concentrations are in the LBE loop related to the corrosion effects on the metal surface, the temperature profiles, the flow rates, and diffusion rates through the metal surface. The chemical kinetics also needs to be fully understood in the corrosion processes coupled with the hydrodynamics. The numerical simulation will be developed and used to analyze the system corrosion effects with different kind of oxygen concentrations, flow rates, chemical kinetics, and geometries. The hydrodynamics modeling of using computational fluid dynamics will provide the necessary the levels of oxygen and corrosion products close to the boundary or surface. This paper presents an approach towards the above explained tasks by analyzing the reactions between the Lead and oxygen at a couple of sections in the MTL. Attempt is also made to understand the surface chemistry by choosing an example model and estimating the near wall surface concentration values for propane and oxygen. (authors)

  3. Influence of dispatching rules on average production lead time for multi-stage production systems.

    Hübl, Alexander; Jodlbauer, Herbert; Altendorfer, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    In this paper the influence of different dispatching rules on the average production lead time is investigated. Two theorems based on covariance between processing time and production lead time are formulated and proved theoretically. Theorem 1 links the average production lead time to the "processing time weighted production lead time" for the multi-stage production systems analytically. The influence of different dispatching rules on average lead time, which is well known from simulation and empirical studies, can be proved theoretically in Theorem 2 for a single stage production system. A simulation study is conducted to gain more insight into the influence of dispatching rules on average production lead time in a multi-stage production system. We find that the "processing time weighted average production lead time" for a multi-stage production system is not invariant of the applied dispatching rule and can be used as a dispatching rule independent indicator for single-stage production systems.

  4. Potential role of NADPH-oxidase in early steps of lead-induced oxidative burst in Vicia faba roots

    Pourrut, Bertrand; Perchet, Geoffrey; Silvestre, Jérôme; Cecchi, Marie; Guiresse, Agnès Maritchù; Pinelli, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of oxidative burst induced by lead in Vicia faba excised roots was investigated by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Results showed that lead triggered a rapid and dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence production. In this study, specific inhibitors of putative reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources were used to determine the mechanism of lead-induced ROS generation. This generation was sensitive to dephenylene iodonium (DPI), quinacrine and imidazole, some inhibitors of ...

  5. Tin oxide quantum dots embedded iron oxide composite as efficient lead sensor

    Dutta, Dipa; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2018-04-01

    SnO2 quantum dots (QDs) embedded iron oxide (IO) nanocomposite is fabricated and explored as a capable sensor for lead detection. Square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) and amperometry have been used to explore the proposed sensor's response towards lead detection. The modified electrode shows linear current response for concentration of lead ranging from 99 nM to 6.6 µM with limit of detection 0.42 µM (34 ppb). Amperometry shows a detection limit as low as 0.18 nM (0.015 ppb); which is far below the permissible limit of lead in drinking water by World Health Organization. This proposed sensor shows linear current response (R2 = 0.98) for the lead concentration ranging from 133 × 10-9 to 4.4 × 10-6M. It also exhibits rapid response time of 12 sec with an ultra high sensitivity of 5.5 µA/nM. These detection properties promise the use of SnO2 QDs -IO composite for detection of lead in environmental sample with great ease.

  6. Cathode recovery products of oxidation of oils

    М.М. Захарчук

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article provides the review of electrochemical reduction of carbonic compounds – those that are among main oxidation of oils  hydrocarbons products. The principal possibility of ketons to alcohols  reduction is proved in practice based on the experimental data . The methodical algoritm of quantative control of the catod reduction is developed, which uses the reduction-oxidizing potentiometric titration method.

  7. Lead Farmers Approach in Disseminating Improved Tef Production ...

    Abate

    interview schedule and testing the tef variety on field plots of ten lead farmers ..... Product transporting from the farm ... partly explained by the fact that smallholder farmers cannot afford to purchase .... Agricultural Extension, Good Intentions.

  8. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review.

    Molnár, Gergő A; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2(nd) and 3(rd) days (ptyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (ptyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + orthotyrosine)/ para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation without oxygen - oxidation products and pathways

    Fossing, H.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation was studied in anoxic marine sediments-both in undisturbed sediment cores and in sediment slurries. The turn over of hydrogen sulfide was followed using 35 S-radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide which was injected into the sediment. However, isotope exchange reactions between the reduced sulfur compounds, in particular between elemental sulfur and hydrogen sulfide, influenced on the specific radioactivity of these pools. It was, therefore, not possible to measure the turn over rates of the reduced sulfur pools by the radiotracer technique but merely to use the radioisotope to demonstrate some of the oxidation products. Thiosulfate was one important intermediate in the anoxic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and was continuously turned over by reduction, oxidation and disproportionation. The author discusses the importance of isotope exchange and also presents the results from experiments in which both 35 S-radiolabeled elemental sulfur, radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide and radiolabeled thiosulfate were used to study the intermediates in the oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle

  10. Development of stable solidification methods for toxic lead oxide in radioactive wastes

    Hitoshi Mimura; Shingo Ikeda; Yuichi Niibori

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop the advanced solidification methods for the toxic lead oxide contained in radioactive wastes and to examine their chemical durability in terms of leachability and surface alteration; the solidification characteristics and leachability for the following three kinds of solidified products immobilizing lead were examined, and the experimental results were summarized as follows. (a) Mineral solidified products: A-zeolite or fly ash (FA) was used as a binder, and NaAlO 2 and Na 2 SiO 3 were mixed as additives. The leachability of lead ions in pure water was considerably lowered by the heat treatment at higher temperature (1,000 degree C), and the concentration of lead ions leached was under criterion value of 0.3 mg/l. The products prepared by mixing A-zeolite and fly ash also had low leachability under 0.3 mg/l even in the saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. (b) Melted solidified products: A-zeolite or fly ash was used as a binder and glass-forming reagents of B 2 O 3 and NaH 2 PO 4 were used as additives. The XRD peaks assigned PbO were not observed in all products. The products for the mixtures of FA:NaH 2 PO 4 :PbO (2:2:1 and 3:1:1) had low leachability under criterion value in both leachants of deionized water and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution. (c) Phosphate ceramics products: the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics were produced by using MgKPO 4 , MgHPO 4 , Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 , potassium iron phosphate and sodium iron phosphate, and FA was used as additives. In particular, by using MgHPO 4 , the leachability of the products was lowered less than 0.3 mg/l in both leachants. The phosphate ceramics products and melted solidified products are favorable as the waste solid forms immobilizing lead. In particular, novel ceramics products have advantages in the simple solidification procedure similarly to the cement products. As for mineral solidification, natural zeolites and FA as binder also useful from the viewpoint of cost efficiency

  11. Cumulative exergy losses associated with the production of lead metal

    Szargut, J [Technical Univ. of Silesia, Gliwice (PL). Inst. of Thermal-Engineering; Morris, D R [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1990-08-01

    Cumulative exergy losses result from the irreversibility of the links of a technological network leading from raw materials and fuels extracted from nature to the product under consideration. The sum of these losses can be apportioned into partial exergy losses (associated with particular links of the technological network) or into constituent exergy losses (associated with constituent subprocesses of the network). The methods of calculation of the partial and constituent exergy losses are presented, taking into account the useful byproducts substituting the major products of other processes. Analyses of partial and constituent exergy losses are made for the technological network of lead metal production. (author).

  12. Production of superconducting ceramic oxides by coprecipitation

    Bizaio, L.R.; Lima, M.A.F. de; Figueiredo Jardim, R.de; Pinheiro, E.A.; Galembeck, F.

    1988-01-01

    An alternative method for production of ceramic oxides is described. The method consist in the coprecipitation reaction of metallic ions with oxalic acid. The obtainment samples present additional phases characterized by X-rays and optical microscopy. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  14. Leading Neutron Production and Fπ2 at HERA

    Borras, K.

    2002-01-01

    New results on leading neutron production at HERA are presented for cross sections in photoproduction, in deep inelastic scattering and in an intermediate Q 2 range. The data with medium to high photon virtuality are presented in terms of structure functions. Vertex factorization is tested for the semi-inclusive leading neutron data, as well as for events with a dijet system in the final state. (author)

  15. Rapid Synthesis of Lead Oxide Nanorods by One-step Solid-state Chemical Reaction at Room Temperature

    CAO, Ya-Li(曹亚丽); JIA, Dian-Zeng(贾殿赠); LIU, Lang(刘浪); LUO, Jian-Min(骆建敏)

    2004-01-01

    A simple and facile method was reported to synthesize lead oxide nanorods. Nanorods of lead oxide were obtained directly from grinding solid metal salt and sodium hydroxide in agate mortar with the assistance of a suitable nonionic surfactant in only one step, which is different from the result of hydroxide in solution. The product has been characterized by XRD, TEM and SEM. The formation mechanism of rod-like morphology is discussed and the surfactant plays an important soft-template role in modifying the interface of solid-state reaction and according process of rod-formation.

  16. Oxidative damage in liver after perinatal intoxication with lead and/or cadmium.

    Massó, Elvira Luján; Corredor, Laura; Antonio, Maria Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Lead acetate (300 mg Pb/L) and/or cadmium acetate (10mg Cd/L) in blood and liver were administrated as drinking water to pregnant Wistar rats from day 1 of pregnancy to parturition (day 0) or until weaning (day 21), to investigate the toxic effects in blood and in the liver. Both metals produced mycrocitic anaemia in the pups as well as oxidative damage in the liver, as suggested by the significant increase in TBARS production and the high catalase activity. Moreover, intense alkaline and acid phosphatase activity, used as biomarkers of liver adaptation to damaging factors, was observed. In addition, the toxikinetics are different for Pb and Cd: while Cd is a hepatotoxic from day 0, Pb is not until day 21. Finally, simultaneous perinatal administration of both metals seems to protect, at least, in the liver TBARS production against the toxicity produced by Cd or Pb separately.

  17. Higgs production at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Instituut-Lorentz, University of Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands. Abstract. We describe the calculation of inclusive Higgs boson production at hadronic colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative quantum chromody- namics. We have used the technique developed in ref. [4]. Our results agree with those.

  18. Oxidative stress and neurological disorders in relation to blood lead levels in children.

    Ahamed, M; Fareed, Mohd; Kumar, A; Siddiqui, W A; Siddiqui, M K J

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Free radical generation appears to be the mode of lead toxicity. We evaluated the effects of blood lead levels on oxidative stress parameters in children suffering from neurological disorders. Thirty children (aged 3-12 years) with neurological disorders (cerebral palsy [n = 12], seizures [n = 11], and encephalopathy [n = 7]) were recruited in the study group. Sixty healthy children (aged 3-12 years) from similar socio-economic environments and not suffering from any chronic disease were taken as the controls. Blood lead levels and oxidant/antioxidant status were determined. Mean blood lead level was significantly higher while delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD) activity, a biomarker for lead exposure, was significantly lower in the study group as compared to the control group (P children with neurological disorders. Lead-induced oxidative stress as an underlying mechanism for neurological diseases in children warranted further investigation.

  19. Production planning of a perishable product with lead time and non-stationary demand

    Pauls-Worm, K.G.J.; Haijema, R.; Hendrix, E.M.T.; Rossi, R.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We study a production planning problem for a perishable product with a fixed lifetime, under a service-level constraint. The product has a non-stationary stochastic demand. Food supply chains of fresh products like cheese and several crop products, are characterised by long lead times due to

  20. Leading neutron production at HERA in the color dipole approach

    Carvalho F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study leading neutron production in e + p → e + n + X collisions at high energies and calculate the Feynman xL distribution of these neutrons. The differential cross section is written in terms of the pion flux and of the photon-pion total cross section. We describe this process using the color dipole formalism and, assuming the validity of the additive quark model, we relate the dipole-pion with the well determined dipoleproton cross section. In this formalism we can estimate the impact of the QCD dynamics at high energies as well as the contribution of gluon saturation effects to leading neutron production. With the parameters constrained by other phenomenological information, we are able to reproduce the basic features of the recently released H1 leading neutron spectra.

  1. Antihelium-3 production in lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    Arsenescu, R; Baglin, C; Beck, H P; Borer, K; Bussiere, A; Elsener, K; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J P; Kabana, S; Klingenberg, R; Lehmann, G; Linden, T; Lohmann, K D; Mommsen, R; Moser, U; Pretzl, K; Schacher, J; Spiwoks, R; Tuominiemi, J; Weber, M

    2003-01-01

    The NA-52 experiment measured particle and antiparticle yields at 0 deg production angle over a wide range in rapidity in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at 158 A GeV/c with a minimum bias trigger. Besides O(10 6 ) antiprotons and O(10 3 ) antideuterons a total of five antihelium-3 were found. The resulting invariant differential production cross sections at p t ≅0 GeV/c turn out to be E (d 3 σ)/(dp 3 ) = (2.5 ± 1.8) x 10 -7 bc 3 GeV -2 at a rapidity of y = 3.4 in the laboratory system and (5.9 ± 3.4) x 10 -8 bc 3 GeV -2 at y = 4.0. The results are discussed in the framework of a simple coalescence model

  2. Production of high purity granular metals: cadmium, zinc, lead

    Shcherban A. P.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium, zinc and lead are constituent components of many semiconductor compounds. The obtained high purity distillates and ingots are large-size elements, which is not always convenient to use, and thus require additional grinding, which does not always allow maintaining the purity of the original materials. For the growth of semiconductor and scintillation single crystals it is advisable to use "friable" granular high-purity distillates, which can be processed without the risk of contamination. For example, the European low-background experiment LUCIFER required more than 20 kg of high-purity granulated zinc, which was agreed to be supplied by NSC KIPT. This task was then extended to cadmium and lead. Motivated by these tasks, the authors of this paper propose complex processes of deep refining of cadmium, zinc and lead by vacuum distillation. A device producing granules has been developed. The process of granulation of high-purity metals is explored. The purity of produced granules for cadmium and zinc is >99,9999, and >99,9995% for lead granules. To prevent oxidation of metal granules during exposition to air, chemical methods of surface passivation were used. Organic solvent based on dimethylformamide used as a coolant improves the resistance of granules to atmospheric corrosion during the granulation of high purity Cd, Zn and Pb.

  3. Exposure to lead in water and cysteine non-oxidative metabolism in Pelophylax ridibundus tissues

    Kaczor, Marta; Sura, Piotr; Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja; Wróbel, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Chronic, low-level exposure to metals is an increasing global problem. Lead is an environmentally persistent toxin that causes many lead-related pathologies, directly affects tissues and cellular components or exerts an effect of the generation of reactive oxygen species causing a diminished level of available sulfhydryl antioxidant reserves. Cysteine is one of substrates in the synthesis of glutathione – the most important cellular antioxidant, and it may also undergo non-oxidative desulfuration that produces compounds containing sulfane sulfur atoms. The aim of the experiment was to examine changes of the non-oxidative metabolism of cysteine and the levels of cysteine and glutathione in the kidneys, heart, brain, liver and muscle of Marsh frogs (Pelophylax ridibundus) exposed to 28 mg/L Pb(NO 3 ) 2 for 10 days. The activities of sulfurtransferases, enzymes related to the sulfane sulfur metabolism – 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransfearse, γ-cystathionase and rhodanese – were detected in tissue homogenates. The activity of sulfurtransferases was much higher in the kidneys of frogs exposed to lead in comparison to control frogs, not exposed to lead. The level of sulfane sulfur remained unchanged. Similarly, the total level of cysteine did not change significantly. The total levels of glutathione and the cysteine/cystine and GSH/GSSG ratios were elevated. Thus, it seems that the exposure to lead intensified the metabolism of sulfane sulfur and glutathione synthesis in the kidneys. The results presented in this work not only confirm the participation of GSH in the detoxification of lead ions and/or products appearing in response to their presence, such as reactive oxygen species, but also indicate the involvement of sulfane sulfur and rhodanese in this process (e.g. brain). As long as the expression of enzymatic proteins (rhodanese, MPST and CST) is not examined, no answer will be provided to the question whether changes in their activity are due to differences

  4. Exposure to lead in water and cysteine non-oxidative metabolism in Pelophylax ridibundus tissues

    Kaczor, Marta [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Sura, Piotr [Department of Human Developmental Biology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Wrobel, Maria, E-mail: mbwrobel@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-02-15

    Chronic, low-level exposure to metals is an increasing global problem. Lead is an environmentally persistent toxin that causes many lead-related pathologies, directly affects tissues and cellular components or exerts an effect of the generation of reactive oxygen species causing a diminished level of available sulfhydryl antioxidant reserves. Cysteine is one of substrates in the synthesis of glutathione - the most important cellular antioxidant, and it may also undergo non-oxidative desulfuration that produces compounds containing sulfane sulfur atoms. The aim of the experiment was to examine changes of the non-oxidative metabolism of cysteine and the levels of cysteine and glutathione in the kidneys, heart, brain, liver and muscle of Marsh frogs (Pelophylax ridibundus) exposed to 28 mg/L Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for 10 days. The activities of sulfurtransferases, enzymes related to the sulfane sulfur metabolism - 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransfearse, {gamma}-cystathionase and rhodanese - were detected in tissue homogenates. The activity of sulfurtransferases was much higher in the kidneys of frogs exposed to lead in comparison to control frogs, not exposed to lead. The level of sulfane sulfur remained unchanged. Similarly, the total level of cysteine did not change significantly. The total levels of glutathione and the cysteine/cystine and GSH/GSSG ratios were elevated. Thus, it seems that the exposure to lead intensified the metabolism of sulfane sulfur and glutathione synthesis in the kidneys. The results presented in this work not only confirm the participation of GSH in the detoxification of lead ions and/or products appearing in response to their presence, such as reactive oxygen species, but also indicate the involvement of sulfane sulfur and rhodanese in this process (e.g. brain). As long as the expression of enzymatic proteins (rhodanese, MPST and CST) is not examined, no answer will be provided to the question whether changes in their activity are due to

  5. Two-Step Electrochemical Intercalation and Oxidation of Graphite for the Mass Production of Graphene Oxide.

    Cao, Jianyun; He, Pei; Mohammed, Mahdi A; Zhao, Xin; Young, Robert J; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2017-12-06

    Conventional chemical oxidation routes for the production of graphene oxide (GO), such as the Hummers' method, suffer from environmental and safety issues due to their use of hazardous and explosive chemicals. These issues are addressed by electrochemical oxidation methods, but such approaches typically have a low yield due to inhomogeneous oxidation. Herein we report a two-step electrochemical intercalation and oxidation approach to produce GO on the large laboratory scale (tens of grams) comprising (1) forming a stage 1 graphite intercalation compound (GIC) in concentrated sulfuric acid and (2) oxidizing and exfoliating the stage 1 GIC in an aqueous solution of 0.1 M ammonium sulfate. This two-step approach leads to GO with a high yield (>70 wt %), good quality (>90%, monolayer), and reasonable oxygen content (17.7 at. %). Moreover, the as-produced GO can be subsequently deeply reduced (3.2 at. % oxygen; C/O ratio 30.2) to yield highly conductive (54 600 S m -1 ) reduced GO. Electrochemical capacitors based on the reduced GO showed an ultrahigh rate capability of up to 10 V s -1 due to this high conductivity.

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions of energy production

    Kinnunen, L.

    1998-01-01

    The share of energy production of the world-wide total N 2 O emissions is about 10 %. In 1991 the N 2 O emissions estimated to be up to 30 %. The previous estimates based on incorrect measurements. The measurement methods have been improved during the past few years. The present measurements have shown that the share of the combustion of fossil fuels is about 2.0 % and the share biomass combustion about 5.0 % of the total. The uncertainty of the values can be few percentage units. According to the present measurements the share of natural emissions and the fertilizers of the total N 2 O emissions is up to 60 %. The formation of nitrous oxide has been studied widely in various countries in the world. In Finland nitrous oxide has been studied in the national LIEKKI research programme. As a result of the research carried out in the programme it has been possible to reduce the formation of N 2 O by using appropriate catalysts and combustion technologies. Nitrous oxide is formed e.g. in fluidized-bed combustion of nitrogen containing fuels. The combustion temperature of other combustion methods is so high that the gas disintegrates in the furnace. By the new methods the nitrous oxide emissions of the fluidized-bed combustion has been possible to reduce from 100-200 ppm to the level less than 50 ppm of the flue gas volume. The Japanese research has shown that the nitrous oxide emissions of bubbling beds vary in between 58 - 103 ppm, but when combusting paper the emissions are 6 - 29 ppm. The corresponding value of circulating fluidized beds is 40 - 153 ppm

  7. Global oceanic production of nitrous oxide

    Freing, Alina; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Bange, Hermann W.

    2012-01-01

    We use transient time distributions calculated from tracer data together with in situ measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) to estimate the concentration of biologically produced N2O and N2O production rates in the ocean on a global scale. Our approach to estimate the N2O production rates integrates the effects of potentially varying production and decomposition mechanisms along the transport path of a water mass. We estimate that the oceanic N2O production is dominated by nitrification with a contribution of only approximately 7 per cent by denitrification. This indicates that previously used approaches have overestimated the contribution by denitrification. Shelf areas may account for only a negligible fraction of the global production; however, estuarine sources and coastal upwelling of N2O are not taken into account in our study. The largest amount of subsurface N2O is produced in the upper 500 m of the water column. The estimated global annual subsurface N2O production ranges from 3.1 ± 0.9 to 3.4 ± 0.9 Tg N yr−1. This is in agreement with estimates of the global N2O emissions to the atmosphere and indicates that a N2O source in the mixed layer is unlikely. The potential future development of the oceanic N2O source in view of the ongoing changes of the ocean environment (deoxygenation, warming, eutrophication and acidification) is discussed. PMID:22451110

  8. Global oceanic production of nitrous oxide.

    Freing, Alina; Wallace, Douglas W R; Bange, Hermann W

    2012-05-05

    We use transient time distributions calculated from tracer data together with in situ measurements of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) to estimate the concentration of biologically produced N(2)O and N(2)O production rates in the ocean on a global scale. Our approach to estimate the N(2)O production rates integrates the effects of potentially varying production and decomposition mechanisms along the transport path of a water mass. We estimate that the oceanic N(2)O production is dominated by nitrification with a contribution of only approximately 7 per cent by denitrification. This indicates that previously used approaches have overestimated the contribution by denitrification. Shelf areas may account for only a negligible fraction of the global production; however, estuarine sources and coastal upwelling of N(2)O are not taken into account in our study. The largest amount of subsurface N(2)O is produced in the upper 500 m of the water column. The estimated global annual subsurface N(2)O production ranges from 3.1 ± 0.9 to 3.4 ± 0.9 Tg N yr(-1). This is in agreement with estimates of the global N(2)O emissions to the atmosphere and indicates that a N(2)O source in the mixed layer is unlikely. The potential future development of the oceanic N(2)O source in view of the ongoing changes of the ocean environment (deoxygenation, warming, eutrophication and acidification) is discussed.

  9. Photoelectric characteristics of lead phthalocyanine/titanium oxide structures

    Ray, A K; Hodgson, S N B

    2003-01-01

    A study has been carried out into the conduction, charge transfer/electron injection and photovoltaic conversion properties of TiO sub 2 -lead phthalocyanine (PbPc) heterojunctions. The results indicate that although the heterojunction area, and hence overall conversion efficiency, was low for the planar device structures used in the investigation, electron injection and effective charge separation across the dye-TiO sub 2 interface was achieved, with open circuit voltages in the region of 0.3 V. The conversion efficiency was found to be a function of the thickness of the phthalocyanine layer, increasing by a factor of more than 30 times as the thickness of the dye layer was reduced from 500 to 100 nm. The results suggest that under appropriate deposition conditions, to ensure effective coating of the inorganic phase, such phthalocyanine dyes may offer potential for use in dye sensitized photovoltaic cells.

  10. Nitrous oxide production in grassland soils: assessing the contribution of nitrifier denitrification

    Wrage, N.; Velthof, G.L.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Oenema, O.

    2004-01-01

    Nitrifier denitrification is the reduction of NO2- to N2 by nitrifiers. It leads to the production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) as an intermediate and possible end product. It is not known how important nitrifier denitrification is for the production of N2O in soils. We explored N2O

  11. Products of radiation removal of lead from aqueous solutions

    Drtinova, Barbora; Pospisil, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Some metal ions, including Pb 2+ can be gradually reduced by primary reducing products of water radiolysis (solvated electrons e aq - and H radicals) to insoluble, easily separable metals. Conditions of water remediation using irradiation with accelerated electrons were studied. The solutions with initial concentration 100 mg/L of Pb(II) (originally nitrate) containing OH radical scavengers were irradiated under intensive agitation in sealed thin-glass ampoules by accelerated electrons (4.5 MeV) from a linear accelerator. Doses ranging from 0.5 to 60 kGy (dose rate of 0.5 kGy/s) determined by an alanine dosimeter were applied. Subsequent process of centrifugation (5000 revs per minute) was used for the separation of product- finely dispersed particles. The changes in metal concentration were determined with error ± 3% by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame atomization. The solid products formed after the irradiation were analyzed by both thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis. For the pre-irradiated systems were carried out calculations by using PHREEQC in order to determinate the speciation. Without addition of an OH radical scavenger the radiation-induced removal of lead did not occur. The influence of potassium formate HCOOK (1x10 -3 - 4x10 -2 mol/L) and 10% isopropanol as typical OH radical scavengers was individually studied. The lead can be completely removed from aqueous solutions (pH about 5-6) containing 1x10 - :2 mol/L of HCOOK already at the dose of 2.5 kGy. With increasing concentration of HCOOK (1x10 -3 - 4x10 -2 mol/L) increases the amount of Pb(HCOO) + form in the solution before irradiation. The radiation product is metallic lead at low concentration of HCOOK to PbCO 3 at higher concentration of the OH radical scavenger. In the system with isopropanol dominates the form Pb 2+ and the product of radiation reduction is then metallic lead

  12. Kaon and open charm production in central lead-lead collisions at the CERN SPS

    van Leeuwen, Marco

    2003-05-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of hadronic systems with a very high energy density and temperature. From theoretical caluclations it is expected that hadronic matter undergoes a phase transition to a deconfined state at an energy density of about 1 GeV/fm^3 or a temperature of 170 MeV. The goal of the experiments is to observe the phase transition and study the properties of the deconfined state, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Two different measurements are described and the results are discussed. The first measurement concerns the momentum distributions and total yields of kaons in lead-lead collisions at 40, 80 and 158 AGeV beam energy. Kaons are the most abundant carrier of the relatively heavy strange quarks and their production is expected to be sensitive to the energy density and the state of matter early in the collision. The second measurement is a search for the production of mesons which carry the even heavier charm quark, at the highest beam energy. The measurements have been performed with the NA49 detector at the SPS accelerator at CERN. The main detector elements are four Time Projection Chambers (TPCs), which record the trajectories of a large fraction of the final state particles to determine the charge and the momentum of each particle. In addition, the measurement of the ionisation energy loss dE/dx in the TPCs allows to identify pions, kaons and protons. Additional detectors provide a measurement of the time-of-flight in a limited acceptance. Combining the time-of-flight and dE/dx measurements greatly improves the separation of the different particle species. The kaon momentum distributions as presented in this thesis have been determined using the dE/dx measurement in the TPCs. The time-of-flight information is used for a detailed study of the peak shape of the dE/dx measurement. The resulting kaon spectra and total yields provide strong indications that interactions between produced particles or even thermalisation play an

  13. Modeling of nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with multiple production pathways.

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Peng, Lai; Law, Yingyu; Guo, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-04-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been recognized as a major contributor to N2O production in wastewater treatment systems. However, so far N2O models have been proposed based on a single N2O production pathway by AOB, and there is still a lack of effective approach for the integration of these models. In this work, an integrated mathematical model that considers multiple production pathways is developed to describe N2O production by AOB. The pathways considered include the nitrifier denitrification pathway (N2O as the final product of AOB denitrification with NO2(-) as the terminal electron acceptor) and the hydroxylamine (NH2OH) pathway (N2O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of NH2OH to NO2(-)). In this model, the oxidation and reduction processes are modeled separately, with intracellular electron carriers introduced to link the two types of processes. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained with two independent nitrifying cultures. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O data from both systems. The model also predicts shifts of the dominating pathway at various dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite levels, consistent with previous hypotheses. This unified model is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O production by AOB in wastewater treatment systems under varying operational conditions.

  14. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher, E-mail: yllars@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Andrea [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, María Jesús [Dept. of Biochemistry, Physiology and Molecular Genetics, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón (Spain); Vassallo, Dalton Valentim [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Health Science Center of Vitória-EMESCAM, Vitória, ES CEP 29045-402 (Brazil); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  15. Green certificates will lead to increased electric power production

    Lind, Oddvar

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of green certificates will lead to increased electricity production from renewable energy sources and less risk of price crises. For the time being, a common market for green certificates will be established with Sweden from January 1, 2006. It is possible to realise a ''compulsory total quota'' of 20 TWh by 2016. Green certificates will imply a premium on the electricity bill. However, the quota system will imply increased power generation, which in turn tends to lower the price. Norway should in principle follow Sweden's definition of renewable energy: all new hydroelectric power, wind power, solar energy, wave and tidal power, biomass energy, and energy recovery. The certificate regime will apply to new investments in renewable power production. However, it would be natural to include the established renewable power production that is currently receiving support. Some critics fear that the consumers rather than the authorities will subsidize the production of green power. The point is being made that central EU countries may save great sums by investing in renewable energy in Norway

  16. Mo-V-Te-Nb oxides as catalysts for ethene production by oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    Hartmann, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center; Meiswinkel, A.; Thaller, C.; Bock, M.; Alvarado, L. [Linde AG, Pullach (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The availability of ethane in shale gas, as well as the interest in valorising previously underutilized carbon feedstocks, makes the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane an attractive alternative to the industrially established processes for production of ethylene. Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed oxide has been chosen as catalyst for the ODH reaction in view of its outstanding ability to activate alkane molecules. Catalytic test results showed that this type of catalyst can selectively oxidize ethane to ethene at moderate temperatures (350-400 C) with minor production of CO{sub x}. The catalytic performance of Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed-oxide is mainly attributable to the crystalline phase 'M1'. Rietveld analysis of the X-Ray diffractograms allowed us to quantify the amount of MoVTeNb oxide that has crystallized as M1. In this way, it was possible to find a linear correlation of the reaction rate with the abundance of M1 in the solid. Therefore, it is clear that for improving the efficiency of MoVTeNb oxide in ODH, the amount of M1 in the catalyst should be maximized. With this purpose, several MoVTeNb oxides were subject to different thermal treatments prior to the catalytic test. Structural changes in the catalyst were monitored by in-situ XRD technique. Under oxidative atmosphere, it was observed a recrystallization of M2 and possibly, amorphous oxide, into M1 phase, leading to correspondingly more active and selective catalysts (selectivities above 95 % for ethane conversions up to 40 % under industrially relevant conditions). The active site of M1 involves V species, likely with redox properties enhanced by the proximity of Mo and Te species, while the function of the crystalline structure itself is to provide the spatial configuration that allows interaction between these species. However, ethene formation rate was observed to be independent of the V content of the samples. The vanadium species exposed at the surface were studied by LEIS and by IR spectroscopy of CO

  17. Galvanic Corrosion of Lead by Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxides: Potential Impacts on Drinking Water Quality.

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Sweet, Gregory A; Harding, Matthew D; Estabrook, Hayden; Bishop, D Paul; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-06-20

    Lead exposure via drinking water remains a significant public health risk; this study explored the potential effects of upstream iron corrosion on lead mobility in water distribution systems. Specifically, galvanic corrosion of lead by iron (oxyhydr)oxides was investigated. Coupling an iron mineral cathode with metallic lead in a galvanic cell increased lead release by 531 μg L -1 on average-a 9-fold increase over uniform corrosion in the absence of iron. Cathodes were composed of spark plasma sintered Fe 3 O 4 or α-Fe 2 O 3 or field-extracted Fe 3 O 4 and α-FeOOH. Orthophosphate immobilized oxidized lead as insoluble hydroxypyromorphite, while humic acid enhanced lead mobility. Addition of a humic isolate increased lead release due to uniform corrosion by 81 μg L -1 and-upon coupling lead to a mineral cathode-release due to galvanic corrosion by 990 μg L -1 . Elevated lead in the presence of humic acid appeared to be driven by complexation, with 208 Pb and UV 254 size-exclusion chromatograms exhibiting strong correlation under these conditions (R 2 average = 0.87). A significant iron corrosion effect was consistent with field data: lead levels after lead service line replacement were greater by factors of 2.3-4.7 at sites supplied by unlined cast iron distribution mains compared with the alternative, lined ductile iron.

  18. Growth and Characterization of PbO Nano rods Grown using Facile Oxidation of Lead Sheet

    Yousefi, R.; Sheini, F.J.; Saaedi, A.; Cheraghizade, M.

    2015-01-01

    PbO nano rods were synthesized by oxidation of lead sheets under an oxygen ambience with different temperatures at 330, 400, 450 and 550 degree Celsius in a tube furnace. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results showed that the nano rods started growing on the sheet that was placed at 330 degree Celsius. On the other hand, by increasing of the temperature to 550 degree Celsius more nano rods appeared on the Pb sheet, which were lied on the lead sheet. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) indicated that the nano rods had α-PbO structures. However, a few β-PbO phases also appeared for the nano rods. Raman measurements confirmed the XRD results and indicated two Raman active modes that belonged to α-PbO phase for the nano rods. In addition, the Raman spectrum of the nano rods showed a weak peak of the β-PbO structure. The optical properties of the products were characterized using a room temperature photoluminescence (PL) technique. The PL result indicated a band gap for the PbO nano rods in the visible region. (author)

  19. Methods for forming complex oxidation reaction products including superconducting articles

    Rapp, R.A.; Urquhart, A.W.; Nagelberg, A.S.; Newkirk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for producing a superconducting complex oxidation reaction product of two or more metals in an oxidized state. It comprises positioning at least one parent metal source comprising one of the metals adjacent to a permeable mass comprising at least one metal-containing compound capable of reaction to form the complex oxidation reaction product in step below, the metal component of the at least one metal-containing compound comprising at least a second of the two or more metals, and orienting the parent metal source and the permeable mass relative to each other so that formation of the complex oxidation reaction product will occur in a direction towards and into the permeable mass; and heating the parent metal source in the presence of an oxidant to a temperature region above its melting point to form a body of molten parent metal to permit infiltration and reaction of the molten parent metal into the permeable mass and with the oxidant and the at least one metal-containing compound to form the complex oxidation reaction product, and progressively drawing the molten parent metal source through the complex oxidation reaction product towards the oxidant and towards and into the adjacent permeable mass so that fresh complex oxidation reaction product continues to form within the permeable mass; and recovering the resulting complex oxidation reaction product

  20. Leading proton production in e+p collisions at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Loizides, J.H.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Antonioli, P.; Anzivino, G.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.F.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K.C.; Wang, M.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D.S.; Brook, N.H.; Cole, J.E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Namsoo, T.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Wing, M.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Iannotti, L.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, Y.K.; Lee, J.H.; Lim, I.T.; Pac, M.Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Ning, Y.; Paganis, S.; Ren, Z.; Schmidke, W.B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A.M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Bloch, I.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Goettlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.F.; Hillert, S.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kramberger, G.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Loehr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M.C.; Polini, A.; Raval, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P.G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Raach, H.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P.J.; Doyle, A.T.; Glasman, C.; Hamilton, J.; Hanlon, S.; Lupi, A.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Goncalo, R.; Long, K.R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D.B.; Tapper, A.D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A.N.; Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; Gonzalez, O.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terron, J.; Vazquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Gliga, S.; Lainesse, S.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D.G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R.K.; Ermolov, P.F.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Katkov, I.I.; Khein, L.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Proskuryakov, A.S.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Vlasov, N.N.; Zotkin, S.A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Pellegrino, A.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J.J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Bruemmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L.S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Kim, C.L.; Ling, T.Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Patel, S.; Rigby, M.; Sutton, M.R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Heaphy, E.A.; Oh, B.Y.; Saull, P.R.B.; Whitmore, J.J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J.C.; Barberis, E.; Heusch, C.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J.T.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D.C.; Park, I.H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kagawa, S.; Kohno, T.; Tawara, T.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Patel, S.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M.I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G.M.; Martin, J.F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J.M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T.W.; Lightwood, M.S.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R.J.; Pawlak, J.M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L.K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kcira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D.D.; Savin, A.A.; Smith, W.H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Straub, P.B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.D.; Fourletov, S.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.

    2003-01-01

    Events with a final-state proton carrying a large fraction of the proton beam momentum, x L >0.6, and the square of the transverse momentum p T 2 2 , have been studied in e + p collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Data with different photon virtualities were used: Q 2 2 , 0.1 2 2 and 3 2 2 , corresponding to integrated luminosities of 0.9, 1.85 and 3.38 pb -1 . The cross sections are given as a function of x L , p T 2 , Q 2 and the Bjorken scaling variable, x. The ratio of the cross section for leading proton production to the inclusive e + p cross section shows only a mild dependence on Q 2 and on x. In the region 0.6 L L

  1. Measured radionuclide production from copper, gold and lead spallation targets

    Parish, T.A.; Belian, A.P. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Spallation target materials are chosen so as to produce large numbers of neutrons while at the same time avoiding the creation of long-lived radioactive wastes. While there has been considerable research to determine the number of neutrons produced per incident particle for various target materials, there has been less effort to precisely quantify the types and amounts of radionuclides produced. Accurate knowledge of the radioactive species produced by spallation reactions is important for specifying waste disposal criteria for targets. In order to verify the production rates calculated by LAHET, a study has been conducted using the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Cyclotron to measure radionuclide yields from copper, gold, and lead targets.

  2. Requirement of argininosuccinate lyase for systemic nitric oxide production.

    Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Premkumar, Muralidhar H; Campeau, Philippe M; Chen, Yuqing; Garg, Harsha K; Li, Li; Mian, Asad; Bertin, Terry K; Black, Jennifer O; Zeng, Heng; Tang, Yaoping; Reddy, Anilkumar K; Summar, Marshall; O'Brien, William E; Harrison, David G; Mitch, William E; Marini, Juan C; Aschner, Judy L; Bryan, Nathan S; Lee, Brendan

    2011-11-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial in diverse physiological and pathological processes. We show that a hypomorphic mouse model of argininosuccinate lyase (encoded by Asl) deficiency has a distinct phenotype of multiorgan dysfunction and NO deficiency. Loss of Asl in both humans and mice leads to reduced NO synthesis, owing to both decreased endogenous arginine synthesis and an impaired ability to use extracellular arginine for NO production. Administration of nitrite, which can be converted into NO in vivo, rescued the manifestations of NO deficiency in hypomorphic Asl mice, and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-independent NO donor restored NO-dependent vascular reactivity in humans with ASL deficiency. Mechanistic studies showed that ASL has a structural function in addition to its catalytic activity, by which it contributes to the formation of a multiprotein complex required for NO production. Our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for ASL in NOS function and NO homeostasis. Hence, ASL may serve as a target for manipulating NO production in experimental models, as well as for the treatment of NO-related diseases.

  3. Oxide scale formation of modified FeCrAl coatings exposed to liquid lead

    Fetzer, Renate, E-mail: renate.fetzer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weisenburger, Alfons; Jianu, Adrian; Mueller, Georg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified FeCrAl coatings show oxide scale formation when exposed to liquid lead. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of thin Al-rich oxide scales is promoted by the presence of Y. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FeCrAlY with at least 8 wt.% Al forms thin Al-rich oxide scales. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For low Al content, thick multilayer Fe-based oxide scales are found. - Abstract: Modified FeCrAl coatings were studied with respect to their capability to form a thin protective oxide scale in liquid lead environment. They were manufactured by low pressure plasma spraying and GESA surface melting, thereby tuning the Al content. The specimens were exposed for 900 h to liquid lead containing 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -8} wt.% oxygen, respectively, at various temperatures from 400 to 550 Degree-Sign C. Threshold values for an Al content that guarantees the formation of thin protective Al-rich oxide scales are determined, dependent on the respective chromium content, on the presence of yttrium in the modified coating, and on the exposure conditions.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cells and hydrogen production

    Dogan, F.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': A single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell (SC-SOFC), operating in a mixture of fuel and oxidant gases, provides several advantages over the conventional SOFC such as simplified cell structure (no sealing required). SC-SOFC allows using a variety of fuels without carbon deposition by selecting appropriate electrode materials and cell operating conditions. The operating conditions of single chamber SOFC was studied using hydrocarbon-air gas mixtures for a cell composed of NiO-YSZ / YSZ / LSCF-Ag. The cell performance and catalytic activity of the anode was measured at various gas flow rates. The results showed that the open-circuit voltage and the power density increased as the gas flow rate increased. Relatively high power densities up to 660 mW/cm 2 were obtained in a SC-SOFC using porous YSZ electrolytes instead of dense electrolytes required for operation of a double chamber SOFC. In addition to propane- or methane-air mixtures as a fuel source, the cells were also tested in a double chamber configuration using hydrogen-air mixtures by controlling the hydrogen/air ratio at the cathode and the anode. Simulation of single chamber conditions in double chamber configurations allows distinguishing and better understanding of the electrode reactions in the presence of mixed gases. Recent research efforts; the effect of hydrogen-air mixtures as a fuel source on the performance of anode and cathode materials in single-chamber and double-chamber SOFC configurations,will be presented. The presentation will address a review on hydrogen production by utilizing of reversible SOFC systems. (author)

  5. Microstructure And Mechanical Properties Of Lead Oxide- Thermoplastic Elas Tomer Composite

    Sudirman; Handayani, Ari; Darwinto, Tri; Teguh, Yulius S.P.P.; Sunarni, Anik; Marlijanti, Isni

    2000-01-01

    Research on microstructure and mechanical properties of lead oxide-thermoplastic elastomer composite with Pb 3 O 4 as lead oxide. Thermoplastic elastomer synthesized from natural rubber as the elastomer and methyl metacrilate as the thermoplastic and irradiated simultaneously with optimum gamma ray. Thermoplastic elastomer (NR-PMMA) grind in a laboplastomill and Pb 3 O 4 was added in varied amount of 10%. 30%. 40% and 50%wt.The results showed that mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation break) decreased as the Pb 3 O 4 composition increased. Microstructure from SEM observation showed that Pb 3 O 4 distributed evenly and having function as filler in composite

  6. Analysis of the stability of native oxide films at liquid lead/metal interfaces

    Lesueur, C.; Chatain, D.; Gas, P.; Bergman, C.; Baque, F.

    2002-01-01

    The interface between liquid lead and different metallic solids (pure metals: Al, Fe and Ni, and T91 steel) was investigated below 400 deg C under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) by wetting experiments. The aim was to check the physical stability of native oxide films grown at the surface of the substrates, along a contact with liquid lead. Two types of metallic substrates were used: i) conventional bulk polycrystals, and ii) nanocrystalline films obtained by e-beam evaporation under UHV. The actual contact between liquid lead and the solid substrates was achieved by preparing lead drops in-situ. Wetting experiments were performed using sessile drop and/or liquid bridge methods. Fresh solid surfaces and former liquid/solid interfaces can be explored by squeezing and stretching a liquid lead bridge formed between two parallel and horizontal substrates. It is shown that the contact with liquid lead produces the detachment of the native oxide films grown on the metallic solids. It is concluded that if oxide coatings are needed to protect a metallic solid from attack by liquid lead, they should be self-renewable. (authors)

  7. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  8. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  9. Products of BVOC oxidation: ozone and organic aerosols

    Wildt, Jürgen; Andres, Stefanie; Carriero, Giulia; Ehn, Mikael; Fares, Silvano; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kleist, Einhard; Paoletti, Elena; Pullinen, Iida; Rohrer, Franz; Rudich, Yinon; Springer, Monika; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Wu, Cheng; Mentel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) are important precursors in photochemical O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments with OH-induced oxidation of monoterpenes to elucidate pathways and efficiencies of O3 and SOA formation. At high NOx conditions ([BVOC] / [NOx] monoterpene mixes emitted from different plant species we observed increasing ozone formation with increasing [NOX]. Between 2 and 3 O3-molecules were formed from 1 monoterpene when ozone formation was BVOC limited. Under such high NOX conditions, new particle formation was suppressed. Increasing [BVOC] / [NOX] ratios caused increasing efficiency of new particle formation indicating that peroxy radicals are the key intermediates in both, photochemical ozone- and new particle formation. The classical chemistry of peroxy radicals is well established (e.g. Master Chemical Mechanism). Peroxy radicals are produced by addition of molecular oxygen to the alkyl radical formed after OH attack at the BVOC. They either react with NO which leads to ozone formation or they react with other peroxy radicals and form chemically stable products (hydroperoxides, alkoholes and ketones). Much less knowledge exists on such reactions for Highly Oxidized Peroxy Radicals, (HOPR). Such HOPR were observed during ozonolysis of several volatiles and, in case of monoterpenes as precursors, they can contain more than 12 Oxygen atoms (Mentel et al., 2015). Although the OH-initiated formation of HOPR is yet not fully understood, their basic gas phase reactions seem to follow classical photochemical rules. In reactions with NO they can act as precursor for O3 and in reactions with other HOPR or with classical less oxidized peroxy radicals they can form highly oxidized stable products and alkoxy radicals. In addition, HOPR-HOPR reactions lead to the formation of dimers that, in case of monoterpenes as reactants, consist of a skeleton with 20 carbon atoms. These dimers seem to

  10. Synthesis of uniform nano-structured lead oxide by sonochemical method and its application as cathode and anode of lead-acid batteries

    Karami, Hassan; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Haghdar, Saeed

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a research aimed at investigating the synthesis of nano-structured lead oxide through reaction of lead nitrate solution and sodium carbonate solution by the sonochemical method. At the first, lead carbonate was obtained in a synthesized solution and then, after filtration, it was calcinated at the temperature of 320 deg. C so that nano-structured lead oxide can be produced. The effects of different parameters on particle size and morphology of final lead oxide powder were optimized by a 'one at a time' method. The prepared lead oxide powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Under optimum conditions, uniformed and homogeneous nano-structured lead oxide powder with more spongy morphology and particle size of 20-40 nm was obtained. The synthesized lead oxide, as anode and cathode of lead-acid batteries, showed an excellent discharge capacity (140 mA h/g)

  11. Vector boson and Charmonium production in proton-lead and lead-lead collisions with ATLAS at the LHC

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00241320; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Electroweak bosons do not interact strongly with the dense and hot medium formed in nuclear collisions, and thus should be sensitive to the nuclear modification of parton distribution functions (nPDFs). The in-medium modification of heavy charmonium states plays an important role in studying the hot and dense medium. The ATLAS detector, optimized to search for new physics in proton-proton collisions, is well equipped to measure Z and W bosons as well as quarkonium in the high occupancy environment produced in heavy ion collisions. Results from the ATLAS experiment on W and Z boson yields as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity, in lead-lead and proton-lead collisions are presented. Quarkonium results from proton-lead collisions are also presented.

  12. Natural Products as Leads in Schistosome Drug Discovery

    Bruno J. Neves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected parasitic tropical disease that claims around 200,000 human lives every year. Praziquantel (PZQ, the only drug recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment and control of human schistosomiasis, is now facing the threat of drug resistance, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to treat this disease. Therefore, globally, there is renewed interest in natural products (NPs as a starting point for drug discovery and development for schistosomiasis. Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and cheminformatics have brought about unprecedented opportunities for the rapid and more cost-effective discovery of new bioactive compounds against neglected tropical diseases. This review highlights the main contributions that NP drug discovery and development have made in the treatment of schistosomiasis and it discusses how integration with virtual screening (VS strategies may contribute to accelerating the development of new schistosomidal leads, especially through the identification of unexplored, biologically active chemical scaffolds and structural optimization of NPs with previously established activity.

  13. Yttrium bismuth titanate pyrochlore mixed oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Merka, Oliver

    2012-10-18

    In this work, the sol-gel synthesis of new non-stoichiometric pyrochlore titanates and their application in photocatalytic hydrogen production is reported. Visible light response is achieved by introducing bismuth on the A site or by doping the B site by transition metal cations featuring partially filled d orbitals. This work clearly focusses on atomic scale structural changes induced by the systematical introduction of non-stoichiometry in pyrochlore mixed oxides and the resulting influence on the activity in photocatalytic hydrogen production. The materials were characterized in detail regarding their optical properties and their atomic structure. The pyrochlore structure tolerates tremendous stoichiometry variations. The non-stoichiometry in A{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich compositions is compensated by distortions in the cationic sub-lattice for the smaller Y{sup 3+} cation and by evolution of a secondary phase for the larger Bi{sup 3+} cation on the A site. For TiO{sub 2} rich compositions, the non-stoichiometry leads to a special vacancy formation in the A and optionally O' sites. It is shown that pyrochlore mixed oxides in the yttrium bismuth titanate system represent very active and promising materials for photocatalytic hydrogen production, if precisely and carefully tuned. Whereas Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} yields stable hydrogen production rates over time, the bismuth richer compounds of YBiTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} are found to be not stable under irradiation. This drawback is overcome by applying a special co-catalyst system consisting of a precious metal core and a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell on the photocatalysts.

  14. Composite materials with metal oxide attached to lead chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots with linkers

    Fuke, Nobuhiro; Koposov, Alexey Y; Sykora, Milan; Hoch, Laura

    2014-12-16

    Composite materials useful for devices such as photoelectrochemical solar cells include a substrate, a metal oxide film on the substrate, nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) of lead sulfide, lead selenide, and lead telluride, and linkers that attach the NQDs to the metal oxide film. Suitable linkers preserve the 1s absorption peak of the NQDs. A suitable linker has a general structure A-B-C where A is a chemical group adapted for binding to a MO.sub.x and C is a chemical group adapted for binding to a NQD and B is a divalent, rigid, or semi-rigid organic spacer moiety. Other linkers that preserve the 1s absorption peak may also be used.

  15. New oxidation and photo-oxidation products of tryptophan

    Savige, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Dye-sensitized photo-oxidation of tryptophan in water gives N'-formylkynurenine and (+-)-3a-hydroxy-1,2,3a,8,8a-hexahydropyrrolo[2,3-b] indole-2-carboxylic acid. The latter rearranges to oxindolyl-3-alanine on irradiation with UV light and reacts with thiols, including cysteine, in warm 20% acetic acid to give the corresponding 2-tryptophyl sulphides. (orig.) [de

  16. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.; Joshi, Meenal M.; Tijare, Saumitra N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K.; Rayalu, Sadhana Suresh

    2012-01-01

    of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lead oxide-decorated graphene oxide/epoxy composite towards X-Ray radiation shielding

    Hashemi, Seyyed Alireza; Mousavi, Seyyed Mojtaba; Faghihi, Reza; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sina, Sedigheh; Amani, Ali Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    In this study, employing modified Hummers method coupled with a multi-stage manufacturing procedure, graphene oxide (GO) decorated with Pb3O4 (GO-Pb3O4) at different weight ratios was synthesized. Thereupon, via the vacuum shock technique, composites holding GO-Pb3O4 at different filler loadings (5 and 10 wt%) and thicknesses (4 and 6 mm) were fabricated. Successful decoration of GO with Pb3O4 was confirmed via FTIR analysis. Moreover, particle size distribution of the produced fillers was examined using particle size analyzer. X-ray attenuation examination revealed that reinforcement of epoxy-based composites with GO-Pb3O4 led to a significant improvement in the overall attenuation rate of X-ray beam. For instance, composites containing 10 wt% GO-Pb3O4 with 6 mm thickness showed 4.06, 4.83 and 3.91 mm equivalent aluminum thickness at 40, 60 and 80 kVp energies, denoting 124.3, 124.6 and 103.6% improvement in the X-ray attenuation rate compared to a sample holding neat epoxy resin, respectively. Simulation results revealed that the effect of GO-Pb3O4 loading on the X-ray shielding performance undermined with increase in the voltage of the applied X-ray beam.

  18. Oxidation flux change on spermatozoa membrane in important pathologic conditions leading to male infertility.

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2008-06-01

    Free radicals or reactive oxygen species mediate their action through proinflammatory cytokines and this mechanism has been proposed as a common underlying factor for male infertility. There is extensive literature on oxidative stress and its role in male infertility and sperm DNA damage and its effects on assisted reproductive techniques. However, there has never been a report on the oxidation flux change in spermatozoa. Here, the author determined the oxidation flux change in such hypoxic cases, using the simulation test based on nanomedicine technique is used. Of interest, change of flux can be detected. The main pathogenesis should be the direct injury of membrane structure of spermatozoa by free radicals which can lead to sperm defect. Therefore, this work can support the finding that the oxidation flux change corresponding to oxygen pressure change in spermatozoa does not exist. However, the flux change can be seen if the membrane thickness of spermatozoa is varied. Thin membrane spermatozoa are more prone to oxidative stress than thick membrane ones. The defect in the enzymatic system within the spermatozoa should be a better explanation for vulnerability of spermatozoa to oxidative stress. The use of enzymatic modification technique by antioxidants can be useful alternative in management of male infertility.

  19. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-07-01

    Nano structured metal oxides including TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 have been synthesized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The photocatalytic activity of nano cobalt oxide was then compared with two other nano structured metal oxides namely TiO 2 and Fe 3O 4. The synthesized nano cobalt oxide was characterized thoroughly with respect to EDX and TEM. The yield of hydrogen was observed to be 900, 2000 and 8275 mmol h -1 g -1 of photocatalyst for TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 respectively under visible light. It was observed that the hydrogen yield in case of nano cobalt oxide was more than twice to that of TiO 2 and the hydrogen yield of nano Fe 3O 4 was nearly four times as compared to nano Co 3O 4. The influence of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Energy Flow and Leading Neutron Production at HERA

    Yan Wenbiao

    2006-01-01

    The azimuthal asymmetry of hadrons in the semi-inclusive process e+p → e+h+X is studied in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. A measurement of the dijet cross section with a leading neutron is also reported, the P T 2 distribution of the leading neutron is investigated

  1. Doxycycline reduces nitric oxide production in guinea pig inner ears.

    Helling, Kai; Wodarzcyk, Karl; Brieger, Jürgen; Schmidtmann, Irene; Li, Huige; Mann, Wolf J; Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger

    2011-12-01

    Gentamicin application is an important therapeutic option to control vertigo spells in Ménière's disease. However, even in the case of low-dose intratympanic application, gentamicin might contribute to a pathological NO-increase leading to cochlear damage and hearing impairment. The study was performed to evaluate the nitric oxide (NO) reducing capacity of doxycycline in the inner ear after NO-induction by gentamicin. In a prospective animal study, a single dose of gentamicin (10mg/kg body weight) was injected intratympanically into male guinea pigs (n=48). The auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded prior to application and 3, 5 and 7 days afterwards. The organ of Corti and the lateral wall of 42 animals were isolated after 7 days and incubated separately for 6h in cell culture medium. Doxycycline was adjusted to organ cultures of 5 animals. Two NOS inhibitors, N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and NG-monomethyl-l-arginine monoacetate (l-NMMA), were applied in three different concentrations to the organ cultures of 30 animals in total (5 animals per concentration). As controls, seven animals received no further substance except gentamicin. The NO-production was quantified by chemiluminescence. Additional six gentamicin-treated animals were used for immunohistochemical studies. The ABRs declined continuously from the first to the seventh day after gentamicin application. Doxycycline reduced NO-production in the lateral wall by 54% (p=.029) comparable to the effect of the applied nitric oxide inhibitors. In the organ of Corti, NO-production was reduced by about 41% showing no statistical significance in respect to great inter-animal variations. The application of doxycycline might offer a new therapeutic approach to prevent NO-induced cochlea damage through ototoxic substances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic lead exposure induces cochlear oxidative stress and potentiates noise-induced hearing loss.

    Jamesdaniel, Samson; Rosati, Rita; Westrick, Judy; Ruden, Douglas M

    2018-08-01

    Acquired hearing loss is caused by complex interactions of multiple environmental risk factors, such as elevated levels of lead and noise, which are prevalent in urban communities. This study delineates the mechanism underlying lead-induced auditory dysfunction and its potential interaction with noise exposure. Young-adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to: 1) control conditions; 2) 2 mM lead acetate in drinking water for 28 days; 3) 90 dB broadband noise 2 h/day for two weeks; and 4) both lead and noise. Blood lead levels were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis (ICP-MS) lead-induced cochlear oxidative stress signaling was assessed using targeted gene arrays, and the hearing thresholds were assessed by recording auditory brainstem responses. Chronic lead exposure downregulated cochlear Sod1, Gpx1, and Gstk1, which encode critical antioxidant enzymes, and upregulated ApoE, Hspa1a, Ercc2, Prnp, Ccl5, and Sqstm1, which are indicative of cellular apoptosis. Isolated exposure to lead or noise induced 8-12 dB and 11-25 dB shifts in hearing thresholds, respectively. Combined exposure induced 18-30 dB shifts, which was significantly higher than that observed with isolated exposures. This study suggests that chronic exposure to lead induces cochlear oxidative stress and potentiates noise-induced hearing impairment, possibly through parallel pathways. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Does Good Corporate Governance Lead to Stronger Productivity Growth?

    Koeke, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of corporate governance and product market competition on total factor productivity growth in Germany and the UK.For Germany, the prototype of a bank-based governance system, productivity grows faster in firms controlled by financial institutions (in particular,

  4. Surface analysis and depth profiling of corrosion products formed in lead pipes used to supply low alkalinity drinking water.

    Davidson, C M; Peters, N J; Britton, A; Brady, L; Gardiner, P H E; Lewis, B D

    2004-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have been applied to investigate the nature of lead pipe corrosion products formed in pH adjusted, orthophosphate-treated, low alkalinity water, under supply conditions. Depth profiling and surface analysis have been carried out on pipe samples obtained from the water distribution system in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. X-ray diffraction spectrometry identified basic lead carbonate, lead oxide and lead phosphate as the principal components. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed the crystalline structure within the corrosion product and also showed spatial correlations existed between calcium, iron, lead, oxygen and phosphorus. Elemental profiling, conducted by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutrals mass spectrometry (SNMS) indicated that the corrosion product was not uniform with depth. However, no clear stratification was apparent. Indeed, counts obtained for carbonate, phosphate and oxide were well correlated within the depth range probed by SIMS. SNMS showed relationships existed between carbon, calcium, iron, and phosphorus within the bulk of the scale, as well as at the surface. SIMS imaging confirmed the relationship between calcium and lead and suggested there might also be an association between chloride and phosphorus.

  5. Determination of lead and radioactivity in cosmetics products: Hazard assessment

    Medhat Moustafa E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the proposed work, an investigation on hazard assessment by lead element and natural radioactivity in cosmetic samples collected from various countries is presented. These samples were face powder, eyebrow paint and henna. The lead element in cosmetic samples was determined using particle-induced X-ray emission. Maximum natural radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra and 40K were found in khol and make-up cosmetic samples, respectively. The qualitative analysis of cosmetic samples showed that lead is the most toxic element found in eyebrow paint samples.

  6. Flotation of zinc and lead oxide minerals from Olkusz region calamine ores

    Cichy Krystian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents chemical and mineralogical characteristics of calamine ore from the Pomorzany mine. A flowsheet for recovery of sulphide minerals of zinc and lead in the form of the Zn-Pb bulk concentrate was presented. In the following part, preparation of the feed for flotation of Zn-Pb oxide minerals and optimal conditions for separation from it iron sulphide minerals, represented by marcasite, were determined. In the final section the results of flotation of Zn-Pb oxide minerals with anionic collector AM2 belonging to the hydroxyamide group of collectors and a cationic collector in the form of a coconut amine, being a mixture of primary aliphatic amines, were presented. Basing on the obtained results, a technological flowsheet for the recovery of Zn-Pb sulphide and oxide minerals from the calamine ore of the Pomorzany mine was presented.

  7. Does increased Nitric Oxide production and oxidative stress due to high fat diet affect cardiac function after myocardial infarction?

    Marjan Aghajani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background &Objectives: High fat (HF diet by affecting the oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO production may lead to different effects on function of the heart after myocardial infarction (MI. In the present study we aimed to address the hypothesis that high release of NO by activated macrophages affects LV function after MI.Methods: The animals were randomly divided into four groups comprising each of 10 rats: 1 Sham; 2 MI; 3 Sham+ HF diet; 4 MI+ HF diet. Animals fed with HF diet 30 days before sham and MI surgery. MI was induced by permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD. Nitric oxide (NO production of peritoneal macrophages, the concentrations of MDA in the heart and the infarct size were measured.Results: Our study indicated that HF has adverse effects on myocardium and it may increase NO production as well as oxidative stress, resulting in augmentation of infarct size.Conclusion: Our results add to our knowledge that HF diet was associated with overproduction of NO by peritoneal macrophages and ROS that lead to development of infarct size and adverse remodeling.

  8. Technological studies for obtaining lead oxide compacts used in generation IV nuclear reactors

    Paraschiv, I.; Benga, D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main concerns of the nuclear research at this moment is the development of the necessary technologies for Generation IV reactors. The main candidate as coolant agent in these reactors is molten lead but this material involves ensuring the oxygen control, due to potential contamination of coolant through the formation of solid oxides and the influence on the corrosion rate of structural parts and for this reason, the oxygen concentration must be kept in a well specified domain. One of the proposed methods for oxygen monitoring and control in the technology of Generation IV reactors, is the use of PbO compacts. For this paper technological tests were performed for developing and setting the optimal parameters in order to attain lead oxide compacts necessary for the oxygen control technology in Generation IV nuclear reactors. (authors)

  9. Effect of surface oxide on the melting behavior of lead-free solder nanowires and nanorods

    Gao Fan; Rajathurai, Karunaharan; Cui, Qingzhou; Zhou, Guangwen; NkengforAcha, Irene; Gu Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    Lead-free nanosolders have shown promise in nanowire and nanoelectronics assembly. Among various important parameters, melting is the most fundamental property affecting the assembly process. Here we report that the melting behavior of tin and tin/silver nanowires and nanorods can be significantly affected by the surface oxide of nanosolders. By controlling the nanosolder reflow atmosphere using a flux, the surface oxide of the nanowires/nanorods can be effectively removed and complete nanosolder melting can be achieved. The complete melting of the nanosolders leads to the formation of nanoscale to microscale spherical solder balls, followed by Ostwald ripening phenomenon. The contact angle of the microscale solder balls formed on Si substrate was measured by direct electron microscopic imaging. These results provide new insights into micro- and nanoscale phase transition and liquid droplet coalescence from nanowires/nanorods to spheroids, and are relevant to nanoscale assembly and smaller ball grid array formation.

  10. Spirulina exhibits hepatoprotective effects against lead induced oxidative injury in newborn rats.

    Gargouri, M; Ben Saad, H; Ben Amara, I; Magné, C; El Feki, A

    2016-08-31

    Lead is a toxic metal that induces a wide range of biochemical and physiological effects. The present investigation was designed at evaluating the toxic effects of a prenatal exposure to lead of mothers on hepatic tissue of newborn rats, and potent protective effects of spirulina. Female rats were randomly divided into 4 groups which were given a normal diet (control),a diet enriched with spirulina (S), lead acetate administered through drinking water (Pb), or a diet enriched with spirulina and lead contaminated water (S Pb), respectively. The duration of treatments was from the 5th day of gestation to 14 days postpartum. Lead toxicity was assessed by measuring body and liver weights, blood and stomach lead levels, hepatic DNA, RNA and protein amounts, blood enzyme activities (AST and ALT), as well as lipid peroxidation level and activities of antioxidant enzymes in hepatic tissues of neonates. Lead intoxication of mothers caused reduction of liver weight as well as of hepatic DNA, mRNA and protein levels in newborns. Moreover, oxidative stress and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities were recorded. Conversely, supplementation of mothers with spirulina mitigated these effects induced by lead. These results substantiated the potential hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of spirulina.

  11. Characterization of lead zirconate titanate (PZT)--indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film interface

    Sreenivas, K.; Sayer, M.; Laursen, T.; Whitton, J.L.; Pascual, R.; Johnson, D.J.; Amm, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the interface between ultrathin sputtered lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films and a conductive electrode (indium tin oxide-ITO) is investigated. Structural and compositional changes at the PZT-ITO interface have been examined by surface analysis and depth profiling techniques of glancing angle x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), SIMS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Studies indicate significant interdiffusion of lead into the underlying ITP layer and glass substrate with a large amount of residual stress at the interface. Influence of such compositional deviations at the interface is correlated to an observed thickness dependence in the dielectric properties of PZT films

  12. Oxidative Stress Induction by Lead in Leaves of Radish (Raphanus sativus Seedlings

    Nadjet BITEUR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress was induced by lead acetate (Pb in Raphanus sativus seedlings grown in a hydroponic system using sand as substrate. Thirty day old acclimated seeds were treated for 7 days with five Pb levels (0 as control, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 mg l-1. Parameters such as growth, oxidative damage markers (lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and hydrogen peroxide contents and enzymatic activities of catalase (CAT and peroxidase (POD were investigated. Lead concentration in plant tissues increased with increasing of Pb levels. Shoot fresh weight, chlorophyll and carotenoid concentration were significantly decreased at 100 mg l-1 Pb. Lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and H2O2 levels were increased at 500 and 1000 mg l-1 Pb compared to control treatment, in shoots. Peroxidase activity showed a straight correlation with H2O2 concentration, whereas CAT activity decreased only in shoots. These changes in enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants showed that the Pb exposition had a significant disturbance on Raphanus sativus plantlets and affect the biochemical and physiological processes.

  13. The Evonik-Uhde HPPO process for proplene oxide production

    Jaeger, B.; Baerz, M. [Evonik Industries, Hanau (Germany); Schemel, J.; Kolbe, B. [Uhde GmbH, Dortmund/Bad Soden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In 2008 the HPPO technology has shown up as an economically and environmentally friendly alternative for manufacturing of propylene oxide. The HPPO technology offers the advantage of an on purpose process for manufacturing of propylene oxide without dependency on disposal or marketing of coupling products. (orig.)

  14. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  15. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    Copat, A; Sood, S P

    1984-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740/sup 0/C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide

  16. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    Copat, A.; Sood, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740 0 C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide (Author) [pt

  17. Chemical oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine transformation products in water

    Abilev, M.; Kenessov, B.N.; Batyrbekova, S.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) during a water treatment has several disadvantages including formation of stable toxic byproducts. Effectiveness of treatment methods in relation to UDMH transformation products is currently poorly studied. This work considers the effectiveness of

  18. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (± 0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (± 0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation.

  19. 40 CFR 415.50 - Applicability; description of the calcium oxide production subcategory.

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium oxide production subcategory. 415.50 Section 415.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Oxide Production Subcategory § 415.50 Applicability; description of the calcium... the production of calcium oxide. ...

  20. Method for production of transparent yttrium oxide

    Dutta, S.K.; Gazza, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The method comprises vacuum hot pressing the yttrium oxide (Y 2 O 3 ) powder in a graphite die at temperatures of between 1300 to 1500 0 C and uniaxial pressures of between 5000 to 7000 psi, for a period of 1 to 2 hours. (U.S.)

  1. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    Kulig, W.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, P.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 199, Sep (2016), s. 144-160 ISSN 0009-3084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cholesterol * oxidation * oxysterols * biological membranes * biophysical properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  2. NADPH oxidases in Microglia oxidant production

    Haslund-Vinding, J; McBean, G; Jaquet, V

    2017-01-01

    inhibitors. Finally, we review the recent literature on NOX and other sources of ROS that are involved in activation of the inflammasome and discuss the potential influence of microglia-derived oxidants on neurogenesis, neural differentiation and culling of surplus progenitor cells. The degree to which...

  3. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    Kulig, W.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 199, SI (2016), s. 144-160 ISSN 0009-3084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR GA15-14292S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : cholesterol * oxidation * oxysterols Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  4. Lipid oxidation. Part 2. Oxidation products of olive oil methyl esters.

    Pokorný, J; Tài, P; Parízková, H; Smidrkalová, E; El-Tarras, M F; Janícek, G

    1976-01-01

    Olive oil was converted into methyl esters which were autoxidized at 60 degrees C. The composition of oxidized products was determined by the comparison of infrared spectra and NMR spectra of the original and acetylated samples, the sample reduced with potassium iodide and the acetylated reduced sample. Oxidized products were separated by preparative thin layer chromatography on silica gel and characterized by selective detection and by infrared spectrometry of the fractions. The oxidation products consisted of hydroperoxido butyl oleate, substituted hydroperoxides, mono- and disubstituted monomeric derivatives and a small amount of oligomers.

  5. 78 FR 41298 - Children's Products Containing Lead; Procedures and Requirements for Exclusions From Lead Limits...

    2013-07-10

    ... on materials previously submitted in connection with a petition for exclusion under this section. In... 16 CFR 1500.90 to provide procedures and requirements for evaluating products or materials for... and comment rulemaking, section 553 of the APA provides an exception when the agency, for good cause...

  6. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, G. Cara Romeo F.; Corradi, M.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; Palmonari, F.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H. -P.; Juengst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Pellegrino, A.

    The semi-inclusive reaction e(+)p -> e(+) Xp was studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 12.8 pb(-1). The final-state proton, which was detected with the ZEUS leading proton spectrometer, carried a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, x(L) > 0.32, and its

  7. Evaluation of covalency of ions in lead-free perovskite-type dielectric oxides

    Naohisa Takesue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic states of ions in lead-free perovskite-type dielectric oxides have been investigated with a first-principle cluster calculation. For this calculation a double-perovskite cluster model based upon the simple cubic ABO3 was used; A and B are both the cations, and O is the oxygen anion. Systematic variations of ionic species for A and B, and lengths of the model cube edge were given to the model. Results of charge transfers of the ions show that their magnitudes depend on the edge length; the lager length leads to the higher transfer magnitude. This tendency implies spatial tolerance of the ions to the clusters, and are expected to correlate with electric polarizability and dipole reversibility of this kind of oxides. The density of states and the overlap population indicate that the higher cation valence causes the higher covalency of the anions. Considering all results together provides us an idea to obtain lead-free high-performance ferroelectrics, as high as the lead-based solid solutions.

  8. Measurements of vector boson production in lead–lead and proton–lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Photons and weak bosons do not interact strongly and, thus, their production yields provide direct tests of scaling with a number of binary nucleon–nucleon collisions in the heavy-ion environment. In addition, they should be sensitive to the nuclear modification of parton distribution functions (nPDF). Proton-lead collisions also provide an excellent opportunity to test nPDF in a less dense environment than lead–lead via looking at forward–backward production of weak bosons. The ATLAS detector has proven to be an excellent apparatus in measurements involving photons, electrons and muons, the latter being products of weak boson decays, in the high occupancy environment produced in heavy-ion collisions. The experiment has recorded 30nb −1 of proton–lead data and 140μb −1 of lead–lead data, both of which have similar integrated partonic luminosities. We present the prompt photon, Z and W boson yields as a function of centrality, and also differentially in transverse momentum and rapidity, in lead–lead and proton–lead collisions from the ATLAS experiment. For W ± bosons, a lepton charge asymmetry has also been studied, which may also shed light on nPDF

  9. Vitamin-E reduces the oxidative damage on delta-aminolevulinic dehydratase induced by lead intoxication in rat erythrocytes.

    Rendón-Ramirez, A; Cerbón-Solórzano, J; Maldonado-Vega, M; Quintanar-Escorza, M A; Calderón-Salinas, J V

    2007-09-01

    Lead intoxication induces oxidative damage on lipids and proteins. In the present paper we study in vivo and in vitro the antioxidant effect of vitamin-E and trolox, on the oxidative effects of lead intoxication in rat erythrocytes. Vitamin-E simultaneously administered to erythrocytes treated with lead was capable to prevent the inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic dehydratase activity and lipid oxidation. Partial but important protective effects were found when vitamin-E was administered either after or before lead exposure in rats. In vitro, the antioxidant trolox protected delta-ALA-D activity against damage induced by lead or menadione. These results indicate that vitamin-E could be useful in order to protect membrane-lipids and, notably, to prevent protein oxidation produced by lead intoxication.

  10. The degradation of lining of rotary furnaces in the production of zinc oxide

    Natália Luptáková; Evgeniy Anisimov; Františka Pešlová

    2014-01-01

    This paper is closely connected with the complex problem of degradation relating to the refractories of rotary furnace linings in the production of zinc oxide. Zinc oxide can be produced by variety of ways, but the most common method of production which is used in Europe is indirect, i.e. pyrolytic combustion of zinc. This method is also called "French process" of manufacturing ZnO. But this mentioned method of preparation leads to the creation of the enormous amount of zinc slag including ch...

  11. High hydrostatic pressure leads to free radicals accumulation in yeast cells triggering oxidative stress.

    Bravim, Fernanda; Mota, Mainã M; Fernandes, A Alberto R; Fernandes, Patricia M B

    2016-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a unicellular organism that during the fermentative process is exposed to a variable environment; hence, resistance to multiple stress conditions is a desirable trait. The stress caused by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in S. cerevisiae resembles the injuries generated by other industrial stresses. In this study, it was confirmed that gene expression pattern in response to HHP displays an oxidative stress response profile which is expanded upon hydrostatic pressure release. Actually, reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration level increased in yeast cells exposed to HHP treatment and an incubation period at room pressure led to a decrease in intracellular ROS concentration. On the other hand, ethylic, thermic and osmotic stresses did not result in any ROS accumulation in yeast cells. Microarray analysis revealed an upregulation of genes related to methionine metabolism, appearing to be a specific cellular response to HHP, and not related to other stresses, such as heat and osmotic stresses. Next, we investigated whether enhanced oxidative stress tolerance leads to enhanced tolerance to HHP stress. Overexpression of STF2 is known to enhance tolerance to oxidative stress and we show that it also leads to enhanced tolerance to HHP stress. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Synthesis of oxidation resistant lead nanoparticle films by modified pulsed laser ablation

    Shin, Eunsung; Murray, P. Terrence; Subramanyam, Guru; Malik, Hans K.; Schwartz, Kenneth L. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0170 (United States); Research Institute, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0170, USA and Graduate Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0240 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0232 (United States); Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Linthicum, MD 21090 (United States)

    2012-07-30

    Thin layers of lead nanoparticles have been produced by a modified pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process in which smaller nanoparticles were swept out of the ablation chamber by a stream of flowing Ar. Large ({mu}m-sized) particles, which are usually deposited during the standard PLA process, were successfully eliminated from the deposit. The nanoparticles deposited on room temperature substrates were well distributed, and the most probable particle diameter was in the order of 30 nm. Since lead is highly reactive, the nanoparticles formed in Ar were quickly oxidized upon exposure to air. A small partial pressure of H{sub 2}S gas was subsequently added to the effluent, downstream from the ablation chamber, and this resulted in the formation of nanoparticle deposits that were surprisingly oxidation resistant. The properties of the nanoparticle films (as determined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and conductivity measurements) are reported, and the mechanism of the oxidation retardation process is discussed.

  13. How microfluidic methods can lead to better emulsion products

    Muijlwijk, Kelly; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Schroën, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Where production lines are judged on their throughput, which is in the order of m3 per hour, interestingly enough the scale at which a lot of phenomena relevant to food structure take place is much smaller: the micro- and nanometre scale. Microfluidics can be used to bridge these

  14. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies

    Scruggs, Caroline E.; Van Buren, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood. PMID:27471326

  15. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies.

    Scruggs, Caroline E; Van Buren, Harry J

    2016-05-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood.

  16. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low...... and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have...

  17. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    The semi-inclusive reaction e + p→e + Xp was studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 12.8 pb -1 . The final-state proton, which was detected with the ZEUS leading proton spectrometer, carried a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, x L >0.32, and its transverse momentum squared satisfied p T 2 2 ; the exchanged photon virtuality, Q 2 , was greater than 3 GeV 2 and the range of the masses of the photon-proton system was 45 L , p T 2 , Q 2 and the Bjorken scaling variable, x. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of dense lead lanthanum titanate ceramics prepared from powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    Pinto, Alexandre H. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Souza, Flavio L., E-mail: flavio.souza@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia 166, Bangu, Santo Andre, SP 09210-170 (Brazil); Chiquito, Adenilson J., E-mail: chiquito@df.ufscar.br [Departamento de Fisica, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Longo, Elson, E-mail: elson@iq.unesp.br [Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Francisco Degni, CP 355 Araraquara, SP 14801-907 (Brazil); Leite, Edson R., E-mail: derl@power.ufscar.br [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Camargo, Emerson R., E-mail: camargo@ufscar.br [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-12-01

    Nanosized powders of lead lanthanum titanate (Pb{sub 1-x}La{sub x}TiO{sub 3}) were synthesized by means of the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added from 5 to 30% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of lead nitrate to prepare a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrates, which was dripped into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes, forming a reactive amorphous precipitate that could be crystallized by heat treatment. Crystallized powders were characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, showing that tetragonal perovskite structure is obtained for samples up to 25% of lanthanum and cubic perovskite for samples with 30% of lanthanum. Powders containing 25 and 30% in mol of lanthanum were calcined at 700 deg. C for 2 h, and in order to determine the relative dielectric permittivity and the phase transition behaviour from ferroelectric-to-paraelectric, ceramic pellets were prepared and sintered at 1100 or 1150 deg. C for 2 h and subjected to electrical characterization. It was possible to observe that sample containing 25% in mol of La presented a normal behaviour for the phase transition, whereas the sample containing 30% in mol of La presented a diffuse phase transition and relaxor behaviour.

  19. Characterization of dense lead lanthanum titanate ceramics prepared from powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    Pinto, Alexandre H.; Souza, Flavio L.; Chiquito, Adenilson J.; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.; Camargo, Emerson R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanosized powders of lead lanthanum titanate (Pb 1-x La x TiO 3 ) were synthesized by means of the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added from 5 to 30% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of lead nitrate to prepare a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrates, which was dripped into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes, forming a reactive amorphous precipitate that could be crystallized by heat treatment. Crystallized powders were characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, showing that tetragonal perovskite structure is obtained for samples up to 25% of lanthanum and cubic perovskite for samples with 30% of lanthanum. Powders containing 25 and 30% in mol of lanthanum were calcined at 700 deg. C for 2 h, and in order to determine the relative dielectric permittivity and the phase transition behaviour from ferroelectric-to-paraelectric, ceramic pellets were prepared and sintered at 1100 or 1150 deg. C for 2 h and subjected to electrical characterization. It was possible to observe that sample containing 25% in mol of La presented a normal behaviour for the phase transition, whereas the sample containing 30% in mol of La presented a diffuse phase transition and relaxor behaviour.

  20. Role of ascorbic acid supplement in reducing oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in lead intoxication

    Farooq, Y.; Hussain, M.M.; Aleem, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to measure the oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in lead intoxicated sprague dawley rats with and without supplementation of ascorbic acid. Study Design: Randomized Control Trial. Place of Study: Physiology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi. (From Oct 2007 to Sep 2008) Material and Methods: One hundred and five male rats (age, 90-120 days; weight 200 - 250 gm) were divided into three groups each having 35 rats. Rats of group 1 and group 2 were given weekly injections of sodium acetate (10 mg /kg body weight) and lead acetate (10 mg /kg body weight) respectively, whereas rats of group 3 were administered lead acetate(10 mg /kg body weight) through weekly injections and ascorbic acid in drinking water (500 mg/l). After 6 weeks, 4 ml of blood was drawn from each rat by cardiac puncture. The blood was allowed to clot and serum was separated for estimation of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels on spectrophotometer; and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels on Merck Micorlab 200. Results: Lead intoxication of rats revealed that serum MDA levels were raised to 7.8 +- 0.48 micro mol/l (control, 3.2 +-0.39 micro mol/l), ALT levels to 76.26 +- 5.88 IU/l (control, 44.1 +- 3.26) and AST levels to 258.06 +- 13.30 IU/l (control, 156.2 +- 4.97). Ascorbic acid supplementation significantly lowered serum MDA levels (3.8 +- 0.34 micro mol/l), ALT levels (52.26 +-4.57 IU/l) and AST levels (188.13 +- 12.91 IU/l). Conclusion: Ascorbic acid supplementation ameliorates lead intoxication probably by reducing the oxidative stress, thus preventing the development of hepatotoxicity, but this amelioration is not equal to the control. (author)

  1. Production and characterization of quality gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2013-01-01

    Rare earth system Gadolinium (Gd), in either pure form or oxide form, is highly stable against environmental attack. It has immense potential as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices. Being mechanically and thermally stable it is always difficult to obtain Gd 2 O 3 nanopowders directly from its bulk counterpart using conventional top-down approach. Recently, we have reported production of Gd 2 O 3 nanopowders by first converting bulk Gd 2 O 3 into a nitrate compound and subsequently reduced into a hydroxide product and finally to the oxide product (nanopowder form)

  2. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of lead oxides for preparation of nanocomposites with polyamide

    Cado, Ronan Gorski; Severo, Vinicius A.; Bulhores, Luis Otavio S.

    2016-01-01

    Lead oxide nanoparticles with diameters between 100 to 250 nm were obtained using a polymeric precursor method in the presence of citric acid and ethylene glycol. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering to measure the size and zeta potential in solution in dispersions with different pH were used to characterize the as-obtained samples. The nanoparticles were incorporated into polyamide 6.6 and composite films were prepared by electrospinning being evaluated the variation of the mechanical properties of the polymer and its effectiveness in attenuation of X-rays. (author)

  4. Development of tellurium oxide and lead-bismuth oxide glasses for mid-wave infra-red transmission optics

    Zhou, Beiming; Rapp, Charles F.; Driver, John K.; Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Goldstein, Jonathan; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2013-03-01

    Heavy metal oxide glasses exhibiting high transmission in the Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) spectrum are often difficult to manufacture in large sizes with optimized physical and optical properties. In this work, we researched and developed improved tellurium-zinc-barium and lead-bismuth-gallium heavy metal oxide glasses for use in the manufacture of fiber optics, optical components and laser gain materials. Two glass families were investigated, one based upon tellurium and another based on lead-bismuth. Glass compositions were optimized for stability and high transmission in the MWIR. Targeted glass specifications included low hydroxyl concentration, extended MWIR transmission window, and high resistance against devitrification upon heating. Work included the processing of high purity raw materials, melting under controlled dry Redox balanced atmosphere, finning, casting and annealing. Batch melts as large as 4 kilograms were sprue cast into aluminum and stainless steel molds or temperature controlled bronze tube with mechanical bait. Small (100g) test melts were typically processed in-situ in a 5%Au°/95%Pt° crucible. Our group manufactured and evaluated over 100 different experimental heavy metal glass compositions during a two year period. A wide range of glass melting, fining, casting techniques and experimental protocols were employed. MWIR glass applications include remote sensing, directional infrared counter measures, detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents, laser detection tracking and ranging, range gated imaging and spectroscopy. Enhanced long range mid-infrared sensor performance is optimized when operating in the atmospheric windows from ~ 2.0 to 2.4μm, ~ 3.5 to 4.3μm and ~ 4.5 to 5.0μm.

  5. Elastin aging and lipid oxidation products in human aorta

    Kamelija Zarkovic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular aging is associated with structural and functional modifications of the arteries, and by an increase in arterial wall thickening in the intima and the media, mainly resulting from structural modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM components. Among the factors known to accumulate with aging, advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs are a hallmark of oxidative stress-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis. Aldehydes generated from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, (4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, acrolein, form adducts on cellular proteins, leading to a progressive protein dysfunction with consequences in the pathophysiology of vascular aging. The contribution of these aldehydes to ECM modification is not known. This study was carried out to investigate whether aldehyde-adducts are detected in the intima and media in human aorta, whether their level is increased in vascular aging, and whether elastin fibers are a target of aldehyde-adduct formation. Immunohistological and confocal immunofluorescence studies indicate that 4-HNE-histidine-adducts accumulate in an age-related manner in the intima, media and adventitia layers of human aortas, and are mainly expressed in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, even if the structure of elastin fiber is strongly altered in the aged vessels, our results show that elastin is not or very poorly modified by 4-HNE. These data indicate a complex role for lipid peroxidation and in particular for 4-HNE in elastin homeostasis, in the vascular wall remodeling during aging and atherosclerosis development.

  6. Edaravone leads to proteome changes indicative of neuronal cell protection in response to oxidative stress.

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Ahmadinejad, Fereshteh; Hoedt, Esthelle; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh; Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Neubert, Thomas A; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2015-11-01

    Neuronal cell death, in neurodegenerative disorders, is mediated through a spectrum of biological processes. Excessive amounts of free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), has detrimental effects on neurons leading to cell damage via peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) has been used for neurological recovery in several countries, including Japan and China, and it has been suggested that Edaravone may have cytoprotective effects in neurodegeneration. Edaravone protects nerve cells in the brain by reducing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. To gain further insight into the cytoprotective effects of Edaravone against oxidative stress condition we have performed comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE)-based proteomic analyses on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to oxidative stress and in combination with Edaravone. We showed that Edaravone can reverse the cytotoxic effects of H2O2 through its specific mechanism. We observed that oxidative stress changes metabolic pathways and cytoskeletal integrity. Edaravone seems to reverse the H2O2-mediated effects at both the cellular and protein level via induction of Peroxiredoxin-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanosized lead lanthanum titanate (PLT) ceramic powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    Camargo, Emerson R. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Department of Chemistry, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod.Washingtin Luis km 235, CP 676, Sao Carlos SP 13565-9905 (Brazil)], E-mail: camargo@ufscar.br; Barrado, Cristiano M. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Department of Chemistry, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod.Washingtin Luis km 235, CP 676, Sao Carlos SP 13565-9905 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Caue [EMBRAPA Instrumentacao Agropecuaria, Rua XV de Novembro 1452, Sao Carlos SP 13560-970 (Brazil)], E-mail: caue@cnpdia.embrapa.br; Longo, Elson [Department of Biochemistry, Chemistry Institute of Araraquara, UNESP-Sao Paulo State University, Rua Francisco Degni, CP 355, Araraquara SP 14801-907 (Brazil)], E-mail: elson@iq.unesp.br; Leite, Edson R. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Department of Chemistry, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod.Washingtin Luis km 235, CP 676, Sao Carlos SP 13565-9905 (Brazil)], E-mail: derl@power.ufscar.br

    2009-05-05

    For the first time it is reported the synthesis of lead titanate modified with rare earth by the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added up to 20% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrate into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes. The amorphous precipitate formed was heat-treated at different temperatures in the range from 400 to 900 deg. C for crystallization. Powders were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Tetragonal perovskite structure was observed for the samples up to 15% of lanthanum substitution and cubic perovskite for sample with 20% of lanthanum. Crystallographic domains calculated by Scherrer equation showing a probable suppression of the crystallite growth in function of lanthanum content. It was observed shifting to lower frequencies of Raman modes in the range between 100 and 400 cm{sup -1} and the vanishing of the A1(2TO) and E(1LO) modes could be attributed to transition phase from tetragonal to cubic. Electronic microscopy image revealed that the powders annealed at height temperature are spherical with sharp size distribution.

  8. Nanosized lead lanthanum titanate (PLT) ceramic powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    Camargo, Emerson R.; Barrado, Cristiano M.; Ribeiro, Caue; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time it is reported the synthesis of lead titanate modified with rare earth by the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added up to 20% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrate into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes. The amorphous precipitate formed was heat-treated at different temperatures in the range from 400 to 900 deg. C for crystallization. Powders were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Tetragonal perovskite structure was observed for the samples up to 15% of lanthanum substitution and cubic perovskite for sample with 20% of lanthanum. Crystallographic domains calculated by Scherrer equation showing a probable suppression of the crystallite growth in function of lanthanum content. It was observed shifting to lower frequencies of Raman modes in the range between 100 and 400 cm -1 and the vanishing of the A1(2TO) and E(1LO) modes could be attributed to transition phase from tetragonal to cubic. Electronic microscopy image revealed that the powders annealed at height temperature are spherical with sharp size distribution.

  9. Lead contamination in cocoa and cocoa products: isotopic evidence of global contamination.

    Rankin, Charley W; Nriagu, Jerome O; Aggarwal, Jugdeep K; Arowolo, Toyin A; Adebayo, Kola; Flegal, A Russell

    2005-10-01

    In this article we present lead concentrations and isotopic compositions from analyses of cocoa beans, their shells, and soils from six Nigerian cocoa farms, and analyses of manufactured cocoa and chocolate products. The average lead concentration of cocoa beans was cocoa and chocolate products were as high as 230 and 70 ng/g, respectively, which are consistent with market-basket surveys that have repeatedly listed lead concentrations in chocolate products among the highest reported for all foods. One source of contamination of the finished products is tentatively attributed to atmospheric emissions of leaded gasoline, which is still being used in Nigeria. Because of the high capacity of cocoa bean shells to adsorb lead, contamination from leaded gasoline emissions may occur during the fermentation and sun-drying of unshelled beans at cocoa farms. This mechanism is supported by similarities in lead isotopic compositions of cocoa bean shells from the different farms (206Pb/207Pb = 1.1548-1.1581; 208Pb/207Pb = 2.4344-2.4394) with those of finished cocoa products (206Pb/207Pb = 1.1475-1.1977; 208Pb/207Pb = 2.4234-2.4673). However, the much higher lead concentrations and larger variability in lead isotopic composition of finished cocoa products, which falls within the global range of industrial lead aerosols, indicate that most contamination occurs during shipping and/or processing of the cocoa beans and the manufacture of cocoa and chocolate products.

  10. Fact and Fiction of Nitrous Oxide Production By Nitrification

    Stein, L. Y.; Kozlowski, J.; Stieglmeier, M.; Klotz, M. G.; Schleper, C.

    2014-12-01

    An accepted dogma in nitrification research is that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) produce a modicum of nitrous oxide (N2O) during nitritation via incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine, and substantially more at low oxygen concentrations via nitrifier denitrification.The nitrifier denitrification pathway involves the reduction of nitrite to N2O via nitric oxide and was thought to require activities of a copper-containing nitrite reductase (NirK) and nitric oxide reductase (NorB); inventory encoded in most, but not all AOB genome sequences. The discovery of nirK genes in ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (AOA) resulted in a slew of publications stating that AOA must also perform nitrifier denitrification and, due to their high abundance, must control the majority of nitrification-linked N2O emissions. Prior to a publication by Stieglmeier et al. (2014), which definitively showed a lack of nitrifier denitrification by two axenic AOA cultures, other researchers relied on enrichment cultures, negative data, and heavy inferencing without direct demonstration of either a functional pathway or involvement of specific genes or enzymes. AOA genomes lack recognizable nitric oxide reductases and thermophilic AOA also lack nirK genes. Physiological and microrespirometry experiments with axenic AOB and AOA cultures allowed us to demonstrate that: 1) AOB produce N2O via nitrifier denitrification even though some lack annotated nirK and/or norB genes; 2) nitrifier denitrification by AOB is reliant on nitric oxide but ammonia oxidation is not; 3) ammonia oxidation by AOA is reliant on production of nitric oxide; 4) AOA are incapable of generating N2O via nitrifier denitrification; 5) N2O production by AOA is from chemical interactions between NO and media components, most likely not by enzyme activity. Our results reveal operation of different N oxide transformation pathways in AOB and AOA governed by different environmental controls and involving different mechanisms of N2O

  11. Evaluation of feed COD/sulfate ratio as a control criterion for the biological hydrogen sulfide production and lead precipitation

    Velasco, Antonio; Ramirez, Martha; Volke-Sepulveda, Tania; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to produce hydrogen sulfide and the high affinity of sulfide to react with divalent metallic cations represent an excellent option to remove heavy metals from wastewater. Different parameters have been proposed to control the hydrogen sulfide production by anaerobic bacteria, such as the organic and sulfate loading rates and the feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio. This work relates the feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio with the hydrogen sulfide production and dissolved lead precipitation, using ethanol as carbon and energy source in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. A maximum dissolved sulfide concentration of 470 ± 7 mg S/L was obtained at a feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 2.5, with sulfate and ethanol conversions of approximately 94 and 87%, respectively. The lowest dissolved sulfide concentration (145 ± 10 mg S/L) was observed with a feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 0.67. Substantial amounts of acetate (510-1730 mg/L) were produced and accumulated in the bioreactor from ethanol oxidation. Although only incomplete oxidation of ethanol to acetate was observed, the consortium was able to remove 99% of the dissolved lead (200 mg/L) with a feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 1.5. It was found that the feed COD/SO 4 2- ratio could be an adequate parameter to control the hydrogen sulfide production and the consequent precipitation of dissolved lead

  12. Australian pyrolysis technology leads the world in demonstrating renewable energy production and biosequestration

    Downie, Adriana; Crosky, Alan; Munroe, Paul; Zwieten, Lukas Van; Cowie, Annette; Chan, Yin; Kimber, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    become apparent. Agronomic experiments have demonstrated that the char product can improve several soil health indicators as well as increase productivity. In addition, it decreases emissions of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide. The chemical and physical characteristics of the char are currently being assessed using highly advanced analysis techniques to elucidate the mechanisms by which char improves fertiliser use efficiency, and decreases emissions from soils. This paper will present the engineering, agronomic, and analytical data which lead Tim Flannery to say, 'This is one of the most exciting and important new technologies out there, in terms of stabilising our climate'

  13. Oxidative stress and production of bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids: biotechnological implications.

    Matsuura, Hélio Nitta; Rau, Mariana Ritter; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano

    2014-02-01

    Monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) encompass plant natural products with important pharmacological relevance. They include the anti-tumoral MIAs found in Catharanthus roseus and Camptotheca acuminata. The often low yields of bioactive alkaloids in plants has prompted research to identify the factors regulating MIA production. Oxidative stress is a general response associated with biotic and abiotic stresses leading to several secondary responses, including elicitation of MIA production. These changes in secondary metabolism may take place directly or via second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). H2O2 is the main ROS that participates in MIA biosynthesis. This review analyzes the links between oxidative stress, elicitation of bioactive MIA production and their potential roles in antioxidant defense, as well as exploring the implications to developing biotechnological strategies relevant for alkaloid supply.

  14. Quality Improvement, Inventory Management, Lead Time Reduction and Production Scheduling in High-Mix Manufacturing Environments

    2017-01-13

    Quality Improvement , Inventory Management, Lead Time Reduction and Production Scheduling in High-mix Manufacturing Environments by Sean Daigle B.S...Mechanical Engineering Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Theses 2 Quality Improvement , Inventory Management, Lead Time Reduction and... Production Scheduling in High-mix Manufacturing Environments by Sean Daigle Submitted to the Department of Mechanical Engineering on January 13, 2017, in

  15. 25 CFR 215.21 - Payment of gross production tax on lead and zinc.

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payment of gross production tax on lead and zinc. 215.21... ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.21 Payment of gross production tax on lead and zinc. The superintendent of the Quapaw Indian Agency is hereby authorized and directed to pay at the...

  16. Nitroxyl-mediated oxidation of lignin and polycarboxylated products

    Stahl, Shannon S.; Rafiee, Mohammad

    2018-02-27

    Methods of selectively modifying lignin, polycarboxylated products thereof, and methods of deriving aromatic compounds therefrom. The methods comprise electrochemically oxidizing lignin using stable nitroxyl radicals to selectively oxidize primary hydroxyls on .beta.-O-4 phenylpropanoid units to corresponding carboxylic acids while leaving the secondary hydroxyls unchanged. The oxidation results in polycarboxylated lignin in the form of a polymeric .beta.-hydroxy acid. The polymeric .beta.-hydroxy acid has a high loading of carboxylic acid and can be isolated in acid form, deprotonated, and/or converted to a salt. The .beta.-hydroxy acid, anion, or salt can also be subjected to acidolysis to generate various aromatic monomers or oligomers. The initial oxidation of lignin to the polycarboxylated form renders the lignin more susceptible to acidolysis and thereby enhances the yield of aromatic monomers and oligomers obtained through acidolysis.

  17. Toxicity to woodlice of zinc and lead oxides added to soil litter

    Beyer, W.N.; Anderson, A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high concentrations of metals in soil are associated with reductions in decomposer populations. We have here determined the relation between the concentrations of lead and zinc added as oxides to soil litter and the survival and reproduction of a decomposer population under controlled conditions. Laboratory populations of woodlice (Porcellio scaber Latr) were fed soil litter treated with lead or zinc at concentrations that ranged from 100 to 12,800 ppm. The survival of the adults, the maximum number of young alive, and the average number of young alive, were recorded over 64 weeks. Lead at 12,800 ppm and zinc at 1,600 ppm or more had statistically significant (p zinc have reduced populations of decomposers in contaminated forest soil litter, and concentrations are similar to those reported to be associated with reductions in natural populations of decomposers. Poisoning of decomposers may disrupt nutrient cycling, reduce the numbers of invertebrates available to other wildlife for food, and contribute to the contamination of food chains.

  18. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF PHOSPHATE PRODUCTS ON LEAD SOLUBILITY IN PLUMBING SYSTEMS

    Lead concentrations in drinking water can be minimized by adjusting the pH and alkalinity. Such lead solubility controls, however, may be offset by other water treatment measures that inadvertently increase lead solubility, e.g., the adding of polyphosphate-containing products. ...

  19. Oxidized lipids enhance RANKL production by T lymphocytes: implications for lipid-induced bone loss.

    Graham, Lucia S; Parhami, Farhad; Tintut, Yin; Kitchen, Christina M R; Demer, Linda L; Effros, Rita B

    2009-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disease that is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Whereas osteoclasts and osteoblasts are the main regulators of bone homeostasis, recent studies underscore a key role for the immune system, particularly via activation-induced T lymphocyte production of receptor activator of NFkappaB ligand (RANKL). Well-documented as a mediator of T lymphocyte/dendritic cell interactions, RANKL also stimulates the maturation and activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Given that lipid oxidation products mediate inflammatory and metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis and atherosclerosis, and since oxidized lipids affect several T lymphocyte functions, we hypothesized that RANKL production might also be subject to modulation by oxidized lipids. Here, we show that short term exposure of both unstimulated and activated human T lymphocytes to minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL), but not native LDL, significantly enhances RANKL production and promotes expression of the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). The effect, which is also observed with 8-iso-Prostaglandin E2, an inflammatory isoprostane produced by lipid peroxidation, is mediated via the NFkappaB pathway, and involves increased RANKL mRNA expression. The link between oxidized lipids and T lymphocytes is further reinforced by analysis of hyperlipidemic mice, in which bone loss is associated with increased RANKL mRNA in T lymphocytes and elevated RANKL serum levels. Our results suggest a novel pathway by which T lymphocytes contribute to bone changes, namely, via oxidized lipid enhancement of RANKL production. These findings may help elucidate clinical associations between cardiovascular disease and decreased bone mass, and may also lead to new immune-based approaches to osteoporosis.

  20. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. The efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness, and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results and observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with PWRs. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of lay-up and various start-up conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on corrosion-product transport on the primary side of steam generators are also discussed. (author)

  1. The formation of highly oxidized multifunctional products in the ozonolysis of cyclohexene

    Rissanen, Matti P.; Kurtén, Theo; Sipilä, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a nitrate ion (NO3 -)-based ionization scheme. Quantum chemical calculations were performed at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12//ωB97XD/aug-cc-pVTZ level, with kinetic modeling using multiconformer transition state theory, including...... of seconds. Dimerization of the peroxy radicals by recombination and cross-combination reactions is in competition with the formation of highly oxidized monomer species and is observed to lead to peroxides, potentially diacyl peroxides. The molar yield of these highly oxidized products (having O/C > 1...

  2. Electrochemical characterisation of solid oxide cell electrodes for hydrogen production

    Bernuy-Lopez, Carlos; Knibbe, Ruth; He, Zeming

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen electrodes and steam electrodes are designed and tested to develop improved solid oxide electrolysis cells for H2 production with the cell support on the oxygen electrode. The electrode performance is evaluated by impedance spectroscopy testing of symmetric cells at open circuit voltage (OCV...

  3. Modification of Casein by the Lipid Oxidation Product Malondialdehyde

    Adams, A.; Kimpe, de N.; Boekel, van T.

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of malondialdehyde with casein was studied in aqueous solution to evaluate the impact of this lipid oxidation product on food protein modification. By using multiresponse modeling, a kinetic model was developed for this reaction. The influence of temperature and pH on protein browning

  4. Fission product release by fuel oxidation after water ingress

    Schreiber.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of data obtained by a literature search, a computer code has been established for the calculation of the degree of oxidation of the fuel in the damaged fuel particles, and hence of the fission product release as a function of the time period of steam ingress. (orig.) [de

  5. Controlling nitrous oxide emissions from grassland livestock production systems

    Oenema, O.; Gebauer, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Sapek, A.; Jarvis, S.C.; Corré, W.J.; Yamulki, S.

    1998-01-01

    There is growing awareness that grassland livestock production systems are major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O). Controlling these emissions requires a thorough understanding of all sources and controlling factors at the farm level. This paper examines the various controlling factors and proposes

  6. Bee products prevent agrichemical-induced oxidative damage in fish.

    Daiane Ferreira

    Full Text Available In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™ and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L(-1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50. We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ, honey (H, bee pollen (BP and propolis (P, reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione-S-transferase (GST are increased.

  7. Bee products prevent agrichemical-induced oxidative damage in fish.

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L(-1) of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased.

  8. ARIES Oxide Production Program Annual Report - FY14

    Kelley, Evelyn A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dinehart, Steven Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A summary of the major accomplishments (September), milestones, financial summary, project performance and issues facing the ARIES Oxide Production Program at the close of FY14 is presented in this Executive Summary. Annual accomplishments are summarized in the body of the report.

  9. Field study of nitrous oxide production with in situ aeration in a closed landfill site.

    Nag, Mitali; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei; Xiaoli, Chai

    2016-03-01

    nitrous oxide production potential during in situ aeration in an old landfill site revealed that increased temperatures and oxygen content inside the landfill site are potential factors for nitrous oxide production. Temperatures within the range of optimum nitrification process (30-40°C) induce nitrous oxide formation with high oxygen concentration as a by-product of nitrogen turnover. Decrease of oxygen content during nitrification leads increase of nitrous oxide production, while temperatures above 40°C with moderate and/or low oxygen content inhibit nitrous oxide generation.

  10. Amperometric detection and electrochemical oxidation of aliphatic amines and ammonia on silver-lead oxide thin-film electrodes

    Ge, Jisheng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-08

    This thesis comprises three parts: Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions: aliphatic amines at mixed Ag-Pb oxide thin-film electrodes; oxidation of ammonia at anodized Ag-Pb eutectic alloy electrodes; and temperature effects on oxidation of ethylamine, alanine, and aquated ammonia.

  11. Chemical interaction in resistors based on lead ruthenite with additions of niobium(5) oxide compounds

    Lozinskij, N.S.; Shevtsova, N.A.; Gruba, A.I.; Volkov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    The method of X-ray phase analysis was used to study chemical interaction in isothermal cross-section of Pb 2 RU 2 O 6 -Nb 2 O 5 , Rbsub(2)Rusub(2)Osub(6)-NbWOsub(5.5) and Rb 2 Ru 2 O 6 -Pb 2 Nb 2 O 7 systems at 850 deg C as well as in models of real ruthenium resistors. Chemical interaction is stated to take place in systems with niobium (5) oxide and NbWOsub(5.5). Niobium (5) and tungsten (6) displace ruthenium (4) from its compounds with formation of their lead salts. Similar chemical interactions between current-carrying phase of the resistor and modifiers representing niobium-containing take place in models of components of the studied systems take place in models of resistors

  12. Effects of lead exposure on oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry in waterbirds in the field.

    Martinez-Haro, Monica; Green, Andy J; Mateo, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Medina lagoon in Andalusia has one of the highest densities of spent lead (Pb) shot in Europe. Blood samples from waterbirds were collected in 2006-2008 to measure Pb concentration (PbB), δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry. PbB above background levels (>20 μg/dl) was observed in 19% (n=59) of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and in all common pochards (Aythya ferina) (n=4), but common coots (Fulica atra) (n=37) and moorhens (Gallinula chloropus) (n=12) were all 6 μg/dl. In mallards, an inhibition of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and an increased level of oxidized glutathione (oxGSH) in red blood cells (RBC) were associated with PbB levels >20 μg/dl. In coots, PbB levels were negatively related to vitamin A and carotenoid levels in plasma, and total glutathione in RBCs; and positively related with higher superoxide dismutase and GPx activities and % oxGSH in RBCs. Overall, the results indicate that previously assumed background levels of PbB for birds need to be revised. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biochar-supported reduced graphene oxide composite for adsorption and coadsorption of atrazine and lead ions

    Zhang, Ying; Cao, Bo; Zhao, Lulu; Sun, Lili; Gao, Yan; Li, Jiaojiao; Yang, Fan

    2018-01-01

    To explore potential in application for simultaneous removal of atrazine and lead ions (Pd2+), the adsorption and coadsorption of atrazine and Pd2+ is evaluated onto a novel biochar-supported reduced graphene oxide composite (RGO-BC), which has been successfully developed via slow pyrolysis of graphene oxide (GO) pretreated corn straws. Structure and morphology analysis reveal that GO nanosheets are coated on the surface of biochar (BC) mainly through π-π interactions, notably, GO nanosheets after annealing reduction can basically retain the original morphology, meanwhile, the change of physico-chemical properties on the surface endow excellent adsorption capaities of 26.10 mg g-1 for Pb2+ and 67.55 mg g-1 for atrazine. A significant difference is in sorption of Pb2+ and atrazine on RGO-BC sample in both single- and binary-solute systems. The adsorption capacity of RGO-BC still remained above 54.58 mg g-1 after four times regeneration (81% adsorption capacity remained), demonstrating a promising candidate for the application of removal contaminant in the environment.

  14. Gills are an initial target of zinc oxide nanoparticles in oysters Crassostrea gigas, leading to mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress

    Trevisan, Rafael; Delapedra, Gabriel; Mello, Danielle F.; Arl, Miriam; Schmidt, Éder C.; Meder, Fabian; Monopoli, Marco; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Bouzon, Zenilda L.; Fisher, Andrew S.; Sheehan, David; Dafre, Alcir L.

    2014-01-01

    count). At 24 h post exposure, decreased (−29%) glutathione reductase (GR) activity was observed in gills, but other biochemical responses were observed only after 48 h of exposure: lower GR activity (−28%) and levels of protein thiols (−21%), increased index of lipid peroxidation (+49%) and GPx activity (+26%). In accordance with ultrastructural changes and zinc load, digestive gland showed delayed biochemical responses. Except for a decreased GR activity (−47%) at 48 h post exposure, the biochemical alterations seen in gills were not present in digestive gland. The results indicate that gills are able to incorporate zinc prior (24 h) to digestive gland (48 h), leading to earlier mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress. Our data suggest that gills are the initial target of ZnONP and that mitochondria are organelles particularly susceptible to ZnONP in C. gigas

  15. Gills are an initial target of zinc oxide nanoparticles in oysters Crassostrea gigas, leading to mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress

    Trevisan, Rafael; Delapedra, Gabriel; Mello, Danielle F.; Arl, Miriam [Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Schmidt, Éder C. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetic, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88049-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Meder, Fabian; Monopoli, Marco [Centre for Bionano Interactions, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo [Federal Institute of Santa Catarina, Campus Garopaba, Laboratory of Histological Markers, 88495-000 Garopaba, SC (Brazil); Bouzon, Zenilda L. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetic, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88049-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Fisher, Andrew S. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, PL4 8AA Plymouth (United Kingdom); Sheehan, David [Department of Biochemistry, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Dafre, Alcir L., E-mail: alcir.dafre@ufsc.br [Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    hemocyte count). At 24 h post exposure, decreased (−29%) glutathione reductase (GR) activity was observed in gills, but other biochemical responses were observed only after 48 h of exposure: lower GR activity (−28%) and levels of protein thiols (−21%), increased index of lipid peroxidation (+49%) and GPx activity (+26%). In accordance with ultrastructural changes and zinc load, digestive gland showed delayed biochemical responses. Except for a decreased GR activity (−47%) at 48 h post exposure, the biochemical alterations seen in gills were not present in digestive gland. The results indicate that gills are able to incorporate zinc prior (24 h) to digestive gland (48 h), leading to earlier mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress. Our data suggest that gills are the initial target of ZnONP and that mitochondria are organelles particularly susceptible to ZnONP in C. gigas.

  16. Effect of vitamin E and C supplementation on oxidative damage and total antioxidant capacity in lead-exposed workers.

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela-Leonor; Maldonado-Vega, María; Quintanar-Escorza, Martha-Angelica; Hernández, Gerardo; Arévalo-Rivas, Bertha-Isabel; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The molecular response of the antioxidant system and the effects of antioxidant supplementation against oxidative insult in lead-exposed workers has not been sufficiently studied. In this work, antioxidants (vitamin E 400 IU+vitamin C 1g/daily) were supplemented for one year to 15 workers exposed to lead (73 μg of lead/dl of blood) and the results were compared with those on 19 non-lead exposed workers (6.7 μg of lead/dl). Lead intoxication was accompanied by a high oxidative damage and an increment in the erythrocyte antioxidant response due to increased activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Antioxidant supplementations decreased significantly the oxidative damage as well as the total antioxidant capacity induced by lead intoxication with reduction of the antioxidant enzyme activities. We conclude that antioxidant supplementation is effective in reducing oxidative damage and induces modifications in the physiopathological status of the antioxidant response in lead-exposed workers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Epiphytes modulate Posidonia oceanica photosynthetic production, energetic balance, antioxidant mechanisms and oxidative damage

    Monya Mendes Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytes impose physical barriers to light penetration into seagrass leaves causing shading, which may decrease the production of oxygen reactive species (ROS, but also constitute a physical aggression that may trigger the production of ROS, leading to oxidative damage. Here we investigate the effects of epiphytes on Posidonia oceanica under both interactive perspectives, light attenuation and oxidative stress. Specifically the role of epiphytes in net photosynthesis, chlorophyll a and b, photoprotection (Violaxanthin+Anteraxanthin+Zeaxanthin cycle, soluble sugar and starch contents, enzymatic (ascorbate peroxidase (APX and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR and global (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC antioxidant responses, phenolics and oxidative damage (malondialdehyde are tested. Leaves with epiphytes showed higher chlorophyll b and lower content in VAZ cycle carotenoids. Epiphyte shading was the probable reason for the lower VAZ de-epoxidation-ratio of leaves with epiphytes. In spite of being shaded, leaves with epiphytes showed higher antioxidant levels, indicating that epiphytes trigger the production of ROS. Both ORAC and TEAC and also APX and DHAR activities were higher in leaves with epiphytes, indicating that this response was related with its presence. Malondialdehyde concentrations also suggest oxidative damage caused by epiphytes. We conclude that the epiphyte load causes oxidative stress in P. oceanica and the mechanisms to scavenge ROS were not completely effective to avoid cell damage.

  18. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  19. Elastin aging and lipid oxidation products in human aorta.

    Zarkovic, Kamelija; Larroque-Cardoso, Pauline; Pucelle, Mélanie; Salvayre, Robert; Waeg, Georg; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Vascular aging is associated with structural and functional modifications of the arteries, and by an increase in arterial wall thickening in the intima and the media, mainly resulting from structural modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Among the factors known to accumulate with aging, advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs) are a hallmark of oxidative stress-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis. Aldehydes generated from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), (4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, acrolein), form adducts on cellular proteins, leading to a progressive protein dysfunction with consequences in the pathophysiology of vascular aging. The contribution of these aldehydes to ECM modification is not known. This study was carried out to investigate whether aldehyde-adducts are detected in the intima and media in human aorta, whether their level is increased in vascular aging, and whether elastin fibers are a target of aldehyde-adduct formation. Immunohistological and confocal immunofluorescence studies indicate that 4-HNE-histidine-adducts accumulate in an age-related manner in the intima, media and adventitia layers of human aortas, and are mainly expressed in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, even if the structure of elastin fiber is strongly altered in the aged vessels, our results show that elastin is not or very poorly modified by 4-HNE. These data indicate a complex role for lipid peroxidation and in particular for 4-HNE in elastin homeostasis, in the vascular wall remodeling during aging and atherosclerosis development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. Efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results of observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with pressurized-water reactors. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of layup and various startup conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on CPT on the primary side of SGs are also discussed. (author)

  1. Synthesis and characterization of lead zirconate titanate powders obtained by the oxidant peroxo method

    Camargo, Emerson R. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Department of Chemistry, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis km 235, CP 676, Sao Carlos SP, 13565-905 (Brazil)], E-mail: camargo@ufscar.br; Leite, Edson R. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Department of Chemistry, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis km 235, CP 676, Sao Carlos SP, 13565-905 (Brazil)], E-mail: derl@power.ufscar.br; Longo, Elson [Department of Biochemistry, Chemistry Institute of Araraquara, UNESP, Sao Paulo State University Rua Francisco Degni, CP 355 Araraquara SP, 14801-907 Brazil (Brazil)], E-mail: elson@iq.unesp.br

    2009-02-05

    Lead zirconate titanate (PbZr{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}) was synthesized by the 'oxidant peroxo method (OPM)' with 'x' between 0.25 and 0.50. Titanium metal was dissolved into a hydrogen peroxide/ammonia aqueous solution, followed by the addition of lead and zirconium nitrate solution. The amorphous precipitated precursor obtained was crystallized by heat treatment between 400 and 1000 deg. C. Images of transmission microscopy showed spherical particles with average diameter between 20 and 60 nm, and the presence of necks between particles treated at 700 deg. C. All of the unpressed powders were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Powder samples with 'x' up to 0.35 showed rhombohedral structure when treated at temperatures higher than 500 deg. C, and tetragonal structure when 'x' was higher than 0.40. Analysis of XRD and Raman spectroscopy of the precursor powders showed amorphous-like structures, however powders treated at 400 deg. C showed a structure identified as an intermediate pyrochlore phase, independently of the Zr and Ti mole ratio.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of lead zirconate titanate powders obtained by the oxidant peroxo method

    Camargo, Emerson R.; Leite, Edson R.; Longo, Elson

    2009-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PbZr 1-x Ti x O 3 ) was synthesized by the 'oxidant peroxo method (OPM)' with 'x' between 0.25 and 0.50. Titanium metal was dissolved into a hydrogen peroxide/ammonia aqueous solution, followed by the addition of lead and zirconium nitrate solution. The amorphous precipitated precursor obtained was crystallized by heat treatment between 400 and 1000 deg. C. Images of transmission microscopy showed spherical particles with average diameter between 20 and 60 nm, and the presence of necks between particles treated at 700 deg. C. All of the unpressed powders were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Powder samples with 'x' up to 0.35 showed rhombohedral structure when treated at temperatures higher than 500 deg. C, and tetragonal structure when 'x' was higher than 0.40. Analysis of XRD and Raman spectroscopy of the precursor powders showed amorphous-like structures, however powders treated at 400 deg. C showed a structure identified as an intermediate pyrochlore phase, independently of the Zr and Ti mole ratio

  3. Stabilization of arsenic and lead by magnesium oxide (MgO) in different seawater concentrations.

    Kameda, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Yohey; Ok, Yong Sik

    2018-02-01

    Ongoing sea level rise will have a major impact on mobility and migration of contaminants by changing a number of natural phenomena that alter geochemistry and hydrology of subsurface environment. In-situ immobilization techniques may be a promising remediation strategy for mitigating contaminant mobility induced by sea level rise. This study investigated the reaction mechanisms of magnesium oxide (MgO) with aqueous Pb and As under freshwater and seawater using XAFS spectroscopy. Initial concentrations of Pb and As in freshwater strongly controlled the characteristics of the reaction product of MgO. Our study revealed that i) the removal of aqueous Pb and As by MgO was increased by the elevation of seawater concentration, and ii) the removal of As was attributed primarily to (inner-sphere) surface adsorption on MgO, independent on seawater concentrations, and iii) the retention mechanism of Pb was dependent on seawater concentrations where formations of Pb oxides and adsorption on the MgO surface were predominant in solutions with low and high salinity, respectively. The release of As fixed with MgO significantly increased in seawater compared to freshwater, although the amount of As desorbed accounted for <0.2% of total As. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodiesel production using calcium manganese oxide as catalyst and different raw materials

    Dias, Joana Maia; Conceição Machado Alvim-Ferraz, Maria; Fonseca Almeida, Manuel; Méndez Díaz, José Diego; Sánchez Polo, Manuel; Rivera Utrilla, José

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Biodiesel production using a calcium manganese oxide catalyst was studied. ► The active specie was Ca 0.9 Mn 0.1 O and its deactivation occurred by hydration. ► The studied catalyst presented lower activation temperature than CaO. ► Biodiesel production and quality using different raw materials is reported. ► Compared to the conventional process, biodiesel water content improved. - Abstract: The use of heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production aims to simplify the production process as well as to reduce purification costs and related environmental impacts. Calcium manganese oxide was recently identified by the authors as an interesting heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production from animal fat; however, the difference between this and other catalysts, the catalyst activation/deactivation mechanisms, its behaviour in the synthesis using different raw materials as well as the impacts of its use on product quality remained unclear. Therefore, the present work: (i) compared biodiesel production using calcium manganese oxide and other catalysts (CaO and NaOH); (ii) studied the reasons leading to activation/deactivation of the heterogeneous catalyst; (iii) analysed biodiesel heterogeneous synthesis using calcium manganese oxide and different raw materials (lard, waste frying oil and a mixture); and (iv) evaluated raw material and catalyst impact on the product quality. Considering the use of different catalysts, the results showed that, after 8 h of reaction, product purity was similar using the different catalysts, being 92.5 wt.% using both NaOH and calcium manganese oxide and 93.8 wt.% using CaO. The active species of the heterogeneous catalysts were CaO, in the case of calcinated calcium carbonate, and Ca 0.9 Mn 0.1 O, in the case of calcinated calcium manganese oxide. Because the deactivating species were different for both catalysts, the calcium manganese oxide required lower activation temperature, which should be an advantage

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory

  7. Kinetics of abiotic nitrous oxide production via oxidation of hydroxylamine by particulate metals in seawater

    Cavazos, A. R.; Taillefert, M.; Glass, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The oceans are a significant of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Current models of global oceanic N2­O flux focus on microbial N2O cycling and often ignore abiotic reactions, such as the thermodynamically favorable oxidation of the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by Mn(IV) or Fe(III). At circumneutral pH, NH2OH oxidation is more thermodynamically favorable via Mn(IV) than Fe(III) reduction. We characterized the kinetics of NH2OH oxidation in synthetic ocean water at pH 5.1-8.8 using microsensor electrodes to measure real-time N2O production. N2O production rates and yield were greater when NH2OH was oxidized by Mn(IV) than Fe(III). Accordingly, the reduction of Mn(IV) was first order with respect to NH2OH whereas the reduction of Fe(III) was zero order with respect to NH2OH. Interestingly, the order of the reaction with respect to Mn(IV) appears to be negative whereas the reaction is second order with respect to Fe(III). The inverse order with respect to Mn(IV) may be due to the aggregation of particles in seawater, which decreases their surface area and changes their reactivity. Finally, the reaction is first order with respect to protons with Fe(III) as the oxidant but zero order with Mn(IV). The stronger effect of the pH on the reaction with Fe(III) as the oxidant compared to Mn(IV) reflects the stoichiometry of these two reactions, as each mole of N2O produced by Fe(III) reduction consumes eight protons while each mole of N2O produced with Mn(IV) as the oxidant requires only four protons. Our data show that abiotic NH2OH oxidation by Mn(IV) or Fe(III) particles may represent a significant source of N2O in seawater. These findings suggest that abiotic N2O production in marine waters may be significant in areas of the oceans where particulate metals originating from aerosols, dust, or rivers may react with NH2OH released from ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.

  8. Cadmium and lead interactive effects on oxidative stress and antioxidative responses in rice seedlings.

    Srivastava, Rajneesh Kumar; Pandey, Poonam; Rajpoot, Ritika; Rani, Anjana; Dubey, R S

    2014-09-01

    Interactive effects of two heavy metal pollutants Cd and Pb in the growth medium were examined on their uptake, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of oxidative stress and antioxidative defence responses in Indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings. When rice seedlings in sand culture were exposed to 150 μM Cd (NO3)2 or 600 μM Pb (CH3COO)2 individually or in combination for 8-16 days, a significant reduction in root/shoot length, fresh weight, relative water content, photosynthetic pigments and increased production of ROS (O2˙- and H2O2) was observed. Both Cd and Pb were readily taken up by rice roots and localisation of absorbed metals was greater in roots than in shoots. When present together in the growth medium, uptake of both the metals Cd and Pb declined by 25-40%. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of leaf stomata revealed that Pb caused more distortion in the shape of guard cells than Cd. Dithizone staining of roots showed localisation of absorbed Cd on root hairs and epidermal cells. Both Cd and Pb caused increased lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, decline in protein thiol and increase in non-protein thiol. The level of reduced forms of non-enzymic antioxidants glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (AsA) and their redox ratios (GSH/AsA) declined, whereas the activities of antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) increased in metal treated seedlings compared to controls. In-gel activity staining also revealed increased intensities of SOD and GPX isoforms with metal treatments. Catalase (CAT) activity increased during early days (8 days) of metal exposure and declined by 16 days. Results suggest that oxidative stress is an important component in expression of Cd and Pb toxicities in rice, though uptake of both metals gets reduced considerably when present together in the medium.

  9. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  10. Chemical oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine transformation products in water

    Madi Abilev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH during a water treatment has several disadvantages including formation of stable toxic byproducts. Effectiveness of treatment methods in relation to UDMH transformation products is currently poorly studied. This work considers the effectiveness of chemical oxidants in respect to main metabolites of UDMH – 1-formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine, dimethylaminoacetontrile, N-nitrosodimethylamine and 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole. Experiments on chemical oxidation by Fenton's reagent, potassium permanganate and sodium nitrite were conducted. Quantitative determination was performed by HPLC. Oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with solid-phase microextraction. 1-Formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine was completely oxidized by Fenton's reagent with formation of formaldehyde N-formyl-N-methyl-hydrazone, 1,4-dihydro-1,4-dimethyl-5H-tetrazol-5-one by the action of potassium permanganate and N-methyl-N-nitro-methanamine in the presence of sodium nitrite. Oxidation of 1-formyl-2,2-dimethylhydrazine also resulted in formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine. Oxidation of dimethylaminoacetontrile proceeded with formation of hydroxyacetonitrile, dimethylformamide and 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole. After 30 days, dimethylaminoacetontrile was not detected in the presence of Fenton’s reagent and potassium permanganate, but it’s concentration in samples with sodium nitrite was 77.3 mg/L. In the presence of Fenton’s reagent, potassium permanganate and sodium nitrite after 30 days, N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration decreased by 85, 80 and 50%, respectively. In control sample, N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration decreased by 50%, indicating that sodium nitrite has no effect of on N-nitrosodimethylamine concentration. Only Fenton's reagent allowed to reduce the concentration of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole to 50% in 30 days. In the presence of other oxidants, 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole

  11. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process for the extraction of oxygen for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements for use in fabrication on the Moon. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis is ideal for extraction, since the electron is the only practical reducing agent. MOE has several advantages over other extraction methods. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. Alternatively, MOE requires no import of consumable reagents (e.g. fluorine and carbon) as other processes do, and does not rely on interfacing multiple processes to obtain refined products. Electrolytic processing has the advantage of selectivity of reaction in the presence of a multi-component feed. Products from lunar regolith can be extracted in sequence according to the stabilities of their oxides as expressed by the values of the free energy of oxide formation (e.g. chromium, manganese, Fe, Si, Ti, Al, magnesium, and calcium). Previous work has demonstrated the viability of producing Fe and oxygen from oxide mixtures similar in composition to lunar regolith by molten oxide electrolysis (electrowinning), also called magma electrolysis having shown electrolytic extraction of Si from regolith simulant. This paper describes recent advances in demonstrating the MOE process by a joint project with participation by NASA KSC and

  12. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantitative speciation of Pb by XAS as a result of Phosphate and MgO treatment revealed Pb converted to pyromorphite was limited. • Subsequent MgO addition increased pyromorphite formation. • Pb was precipitated on the surface of MgO as PbO. • Bioaccessibility of Pb decreased with P treatments, but not with MgO only. - Abstract: Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3–9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  13. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation

    Sanderson, Peter [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Bolan, Nanthi [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik [Korea Biochar Research Center & Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative speciation of Pb by XAS as a result of Phosphate and MgO treatment revealed Pb converted to pyromorphite was limited. • Subsequent MgO addition increased pyromorphite formation. • Pb was precipitated on the surface of MgO as PbO. • Bioaccessibility of Pb decreased with P treatments, but not with MgO only. - Abstract: Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3–9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  14. Differences in oxidative stress between young Canada geese and mallards exposed to lead-contaminated sediment

    Mateo, R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure causes an increase in tissue lipid peroxides and variation in glutathione (GSH) concentration, which can be related to peroxidative damage of cell membranes in Pb poisoned animals. Species and individual variation in sensitivity to Pb poisoning among animals may be due to differential resistance to oxidative stress. We compared the effects of oxidative stress caused by Pb exposure (1.7, 414 and 828 ig/g of diet) for the first six weeks in growing young of two species of waterfowl, Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), with the first species being possibly more sensitive to Pb poisoning based on previous field and laboratory observations. Blood and liver Pb concentrations increased more in mallards than in geese; this may be explained on the basis of body weight, being 3.2 times higher in geese, and hepatic metabolism where GSH-S-transferase activity is 2.9 fold higher in geese and presumably has a role in the binding of Pb to GSH and subsequent biliary excretion. In contrast, mallards showed higher hepatic levels of GSH and activities of GSH peroxidase (GPX) and GSH reductase (GR). Although both species showed an increase in hepatic GSH concentration with Pb exposure, the increase of lipid peroxidation with Pb exposure was more significant in geese. Within treatment groups, hepatic GSH concentrations were inversely related to liver Pb concentration in both species, which may correspond to the role of GSH in Pb excretion. Hepatic GSH was also inversely related to hepatic lipid peroxidation, but only in mallards and in agreement with the differences observed in GPX and GR activities. The lower resistance to lipid peroxidation of Canada geese may explain why birds of this species found dead in the field by Pb shot ingestion often have a lower number of shot in the gizzard and lower liver Pb concentrations than mallards.

  15. Oxidative stress induced inflammation initiates functional decline of tear production.

    Yuichi Uchino

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation are proposed to be involved in an age-related functional decline of exocrine glands. However, the molecular mechanism of how oxidative stress affects the secretory function of exocrine glands is unclear. We developed a novel mev-1 conditional transgenic mouse model (Tet-mev-1 using a modified tetracycline system (Tet-On/Off system. This mouse model demonstrated decreased tear production with morphological changes including leukocytic infiltration and fibrosis. We found that the mev-1 gene encodes Cyt-1, which is the cytochrome b(560 large subunit of succinate-ubiquinone oxidoreductase in complex II of mitochondria (homologous to succinate dehydrogenase C subunit (SDHC in humans. The mev-1 gene induced excessive oxidative stress associated with ocular surface epithelial damage and a decrease in protein and aqueous secretory function. This new model provides evidence that mitochondrial oxidative damage in the lacrimal gland induces lacrimal dysfunction resulting in dry eye disease. Tear volume in Tet-mev-1 mice was lower than in wild type mice and histopathological analyses showed the hallmarks of lacrimal gland inflammation by intense mononuclear leukocytic infiltration and fibrosis in the lacrimal gland of Tet-mev-1 mice. These findings strongly suggest that oxidative stress can be a causative factor for the development of dry eye disease.

  16. A novel redox-based switch: LMW-PTP oxidation enhances Grb2 binding and leads to ERK activation

    Giannoni, Elisa; Raugei, Giovanni; Chiarugi, Paola; Ramponi, Giampietro

    2006-01-01

    Low molecular weight-PTP has been reported as a redox-sensitive protein during both platelet-derived growth factor and integrin signalling. In response to oxidation the phosphatase undergoes a reversible inactivation, which in turn leads to the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of its substrates and the properly executed anchorage-dependent proliferation program. Here, we report that an exogenous oxidative stress enhances LMW-PTP tyrosine phosphorylation, through oxidation/inactivation of the enzyme, thus preventing its auto-dephosphorylation activity. In particular, we observed a selective hyper-phosphorylation of Tyr132, that acts as a docking site for the adaptor protein Grb2. The redox-dependent enhancement of Grb2 recruitment to LMW-PTP ultimately leads to an improvement of ERK activation, likely triggering a prosurvival signal against the oxidant environment

  17. Protective effects of Spirulina maxima on hyperlipidemia and oxidative-stress induced by lead acetate in the liver and kidney.

    Ponce-Canchihuamán, Johny C; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Torres-Durán, Patricia V; Juárez-Oropeza, Marco A

    2010-03-31

    Oxidative damage has been proposed as a possible mechanism involved in lead toxicity, specially affecting the liver and kidney. Previous studies have shown the antioxidant effect of Spirulina maxima in several experimental models of oxidative stress. The current study was carried out to evaluate the antioxidant activity of Spirulina maxima against lead acetate-induced hyperlipidemia and oxidative damage in the liver and kidney of male rats. Control animals were fed on a standard diet and did not receive lead acetate (Control group). Experimental animals were fed on a standard laboratory diet with or without Spirulina maxima 5% in the standard laboratory diet and treated with three doses of lead acetate (25 mg each/weekly, intraperitoneal injection) (lead acetate with Spirulina, and lead acetate without Spirulina groups). The results showed that Spirulina maxima prevented the lead acetate-induced significant changes on plasma and liver lipid levels and on the antioxidant status of the liver and kidney. On the other hand, Spirulina maxima succeeded to improve the biochemical parameters of the liver and kidney towards the normal values of the Control group. It was concluded that Spirulina maxima has protective effects on lead acetate-induced damage, and that the effects are associated with the antioxidant effect of Spirulina.

  18. Dispersion strengthening of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products

    Hansen, Niels

    1970-01-01

    The true stress-true strain curves at room temperature and at 400°C were determined for various types of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products containing from 0.2 to 4.7 weight per cent of aluminium oxide. The effect of particles on the initial flow stress and the flow stress for 0.2% offset at room...... temperature and at 400°C is in agreement with Orowan's theory. The increase in flow stress at room temperature for strain values below 3 per cent was related to the plastic strain by the equation σ-σoy=k1ε 1/2, where σoy is the initial flow stress and where k1 increases for increasing volume fraction...... and decreasing particle size of the dispersed particles. A general expression for k1 was derived for the relationship between the dislocation density and the strain in dispersion-strengthened products...

  19. Studies on mathematical modeling of the leaching process in order to efficiently recover lead from the sulfate/oxide lead paste.

    Buzatu, Traian; Ghica, Gabriel Valeriu; Petrescu, Ionuţ Mircea; Iacob, Gheorghe; Buzatu, Mihai; Niculescu, Florentina

    2017-02-01

    Increasing global lead consumption has been mainly supported by the acid battery manufacturing industry. As the lead demand will continue to grow, to provide the necessary lead will require an efficient approach to recycling lead acid batteries. In this paper was performed a mathematical modeling of the process parameters for lead recovery from spent lead-acid batteries. The results of the mathematical modeling compare well with the experimental data. The experimental method applied consists in the solubilisation of the sulfate/oxide paste with sodium hydroxide solutions followed by electrolytic processing for lead recovery. The parameters taken into considerations were NaOH molarity (4M, 6M and 8M), solid/liquid ratio - S/L (1/10, 1/30 and 1/50) and temperature (40°C, 60°C and 80°C). The optimal conditions resulted by mathematical modeling of the electrolytic process of lead deposition from alkaline solutions have been established by using a second-order orthogonal program, in order to obtain a maximum efficiency of current without exceeding an imposed energy specific consumption. The optimum value for the leaching recovery efficiency, obtained through mathematical modeling, was 89.647%, with an error of δ y =3.623 which leads to a maximum recovery efficiency of 86.024%. The optimum values for each variable that ensure the lead extraction efficiency equal to 89.647% are the following: 3M - NaOH, 1/35 - S/L, 70°C - temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Production and consumption of nitric oxide by three methanotrophic bacteria.

    Ren, T; Roy, R; Knowles, R

    2000-09-01

    We studied nitrogen oxide production and consumption by methanotrophs Methylobacter luteus (group I), Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (group II), and an isolate from a hardwood swamp soil, here identified by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Methylobacter sp. strain T20 (group I). All could consume nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, NO), and produce small amounts of nitrous oxide (N(2)O). Only Methylobacter strain T20 produced large amounts of NO (>250 parts per million by volume [ppmv] in the headspace) at specific activities of up to 2.0 x 10(-17) mol of NO cell(-1) day(-1), mostly after a culture became O(2) limited. Production of NO by strain T20 occurred mostly in nitrate-containing medium under anaerobic or nearly anaerobic conditions, was inhibited by chlorate, tungstate, and O(2), and required CH(4). Denitrification (methanol-supported N(2)O production from nitrate in the presence of acetylene) could not be detected and thus did not appear to be involved in the production of NO. Furthermore, cd(1) and Cu nitrite reductases, NO reductase, and N(2)O reductase could not be detected by PCR amplification of the nirS, nirK, norB, and nosZ genes, respectively. M. luteus and M. trichosporium produced some NO in ammonium-containing medium under aerobic conditions, likely as a result of methanotrophic nitrification and chemical decomposition of nitrite. For Methylobacter strain T20, arginine did not stimulate NO production under aerobiosis, suggesting that NO synthase was not involved. We conclude that strain T20 causes assimilatory reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which then decomposes chemically to NO. The production of NO by methanotrophs such as Methylobacter strain T20 could be of ecological significance in habitats near aerobic-anaerobic interfaces where fluctuating O(2) and nitrate availability occur.

  1. Electro-oxidation of the dye azure B: kinetics, mechanism, and by-products.

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Oturan, Nihal; Aravindakumar, C T; Paul, M M Sunil; Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electrochemical degradation of the dye azure B in aqueous solutions was studied by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), electro-Fenton, and anodic oxidation processes, using Pt/carbon-felt and boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cells with H₂O₂ electrogeneration. The higher oxidation power of the electro-Fenton (EF) process using BDD anode was demonstrated. The oxidative degradation of azure B by the electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent rate constants of the oxidation of azure B by (•)OH were measured according to pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The absolute rate constant of azure B hydroxylation reaction was determined by competition kinetics method and found to be 1.19 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). It was found that the electrochemical degradation of the dye leads to the formation of aromatic by-products which are then oxidized to aliphatic carboxylic acids before their almost mineralization to CO₂ and inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium). The evolution of the TOC removal and time course of short-chain carboxylic acids during treatment were also investigated.

  2. Size characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles in commercial sunscreen products

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Fong, Andrew; Linder, Sean W.

    2017-07-01

    There is an increase in the usage of engineered metal oxide (TiO2 and ZnO) nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens due to their pleasing esthetics and greater sun protection efficiency. A number of studies have been done concerning the safety of nanoparticles in sunscreen products. In order to do the safety assessment, it is pertinent to develop novel analytical techniques to analyze these nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens. This study is focused on developing analytical techniques that can efficiently determine particle size of metal oxides present in the commercial sunscreens. To isolate the mineral UV filters from the organic matrices, specific procedures such as solvent extraction were identified. In addition, several solvents (hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, and tetrahydrofuran) have been investigated. The solvent extraction using tetrahydrofuran worked well for all the samples investigated. The isolated nanoparticles were characterized by using several different techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, differential centrifugal sedimentation, and x-ray diffraction. Elemental analysis mapping studies were performed to obtain individual chemical and morphological identities of the nanoparticles. Results from the electron microscopy techniques were compared against the bulk particle sizing techniques. All of the sunscreen products tested in this study were found to contain nanosized (≤100 nm) metal oxide particles with varied shapes and aspect ratios, and four among the 11 products were showed to have anatase TiO2.

  3. How do users interact with photovoltaic-powered products? Investigating 100 'lead-users' and 6 PV products

    Apostolou, G.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand how 'lead-users' interact with PV-powered products, the behaviour of 100 people interacting with six different PV-powered products in their daily life was analysed. The sample of respondents to be observed consisted of 20 groups, each one formed by five students of

  4. The results of the lipids peroxidation products on the DNA bases as biological markers of the oxidative stress

    Falletti, O.

    2007-10-01

    Different ways of DNA damages have been studied, among these ones the direct way of DNA damages formation by the reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). This way leads to the formation of oxidative DNA damages. In 1990, works have suggested an indirect way of DNA damages formation, the lipids peroxidation. Instead of oxidizing directly DNA, the R.O.S. oxide the lipids present in the cells and their membranes; The products coming from this degradation are able to provoke DNA damages. This way has not been studied very much. The work of this thesis is axed on this DNA theme and lipids peroxidation. In the first chapter, we begin by presenting DNA and the direct way of oxidative damages formation by the R.O.S.Then, we speak about the cell lipids suffering oxidation reactions and the different ways of lipids oxidation. Then, we present how the lipid peroxidation is a source of damages for DNA. (N.C.)

  5. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  6. Shell biofilm-associated nitrous oxide production in marine molluscs

    Heisterkamp, I.M.; Schramm, Andreas; Larsen, Lone Heimann

    2013-01-01

    Emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) from freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates has exclusively been ascribed to N2O production by ingested denitrifying bacteria in the anoxic gut of the animals. Our study of marine molluscs now shows that also microbial biofilms on shell surfaces...... are important sites of N2O production. The shell biofilms of Mytilus edulis, Littorina littorea and Hinia reticulata contributed 18-94% to the total animal-associated N2O emission. Nitrification and denitrification were equally important sources of N2O in shell biofilms as revealed by 15N-stable isotope...... mollusc species. Ammonium excretion by the animals was found to be sufficient to sustain N2O production in the shell biofilm. Apparently, the animals provide a nutrient-enriched microenvironment that stimulates growth and N2O production of the shell biofilm. This animal-induced stimulation...

  7. Lead Contamination in Cocoa and Cocoa Products: Isotopic Evidence of Global Contamination

    Rankin, Charley W.; Nriagu, Jerome O.; Aggarwal, Jugdeep K.; Arowolo, Toyin A.; Adebayo, Kola; Flegal, A. Russell

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present lead concentrations and isotopic compositions from analyses of cocoa beans, their shells, and soils from six Nigerian cocoa farms, and analyses of manufactured cocoa and chocolate products. The average lead concentration of cocoa beans was ≤ 0.5 ng/g, which is one of the lowest reported values for a natural food. In contrast, lead concentrations of manufactured cocoa and chocolate products were as high as 230 and 70 ng/g, respectively, which are consistent with mark...

  8. A technology for production of a ''Cureless'' paste containing a high concentration of tetrabasic lead sulfate and a low concentration of free lead

    Boden, David P.; Loosemore, Daniel [Hammond Lead Products, Division of Hammond Group Inc., 6544 Osborn Avenue, Hammond, IN 46320 (United States)

    2007-05-25

    The conventional paste used to produce plates for lead-acid batteries comprises a mixture of leady oxide, water and sulfuric acid. Fibre and other additives, such as expander in negative plates, are added to improve paste properties and battery performance. Following pasting of the plates, they have to be cured to provide the correct chemical composition and crystal morphology, and to oxidize any residual free lead metal to lead monoxide. The desired result of the curing process is a positive plate with a high concentration of uniformly sized tetrabasic lead sulfate (4BS) crystals and with both positive and negative plates having a low concentration of free lead. Curing is a time-consuming and expensive process, which requires large numbers of chambers capable of being heated to 85 C and containing an atmosphere with a relative humidity greater than 95%. This process adds significant cost to the battery. (author)

  9. Arginase expression modulates nitric oxide production in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    Acuña, Stephanie Maia; Aoki, Juliana Ide; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Fernandes, Juliane Cristina Ribeiro; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2017-01-01

    Arginase is an enzyme that converts L-arginine to urea and L-ornithine, an essential substrate for the polyamine pathway supporting Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis replication and its survival in the mammalian host. L-arginine is also the substrate of macrophage nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) to produce nitric oxide (NO) that kills the parasite. This competition can define the fate of Leishmania infection. The transcriptomic profiling identified a family of oxidoreductases in L. (L.) amazonensis wild-type (La-WT) and L. (L.) amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg-) promastigotes and axenic amastigotes. We highlighted the identification of an oxidoreductase that could act as nitric oxide synthase-like (NOS-like), due to the following evidences: conserved domain composition, the participation of NO production during the time course of promastigotes growth and during the axenic amastigotes differentiation, regulation dependence on arginase activity, as well as reduction of NO amount through the NOS activity inhibition. NO quantification was measured by DAF-FM labeling analysis in a flow cytometry. We described an arginase-dependent NOS-like activity in L. (L.) amazonensis and its role in the parasite growth. The increased detection of NO production in the mid-stationary and late-stationary growth phases of La-WT promastigotes could suggest that this production is an important factor to metacyclogenesis triggering. On the other hand, La-arg- showed an earlier increase in NO production compared to La-WT, suggesting that NO production can be arginase-dependent. Interestingly, La-WT and La-arg- axenic amastigotes produced higher levels of NO than those observed in promastigotes. As a conclusion, our work suggested that NOS-like is expressed in Leishmania in the stationary growth phase promastigotes and amastigotes, and could be correlated to metacyclogenesis and amastigotes growth in a dependent way to the internal pool of L-arginine and arginase activity.

  10. Production of heavy flavours at the next-to-leading order

    Nason, P.; Ridolfi, G.; Frixione, S.; Mangano, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The status of next-to-leading calculations of heavy quark production is reviewed. In particular, results on the doubly-differential cross section for the photoproduction of heavy flavours are discussed. The possibility of using heavy flavour production in order to determine the gluon density in the proton at HERA is also discussed. 3 figs., 22 refs

  11. Evaluation of feed COD/sulfate ratio as a control criterion for the biological hydrogen sulfide production and lead precipitation

    Velasco, Antonio [Direccion General del Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental-Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: jvelasco@ine.gob.mx; Ramirez, Martha [Direccion General del Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental-Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Volke-Sepulveda, Tania [Departamento de Biotecnologia, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez-Sanchez, Armando [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Revah, Sergio [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-03-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to produce hydrogen sulfide and the high affinity of sulfide to react with divalent metallic cations represent an excellent option to remove heavy metals from wastewater. Different parameters have been proposed to control the hydrogen sulfide production by anaerobic bacteria, such as the organic and sulfate loading rates and the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. This work relates the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio with the hydrogen sulfide production and dissolved lead precipitation, using ethanol as carbon and energy source in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. A maximum dissolved sulfide concentration of 470 {+-} 7 mg S/L was obtained at a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 2.5, with sulfate and ethanol conversions of approximately 94 and 87%, respectively. The lowest dissolved sulfide concentration (145 {+-} 10 mg S/L) was observed with a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 0.67. Substantial amounts of acetate (510-1730 mg/L) were produced and accumulated in the bioreactor from ethanol oxidation. Although only incomplete oxidation of ethanol to acetate was observed, the consortium was able to remove 99% of the dissolved lead (200 mg/L) with a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 1.5. It was found that the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio could be an adequate parameter to control the hydrogen sulfide production and the consequent precipitation of dissolved lead.

  12. Photoelectrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of thermally oxidized copper oxide for efficient solar fuel production

    Garcia Esparza, Angel T.; Limkrailassiri, Kevin; Leroy, Fré dé ric; Rasul, Shahid; Yu, Weili; Lin, Liwei; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of a facile and highly scalable synthesis process to control growth products of earth-abundant Cu-based oxides and their application in relevant photoelectrochemical and electrochemical solar fuel generation systems. Characterization of the synthesized Cu(I)/Cu(II) oxides indicates that their surface morphology and chemical composition can be simply tuned by varying two synthesis parameters (time and temperature). UV-Vis spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy studies are performed to estimate the band structures and electronic properties of these p-type semiconductor materials. Photoelectrodes made of Cu oxides possess favorable energy band structures for production of hydrogen from water; the position of their conduction band is ≈1 V more negative than the water-reduction potential. High acceptor concentrations on the order of 1018-1019 cm-3 are obtained, producing large electric fields at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface and thereby enhancing charge separation. The highly crystalline pristine samples used as photocathodes in photoelectrochemical cells exhibit high photocurrents under AM 1.5G simulated illumination. When the samples are electrochemically reduced under galvanostatic conditions, the co-existence of the oxide with metallic Cu on the surface seems to function as an effective catalyst for the selective electrochemical reduction of CO2. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  13. Molasses melanoidin-like products enhance phytoextraction of lead through three Brassica species.

    Hatano, Ken-Ichi; Yamatsu, Takeshi

    2018-05-12

    Previously, it has been suggested that melanoidin-like products (MLP) from sugarcane molasses may accelerate copper phytoextraction. In this study, we evaluated the facilitatory effect of MLP on phytoextraction in a medium including cadmium or lead, the concentrations of which were adjusted around the regulation values of the Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act in Japan. Three Brassica species were tested based on their fast growth, high biomass productivity, and high heavy metal absorption. Both biomass and lead uptake in the nutrient medium with 1 mM lead nitrate were significantly increased by the addition of MLP, and almost all of the lead was accumulated in the root tissue. Therefore, MLP were able both to detoxify lead ions and to improve their bioavailability in Brassica species. In contrast, only these species with MLP or citric acid survived in the nutrient medium with 1 mM cadmium sulfate. The phytoextraction of cadmium using these species was therefore impractical under the Act.

  14. Hydrogen production by ethanol partial oxidation over nano-iron oxide catalysts produced by chemical vapour synthesis

    Ahmed, Wael Ahmed Abou Taleb Sayed

    2011-01-13

    stability was reported for a reaction time of 10 hours. The results showed that the reaction route, the product distribution and hydrogen selectivity strongly depend on the iron oxide phase. The {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase showed high hydrogen selectivity with the highest stability. Over {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC supported catalysts acetaldehyde, water and CO{sub 2} were the main products. The product distributions strongly depended on the catalyst iron content. With increasing sample iron content, more CO{sub 2} and water was produced. The catalyst with an iron content of 1.9% showed the highest acetaldehyde yield. This is attributed to the low iron oxide content at active sites which lead to a dehydrogenation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. In contrast, at higher iron content more active sites were provided hence the acetaldehyde re-adsorbed and further oxidised to CO{sub 2}. All supported catalysts showed a good stability for 10 hours. In this time, the ethanol conversion was decreased by 9% with constant acetaldehyde yield. These results provide evidence that the reaction occurs over the iron oxide surface and iron oxide-support interface but not over the SiC particles. These results were supported by carrying out the ethanol oxidation over pure {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles with different surface areas. Those surface areas were chosen depending on the surface areas measured for the pure {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and surface area calculated for iron oxide in the supported samples. The investigation showed that with a large catalyst surface areas hydrogen with a high selectivity may be produced, whereas with a small surface area only acetaldehyde, water and CO{sub 2} can be produced. The characterisation of the used catalyst showed a small variation of the iron oxide particle size and large surface area. This proved that the SiC support avoids a hot spot formation and prevents iron oxide particles from being sintered. (orig.)

  15. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion in mouse liver leads to defect β-oxidation.

    Xiaoshan Zhou

    Full Text Available Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2 deficiency in humans causes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion syndrome. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and search for treatment options, we previously generated and described a TK2 deficient mouse strain (TK2(-/- that progressively loses its mtDNA. The TK2(-/- mouse model displays symptoms similar to humans harboring TK2 deficient infantile fatal encephalomyopathy. Here, we have studied the TK2(-/- mouse model to clarify the pathological role of progressive mtDNA depletion in liver for the severe outcome of TK2 deficiency. We observed that a gradual depletion of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/- mice was accompanied by increasingly hypertrophic mitochondria and accumulation of fat vesicles in the liver cells. The levels of cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids were elevated and there was accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines in plasma of the TK2(-/- mice. In mice with hepatic mtDNA levels below 20%, the blood sugar and the ketone levels dropped. These mice also exhibited reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation due to decreased transport of long chain acylcarnitines into the mitochondria. The gradual loss of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/- mice causes impaired mitochondrial function that leads to defect β-oxidation and, as a result, insufficient production of ketone bodies and glucose. This study provides insight into the mechanism of encephalomyopathy caused by TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion that may be used to explore novel therapeutic strategies.

  16. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion in mouse liver leads to defect β-oxidation.

    Zhou, Xiaoshan; Kannisto, Kristina; Curbo, Sophie; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Hultenby, Kjell; Isetun, Sindra; Gåfvels, Mats; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in humans causes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and search for treatment options, we previously generated and described a TK2 deficient mouse strain (TK2(-/-)) that progressively loses its mtDNA. The TK2(-/-) mouse model displays symptoms similar to humans harboring TK2 deficient infantile fatal encephalomyopathy. Here, we have studied the TK2(-/-) mouse model to clarify the pathological role of progressive mtDNA depletion in liver for the severe outcome of TK2 deficiency. We observed that a gradual depletion of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/-) mice was accompanied by increasingly hypertrophic mitochondria and accumulation of fat vesicles in the liver cells. The levels of cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids were elevated and there was accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines in plasma of the TK2(-/-) mice. In mice with hepatic mtDNA levels below 20%, the blood sugar and the ketone levels dropped. These mice also exhibited reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation due to decreased transport of long chain acylcarnitines into the mitochondria. The gradual loss of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/-) mice causes impaired mitochondrial function that leads to defect β-oxidation and, as a result, insufficient production of ketone bodies and glucose. This study provides insight into the mechanism of encephalomyopathy caused by TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion that may be used to explore novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Leading product-related environmental performance indicators: a selection guide and database

    Issa, Isabela I.; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    2015-01-01

    Ecodesign is a proactive environmental management and improvement approach employed in the product development process, which aims to minimize the environmental impacts caused during a product's life cycle and thus improve its environmental performance. The establishment of measurable environmental...... in the selection and application of environmental performance indicators - a more structured approach is still lacking. This paper presents the efforts made to identify and systematize existing leading product-related environmental performance indicators, based on a systematic literature review, and to develop...

  18. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  19. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  20. Production of aromas and fragrances through microbial oxidation of monoterpenes

    H. F. Rozenbaum

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Aromas and fragrances can be obtained through the microbial oxidation of monoterpenes. Many microorganisms can be used to carry out extremely specific conversions using substrates of low commercial value. However, for many species, these substrates are highly toxic, consequently inhibiting their metabolism. In this work, the conversion ability of Aspergillus niger IOC-3913 for terpenic compounds was examined. This species was preselected because of its high resistance to toxic monoterpenic substrates. Though it has been grown in media containing R-limonene (one of the cheapest monoterpenic hydrocarbons, which is widely available on the market, the species has not shown the ability to metabolize it, since biotransformation products were not detected in high resolution gas chromatography analyses. For this reason, other monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and camphor were used as substrates. These compounds were shown to be metabolized by the selected strain, producing oxidized compounds. Four reaction systems were used: a biotransformation in a liquid medium with cells in growth b with pre-grown cultures c with cells immobilized in a synthetic polymer network and d in a solid medium to which the substrate was added via the gas phase. The main biotransformation products were found in all the reaction systems, although the adoption of previously cultivated cells seemed to favor biotransformation. Cell immobilization seemed to be a feasible strategy for alleviating the toxic effect of the substrate. Through mass spectrometry it was possible to identify verbenone and alpha-terpineol as the biotransformation products of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene, respectively. The structures of the other oxidation products are described.

  1. Next-to-leading-logarithmic power corrections for N -jettiness subtraction in color-singlet production

    Boughezal, Radja; Isgrò, Andrea; Petriello, Frank

    2018-04-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the power corrections to the factorization theorem for the 0-jettiness event shape variable T . Our calculation is performed directly in QCD without using the formalism of effective field theory. We analytically calculate the next-to-leading logarithmic power corrections for small T at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant, extending previous computations which obtained only the leading-logarithmic power corrections. We address a discrepancy in the literature between results for the leading-logarithmic power corrections to a particular definition of 0-jettiness. We present a numerical study of the power corrections in the context of their application to the N -jettiness subtraction method for higher-order calculations, using gluon-fusion Higgs production as an example. The inclusion of the next-to-leading-logarithmic power corrections further improves the numerical efficiency of the approach beyond the improvement obtained from the leading-logarithmic power corrections.

  2. Combined exposure of Japanese quails to cyanotoxins, Newcastle virus and lead: oxidative stress responses.

    Paskova, Veronika; Veronika, Paskova; Paskerova, Hana; Hana, Paskerova; Pikula, Jiri; Jiri, Pikula; Bandouchova, Hana; Hana, Bandouchova; Sedlackova, Jana; Jana, Sedlackova; Hilscherova, Klara; Klara, Hilscherova

    2011-10-01

    Wild birds are continually exposed to many anthropogenic and natural stressors in their habitats. Over the last decades, mass mortalities of wild birds constitute a serious problem and may possibly have more causations such as natural toxins including cyanotoxins, parasitic diseases, industrial chemicals and other anthropogenic contaminants. This study brings new knowledge on the effects of controlled exposure to multiple stressors in birds. The aim was to test the hypothesis that influence of cyanobacterial biomass, lead and antigenic load may combine to enhance the effects on birds, including modulation of antioxidative and detoxification responses. Eight treatment groups of model species Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were exposed to various combinations of these stressors. The parameters of detoxification and oxidative stress were studied in liver and heart after 30 days of exposure. The antioxidative enzymatic defense in birds seems to be activated quite efficiently, which was documented by the elevated levels and activities of antioxidative and detoxification compounds and by the low incidence of damage to lipid membranes. The greatest modulations of glutathione level and activities of glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and lipid peroxidation were shown mostly in the groups with combined multiple exposures. The results indicate that the antioxidative system plays an important role in the protective response of the tissues to applied stressors and that its greater induction helps to protect the birds from more serious damage. Most significant changes of these "defense" parameters in case of multiple stressors suggest activation of this universal mechanism in situation with complex exposure and its crucial role in protection of the bird health in the environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alterations in growth, oxidative damage, and metal uptake of five aromatic rice cultivars under lead toxicity.

    Ashraf, Umair; Hussain, Saddam; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Abbas, Farhat; Tanveer, Mohsin; Noor, Mehmood Ali; Tang, Xiangru

    2017-06-01

    Lead (Pb) affects plant growth and its related physio-biochemical functions negatively. The present study investigated the responses of five different fragrant rice cultivars viz., Meixiangzhan (MXZ-2), Xiangyaxiangzhan (XYXZ), Guixiangzhan (GXZ), Basmati-385 (B-385), and Nongxiang-18 (NX-18) to four different Pb concentrations viz., 0, 400, 800 and 1200 μM. Results depicted that Pb toxicity significantly (P rice plants; nonetheless, a significant variation was found in the sensitivity of rice cultivars to Pb toxicity. Soluble sugars increased significantly only at 1200 μM in GXZ and 800 μM in B-385, whilst the maximum reductions in protein contents were observed at 1200 μM Pb for all rice cultivars. Proline contents were reduced for XYXZ and NX-18 at Pb1200 μM. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) showed differential behavior among Pb treatments and rice cultivars. Among rice cultivars, GXZ showed better antioxidative defense system under Pb toxicity compared with all other cultivars. For all rice cultivars, the trend for Pb accumulation was recorded as: roots > stems > leaves. Furthermore, significant but negative correlations among Pb uptake and plant height (r = -0.79), tillers per plant (r = -0.91) and plant dry biomass (r = -0.81) were recorded for all rice cultivars whereas the values of translocation factor (TF) from stems to leaves were higher than roots to stems. In sum, Pb reduced the early growth and caused physio-biochemical changes in all rice cultivars, nonetheless, GXZ proved better able to tolerate Pb stress than all other rice cultivars under study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production in pressurized solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2012-01-01

    A promising way to store wind and solar electricity is by electrolysis of H2O and CO2 using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) to produce synthetic hydrocarbon fuels that can be used in existing fuel infrastructure. Pressurized operation decreases the cell internal resistance and enables...... improved system efficiency, potentially lowering the fuel production cost significantly. In this paper, we present a thermodynamic analysis of synthetic methane and dimethyl ether (DME) production using pressurized SOECs, in order to determine feasible operating conditions for producing the desired......, and outlet gas composition. For methane production, low temperature and high pressure operation could improve the system efficiency, but might lead to a higher capital cost. For DME production, high pressure SOEC operation necessitates higher operating temperature in order to avoid carbon formation at higher...

  5. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10 mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning. - Highlights: • Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene elevates glutathione level in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene administration could be beneficial in lead poisoning

  6. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir, E-mail: kaslav@mp.pl [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Dobrakowski, Michał [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Kasperczyk, Janusz [Dept. of Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland)

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10 mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning. - Highlights: • Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene elevates glutathione level in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene administration could be beneficial in lead poisoning.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Shiga Toxin Production by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Katarzyna Licznerska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virulence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC strains depends on production of Shiga toxins. These toxins are encoded in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages (Shiga toxin-converting phages, present in EHEC cells as prophages. The genes coding for Shiga toxins are silent in lysogenic bacteria, and prophage induction is necessary for their efficient expression and toxin production. Under laboratory conditions, treatment with UV light or antibiotics interfering with DNA replication are commonly used to induce lambdoid prophages. Since such conditions are unlikely to occur in human intestine, various research groups searched for other factors or agents that might induce Shiga toxin-converting prophages. Among other conditions, it was reported that treatment with H2O2 caused induction of these prophages, though with efficiency significantly lower relative to UV-irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. A molecular mechanism of this phenomenon has been proposed. It appears that the oxidative stress represents natural conditions provoking induction of Shiga toxin-converting prophages as a consequence of H2O2 excretion by either neutrophils in infected humans or protist predators outside human body. Finally, the recently proposed biological role of Shiga toxin production is described in this paper, and the “bacterial altruism” and “Trojan Horse” hypotheses, which are connected to the oxidative stress, are discussed.

  8. Lipid oxidation in baked products: impact of formula and process on the generation of volatile compounds.

    Maire, Murielle; Rega, Barbara; Cuvelier, Marie-Elisabeth; Soto, Paola; Giampaoli, Pierre

    2013-12-15

    This paper investigates the effect of ingredients on the reactions occurring during the making of sponge cake and leading to the generation of volatile compounds related to flavour quality. To obtain systems sensitive to lipid oxidation (LO), a formulation design was applied varying the composition of fatty matter and eggs. Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and formation of related volatile compounds were followed at the different steps of cake-making. Optimised dynamic Solid Phase Micro Extraction was applied to selectively extract either volatile or semi-volatile compounds directly from the baking vapours. We show for the first time that in the case of alveolar baked products, lipid oxidation occurs very early during the step of dough preparation and to a minor extent during the baking process. The generation of lipid oxidation compounds depends on PUFA content and on the presence of endogenous antioxidants in the raw matter. Egg yolk seemed to play a double role on reactivity: protecting unsaturated lipids from oxidation and being necessary to generate a broad class of compounds of the Maillard reaction during baking and linked to the typical flavour of sponge cake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of product configurators on lead times in engineering-oriented companies

    Haug, Anders; Hvam, Lars; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study of how the use of product configurators affects business processes of engineering-oriented companies. A literature study shows that only a minor part of product configuration research deals with the effects of product configuration, and that the ones that do are mostly...... vague when reporting the effects of configurator projects. Only six cases were identified, which provide estimates of the actual size of lead time reduction achieved from product configurators. To broaden this knowledge, this paper presents the results of a study of 14 companies concerning the impact...

  10. Aqueous-phase oxidation of green leaf volatiles by hydroxyl radical as a source of SOA: Product identification from methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate oxidation

    Hansel, Amie K.; Ehrenhauser, Franz S.; Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Anastasio, Cort; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    2015-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a group of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into the atmosphere by vegetation. BVOCs produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via gas-phase reactions, but little is known of their aqueous-phase oxidation as a source of SOA. GLVs can partition into atmospheric water phases, e.g., fog, mist, dew or rain, and be oxidized by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH). These reactions in the liquid phase also lead to products that have higher molecular weights, increased polarity, and lower vapor pressures, ultimately forming SOA after evaporation of the droplet. To examine this process, we investigated the aqueous, ˙OH-mediated oxidation of methyl jasmonate (MeJa) and methyl salicylate (MeSa), two GLVs that produce aqueous-phase SOA. High performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used to monitor product formation. The oxidation products identified exhibit higher molecular mass than their parent GLV due to either dimerization or the addition of oxygen and hydroxyl functional groups. The proposed structures of potential products are based on mechanistic considerations combined with the HPLC/ESI-MS data. Based on the structures, the vapor pressure and the Henry's law constant were estimated with multiple methods (SPARC, SIMPOL, MPBPVP, Bond and Group Estimations). The estimated vapor pressures of the products identified are significantly (up to 7 orders of magnitude) lower than those of the associated parent compounds, and therefore, the GLV oxidation products may remain as SOA after evaporation of the water droplet. The contribution of the identified oxidation products to SOA formation is estimated based on measured HPLC-ESI/MS responses relative to previous aqueous SOA mass yield measurements.

  11. Production and analysis of ultradispersed uranium oxide powders

    Zajogin, A. P.; Komyak, A. I.; Umreiko, D. S.; Umreiko, S. D.

    2010-05-01

    Spectroscopic studies are made of the laser plasma formed near the surface of a porous body containing nanoquantities of uranium compounds which is irradiated by two successive laser pulses. The feasibility of using laser chemical methods for obtaining nanoclusters of uranium oxide particles in the volume of a porous body and the simultaneous possibility of determining the uranium content with good sensitivity are demonstrated. The thermochemical and spectral characteristics of the analogs of their compounds with chlorine are determined and studied. The possibility of producing uranium dioxides under ordinary conditions and their analysis in the reaction products is demonstrated.

  12. Childhood Blood Lead Reductions Following Removal of Leaded Ceramic Glazes in Artisanal Pottery Production: A Success Story

    Donald E. Jones, MS; Mario Covarrubias Pérez; Bret Ericson; Daniel Estrada Sánchez; Sandra Gualtero; Andrea Smith-Jones, MS; Jack Caravanos, DrPH, CIH

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lead exposure within artisanal ceramics workshop communities in Mexico continues to be a major source of childhood lead poisoning. Artisanal ceramics workshops expose children through direct ingestion, contaminated soil, and food prepared in lead-glazed pottery. Conversion to non-lead glazes alone may not effectively reduce exposure. This paper describes a model comprehensive intervention and environmental remediation of an artisanal ceramics workshop in the state of Hidalgo, Mexi...

  13. Microarc Oxidation of Product Surfaces without Using a Bath

    V. K. Shatalov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While using an electrochemical method to cover the large-sized work-pieces, units, and products up to 6 м3 by protective coating, there is a certain difficulty to apply traditional anodizing techniques in a plating vat, and it is necessary to find various processing techniques.To use the existing micro-arc oxide coating (MOC methods for work-pieces of various forms and sizes in a plating vat is complicated in case it is required to provide oxide layers in separate places rather than over entire surface of a work-piece. The challenge is to treat flat surfaces in various directions, external and internal surfaces of rotation bodies, profiled surfaces, intersections, closed and through holes, pipes, as well as spline and thread openings for ensuring anti-seize properties in individual or small-scale production to meet technical requirements and operational properties of products.A design of tools to provide MOC-process of all possible surfaces of various engineering box-type products depends on many factors and can be considerably different even when processing the surfaces of the same forms. An attachment to be used is fixed directly on a large-sized design (a work-piece, a product or fastened in the special tool. The features of technological process, design shape, and arrangement of the processed surfaces define a fastening method of the attachment. Therefore it is necessary to pay much attention to a choice of the processing pattern and a design of tools.The Kaluga-branch of Bauman Moscow State Technical University is an original proposer of methods to form MOC-coatings on the separate surfaces of large-sized work-pieces using the moved and stationary electrodes to solve the above listed tasks.The following results of work will have an impact on development of the offered processing methods and their early implementation in real production:1. To provide oxide coatings on the surfaces of large-sized products or assemblies in a single or small

  14. Aerobic nitrous oxide production through N-nitrosating hybrid formation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Mooshammer, Maria; Kitzler, Barbara; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa

    2014-05-01

    Soil emissions are largely responsible for the increase of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere and are generally attributed to the activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. However, the contribution of the recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to N2O production from soil is unclear as is the mechanism by which they produce it. Here we investigate the potential of Nitrososphaera viennensis, the first pure culture of AOA from soil, to produce N2O and compare its activity with that of a marine AOA and an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) from soil. N. viennensis produced N2O at a maximum yield of 0.09% N2O per molecule of nitrite under oxic growth conditions. N2O production rates of 4.6±0.6 amol N2O cell(-1) h(-1) and nitrification rates of 2.6±0.5 fmol NO2(-) cell(-1) h(-1) were in the same range as those of the AOB Nitrosospira multiformis and the marine AOA Nitrosopumilus maritimus grown under comparable conditions. In contrast to AOB, however, N2O production of the two archaeal strains did not increase when the oxygen concentration was reduced, suggesting that they are not capable of denitrification. In (15)N-labeling experiments we provide evidence that both ammonium and nitrite contribute equally via hybrid N2O formation to the N2O produced by N. viennensis under all conditions tested. Our results suggest that archaea may contribute to N2O production in terrestrial ecosystems, however, they are not capable of nitrifier-denitrification and thus do not produce increasing amounts of the greenhouse gas when oxygen becomes limiting.

  15. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

    Takamasa Ishii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility.

  16. Multilevel Production Systems with Dependent Demand with Uncertainty of Lead Times

    Haibatolah Sadeghi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study considers a multilevel assembly system with several components in each sublevel. It is assumed that actual lead time for all components is probabilistic; and periodic order quantity (POQ policy for ordering is utilized. If at a certain level a job is not received at the expected time, a delay is incurred at the delivery of production at this level and this may result in backorders of the finished product. It is assumed in this case that a fixed percentage of the shortage is backlogged and other sales are lost. In the real situation, some but not all customers will wait for backlogged components during a period of shortage, such as for fashionable commodities or high-tech products with the short product life cycle. The objective of this study is to find the planned lead time and periodicity for the total components in order to minimize the expected fixed ordering, holding, and partial backlogging costs for the finished product. In this study, it is assumed that a percentage of components at each level are scrap. A general mathematical model is suggested and the method developed can be used for optimization planned lead time and periodicity for such an MRP system under lead time uncertainties.

  17. Stress proteins and oxidative damage in a renal derived cell line exposed to inorganic mercury and lead

    Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Morandini, Fausta; Bettoni, Francesca; Schena, Ilaria; Lavazza, Antonio; Grigolato, Pier Giovanni; Apostoli, Pietro; Rezzani, Rita; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2009-01-01

    A close link between stress protein up-regulation and oxidative damage may provide a novel therapeutic tool to counteract nephrotoxicity induced by toxic metals in the human population, mainly in children, of industrialized countries. Here we analysed the time course of the expression of several heat shock proteins, glucose-regulated proteins and metallothioneins in a rat proximal tubular cell line (NRK-52E) exposed to subcytotoxic doses of inorganic mercury and lead. Concomitantly, we used morphological and biochemical methods to evaluate metal-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative damage. In particular, as biochemical indicators of oxidative stress we detected reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), total glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. Our results clearly demonstrated that mercury increases ROS and RNS levels and the expressions of Hsp25 and inducible Hsp72. These findings are corroborated by evident mitochondrial damage, apoptosis or necrosis. By contrast, lead is unable to up-regulate Hsp72 but enhances Grp78 and activates nuclear Hsp25 translocation. Furthermore, lead causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, vacuolation and nucleolar segregation. Lastly, both metals stimulate the over-expression of MTs, but with a different time course. In conclusion, in NRK-52E cell line the stress response is an early and metal-induced event that correlates well with the direct oxidative damage induced by mercury. Indeed, different chaperones are involved in the specific nephrotoxic mechanism of these environmental pollutants and work together for cell survival.

  18. Regulation of adrenomedullin and nitric oxide production by periodontal bacteria.

    Hussain, Q A; McKay, I J; Gonzales-Marin, C; Allaker, R P

    2015-10-01

    In periodontitis the host response to bacterial challenge includes activity of the multifunctional molecules adrenomedullin (AM) and nitric oxide (NO). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of periodontal bacteria in regulating the production of these molecules from cultured cells. Regulation of AM and NO production from oral keratinocytes when challenged with culture supernatants from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Veillonella atypica, Streptococcus salivarius and Candida albicans was examined. AM and NO were measured in cell culture supernatants using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the nitrate/nitrite (NO metabolites) Griess assay respectively. Cellular production of AM and inducible NO synthase was also analysed in target cells by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. The inter-relationship of AM and NO production were further investigated with macrophages. A. actinomycetemcomitans and C. rectus induced maximal levels of both AM and NO after 6 and 48 h respectively from oral keratinocytes. AM production in macrophages was upregulated in response to the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione and partially blocked by the inducible NO synthase inhibitor, N(ω) -Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. Likewise, NO production was increased upon exposure to AM, while the AM receptor antagonist AM 22-52 reduced the release of NO. Pathogens associated with aggressive periodontitis, A. actinomycetemcomitans and C. rectus, were more effective than those associated with chronic periodontitis, P. gingivalis and Prev. intermedia, and commensals, S. salivarius and V. atypica, as regards the upregulation of AM and NO production from oral keratinocytes. Interaction between these molecules was also demonstrated with macrophages. Understanding the coordinated regulation of AM and NO production in response to periodontal bacteria may identify

  19. Coupling Solid Oxide Electrolyser (SOE) and ammonia production plant

    Cinti, Giovanni; Frattini, Domenico; Jannelli, Elio; Desideri, Umberto; Bidini, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative NH 3 production plant was designed. • CO 2 emissions and energy consumption are studied in three different designs. • High temperature electrolysis allows to achieve high efficiency and heat recovery. • The coupling permits storage of electricity into a liquid carbon free chemical. - Abstract: Ammonia is one of the most produced chemicals worldwide and is currently synthesized using nitrogen separated from air and hydrogen from natural gas reforming with consequent high consumption of fossil fuel and high emission of CO 2 . A renewable path for ammonia production is desirable considering the potential development of ammonia as energy carrier. This study reports design and analysis of an innovative system for the production of green ammonia using electricity from renewable energy sources. This concept couples Solid Oxide Electrolysis (SOE), for the production of hydrogen, with an improved Haber Bosch Reactor (HBR), for ammonia synthesis. An air separator is also introduced to supply pure nitrogen. SOE operates with extremely high efficiency recovering high temperature heat from the Haber-Bosch reactor. Aspen was used to develop a model to study the performance of the plant. Both the SOE and the HBR operate at 650 °C. Ammonia production with zero emission of CO 2 can be obtained with a reduction of 40% of power input compared to equivalent plants.

  20. Effect of substrate availability on nitrous oxide production by deammonification processes under anoxic conditions.

    Schneider, Yvonne; Beier, Maike; Rosenwinkel, Karl-Heinz

    2012-05-01

    Due to its high global warming potential, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from wastewater treatment processes have recently received a high degree of attention. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information regarding the microbiological processes leading to N(2)O production. In this study, two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors were operated with deammonification biomass to investigate the role of denitrification and the influence of substrate availability regarding N(2)O formation during the anoxic phase of deammonification. Three different operational phases were established: within the first phase conversion by anammox was favoured and after a transition phase, denitrification activity was promoted. Low nitrous oxide production was observed during stable operation aiming for anammox conversion. Pulsed inflow of the wastewater containing ammonium (NH(4)(+)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) led to increased N(2)O production rates. Within the period of denitrification as dominating nitrogen conversion process, the nitrous oxide concentration level was higher during continuous inflow conditions, but the reaction to pulsed inflow was less pronounced. The results indicated that denitrification was responsible for N(2)O formation from the deammonification biomass. Operational settings to achieve suppression of denitrification processes to a large extend were deducted from the results of the experiments. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Use of calcium oxide in palm oil methyl ester production

    Kulchanat Prasertsit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducing an untreated calcium oxide (CaO as a solid heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production from palm oil by transesterification was studied in this work. The four studied parameters were methanol to oil molar ratio, CaO catalyst concentration, reaction time, and water content. The results for palm oil show that when the water content is higher than 3%wt and the amount of CaO greater than 7%wt soap formation from saponification occurs. A higher methanol to oil molar ratio requires a higher amount of CaO catalyst to provide the higher product purity. The appropriate methanol to CaO catalyst ratio is about 1.56. Commercial grade CaO gives almost the same results as AR grade CaO. In addition, reusing commercial grade CaO for about 5 to 10 repetitions without catalyst regeneration drops the percentage of methyl ester purity approximately 5 to 10%, respectively.

  2. Clean forming of stainless steel and titanium products by lubricious oxides

    Heikkilä, Irma; Wadman, Boel; Thoors, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    to industrial forming processes. Preliminary evaluations show a beneficial influence of two oxides types, on stainless steel and on titanium. More work is needed to test the lubricating effect in other forming operations and to analyse the sustainability aspects for products manufactured with this alternative......Big social benefits can be attained through increased use of stainless steel or titanium in new sheet metal applications. Unfortunately, forming of these materials is often a challenging and costly operation, that can lead to environmental and health problems when solving the technical limitations...

  3. Evaluating four mathematical models for nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Chandran, Kartik; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Murthy, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are major contributors to N(2)O emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Although the fundamental metabolic pathways for N(2)O production by AOB are now coming to light, the mechanisms responsible for N(2)O production by AOB in WWTP are not fully understood. Mathematical modeling provides a means for testing hypotheses related to mechanisms and triggers for N(2)O emissions in WWTP, and can then also become a tool to support the development of mitigation strategies. This study examined the ability of four mathematical model structures to describe two distinct mechanisms of N(2)O production by AOB. The production mechanisms evaluated are (1) N(2)O as the final product of nitrifier denitrification with NO(2)- as the terminal electron acceptor and (2) N(2)O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) to NO(2)-. The four models were compared based on their ability to predict N(2)O dynamics observed in three mixed culture studies. Short-term batch experimental data were employed to examine model assumptions related to the effects of (1) NH4+ concentration variations, (2) dissolved oxygen (DO) variations, (3) NO(2)- accumulations and (4) NH(2OH as an externally provided substrate. The modeling results demonstrate that all these models can generally describe the NH4+, NO(2)-, and NO(3)- data. However, none of these models were able to reproduce all measured N(2)O data. The results suggest that both the denitrification and NH(2)OH pathways may be involved in N(2)O production and could be kinetically linked by a competition for intracellular reducing equivalents. A unified model capturing both mechanisms and their potential interactions needs to be developed with consideration of physiological complexity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The degradation of lining of rotary furnaces in the production of zinc oxide

    Natália Luptáková

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is closely connected with the complex problem of degradation relating to the refractories of rotary furnace linings in the production of zinc oxide. Zinc oxide can be produced by variety of ways, but the most common method of production which is used in Europe is indirect, i.e. pyrolytic combustion of zinc. This method is also called "French process" of manufacturing ZnO. But this mentioned method of preparation leads to the creation of the enormous amount of zinc slag including chemical complexes of elements Fe, Zn and Al. The mechanism of degradation of the lining leads to slag rests and it is closely connected with the mutual interaction of the aggressive agents with the components of the lining. This process creates a new undesired surface layer which increased the overall thickness of zinc slag. Stuck slag has the influence on rapid degradation of the linings and moreover it also decreases the production quality of ZnO. Analysis results introduced in this paper are significant information for minimizing of degradation of rotary furnaces.  

  5. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). To reduce the water use and increase the energy efficiency in WO pretreatment features like recycling liquid (filtrate), presoaking of rape straw in water or recycled filtrate before WO, skip washing pretreated solids (filter cake) after WO, or use of whole slurry (Filter cake + filtrate) in SSF were also tested. Except ethanol yields, pretreatment methods were evaluated based on achieved glucose yields, amount of water used, recovery of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The highest ethanol yield obtained was 67% after fermenting the whole slurry produced by WO at 205 °C for 3 min with 12 bar of oxygen gas pressure and featured with presoaking in water. At these conditions after pre-treatment, cellulose and hemicellulose was recovered quantitatively (100%) together with 86% of the lignin. WO treatments of 2–3 min at 205–210 °C with 12 bar of oxygen gas produced higher ethanol yields and cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin recoveries, than 15 min WO treatment at 195 °C. Also, recycling filtrate and use of higher oxygen gas pressure reduced recovery of materials. The use of filtrate could be inhibitory for the yeast, but also reduced lactic acid formation in SSF. -- Highlights: ► Wet Oxidation pretreatment on rape straw for sugar and ethanol production. ► Variables were reaction time, temperature, and oxygen gas pressure. ► Also, other configurations for increase of water and energy efficiency. ► Short Wet oxidation pretreatment (2–3 min) produced highest ethanol yield. ► After these pretreatment conditions recovery of lignin in solids was 86%.

  6. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  7. Cadmium and lead in cocoa powder and chocolate products in the US Market.

    Abt, Eileen; Fong Sam, Jennifer; Gray, Patrick; Robin, Lauren Posnick

    2018-06-01

    Cocoa powder and chocolate products are known to sometimes contain cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) from environmental origins. A convenience sample of cocoa powder, dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and cocoa nib products was purchased at retail in the US and analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to assess Cd and Pb concentrations. Cd and Pb were evaluated in relation to the percent cocoa solids and to the reported origin of the cocoa powder and chocolate products. Cd ranged from 0.004 to 3.15 mg/kg and Pb ranged from cocoa, with correlations varying by product type and geographic origin. Geographic variation was observed for Cd, with higher Cd concentrations found in products reported as originating from Latin America than from Africa. The influence of percent cocoa solids and cocoa origin on Cd levels are relevant to international standards for Cd in chocolate products.

  8. Preparation of lead oxide nanoparticles from cathode-ray tube funnel glass by self-propagating method.

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Jianxin

    2012-05-15

    This paper presents a novel process of extracting lead oxide nanoparticles from cathode-ray tube (CRT) funnel glass using self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The impacts of added amount of funnel glass on the extraction ratio of lead, the lead extraction velocity and the micromorphology, as well as particle size of extracted nanoparticles were investigated. We found that self-propagating reaction in the presence of Mg and Fe(2)O(3) could separate lead preferentially and superfine lead oxide nanoparticles were obtained from a collecting chamber. The separation ratio was related closely to the amount of funnel glass added in the original mixture. At funnel glass addition of no more than 40wt.%, over 90wt.% of lead was recovered from funnel glass. High extraction yield reveals that the network structure of funnel glass was fractured due to the dramatic energy generated during the SHS melting process. The PbO nanoparticles collected show good dispersion and morphology with a mean grain size of 40-50nm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of lead on Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 oxide layers formed in simulated steam generator secondary environments

    Garcia-Mazario, M.; Lancha, A.M.; Hernandez, M.; Maffiotte, C.

    1996-01-01

    The existence of lead in steam generators, detected during the analysis of deposits in the damaged areas of tubing, supports the hypothesis that lead may contribute to the cracking problems experienced in steam generator tubes. In addition, the harmful effect of lead on Inconel 600 is known not only through laboratory tests but also as a result of operating experience. Operating experience of Incoloy 800 is, however, much more limited and there are very few laboratory studies in this area. Taking into account that thin films formed on metals reflect the interaction between such metals and the aqueous environment and also that incoloy 800 is considered to be a suitable material for new steam generators as a substitute for Inconel 600, attempts to determine the effect of lead on corrosion films are considered useful with a view to better understanding the stress-corrosion-cracking behaviour of these materials. For these reasons the objective of this paper is to gain some insights into the effect of lead on the oxide layers forming on Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 tested in the laboratory in various aggressive lead-containing environments. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) have been used to study the composition of these oxide layers. (orig.)

  10. Biochemical effects of lead exposure on oxidative stress and antioxidant status of battery manufacturing workers of Western Maharashtra, India.

    Ghanwat, Ganesh Haribhau; Patil, Arun Jalindar; Patil, Jyotsna A; Kshirsagar, Mandakini S; Sontakke, Ajit; Ayachit, Ram Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Lead induces oxidative stress and alters the antioxidant status of population exposed to high lead levels, i.e. battery manufacturing workers. The aim of this study was to know the current scenario of blood lead (PbB) levels and their effect on the oxidative stress parameter, i.e. serum lipid peroxide (LP), and antioxidant parameters, such as red blood cell (RBC)-superoxide dismutase (SOD), RBC-catalase (CAT), plasma ceruloplasmin (CP), and serum nitrite, of battery manufacturing workers. Forty-three battery manufacturing workers from Western Maharashtra, India, with ages between 19 and 42 years, were selected as study group and compared with 38 age-matched, healthy male subjects (control group). From both group subjects, 10 mL of blood sample was drawn by puncturing the antecubital vein, and PbB, serum LP, RBC-SOD, RBC-CAT, plasma CP, and serum nitrite were estimated using standard methods. The PbB levels of the battery manufacturing workers were significantly higher (pworkers as compared with the control subjects. Despite modern techniques used to reduce lead exposure in battery manufacturing workers, PbB levels remain high, inducing oxidative stress and altering the antioxidant status of battery manufacturing workers.

  11. Separation of Rhenium from Lead-Rich Molybdenite Concentrate via Hydrochloric Acid Leaching Followed by Oxidative Roasting

    Guanghui Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lead-rich molybdenite is a typical rhenium-bearing molybdenum resource in China, which has not been efficiently utilized due to its high contents of lead and gangue minerals. In this study, hydrochloric acid was used for preliminarily removing lead and calcite from a lead-rich molybdenite concentrate. Oxidative roasting-ammonia leaching was then carried out for separation of rhenium and extraction of molybdenum. The hydrochloric acid leaching experiments revealed that 93.6% Pb and 97.4% Ca were removed when the leaching was performed at 95 °C for 10 min with HCl concentration of 8 wt. % and liquid-solid ratio of 5 (mL/g. The results of direct oxidative roasting indicated that 89.3% rhenium was volatilized from the raw concentrate after roasting at 600 °C for 120 min in air. In contrast, the rhenium volatilization was enhanced distinctly to 98.0% after the acid-leached concentrate (leaching residue was roasted at 550 °C for 100 min. By the subsequent ammonia leaching, 91.5% molybdenum was leached out from the calcine produced from oxidative roasting of the acid-leached concentrate, while only 79.3% Mo was leached from the calcine produced by roasting molybdenite concentrate without pretreatment.

  12. Sex-Specificity of Oxidative Stress in Newborns Leading to a Personalized Antioxidant Nutritive Strategy

    Jean-Claude Lavoie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a critical process that triggers several diseases observed in premature infants. Growing recognition of the detriment of oxidative stress in newborns warrants the use of an antioxidant strategy that is likely to be nutritional in order to restore redox homeostasis. It appears essential to have a personalized approach that will take into account the age of gestation at birth and the sex of the infant. However, the link between sex and oxidative stress remains unclear. The aim of this study was to find a common denominator explaining the discrepancy between studies related to sex-specific effects of oxidative stress. Results highlight a specificity of sex in the levels of oxidative stress markers linked to the metabolism of glutathione, as measured in the intracellular compartments. Levels of all sex-dependent oxidative stress markers are greater and markers associated to a better antioxidant defense are lower in boys compared to girls during the neonatal period. This sex-specific discrepancy is likely to be related to estrogen metabolism, which is more active in baby-girls and promotes the activation of glutathione metabolism. Conclusion: our observations suggest that nutritive antioxidant strategies need to target glutathione metabolism and, therefore, should be personalized considering, among others, the sex specificity.

  13. Sex-Specificity of Oxidative Stress in Newborns Leading to a Personalized Antioxidant Nutritive Strategy.

    Lavoie, Jean-Claude; Tremblay, André

    2018-03-27

    Oxidative stress is a critical process that triggers several diseases observed in premature infants. Growing recognition of the detriment of oxidative stress in newborns warrants the use of an antioxidant strategy that is likely to be nutritional in order to restore redox homeostasis. It appears essential to have a personalized approach that will take into account the age of gestation at birth and the sex of the infant. However, the link between sex and oxidative stress remains unclear. The aim of this study was to find a common denominator explaining the discrepancy between studies related to sex-specific effects of oxidative stress. Results highlight a specificity of sex in the levels of oxidative stress markers linked to the metabolism of glutathione, as measured in the intracellular compartments. Levels of all sex-dependent oxidative stress markers are greater and markers associated to a better antioxidant defense are lower in boys compared to girls during the neonatal period. This sex-specific discrepancy is likely to be related to estrogen metabolism, which is more active in baby-girls and promotes the activation of glutathione metabolism. our observations suggest that nutritive antioxidant strategies need to target glutathione metabolism and, therefore, should be personalized considering, among others, the sex specificity.

  14. Proanthocyanidins Attenuation of Chronic Lead-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage in Kunming Mice via the Nrf2/ARE Pathway

    Miao Long

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lead is harmful for human health and animals. Proanthocyanidins (PCs, a natural antioxidant, possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against lead-induced liver damage have not been clarified. This study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PCs on the hepatotoxicity of male Kunming mice induced by chronic lead exposure. A total of 70 healthy male Kunming mice were averagely divided into four groups: control group, i.e., the group exposed to lead, the group treated with PCs, and the group co-treated with lead and PCs. The mice exposed to lead were given water containing 0.2% lead acetate. Mice treated in the PCs and PCs lead co-treated groups were given PC (100 mg/kg in 0.9% saline by oral gavage. Lead exposure caused a significant elevation in the liver function parameters, lead level, lipid peroxidation, and inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The induction of oxidative stress and histological alterations in the liver were minimized by co-treatment with PCs. Meanwhile, the number of Transferase-Mediated Deoxyuridine Triphosphate-Biotin Nick End Labeling (TUNEL-positive cells was significantly reduced in the PCs/lead co-treated group compared to the lead group. In addition, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of Bax, while the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Furthermore, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related genes and protein (GRP78 and CHOP. Co-treated with PCs significantly reversed these expressions in the liver. PCs were, therefore, demonstrated to have protective, antioxidant, and anti-ER stress and anti-apoptotic activities in liver damage caused by chronic lead exposure in the Kunming mouse. This may be due to the ability of PCs to enhance the ability of liver tissue to protect against oxidative stress via the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway, resulting in decreasing ER stress

  15. Structure-property relationships of new bismuth and lead oxide based perovskite ternary solid solutions

    Dwivedi, Akansha

    Two new bismuth and lead oxide based perovskite ternary solid solutions, namely xBi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3-yPbZrO3-zPbTiO3 [xBZT-yPZ-zPT] and xBi(Mg1/2Ti1/2)O3-yBi(Zn 1/2Ti1/2)O3-zPbTiO3 [xBMT-yBZT-zPT] have been developed and their structural and electrical properties have been determined. Various characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, calorimetery, electron microscopy, dielectric and piezoelectric measurements have been performed to determine the details of the phase diagram, crystal structure, and domain structure. The selection of these materials is based on the hypothesis that the presence of BZT-PT (Case I ferroelectric (FE)) will increase the transition temperature of MPB systems BMT-PT (Case II FE), and PZ-PT (Case III FE), and subsequently a MPB will be observed in the ternary phase diagrams. The Case I, II, and III classification has been outlined by Stringer et al., is on the basis of the transition temperatures (TC) behavior with composition in the Bi and Pb oxide based binary systems. Several pseudobinary lines have been investigated across the xBZT-yPZ-zPT ternary phase diagram which exhibit varied TC behavior with composition, showing both Case I- and Case III-like TC trends in different regions. A MPB between rhombohedral to tetragonal phases has been located on a pseudobinary line 0.1BZT-0.9[xPT-(1-x)PZ]. Compositions near MPB exhibit mainly soft PZT-like properties with the TC around 60°C lower than the unmodified PZT near its MPB. Electrical properties are reported for the MPB composition, TC = 325°C, Pr = 35 microC/cm2, d33 = 300 pC/N and kP =0.45. Rhombohedral compositions show diffuse phase transition with small frequency dispersion, similar to relaxors. Two transition peaks in the permittivity as well as in the latent heat has been observed in some compositions near the BZT-PT binary. This leads to the speculation for the existence of miscibility gap in the solid solutions in these regions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM

  16. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Liguo Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric (TG, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product and CH (calcium hydroxide. The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001, (100, (101, and (102 for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals.

  17. Observation of Z production in proton-lead collisions at LHCb

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Onderwater, G.; Pellegrino, A.

    2014-01-01

    The first observation of Z boson production in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per proton-nucleon pair of root(s) N N = 5TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1.6 nb(-1) collected with the LHCb detector. The Z candidates are reconstructed from

  18. Microbial electrolysis contribution to anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, leading to accelerated methane production

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Guo, Zechong

    2016-01-01

    Methane production rate (MPR) in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion processes is typically limitedby the initial steps of complex organic matter degradation, leading to a limited MPR due to sludgefermentation speed of solid particles. In this study, a novel microbial electrolysis AD reactor (ME...

  19. Measurement of leading neutron production in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Sunar, D.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; List, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Grab, C.; Zimmermann, T.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; Tsakov, I.

    2010-01-01

    The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb -1 . The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 2 2 , Bjorken scaling variable 1.5 .10 -4 -2 , longitudinal momentum fraction 0.32 L T 2 LN(3) (Q 2 ,x,x L ), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q 2 , x and x L . Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function. (orig.)

  20. Automized squark-neutralino production to next-to-leading order

    Binoth, Thomas; Wigmore, Ioan; Netto, Dorival Goncalves; Lopez-Val, David; Plehn, Tilman; Mawatari, Kentarou

    2011-01-01

    The production of one hard jet in association with missing transverse energy is a major LHC search channel motivated by many scenarios for physics beyond the standard model. In scenarios with a weakly interacting dark matter candidate, like supersymmetry, it arises from the associated production of a quark partner with the dark matter agent. We present the next-to-leading-order cross section calculation as the first application of the fully automized MadGolem package. We find moderate corrections to the production rate with a strongly reduced theory uncertainty.

  1. Nitrous oxide production kinetics during nitrate reduction in river sediments.

    Laverman, Anniet M; Garnier, Josette A; Mounier, Emmanuelle M; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline L

    2010-03-01

    A significant amount of nitrogen entering river basins is denitrified in riparian zones. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nitrate and carbon concentrations on the kinetic parameters of nitrate reduction as well as nitrous oxide emissions in river sediments in a tributary of the Marne (the Seine basin, France). In order to determine these rates, we used flow-through reactors (FTRs) and slurry incubations; flow-through reactors allow determination of rates on intact sediment slices under controlled conditions compared to sediment homogenization in the often used slurry technique. Maximum nitrate reduction rates (R(m)) ranged between 3.0 and 7.1microg Ng(-1)h(-1), and affinity constant (K(m)) ranged from 7.4 to 30.7mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). These values were higher in slurry incubations with an R(m) of 37.9microg Ng(-1)h(-1) and a K(m) of 104mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). Nitrous oxide production rates did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and we deduced a rate constant with an average of 0.7 and 5.4ng Ng(-1)h(-1) for FTR and slurry experiments respectively. The addition of carbon (as acetate) showed that carbon was not limiting nitrate reduction rates in these sediments. Similar rates were obtained for FTR and slurries with carbon addition, confirming the hypothesis that homogenization increases rates due to release of and increasing access to carbon in slurries. Nitrous oxide production rates in FTR with carbon additions were low and represented less than 0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates and were even negligible in slurries. Maximum nitrate reduction rates revealed seasonality with high potential rates in fall and winter and low rates in late spring and summer. Under optimal conditions (anoxia, non-limiting nitrate and carbon), nitrous oxide emission rates were low, but significant (0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of a superconducting lead on orbital entanglement production in chaotic cavities

    Rodriguez-Perez, Sergio; Novaes, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    We study orbital entanglement production in a chaotic cavity connected to four single-channel normal metal leads and one superconducting lead, assuming the presence of time-reversal symmetry and within a random matrix theory approach. The scattered state of two incident electrons is written as the superposition of several two-outgoing quasi-particle components, four of which are orbitally entangled in a left-right bipartition. We calculate numerically the mean value of the squared norm of each entangled component, as functions of the number of channels in the superconducting lead. Its behavior is explained as resulting from the proximity effect. We also study statistically the amount of entanglement carried by each pair of outgoing quasi-particles. When the influence of the superconductor is more intense, the device works as an entangler of electron-hole pairs, and the average entanglement is found to be considerably larger than that obtained without the superconducting lead. (author)

  3. Influence of a superconducting lead on orbital entanglement production in chaotic cavities

    Rodriguez-Perez, Sergio [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Novaes, Marcel, E-mail: sergio.rodriguez@ect.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-10-15

    We study orbital entanglement production in a chaotic cavity connected to four single-channel normal metal leads and one superconducting lead, assuming the presence of time-reversal symmetry and within a random matrix theory approach. The scattered state of two incident electrons is written as the superposition of several two-outgoing quasi-particle components, four of which are orbitally entangled in a left-right bipartition. We calculate numerically the mean value of the squared norm of each entangled component, as functions of the number of channels in the superconducting lead. Its behavior is explained as resulting from the proximity effect. We also study statistically the amount of entanglement carried by each pair of outgoing quasi-particles. When the influence of the superconductor is more intense, the device works as an entangler of electron-hole pairs, and the average entanglement is found to be considerably larger than that obtained without the superconducting lead. (author)

  4. Production and characterization of aluminium oxide nanoshells on spray dried lactose.

    Hellrup, Joel; Rooth, Mårten; Johansson, Anders; Mahlin, Denny

    2017-08-30

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables deposition of dense nanometer thick metal oxide nanoshells on powder particles with precise thickness control. This leads to products with low weight fraction coating, also when depositing on nano- or micron sized powder particles. This study aimed at investigating the aluminium oxide nanoshell thickness required to prevent moisture sorption. The nanoshells were produced with ALD on spray-dried lactose, which is amorphous and extremely hygroscopic. The particles were studied with dynamic vapor sorption between 0 and 50% RH, light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and polarized light microscopy. The ALD did not induce any recrystallization of the amorphous lactose. The dynamic vapor sorption indicated that the moisture sorption was almost completely inhibited by the nanoshell. Neat amorphous lactose rapidly recrystallized upon moisture exposure. However, only ca. 15% of the amorphous lactose particles recrystallized of a sample with 9% (by weight) aluminium oxide nanoshell at storage for six months upon 75% RH/40°C, which indicate that the moisture sorption was completely inhibited in the majority of the particles. In conclusion, the aluminium oxide nanoshells prevented moisture sorption and dramatically improved the long term physical stability of amorphous lactose. This shows the potential of the ALD-technique to protect drug microparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems.

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-15

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO(3))(2) was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0-24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO(3))(2). Anglesite (PbSO(4)) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9-17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO(3))(2) added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO(3))(2) addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0-48 mM KNO(3) demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO(3))(2) addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Possible role of Arthrospira platensis in reversing oxidative stress-mediated liver damage in rats exposed to lead.

    Khalil, Samah R; Elhady, Walaa M; Elewa, Yaser H A; Abd El-Hameed, Noura E; Ali, Sozan A

    2018-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, particularly metallic elements, mobilized and released into the environment, eventually accumulate in the food chain and thus pose a serious threat to human and animal health. In the present study, the role of Arthrospira (Spirulina platensis; SP) as a protector against oxidative stress-mediated liver damage induced by an exposure to lead acetate (LA; as a metallic pollutant) was assessed. To achieve this aim, rats were orally administered with 300 mg/kg bw SP for 15 days, before and concurrently with an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg bw LA (6 injections throughout 15 days). As a result, co-administration of SP with LA reduced the amount of lead that accumulated in both blood and liver tissue of the exposed rats and minimized the increased levels of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, DNA oxidative damage, and liver enzyme endpoints. In addition, because of SP administration, the levels of depleted biomarkers of antioxidant status and total antioxidant capacity in LA-exposed rats improved. Moreover, SP protected the liver tissue against the changes caused by LA exposure and also decreased the reactivity of HSP70 in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Collectively, our data suggest that SP has a potential use as a food supplement in the regions highly polluted with heavy metals such as lead. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin B12 deficiency results in severe oxidative stress, leading to memory retention impairment in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Bito, Tomohiro; Misaki, Taihei; Yabuta, Yukinori; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2017-04-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in various human diseases and conditions, such as a neurodegeneration, which is the major symptom of vitamin B 12 deficiency, although the underlying disease mechanisms associated with vitamin B 12 deficiency are poorly understood. Vitamin B 12 deficiency was found to significantly increase cellular H 2 O 2 and NO content in Caenorhabditis elegans and significantly decrease low molecular antioxidant [reduced glutathione (GSH) and L-ascorbic acid] levels and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities, indicating that vitamin B 12 deficiency induces severe oxidative stress leading to oxidative damage of various cellular components in worms. An NaCl chemotaxis associative learning assay indicated that vitamin B 12 deficiency did not affect learning ability but impaired memory retention ability, which decreased to approximately 58% of the control value. When worms were treated with 1mmol/L GSH, L-ascorbic acid, or vitamin E for three generations during vitamin B 12 deficiency, cellular malondialdehyde content as an index of oxidative stress decreased to the control level, but the impairment of memory retention ability was not completely reversed (up to approximately 50%). These results suggest that memory retention impairment formed during vitamin B 12 deficiency is partially attributable to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient production of ultrapure manganese oxides via electrodeposition.

    Cheney, Marcos A; Joo, Sang Woo; Banerjee, Arghya; Min, Bong-Ki

    2012-08-01

    A new process for the production of electrolytic amorphous nanomanganese oxides (EAMD) with uniform size and morphology is described. EAMD are produced for the first time by cathodic deposition from a basic aqueous solution of potassium permanganate at a constant temperature of 16°C. The synthesized materials are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM. The materials produced at 5.0 V at constant temperature are amorphous with homogeneous size and morphology with an average particle size around 20 nm, which appears to be much lesser than the previously reported anodic EAMD. A potentiostatic electrodeposition with much lesser deposition rate (with respect to previously reported anodic depositions) is considered to be the reason behind the very low and homogenous particle size distribution due to the lesser agglomeration of our as-synthesized nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of zinc oxide nanowires power with precisely defined morphology

    Mičová, Júlia; Remeš, Zdeněk; Chan, Yu-Ying

    2017-12-01

    The interest about zinc oxide is increasing thanks to its unique chemical and physical properties. Our attention has focused on preparation powder of 1D nanostructures of ZnO nanowires with precisely defined morphology include characterization size (length and diameter) and shape controlled in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We have compared results of SEM with dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. We have found out that SEM method gives more accurate results. We have proposed transformation process from ZnO nanowires on substrates to ZnO nanowires powder by ultrasound peeling to colloid followed by lyophilization. This method of the mass production of the ZnO nanowires powder has some advantages: simplicity, cost effective, large-scale and environment friendly.

  10. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via...... Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). To reduce the water use and increase the energy efficiency in WO pretreatment features like recycling liquid (filtrate), presoaking of rape straw in water or recycled filtrate before WO, skip washing pretreated solids (filter cake) after WO, or use of whole...... gas produced higher ethanol yields and cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin recoveries, than 15 min WO treatment at 195 °C. Also, recycling filtrate and use of higher oxygen gas pressure reduced recovery of materials. The use of filtrate could be inhibitory for the yeast, but also reduced lactic acid...

  11. In vivo toxicity of copper oxide, lead oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles acting in different combinations and its attenuation with a complex of innocuous bio-protectors.

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Katsnelson, Boris A; Panov, Vladimir G; Privalova, Larisa I; Varaksin, Anatoly N; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Sutunkova, Marina P; Shur, Vladimir Ya; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Valamina, Irene E; Zubarev, Ilya V; Makeyev, Oleg H; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y; Klinova, Svetlana V

    2017-04-01

    Stable suspensions of metal oxide nanoparticles (Me-NPs) obtained by laser ablation of 99.99% pure copper, zinc or lead under a layer of deionized water were used separately, in three binary combinations and a triple combination in two independent experiments on rats. In one of the experiments the rats were instilled with Me-NPs intratracheally (i.t.) (for performing a broncho-alveolar lavage in 24h to estimate the cytological and biochemical indices of the response of the lower airways), while in the other, Me-NPs were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) 18 times during 6 weeks (for estimating the accumulation of corresponding metals in the blood and their excretion with urine and feces and for assessing subchronic intoxication by a large number of functional and morphological indices). Mathematical description of the results from both experiments with the help of the Response Surface Methodology has shown that, as well as in the case of any other binary toxic combinations previously investigated by us, the response of the organism to a simultaneous exposure to any two of the Me-NPs under study is characterized by complex interactions between all possible types of combined toxicity (additivity, subadditivity or superadditivity of unidirectional action and different variants of opposite effects) depending on which effect it is estimated for as well as on the levels of the effect and dose. With any third Me-NP species acting in the background, the type of combined toxicity displayed by the other two may change significantly (as in the earlier described case of a triple combination of soluble metal salts). It is shown that various harmful effects produced by CuO-NP+ZnO-NP+PbO-NP combination may be substantially attenuated by giving rats per os a complex of innocuous bioactive substances theoretically expected to provide a protective integral and/or metal-specific effect during one month before i.t. instillation or during the entire period of i.p. injections

  12. Comparative Effect of Silymarin and D-Penicillamine on Lead Induced Hemotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Rat

    Seyedeh Missagh Jalali*

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was performed to investigate the adverse effects of acute lead intoxication on hemogram, erythrocyte osmotic fragility and oxidant/antioxidant status and the probable ameliorating effect of silymarin in comparison to d-penicillamine. Methods: Forty-eight albino rats were divided in 8 groups and received the following treatments in a 10 day experiment in Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, southwest Iran in 2015. Group 1: Normal saline as control; Group 2: 25 mg/kg lead acetate, intraperitoneally (IP for the last 5 days; Group 3: 100 mg/kg D-penicillamine, IP for the last 5 days; Group 4: 200 mg/kg silymarin, orally for 10 days; Group 5, 6, 7 and 8: In addition to lead, they received D-penicillamine, for the last 5 days, silymarin for 10 days, a combination of silymarin for 10 days and D-penicillamine for the last 5 days, and silymarin for the last 5 days, respectively. Results: Lead exposure induced a significant microcytic anemia accompanied by a significant elevation in total leukocyte, lymphocyte and neutrophil counts. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathion peroxidase (Gpx activities were significantly increased along with a significant elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA concentration in lead treated rats. Activities of SOD and Gpx were significantly alleviated by silymarin administration for 10 days while both D-penicillamine and silymarin could significantly reduce MDA concentration. Conclusion: Acute lead exposure induced significant leukocytosis and anemia that was associated with increased activity of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. Silymarin in contrast to D-penicillamine treatment was more effective in preventing lead-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes.

  13. Stability and oxidation products of hydrolysable tannins in basic conditions detected by HPLC/DAD-ESI/QTOF/MS.

    Tuominen, Anu; Sundman, Terhi

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysable tannins occur in plants that are used for food or medicine by humans or herbivores. Basic conditions can alter the structures of tannins, that is, the oxidation of phenolic groups can lead to the formation of toxic quinones. Previously, these labile quinones and other oxidation products have been studied with colorimetric or electron paramagnetic resonance methods, which give limited information about products. To study the stability and oxidation products of hydrolysable tannins in basic conditions using HPLC with a diode-array detector (DAD) combined with electrospray ionisation (ESI) and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) MS. Three galloyl glucoses, four galloyl derivatives with different polyols and three ellagitannins were purified from plants. The incubation reactions of tannins were monitored by HPLC/DAD at five pH values and in reduced oxygen conditions. Reaction products were identified based on UV spectra and mass spectral fragmentation obtained with the high-resolution HPLC/DAD-ESI/QTOF/MS. The use of a base-resistant HPLC column enabled injections without the sample pre-treatment and thus detection of short-lived products. Hydrolysable tannins were unstable in basic conditions and half-lives were mostly less than 10 min at pH 10. Degradation rates were faster at pH 11 but slower at milder pH. The HPLC analyses revealed that various products were formed and identified to be the result of hydrolysis, deprotonation and oxidation. Interestingly, the main hydrolysis product was ellagic acid; it was also formed from galloyl glucoses that do not contain oxidatively coupled galloyl groups in their initial structures. HPLD/DAD-ESI/QTOF/MS was an efficient method for the identification of polyphenol oxidation products and showed how different pH conditions determine the fate of hydrolysable tannins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The role of phospholipid oxidation products in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: evidence from animal models and in humans.

    Leitinger, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) and their implication as modulators of inflammation in cardiovascular disease, roles for these lipid oxidation products have been suggested in many other disease settings. Lipid oxidation products accumulate in inflamed and oxidatively damaged tissue, where they are derived from oxidative modification of lipoproteins, but also from membranes of cells undergoing apoptosis. Thus, increased oxidative stress as well as decreased clearance of apoptotic cells has been implied to contribute to accumulation of OxPL in chronically inflamed tissues.A central role for OxPL in disease states associated with dyslipedemia, including atherosclerosis, diabetes and its complications, metabolic syndrome, and renal insufficiency, as well as general prothrombotic states, has been proposed. In addition, in organs which are constantly exposed to oxidative stress, including lung, skin, and eyes, increased levels of OxPL are suggested to contribute to inflammatory conditions. Moreover, accumulation of OxPL causes general immunmodulation and may lead to autoimmune diseases. Evidence is accumulating that OxPL play a role in lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. Last but not least, a role for OxPL in neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease has been suggested.This chapter will summarize recent findings obtained in animal models and from studies in humans that indicate that formation of OxPL represents a general mechanism that may play a major role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  15. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol in acetonitrile leads to the formation of cholesta-4,6-dien-3-one

    Hosokawa, Yu-Ya; Hakamata, Hideki; Murakami, Tomonori; Aoyagi, Sakae; Kuroda, Minpei; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ito, Ayumi; Morosawa, Sayaka; Kusu, Fumiyo

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol was shown to be oxidized at the glassy carbon electrode in an acetonitrile-2-propanol mixture and this oxidation reaction was applied to the determination of serum total cholesterol by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (K. Hojo, H. Hakamata, A. Ito, A. Kotani, C. Furukawa, Y.Y. Hosokawa, F. Kusu, J. Chromatogr. A 1166 (2007) 135-141). To gain insight into the detection mechanisms of cholesterol, an electrolytic product of cholesterol was collected and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The three techniques, together with comparisons of literature spectral data, confirmed the formation of cholesta-4,6-dien-3-one. The conversion of cholesterol to cholesta-4,6-dien-3-one, a four-electron, four-proton electrochemical process, has been proposed as an electrochemical oxidation mechanism of cholesterol in acetonitrile.

  16. Assessment of Lead and Cadmium Levels in Frequently Used Cosmetic Products in Iran

    Nourmoradi, H.; Foroghi, M.; Farhadkhani, M.; Vahid Dastjerdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the content of lead and cadmium in most frequently used brands of cosmetic products (lipstick and eye shadow) in Iran. Fifty samples of lipstick (5 colors in 7 brands) and eye shadow (3 colors in 5 brands) were selected taken from large cosmetic stores in Isfahan (Iran) and lead and cadmium of them were analyzed. The results showed that the concentration of lead and cadmium in the lipsticks was within the range of 0.08–5.2 µg/g and 4.08–60.20 µg/g, respectively. The eye shadow samples had a lead level of 0.85–6.90 µg/g and a cadmium level of 1.54–55.59 µg/g. The content range of the heavy metals in the eye shadows was higher than that of the lipsticks. There was significant difference between the average of the lead content in the different brands of the lipsticks and eye shadows. Thus, the continuous use of these cosmetics can increase the absorption of heavy metals, especially Cd and Pb, in the body when swallowing lipsticks or through dermal cosmetic absorption. The effects of heavy metals such as lead can be harmful, especially for pregnant women and children. Therefore, effort must be made to inform the users and the general public about the harmful consequences of cosmetics. PMID:24174937

  17. Western Siberia leads slide in former U.S.S.R.'s oil production

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The huge western Siberian basin, which Moscow had counted on to ensure rising Soviet petroleum production into the next century, is in steady leading the sharp decline in the former U.S.S.R.'s total oil flow. New data indicate that western Siberia's 1991 crude and condensate production fell to less than 6.5 million b/d. That's down from nearly 7.5 million b/d in 1990 and a peak of 8.28 million b/d in 1988. This paper reports that such low production would make it difficult for Russia to meet the oil needs of other members of the new Commonwealth of Independent States, let alone earn substantial amounts of desperately needed hard currency from crude and refined products sales to foreign countries

  18. Lead-induced DNA damage in Vicia faba root cells: Potential involvement of oxidative stress

    Pourrut, Bertrand; Jean, Séverine; Silvestre, Jérôme; Pinelli, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Genotoxic effects of lead (0–20 µM) were investigated in whole-plant roots of Vicia faba L., grown hydroponically under controlled conditions. Lead-induced DNA damage in V. faba roots was evaluated by use of the comet assay, which allowed the detection of DNA strand-breakage and with the V. faba micronucleus test, which revealed chromosome aberrations. The results clearly indicate that lead induced DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependant manner with a maximum effect at 10 µM. In addition, at th...

  19. Production of biogenic manganese oxides coupled with methane oxidation in a bioreactor for removing metals from wastewater.

    Matsushita, Shuji; Komizo, Daisuke; Cao, Linh Thi Thuy; Aoi, Yoshiteru; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2018-03-01

    Biogenic manganese oxide (BioMnO x ) can efficiently adsorb various minor metals. The production of BioMnO x in reactors to remove metals during wastewater treatment processes is a promising biotechnological method. However, it is difficult to preferentially enrich manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MnOB) to produce BioMnO x during wastewater treatment processes. A unique method of cultivating MnOB using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) to produce soluble microbial products is proposed here. MnOB were successfully enriched in a methane-fed reactor containing MOB. BioMnO x production during the wastewater treatment process was confirmed. Long-term continual operation of the reactor allowed simultaneous removal of Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). The Co(II)/Mn(II) and Ni(II)/Mn(II) removal ratios were 53% and 19%, respectively. The degree to which Mn(II) was removed indicated that the enriched MnOB used utilization-associated products and/or biomass-associated products. Microbial community analysis revealed that methanol-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Hyphomicrobiaceae family played important roles in the oxidation of Mn(II) by using utilization-associated products. Methane-oxidizing bacteria were found to be inhibited by MnO 2 , but the maximum Mn(II) removal rate was 0.49 kg m -3  d -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Issues in leading particle and charm production in DIS at HERA

    Chekanov, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation based on Ο(α s ) QCD matrix elements matched to parton showers shows that final-state hadrons in DIS can be used to tag events with a single (anti)quark recoiled against the proton. The method is particularly suited to study the mean charge of leading particles, which is sensitive to fragmentation and sea quark contribution to the proton structure function. They also discuss methods to study the charm production in DIS using the Breit frame

  1. Photobiomodulation Leads to Reduced Oxidative Stress in Rats Submitted to High-Intensity Resistive Exercise

    Helenita Antonia de Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative stress markers are influenced by low-intensity laser therapy (LLLT in rats subjected to a high-intensity resistive exercise session (RE. Female Wistar rats divided into three experimental groups (Ctr: control, 4J: LLLT, and RE and subdivided based on the sampling times (instantly or 24 h postexercise underwent irradiation with LLLT using three-point transcutaneous method on the hind legs, which was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle at the distal, medial, and proximal points. Laser (4J or placebo (device off were carried out 60 sec prior to RE that consisted of four climbs bearing the maximum load with a 2 min time interval between each climb. Lipoperoxidation levels and antioxidant capacity were obtained in muscle. Lipoperoxidation levels were increased (4-HNE and CL markers instantly post-RE. LLLT prior to RE avoided the increase of the lipid peroxidation levels. Similar results were also notified for oxidation protein assays. The GPx and FRAP activities did not reduce instantly or 24 h after RE. SOD increased 24 h after RE, while CAT activity did not change with RE or LLLT. In conclusion, LLLT prior to RE reduced the oxidative stress markers, as well as, avoided reduction, and still increased the antioxidant capacity.

  2. Products and stability of phosphate reactions with lead under freeze-thaw cycling in simple systems

    Hafsteinsdottir, Erla G., E-mail: erla.hafsteinsdottir@gmail.com [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); White, Duanne A., E-mail: duanne.white@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Gore, Damian B., E-mail: damian.gore@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Stark, Scott C., E-mail: scott.stark@aad.gov.au [Environmental Protection and Change, Australian Antarctic Division, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Tasmania 7050 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Orthophosphate fixation of metal contaminated soils in environments that undergo freeze-thaw cycles is understudied. Freeze-thaw cycling potentially influences the reaction rate, mineral chemical stability and physical breakdown of particles during fixation. This study determines what products form when phosphate (triple superphosphate [Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] or sodium phosphate [Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}]) reacts with lead (PbSO{sub 4} or PbCl{sub 2}) in simple chemical systems in vitro, and assesses potential changes in formation during freeze-thaw cycles. Systems were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles from +10 deg. C to -20 deg. C and then analysed by X-ray diffractometry. Pyromorphite formed in all systems and was stable over multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Low temperature lead orthophosphate reaction efficiency varied according to both phosphate and lead source; the most time-efficient pyromorphite formation was observed when PbSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were present together. These findings have implications for the manner in which metal contaminated materials in freezing ground can be treated with phosphate. - Highlights: > Formation of lead phosphate products in cold environments is identified. > Potential change in formation during freeze-thaw cycling is assessed. > Lead phosphate reaction efficiency varies according to phosphate and lead source. > Pyromorphite formation is stable during 240 freeze-thaw cycles. - Pyromorphite, formed from Pb phosphate fixation, is stable during multiple freeze-thaw cycles but the efficiency of the fixation depends on the phosphate source and the type of Pb mineral.

  3. Products and stability of phosphate reactions with lead under freeze-thaw cycling in simple systems

    Hafsteinsdottir, Erla G.; White, Duanne A.; Gore, Damian B.; Stark, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Orthophosphate fixation of metal contaminated soils in environments that undergo freeze-thaw cycles is understudied. Freeze-thaw cycling potentially influences the reaction rate, mineral chemical stability and physical breakdown of particles during fixation. This study determines what products form when phosphate (triple superphosphate [Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 ] or sodium phosphate [Na 3 PO 4 ]) reacts with lead (PbSO 4 or PbCl 2 ) in simple chemical systems in vitro, and assesses potential changes in formation during freeze-thaw cycles. Systems were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles from +10 deg. C to -20 deg. C and then analysed by X-ray diffractometry. Pyromorphite formed in all systems and was stable over multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Low temperature lead orthophosphate reaction efficiency varied according to both phosphate and lead source; the most time-efficient pyromorphite formation was observed when PbSO 4 and Na 3 PO 4 were present together. These findings have implications for the manner in which metal contaminated materials in freezing ground can be treated with phosphate. - Highlights: → Formation of lead phosphate products in cold environments is identified. → Potential change in formation during freeze-thaw cycling is assessed. → Lead phosphate reaction efficiency varies according to phosphate and lead source. → Pyromorphite formation is stable during 240 freeze-thaw cycles. - Pyromorphite, formed from Pb phosphate fixation, is stable during multiple freeze-thaw cycles but the efficiency of the fixation depends on the phosphate source and the type of Pb mineral.

  4. Lead and silver extraction from waste cake from hydrometallurgical zinc production

    DUSAN D. STANOJEVIC

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results of the extraction of lead and silver from a lead–silver waste cake obtained in the process of hydrometallurgical zinc production. While controlling the pH value, the lead–silver cake was leached at a temperature close to boiling point in different concentrations of aqueous calcium chloride solutions. The experiments were performed applying different ratios between the mass of cake and the volume of the leaching agent under different durations of the process. It was concluded that at the optimal process parameters (pH 2.0–2.5; CaCl2 concentration, 3.6 mol dm-3; temperature, 95 °C; solid/liquid ratio, 1:5, the leaching efficiency of lead and silver could reach the approximate value of 94 %. Applying the same optimal process parameters, the method was applied to the leaching of a lead–silver cake in a magnesium chloride solution, but with significantly lower efficiencies. The results show that leaching of lead and silver in a calcium chloride solution could be a prospective method for increasing the recovery of lead and silver during hydrometallurgical zinc production.

  5. Measurement of Leading Neutron Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x_L of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb^{-1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2, Bjorken scaling variable 1.5x10^{-4} < x < 3x10^{-2}, longitudinal momentum fraction 0.32 < x_L < 0.95 and neutron transverse momentum p_T < 0.2 GeV. The leading neutron structure function, F_2^{LN(3)}(Q^2,x,x_L), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q^2, x and x_L. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function.

  6. Measurement of leading neutron production in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Sunar, D.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [Universites Paris VI et VII, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Physics and Technology, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2010-08-15

    The production of leading neutrons, where the neutron carries a large fraction x{sub L} of the incoming proton's longitudinal momentum, is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 122 pb {sup -1}. The semi-inclusive cross section is measured in the phase space defined by the photon virtuality 6leading neutron structure function, F{sub 2}{sup LN(3)}(Q{sup 2},x,x{sub L}), and the fraction of deep-inelastic scattering events containing a leading neutron are studied as a function of Q{sup 2}, x and x{sub L}. Assuming that the pion exchange mechanism dominates leading neutron production, the data provide constraints on the shape of the pion structure function. (orig.)

  7. 16 CFR 1500.88 - Exemptions from lead limits under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for...

    2010-01-01

    ... 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for certain electronic devices. 1500.88 Section... from lead limits under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for certain electronic devices. (a) The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) provides for specific lead limits...

  8. Healthy Dietary Patterns and Oxidative Stress as Measured by Fluorescent Oxidation Products in Nurses’ Health Study

    Seungyoun Jung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Healthy diets may lower oxidative stress and risk of chronic diseases. However, no previous studies examined associations between diet and fluorescent oxidation products (FlOP, a global marker of oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between healthy eating patterns (Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH, and Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED and FlOP, measured at three excitation/emission wavelengths (FlOP_360, FlOP_320, FlOP_400 from 2021 blood samples collected from 1688 women within the Nurses’ Health Study. AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were significantly positively associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320 concentrations (p-trend ≤ 0.04, but not associated with FlOP_400. Among specific food groups that contribute to these diet scores, significantly positive associations were observed with legumes and vegetables for FlOP_360, vegetables and fruits for FlOP_320, and legumes and alcohol for FlOP_400. Inverse associations were observed with nuts, sweets or desserts, and olive oil for FlOP_360, nuts for FlOP_320 and sweets or desserts for FlOP_400 (all p-trend ≤ 0.05. However, FlOP variation due to diet was small compared to overall FlOP variation. In conclusion, AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were unexpectedly positively, but weakly, associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320. However, these findings should be interpreted cautiously as the determinants of FlOP concentrations are not fully understood.

  9. Healthy Dietary Patterns and Oxidative Stress as Measured by Fluorescent Oxidation Products in Nurses' Health Study.

    Jung, Seungyoun; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Willett, Walter C; Wang, Molin; Wu, Tianying; Jensen, Majken; Hankinson, Susan E; Eliassen, A Heather

    2016-09-21

    Healthy diets may lower oxidative stress and risk of chronic diseases. However, no previous studies examined associations between diet and fluorescent oxidation products (FlOP), a global marker of oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between healthy eating patterns (Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED)) and FlOP, measured at three excitation/emission wavelengths (FlOP_360, FlOP_320, FlOP_400) from 2021 blood samples collected from 1688 women within the Nurses' Health Study. AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were significantly positively associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320 concentrations ( p -trend ≤ 0.04), but not associated with FlOP_400. Among specific food groups that contribute to these diet scores, significantly positive associations were observed with legumes and vegetables for FlOP_360, vegetables and fruits for FlOP_320, and legumes and alcohol for FlOP_400. Inverse associations were observed with nuts, sweets or desserts, and olive oil for FlOP_360, nuts for FlOP_320 and sweets or desserts for FlOP_400 (all p -trend ≤ 0.05). However, FlOP variation due to diet was small compared to overall FlOP variation. In conclusion, AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were unexpectedly positively, but weakly, associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320. However, these findings should be interpreted cautiously as the determinants of FlOP concentrations are not fully understood.

  10. Nitrous oxide production associated with coastal marine invertebrates

    Heisterkamp, Ines Maria; Schramm, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Several freshwater and terrestrial invertebrate species emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). The N2O production associated with these animals was ascribed to incomplete denitrification by ingested sediment or soil bacteria. The present study shows that many marine invertebrates also emit N2......O at substantial rates. A total of 19 invertebrate species collected in the German Wadden Sea and in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, and 1 aquacultured shrimp species were tested for N2O emission. Potential N2O emission rates ranged from 0 to 1.354 nmol ind.–1 h–1, with an average rate of 0.320 nmol ind.–1 h–1...... with an experimentally cleaned shell. Thus, the N2O production associated with marine invertebrates is apparently not due to gut denitrification in every species, but may also result from microbial activity on the external surfaces of animals. The high abundance and potential N2O emission rates of many marine...

  11. Durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    Hauch, A.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Dalgaard Ebbesen, S.

    2007-05-15

    In the perspective of the increasing interest in renewable energy and hydrogen economy, the reversible solid oxide cells (SOCs) is a promising technology as it has the potential of providing efficient and cost effective hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam (HTES). Furthermore development of such electrolysis cells can gain from the results obtained within the R and D of SOFCs. For solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) to become interesting from a technological point of view, cells that are reproducible, high performing and long-term stable need to be developed. In this paper we address some of the perspectives of the SOEC technology i.e. issues such as a potential H2 production price as low as 0.71 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} using SOECs for HTES; is there a possible market for the electrolysers? and what R and D steps are needed for the realisation of the SOEC technology? In the experimental part we present electrolysis test results on SOCs that have been optimized for fuel cell operation but applied for HTES. The SOCs are produced on a pre-pilot scale at Risoe National Laboratory. These cells have been shown to have excellent initial electrolysis performance, but the durability of such electrolysis cells are not optimal and examples of results from SOEC tests over several hundreds of hours are given here. The long-term tests have been run at current densities of -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} and -1 A/cm{sup 2}, temperatures of 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C and p(H{sub 2}O)/p(H{sub 2}) of 0.5/0.5 and 0.9/0.1. Long-term degradation rates are shown to be up to 5 times higher for SOECs compared to similar SOFC testing. Furthermore, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production prices are calculated using the experimental results from long-term electrolysis test as input and a short outlook for the future work on SOECs will be given as well. (au)

  12. Compositional evolution of particle-phase reaction products and water in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of model aqueous organic aerosols

    M. M. Chim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds present at or near the surface of aqueous droplets can be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase OH radicals, which alter the molecular distribution of the reaction products within the droplet. A change in aerosol composition affects the hygroscopicity and leads to a concomitant response in the equilibrium amount of particle-phase water. The variation in the aerosol water content affects the aerosol size and physicochemical properties, which in turn governs the oxidation kinetics and chemistry. To attain better knowledge of the compositional evolution of aqueous organic droplets during oxidation, this work investigates the heterogeneous OH-radical-initiated oxidation of aqueous methylsuccinic acid (C5H8O4 droplets, a model compound for small branched dicarboxylic acids found in atmospheric aerosols, at a high relative humidity of 85 % through experimental and modeling approaches. Aerosol mass spectra measured by a soft atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer reveal two major products: a five carbon atom (C5 hydroxyl functionalization product (C5H8O5 and a C4 fragmentation product (C4H6O3. These two products likely originate from the formation and subsequent reactions (intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and carbon–carbon bond scission of tertiary alkoxy radicals resulting from the OH abstraction occurring at the methyl-substituted carbon site. Based on the identification of the reaction products, a kinetic model of oxidation (a two-product model coupled with the Aerosol Inorganic–Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC model is built to simulate the size and compositional changes of aqueous methylsuccinic acid droplets during oxidation. Model results show that at the maximum OH exposure, the droplets become slightly more hygroscopic after oxidation, as the mass fraction of water is predicted to increase from

  13. The effect of lipid peroxidation products on reactive oxygen species formation and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Ambrozova, Gabriela; Pekarova, Michaela; Lojek, Antonin

    2011-02-01

    Lipid peroxidation induced by oxidants leads to the formation of highly reactive metabolites. These can affect various immune functions, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of lipid peroxidation products (LPPs) - acrolein, 4-hydroxynonenal, and malondialdehyde - on ROS and NO production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and to compare these effects with the cytotoxic properties of LPPs. Macrophages were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (0.1 μg/ml) and treated with selected LPPs (concentration range: 0.1-100 μM). ATP test, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence, Griess reaction, Western blotting analysis, amperometric and total peroxyl radical-trapping antioxidant parameter assay were used for determining the LPPs cytotoxicity, ROS and NO production, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, NO scavenging, and antioxidant properties of LPPs, respectively. Our study shows that the cytotoxic action of acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal works in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, our results imply that acrolein, 4-hydroxynonenal, and malondialdehyde can inhibit, to a different degree, ROS and NO production in stimulated macrophages, partially independently of their toxic effect. Also, changes in enzymatic pathways (especially NADPH-oxidase and nitric oxide synthase inhibition) and NO scavenging properties are included in the downregulation of reactive species formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inherent health and environmental risk assessment of nanostructured metal oxide production processes.

    Torabifard, Mina; Arjmandi, Reza; Rashidi, Alimorad; Nouri, Jafar; Mohammadfam, Iraj

    2018-01-10

    The health and environmental effects of chemical processes can be assessed during the initial stage of their production. In this paper, the Chemical Screening Tool for Exposure and Environmental Release (ChemSTEER) software was used to compare the health and environmental risks of spray pyrolysis and wet chemical techniques for the fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide on a semi-industrial scale with a capacity of 300 kg/day in Iran. The pollution sources identified in each production process were pairwise compared in Expert Choice software using indicators including respiratory damage, skin damage, and environmental damages including air, water, and soil pollution. The synthesis of nanostructured zinc oxide using the wet chemical technique (with 0.523 wt%) leads to lower health and environmental risks compared to when spray pyrolysis is used (with 0.477 wt%). The health and environmental risk assessment of nanomaterial production processes can help select safer processes, modify the operation conditions, and select or modify raw materials that can help eliminate the risks.

  15. Gross nitrous oxide production drives net nitrous oxide fluxes across a salt marsh landscape.

    Yang, Wendy H; Silver, Whendee L

    2016-06-01

    Sea level rise will change inundation regimes in salt marshes, altering redox dynamics that control nitrification - a potential source of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2 O) - and denitrification, a major nitrogen (N) loss pathway in coastal ecosystems and both a source and sink of N2 O. Measurements of net N2 O fluxes alone yield little insight into the different effects of redox conditions on N2 O production and consumption. We used in situ measurements of gross N2 O fluxes across a salt marsh elevation gradient to determine how soil N2 O emissions in coastal ecosystems may respond to future sea level rise. Soil redox declined as marsh elevation decreased, with lower soil nitrate and higher ferrous iron in the low marsh compared to the mid and high marshes (P production was highest in the low marsh and lowest in the mid-marsh (P = 0.02), whereas gross N2 O consumption did not differ among marsh zones. Thus, variability in gross N2 O production rates drove the differences in net N2 O flux among marsh zones. Our results suggest that future studies should focus on elucidating controls on the processes producing, rather than consuming, N2 O in salt marshes to improve our predictions of changes in net N2 O fluxes caused by future sea level rise. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Limonene ozonolysis in the presence of nitric oxide: Gas-phase reaction products and yields

    Ham, Jason E.; Harrison, Joel C.; Jackson, Stephen R.; Wells, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    The reaction products from limonene ozonolysis were investigated using the new carbonyl derivatization agent, O-tert-butylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (TBOX). With ozone (O3) as the limiting reagent, five carbonyl compounds were detected. The yields of the carbonyl compounds are discussed with and without the presence of a hydroxyl radical (OHrad) scavenger, giving insight into the influence secondary OH radicals have on limonene ozonolysis products. The observed reaction product yields for limonaketone (LimaKet), 7-hydroxyl-6-oxo-3-(prop-1-en-2-yl)heptanal (7H6O), and 2-acetyl-5-oxohexanal (2A5O) were unchanged suggesting OHrad generated by the limonene + O3 reaction does not contribute to their formation. The molar yields of 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal (IPOH) and 3-acetyl-6-oxoheptanal (3A6O) decreased by 68% and >95%; respectively, when OHrad was removed. This suggests that OHrad radicals significantly impact the formation of these products. Nitric oxide (NO) did not significantly affect the molar yields of limonaketone or IPOH. However, NO (20 ppb) considerably decreased the molar reaction product yields of 7H6O (62%), 2A5O (63%), and 3A6O (47%), suggesting NO reacted with peroxyl intermediates, generated during limonene ozonolysis, to form other carbonyls (not detected) or organic nitrates. These studies give insight into the transformation of limonene and its reaction products that can lead to indoor exposures.

  17. Supplementation of T3 Recovers Hypothyroid Rat Liver Cells from Oxidatively Damaged Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Leading to Apoptosis

    Sutapa Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothyroidism is a growing medical concern. There are conflicting reports regarding the mechanism of oxidative stress in hypothyroidism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is pivotal to thyroid dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate the effects of hepatic inner mitochondrial membrane dysfunction as a consequence of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism in rats. Increased oxidative stress predominance in the submitochondrial particles (SMP and altered antioxidant defenses in the mitochondrial matrix fraction correlated with hepatocyte apoptosis. In order to check whether the effects caused by hypothyroidism are reversed by T3, the above parameters were evaluated in a subset of T3-treated hypothyroid rats. Complex I activity was inhibited in hypothyroid SMP, whereas T3 supplementation upregulated electron transport chain complexes. Higher mitochondrial H2O2 levels in hypothyroidism due to reduced matrix GPx activity culminated in severe oxidative damage to membrane lipids. SMP and matrix proteins were stabilised in hypothyroidism but exhibited increased carbonylation after T3 administration. Glutathione content was higher in both. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evident in hypothyroid liver sections; T3 administration, on the other hand, exerted antiapoptotic and proproliferative effects. Hence, thyroid hormone level critically regulates functional integrity of hepatic mitochondria; hypothyroidism injures mitochondrial membrane lipids leading to hepatocyte apoptosis, which is substantially recovered upon T3 supplementation.

  18. Insight into the oxidative stress induced by lead and/or cadmium in blood, liver and kidneys.

    Matović, Vesna; Buha, Aleksandra; Ðukić-Ćosić, Danijela; Bulat, Zorica

    2015-04-01

    Besides being important occupational hazards, lead and cadmium are nowadays metals of great environmental concern. Both metals, without any physiological functions, can induce serious adverse health effects in various organs and tissues. Although Pb and Cd are non-redox metals, one of the important mechanisms underlying their toxicity is oxidative stress induction as a result of the generation of reactive species and/or depletion of the antioxidant defense system. Considering that the co-exposure to both metals is a much more realistic scenario, the effects of these metals on oxidative status when simultaneously present in the organism have become one of the contemporary issues in toxicology. This paper reviews short and long term studies conducted on Pb or Cd-induced oxidative stress in blood, liver and kidneys as the most prominent target organs of the toxicity of these metals and proposes the possible molecular mechanisms of the observed effects. The review is also focused on the results obtained for the effects of the combined treatment with Pb and Cd on oxidative status in target organs and on the mechanisms of their possible interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  20. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant. - Highlights: • Irradiation had little effects on lipid oxidation of ready-to-eat cured turkey. • 4.5 kGy irradiation increased protein oxidation. • Irradiated samples were isolated due to Strecker/radiolytic degradation products. • 1.5 kGy irradiation had limited effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages. • Dimethyl disulfide can be used as a potential marker for irradiated meat products.

  1. Strategies to mitigate nitrous oxide emissions from herbivore production systems.

    Schils, R L M; Eriksen, J; Ledgard, S F; Vellinga, Th V; Kuikman, P J; Luo, J; Petersen, S O; Velthof, G L

    2013-03-01

    Herbivores are a significant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions. They account for a large share of manure-related N(2)O emissions, as well as soil-related N(2)O emissions through the use of grazing land, and land for feed and forage production. It is widely acknowledged that mitigation measures are necessary to avoid an increase in N(2)O emissions while meeting the growing global food demand. The production and emissions of N(2)O are closely linked to the efficiency of nitrogen (N) transfer between the major components of a livestock system, that is, animal, manure, soil and crop. Therefore, mitigation options in this paper have been structured along these N pathways. Mitigation technologies involving diet-based intervention include lowering the CP content or increasing the condensed tannin content of the diet. Animal-related mitigation options also include breeding for improved N conversion and high animal productivity. The main soil-based mitigation measures include efficient use of fertilizer and manure, including the use of nitrification inhibitors. In pasture-based systems with animal housing facilities, reducing grazing time is an effective option to reduce N(2)O losses. Crop-based options comprise breeding efforts for increased N-use efficiency and the use of pastures with N(2)-fixing clover. It is important to recognize that all N(2)O mitigation options affect the N and carbon cycles of livestock systems. Therefore, care should be taken that reductions in N(2)O emissions are not offset by unwanted increases in ammonia, methane or carbon dioxide emissions. Despite the abundant availability of mitigation options, implementation in practice is still lagging. Actual implementation will only follow after increased awareness among farmers and greenhouse gases targeted policies. So far, reductions in N(2)O emissions that have been achieved are mostly a positive side effect of other N-targeted policies.

  2. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for the hadronic WH+jet production

    Su Jijuan; Ma Wengan; Zhang Renyou; Guo Lei

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the WH 0 production in association with a jet at hadron colliders. We study the impacts of the complete NLO QCD radiative corrections to the integrated cross sections, the scale dependence of the cross sections, and the differential cross sections ((dσ/dcosθ), (dσ/dp T )) of the final W-, Higgs boson and jet. We find that the corrections significantly modify the physical observables, and reduce the scale uncertainty of the leading-order cross section. Our results show that by applying the inclusive scheme with p T,j cut =20 GeV and taking m H =120 GeV, μ=μ 0 ≡(1/2)(m W +m H ), the K-factor is 1.15 for the process pp→W ± H 0 j+X at the Tevatron, while the K-factors for the processes pp→W - H 0 j+X and pp→W + H 0 j+X at the LHC are 1.12 and 1.08, respectively. We conclude that to understand the hadronic associated WH 0 production, it is necessary to study the NLO QCD corrections to the WH 0 j production process which is part of the inclusive WH 0 production.

  3. Fluorescent proteins such as eGFP lead to catalytic oxidative stress in cells.

    Ganini, Douglas; Leinisch, Fabian; Kumar, Ashutosh; Jiang, JinJie; Tokar, Erik J; Malone, Christine C; Petrovich, Robert M; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins are an important tool that has become omnipresent in life sciences research. They are frequently used for localization of proteins and monitoring of cells [1,2]. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was the first and has been the most used fluorescent protein. Enhanced GFP (eGFP) was optimized from wild-type GFP for increased fluorescence yield and improved expression in mammalian systems [3]. Many GFP-like fluorescent proteins have been discovered, optimized or created, such as the red fluorescent protein TagRFP [4]. Fluorescent proteins are expressed colorless and immature and, for eGFP, the conversion to the fluorescent form, mature, is known to produce one equivalent of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) per molecule of chromophore [5,6]. Even though it has been proposed that this process is non-catalytic and generates nontoxic levels of H 2 O 2 [6], this study investigates the role of fluorescent proteins in generating free radicals and inducing oxidative stress in biological systems. Immature eGFP and TagRFP catalytically generate the free radical superoxide anion (O 2 •- ) and H 2 O 2 in the presence of NADH. Generation of the free radical O 2 •- and H 2 O 2 by eGFP in the presence of NADH affects the gene expression of cells. Many biological pathways are altered, such as a decrease in HIF1α stabilization and activity. The biological pathways altered by eGFP are known to be implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases associated with oxidative stress; therefore, it is critical that such experiments using fluorescent proteins are validated with alternative methodologies and the results are carefully interpreted. Since cells inevitably experience oxidative stress when fluorescent proteins are expressed, the use of this tool for cell labeling and in vivo cell tracing also requires validation using alternative methodologies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Nano tubular Transition Metal Oxide for Hydrogen Production

    Sreekantan, S.; San, E.P.; Kregvirat, W.; Wei, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    TiO 2 , transition metal oxide nano tubes were successfully grown by anodizing of titanium foil (Ti) in ethylene glycol electrolyte containing 5wt. % hydrogen peroxide and 5wt. % ammonium fluoride for 60 minutes at 60V. It was found such electrochemical condition resulted in the formation of nano tube with average diameter of 90nm and length of 6.6 μm. These samples were used to study the effect of W loading by RF sputtering on TiO 2 nano tubes. Amorphous TiO 2 nano tube substrate leads to enhance incorporation of W instead of anatase. Therefore for the entire study, W was sputtered on amorphous TiO 2 nano tube substrate. TiO 2 nano tube sputtered for 1 minute resulted in the formation of W-O-Ti while beyond this point (10 minutes); it accumulates to form a self independent structure of WO 3 on the surface of the nano tubes. TiO 2 nano tube sputtered for 1 minute at 150 W and annealed at 450 degree Celsius exhibited best photocurrent density (1.4 mA/ cm 2 ) with photo conversion efficiency of 2.5 %. The reason for such behavior is attributed to W 6+ ions allows for electron traps that suppress electron hole recombination and exploit the lower band gap of material to produce a water splitting process by increasing the charge separation and extending the energy range of photoexcitation for the system. (author)

  5. Single Top Production at Next-to-Leading Order in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory.

    Zhang, Cen

    2016-04-22

    Single top production processes at hadron colliders provide information on the relation between the top quark and the electroweak sector of the standard model. We compute the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the three main production channels: t-channel, s-channel, and tW associated production, in the standard model including operators up to dimension six. The calculation can be matched to parton shower programs and can therefore be directly used in experimental analyses. The QCD corrections are found to significantly impact the extraction of the current limits on the operators, because both of an improved accuracy and a better precision of the theoretical predictions. In addition, the distributions of some of the key discriminating observables are modified in a nontrivial way, which could change the interpretation of measurements in terms of UV complete models.

  6. Chemical analysis of particulate and gaseous products from the monoterpene oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber during the EUCAARI campaign 2008

    Kahnt, A.; Iinuma, Y.; Herrmann, H.; Mentel, T. F.; Fisseha, R.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes leads to multifunctional products with lower vapour pressure. These products condense and coagulate to existing particles leading to particle formation and growth. In order to obtain better insights into the mechanisms and the importance of sources to organic aerosol, a mixture of monoterpenes was oxidised in the SAPHIR outdoor chamber during the EUCAARI campaign in 2008. The mixture was made of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, 3-carene and ocimene, representing a typical monoterpene emission from a boreal forest. In addition, two sesquiterpenes (α-farnesene and caryophyllene) were reacted together with the monoterpene mixture in some experiments. The VOC (volatile organic compound) mixture was reacted under tropospheric oxidation and light conditions in a prolonged time scale over two days. In the present study, a special emphasis is put on the detection of carbonyl compounds from the off-line analysis of collected filter and denuder samples from the campaign in 2008. The oxidation products which contain carbonyl groups are important first stable intermediates during the monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation. They react further with atmospheric oxidants to form lower volatile acidic compounds, contributing to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Commonly used methods for the analysis of carbonyl compounds involve derivatisation steps prior to separation and subsequent UV or MS detection. In the present study, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was used to derivatise the extracted filter and denuder samples. The DNPH converts aldehyde- and keto-groups to stable hydrazones, which can be purified afterwards using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The derivatised samples were analysed with HPLC/ESI-TOFMS which allowed us to determine the exact chemical formula of unknown products. In addition to known carbonyl compounds from monoterpene oxidation such as pinonaldehyde and nopinon, previously unreported molecular masses

  7. Recovery of copper and lead from waste printed circuit boards by supercritical water oxidation combined with electrokinetic process

    Xiu Furong; Zhang Fushen

    2009-01-01

    An effective and benign process for copper and lead recovery from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) was developed. In the process, the PCBs was pre-treated in supercritical water, then subjected to electrokinetic (EK) process. Experimental results showed that supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process was strong enough to decompose the organic compounds of PCBs, and XRD spectra indicated that copper and lead were oxidized into CuO, Cu 2 O and β-PbO 2 in the process. The optimum SCWO treatment conditions were 60 min, 713 K, 30 MPa, and EK treatment time, constant current density were 11 h, 20 mA cm -2 , respectively. The recovery percentages of copper and lead under optimum SCWO + EK treatment conditions were around 84.2% and 89.4%, respectively. In the optimized EK treatment, 74% of Cu was recovered as a deposit on the cathode with a purity of 97.6%, while Pb was recovered as concentrated solutions in either anode (23.1%) or cathode (66.3%) compartments but little was deposited on the electrodes. It is believed that the process is effective and practical for Cu and Pb recovery from waste electric and electronic equipments.

  8. Potential Association of Lead Exposure During Early Development of Mice With Alteration of Hippocampus Nitric Oxide Levels and Learning Memory

    LI SUN; ZHENG-YAN ZHAO; JIAN HU; XIE-LAI ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Objective Chronic lead (Pb) exposure during development is known to produce learning deficits. Nitric oxide participates in the synaptic mechanisms involved in certain forms of learning and memory. This study was designed to clarify whether Pb-induced impairment in learning and memory was associated with the changes of nitric oxide levels in mice brains.Methods Sixty Balb/c mice aged 10 days were chosen. A model of lead exposure was established by drinking 0.025%, 0.05%,0.075% lead acetate, respectively for 8 weeks. The controls were orally given distilled water. The ability to learn and memorize was examined by open field test, T-water maze test. In parallel with the behavioral data, NO level of hippocampus tissue was detected by biochemical assay. Results Compared with control groups, (1) the weight of 0.075% group was significantly reduced (P<0.05); (2) The number of times in mice attaining the required standards in T-water maze test was lower in 0.075%group (P<0.01). No significant difference was found between experimental and control groups in open field test (P>0.05); (3)NO level of mouse hippocampus tissue was decreased in 0.075% group (P<0.01). Conclusions The findings suggest that decreased hippocampus NO level may contribute to the Pb-induced deficits in learning and memory processes.

  9. Tungsten and molybdenum with oxide dispersion, production and properties

    Haerdtle, S.; Schmidberger, R.

    1989-01-01

    By the reaction spray process metal powders with dispersed metal oxides can be produced in one step. The systems investigated here are tungsten and molybdenum with 0,5% resp. 5% La 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 . The oxides with diameters below 0,5μm are finely dispersed within the metal powder particles. The sinterability of the powders depends on the oxide content. Maximum density at an oxide content of 0,5% is about 96% at a sintering temperature of 1600 0 C. The type of oxide influences the densification versus temperature but not the final density. 5 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  10. Inhibition of DNA repair by whole body irradiation induced nitric oxide leads to higher radiation sensitivity in lymphocytes

    Sharma, Deepak; Santosh Kumar, S.; Raghu, Rashmi; Maurya, D.K.; Sainis, K.B.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: It is well accepted that the sensitivity of mammalian cells is better following whole body irradiation (WBI) as compared to that following in vitro irradiation. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Following WBI, the lipid peroxidation and cell death were significantly higher in lymphocytes as compared to that in vitro irradiated lymphocytes. Further, WBI treatment of tumor bearing mice resulted in a significantly higher inhibition of EL-4 cell proliferation as compared to in vitro irradiation of EL-4 cells. The DNA repair was significantly slower in lymphocytes obtained from WBI treated mice as compared to that in the cells exposed to same dose of radiation in vitro. Generation of nitric oxide following irradiation and also its role in inhibition of DNA repair have been reported, hence, its levels were estimated under both WBI and in vitro irradiation conditions. Nitric oxide levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of WBI treated mice but not in the supernatant of in vitro irradiated cells. Addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide donor to in vitro irradiated cells inhibited the repair of DNA damage and sensitized cells to undergo cell death. It also enhanced the radiation-induced functional impairment of lymphocytes as evinced from suppression of mitogen-induced IL-2, IFN-γ and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Administration of N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester(L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to mice significantly protected lymphocytes against WBI-induced DNA damage and inhibited in vivo radiation-induced production of nitric oxide. Our results indicated that nitric oxide plays a role in the higher radiosensitivity of lymphocytes in vivo by inhibiting repair of DNA damage

  11. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo López Mateos No. 1801 Ote. C.P, Aguascalientes, Ags, 20256 (Mexico); Hernández-Montoya, Virginia, E-mail: virginia.hernandez@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo López Mateos No. 1801 Ote. C.P, Aguascalientes, Ags, 20256 (Mexico); Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080, Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite was observed on the carbon surface. • Occurrence of CaCO{sub 3} on the carbons surface plays a crucial role in the formation. • The carbons were prepared by carbonization and oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. • Oxidation with cold oxygen plasma increases the formation of these compounds. - Abstract: A new procedure of elimination of Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N{sub 2} at −196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb{sup 2+} removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO{sub 3} on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb{sup 2+}. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb{sup 2+} per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  12. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S.; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite was observed on the carbon surface. • Occurrence of CaCO_3 on the carbons surface plays a crucial role in the formation. • The carbons were prepared by carbonization and oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. • Oxidation with cold oxygen plasma increases the formation of these compounds. - Abstract: A new procedure of elimination of Pb"2"+ from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N_2 at −196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb"2"+ was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb"2"+ removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO_3 on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb"2"+. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb"2"+ per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  13. Method of manufacturing gadolinium oxide-incorporated nuclear fuel sintering products

    Komono, Akira; Seki, Makoto; Omori, Sadayuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture nuclear fuel sintering products excellent in burning property and mechanical property. Constitution: In the manufacturing step for nuclear fuel sintering products, specific metal oxides are added for promoting the growth of crystal grains in the sintering. Those metal oxides melted at a temperature lower than the sintering temperature of a mixture of nuclear fuel oxide powder and oxide power, or those metal oxides causing eutectic reaction are used as the metal oxide. Particularly, those compounds having oxygen atom - metal atom ratio (O/M) of not less than 2 are preferably used. As such metal oxides usable herein transition metal oxides, e.g., Nb 2 O 5 , TiO 2 , MoO 3 and WO 3 are preferred, with Nb 2 O 3 and TiO 2 being preferred particularly. (Seki, T.)

  14. WA97 results on strangeness production in lead lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    Andersen, E.; Andrighetto, A.; Antinori, F.; Böhm, Jan; Píška, Karel; Staroba, Pavel; Šťastný, Jan; Vaníčková, Marcela; Závada, Petr

    1996-01-01

    Roč. 610, - (1996), 165c-174c ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/95/0217 Keywords : hyperon * antihyperon production * yield (Lambda Antilambda) * yield (Omega- Xi-) * mass spectrum * CERN SPS * 158 GeV/c/nucleon Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.825, year: 1996

  15. Aging-associated oxidative stress leads to decrease in IAS tone via RhoA/ROCK downregulation.

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Rattan, Satish

    2014-06-01

    Internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence (RI). IAS tone may be compromised during aging, leading to RI in certain patients. We examined the influence of oxidative stress in the aging-associated decrease in IAS tone (AADI). Using adult (4-6 mo old) and aging (24-30 mo old) rats, we determined the effect of oxidative stress on IAS tone and the regulatory RhoA/ROCK signal transduction cascade. We determined the effect of the oxidative stress inducer LY83583, which produces superoxide anions (O2 (·-)), on basal and stimulated IAS tone before and after treatment of intact smooth muscle strips and smooth muscle cells with the O2 (·-) scavenger SOD. Our data showed that AADI was associated with a decrease in RhoA/ROCK expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Oxidative stress with a LY83583-mediated decrease in IAS tone and relaxation of IAS smooth muscle cells was associated with a decrease in RhoA/ROCK signal transduction, which was reversible by SOD. In addition, LY83583 caused a significant decrease in IAS contraction produced by the RhoA activator and a known RhoA/ROCK agonist, U46619, that was also reversible by SOD. The inhibitory effects of LY83583 and the ROCK inhibitor Y27632 on the U46619-induced increase in IAS tone were similar. We conclude that an increase in oxidative stress plays an important role in AADI in the elderly and may be one of the underlying mechanisms of RI in certain aging patients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Investigation of self-powered gamma flux detectors with Lead(II) oxide serving as both emitter and insulator

    Shi, H.; Yue, S.; Jonkmans, G.; Sur, B.; Hilborn, J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Lead(II) oxide as the electron-emitting component and the insulating component of self-powered flux detectors is a concept that had not been previously explored. Detectors constructed from various combinations of electrodes (stainless steel, Al, Pb, and W) and insulating materials (Al 2 O 3 and PbO) were irradiated in a 427 Gy/h gamma field. Although high gamma sensitivities were achieved, PbO did not prove to be a strong emitter of gamma-induced electrons. Nevertheless, PbO did serve as a better insulator than one that is currently in use, namely alumina. (author)

  17. High glucose alters retinal astrocytes phenotype through increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    Eui Seok Shin

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are macroglial cells that have a crucial role in development of the retinal vasculature and maintenance of the blood-retina-barrier (BRB. Diabetes affects the physiology and function of retinal vascular cells including astrocytes (AC leading to breakdown of BRB. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms leading to retinal AC dysfunction under high glucose conditions remain unclear. Here we show that high glucose conditions did not induce the apoptosis of retinal AC, but instead increased their rate of DNA synthesis and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. These alterations were associated with changes in intracellular signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration and proliferation. High glucose conditions also affected the expression of inflammatory cytokines in retinal AC, activated NF-κB, and prevented their network formation on Matrigel. In addition, we showed that the attenuation of retinal AC migration under high glucose conditions, and capillary morphogenesis of retinal endothelial cells on Matrigel, was mediated through increased oxidative stress. Antioxidant proteins including heme oxygenase-1 and peroxiredoxin-2 levels were also increased in retinal AC under high glucose conditions through nuclear localization of transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2. Together our results demonstrated that high glucose conditions alter the function of retinal AC by increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress with significant impact on their proliferation, adhesion, and migration.

  18. Hydrogen Production via Steam Reforming of Ethyl Alcohol over Palladium/Indium Oxide Catalyst

    Tetsuo Umegaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synergetic effect between palladium and indium oxide on hydrogen production in the steam reforming reaction of ethyl alcohol. The palladium/indium oxide catalyst shows higher hydrogen production rate than indium oxide and palladium. Palladium/indium oxide affords ketonization of ethyl alcohol with negligible by-product carbon monoxide, while indium oxide mainly affords dehydration of ethyl alcohol, and palladium affords decomposition of ethyl alcohol with large amount of by-product carbon monoxide. The catalytic feature of palladium/indium oxide can be ascribed to the formation of palladium-indium intermetallic component during the reaction as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements.

  19. Diet-induced dyslipidemia leads to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and oxidative stress in guinea pigs

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Ipsen, David Højland

    2016-01-01

    Chronic dyslipidemia imposed by a high-fat and high-caloric dietary regime leads to debilitating disorders such as obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and insulin resistance. As disease rates surge, so does the need for high validity animal models to effectively study the causal...... and either 15% or 20% sucrose) compared with isocaloric standard chow in adult guinea pigs. Biochemical markers confirmed dyslipidemia in agreement with dietary regimens; however, both high-fat groups displayed a decreased tissue fat percentage compared with controls. Macroscopic appearance, histopathologic....... Evaluation of glucose tolerance showed no indication of insulin resistance. The 5% increase in sucrose between the 2 high-fat diets did not lead to significant differences between groups. In conclusion, we find the dyslipidemic guinea pig to be a valid model of diet imposed dyslipidemia, particularly...

  20. Effects of lead mineralogy on soil washing enhanced by ferric salts as extracting and oxidizing agents.

    Yoo, Jong-Chan; Park, Sang-Min; Yoon, Geun-Seok; Tsang, Daniel C W; Baek, Kitae

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using ferric salts including FeCl 3 and Fe(NO 3 ) 3 as extracting and oxidizing agents for a soil washing process to remediate Pb-contaminated soils. We treated various Pb minerals including PbO, PbCO 3 , Pb 3 (CO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 , PbSO 4 , PbS, and Pb 5 (PO 4 ) 3 (OH) using ferric salts, and compared our results with those obtained using common washing agents of HCl, HNO 3 , disodium-ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (Na 2 -EDTA), and citric acid. The use of 50 mM Fe(NO 3 ) 3 extracted significantly more Pb (above 96% extraction) from Pb minerals except PbSO 4 (below 55% extraction) compared to the other washing agents. In contrast, washing processes using FeCl 3 and HCl were not effective for extraction from Pb minerals because of PbCl 2 precipitation. Yet, the newly formed PbCl 2 could be dissolved by subsequent wash with distilled water under acidic conditions. When applying our washing method to remediate field-contaminated soil from a shooting range that had high concentrations of Pb 3 (CO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 and PbCO 3 , we extracted more Pb (approximately 99% extraction) from the soil using 100 mM Fe(NO 3 ) 3 than other washing agents at the same process conditions. Our results show that ferric salts can be alternative washing agents for Pb-contaminated soils in view of their extracting and oxidizing abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ARIES Oxide Production Program Assessment of Risk to Long-term Sustainable Production Rate

    Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lloyd, Jane Alexandria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Majors, Harry W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-04

    This report describes an assessment of risks and the development of a risk watch list for the ARIES Oxide Production Program conducted in the Plutonium Facility at LANL. The watch list is an active list of potential risks and opportunities that the management team periodically considers to maximize the likelihood of program success. The initial assessments were made in FY 16. The initial watch list was reviewed in September 2016. The initial report was not issued. Revision 1 has been developed based on management review of the original watch list and includes changes that occurred during FY-16.

  2. Evaluation of neutron and gamma-ray-production cross-section data for lead

    Fu, C.Y.; Perey, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    A survey was made of the available information on neutron and gamma-ray-production cross-section measurements of lead. From these and from relevant nuclear-structure information on the Pb isotopes, recommended neutron cross-section data sets for lead covering the neutron energy range from 0.00001 eV to 20.0 MeV have been prepared. The cross sections are derived from experimental results available to February 1972 and from calculations based on optical-model, DWBA, and Hauser--Feshbach theories. Comparisons which show good agreement between theoretical and experimental values are displayed in a number of graphs. Also presented graphically are smoothed total cross sections, Legendre coefficients for angular distributions, and a representative energy distribution of gamma rays from resonance capture. 15 tables, 36 figures, 104 references

  3. Guideline tests on the corrosion of sintered uranium oxide by lead and sodium about 450 deg. C

    Portnoff, A.; Pointud, R.

    1958-05-01

    Within the frame of the investigation of behaviour of a fuel element (such as UO 2 ) under irradiation, the authors report the study of the physical-chemical action of the coolant at different temperatures on the body to be irradiated. Thus, sintered uranium oxide has been submitted to corrosion by lead and by sodium during 250 hours at temperatures between 400 and 500 C. The physical characteristics of the UO 2 powder and of different sintered UO 2 pellets produced from this powder under different sintering processes are indicated, as well as the results of a spectrographic analysis of the sintered UO 2 . Corrosion devices, treatments and obtained results are reported for corrosion by lead and by sodium. In the latter case, extraction processes are discussed (using butyl alcohol, or melting in vaseline oil)

  4. Analysis of microbial populations, denitrification, and nitrous oxide production in riparian buffers

    Riparian buffers are used extensively to protect water bodies from nonpoint source nitrogen pollution. However there is relatively little information on the impact of these buffers on production of nitrous oxide (N2O). In this study, we assessed nitrous oxide production in riparian buffers of the so...

  5. Methods to assess secondary volatile lipid oxidation products in complex food matrices

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Yesiltas, Betül

    A range of different methods are available to determine secondary volatile lipid oxidation products. These methods include e.g. spectrophotometric determination of anisidine values and TBARS as well as GC based methods for determination of specific volatile oxidation products such as pentanal...... headspace methods on the same food matrices will be presented....

  6. STIMULATION OF OXIDANT PRODUCTION IN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES BY POLLUTANT AND LATEX PARTICLES

    Air pollutant dusts as well as chemically defined particles were examined for their activating effect on oxidant production (O2- and H2O2) in guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM). Oxidant production was measured as chemiluminescence of albumin-bound luminol. All particles examine...

  7. Characterization of oxidation end product of plasma albumin 'in vivo'.

    Musante, Luca; Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Petretto, Andrea; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Del Boccio, Piero; Urbani, Andrea; Rialdi, Giovanni; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2006-10-20

    Anti-oxidants are paradoxically much lower in plasma than inside cells even blood is comparably exposed to the oxidative stress. 'In vitro' models suggest a critical role of albumin as substitutive anti-oxidant in plasma but no proof for this role is available 'in vivo.' Herein, we demonstrate by LC/MS/MS that plasma albumin undergoes massive oxidation in primary nephrotic syndrome, involving stable sulphonation SO3- of the free SH of Cys 34 with +48Da increase in exact mass of the protein (ESI-MS) and formation of a fast moving isoform in the pH range between 5 and 7. Physical-chemical experiments with DSC and fluorescence spectra indicate a thermal stabilization of the structure upon oxidation. This is the first demonstration of massive oxidation of albumin 'in vivo' that reflects a functional role of the protein. Free radicals should be implicated in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in human FSGS.

  8. [Effects of metal-catalyzed oxidation on the formation of advanced oxidation protein products].

    Li, Li; Peng, Ai; Zhu, Kai-Yuan; Yu, Hong; Ll, Xin-Hua; Li, Chang-Bin

    2008-03-11

    To explore the relationship between metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) and the formation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs). Specimens of human serum albumin (HSA) and pooled plasma were collected from 3 healthy volunteers and 4 uremia patients were divided into 3 groups: Group A incubated with copper sulfate solution of the concentrations of 0, 0.2, or 0.5 mmol/L, Group B, incubated with hydrogen peroxide 2 mmol/L, and Group C, incubated with copper sulfate 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/L plus hydrogen peroxide 2 mmol/L. 30 min and 24 h later the AOPP level was determined by ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to observe the fragmentation effect on plasma proteins. Ninhydrin method was used to examine the protein fragments. The scavenging capacity of hydroxyl radical by macromolecules was measured so as to estimate the extent of damage for proteins induced by MCO. (1) The AOPP level of the HSA and plasma specimens of the uremia patients increased along with the increase of cupric ion concentration in a dose-dependent manner, especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.05). (2) Aggregation of proteins was almost negligible in all groups, however, HPLC showed that cupric ion with or without hydrogen peroxide increased the fragments in the HAS specimens (with a relative molecular mass of 5000) and uremia patients' plasma proteins (with the molecular mass 7000). (3) The plasma AOPP level of the healthy volunteers was 68.2 micromol/L +/- 2.4 micromol/L, significantly lower than that of the uremia patients (158.5 micromol/L +/- 8.2 micromol/L). (4) The scavenging ability to clear hydroxyl radical by plasma proteins of the healthy volunteers was 1.38 -9.03 times as higher than that of the uremia patients. MCO contributes to the formation of AOPPs mainly through its fragmentation effect to proteins.

  9. Leading safety performance indicators for resilience assessment of radiopharmaceuticals production process

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: grecco@ien.gov.b, E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.b, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Instrumentacao e Confiabilidade Humana; Vidal, Mario C.R., E-mail: mvidal@ergonomia.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEP/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia de Producao. Grupo de Ergonomia e Novas Tecnologias (GENTE)

    2011-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are radiation-emitting substances used in medicine for radiotherapy and imaging diagnosis. A Research Institute, located in Rio de Janeiro, produces three radiopharmaceuticals: the sodium iodate is used in the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunctions, the meta-iodo-benzyl guanidine is used in the diagnosis of cardiac diseases, and the fluorodeoxyglucose is used in diagnosis in cardiology, oncology, neurology and neuro psychiatry. This paper presents a leading safety performance indicators framework to assess the resilience of radiopharmaceuticals production processes. The organizations that use resilience indicators will be able to pro actively evaluate and manage safety. (author)

  10. Leading safety performance indicators for resilience assessment of radiopharmaceuticals production process

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.

    2011-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are radiation-emitting substances used in medicine for radiotherapy and imaging diagnosis. A Research Institute, located in Rio de Janeiro, produces three radiopharmaceuticals: the sodium iodate is used in the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunctions, the meta-iodo-benzyl guanidine is used in the diagnosis of cardiac diseases, and the fluorodeoxyglucose is used in diagnosis in cardiology, oncology, neurology and neuro psychiatry. This paper presents a leading safety performance indicators framework to assess the resilience of radiopharmaceuticals production processes. The organizations that use resilience indicators will be able to pro actively evaluate and manage safety. (author)

  11. Spectrometric gamma investigations concerning zinc-lead ores and the products of their processing

    Girczys, J.; Skowronek, J.; Zrodlowski, B.

    1983-01-01

    Zinc-lead ore and products of its enrichment were investigated using gamma spectrometry for the content of uranium, thorium and potassium 40. It was stated that the mean content of these elements in a deposit does not diverge from their mean concentration in the lithosphere. They also accompany the surrounding rocks. As a result of mechanical processing of this ore radionuclides pass discards in which they do not form concentrations dangerous for life, either. In the exploitation areas and in the surroundings there is no state of ecological hazard. (author)

  12. Plant polyphenols mobilize nuclear copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidatively generated DNA breakage: implications for an anticancer mechanism.

    Shamim, Uzma; Hanif, Sarmad; Ullah, M F; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhat, Showket H; Hadi, S M

    2008-08-01

    It was earlier proposed that an important anti-cancer mechanism of plant polyphenols may involve mobilization of endogenous copper ions, possibly chromatin-bound copper and the consequent pro-oxidant action. This paper shows that plant polyphenols are able to mobilize nuclear copper in human lymphocytes, leading to degradation of cellular DNA. A cellular system of lymphocytes isolated from human peripheral blood and comet assay was used for this purpose. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable copper chelator) inhibited DNA degradation in intact lymphocytes. Bathocuproine, which is unable to permeate through the cell membrane, did not cause such inhibition. This study has further shown that polyphenols are able to degrade DNA in cell nuclei and that such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine as well as bathocuproine (both of which are able to permeate the nuclear pore complex), suggesting that nuclear copper is mobilized in this reaction. Pre-incubation of lymphocyte nuclei with polyphenols indicates that it is capable of traversing the nuclear membrane. This study has also shown that polyphenols generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte nuclei which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neocuproine. These results indicate that the generation of ROS occurs through mobilization of nuclear copper resulting in oxidatively generated DNA breakage.

  13. Higgs boson production in association with a jet at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Boughezal, Radja; Melnikov, Kirill; Petriello, Frank; Schulze, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present precise predictions for Higgs boson production in association with a jet. Our calculation is accurate to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD in the Higgs Effective Field Theory and constitutes the first complete NNLO computation for Higgs production with a final-state jet in hadronic collisions. We include all relevant phenomenological channels and present fully-differential results as well as total cross sections for the LHC. Our NNLO predictions reduce the unphysical scale dependence by more than a factor of two and enhance the total rate by about twenty percent compared to NLO QCD predictions. Our results demonstrate for the first time satisfactory convergence of the perturbative series.

  14. K2 Mn4 O8 /Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites for Excellent Lithium Storage and Adsorption of Lead Ions.

    Hao, Shu-Meng; Qu, Jin; Yang, Jing; Gui, Chen-Xi; Wang, Qian-Qian; Li, Qian-Jie; Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Ion diffusion efficiency at the solid-liquid interface is an important factor for energy storage and adsorption from aqueous solution. Although K 2 Mn 4 O 8 (KMO) exhibits efficient ion diffusion and ion-exchange capacities, due to its high interlayer space of 0.70 nm, how to enhance its mass transfer performance is still an issue. Herein, novel layered KMO/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites are fabricated through the anchoring of KMO nanoplates on RGO with a mild solution process. The face-to-face structure facilitates fast transfer of lithium and lead ions; thus leading to excellent lithium storage and lead ion adsorption. The anchoring of KMO on RGO not only increases electrical conductivity of the layered nanocomposites, but also effectively prevents aggregation of KMO nanoplates. The KMO/RGO nanocomposite with an optimal RGO content exhibits a first cycle charge capacity of 739 mA h g -1 , which is much higher than that of KMO (326 mA h g -1 ). After 100 charge-discharge cycles, it still retains a charge capacity of 664 mA h g -1 . For the adsorption of lead ions, the KMO/RGO nanocomposite exhibits a capacity of 341 mg g -1 , which is higher than those of KMO (305 mg g -1 ) and RGO (63 mg g -1 ) alone. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Natural fibre high-density polyethylene and lead oxide composites for radiation shielding

    El-Sayed, A; Ismail, M R

    2003-01-01

    Study has been made of the radiation shielding provided by recycled agricultural fibre and industrial plastic wastes produced as composite materials. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra behind composites of fibre-plastic (rho = 1.373 g cm sup - sup 3) and fibre-plastic-lead (rho = 2.756 g cm sup - sup 3) have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating technique based on the zero-cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and BF sub 3 counter, leading to determination of the macroscopic cross-section (SIGMA). The removal cross-sections (SIGMA sub R) of fast neutrons have been determined from measured results and elemental composition of the composites. For gamma-rays, total linear attenuation coefficients (mu) and total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) have been determined from use of the XCOM code and me...

  16. Fabrication, characterization and gamma rays shielding properties of nano and micro lead oxide-dispersed-high density polyethylene composites

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; El-Khatib, Ahmed M.; Badawi, Mohamed S.; Rashad, Amal R.; El-Sharkawy, Rehab M.; Thabet, Abouzeid A.

    2018-04-01

    Polymer composites of high-density polyethylene (HD-PE) filled with powdered lead oxide nanoparticles (PbO NPs) and bulk lead oxide (PbO Blk) were prepared with filler weight fraction [10% and 50%]. These polymer composites were investigated for radiation-shielding of gamma-rays emitted from radioactive point sources [241Am, 133Ba, 137Cs, and 60Co]. The polymer was found to decrease the heaviness of the shielding material and increase the flexibility while the metal oxide fillers acted as principle radiation attenuators in the polymer composite. The prepared composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (BET) and field emission transmission electron microscope (FE-TEM). The morphological analysis of the assembled composites showed that, PbO NPs and PbO Blk materials exhibited homogenous dispersion in the polymer-matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) demonstrated that the thermal-stability of HD-PE was enhanced in the presence of both PbO Blk and PbO NPs. The results declared that, the density of polymer composites was increase with the percentage of filler contents. The highest density value was identified as 1.652 g cm-3 for 50 wt% of PbO NPs. Linear attenuation coefficients (μ) have been estimated from the use of XCOM code and measured results. Reasonable agreement was attended between theoretical and experimental results. These composites were also found to display excellent percentage of heaviness with respect to other conventional materials.

  17. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs.

  18. Drugs from the Oceans: Marine Natural Products as Leads for Drug Discovery.

    Altmann, Karl-Heinz

    2017-10-25

    The marine environment harbors a vast number of species that are the source of a wide array of structurally diverse bioactive secondary metabolites. At this point in time, roughly 27'000 marine natural products are known, of which eight are (were) at the origin of seven marketed drugs, mostly for the treatment of cancer. The majority of these drugs and also of drug candidates currently undergoing clinical evaluation (excluding antibody-drug conjugates) are unmodified natural products, but synthetic chemistry has played a central role in the discovery and/or development of all but one of the approved marine-derived drugs. More than 1000 new marine natural products have been isolated per year over the last decade, but the pool of new and unique structures is far from exhausted. To fully leverage the potential offered by the structural diversity of marine-produced secondary metabolites for drug discovery will require their broad assessment for different bioactivities and the productive interplay between new fermentation technologies, synthetic organic chemistry, and medicinal chemistry, in order to secure compound supply and enable lead optimization.

  19. Low nitrous oxide production in intermittent-feed high performance nitritating reactors

    Su, Qingxian; Jensen, Malene M.; Smets, Barth F.

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production from autotrophic nitrogen removal processes, especially nitritating systems, is of growing concern. N2O dynamics were characterized and N2O production factors were quantified in two lab-scale intermittent-feed nitritating SBRs. 93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium...... was converted to nitrite, with the average total net N2O production of 2.1 ± 0.7% of the ammonium oxidized. Operation with intermittent feeding appears an effective optimization approach to mitigate N2O emissions from nitritating systems. Net N2O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after...

  20. Detection of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation products in the extracellular matrix of human atherosclerotic plaques

    Woods, Alan A; Linton, Stuart M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation is believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. Oxidized lipids, sterols and proteins have been detected in early, intermediate and advanced human lesions at elevated levels. The spectrum of oxidized side-chain products detected on proteins from homogenates of advanced human lesions has...... been interpreted in terms of the occurrence of two oxidative mechanisms, one involving oxygen-derived radicals catalysed by trace transition metal ions, and a second involving chlorinating species (HOCl or Cl2), generated by the haem enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). As MPO is released extracellularly...... for 83-96% of the total oxidized protein side-chain products detected in these plaques. Oxidation of matrix components extracted from healthy artery tissue, and model proteins, with reagent HOCl is shown to give rise to a similar pattern of products to those detected in advanced human lesions...

  1. Observation of $Z$ production in proton-lead collisions at LHCb

    Aaij, R.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L.Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Pardinas, J.Garcia; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grunberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J.F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C.Marin; Marino, P.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M.J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D.P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B.K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M.M.; Reis, A.C. dos; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A.B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A.Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P.Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D.M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V.K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J.A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S.A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The first observation of $Z$ boson production in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per proton-nucleon pair of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5~\\text{TeV}$ is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $1.6~\\text{nb}^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. The $Z$ candidates are reconstructed from pairs of oppositely charged muons with pseudorapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 and transverse momenta above $20~\\text{GeV}/c$. The invariant dimuon mass is restricted to the range $60-120~\\text{GeV}/c^2$. The $Z$ production cross-section is measured to be \\begin{eqnarray*} \\sigma_{Z\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-}(\\text{fwd})&=&13.5^{+5.4}_{-4.0}\\text{(stat.)}\\pm1.2\\text{(syst.)}~\\text{nb} \\end{eqnarray*} in the direction of the proton beam and \\begin{eqnarray*} \\sigma_{Z\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-}(\\text{bwd}) & =&10.7^{+8.4}_{-5.1}\\text{(stat.)}\\pm1.0\\text{(syst.)}~\\text{nb} \\end{eqnarray*} in the direction of the lead beam, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  2. Event generation for next to leading order chargino production at the international linear collider

    Robens, T.

    2006-10-15

    At the International Linear Collider (ILC), parameters of supersymmetry (SUSY) can be determined with an experimental accuracy matching the precision of next-to-leading order (NLO) and higher-order theoretical predictions. Therefore, these contributions need to be included in the analysis of the parameters. We present a Monte-Carlo event generator for simulating chargino pair production at the ILC at next-to-leading order in the electroweak couplings. We consider two approaches of including photon radiation. A strict fixed-order approach allows for comparison and consistency checks with published semianalytic results in the literature. A version with soft- and hard-collinear resummation of photon radiation, which combines photon resummation with the inclusion of the NLO matrix element for the production process, avoids negative event weights, so the program can simulate physical (unweighted) event samples. Photons are explicitly generated throughout the range where they can be experimentally resolved. In addition, it includes further higher-order corrections unaccounted for by the fixed-order method. Inspecting the dependence on the cutoffs separating the soft and collinear regions, we evaluate the systematic errors due to soft and collinear approximations for NLO and higher-order contributions. In the resummation approach, the residual uncertainty can be brought down to the per-mil level, coinciding with the expected statistical uncertainty at the ILC. We closely investigate the two-photon phase space for the resummation method. We present results for cross sections and event generation for both approaches. (orig.)

  3. Production of nano structured zinc oxide by the flame spray method

    Trommer, R.M.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc oxide has been widely employed in several applications, mainly as antibactericidal and absorber of ultraviolet radiation (UV). The preference for a nanostructured material is associated with the different properties presented by these entities when compared to the bulk material. Thus, this work employed the flame spray technique, an alternative method with an enormous potential in nanoparticles production, to obtain ZnO powders. Basically, a precursor solution is prepared, atomized and then sprayed in the flame, where it burns and leads to the formation of particles. X-ray diffraction analysis pointed the crystalline phase zincite. By scanning electronic microscopy, it was possible to observe irregular and aggregated particles in the powder. By transmission electronic microscopy, images of the nanometric ZnO particles were obtained, being later confirmed by the single line method. (author)

  4. Involvement of Syk kinase in TNF-induced nitric oxide production by airway epithelial cells

    Ulanova, Marina; Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Munoz, Samira; Asfaha, Samuel; Kim, Moo-Kyung; Schreiber, Alan D.; Befus, A. Dean

    2006-01-01

    We have recently found that Syk is widely expressed in lung epithelial cells (EC) and participates in β1 integrin signaling. In this study, we assessed the role of Syk in regulation of NO production. Stimulation of human bronchial EC line HS-24 by TNF caused an increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Inhibition of Syk using siRNA or piceatannol down-regulated the iNOS expression and reduced NO production. This effect occurred in EC simultaneously stimulated via β1 integrins, suggesting that TNF and β1 integrins provide co-stimulatory signals. Inhibition of Syk down-regulated TNF-induced p38 and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB. Thus, TNF-induced activation of pro-inflammatory signaling in EC leading to enhanced expression of iNOS and NO production was dependent on Syk. Syk-mediated signaling regulates NO production at least partly via activating the MAPK cascade. Understanding the role of Syk in airway EC may help in developing new therapeutic tools for inflammatory lung disorders

  5. Measurements of nitrous oxide emissions from vegetable production in China

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Xie, Yingxin; Xing, Guangxi; Zhu, Zhaoliang; Butenhoff, Chris

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions resulting from Chinese vegetable production were measured. A site in suburban Nanjing (East coast; Jiangsu Province) was monitored from November 2001 to January 2003, in which five consecutive vegetable crops were sown. The crops consisted of radish, baby bok choy, lettuce, second planting of baby bok choy, and finally celery. Results suggested that N 2O emission events occur in pulses. The average N 2O-N flux for all five crops was 148±9 μg N m -2 h -1 and the average emission rate was 12±0.7 kg N ha -1. The average seasonal emission fluxes ranged from 37 μg N m -2 h -1 in the radish plot to 300 μg N m -2 h -1 in the celery plot. The celery field produced the greatest cumulative emission of 5.8 kg N ha -1 while the baby bok choy field had the lowest rate of 0.96-1.0 kg N ha -1. In total, 0.73% of applied fertilizer N was emitted as N 2O-N as a whole. The lettuce field had the largest emission factor of 2.2%. Results indicate that emissions from vegetable field are a potential source of national N 2O inventory. Temporal variation is much greater than spatial variation and the corresponding CV averaged 115% and 22%, respectively. Under the same total sampling quantity, increasing sampling frequency is more important than increasing spatial replicates.

  6. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) regulates skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling via altered mitochondrial oxidation and reactive oxygen species production

    Jing, Enxuan; Emanuelli, Brice; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Sirt3 is a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized in mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial function. Sirt3 expression in skeletal muscle is decreased in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and regulated by feeding, fasting, and caloric restriction. Sirt3 knockout...... mice exhibit decreased oxygen consumption and develop oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, leading to JNK activation and impaired insulin signaling. This effect is mimicked by knockdown of Sirt3 in cultured myoblasts, which exhibit reduced mitochondrial oxidation, increased reactive oxygen species......, activation of JNK, increased serine and decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and decreased insulin signaling. Thus, Sirt3 plays an important role in diabetes through regulation of mitochondrial oxidation, reactive oxygen species production, and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  7. Amorphous semiconducting and conducting transparent metal oxide thin films and production thereof

    Perkins, John; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David; Taylor, Matthew; Neuman, George A.; Luten, Henry A.; Forgette, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, John S.

    2010-07-13

    Metal oxide thin films and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a metal oxide thin film may comprise introducing at least two metallic elements and oxygen into a process chamber to form a metal oxide. The method may also comprise depositing the metal oxide on a substrate in the process chamber. The method may also comprise simultaneously controlling a ratio of the at least two metallic elements and a stoichiometry of the oxygen during deposition. Exemplary amorphous metal oxide thin films produced according to the methods herein may exhibit highly transparent properties, highly conductive properties, and/or other opto-electronic properties.

  8. A first principles study of the mechanical, electronic, and vibrational properties of lead oxide

    Zhuravlev, Yu. N.; Korabel'nikov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    The first principles study of the crystal structure, chemical bonds, elastic and mechanical properties, electron energy band structure and density, and normal long-wave vibrations of nine phases of lead monoxide, dioxide, and tetraoxide has been performed under normal and external pressure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT) with the Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof (PBE) gradient exchange-correlation functional and its hybrid version with a 25-% Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange contribution in the basis of localized atom orbitals. The behavior of physical parameters has been studied using the cold four- and threeparameter equations of state. The parameters of the crystal structures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data, and elastic constants indicate their mechanical stability and anisotropy in the elastic properties. The elasticity, shear, and Young moduli, hardness, acoustic velocities, and Debye temperature of dioxide on the one hand and monoxide and tetraoxide on the other hand appreciably differ from each other. The difference between electron properties may be explained by the character of hybridization in the upper filled and lower empty energy bands as evident from the density of states. In monoxide, the indirect band gap width decreases with increasing pressure at a rate of 0.16 eV/GPa, and the direct band gap width increases at a rate of 0.13 eV/GPa. To identify crystalline phases, the frequencies and intensities of long-wave modes active in IR and Raman spectra have been calculated.

  9. Formation of lysine-derived oxidation products and loss of tryptophan during processing of porcine patties with added avocado byproducts.

    Utrera, Mariana; Rodríguez-Carpena, Javier-Germán; Morcuende, David; Estévez, Mario

    2012-04-18

    The effects of the addition of avocado oil and a phenolic-rich avocado peel extract on protein oxidation were studied in porcine patties subjected to cooking and chilled storage. Protein oxidation was assessed by means of tryptophan loss and the formation of specific lysine oxidation products, such as α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS), α-aminoadipic acid (AAA), and Schiff bases. In the present paper, quantitative data of AAA are reported for the first time on a food matrix. The addition of the avocado extract inhibited the formation of AAS, AAA, and Schiff bases in patties during cooking and subsequent chilled storage. The antioxidant effect may respond to the protecting effect of phenolic compounds, mainly procyanidins, found on the avocado extract. Apparently, the combination of both strategies (back-fat replacement and addition of avocado extract) does not lead to an enhanced advantage on the oxidative stability of the product. The novel methodologies used in the present study enable a better comprehension of the mechanisms and consequences of protein oxidation in food systems.

  10. Microbial production of nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in boreal peatlands

    Regina, K.

    1998-12-31

    Soils are an important source of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). N{sub 2}O is a greenhouse gas participating in both warming of the climate and the destruction of ozone, and NO is active in tropospheric chemistry. The fluxes and formation mechanisms of these gases in boreal Finnish peatlands were studied by both laboratory and field techniques. Special attention was paid to factors regulating their production, e.g. height of the water table, pH, temperature, nutrient level and nitrification activity. Both N{sub 2}O and NO fluxes were detected in the peatlands, some of which were sources of these trace gases and some sinks. The flux rates of N{sub 2}O ranged from negative values to several milligrammes per square metre per day. Natural peatlands were the lowest sources of N{sub 2}O, often showing negative fluxes, whereas sites drained for forestry some decades ago had markedly higher fluxes. A site drained for agriculture (grassland) was the highest source found. NO fluxes were observed on the two drained sites studied, a forested fen and the same field of grass, but not on a natural fen with a high water table. NO fluxes amounted to 16-30 % of the N{sub 2}O flux rates. The importance of the water table in regulating N{sub 2}0 fluxes was demonstrated in field and laboratory studies. It was shown in the laboratory that even a short lowering of the water table, for 14 weeks at 20 deg C, induced N{sub 2}0 fluxes from the fens that normally acted as sinks or only low sources. Raising the water table in peat monoliths from drained sites reduced the flux of N{sub 2}O. Nutrient-rich peatlands had much higher capacities for N{sub 2}O and NO production than poorer ones. The addition of KNO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}Cl or urea to minerotrophic peat further increased the fluxes of N{sub 2}O and NO, and also nitrogen mineralisation. There was a clear connection between the fluxes of N{sub 2}0 and NO and nitrification activity measured as the numbers of nitrite

  11. Microbial production of nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in boreal peatlands

    Regina, K.

    1998-01-01

    Soils are an important source of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and nitric oxide (NO). N 2 O is a greenhouse gas participating in both warming of the climate and the destruction of ozone, and NO is active in tropospheric chemistry. The fluxes and formation mechanisms of these gases in boreal Finnish peatlands were studied by both laboratory and field techniques. Special attention was paid to factors regulating their production, e.g. height of the water table, pH, temperature, nutrient level and nitrification activity. Both N 2 O and NO fluxes were detected in the peatlands, some of which were sources of these trace gases and some sinks. The flux rates of N 2 O ranged from negative values to several milligrammes per square metre per day. Natural peatlands were the lowest sources of N 2 O, often showing negative fluxes, whereas sites drained for forestry some decades ago had markedly higher fluxes. A site drained for agriculture (grassland) was the highest source found. NO fluxes were observed on the two drained sites studied, a forested fen and the same field of grass, but not on a natural fen with a high water table. NO fluxes amounted to 16-30 % of the N 2 O flux rates. The importance of the water table in regulating N 2 0 fluxes was demonstrated in field and laboratory studies. It was shown in the laboratory that even a short lowering of the water table, for 14 weeks at 20 deg C, induced N 2 0 fluxes from the fens that normally acted as sinks or only low sources. Raising the water table in peat monoliths from drained sites reduced the flux of N 2 O. Nutrient-rich peatlands had much higher capacities for N 2 O and NO production than poorer ones. The addition of KNO 3 , NH 4 Cl or urea to minerotrophic peat further increased the fluxes of N 2 O and NO, and also nitrogen mineralisation. There was a clear connection between the fluxes of N 2 0 and NO and nitrification activity measured as the numbers of nitrite-oxidising bacteria, nitrification potential or in situ net

  12. Microbial production of nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in boreal peatlands

    Regina, K

    1999-12-31

    Soils are an important source of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). N{sub 2}O is a greenhouse gas participating in both warming of the climate and the destruction of ozone, and NO is active in tropospheric chemistry. The fluxes and formation mechanisms of these gases in boreal Finnish peatlands were studied by both laboratory and field techniques. Special attention was paid to factors regulating their production, e.g. height of the water table, pH, temperature, nutrient level and nitrification activity. Both N{sub 2}O and NO fluxes were detected in the peatlands, some of which were sources of these trace gases and some sinks. The flux rates of N{sub 2}O ranged from negative values to several milligrammes per square metre per day. Natural peatlands were the lowest sources of N{sub 2}O, often showing negative fluxes, whereas sites drained for forestry some decades ago had markedly higher fluxes. A site drained for agriculture (grassland) was the highest source found. NO fluxes were observed on the two drained sites studied, a forested fen and the same field of grass, but not on a natural fen with a high water table. NO fluxes amounted to 16-30 % of the N{sub 2}O flux rates. The importance of the water table in regulating N{sub 2}0 fluxes was demonstrated in field and laboratory studies. It was shown in the laboratory that even a short lowering of the water table, for 14 weeks at 20 deg C, induced N{sub 2}0 fluxes from the fens that normally acted as sinks or only low sources. Raising the water table in peat monoliths from drained sites reduced the flux of N{sub 2}O. Nutrient-rich peatlands had much higher capacities for N{sub 2}O and NO production than poorer ones. The addition of KNO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}Cl or urea to minerotrophic peat further increased the fluxes of N{sub 2}O and NO, and also nitrogen mineralisation. There was a clear connection between the fluxes of N{sub 2}0 and NO and nitrification activity measured as the numbers of nitrite

  13. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    C. H. Frame

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is a trace gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion. The N2O yield from nitrification (moles N2O-N produced per mole ammonium-N consumed has been used to estimate marine N2O production rates from measured nitrification rates and global estimates of oceanic export production. However, the N2O yield from nitrification is not constant. Previous culture-based measurements indicate that N2O yield increases as oxygen (O2 concentration decreases and as nitrite (NO2 concentration increases. Here, we have measured yields of N2O from cultures of the marine β-proteobacterium Nitrosomonas marina C-113a as they grew on low-ammonium (50 μM media. These yields, which were typically between 4 × 10−4 and 7 × 10−4 for cultures with cell densities between 2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml−1, were lower than previous reports for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The observed impact of O2 concentration on yield was also smaller than previously reported under all conditions except at high starting cell densities (1.5 × 106 cells ml−1, where 160-fold higher yields were observed at 0.5% O2 (5.1 μM dissolved O2 compared with 20% O2 (203 μM dissolved O2. At lower cell densities (2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml−1, cultures grown under 0.5% O2 had yields that were only 1.25- to 1.73-fold higher than cultures grown under 20% O2. Thus, previously reported many-fold increases in N2O yield with dropping O2 could be reproduced only at cell densities that far exceeded those of ammonia oxidizers in the ocean. The presence of excess NO2 (up to 1 mM in the growth

  14. Graphene oxide sheets immobilized polystyrene for column preconcentration and sensitive determination of lead by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Islam, Aminul; Ahmad, Hilal; Zaidi, Noushi; Kumar, Suneel

    2014-08-13

    A novel solid-phase extractant was synthesized by coupling graphene oxide (GO) on chloromethylated polystyrene through an ethylenediamine spacer unit to develop a column method for the preconcentration/separation of lead prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, far-infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The abundant oxygen-containing surface functional groups form a strong complex with lead, resulting in higher sorption capacity (227.92 mg g(-1)) than other nanosorbents used for sorption studies of the column method. Using the column procedure here is an alternative to the direct use of GO, which restricts irreversible aggregation of GO and its escape into the ecosystem, making it an environmentally sustainable method. The column method was optimized by varying experimental variables such as pH, flow rate for sorption/desorption, and elution condition and was observed to exhibit a high preconcentration factor (400) with a low preconcentration limit (2.5 ppb) and a high degree of tolerance for matrix ions. The accuracy of the proposed method was verified by determining the Pb content in the standard reference materials and by recovery experiments. The method showed good precision with a relative standard deviation <5%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of lead in tap water, electroplating wastewater, river water, and food samples after preconcentration.

  15. 16 CFR 1500.91 - Determinations regarding lead content for certain materials or products under section 101 of the...

    2010-01-01

    ... certain materials or products under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act. 1500.91... Safety Improvement Act. (a) The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act provides for specific lead limits..., flowers, bone, sea shell, coral, amber, feathers, fur, leather. (e) The following metals and alloys do not...

  16. Effects of garlic extract on color, lipid oxidation and oxidative breakdown products in raw ground beef during refrigerated storage

    XINZHUANG ZHANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate the effects of garlic extracts on color, lipid oxidation, and oxidative breakdown products in raw ground beef during refrigerated storage. The two treatments were:control group (C, with no addition and experiment group (D, 50 mg garlic extracts added to 100 g beef. Adding garlic extracts significant increased a* value (PA ≤ 0.05, and significant decreased TBARS and PV values (PA ≤ 0.05. The pH and –SH value of D group had a decreasing tendency (PA=0.0522 and an increasing tendency (PA=0.0636 respectively compared to C group. Garlic extracts protected phospholipids, fatty acids and polypeptides from oxidation. The results indicatethat garlic extracts have the antioxidant activity, helping maintain the meat color, inhibiting lipid oxidation and protein degradation of raw ground beef during refrigerated storage.

  17. Electroweak Higgs boson production in the standard model effective field theory beyond leading order in QCD

    Degrande, Celine [CERN, Theory Division, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Fuks, Benjamin [Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Paris (France); CNRS, Paris (France); Mawatari, Kentarou [Universite Grenoble-Alpes, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE/ELEM, International Solvay Institutes, Brussels (Belgium); Mimasu, Ken [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Sanz, Veronica [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    We study the impact of dimension-six operators of the standard model effective field theory relevant for vector-boson fusion and associated Higgs boson production at the LHC. We present predictions at the next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD that include matching to parton showers and that rely on fully automated simulations. We show the importance of the subsequent reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in improving the possible discrimination between effective field theory and standard model results, and we demonstrate that the range of the Wilson coefficient values allowed by a global fit to LEP and LHC Run I data can be further constrained by LHC Run II future results. (orig.)

  18. BUSINESS SURVEY LIQUIDITY MEASURE AS A LEADING INDICATOR OF CROATIAN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION

    Mirjana Čižmešija

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Business survey liquidity measure is one of the modifications of the uniform EU business survey methodology applied in Croatia. Consequent liquidity problem have been, since socialist times, one of the major problem for Croatia's business. The problem rapidly increased between 1995 and 2000 and now it again represents the main difficulty for the Croatian economy. In order to improve the forecasting properties of business survey liquidity measure, some econometric models ware applied. Based on the regression analysis we concluded that the changes in the liquidity variable can predict the direction of changes in industrial production with one quarter lead. The results also show that liquidity can be a proxy of the Industrial Confidence Indicator in the observed period. The empirical analysis was performed using quarterly data covering the period from the first quarter 2005 to the fourth quarter 2011. The data sources were Privredni vjesnik (a business magazine in Croatia and the Croatian Bureau of Statistics.

  19. On top-pair hadro-production at next-to-next-to-leading order

    Moch, S.; Uwer, P.; Vogt, A.

    2012-03-01

    We study the QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) to the cross section for the hadronic pair-production of top quarks. We present new results in the high-energy limit using the well-known framework of k t -factorization. We combine these findings with the known threshold corrections and present improved approximate NNLO results over the full kinematic range. This approach is employed to quantify the residual theoretical uncertainty of the approximate NNLO results which amounts to about 4% for the Tevatron and 5% for the LHC cross-section predictions. Our analytic results in the high-energy limit will provide an important check on future computations of the complete NNLO cross sections.

  20. Direct Photon Production at Next-to–Next-to-Leading Order

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-05-01

    We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order we use the $N$-jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. We compare our predictions to ATLAS 8 TeV data and find that the inclusion of the NNLO terms in the perturbative expansion, supplemented by electroweak corrections, provides an excellent description of the data with greatly reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  1. Cholesterol oxidized products in foods: potential health hazards and the role of antioxidants in prevention

    Nieto, Susana

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a molecule with a double bond in its structure, and therefore it is susceptible to oxidation leading to the formation of oxysterols. These oxidation products are found in many commonly consumed foods and are formed during their manufacture and/or processing. Concern about the consumption of oxysterols arises from the potentially cytotoxic, mutagenic, atherogenic, and possibly carcinogenic effects of some of them. Eggs and egg-derived products are the main dietary sources of oxysterols. Thermally processed milk and milk-derived products are also another source of oxysterols in our diet. Fried meats, and other miscellaneous foods, such as French fried potatoes, when prepared using vegetable/animal frying oil, are another important source of oxysterols in the western diet. Efforts to prevent or to reduce cholesterol oxidation are directed to the application of antioxidants of either synthetic or natural origin. Antioxidants cannot only inhibit triglyceride oxidation, but some of them can also inhibit cholesterol oxidation. Among synthetic antioxidants, 2,6-di-ter tiarybutyl-4-methylphenol (BHT and ter tiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ , can eff icient ly inhibit the thermal-induced oxidation of cholesterol. Among natural antioxidants, alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, rosemary extracts, and flavonoid quercetin, show the strongest inhibitory action against cholesterol oxidation.El colesterol es una molécula con un doble enlace en su estructura; por lo tanto es susceptible a la oxidación y su transformación en oxiesteroles. Estos productos de oxidación se encuentran en gran diversidad de alimentos y se forman durante la manufactura y procesamiento. Algunos de los oxiesteroles son potencialmente citotóxicos, mutagénicos, aterogénicos y carcinogénicos. Los huevos y productos derivados del huevo constituyen la principal fuente en la dieta de oxiesteroles. También se encuentran oxiesteroles en derivados lácteos y leche sometida a altas

  2. Enhancement of emulsifier production by Curvularia lunata in cadmium, zinc and lead presence.

    Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Frycie, Aleksandra; Słaba, Mirosława; Długoński, Jerzy

    2007-10-01

    The influence of cadmium, zinc and lead on fungal emulsifier synthesis and on the growth of filamentous fungus Curvularia lunata has been studied. Tolerance to heavy metals established for C. lunata was additionally compared with the sensitivity exhibited by strains of Curvularia tuberculata and Paecilomyces marquandii-fungi which do not secrete compounds of emulsifying activity. Although C. lunata, as the only one out of all studied fungi, exhibited the lowest tolerance to heavy metals when grown on a solid medium (in conditions preventing emulsifier synthesis), it manifested the highest tolerance in liquid culture - in conditions allowing exopolymer production. Cadmium, zinc and lead presented in liquid medium up to a concentration of 15 mM had no negative effect on C. lunata growth and stimulated emulsifier synthesis. In the presence of 15 mM of heavy metals, both the emulsifier and 24-h-old growing mycelium exhibited maximum sorption capacities, which were determined as 18.2 +/- 2.67, 156.1 +/- 10.32 mg g(-1) for Cd2+, 22.2 +/- 3.40, 95.2 +/- 14.21 mg g(-1) for Zn2+ and 51.1 +/- 1.85, 230.0 +/- 28.47 mg g(-1) for Pb2+ respectively. The results obtained by us in this work indicate that the emulsifier acts as a protective compound increasing the ability of C. lunata to survive in heavy metal polluted environment. Enhancement of exopolymer synthesis in the presence of Cd2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ may also suggest, at least to some extent, a metal-specific nature of emulsifier production in C. lunata. Due to accumulation capability and tolerance to heavy metals, C. lunata mycelium surrounded by the emulsifier could be applied for toxic metal removal.

  3. Differential Higgs boson pair production at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    Florian, Daniel de; Mazzitelli, Javier; Grazzini, Massimiliano; Hanga, Catalin; Lindert, Jonas M.; Kallweit, Stefan; Maierhoefer, Philipp; Rathlev, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    We report on the first fully differential calculation for double Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in hadron collisions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. The calculation is performed in the heavy-top limit of the Standard Model, and in the phenomenological results we focus on pp collisions at √(s)=14 TeV. We present differential distributions through NNLO for various observables including the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions of the two Higgs bosons. NNLO corrections are at the level of 10%-25% with respect to the next-to-leading order (NLO) prediction with a residual scale uncertainty of 5%-15% and an overall mild phase-space dependence. Only at NNLO the perturbative expansion starts to converge yielding overlapping scale uncertainty bands between NNLO and NLO in most of the phase-space. The calculation includes NLO predictions for pp→HH+jet+X. Corrections to the corresponding distributions exceed 50% with a residual scale dependence of 20%-30%.

  4. Chemical recovery of thallium-203 following production and separation of lead-201

    Kayfus, G.P.; Boothe, T.E.; Campbell, J.A.; Finn, R.D.; Gilson, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the cost and limited availabilty of isotopically enriched thallium (>92% 203 Tl), its use in the 203 Tl(p, 3n) 201 Pb nuclear reaction necessitates chemical recovery. An adaptive method has been developed and evaluated. After the separation of 201 Pb, the 203 Tl(I) is oxidized to 203 Tl(III) by Cl 2 , Br 2 or [Fe(CN) 6 ] -2 , precipitated as Tl(OH) 3 with NaOH and subsequently converted to Tl 2 O 3 by heating. Due to potential loss during recovery, the solubilities of Tl(OH) 3 and Tl 2 O 3 in aqueous solution as a function of pH have been studied using the internal tracer 202 Tl(T=12.2 d), produced during cyclotron irradiation. Effective solubility product constants have been determined to be 5.4x10 -48 and 2.5x10 -47 for Tl(OH) 3 and Tl 2 O 3 , respectively. (author)

  5. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    Na, Young Ho; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup; Kumar, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development. (paper)

  6. Oxidation of UO2 at 400 to 1000 degrees C in air and its relevance to fission product release

    McCracken, D.R.

    1985-07-01

    Currently there is great interest in the behaviour of UO 2 under oxidizing conditions because irradiated uranium dioxide fuel can conceivably be exposed to a hot oxidizing atmosphere as a result of accidents. The temperature range covered in this paper is 400 to 1000 degrees C. At these high temperatures, UO 2 in air can oxidize rapidly to U 3 O 8 via U 3 O 7 and/or U 4 O 9 . The accompanying volume increase and corresponding stresses lead to fragmentation of the fuel pellets. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dependence of UO 2 oxidation on temperature, rate of air supply and residence time at temperature; to determine the rate controlling steps and rate of oxygen penetration; and to characterize the oxidation products and size of fragments. In addition, detailed metallography was related to X-ray diffraction studies of the oxidized UO 2 to facilitate future study of irradiated fuel, which is easier to do by metallography in hot-cells than by X-ray diffraction. Samples were heated in argon, then once at temperature they were exposed to air at a controlled flow-rate. Studies of the oxidation of unirradiated UO 2 pellets in air show two distinct types of oxidation with a change in mechanism at 600-700 degrees C. At temperatures ≤ 600 degrees C fragmentation accompanies the formation of U 3 O 8 while at T ≥ 800 degrees C, rapid grain growth occurs. In the first temperature region, volatile fission product releases are small, while in the second region, 100% release can be correlated with U 3 O 8 formation. In the first region, only the grain boundary inventory is released while in the other, 100% of the Xe, Kr, Ru, Sb, Cs and I are released. It appears that, within the error of present measurements, burnup does not affect rates of fission product release and oxidation in air at 400 to 1000 degrees C, so that oxidation rate data gathered using unirradiated pellets can be applied to irradiated fuel. 33 refs

  7. Biodiesel Production from Castor Oil by Using Calcium Oxide Derived from Mud Clam Shell

    Ismail, S.; Ahmed, A. S.; Anr, Reddy; Hamdan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic potential of calcium oxide synthesized from mud clam shell as a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production was studied. The mud clam shell calcium oxide was characterized using particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and BET gas sorption analyzer. The catalyst performance of mud clam shell calcium oxide was studied in the transesterification of castor oil as biodiesel. Catalyst characterization and transesterification s...

  8. Resolving the contributions of the membrane-bound and periplasmic nitrate reductase systems to nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Rowley, Gary; Hensen, Daniela; Felgate, Heather; Arkenberg, Anke; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Prior, Karen; Harrington, Carl; Field, Sarah J; Butt, Julea N; Baggs, Elizabeth; Richardson, David J

    2012-01-15

    The production of cytotoxic nitric oxide (NO) and conversion into the neuropharmacological agent and potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N₂O) is linked with anoxic nitrate catabolism by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Salmonella can synthesize two types of nitrate reductase: a membrane-bound form (Nar) and a periplasmic form (Nap). Nitrate catabolism was studied under nitrate-rich and nitrate-limited conditions in chemostat cultures following transition from oxic to anoxic conditions. Intracellular NO production was reported qualitatively by assessing transcription of the NO-regulated genes encoding flavohaemoglobin (Hmp), flavorubredoxin (NorV) and hybrid cluster protein (Hcp). A more quantitative analysis of the extent of NO formation was gained by measuring production of N₂O, the end-product of anoxic NO-detoxification. Under nitrate-rich conditions, the nar, nap, hmp, norV and hcp genes were all induced following transition from the oxic to anoxic state, and 20% of nitrate consumed in steady-state was released as N₂O when nitrite had accumulated to millimolar levels. The kinetics of nitrate consumption, nitrite accumulation and N₂O production were similar to those of wild-type in nitrate-sufficient cultures of a nap mutant. In contrast, in a narG mutant, the steady-state rate of N₂O production was ~30-fold lower than that of the wild-type. Under nitrate-limited conditions, nap, but not nar, was up-regulated following transition from oxic to anoxic metabolism and very little N₂O production was observed. Thus a combination of nitrate-sufficiency, nitrite accumulation and an active Nar-type nitrate reductase leads to NO and thence N₂O production, and this can account for up to 20% of the nitrate catabolized.

  9. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  10. Study of beauty quark production and next-to-leading order at HERA

    Nuncio Quiroz, Adriana Elizabeth

    2008-08-15

    In this thesis a study on the production and evolution of beauty quarks in ep collisions at HERA is presented. The emphasis is put on the corresponding Quantum Chromodynamics predictions including next-to-leading order corrections. In the context of this work the FMNR x Pythia interface was developed, which calculates next-to-leading order Quantum Chromodynamics predictions at visible level for heavy-flavour processes in the photoproduction regime. This is achieved using the RedStat routines which transform the FMNR program into a Monte Carlo-like event generator. The parton-level events obtained are interfaced to Pythia using the Le Houches accord routines. All branching ratios and decay channels of the heavy quarks implemented in the Pythia framework are used, and therefore complex cuts on the nal state can be applied. The FMNR x Pythia interface is applied in this thesis to obtain next-to-leading order predictions for the recently finished heavy flavour ZEUS analyses: the ep {yields} b anti bX {yields} D{sup *}{mu}X' and ep {yields} b anti bX {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}X' channels. A comparison with the H1 D{sup *}{mu} measurement is also performed. Since the use of such double tagging techniques to identify events where heavy flavours are present proved to be very convenient when the nal state is a pair of leptons, another part of this thesis work deals with the implementation of an electron finder, the {sup G}Elec finder. This finder is tested on the reconstruction of the J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} signal. Finally, a heavy-flavour analysis has been started, namely the ep {yields} b anti bX {yields} e{mu}X' dilepton channel, using an integrated luminosity of 114 pb{sup -1} gated by the ZEUS detector in the years 1996-2000. Compared to previous analyses the study of beauty quark production in this channel extends the phase space of the measurement closer to the kinematic threshold, since electrons provide access to lower p{sub T} values

  11. Study of beauty quark production and next-to-leading order effects at HERA

    Nuncio Quiroz, Adriana Elizabeth

    2008-08-01

    In this thesis a study on the production and evolution of beauty quarks in ep collisions at HERA is presented. The emphasis is put on the corresponding Quantum Chromodynamics predictions including next-to-leading order corrections. In the context of this work the FMNR x Pythia interface was developed, which calculates next-to-leading order Quantum Chromodynamics predictions at visible level for heavy-flavour processes in the photoproduction regime. This is achieved using the RedStat routines which transform the FMNR program into a Monte Carlo-like event generator. The parton-level events obtained are interfaced to Pythia using the Le Houches accord routines. All branching ratios and decay channels of the heavy quarks implemented in the Pythia framework are used, and therefore complex cuts on the nal state can be applied. The FMNR x Pythia interface is applied in this thesis to obtain next-to-leading order predictions for the recently finished heavy flavour ZEUS analyses: the ep → b anti bX → D * μX' and ep → b anti bX → μ + μ - X' channels. A comparison with the H1 D * μ measurement is also performed. Since the use of such double tagging techniques to identify events where heavy flavours are present proved to be very convenient when the nal state is a pair of leptons, another part of this thesis work deals with the implementation of an electron finder, the G Elec finder. This finder is tested on the reconstruction of the J/ψ → e + e - signal. Finally, a heavy-flavour analysis has been started, namely the ep → b anti bX → eμX' dilepton channel, using an integrated luminosity of 114 pb -1 gated by the ZEUS detector in the years 1996-2000. Compared to previous analyses the study of beauty quark production in this channel extends the phase space of the measurement closer to the kinematic threshold, since electrons provide access to lower p T values than muons do. The technical part of this thesis consisted in the calibration, maintenance and data

  12. Proteomic analysis of the metabolic adaptation of the biocontrol agent Pseudozyma flocculosa leading to glycolipid production

    Bélanger Richard R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast-like epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma flocculosa is known to antagonize powdery mildew fungi through proliferation on colonies presumably preceded by the release of an antifungal glycolipid (flocculosin. In culture conditions, P. flocculosa can be induced to produce or not flocculosin through manipulation of the culture medium nutrients. In order to characterize and understand the metabolic changes in P. flocculosa linked to glycolipid production, we conducted a 2-DE proteomic analysis and compared the proteomic profile of P. flocculosa growing under conditions favoring the development of the fungus (control or conducive to flocculosin synthesis (stress. A large number of protein spots (771 were detected in protein extracts of the control treatment compared to only 435 matched protein spots in extracts of the stress cultures, which clearly suggests an important metabolic reorganization in slow-growing cells producing flocculosin. From the latter treatment, we were able to identify 21 protein spots that were either specific to the treatment or up-regulated significantly (2-fold increase. All of them were identified based on similarity between predicted ORF of the newly sequenced genome of P. flocculosa with Ustilago maydis' available annotated sequences. These proteins were associated with the carbon and fatty acid metabolism, and also with the filamentous change of the fungus leading to flocculosin production. This first look into the proteome of P. flocculosa suggests that flocculosin synthesis is elicited in response to specific stress or limiting conditions.

  13. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Byers, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed.

  14. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  15. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Byers, C.H.

    1992-06-16

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed. 2 figs.

  16. Enhancing Biodiesel Production Using Green Glycerol-Enriched Calcium Oxide Catalyst : An Optimization Study

    Avhad, Mangesh R.; Gangurde, L.S.; Sánchez, Marcos; Bouaid, Abderrahim; Aracil, José; Martínez, Mercedes; Marchetti, Jorge M.

    2018-01-01

    The present article demonstrates a superior catalytic performance of glycerol-enriched calcium oxide for biodiesel production than other calcium-based counterparts. The proficiency of glycerol-enriched calcium oxide in catalyzing the methanolysis of crude Jatropha curcas oil containing high free

  17. The degradation of lining of rotary furnaces in the production of zinc oxide

    Luptáková, Natália; Pešlová, F.; Anisimov, E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2014), s. 116-121 ISSN 1335-0803 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : zinc oxide * the production of zinc oxide * zinc slag * refractories * the degradation of rotary furnace linings Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy http://ojs.mateng.sk/index.php/Mateng/article/view/133/194

  18. Continuous operation of a pilot plant for the production of beryllium oxide

    Costa, T C; Amaral, S; Silveira, C M.S.; de Oliveira, A P [Instituto de Tecnologia, Governador Valadares (Brazil)

    1975-12-01

    A method of obtaining beryllium oxide with a purity of 99,2% was developed in a pilot plant with a capacity of 7 tons per month destined to operate continuously. The operation market prospects and control of production with the objective of obtaining internacional technical grade beryllium oxide are discussed.

  19. Continuous operation of a pilot plant for the production of beryllium oxide

    Costa, T.C.; Amaral, S.; Silveira, C.M.S.; Oliveira, A.P. de

    1975-01-01

    A method of obtaining beryllium oxide with a purity of 99,2% was developed in a pilot plant with a capacity of 7 tons per month destined to operate continuously. The operation market prospects and control of production with the objective of obtaining internacional technical grade beryllium oxide are discussed [pt

  20. Impact of residual elements on zinc quality in the production of zinc oxide

    Luptáková, Natália; Dymáček, Petr; Pešlová, F.; Jurkovič, Z.; Barborák, O.; Stodola, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2016), s. 407-410 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : zinc * metallography * microstructure of zinc * zinc oxide * production of zinc oxide Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2014

  1. Formation and occurrence of dimer esters of pinene oxidation products in atmospheric aerosols

    Kristensen, Kasper; Enggrob, Kirsten L.; King, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    products cis-pinic and terpenylic acids, but similar to the second-generation oxidation products 3-methyl-1,2,3-butane tricarboxylic acid (MBTCA) and diaterpenylic acid acetate (DTAA). Dimer esters were observed within the first 30 min, indicating rapid production simultaneous to their structural...

  2. Do Corporate Control and Product Market Competition Lead to Stronger Productivity Growth? Evidence from Market-Oriented and Blockholder-Based Governance Regimes

    Koke, J.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of corporate governance and product market competition on total factor productivity growth for two large samples of German and UK firms. In poorly performing UK firms, the presence of strong outside blockholders lead to substantial increases in productivity.

  3. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    Venterea, R. T.; Sadowsky, M.; Breuillin-Sessoms, F.; Wang, P.; Clough, T. J.; Coulter, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  4. Denitrification: An important pathway for nitrous oxide production in tropical mangrove sediments (Goa, India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Bonin, P.C.; Michotey, V.D.

    Net nitrous oxide production and denitrification activity were measured in two mangrove ecosystems of Goa, India. The relatively pristine site Tuvem was compared to Divar, which is prone to high nutrient input. Stratified sampling at 2-cm intervals...

  5. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Ugusman, Azizah; Zakaria, Zaiton; Hui, Chua Kien; Nordin, Nor Anita Megat Mohd

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECS WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS: control, treatment with 180 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), treatment with 150 microg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H(2)O(2) for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  6. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Azizah Ugusman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. METHODS: HUVECs were divided into four groups: control, treatment with 180 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, treatment with 150 μg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H2O2 for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. RESULTS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. CONCLUSION: Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  7. Bradykinin stimulation of nitric oxide production is not sufficient for gamma-globin induction

    Čokić Vladan P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hydroxycarbamide, used in therapy of hemoglobinopathies, enhances nitric oxide (NO production both in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and human bone marrow endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC. Moreover, NO increases γ-globin and fetal hemoglobin levels in human erythroid progenitors. Objective. In order to find out whether simple physiologic stimulation of NO production by components of hematopoietic microenvironment can increase γ-globin gene expression, the effects of NO-inducer bradykinin were examined in endothelial cells. Methods. The study was performed in co-cultures of human erythroid progenitors, TrHBMEC and HUVECs by ozone-based chemiluminescent determination of NO and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results. In accordance with previous reports, the endogenous factor bradykinin increased endothelial cell production of NO in a dose- and time-dependent manner (0.1-0.6 μM up to 30 minutes. This induction of NO in HUVECs and TrHBMEC by bradykinin was blocked by competitive inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS, demonstrating NOS-dependence. It has been shown that bradykinin significantly reduced endothelial NOS (eNOS mRNA level and eNOS/Я-actin ratio in HUVEC (by twofold. In addition, bradykinin failed to increase γ-globin mRNA expression in erythroid progenitors only, as well as in co-culture studies of erythroid progenitors with TrHBMEC and HUVEC after 24 hours of treatment. Furthermore, bradykinin did not induce γ/β globin ratio in erythroid progenitors in co-cultures with HUVEC. Conclusion. Bradykinin mediated eNOS activation leads to short time and low NO production in endothelial cells, insufficient to induce γ-globin gene expression. These results emphasized the significance of elevated and extended NO production in augmentation of γ-globin gene expression. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175053

  8. Ascorbic acid reduces noise-induced nitric oxide production in the guinea pig ear.

    Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger; Fischer, Ilka; Brieger, Jürgen; Rümelin, Andreas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Li, Huige; Mann, Wolf J; Helling, Kai

    2008-05-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss can be caused, among other causes, by increased nitric oxide (NO) production in the inner ear leading to nitroactive stress and cell destruction. Some studies in the literature suggest that the degree of hearing loss (HL) could be reduced in an animal model through ascorbic acid supplementation. To identify the effect of ascorbic acid on tissue-dependent NO content in the inner ear of the guinea pig, we determined the local NO production in the organ of Corti and the lateral wall separately 6 hours after noise exposure. Prospective animal study in guinea pigs. Over a period of 7 days, male guinea pigs were supplied with minimum (25 mg/kg body weight/day) and maximum (525 mg/kg body weight/day) ascorbic acid doses, and afterwards exposed to noise (90 dB sound pressure level for 1 hour). The acoustic-evoked potentials were recorded before and after noise exposure. The organ of Corti and the lateral wall were incubated differently for 6 hours in culture medium, and the degree of NO production was determined by chemiluminescence. Ascorbic acid treatment reduced the hearing threshold shift after noise exposure depending on concentration. When the maximum ascorbic acid dose was substituted, NO production was significantly reduced in the lateral wall after noise exposure and slightly reduced in the organ of Corti. Oral supplementation of the natural radical scavenger ascorbic acid reduces the NO-production rate in the inner ear in noisy conditions. This finding supports the concept of inner ear protection by ascorbic acid supplementation.

  9. Restoration of impaired nitric oxide production in MELAS syndrome with citrulline and arginine supplementation.

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Hsu, Jean W; Emrick, Lisa T; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Craigen, William J; Jahoor, Farook; Scaglia, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most common mitochondrial disorders. Although the pathogenesis of stroke-like episodes remains unclear, it has been suggested that mitochondrial proliferation may result in endothelial dysfunction and decreased nitric oxide (NO) availability leading to cerebral ischemic events. This study aimed to assess NO production in subjects with MELAS syndrome and the effect of the NO precursors arginine and citrulline. Using stable isotope infusion techniques, we assessed arginine, citrulline, and NO metabolism in control subjects and subjects with MELAS syndrome before and after arginine or citrulline supplementation. The results showed that subjects with MELAS had lower NO synthesis rate associated with reduced citrulline flux, de novo arginine synthesis rate, and plasma arginine and citrulline concentrations, and higher plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentration and arginine clearance. We conclude that the observed impaired NO production is due to multiple factors including elevated ADMA, higher arginine clearance, and, most importantly, decreased de novo arginine synthesis secondary to decreased citrulline availability. Arginine and, to a greater extent, citrulline supplementation increased the de novo arginine synthesis rate, the plasma concentrations and flux of arginine and citrulline, and NO production. De novo arginine synthesis increased markedly with citrulline supplementation, explaining the superior efficacy of citrulline in increasing NO production. The improvement in NO production with arginine or citrulline supplementation supports their use in MELAS and suggests that citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect than arginine. These findings can have a broader relevance for other disorders marked by perturbations in NO metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction.

    Hansel, Colleen M; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Webb, Samuel M

    2012-07-31

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  11. Pitfalls in measuring nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers

    Wrage, N.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is an important greenhouse gas. At present, it causes 6% of global warming. The atmospheric concentration of N 2 O continues to increase at a rate of 0.8 ppb per year. The main known sink of N 2 O is its destruction in the stratosphere to

  12. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    JTEkanem

    reduction in the serum iron status and a modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity of T. brucei infected rats. ... inflammation and tissue damage15. ... The serum iron level was determined ... concentration or of total nitrate and nitrite ... 15. 16. 17. 18. Days. S e ru m iro n lev e l mg. /ml. Infected treated. Infected untreated. 0.

  13. Hydrodeoxygenation of oxidized distilled bio-oil for the production of gasoline fuel type

    Luo, Yan; Guda, Vamshi Krishna; Hassan, El Barbary; Steele, Philip H.; Mitchell, Brian; Yu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation had more influence on the yield of total hydrocarbons than distillation. • The highest total hydrocarbon yield was obtained from oxidized distilled bio-oil. • The 2nd-stage hydrocarbons were in the range of gasoline fuel boiling points. • The main products for upgrading of oxidized bio-oil were aliphatic hydrocarbons. • The main products for upgrading of non-oxidized bio-oil were aromatic hydrocarbons. - Abstract: Distilled and oxidized distilled bio-oils were subjected to 1st-stage mild hydrodeoxygenation and 2nd-stage full hydrodeoxygenation using nickel/silica–alumina catalyst as a means to enhance hydrocarbon yield. Raw bio-oil was treated for hydrodeoxygenation as a control to which to compare study treatments. Following two-stage hydrodeoxygenation, four types of hydrocarbons were mainly comprised of gasoline and had water contents, oxygen contents and total acid numbers of nearly zero and higher heating values of 44–45 MJ/kg. Total hydrocarbon yields for raw bio-oil, oxidized raw bio-oil, distilled bio-oil and oxidized distilled bio-oil were 11.6, 16.2, 12.9 and 20.5 wt.%, respectively. The results indicated that oxidation had the most influence on increasing the yield of gasoline fuel type followed by distillation. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization showed that 66.0–76.6% of aliphatic hydrocarbons and 19.5–31.6% of aromatic hydrocarbons were the main products for oxidized bio-oils while 35.5–38.7% of aliphatic hydrocarbons and 58.2–63.1% of aromatic hydrocarbons were the main products for non-oxidized bio-oils. Both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are important components for liquid transportation fuels and chemical products.

  14. A Comparative Study of Basic, Amphoteric, and Acidic Catalysts in the Oxidative Coupling of Methanol and Ethanol for Acrolein Production.

    Lilić, Aleksandra; Wei, Tiantian; Bennici, Simona; Devaux, Jean-François; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Auroux, Aline

    2017-09-11

    The impact of acid/base properties (determined by adsorption microcalorimetry) of various catalysts on the cross-aldolization of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde leading to acrolein was methodically studied in oxidizing conditions starting from a mixture of methanol and ethanol. The aldol condensation and further dehydration to acrolein were carried out on catalysts presenting various acid/base properties (MgO, Mg-Al oxides, Mg/SiO 2 , NbP, and heteropolyanions on silica, HPA/SiO 2 ). Thermodynamic calculations revealed that cross-aldolization is always favored compared with self-aldolization of acetaldehyde, which leads to crotonaldehyde formation. The presence of strong basic sites is shown to be necessary, but a too high amount drastically increases CO x production. On strong acid sites, production of acrolein and carbon oxides (CO x ) does not increase with temperature. The optimal catalyst for this process should be amphoteric with a balanced acid/base cooperation of medium strength sites and a small amount (150 kJ mol -1 ). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Intensity of lipid oxidation and formation of cholesterol oxidation products during frozen storage of raw and cooked chicken

    Conchillo, A. (Ana); Ansorena, D. (Diana); Astiasarán, I. (Iciar)

    2004-01-01

    Raw and cooked chicken breasts were stored at −18 °C for 3 months under aerobic and vacuum conditions, and the intensity of lipid oxidation and the formation of COP (cholesterol oxidation products) were studied. Raw samples showed low COP levels (4.60–7.40 µg g−1 fat), TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) levels (0.01–0.03 mg kg−1) and peroxide values (not detected) under both aerobic and vacuum conditions. Cooked samples (grilled and roasted) showed TBARS levels of 0.36–0.99 mg kg...

  16. Damage of polyesters by the atmospheric free radical oxidant NO3 •: a product study involving model systems

    Goeschen, Catrin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Manufactured polymer materials are used in increasingly demanding applications, but their lifetime is strongly influenced by environmental conditions. In particular, weathering and ageing leads to dramatic changes in the properties of the polymers, which results in decreased service life and limited usage. Despite the heavy reliance of our society on polymers, the mechanism of their degradation upon exposure to environmental oxidants is barely understood. In this work, model systems of important structural motifs in commercial high-performing polyesters were used to study the reaction with the night-time free radical oxidant NO3 • in the absence and presence of other radical and non-radical oxidants. Identification of the products revealed ‘hot spots’ in polyesters that are particularly vulnerable to attack by NO3 • and insight into the mechanism of oxidative damage by this environmentally important radical. It is suggested that both intermediates as well as products of these reactions are potentially capable of promoting further degradation processes in polyesters under environmental conditions. PMID:24204400

  17. Secondary organic aerosol production from pinanediol, a semi-volatile surrogate for first-generation oxidation products of monoterpenes

    Ye, Penglin; Zhao, Yunliang; Chuang, Wayne K.; Robinson, Allen L.; Donahue, Neil M.

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from pinanediol (PD), a precursor chosen as a semi-volatile surrogate for first-generation oxidation products of monoterpenes. Observations at the CLOUD facility at CERN have shown that oxidation of organic compounds such as PD can be an important contributor to new-particle formation. Here we focus on SOA mass yields and chemical composition from PD photo-oxidation in the CMU smog chamber. To determine the SOA mass yields from this semi-volatile precursor, we had to address partitioning of both the PD and its oxidation products to the chamber walls. After correcting for these losses, we found OA loading dependent SOA mass yields from PD oxidation that ranged between 0.1 and 0.9 for SOA concentrations between 0.02 and 20 µg m-3, these mass yields are 2-3 times larger than typical of much more volatile monoterpenes. The average carbon oxidation state measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer was around -0.7. We modeled the chamber data using a dynamical two-dimensional volatility basis set and found that a significant fraction of the SOA comprises low-volatility organic compounds that could drive new-particle formation and growth, which is consistent with the CLOUD observations.

  18. Performance of the Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Concept Balanced for Actinide Burning and Electricity Production

    Hejzlar, Pavel; Davis, Cliff B.

    2004-01-01

    A lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor concept targeted for a balanced mission of actinide burning and low-cost electricity production is proposed and its performance analyzed. The design explores the potential benefits of thorium-based fuel in actinide-burning cores, in particular in terms of the reduction of the large reactivity swing and enhancement of the small Doppler coefficient typical of fertile-free actinide burners. Reduced electricity production cost is pursued through a longer cycle length than that used for fertile-free burners and thus a higher capacity factor. It is shown that the concept can achieve a high transuranics destruction rate, which is only 20% lower than that of an accelerator-driven system with fertile-free fuel. The small negative fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, small positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and negative core radial expansion coefficient provide self-regulating characteristics so that the reactor is capable of inherent shutdown during major transients without scram, as in the Integral Fast Reactor. This is confirmed by thermal-hydraulic analysis of several transients without scram, including primary coolant pump trip, station blackout, and reactivity step insertion, which showed that the reactor was able to meet all identified thermal limits. However, the benefits of high actinide consumption and small reactivity swing can be attained only if the uranium from the discharged fuel is separated and not recycled. This additional uranium separation step and thorium reprocessing significantly increase the fuel cycle costs. Because the higher fuel cycle cost has a larger impact on the overall cost of electricity than the savings from the higher capacity factor afforded through use of thorium, this concept appears less promising than the fertile-free actinide burners

  19. Performance of the Lead-Alloy Cooled Concept Balanced for Actinide Burning and Electricity Production

    Pavel Hejzlar; Cliff Davis

    2004-01-01

    A lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor concept targeted for a balanced mission of actinide burning and low-cost electricity production is proposed and its performance analyzed. The design explores the potential benefits of thorium-based fuel in actinide-burning cores, in particular in terms of the reduction of the large reactivity swing and enhancement of the small Doppler coefficient typical of fertile-free actinide burners. Reduced electricity production cost is pursued through a longer cycle length than that used for fertile-free burners and thus a higher capacity factor. It is shown that the concept can achieve a high transuranics destruction rate, which is only 20% lower than that of an accelerator-driven system with fertile-free fuel. The small negative fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, small positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and negative core radial expansion coefficient provide self-regulating characteristics so that the reactor is capable of inherent shutdown during major transients without scram, as in the Integral Fast Reactor. This is confirmed by thermal-hydraulic analysis of several transients without scram, including primary coolant pump trip, station blackout, and reactivity step insertion, which showed that the reactor was able to meet all identified thermal limits. However, the benefits of high actinide consumption and small reactivity swing can be attained only if the uranium from the discharged fuel is separated and not recycled. This additional uranium separation step and thorium reprocessing significantly increase the fuel cycle costs. Because the higher fuel cycle cost has a larger impact on the overall cost of electricity than the savings from the higher capacity factor afforded through use of thorium, this concept appears less promising than the fertile-free actinide burners

  20. An economic route to mass production of graphene oxide solution for preparing graphene oxide papers

    Liou, Yan-Jia; Tsai, Bo-Da; Huang, Wu-Jang, E-mail: wjhuang@mail.npust.edu.tw

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Graphene oxide paper can be prepared from synthesized graphene sheet containing carbon materials. • Graphene oxide paper can be used as a phase change materials for thermal storage. • To prepare graphene oxide paper from synthesized graphene sheet containing carbon materials could highly reduce the cost. - Abstract: Graphene oxide paper (GOP) is a composite material fabricated from graphene oxide (GO) solution. In addition, it can be a novel and potential material for application on the separation of water vapor from gaseous steam or larger alkali ions from aqueous solution. GOP could be used as electricity and thermal storage materials. The preparation of GO commonly uses high purity natural or artificial graphite. It is difficult to prepare GOP from artificial graphite powder due to the cost of $1,450 US/ton. In this study, we tried to prepare GOPs from homemade graphene sheets containing carbon materials (GSCCMs) and evaluate the thermal properties of GSCCM derived GOPs. Results show that GSCCM derived GOPs have a higher phase transition temperature, and the average mesophase phase change enthalpy is 9.41 J/g, which is 2.87 times higher than graphite derived GOP. Therefore, to prepare GOP from GSCCMs could highly reduce the cost.

  1. Nano-Structured Magnesium Oxide Coated Iron Ore: Its Application to the Remediation of Wastewater Containing Lead.

    Nagarajah, Ranjini; Jang, Min; Pichiah, Saravanan; Cho, Jongman; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-12-01

    Magnetically separable nano-structured magnesium oxide coated iron ore (IO(MgO)) was prepared using environmentally benign chemicals, such as iron ore (IO), magnesium(II) nitrate hexahydrate [Mg(NO3)2 x 6H2O] and urea; via an easy and fast preparation method. The lO(MgO) was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) analyses. The isotherm and kinetic studies indicated that lO(MgO) has a comparably higher Langmuir constant (K(L), 1.69 L mg(-1)) and maximum sorption capacity (33.9 mg g(-1)) for lead (Pb) than other inorganic media. Based on MgO amount, the removal capacity of Pb by IO(MgO) was 2,724 mg Pb (g MgO)(-1), which was higher than that (1,980 mg g(-1)) for flowerlike magnesium oxide nanostructures reported by Cao et al. The kinetics, FE-SEM, elemental mapping and XRD results revealed that the substitution followed by precipitation was identified as the mechanism of Pb removal and plumbophyllite (Pb2Si4O10 x H2O) was the precipitated phase of Pb. A leaching test revealed that IOMgO) had negligible concentrations of leached Fe at pH 4-9. Since the base material, IO, is cheap and easily available, lO(MgO) could be produced in massive amounts and used for remediation of wastewater containing heavy metals, applying simple and fast magnetic separation.

  2. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  3. Production of oxidatively stable fish oil enriched food emulsions

    Bruni Let, Mette

    Purpose: The objective of the project is to determine how a number of selected fish oil enriched foods can be protected against oxidation by the right choice of antioxidants, emulsifiers and optimal process conditions. Furthermore the influence of antioxidant addition to the fish oil it...... have many other health benefiting properties such as preventing heart diseases. Addition of fish oils to foods is therefore of interest. The many double bonds in the fatty acids are however susceptible to oxidation. Collaboration partners: The project is a collaborative project between DFU-FF, Bio......-self on the effect of antioxidants added to the foods will also be investigated. Background: Fish oils are rich sources of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids EPA and DHA of which DHA is a vital component of the phospholipids of human cellular membranes, especially those in the brain and retina. Fish oils...

  4. Inhibition of oxidant production in rat adjuvant arthritis with perostilbene

    Perečko, T.; Drábiková, K.; Nosáľ, R.; Harmatha, Juraj; Bauerová, K.; Mihalová, D.; Jančinová, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2010), A73-A74 ISSN 1337-6853. [Toxcon 2010, Borderless Toxicology. 15th Interdisciplinary Toxicological Conference & Advanced Toxicological Course. 06.09.-10.09.2010, Stará Lesná - Hotel Academia] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : stilbene type polyphenols * antiinflammatory * oxidative burst of neutrophils Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  5. Removal of Cadmium, Zinc, Lead and Copper by Sorption on Leaching Residue from Nickel Production

    Miroslava Václavíková

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A leaching resudue from the nickel production (LRNi, was used to study the removal of selected bivalent cations (Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn from model aqueous solutions. Batch-type experiments have been performed in solutions with initial concentrations of heavy metals in the range of 20-400 mg.L-1 and the adsorbent dosage 2 g.L-1. All adsorption experiments were carried out at ambient temperature (22+1°C in orbital shaker. The experimental data were modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The relatively high uptake indicated that LRNi can adsorb considerable amounts of cadmium and zinc (maximum uptake capacity for cadmium: 25 mg/g at pH 7.2 and ca. 40 mg/g for zinc at pH 7. A significant uptake was also observed for copper and lead at pH 5.8 and 6 respectively, which was attributed to the precipitation of the respective insoluble hydroxides.

  6. Partial strands synthesizing leads to inevitable aborting and complicated products in consecutive polymerase chain reactions (PCRs)

    LUO Rui; ZHANG DaMing

    2007-01-01

    Various abnormal phenomena have been observed during PCR so far. The present study performed a series of consecutive PCRs (including many rounds of re-amplification continuously) and found that the abortion of re-amplification was inevitable as long as a variety of complicated product appeared.The aborting stages varied, according to the lengths of targets. Longer targets reached the abortion earlier than the shorter ones, marked by appearance of the complex that was immobile in electrophoresis. Denatured gel-electrophoresis revealed that the complex was mainly made up of shorter or partially synthesized strands, together with small amounts of full-length ones. Able to be digested by S1 nuclease but unable by restriction endonucleases (REs), the complex was proved to consist of both single regions and double-helix regions that kept the complex stable thermodynamically. Simulations gave evidence that partial strands, even at lower concentration, could disturb re-amplification effectively and lead to the abortion of re-amplifications finally. It was pointed out that the partial strands formed chiefly via polymerase's infidelity, and hence the solution to lighten the abnormality was also proposed.

  7. Partial strands synthesizing leads to inevitable aborting and complicated products in consecutive polymerase chain reactions (PCRs)

    2007-01-01

    Various abnormal phenomena have been observed during PCR so far. The present study performed a series of consecutive PCRs (including many rounds of re-amplification continuously) and found that the abortion of re-amplification was inevitable as long as a variety of complicated product appeared. The aborting stages varied, according to the lengths of targets. Longer targets reached the abortion earlier than the shorter ones, marked by appearance of the complex that was immobile in electropho-resis. Denatured gel-electrophoresis revealed that the complex was mainly made up of shorter or partially synthesized strands, together with small amounts of full-length ones. Able to be digested by S1 nuclease but unable by restriction endonucleases (REs), the complex was proved to consist of both single regions and double-helix regions that kept the complex stable thermodynamically. Simulations gave evidence that partial strands, even at lower concentration, could disturb re-amplification effec- tively and lead to the abortion of re-amplifications finally. It was pointed out that the partial strands formed chiefly via polymerase’s infidelity, and hence the solution to lighten the abnormality was also proposed.

  8. The combined effects of developmental lead and ethanol exposure on hippocampus dependent spatial learning and memory in rats: Role of oxidative stress.

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2016-10-01

    Either developmental lead or ethanol exposure can impair learning and memory via induction of oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage. we examined the effect of combined exposure with lead and ethanol on spatial learning and memory in offspring and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Rats were exposed to lead (0.2% in drinking water) or ethanol (4 g/kg) either individually or in combination in 5th day gestation through weaning. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done. Also, oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were also evaluated. Results demonstrated that lead + ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency and average proximity in probe trial test. There was significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in hippocampus of animals co-exposed to lead and ethanol compared with their individual exposures. We suggest that maternal consumption of ethanol during lead exposure has pronounced detrimental effects on memory, which may be mediated by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Next-to-leading order electroweak corrections to off-shell WWW production at the LHC arXiv

    Schönherr, Marek

    Triboson processes allow for a measurement of the triple and quartic couplings of the Standard Model gauge bosons, which can be used to constrain anomalous gauge couplings. In this paper we calculate the next-to-leading order electroweak corrections to fully off-shell $W^-W^+W^+$ production, namely the production of a $\\ell_1^-\\ell_2^+\\ell_3^+\\bar{\

  10. Hydrogen isotope double differential production cross sections induced by 62.7 MeV neutrons on a lead target

    Kerveno, M.; Haddad, F.; Eudes, Ph.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Slypen, I.; Meulders, J.P.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Louvel, M.; Lefebvres, F.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Double differential hydrogen isotope production cross sections have been extracted in 62.7 MeV neutron induced reactions on a lead target. The angular distribution was measured at eight angles from 20 deg. to 160 deg. allowing the extraction of angle-differential, energy differential, and total production cross sections. A first set of comparisons with several theoretical calculations is also presented

  11. A Study on the Oxidative-dissolution Leaching of Fission Product Oxides in the carbonate solution

    Lee, Eil Hee; Kim, Kwang Wook; Lim, Jae Gwan; Chung, Dong Yong; Yang, Han Beom; Joe, Kih Soo; Seo, Heui Seung; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Se Yoon

    2009-07-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the characteristics of an oxidativedissolution leaching of FP co-dissolved with U in a carbonate solution of Na 2 CO 3 - H 2 O 2 and (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 -H 2 O 2 , respectively. Simulated FP-oxides which contained 12 components have been added to the solution to examine their oxidative dissolution characteristics. It was found that H 2 O 2 was an effective oxidant to minimize the dissolution of FP in a carbonate solution. In 0.5M Na 2 CO 3 -0.5M H 2 O 2 and 0.5M (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 -0.5M H 2 O 2 solution, some elements such as Re, Te, Cs and Mo seem to be dissolved together with U. It is revealed that dissolution rates of Re, Te and Cs are high (completely dissolved within 10∼20 minutes) due to their high solubility in Na 2 CO 3 and (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 solution regardless of the addition of H 2 O 2 , and independent of the concentrations of Na 2 CO 3 and H 2 O 2 . However, Mo was slowly dissolved by an oxidative dissolution with H 2 O 2 . It is found that the most important factor for the oxidative dissolution of FP is the pH of the solution and an effective oxidative dissolution is achieved at a pH between 10∼12 for Na 2 CO 3 and a pH between 9∼10 for (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 , respectively, in order to minimize the dissolution of FP

  12. Oxidative Stability and Sensory Attributes of Fermented Milk Product Fortified with Fish Oil and Marine Phospholipids

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Hyldig, Grethe

    2013-01-01

    Marine phospholipids (PL) are potential ingredients for food fortification due to its numerous advantages. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether a fermented milk product fortified with a mixture of marine PL and fish oil had better oxidative stability than a fermented milk...... product fortified with fish oil alone. Fortification of a fermented milk product with marine PL was performed by incorporating 1 % w/w lipids, either in the form of neat oil or in the form of a pre-emulsion. Lipid oxidation was investigated in the neat emulsions and fortified products by the measurements...... of primary, secondary volatile oxidation products and tocopherol content upon 32 days storage at 2 °C and 28 days storage at 5 °C, respectively. Analyses of particle size distribution, viscosity and microbial growth were also performed. In addition, sensory attributes such as sour, fishy and rancid flavor...

  13. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  14. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine Affords Protection against Lead-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although lead exposure has declined in recent years as a result of change to lead-free gasoline, several epidemiological have pointed out that it represents a medical and public health emergency, especially in young children consuming high amounts of lead-contaminated flake paints. A previous study in our laboratory indicated that lead exposure induces cytotoxicity in human liver carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress in lead-induced toxicity, and the protective effect of the anti-oxidant n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. We hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a role in lead-induced cytotoxicity, and that NAC affords protection against this adverse effect. To test this hypothesis, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the trypan blue exclusion test for cell viability. We also performed the thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation. Data obtained from the MTT assay indicated that NAC significantly increased the viability of HepG2 cells in a dosedependent manner upon 48 hours of exposure. Similar trend was obtained with the trypan blue exclusion test. Data generated from the thiobarbituric acid test showed a significant (p ≤ 0.05 increase of MDA levels in lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells compared to control cells. Interestingly, the addition of NAC to lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells significantly decreased cellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS, as evidenced by the decrease in lipid peroxidation byproducts. Overall, findings from this study suggest that NAC inhibits lead nitrate-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Hence, NAC may be used as a salvage therapy for lead-induced toxicity in exposed persons.

  15. Health hazards of China's lead-acid battery industry: a review of its market drivers, production processes, and health impacts.

    van der Kuijp, Tsering Jan; Huang, Lei; Cherry, Christopher R

    2013-08-03

    Despite China's leaded gasoline phase out in 2000, the continued high rates of lead poisoning found in children's blood lead levels reflect the need for identifying and controlling other sources of lead pollution. From 2001 to 2007, 24% of children in China studied (N = 94,778) were lead poisoned with levels exceeding 100 μg/L. These levels stand well above the global average of 16%. These trends reveal that China still faces significant public health challenges, with millions of children currently at risk of lead poisoning. The unprecedented growth of China's lead-acid battery industry from the electric bike, automotive, and photovoltaic industries may explain these persistently high levels, as China remains the world's leading producer, refiner, and consumer of both lead and lead-acid batteries.This review assesses the role of China's rising lead-acid battery industry on lead pollution and exposure. It starts with a synthesis of biological mechanisms of lead exposure followed by an analysis of the key technologies driving the rapid growth of this industry. It then details the four main stages of lead battery production, explaining how each stage results in significant lead loss and pollution. A province-level accounting of each of these industrial operations is also included. Next, reviews of the literature describe how this industry may have contributed to mass lead poisonings throughout China. Finally, the paper closes with a discussion of new policies that address the lead-acid battery industry and identifies policy frameworks to mitigate exposure.This paper is the first to integrate the market factors, production processes, and health impacts of China's growing lead-acid battery industry to illustrate its vast public health consequences. The implications of this review are two-fold: it validates calls for a nationwide assessment of lead exposure pathways and levels in China as well as for a more comprehensive investigation into the health impacts of the lead

  16. An investigation of oxidation products and SOA yields from OH + pesticide reactions

    Murschell, T.; Friedman, B.; Link, M.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Pesticides are used globally in agricultural and residential areas. After application and/or volatilization from a surface, these compounds can be transported over long distances in the atmosphere. However, their chemical fate, including oxidation and gas-particle partitioning in the atmosphere, is not well understood. We present gas and particle measurements of oxidation products from pesticide + OH reactions using a dynamic solution injection system coupled to an Oxidative Flow Reactor. Products were detected with a High Resolution Time of Flight Iodide Chemical Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) and a Size Mobility Particle Scanner (SMPS). The OFR allows pesticides to react with variable OH radical exposures, ranging from the equivalent of one day to a full week of atmospheric oxidative aging. In this work, we explore pesticide oxidation products from reaction with OH and ozone, and compare those products to photolysis reactions. Pesticides of similar chemical structures were explored, including acetochlor / metolachlor and permethrin / cypermethrin, to explore mechanistic differences. We present chemical parameters including average product oxidation state, average oxygen to carbon ratio, and potential secondary organic aerosol formation for each of these compounds.

  17. Molecular basis for arsenic-Induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction

    Kumagai, Yoshito; Pi Jingbo

    2004-01-01

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed

  18. An MCM modeling study of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) impacts on oxidation, ozone production and nitrogen oxide partitioning in polluted continental outflow

    Riedel, T. P.; Wolfe, G. M.; Danas, K. T.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D. M.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B.; Brown, S. S.; Thornton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) is produced at night by reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on chloride containing surfaces. ClNO2 is photolyzed during the morning hours after sunrise to liberate highly reactive chlorine atoms (Cl·). This chemistry takes place primarily in polluted environments where the concentrations of N2O5 precursors (nitrogen oxide radicals and ozone) are high, though it likely occurs in remote regions at lower intensities. Recent field measurements have illustrated the potential importance of ClNO2 as a daytime Cl· source and a nighttime NOx reservoir. However, the fate of the Cl· and the overall impact of ClNO2 on regional photochemistry remain poorly constrained by measurements and models. To this end, we have incorporated ClNO2 production, photolysis, and subsequent Cl· reactions into an existing master chemical mechanism (MCM version 3.2) box model framework using observational constraints from the CalNex 2010 field study. Cl· reactions with a set of alkenes and alcohols, and the simplified multiphase chemistry of N2O5, ClNO2, HOCl, ClONO2, and Cl2, none of which are currently part of the MCM, have been added to the mechanism. The presence of ClNO2 produces significant changes to oxidants, ozone, and nitrogen oxide partitioning, relative to model runs excluding ClNO2 formation. From a nighttime maximum of 1.5 ppbv ClNO2, the daytime maximum Cl· concentration reaches 1 × 105 atoms cm-3 at 07:00 model time, reacting mostly with a large suite of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to produce 2.2 times more organic peroxy radicals in the morning than in the absence of ClNO2. In the presence of several ppbv of nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2), these perturbations lead to similar enhancements in hydrogen oxide radicals (HOx = OH + HO2). Neglecting contributions from HONO, the total integrated daytime radical source is 17% larger when including ClNO2, which leads to a similar enhancement in integrated ozone production of 15%. Detectable

  19. Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    Afzelius, Pia; Bazeghi, Nassim; Bie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development of this ...

  20. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals.

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-06-03

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV).

  1. Effect of influenza vaccination on oxidative stress products in breath.

    Phillips, Michael; Cataneo, Renee N; Chaturvedi, Anirudh; Danaher, Patrick J; Devadiga, Anantrai; Legendre, David A; Nail, Kim L; Schmitt, Peter; Wai, James

    2010-06-01

    Viral infections cause increased oxidative stress, so a breath test for oxidative stress biomarkers (alkanes and alkane derivatives) might provide a new tool for early diagnosis. We studied 33 normal healthy human subjects receiving scheduled treatment with live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). Each subject was his or her own control, since they were studied on day 0 prior to vaccination, and then on days 2, 7 and 14 following vaccination. Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected with a breath collection apparatus, then analyzed by automated thermal desorption with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo simulation technique identified non-random VOC biomarkers of infection based on their C-statistic values (area under curve of receiver operating characteristic). Treatment with LAIV was followed by non-random changes in the abundance of breath VOCs. 2, 8-Dimethyl-undecane and other alkane derivatives were observed on all days. Conservative multivariate models identified vaccinated subjects on day 2 (C-statistic = 0.82, sensitivity = 63.6% and specificity = 88.5%); day 7 (C-statistic = 0.94, sensitivity = 88.5% and specificity = 92.3%); and day 14 (C-statistic = 0.95, sensitivity = 92.3% and specificity = 92.3%). The altered breath VOCs were not detected in live attenuated influenza vaccine, excluding artifactual contamination. LAIV vaccination in healthy humans elicited a prompt and sustained increase in breath biomarkers of oxidative stress. A breath test for these VOCs could potentially identify humans who are acutely infected with influenza, but who have not yet developed clinical symptoms or signs of disease.

  2. Ultrasound-assisted HCl-NaCl leaching of lead-rich and antimony-rich oxidizing slag.

    Zhang, Rong Liang; Zhang, Xiao Fei; Tang, Shu Zhen; Huang, Ai Dong

    2015-11-01

    Lead-rich and antimony-rich oxidizing slag was subjected to regular HCl-NaCl leaching, with the experimental conditions optimized under which ultrasound was introduced. After only 15 min of ultrasound-assisted leaching, the leaching rate of Sb resembled that after 45 min of regular leaching. Ultrasonic treatment considerably elevated the leaching rates of Sb and Pb, and shortened the leaching time. With the decrease of particle size, the leaching rate of Sb and Pb increased gradually. Especially, as the particle size of the slag was greater than 0.217 mm, the ultrasonic leaching effects of Sb and Pb were significantly higher than that of regular leaching effects. The temperature exhibited great effect on ultrasonic leaching performance. As the temperature increased, the leaching rates of Sb and Pb increased step by step. In case the temperature was higher than 85°C, the increasing speed of the leaching rates for Sb and Pb tended to be slow. Increasing ultrasonic power could augment the leaching rate or accelerate the procedure till the same leaching rate. However, since ultrasound failed to energize the formation of new reaction pathways, the maximum leaching rates of Sb and Pb were determined by their phase compositions rather than by ultrasonic field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation of novel oxidized mesoporous carbon with excellent adsorption performance for removal of malachite green and lead ion

    Zhang, Xialan; Lin, Qilang; Luo, Shiyuan; Ruan, Kezhao; Peng, Kaiping

    2018-06-01

    An oxidized mesoporous carbon (OMC) with fluffy structure was fabricated from the mixture of petroleum asphalt and aluminum isopropoxide, and its structures were characterized by FESEM, TEM, BET, TG, XPS and FT-IR. In addition, bath absorption experiments for malachite green (MG) and lead ion (Pb2+) were carried out to explore the effects of pH, initial concentration, contact time and temperature on its absorption process. Results show that the OMC prepared has a fluffy ultrathin-wall structure with narrow pore size distribution and rich oxygen-containing groups. It exhibits excellent absorption performance for the removal of MG as well as Pb2+, as indicated by that its maximum adsorption capacity is 963.1 mg g-1 for MG and 198.6 mg g-1 for Pb2+. The absorption experimental data are all fitted well with pseudo-second-order model and Frendlich isotherm, respectively. More importantly, the OMC still maintains relatively high adsorption capacity after five cycles.

  4. Anti-oxidative feedback and biomarkers in the intertidal seagrass Zostera japonica induced by exposure to copper, lead and cadmium

    Lin, Haiying; Sun, Tao; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the potential influences of anthropogenic pollutants, we evaluated the responses of the intertidal seagrass Zostera japonica to three heavy metals: copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd). Z. japonica was exposed to various concentrations of Cu, Pb , and Cd (0, 0.5, 5, 50 μM) over seven days. The effects were then analyzed using the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and lipid peroxidation measured using malondialdehyde (MDA) as proxy. Metal accumulation in the above-ground tissues and phenotypic changes were also investigated. Our results revealed that heavy metal concentration increased in seagrass exposed to high levels of metals. Z. japonica has great potential for metal accumulation and a suitable candidate for the decontamination of moderately Cu contaminated bodies of water and can also potentially enhanced efforts of environmental decontamination, either through phytoextraction abilities or by functioning as an indicator for monitoring programs that use SOD, CAT, GPX, POD and MDA as biomarkers. - Highlights: • Anti-oxidative feedback of Zostera japonica to the heavy metals Cu, Pb, and Cd was determined. • The endangered intertidal seagrass Z. japonica had a high metal accumulation potential. • Z. japonica might be a potential indicator in monitoring programs using SOD, CAT, GPX, POD and MDA as biomarkers.

  5. The investigation of the influence of lead oxide on the formation and on the structure of lithium diborate glasses

    Soliman, A.A.; Sakr, E.M.; Kashif, I.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudo-binary (100 - x) Li 2 B 4 O 7 .xPbO, where x = 0, 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65 mol%. PbO have been investigated. The glass transition temperatures, density and molar volume have been determined. Both T g 's values and molar volume decreased non-linearly while the density increased by increase the PbO content. Infrared spectra of the glasses reveal that the strong network consisting of diborate units is break open by PbO. The absorption bands below 620 cm -1 show that PbO is one of the network former of glasses 65 ≥ PbO ≥ 5 which can be associated with vibrations due to [PbO 4 ] 2- type of grouping are become sharp and high intensities by increase PbO content. PbO plays the dual role in the glass network. The calculated values of N 4 slightly decreased by increase PbO content up to 25 mol% and then increased up to 45 mol% PbO, then decreases above it. Proving that three-coordinated boron atoms are predominant in these glass samples. The Vicker's hardness values of the glasses vary as a function of the PbO content in a manner that N 4 varied. The dc conductivity decreased by increase PbO concentration up to about 25 mol% and then increased by increase the concentration of lead oxide

  6. Or mutation leads to photo-oxidative stress responses in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) seedlings during de-etiolation.

    Men, Xiao; Dong, Kang

    2013-11-01

    The Orange (Or) gene is a gene mutation that can increase carotenoid content in plant tissues normally devoid of pigments. It affects plastid division and is involved in the differentiation of proplastids or non-colored plastids into chromoplasts. In this study, the de-etiolation process of the wild type (WT) cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) and Or mutant seedlings was investigated. We analyzed pigment content, plastid development, transcript abundance and protein levels of genes involved in the de-etiolation process. The results showed that Or can increase the carotenoid content in green tissues, although not as effectively as in non-green tissues, and this effect might be caused by the changes in biosynthetic pathway genes at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. There was no significant difference in the plastid development process between the two lines. However, the increased content of antheraxanthin and anthocyanin, and higher expression levels of violaxanthin de-epoxidase gene (VDE) suggested a stress situation leading to photoinhibition and enhanced photoprotection in the Or mutant. The up-regulated expression levels of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced genes, ZAT10 for salt tolerance zinc finger protein and ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2 (APX2), suggested the existence of photo-oxidative stress in the Or mutant. In summary, abovementioned findings provide additional insight into the functions of the Or gene in different tissues and at different developmental stages.

  7. Production of the oxidation-resistant polypropylene track membranes

    Kravets, L.I.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Apel, P.Y.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes results of the method of manufacturing the polypropylene track membranes produced by physicochemical treatment under irradiation of accelerated heavy ions of polymer films. The developed method allows to produce membranes 0.1 - 0.2 μm in diameter and more with an improved structural and physicochemical properties. Poly-propylene track membranes of a novel sample are characterized by high homogeneity of pore sizes in magnitude, considerable mechanical strength, advanced thermal stability and resistance to oxidation in aggressive media. It opens new fields for their usage

  8. Production of zinc oxide nanowires power with precisely defined morphology

    Mičová, J.; Remeš, Zdeněk; Chang, Yu-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 7 (2017), s. 66-69 ISSN 1335-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC16-10429J Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) KONNECT-007 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : zinc oxide nanowires * hydrothermal growth method * scanning electron microscopy (SEM) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.483, year: 2016

  9. TiO2 assisted photo-oxidative pretreatment of wheat straw for biogas production

    Awais, Muhammad; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Tsapekos, Panagiotis

    Photo-catalytic oxidation is an advanced oxidation process in which a catalyst is used to absorb light energy and oxidize the target substrates such as organic polymers. A number of metal oxides and metal ions can efficiently increase substrate’s depolymerisation during the process of photo...... to be markedly higher in the pretreated samples that were exposed for 180min with 1.5 wt% and 2 wt% of TiO2 compared to the untreated wheat straw. Moreover, it was concluded that the products of lignin oxidation and also, the presence of TiO2 did not inhibit the AD process. Finally, UV treatment or TiO2 alone......-catalytic oxidation. Titanium oxide (TiO2) is a photo-catalyst that in its rutile and anatase forms presents the property to enhance the photo-oxidation of lignin-containing substrates. Due to lignin is one of the major obstacles in methane production from lignocellulosic biomass, its destruction is a necessary step...

  10. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate...

  11. Nitrous oxide production, its source and distribution in urine patches on grassland on peat soil.

    Koops, J.G.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1997-01-01

    Urine patches are considered to be important sites for nitrous oxide (N2O) production through nitrification and denitrification due to their high concentration of nitrogen (N). The aim of the present study was to determine the microbial source and size of production of N2O in different zones of a

  12. Inclusive hadron production in photon-photon collisions at next-to-leading order

    Binnewies, J.

    1996-01-01

    We study inclusive charged-hadron production in collisions of quasireal photons at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the QCD-improved parton model, using fragmentation functions recently extracted from PEP and LEP1 data of e + e - annihilation. We consistently superimpose the direct (DD), single-resolved (DR), and double-resolved (RR) γγ channels. We consider photon spectra generated by electromagnetic bremsstrahlung and/or beamstrahlung off colliding e + and e - beams as well as those which result from backscattering of laser light off such beams. First, we revisit existing single-tag data taken by TASSO at PETRA and by MARK II at PEP (with e + e - energy √S∼30 GeV) and confront them with our NLO calculations imposing the respective experimental cuts. We also make comparisons with the neutral-kaon to charged-hadron ratio measured by MARK II. Then, we present NLO predictions for LEP2, a next-generation e + e - linear collider (NLC) in the TESLA design with √S=500 GeV, and a Compton collider obtained by converting a 500-GeV NLC. We analyze transverse-momentum and rapidity spectra with regard to the scale dependence, the interplay of the DD, DR, and RR components, the sensitivity to the gluon density inside the resolved photon, and the influence of gluon fragmentation. It turns out that the inclusive measurement of small-p T hadrons at a Compton collider would greatly constrain the gluon density of the photon and the gluon fragmentation function. (orig.)

  13. Production of heavy neutrino in next-to-leading order QCD at the LHC and beyond

    Das, Arindam; Konar, Partha; Majhi, Swapan

    2016-01-01

    Majorana and pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrinos are introduced into the type-I and inverse seesaw models, respectively, in explaining the naturally small neutrino mass. TeV scale heavy neutrinos can also be accommodated to have a sizable mixing with the Standard Model light neutrinos, through which they can be produced and detected at the high energy colliders. In this paper we consider the Next-to-Leading Order QCD corrections to the heavy neutrino production, and study the scale variation in cross-sections as well as the kinematic distributions with different final states at 14 TeV LHC and also in the context of 100 TeV hadron collider. The repertoire of the Majorana neutrino is realized through the characteristic signature of the same-sign dilepton pair, whereas, due to a small lepton number violation, the pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrino can manifest the trileptons associated with missing energy in the final state. Using the √s=8 TeV, 20.3 fb"−"1 and 19.7 fb"−"1 data at the ATLAS and CMS respectively, we obtain prospective scale dependent upper bounds of the light-heavy neutrino mixing angles for the Majorana heavy neutrinos at the 14 TeV LHC and 100 TeV collider. Further exploiting a recent study on the anomalous multilepton search by CMS at √s=8 TeV with 19.5 fb"−"1 data, we also obtain the prospective scale dependent upper bounds on the mixing angles for the pseudo-Dirac neutrinos. We thus project a scale dependent prospective reach using the NLO processes at the 14 TeV LHC.

  14. Nitrogen oxides in the combustion products of gas cookers

    Benes, M.; Zahourek, J.

    1981-07-01

    The combustion of town gas and natural gas in two types of gas ranges manufactured in Czechoslovakia resulted in measurable amounts of NO/sub x/ in both the combustion products and the surrounding air. In all the cases tested, the amounts of NO/sub x/ given off exceeded levels permitted by current Czech standards. These results indicate that before the widespread use of any new gas ranges, their combustion products should be tested for NO/sub x/.

  15. Arginine de novo and nitric oxide production in disease states

    Luiking, Yvette C.; Ten Have, Gabriella A. M.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine is derived from dietary protein intake, body protein breakdown, or endogenous de novo arginine production. The latter may be linked to the availability of citrulline, which is the immediate precursor of arginine and limiting factor for de novo arginine production. Arginine metabolism is highly compartmentalized due to the expression of the enzymes involved in arginine metabolism in various organs. A small fraction of arginine enters the NO synthase (NOS) pathway. Tetrahydrobiopterin ...

  16. Production of petroleum bitumen by oxidation of heavy oil residue with sulfur

    Tileuberdi, Ye.; Akkazyn, Ye. A.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper production of bitumen adding elemental sulfur at oxidation of oil residue are investigated. The objects of research were distilled residue of Karazhanbas crude oil and elemental sulfur. These oil residue characterized by a low output of easy fractions and the high content of tar-asphaltene substances, therefore is the most comprehensible feedstock for producing bitumen. The sulfur is one of the oil product collected in oil extraction regions. Oxidation process of hydrocarbons carried out at temperatures from 180 up to 210 °С without addition of sulfur and with the addition of sulfur (5-10 wt. %) for 4 hours. At 200 °С oxidation of hydrocarbons with 5, 7 and 10 wt.% sulfur within 3-4 h allows receiving paving bitumen on the mark BND 200/300, BND 130/200, BN 90/130 and BN 70/30. Physical and mechanical characteristics of oxidation products with the addition of 5-7 wt. % sulfur corresponds to grade of paving bitumen BND 40/60. At the given temperature oxidized for 2.5-3 h, addition of 10 wt. % sulfur gave the products of oxidation describing on parameters of construction grades of bitumen (BN 90/10).

  17. submitter Elemental composition and clustering behaviour of α-pinene oxidation products for different oxidation conditions

    Praplan, A P; Bianchi, F; Rissanen, M P; Ehn, M; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H; Adamov, A; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Duplissy, J; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Heinritzi, M; Kangasluoma, J; Kirkby, J; Krapf, M; Kürten, A; Lehtipalo, K; Riccobono, F; Rondo, L; Sarnela, N; Simon, M; Tomé, A; Tröstl, J; Winkler, P M; Williamson, C; Ye, P; Curtius, J; Baltensperger, U; Donahue, N M; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the difference between oxidised organic compounds formed by α-pinene oxidation under various conditions in the CLOUD environmental chamber: (1) pure ozonolysis (in the presence of hydrogen as hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenger) and (2) OH oxidation (initiated by nitrous acid (HONO) photolysis by ultraviolet light) in the absence of ozone. We discuss results from three Atmospheric Pressure interface Time-of-Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers measuring simultaneously the composition of naturally charged as well as neutral species (via chemical ionisation with nitrate). Natural chemical ionisation takes place in the CLOUD chamber and organic oxidised compounds form clusters with nitrate, bisulfate, bisulfate/sulfuric acid clusters, ammonium, and dimethylaminium, or get protonated. The results from this study show that this process is selective for various oxidised organic compounds with low molar mass and ions, so that in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the elemental composition o...

  18. Nitric oxide, human diseases and the herbal products that affect the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

    Achike, Francis I; Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2003-09-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed enzymatically from l-arginine in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide is generated constitutively in endothelial cells via sheer stress and blood-borne substances. Nitric oxide is also generated constitutively in neuronal cells and serves as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve endings. Furthermore, NO can also be formed via enzyme induction in many tissues in the presence of cytokines. 2. The ubiquitous presence of NO in the living body suggests that NO plays an important role in the maintenance of health. Being a free radical with vasodilatory properties, NO exerts dual effects on tissues and cells in various biological systems. At low concentrations, NO can dilate the blood vessels and improve the circulation, but at high concentrations it can cause circulatory shock and induce cell death. Thus, diseases can arise in the presence of the extreme ends of the physiological concentrations of NO. 3. The NO signalling pathway has, in recent years, become a target for new drug development. The high level of flavonoids, catechins, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds present in vegetables, fruits, soy, tea and even red wine (from grapes) is believed to contribute to their beneficial health effects. Some of these compounds induce NO formation from the endothelial cells to improve circulation and some suppress the induction of inducible NOS in inflammation and infection. 4. Many botanical medicinal herbs and drugs derived from these herbs have been shown to have effects on the NO signalling pathway. For example, the saponins from ginseng, ginsenosides, have been shown to relax blood vessels (probably contributing to the antifatigue and blood pressure-lowering effects of ginseng) and corpus cavernosum (thus, for the treatment of men suffering from erectile dysfunction; however, the legendary aphrodisiac effect of ginseng may be an overstatement). Many plant extracts or

  19. Nitric oxide production by visible light irradiation of aqueous solution of nitrosyl ruthenium complexes.

    Sauaia, Marília Gama; de Lima, Renata Galvão; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; da Silva, Roberto Santana

    2005-12-26

    [Ru(II)L(NH(3))(4)(pz)Ru(II)(bpy)(2)(NO)](PF(6))(5) (L is NH(3), py, or 4-acpy) was prepared with good yields in a straightforward way by mixing an equimolar ratio of cis-[Ru(NO(2))(bpy)(2)(NO)](PF(6))(2), sodium azide (NaN(3)), and trans-[RuL(NH(3))(4)(pz)] (PF(6))(2) in acetone. These binuclear compounds display nu(NO) at ca. 1945 cm(-)(1), indicating that the nitrosyl group exhibits a sufficiently high degree of nitrosonium ion (NO(+)). The electronic spectrum of the [Ru(II)L(NH(3))(4)(pz)Ru(II)(bpy)(2)(NO)](5+) complex in aqueous solution displays the bands in the ultraviolet and visible regions typical of intraligand and metal-to-ligand charge transfers, respectively. Cyclic voltammograms of the binuclear complexes in acetonitrile give evidence of three one-electron redox processes consisting of one oxidation due to the Ru(2+/3+) redox couple and two reductions concerning the nitrosyl ligand. Flash photolysis of the [Ru(II)L(NH(3))(4)(pz)Ru(II)(bpy)(2)(NO)](5+) complex is capable of releasing nitric oxide (NO) upon irradiation at 355 and 532 nm. NO production was detected and quantified by an amperometric technique with a selective electrode (NOmeter). The irradiation at 532 nm leads to NO release as a consequence of a photoinduced electron transfer. All species exhibit similar photochemical behavior, a feature that makes their study extremely important for their future application in the upgrade of photodynamic therapy in living organisms.

  20. Role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and oxidative stress in diabetic retinopathy.

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Ueda, Seiji; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Okuda, Seiya

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common and potentially devastating microvascular complication in diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness among the people of occupational age. However, current therapeutic options for the treatment of sight-threatening proliferative diabetic retinopathy such as photocoagulation and vitrectomy are limited by considerable side effects and far from satisfactory. Therefore, to develop novel therapeutic strategies that specifically target diabetic retinopathy is actually desired for most of the patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major initiator of diabetic retinopathy. However, recent clinical study has substantiated the concept of 'hyperglycemic memory' in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial-Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT-EDIC) Research, has revealed that the reduction in the risk of progressive retinopathy resulting from intensive therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes persisted for at least several years after the DCCT trial, despite increasing hyperglycemia. These findings suggest a long-term beneficial influence of early metabolic control on clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetic patients. Among various biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, the process of formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their mode of action are most compatible with the theory 'hyperglycemic memory'. Further, there is a growing body of evidence that AGEs-RAGE (receptor for AGEs) interaction-mediated oxidative stress generation plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. This article summarizes the role of AGEs and oxidative stress in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy and the therapeutic interventions that could prevent this devastating disorder. We also discuss here the pathological crosstalk between the AGEs-RAGE and the renin-angiotensin system in

  1. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D) + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; Kolb, Charles; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas; Brune, William

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D) + N2O → 2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3 → NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D) + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO3-) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  2. Production of He-, Ne-, Ar-, Kr-, and Xe-isotopes by proton-induced reactions on lead

    Leya, I.; Michel, R.

    2003-01-01

    We measured integral thin target cross sections for the proton-induced production of He-, Ne-, Ar-, Kr-, and Xe-isotopes from lead from the respective reaction thresholds up to 2.6 GeV. The production of noble gas isotopes in lead by proton-induced reactions is of special importance for design studies of accelerator driven systems and energy amplifiers. In order to minimise the influences of secondary particles on the production of residual nuclides a new Mini-Stack approach was used instead of the well-known stacked-foil techniques for all experiments with proton energies above 200 MeV. With some exceptions our database for the proton-induced production of noble gas isotopes from lead is consistent and nearly complete. In contradistinction to the production of He from Al and Fe, where the cross sections obtained by thin-target irradiation experiments are up to a factor of 2 higher than the NESSI data, both datasets agree for the He production from lead. (orig.)

  3. Reduction of myeloid suppressor cell derived nitric oxide provides a mechanistic basis of lead enhancement of alloreactive CD4+ T cell proliferation

    Farrer, David G.; Hueber, Sara; Laiosa, Michael D.; Eckles, Kevin G.; McCabe, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The persistent environmental toxicant and immunomodulator, lead (Pb), has been proposed to directly target CD4 + T cells. However, our studies suggest that CD4 + T cells are an important functional, yet indirect target. In order to identify the direct target of Pb in the immune system and the potential mechanism of Pb-induced immunotoxicity, myeloid suppressor cells (MSCs) were evaluated for their ability to modulate CD4 + T cell proliferation after Pb exposure. Myeloid suppressor cells regulate the adaptive immune response, in part, by inhibiting the proliferation of CD4 + T cells. It is thought that the mechanism of MSC-dependent regulation involves the release of the bioactive gas, nitric oxide (NO), blocking cell signaling cascades downstream of the IL-2 receptor and thus preventing T cells from entering cell-cycle. In mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), increasing numbers of MSCs suppressed T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and this suppression is strikingly abrogated with 5 μM lead (Pb) treatment. The Pb-sensitive MSC population is CD11b + , GR1 + and CD11c - and thus phenotypically consistent with MSCs described in other literature. Inhibition of NO-synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for the production of NO, enhanced alloreactive T cell proliferation in MLC. Moreover, Pb attenuated NO production in MLC, and exogenous replacement of NO restored suppression in the presence of Pb. Significantly, MSC from iNOS-/- mice were unable to suppress T cell proliferation. An MSC-derived cell line (MSC-1) also suppressed T cell proliferation in MLC, and Pb disrupted this suppression by attenuating NO production. Additionally, Pb disrupted NO production in MSC-1 cells in response to treatment with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and LPS or in response to concanavalin A-stimulated splenocytes. However, neither the abundance of protein nor levels of mRNA for the inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) were altered with Pb treatment. Taken together these data suggest that Pb

  4. Description and drawing of a mini-plant to lead-acid batteries active material production; Descricao e desenho de uma mini-planta piloto para producao de material ativo para baterias de chumbo-acido

    D` Alkaine, C V; Mattos, J S.D.; Machado, D M; Nart, F C [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1985-12-31

    As a part of the UFSCAR/Solar Energy/FINEP program, a pilot plant for the production of the active material for lead-acid batteries was developed. The basic operations are: milling and lead oxidation in ball mill, classifying of lead monoxide in the proper particle size by means of a cyclone, monoxide mixture with water and sulphuric acid, thus forming the paste. The paste is then placed on grids and finally scrapped and compacted. The plates pass through a 300 deg C oven and are cured in controlled atmosphere. (author). 4 refs

  5. Exploring how pain leads to productivity loss in primary care consulters for osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    Wilkie, Ross; Hay, Elaine M; Croft, Peter; Pransky, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis pain has become a leading cause of decreased productivity and work disability in older workers, a major concern in primary care. How osteoarthritis pain leads to decreased productivity at work is unclear; the aim of this study was to elucidate causal mechanisms and thus identify potential opportunities for intervention. Population-based prospective cohort study of primary care consulters with osteoarthritis. Path analysis was used to test proposed mechanisms by examining the association between pain at baseline, and onset of work productivity loss at three years for mediation by physical limitation, depression, poor sleep and poor coping mechanisms. High pain intensity was associated with onset of work productivity loss (Adjusted Odds Ratio 2.5; 95%CI 1.3, 4.8). About half of the effect of pain on work productivity was a direct effect, and half was mediated by the impact of pain on physical function. Depression, poor sleep quality and poor coping did not mediate the association between high pain intensity and onset of work productivity loss. As pain is a major cause of work productivity loss, results suggest that decreasing pain should be a major focus. However, successfully improving function may have an indirect effect by decreasing the impact of pain on work productivity, especially important as significant pain reduction is often difficult to achieve. Although depression, sleep problems, and coping strategies may be directly related to work productivity loss, addressing these issues may not have much effect on the significant impact of pain on work productivity.

  6. Denitrification: an important pathway for nitrous oxide production in tropical mangrove sediments (Goa, India).

    Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Bharathi, P A Loka; Bonin, Patricia C; Michotey, Valérie D

    2010-01-01

    Net nitrous oxide production and denitrification activity were measured in two mangrove ecosystems of Goa, India. The relatively pristine site Tuvem was compared to Divar, which is prone to high nutrient input. Stratified sampling at 2-cm intervals within the 0- to 10-cm depth range showed that N2O production at both the locations decreased with depth. Elevated denitrification activity at Divar resulted in maximum production of up to 1.95 nmol N2O-N g(-1) h(-1) at 2 to 4 cm, which was three times higher than at Tuvem. Detailed investigations to understand the major pathway contributing to N2O production performed at Tuvem showed that incomplete denitrification was responsible for up to 43 to 93% of N2O production. Nitrous oxide production rates closely correlated to nitrite concentration (n = 15; r = -0.47; p production. Nitrous oxide production through nitrification was below detection, affirming that denitrification is the major pathway responsible for production of the greenhouse gas. Net N2O production in these mangrove systems are comparatively higher than those reported from other natural estuarine sediments and therefore warrant mitigation measures.

  7. Human endogenous retrovirus W env increases nitric oxide production and enhances the migration ability of microglia by regulating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Xiao, Ran; Li, Shan; Cao, Qian; Wang, Xiuling; Yan, Qiujin; Tu, Xiaoning; Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Fan

    2017-06-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus W env (HERV-W env) plays a critical role in many neuropsychological diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis (MS). These diseases are accompanied by immunological reactions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia are important immunocytes in brain inflammation that can produce a gasotransmitter-nitric oxide (NO). NO not only plays a role in the function of neuronal cells but also participates in the pathogenesis of various neuropsychological diseases. In this study, we reported increased NO production in CHME-5 microglia cells after they were transfected with HERV-W env. Moreover, HERV-W env increased the expression and function of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) and enhanced the promoter activity of hiNOS. Microglial migration was also enhanced. These data revealed that HERV-W env might contribute to increase NO production and microglial migration ability in neuropsychological disorders by regulating the expression of inducible NOS. Results from this study might lead to the identification of novel targets for the treatment of neuropsychological diseases, including neuroinflammatory diseases, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Production of reduction gases: partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and coal

    Tippmer, K

    1976-04-01

    After some general remarks on reduction gas and quality demands, the Texaco process of partial oxidation with scrubbing is dealt with. A comparison of current iron-sponge techniques shows that a heat demand below 3 M kcal/t Fe should be envisaged, which means that heavy fuel oil or coal should be used. The special features of oxygen generation, coal processing, demands made on fuel oil, gasoline, and natural gas, gas generation, soot recovery, hydrogen sulphide-carbon dioxide scrubbing, system Benfield HP process, recycle-carbon dioxide scrubbing, auxiliary steam system, gas preheating, recycle gas cooling and compression, process data and heat balances for natural gas (one-heat system) and heating fuel oil or naphtha (two-heat system) are given.

  9. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    Knudsen, I.E.; Randall, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen and by preliminary reacting in an ejector gaseous uranium hexafluoride with steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium and oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures

  10. Microstructural Analysis of the Oxidation Products of Metallic Alloys According to the HALOX Development

    De Micco, G.

    2001-01-01

    This publication is a first stage in the development of an oxidation process of the fissile material, from spent nuclear fuel elements of research reactors, containing molybdenum.The oxidation of molybdenum powder with air at elevated temperatures (375-500 o C) has been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.The results show that the only product was MoO 3 in two different phases: Monoclinic and Orthorhombic.MoO 2 and non-stoichiometric molybdenum oxide such as Mo 4 O 1 1 were not evidenced in any of the Mo oxidation steps. By monitoring the time required for the complete oxidation of Mo at different conditions of temperature and pressure, a rate equation has been determined for the whole process. The activation energy and the pressure and degree of reaction dependence, has been calculated.This values remain constant trough out the complete reaction

  11. Selective Production of Aromatic Aldehydes from Heavy Fraction of Bio-oil via Catalytic Oxidation

    Li, Yan; Chang, Jie; Ouyang, Yong; Zheng, Xianwei

    2014-01-01

    High value-added aromatic aldehydes (e. g. vanillin and syringaldehyde) were produced from heavy fraction of bio-oil (HFBO) via catalytic oxidation. The concept is based on the use of metalloporphyin as catalyst and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as oxidant under alkaline condition. The biomimetic catalyst cobalt(II)-sulfonated tetraphenylporphyrin (Co(TPPS 4 )) was prepared and characterized. It exhibited relative high activity in the catalytic oxidation of HFBO. 4.57 wt % vanillin and 1.58 wt % syringaldehyde were obtained from catalytic oxidation of HFBO, compared to 2.6 wt % vanillin and 0.86 wt % syringaldehyde without Co(TPPS 4 ). Moreover, a possible mechanism of HFBO oxidation using Co(TPPS 4 )/H 2 O 2 was proposed by the research of model compounds. The results showed that this is a promising and environmentally friendly method for production of aromatic aldehydes from HFBO under Co(TPPS 4 )/H 2 O 2 system

  12. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biodiesel Production from Castor Oil by Using Calcium Oxide Derived from Mud Clam Shell

    S. Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic potential of calcium oxide synthesized from mud clam shell as a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production was studied. The mud clam shell calcium oxide was characterized using particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and BET gas sorption analyzer. The catalyst performance of mud clam shell calcium oxide was studied in the transesterification of castor oil as biodiesel. Catalyst characterization and transesterification study results of synthesized catalyst proved the efficiency of the natural derived catalyst for biodiesel production. A highest biodiesel yield of 96.7% was obtained at optimal parameters such as 1 : 14 oil-to-methanol molar ratio, 3% w/w catalyst concentration, 60°C reaction temperature, and 2-hour reaction time. Catalyst reusability test shows that the synthesized calcium oxide from mud clam shell is reusable up to 5 times.

  14. Oxidation of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin by ferrate(VI): Products identification, and toxicity evaluation

    Yang, Bin; Kookana, Rai S.; Williams, Mike; Ying, Guang-Guo; Du, Jun; Doan, Hai; Kumar, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) has been known to react with emerging organic contaminants containing electron-rich organic moieties, such as phenols, anilines, olefins, reduced sulfur and deprotonated amines. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, ciprofloxacin (CIP) and enrofloxacin (ENR), by Fe(VI) were investigated for their reaction products and toxicity changes as well as biodegradability of these products. Ten products were identified for both CIP and ENR reactions with Fe(VI) using a high-resolution accurate-mass Orbitrap mass analyzer. Structural changes to the CIP and ENR molecule included dealkylation, formation of alcohols and amides in piperazine ring and oxygen transfer to the double bond in quinolone structure. An enamine formation mechanism was tentatively proposed to facilitate the interpretation of CIP and ENR oxidation pathways. Toxicity evaluation using Microbial Assay for toxicity Risk Assessment (MARA) bioassay indicated that Fe(VI) oxidation products of CIP and ENR contributed negligible antibacterial potency and Fe(VI) oxidation treatment can remove the residual toxicity of CIP and ENR impacted source waters. The Fe(VI) oxidation treatment resulted in formation of relatively more biodegradable products (based on in silico assessment) than their corresponding parent compounds. The results showed that Fe(VI) has a good potential to degrade fluoroquinolone antibiotics and their antimicrobial potency in natural waters.

  15. Oxidation of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin by ferrate(VI): Products identification, and toxicity evaluation

    Yang, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Yang@csiro.au [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia); Kookana, Rai S.; Williams, Mike [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia); Ying, Guang-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Du, Jun; Doan, Hai; Kumar, Anupama [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) has been known to react with emerging organic contaminants containing electron-rich organic moieties, such as phenols, anilines, olefins, reduced sulfur and deprotonated amines. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, ciprofloxacin (CIP) and enrofloxacin (ENR), by Fe(VI) were investigated for their reaction products and toxicity changes as well as biodegradability of these products. Ten products were identified for both CIP and ENR reactions with Fe(VI) using a high-resolution accurate-mass Orbitrap mass analyzer. Structural changes to the CIP and ENR molecule included dealkylation, formation of alcohols and amides in piperazine ring and oxygen transfer to the double bond in quinolone structure. An enamine formation mechanism was tentatively proposed to facilitate the interpretation of CIP and ENR oxidation pathways. Toxicity evaluation using Microbial Assay for toxicity Risk Assessment (MARA) bioassay indicated that Fe(VI) oxidation products of CIP and ENR contributed negligible antibacterial potency and Fe(VI) oxidation treatment can remove the residual toxicity of CIP and ENR impacted source waters. The Fe(VI) oxidation treatment resulted in formation of relatively more biodegradable products (based on in silico assessment) than their corresponding parent compounds. The results showed that Fe(VI) has a good potential to degrade fluoroquinolone antibiotics and their antimicrobial potency in natural waters.

  16. Nitrous Oxide Production in a Granule-based Partial Nitritation Reactor: A Model-based Evaluation.

    Peng, Lai; Sun, Jing; Liu, Yiwen; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2017-04-03

    Sustainable wastewater treatment has been attracting increasing attentions over the past decades. However, the production of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a potent GHG, from the energy-efficient granule-based autotrophic nitrogen removal is largely unknown. This study applied a previously established N 2 O model, which incorporated two N 2 O production pathways by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) (AOB denitrification and the hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH) oxidation). The two-pathway model was used to describe N 2 O production from a granule-based partial nitritation (PN) reactor and provide insights into the N 2 O distribution inside granules. The model was evaluated by comparing simulation results with N 2 O monitoring profiles as well as isotopic measurement data from the PN reactor. The model demonstrated its good predictive ability against N 2 O dynamics and provided useful information about the shift of N 2 O production pathways inside granules for the first time. The simulation results indicated that the increase of oxygen concentration and granule size would significantly enhance N 2 O production. The results further revealed a linear relationship between N 2 O production and ammonia oxidation rate (AOR) (R 2  = 0.99) under the conditions of varying oxygen levels and granule diameters, suggesting that bulk oxygen and granule size may exert an indirect effect on N 2 O production by causing a change in AOR.

  17. Thermal Oxidation of Tail Gases from the Production of Oil-furnace Carbon Black

    Bosak, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the production technology of oil-furnace carbon black, as well as the selected solution for preventing the emissions of this process from contaminating the environment.The products of industrial oil-furnace carbon black production are different grades of carbon black and process tail gases. The qualitative composition of these tail gases during the production of oil-furnace carbon black are: carbon(IV oxide, carbon(II oxide, hydrogen, methane, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen, oxygen, and water vapor.The quantitative composition and lower caloric value of process tail gases change depending on the type of feedstock used in the production, as well as the type of process. The lower caloric value of process tail gases is relatively small with values ranging between 1500 and 2300 kJ m–3.In the conventional production of oil-furnace carbon black, process tail gases purified from carbon black dust are freely released into the atmosphere untreated. In this manner, the process tail gases pollute the air in the town of Kutina, because their quantitative values are much higher than the prescribed emissions limits for hydrogen sulfide and carbon(II oxide. A logical solution for the prevention of such air pollution is combustion of the process tail gases, i. e. their thermal oxidation. For this purpose, a specially designed flare system has been developed. Consuming minimum amounts of natural gas needed for oxidation, the flare system is designed to combust low caloric process tail gases with 99 % efficiency. Thus, the toxic and flammable components of the tail gases (hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, carbon(II oxide, methane and other trace hydrocarbons would be transformed into environmentally acceptable components (sulfur(IV oxide, water, carbon(IV oxide and nitrogen(IV oxide, which are in compliance with the emissions limit values prescribed by law.Proper operation of this flare system in the production of oil-furnace carbon black would solve

  18. Lake sediments record prehistoric lead pollution related to early copper production in North America.

    Pompeani, David P; Abbott, Mark B; Steinman, Byron A; Bain, Daniel J

    2013-06-04

    The mining and use of copper by prehistoric people on Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula is one of the oldest examples of metalworking. We analyzed the concentration of lead, titanium, magnesium, iron, and organic matter in sediment cores recovered from three lakes located near mine pits to investigate the timing, location, and magnitude of ancient copper mining pollution. Lead concentrations were normalized to lithogenic metals and organic matter to account for processes that can influence natural (or background) lead delivery. Nearly simultaneous lead enrichments occurred at Lake Manganese and Copper Falls Lake ∼8000 and 7000 years before present (yr BP), indicating that copper extraction occurred concurrently in at least two locations on the peninsula. The poor temporal coherence among the lead enrichments from ∼6300 to 5000 yr BP at each lake suggests that the focus of copper mining and annealing shifted through time. In sediment younger than ∼5000 yr BP, lead concentrations remain at background levels at all three lakes, excluding historic lead increases starting ∼150 yr BP. Our work demonstrates that lead emissions associated with both the historic and Old Copper Complex tradition are detectable and can be used to determine the temporal and geographic pattern of metal pollution.

  19. Regge vertex for quark production in the central rapidity region in the next-to-leading order

    Kozlov, M. G., E-mail: M.G.Kozlov@inp.nsk.su; Reznichenko, A. V., E-mail: A.V.Reznichenko@inp.nsk.su [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    The effective vertex for quark production in the interaction of a Reggeized quark and a Reggeized gluon is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO). The resulting vertex is the missing component of the NLO multi-Regge amplitude featuring quark and gluon exchanges in the t channels. This calculation will make it possible to develop in future the bootstrap approach to proving quark Reggeization in the next-to-leading logarithmic approximation.

  20. Production of nitrous oxide in the auroral D and E regions

    Zipf, E. C.; Prasad, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    A study of nitrous oxide formation mechanisms indicates that N2O concentrations greater than 10 to the 9th per cu cm could be produced in IBC III aurora or by lower-level activity lasting for many hours, and, in favorable conditions, the N2O concentration could exceed the local nitric oxide density. An upper limit on the globally averaged N2O production rate from auroral activity is estimated at 2 x 10 to the 27th per second.

  1. Fish Protein Concentrate Fortification Siam Patin on Amplang Snack Products and Mi Sago Instant Product as a Leading Regional Riau

    Dewita Buchari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To enhance fish consumption in the community especially children, fortification on processed fish product is conducted. The processed fish products are developed to fill the requirements as the fish based food products that own characterizations such as ready to eat, easy to carry, and less time to cook. Amplang snacks and instant sagoo noodles are defined as the products that fills the requirements. The research was aimed to process catfish into fish protein concentrate to become amplang snack and instant sagoo noodles. These products were designed as the effort to develop the local priority products in Riau by using diversification and fortification methods. Experimental method with fortification treatments on Fish Protein Concentrate (FPC extract from Catfish that generate products of amplang snacks and instant sagoo noodles and fish tofu were carried out. The fortified products were examined by organoleptics test that involved panelists. The results showed that the proximate analysis on fortified Catfish Protein Concentrate products were presented as following :1. water contents of 3,13 %, ash of 2,85 %, protein content of 16,13 % and fat content of 18, 66 % for ampang snacks; and 2. water contents of 11,77 %, ash of 1,30 %, protein content of 12,35 % and fat content of 1,86 % for instant sagoo nodles. All fortified FPC products filled the Indonesian Nasional Standard (SNI.Keywords: Fortification, Catfish, and Fish Protein Concentrate

  2. Hybrid input-output approach to metal production and its application to the introduction of lead-free solders.

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Murakami, Shinsuke; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2008-05-15

    The production process of metals such as copper, lead, and zinc is characterized by mutual interconnections and interdependence, as well as by the occurrence of a large number of byproducts, which include precious or rare metals, such as gold, silver, bismuth, and indium. On the basis of the framework of waste input-output (WIO), we present a hybrid 10 model that takes full account of the mutual interdependence among the metal production processes and the interdependence between them and all the other production sectors of the economy as well. The combination of a comprehensive representation of the whole national economy and the introduction of process knowledge of metal production allows for a detailed analysis of different materials-use scenarios under the consideration of full supply chain effects. For illustration, a hypothetical case study of the introduction of lead-free solder involving the production of silver as a byproduct of copper and lead smelting processes was developed and implemented using Japanese data. To meet the increased demand for the recovery and recycling of silver resources from end-of-life products, the final destination of metal silver in terms of products and user categories was estimated, and the target components with the highest silver concentration were identified.

  3. Nitric oxide production by rat bronchoalveolar macrophages or ...

    Unknown

    inflammatory responses to either LPS or silica. For in- stance, the capacity of AMs to respond directly to LPS with increases in NO production has been well docu- mented (Jorens et al 1991; Warner et al 1995). AMs also are a likely source of the NO produced following silica exposure (Huffman et al 1998; Porter et al 2002).

  4. Nitric oxide production by rat bronchoalveolar macrophages or ...

    Unknown

    Media levels of nitrate and nitrite (NOx; the stable decomposition products of NO) ... have the capacity to express iNOS mRNA and produce. NO, much of ... Sil, < 5 µm diameter, US Silica Corp., Berkeley Springs, ..... provides new information.

  5. Variation in excess oxidant factor in combustion products of MHD generator. [Natural gas fuel

    Pinkhasik, M S; Mironov, V D; Zakharko, Yu A; Plavinskii, A I

    1977-12-01

    Methods and difficulties associated with determining the excess oxidant factor for natural gas-fired MHD generators are discussed. The measurement of this factor is noted to be essential for the optimization of the combustion chamber and operation of MHD generators. A gas analyzer of electrochemical type is considered as a quick - response sensor capable of analyzing the composition of the combustion products and thus determining accurately the excess oxidant factor. The principle of operation of this sensor is discussed and the dependence of the electrochemical sensor emf on excess oxidant factor is shown. Three types of sensors are illustrated and tables of test results are provided.

  6. Preliminary assessment of air quality for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and lead in the Netherlands under European legislation

    Breugel PB van; Buijsman E; LLO

    2001-01-01

    The current air quality in the Netherlands for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter and lead has been assessed in the context of limit values, margins of tolerance and the assessment thresholds used in the first daughter directive for air quality of the European

  7. Combination of a Sample Pretreatment Microfluidic Device with a Photoluminescent Graphene Oxide Quantum Dot Sensor for Trace Lead Detection.

    Park, Minsu; Ha, Hyun Dong; Kim, Yong Tae; Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-11-03

    A novel trace lead ion (Pb(2+)) detection platform by combining a microfluidic sample pretreatment device with a DNA aptamer linked photoluminescent graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD) sensor was proposed. The multilayered microdevice included a microchamber which was packed with cation exchange resins for preconcentrating metal ions. The sample loading and recovery were automatically actuated by a peristaltic polydimethylsiloxane micropump with a flow rate of 84 μL/min. Effects of the micropump actuation time, metal ion concentration, pH, and the volumes of the sample and eluent on the metal ion capture and preconcentration efficiency were investigated on a chip. The Pb(2+) samples whose concentrations ranged from 0.48 nM to 1.2 μM were successfully recovered with a preconcentration factor value between 4 and 5. Then, the preconcentrated metal ions were quantitatively analyzed with a DNA aptamer modified GOQD. The DNA aptamer on the GOQD specifically captured the target Pb(2+) which can induce electron transfer from GOQD to Pb(2+) upon UV irradiation, thereby resulting in the fluorescence quenching of the GOQD. The disturbing effect of foreign anions on the Pb(2+) detection and the spiked Pb(2+) real samples were also analyzed. The proposed GOQD metal ion sensor exhibited highly sensitive Pb(2+) detection with a detection limit of 0.64 nM and a dynamic range from 1 to 1000 nM. The on-chip preconcentration of the trace metal ions from a large-volume sample followed by the metal ion detection by the fluorescent GOQD sensor can provide an advanced platform for on-site water pollution screening.

  8. Nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor: Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production associated anaerobic ammonium oxidation?

    Wunderlin, P.; Harris, E. J.; Joss, A.; Emmenegger, L.; Kipf, M.; Mohn, J.; Siegrist, H.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a major sink for stratospheric ozone. In biological wastewater treatment N2O can be produced via several pathways. This study investigates the dynamics of N2O emissions from a nitritation-anammox reactor, and links its interpretation to the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signature of the emitted N2O. A 400-litre single-stage nitritation-anammox reactor was operated and continuously fed with digester liquid. The isotopic composition of N2O emissions was monitored online with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS; Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Waechter et al., 2008). Dissolved ammonium and nitrate were monitored online (ISEmax, Endress + Hauser), while nitrite was measured with test strips (Nitrite-test 0-24mgN/l, Merck). Table 1. Summary of experiments conducted to understand N2O emissions Experimental conditions O2[mgO2/L] NO2-[mgN/L] NH4+[mgN/L] N2O/NH4+[%] Normal operation production pathway, which is hypothesized to be mediated by anammox activity (Figure 1). A less likely explanation is that the SP of N2O was increased by partial N2O reduction by heterotrophic denitrification. Various experiments were conducted to further investigate N2O formation pathways in the reactor. Our data reveal that N2O emissions increased when reactor operation was not ideal, for example when dissolved oxygen was too high (Table 1). SP measurements confirmed that these N2O peaks were due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor (Figure 1; Table 1). Overall, process control via online N2O monitoring was confirmed to be an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. ReferencesWaechter H. et al. (2008) Optics Express, 16: 9239-9244. Wunderlin, P et al. (2013) Environmental Science & Technology 47: 1339-1348.

  9. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively.

  10. Neutron production in interactions of relativistic protons and deuterons with lead targets

    Yurevich, V.I.; Amelin, N.S.; Yakovlev, R.M.; Nikolaev, V.A.; Lyapin, V.G.; Tsvetkov, I.O.

    2005-01-01

    Results on the neutron double-differential cross sections and yields obtained in the time-of-flight measurements with different lead targets and beams of protons and deuterons at an energy of about 2 GeV are discussed. The neutron spatial-energy distribution for an extended lead target was studied by the threshold detector method in the energy range of protons and deuterons 1-3.7 GeV. A dependence of the mean neutron multiplicity, energy of neutrons, and process of neutron multiplication in lead on the target dimension, and the type and energy of the beam particle is analyzed. (author)

  11. Arene activation by a nonheme iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex: pathways leading to phenol and ketone products.

    Faponle, Abayomi S; Banse, Frédéric; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-07-01

    Iron(III)-hydroperoxo complexes are found in various nonheme iron enzymes as catalytic cycle intermediates; however, little is known on their catalytic properties. The recent work of Banse and co-workers on a biomimetic nonheme iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex provided evidence of its involvement in reactivity with arenes. This contrasts the behavior of heme iron(III)-hydroperoxo complexes that are known to be sluggish oxidants. To gain insight into the reaction mechanism of the biomimetic iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex with arenes, we performed a computational (density functional theory) study. The calculations show that iron(III)-hydroperoxo reacts with substrates via low free energies of activation that should be accessible at room temperature. Moreover, a dominant ketone reaction product is observed as primary products rather than the thermodynamically more stable phenols. These product distributions are analyzed and the calculations show that charge interaction between the iron(III)-hydroxo group and the substrate in the intermediate state pushes the transferring proton to the meta-carbon atom of the substrate and guides the selectivity of ketone formation. These studies show that the relative ratio of ketone versus phenol as primary products can be affected by external interactions of the oxidant with the substrate. Moreover, iron(III)-hydroperoxo complexes are shown to selectively give ketone products, whereas iron(IV)-oxo complexes will react with arenes to form phenols instead.

  12. Effective production planning for purchased part under long lead time and uncertain demand: MRP Vs demand-driven MRP

    Shofa, M. J.; Moeis, A. O.; Restiana, N.

    2018-04-01

    MRP as a production planning system is appropriate for the deterministic environment. Unfortunately, most production systems such as customer demands are stochastic, so that MRP is inappropriate at the time. Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP) is new approach for production planning system dealing with demand uncertainty. The objective of this paper is to compare the MRP and DDMRP for purchased part under long lead time and uncertain demand in terms of average inventory levels. The evaluation is conducted through a discrete event simulation with the long lead time and uncertain demand scenarios. The next step is evaluating the performance of DDMRP by comparing the inventory level of DDMRP with MRP. As result, DDMRP is more effective production planning than MRP in terms of average inventory levels.

  13. Oxidation of the N-terminal domain of the wheat metallothionein Ec -1 leads to the formation of three distinct disulfide bridges.

    Tarasava, Katsiaryna; Chesnov, Serge; Freisinger, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins, characterized by a high cysteine content and the ability to coordinate large amounts of d(10) metal ions, for example, Zn(II), Cd(II), and Cu(I), in form of metal-thiolate clusters. Depending on intracellular conditions such as redox potential or metal ion concentrations, MTs can occur in various states ranging from the fully metal-loaded holo- to the metal-free apo-form. The Cys thiolate groups in the apo-form can be either reduced or be involved in disulfide bridges. Although oxidation-mediated Zn(II) release might be a possible mechanism for the regulation of Zn(II) availability by MTs, no concise information regarding the associated pathways and the structure of oxidized apo-MT forms is available. Using the well-studied Zn2 γ-Ec -1 domain of the wheat Zn6 Ec -1 MT we attempt here to answer several question regarding the structure and biophysical properties of oxidized MT forms, such as: (1) does disulfide bond formation increase the stability against proteolysis, (2) is the overall peptide backbone fold similar for the holo- and the oxidized apo-MT form, and (3) are disulfide bridges specifically or randomly formed? Our investigations show that oxidation leads to three distinct disulfide bridges independently of the applied oxidation conditions and of the initial species used for oxidation, that is, the apo- or the holo-form. In addition, the oxidized apo-form is as stable against proteolysis as Zn2 γ-Ec -1, rendering the currently assumed degradation of oxidized MTs unlikely and suggesting a role of the oxidation process for the extension of protein lifetime in absence of sufficient amounts of metal ions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 295-308, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. High production volume chemical Amine Oxide [C8-C20] category environmental risk assessment

    Sanderson, Hans; Tibazarwa, Caritas; Greggs, William

    2009-01-01

    and personal care products. Given the lack of persistence or bioaccumulation, and the low likelihood of these chemicals partitioning to soil, the focus of the environmental assessment is on the aquatic environment. In the United States, the E-FAST model is used to estimate effluent concentrations in the United......An environmental assessment of amine oxides has been conducted under the OECD SIDS High Production Volume (HPV) Program via the Global International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) Amine Oxides Consortium. Amine oxides are primarily used in conjunction with surfactants in cleaning...... States from manufacturing facilities and from municipal facilities resulting from consumer product uses. Reasonable worst-case ratios of predicted environmental concentration (PEC) to predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) range from 0.04 to 0.003, demonstrating that these chemicals are a low risk...

  15. MIS High-Purity Plutonium Oxide Metal Oxidation Product TS707001 (SSR123): Final Report

    Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Max A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carillo, Alex [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-09

    A high-purity plutonium dioxide material from the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program inventory has been studied with regard to gas generation and corrosion in a storage environment. Sample TS707001 represents process plutonium oxides from several metal oxidation operations as well as impure and scrap plutonium from Hanford that are currently stored in 3013 containers. After calcination to 950°C, the material contained 86.98% plutonium with no major impurities. This study followed over time, the gas pressure of a sample with nominally 0.5 wt% water in a sealed container with an internal volume scaled to 1/500th of the volume of a 3013 container. Gas compositions were measured periodically over a six year period. The maximum observed gas pressure was 138 kPa. The increase over the initial pressure of 80 kPa was primarily due to generation of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas in the first six months. Hydrogen and oxygen were minor components of the headspace gas. At the completion of the study, the internal components of the sealed container showed signs of corrosion, including pitting.

  16. Charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei at CERN and comparison with Brookhaven data

    Topilskaya, N. S.

    2013-01-01

    A review of experimental data on charmoniumproduction that were obtained in fixed-target experiments at the SPS synchrotron and in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in beams of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Switzerland) is presented. A comparison with data obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) from experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is performed. Measurement of the suppression of J/ψ-meson production as a possible signal of the production of quark-gluon plasmawas proposed back in 1986 by T. Matsui and H. Satz. An anomalous suppression of J/ψ-meson production was discovered by the NA50 Collaboration at SPS (CERN) in central collisions of lead nuclei at the c.m. collision energy of 158 GeV per nucleon. Data obtained at the c.m. energy of 200 GeV per nucleon in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC indicate that, depending on multiplicity, the suppression of J/ψ-meson production at this energy approximately corresponds to the suppression of J/ψ-meson production in collisions of lead nuclei at the SPS accelerator. Theoretical models that take into account the regeneration of J/ψ mesons describe better RHIC experimental data. The measurement of charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in LHC beams revealed the importance of taking into account the regeneration process. At the LHC energies, it is also necessary to take into account the contribution of B-meson decays. Future measurements of charmonium production at the LHC to a higher statistical precision and over an extended energy region would be of importance for obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of charmonium production and for studying the properties of matter at high energy density and temperature

  17. Enhancing lipid productivity of Chlorella vulgaris using oxidative stress by TiO2 nanoparticles

    Kang, Nam Kyu; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Gang-Guk; Moon, Myounghoon; Park, Min S.; Yang, Ji-Won; Lim, JitKang

    2014-01-01

    Ability to increase the lipid production in microalgae is one of the heavily sought-after ideas to improve the economic feasibility of microalgae-derived transportation fuels for commercial applications. We used the oxidative stress by TiO 2 nanoparticles, a well-known photocatalyst, to induce lipid production in microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 265 was cultivated under various concentrations of TiO 2 ranging from 0.1 to 5 g/L under UV-A illumination. Maximum specific growth rate was affected in responding to TiO 2 concentrations. In the presence of UV-A, chlorophyll concentration was decreased at the highest concentration of TiO 2 (5 g/L TiO 2 ) by oxidative stress. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition analysis suggested that oxidative stress causes the accumulation and decomposition of lipids. The highest FAME productivity was 18.2 g/L/d under low concentrations of TiO 2 (0.1 g/L) and a short induction time (two days). The controlled condition of TiO 2 /UV-A inducing oxidative stress (0.1 g/L TiO 2 and two days induction) could be used to increase the lipid productivity of C. vulgaris UTEX 265. Our results show the possibility of modulating the lipid induction process through oxidative stress with TiO 2 /UV-A

  18. Enhancing lipid productivity of Chlorella vulgaris using oxidative stress by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Kang, Nam Kyu; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Gang-Guk; Moon, Myounghoon; Park, Min S.; Yang, Ji-Won [Daejeon, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, JitKang [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-05-15

    Ability to increase the lipid production in microalgae is one of the heavily sought-after ideas to improve the economic feasibility of microalgae-derived transportation fuels for commercial applications. We used the oxidative stress by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, a well-known photocatalyst, to induce lipid production in microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 265 was cultivated under various concentrations of TiO{sub 2} ranging from 0.1 to 5 g/L under UV-A illumination. Maximum specific growth rate was affected in responding to TiO{sub 2} concentrations. In the presence of UV-A, chlorophyll concentration was decreased at the highest concentration of TiO{sub 2} (5 g/L TiO{sub 2}) by oxidative stress. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition analysis suggested that oxidative stress causes the accumulation and decomposition of lipids. The highest FAME productivity was 18.2 g/L/d under low concentrations of TiO{sub 2} (0.1 g/L) and a short induction time (two days). The controlled condition of TiO{sub 2}/UV-A inducing oxidative stress (0.1 g/L TiO{sub 2} and two days induction) could be used to increase the lipid productivity of C. vulgaris UTEX 265. Our results show the possibility of modulating the lipid induction process through oxidative stress with TiO{sub 2}/UV-A.

  19. Serum Antioxidative Enzymes Levels and Oxidative Stress Products in Age-Related Cataract Patients

    Dong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the products of oxidative stress in patients with age-related cataracts and compare the findings with those in healthy control subjects. Method. Sixty patients with age-related cataract and sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were included in this study. Serum samples were obtained to detect the antioxidative enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and oxidation degradation products of malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, conjugated diene (CD, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyl (PC, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Results. Serum SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in cataract group were significantly decreased as compared to the control subjects (P<0.05. The levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and CD in cataract patients were significantly higher than those in the control subjects (P<0.05, P<0.01. Cataract patients had higher levels of 8-OHdG, AOPP, and PC with respect to the comparative group of normal subjects (P<0.01. And there was no statistical significance in concentration of antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products in patients with different subtype cataract. Conclusions. Oxidative stress is an important risk factor in the development of age-related cataract, and augmentation of the antioxidant defence systems may be of benefit to prevent or delay cataractogenesis.

  20. Lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color changes, and volatile compounds production in irradiated raw pork batters with different fat content

    Jo, Cheo Run; Byun, Myung Woo

    2000-01-01

    An emulsion-type product was prepared to determine the effect of irradiation on lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color change, and volatile production in raw pork with different fat content. Lipid oxidation increased with an increase in fat content or irradiation dose. Irradiated batters had higher cholesterol oxides than did non-irradiated batters, and the major cholesterol oxides formed in irradiated pork batters were 7α- and 7β- hydroxycholesterol. Hunter color a- and b-values of raw pork batters were decreased by irradiation regardless of fat content. Irradiation significantly increased the amount of volatile compounds. Although lipid oxidation of high fat products (10 and 15% fat) was higher than that of low fat products (4%), high fat products did not always produce greater amount of volatile compounds in raw pork batters. In summary, irradiation increased lipid and cholesterol oxidation, and volatile compounds production, and had detrimental effects on the color of raw pork batter under aerobic conditions

  1. Nitrous Oxide Production and Fluxes from Coastal Sediments under Varying Environmental Conditions

    Ziebis, W.; Wankel, S. D.; de Beer, D.; Dentinger, J.; Buchwald, C.; Charoenpong, C.

    2014-12-01

    Although coastal zones represent important contributors to the increasing levels of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), it is still unclear which role benthic processes play and whether marine sediments represent sinks or sources for N2O, since interactions among closely associated microbial groups lead to a high degree of variability. In addition, coastal areas are extremely dynamic regions, often exposed to increased nutrient loading and conditions of depleted oxygen. We investigated benthic N2O fluxes and how environmental conditions affect N2O production in different sediments at 2 different geographical locations (German Wadden Sea, a California coastal lagoon). At each location, a total of 32 sediment cores were taken in areas that differed in sediment type, organic content and pore-water nutrient concentrations, as well as in bioturbation activity. Parallel cores were incubated under in-situ conditions, low oxygen and increased nitrate levels for 10 days. Zones of N2O production and consumption were identified in intact cores by N2O microprofiles at the beginning and end of the experiments. In a collaborative effort to determine the dominant sources of N2O, samples were taken throughout the course of the experiments for the determination of the isotopic composition of N2O (as well as nitrate, nitrite and ammonium). Our results indicate that both, nitrate addition and low oxygen conditions in the overlying water, caused an increase of subsurface N2O production in most sediments, with a high variability between different sediment types. N2O production in the sediments was accompanied by N2O consumption, reducing the fluxes to the water column. In general, organic rich sediments showed the strongest response to environmental changes with increased production and efflux of N2O into the overlying water. Bioturbation activity added to the complexity of N2O dynamics by an increase in nitrification-denitrification processes, as well as enhanced pore-water transport

  2. Flood effects on efflux and net production of nitrous oxide in river floodplain soils

    Riaz, Muhammad; Bruderer, Christian; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Floodplain soils are often rich in nutrients and exhibit high spatial heterogeneity in terms of geomorphology, soil environmental conditions and substrate availability for processes involved in carbon and nutrient cycling. In addition, fluctuating water tables lead to temporally changing redox conditions. In such systems, there are ideal conditions for the occurrence of hot spots and moments of nitrous oxide emissions, a potent greenhouse gas. The factors that govern the spatial heterogeneity and dynamics of N2O formation in floodplain soils and the surface efflux of this gas are not fully understood. A particular issue is the contribution of N2O formation in the subsoil to surface efflux. We studied this question in the floodplain of a restored section of the Thur river (NE Switzerland) which is characterized by a flashy flow regime. As a consequence, the floodplain soils are unsaturated most of the time. We showed earlier that saturation during flood pulses leads to short phases of generally anoxic conditions followed by a drying phase with anoxic conditions within aggregates and oxic conditions in larger soil pores. The latter conditions are conducive for spatially closely-coupled nitrification-denitrification and related hot moments of nitrous oxide formation. In a floodplain zone characterized by about one meter of young, sandy sediments, that are mostly covered by the tall grass Phalaris arundinacea, we measured at several time points before and after a small flood event N2O surface efflux with the closed-chamber method, and assessed N2O concentrations in the soil air at four different depths using gas-permeable tubings. In addition, we calculated the N2O diffusivity in the soil from Radon diffusivity. The latter was estimated in-situ from the recovery of Radon concentration in the gas-permeable tubings after purging with ambient air. All these data were then used to calculate net N2O production rates at different soil depths with the gradient method. In

  3. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0075 The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters KIT BOWEN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD...2. REPORT TYPE Final Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30-09-2014 to 29-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Oxidation Products of Aluminum ...Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0324 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) KIT

  4. Oxidant production and SOD1 protein expression in single skeletal myofibers from Down syndrome mice

    Patrick M. Cowley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a genetic condition caused by the triplication of chromosome 21. Persons with DS exhibit pronounced muscle weakness, which also occurs in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Oxidative stress is thought to be an underlying factor in the development of DS-related pathologies including muscle dysfunction. High-levels of oxidative stress have been attributed to triplication and elevated expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; a gene located on chromosome 21. The elevated expression of SOD1 is postulated to increase production of hydrogen peroxide and cause oxidative injury and cell death. However, it is unknown whether SOD1 protein expression is associated with greater oxidant production in skeletal muscle from Ts65Dn mice. Thus, our objective was to assess levels of SOD1 expression and oxidant production in skeletal myofibers from the flexor digitorum brevis obtained from Ts65Dn and control mice. Measurements of oxidant production were obtained from myofibers loaded with 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH2-DA in the basal state and following 15 min of stimulated unloaded contraction. Ts65Dn myofibers exhibited a significant decrease in basal DCF emissions (p 0.05. Myofibers from Ts65Dn mice tended to be smaller and myonuclear domain was lower (p < 0.05. In summary, myofibers from Ts65Dn mice exhibited decreased basal DCF emissions that were coupled with elevated protein expression of SOD1. Stimulated contraction in isolated myofibers did not affect DCF emissions in either group. These findings suggest the skeletal muscle dysfunction in the adult Ts65Dn mouse is not associated with skeletal muscle oxidative stress.

  5. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    Kester, R.A.; Boer, W. de; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of nitrous oxide production at oxic conditions, but strongly enhanced the nitrous oxide production at oxygen-poor and anoxic conditions. Inhibition of nitrification by short exposure (1 to 24 h) to high conce...

  6. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  7. Lead-zinc interactions in the production of osteocalcin by ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic bone cells

    Pounds, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The serum level of osteocalcin, a bone specific protein produced by osteoblasts and used clinically as a marker of osteoblast acceptive, is decreased in lead intoxicated children. Previous studies suggest that the reduced osteocalcin production appears to be the result of impaired transcriptional regulation of this 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 gene product, and not translation. As part of a study to investigate the potential interaction of Pb 2+ with Zn 2+ , and with the zinc fingers of the vitamin D receptor, ROS cells were treated with 0, 5, 10, or 25 μM lead acetate for 24 hr, in the presence of 10, 30, or 50 μM Zn followed by an additional 24 hr treatment with lead with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (100 pg/ml media). At the end of this period a radioimmunoassay was conducted to determine the amount of osteocalcin in the cells and secreted in the media. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 caused an increase in osteocalcin secreted into the media in cultures containing 0 μM lead, but this increase was inhibited by lead in a concentration dependent manner, so that osteocalcin secretion in 10 or 25 μM lead treated groups was less than cultures without 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 treatment. This inhibitory effect of lead was blocked by increasing the medium zinc concentration of 50 μM. Increasing medium Pb 2+ concentrations decreased the amount of 65 Zn taken up by cells by ∼30%, which was nullified by increasing medium Zn. These results suggest that lead produces a localized and specific Zn deficiency in the vitamin D receptor zinc finger, and perhaps other zinc metalloproteins, and that these effects of lead are not mediated through general effects on RNA or protein synthesis

  8. Inclusive particle production at HERA: Resolved and direct quasi-real photon contributions in next-to-leading order QCD

    Kniehl, B.A.; Kramer, G.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate in next-to-leading order inclusive cross sections of single-particle production via both direct and resolved photons in ep collisions at HERA. Transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions are presented and the dependences on renormalization and factorization scales and subtraction schemes are investigated. (orig.)

  9. Next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to the production of three charged leptons plus missing energy at the LHC

    Biedermann, Benedikt; Denner, Ansgar; Hofer, Lars

    2017-10-01

    The production of a neutral and a charged vector boson with subsequent decays into three charged leptons and a neutrino is a very important process for precision tests of the Standard Model of elementary particles and in searches for anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings. In this article, the first computation of next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to the production of the four-lepton final states μ + μ -e+ ν e, {μ}+{μ}-{e}-{\\overline{ν}}e , μ + μ - μ + ν μ , and {μ}+{μ}-{μ}-{\\overline{ν}}_{μ } at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. We use the complete matrix elements at leading and next-to-leading order, including all off-shell effects of intermediate massive vector bosons and virtual photons. The relative electroweak corrections to the fiducial cross sections from quark-induced partonic processes vary between -3% and -6%, depending significantly on the event selection. At the level of differential distributions, we observe large negative corrections of up to -30% in the high-energy tails of distributions originating from electroweak Sudakov logarithms. Photon-induced contributions at next-to-leading order raise the leading-order fiducial cross section by +2%. Interference effects in final states with equal-flavour leptons are at the permille level for the fiducial cross section, but can lead to sizeable effects in off-shell sensitive phase-space regions.

  10. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Placakyte, R.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.

    2012-01-01

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep→eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x P 2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 2 2 in photon virtuality. The differential cross sections extrapolated to vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 are in agreement with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Yerevan (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Univ. of Belgrade, Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)] [and others

    2012-04-15

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep{yields}eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x{sub P}<0.1 and covers the range 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  12. Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

    Elisa Couto Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise.

  13. Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

    Gomes, Elisa Couto; Silva, Albená Nunes; de Oliveira, Marta Rubino

    2012-01-01

    This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise. PMID:22701757

  14. Durable solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-01-01

    production is required for promoting commercialization of the SOEC technology. In this work, we report a recent 4400 hours test of a state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ electrode supported SOEC cell. The cell consists of a Ni-YSZ (YSZ: yttria stabilized zirconia) support and active fuel electrode, an YSZ electrolyte...... that except for the first 250 hours fast initial degradation, for the rest of the testing period, the cell showed rather stable performance with an moderate degradation rate of around 25 mV/1000 h. The electrochemical impedance spectra show that both serial resistance and polarization resistance of the cell...... and changing of porosity inside the active layer. The degree of these microstructural changes becomes less and less severe along the hydrogen-steam flow path. The present test results show that this type of cell can be used for early demonstration electrolysis at 1A/cm2. Future work should be focus on reducing...

  15. Series Production of 13 kA Current Leads with Dry and Compact Warm Terminals

    Andersen, T P; Vullierme, B

    2005-01-01

    For the LHC magnet test benches 13 pairs of conventional helium vapour-cooled 13 kA current leads are required. The current leads have been designed and built by industry. Attention was given to economical and reliable design and to a design of the warm terminal in order to avoid any condensation. Three pairs of them were tested at CERN. The dry warm terminal enables voltage test at 4.1 kV at cold condition. The paper describes construction details and compares calculated and measured values of the main parameters.

  16. Production of transverse energy from minijets in next-to-leading order perturbative QCD

    Eskola, Kari J

    2000-01-01

    We compute in next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD the transverse energy carried into the central rapidity unit of hadron or nuclear collisions by the partons freed in the few-GeV subcollisions. The formulation is based on a rapidity window and a measurement function of a new type. The behaviour of the NLO results as a function of the minimum transverse momentum and as a function of the scale choice is studied. The NLO results are found to be stable relative to the leading-order ones even in the few-GeV domain.

  17. Large-scale Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production: Issues of Representing Spatial Heterogeneity

    Morris, C. K.; Knighton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is produced from the biological processes of nitrification and denitrification in terrestrial environments and contributes to the greenhouse effect that warms Earth's climate. Large scale modeling can be used to determine how global rate of nitrous oxide production and consumption will shift under future climates. However, accurate modeling of nitrification and denitrification is made difficult by highly parameterized, nonlinear equations. Here we show that the representation of spatial heterogeneity in inputs, specifically soil moisture, causes inaccuracies in estimating the average nitrous oxide production in soils. We demonstrate that when soil moisture is averaged from a spatially heterogeneous surface, net nitrous oxide production is under predicted. We apply this general result in a test of a widely-used global land surface model, the Community Land Model v4.5. The challenges presented by nonlinear controls on nitrous oxide are highlighted here to provide a wider context to the problem of extraordinary denitrification losses in CLM. We hope that these findings will inform future researchers on the possibilities for model improvement of the global nitrogen cycle.

  18. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to Higgs Boson Plus Jet Production with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence

    Jones, S. P.; Kerner, M.; Luisoni, G.

    2018-04-01

    We present the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of a Higgs boson in association with one jet at the LHC including the full top-quark mass dependence. The mass of the bottom quark is neglected. The two-loop integrals appearing in the virtual contribution are calculated numerically using the method of sector decomposition. We study the Higgs boson transverse momentum distribution, focusing on the high pt ,H region, where the top-quark loop is resolved. We find that the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are large but that the ratio of the next-to-leading-order to leading-order result is similar to that obtained by computing in the limit of large top-quark mass.

  19. Development of the production of lead and precious metals in Central Asia

    Nikolić Branislav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There were several rich deposits of polymetal ores of non-ferrous and precious metals in the region of Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union. Metallurgical production of these metals was developed even a thousand years ago and was in the top of the world at the beginning of the fourth quarter of the twentieth century. The disintegration of the Soviet Union and the change of government structures caused a reduction of metallurgical production, but there are all conditions to intensify