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Sample records for oxidation deposit-induced corrosion

  1. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part I: Exposures in oxidizing and chlorinating atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    on hightemperature corrosion of an austenitic superheater material under laboratoryconditions mimicking biomass firing is investigated in this work. Exposuresinvolving deposit (KCl)-coated and deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP347H FG) samples were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, under...... only in an oxidizing-chlorinating atmosphere, otherwise corrosionresults in formation of a duplex oxide. Corrosion attack on deposit-coatedsamples was higher than on deposit-free samples irrespective of the gaseousatmosphere. Specifically, severe volatilization of alloying elements occurred ondeposit-coated...

  2. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  3. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  4. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  5. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part II: Exposures in SO2 containing atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    SO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-rayspectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques werecomplimentarily applied to characterize the resulting corrosion products. Apartially molten K2SO4-layer formed on KCl coated specimens, and corrosionresulted in localized......In biomass fired power plants, the fast corrosion of superheaters is facilitatedby the presence of corrosive flue gas species, for example, SO2, which arereleased during combustion. To understand the role of the gas species on thecorrosion process, comparative laboratory exposures of deposit (KCl......)-coatedand deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG) samples to gas mixturescontaining SO2 was carried out, under conditions relevant to biomass-firing.Exposures were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, in oxidizingsulphidizing,and oxidizing-sulphidizing-chlorinating gas mixtures containing60 ppmv...

  6. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  7. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  8. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. The efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness, and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results and observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with PWRs. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of lay-up and various start-up conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on corrosion-product transport on the primary side of steam generators are also discussed. (author)

  9. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  10. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  11. Study on influence of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of pure Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Zhenyao; Ke, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Corrosion products layer is only formed in coastal atmosphere. •In coastal atmosphere, rate controlling step is diffusion process. •In rural atmosphere, rate controlling step is charge transfer process. •Pitting area increases greatly in coastal site, but slightly in rural site. -- Abstract: Effects of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of aluminium in rural and coastal sites were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open-circuit potential (OCP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques after outdoor exposure. In the rural atmosphere, only the compact, adhesive native oxide layer exists, and the rate controlling step is diffusion process, while in the coastal atmosphere, another loose, inadhesive corrosion products layer exists, and a charge transfer process controls the corrosion process. The pitting area in the coastal atmosphere increases over time more obviously than that in the rural atmosphere

  12. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. Efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results of observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with pressurized-water reactors. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of layup and various startup conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on CPT on the primary side of SGs are also discussed. (author)

  13. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several

  14. Corrosion evaluation of zirconium doped oxide coatings on aluminum formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajat, Jelena; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Vasilić, Rastko; Stojadinović, Stevan

    2014-01-01

    The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of aluminum in sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O) and Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O doped with Zr was analyzed in order to obtain oxide coatings with improved corrosion resistance. The influence of current density in PEO process and anodization time was investigated, as well as the influence of Zr, with the aim to find out how they affect the chemical content, morphology, surface roughness, and corrosion stability of oxide coatings. It was shown that the presence of Zr increases the corrosion stability of oxide coatings for all investigated PEO times. Evolution of EIS spectra during the exposure to 3% NaCl, as a strong corrosive agent, indicated the highest corrosion stability for PEO coating formed on aluminum at 70 mA/cm(2) for 2 min in a zirconium containing electrolyte.

  15. (IV) Oxide Corrosion in Oil Exploration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    method was used. Results of the experiment showed that mild steel material was the most susceptible material . to corrosion in the environment while Type (316) Stainless Steel material exhibited the best performance of all the materials. The result of this study can be used in the design of crude/product llow lines in the ...

  16. Physical metallurgy. Vol. 6. Corrosion, oxidation and physical metallurgy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, Y.; Dupuy, J.M.; Philibert, J.; Quere, Y.

    1982-12-01

    This document deals with the following subjects: oxidation, corrosion and surface treatments. Some physical metallurgy applications are presented: aluminium alloys, high elastic limit materials, materials for very high temperature, nuclear metallurgy problems, composite materials, magnetic materials, very high purity materials, and, superconductor materials [fr

  17. Materials and coatings to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Object of the given papers are the oxidation and corrosion behaviour of several materials (such as stainless steels, iron-, or nickel-, or cobalt-base alloys, Si-based ceramics) used at high temperatures and various investigations on high-temperature protective coatings. (IHoe) [de

  18. Formation of corrosion-resistant oxide film on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, G.S.

    1976-01-01

    A vacuum heat-treatment method was developed for coating metallic uranium with an adherent protective film of uranium oxide. The film is prepared by vacuum heat-treating the metallic uranium at 625 0 C for 1 h while controlling the amount of oxygen being metered into the furnace. Uranium coupons with the protective film were exposed for several hundred hours in a corrosion test bath at 95 0 C and 100 percent RH without corroding. Film thicknesses ranging from 5 to 25 μm (0.0002 to 0.001 in.) were prepared and corrosion tested; the film thickness can be controlled to less than +-2.5 μm (+-0.0001 in.). The oxide film is hard, nonwetting, and very adherent. The resulting surface finish of the metal is equivalent to that of the original finish. The advantages of the oxide films over other protective coatings are given. 12 fig

  19. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3was a function of the concentration of NO3−ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local......Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...

  20. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  1. Coatings for Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Protection of Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jim; Gabb, Tim; Draper, Sue; Miller, Bob; Locci, Ivan; Sudbrack, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in aero gas turbines is resulting in oxidation and hot corrosion attack of turbine disks. Since disks are sensitive to low cycle fatigue (LCF), any environmental attack, and especially hot corrosion pitting, can potentially seriously degrade the life of the disk. Application of metallic coatings are one means of protecting disk alloys from this environmental attack. However, simply the presence of a metallic coating, even without environmental exposure, can degrade the LCF life of a disk alloy. Therefore, coatings must be designed which are not only resistant to oxidation and corrosion attack, but must not significantly degrade the LCF life of the alloy. Three different Ni-Cr coating compositions (29, 35.5, 45wt. Cr) were applied at two thicknesses by Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering (PEMS) to two similar Ni-based disk alloys. One coating also received a thin ZrO2 overcoat. The coated samples were also given a short oxidation exposure in a low PO2 environment to encourage chromia scale formation. Without further environmental exposure, the LCF life of the coated samples, evaluated at 760C, was less than that of uncoated samples. Hence, application of the coating alone degraded the LCF life of the disk alloy. Since shot peening is commonly employed to improve LCF life, the effect of shot peening the coated and uncoated surface was also evaluated. For all cases, shot peening improved the LCF life of the coated samples. Coated and uncoated samples were shot peened and given environmental exposures consisting of 500 hrs of oxidation followed by 50 hrs of hot corrosion, both at 760C). The high-Cr coating showed the best LCF life after the environmental exposures. Results of the LCF testing and post-test characterization of the various coatings will be presented and future research directions discussed.

  2. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  3. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shen, Dejiu, E-mail: DejiuShen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  4. Correlation between the oxide impedance and corrosion behavior of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Myung-Ho; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Jung, Youn-Ho

    2004-12-01

    The correlation between the oxide impedance and corrosion behavior of two series of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys was evaluated. Corrosion tests were performed in a 70 ppm LiOH aqueous solution at 360°C for 300 days. The results of the corrosion tests revealed that the corrosion behavior of the alloys depended on the Nb and Sn content. The impedance characteristics for the pre- and post-transition oxide layers formed on the surface of the alloys were investigated in sulfuric acid at room temperature. From the results, a pertinent equivalent circuit model was preferably established, explaining the properties of double oxide layers. The impedance of the oxide layers correlated with the corrosion behavior; better corrosion resistance always showed higher electric resistance for the inner layers. It is thus concluded that a pertinent equivalent circuit model would be useful for evaluating the long-term corrosion behavior of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys.

  5. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of nanometre sized cerium oxide and titanium oxide incorporated aluminium in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, P. Muhamed; Edwin, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion resistant aluminium incorporated with nano oxides of cerium and titanium. ► 0.2% nano CeO 2 and 0.05% nano TiO 2 showed increased corrosion resistance. ► Nano TiO 2 concentration influenced the optimum performance of the material. ► Comparison of Micro and nano CeO 2 and TiO 2 aluminium showed the latter is best. - Abstract: The study highlights the development of an aluminium matrix composite by incorporating mixture of nanometre sized cerium oxide and titanium oxide in pure aluminium and its corrosion resistance in marine environment. The mixed nanometre sized oxides incorporated aluminium exhibited improved microstructure and excellent corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance depends on the concentration of nanometre sized titanium oxide. Electrochemical characteristics improved several folds in nanometre sized mixed oxides incorporated aluminium than micrometre sized oxides incorporated aluminium.

  7. Corrosion of beryllium oxide; Corrosion de l'oxyde de beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, J; Caillat, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m{sup 3}, - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm{sup 2} water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author)Fren. [French] La volatilisation de l'oxyde de beryllium dans l'air humide est etudiee en fonction de la temperature pour differentes teneurs de vapeur d'eau. Les essais decrits portent sur de l'oxyde de beryllium en poudre ou sur des echantillons d'oxyde de beryllium fritte de differentes densites. Avec un debit d'air de 12 I/h contenant 25 g de vapeur par m{sup 3} correspondant a une vitesse de 40 m/h sur la surface de l'echantillon, la volatilisation des frittes a 1300 deg. C reste tres faible. Sur de la poudre d'oxyde de beryllium calcinee initialement a 1300 deg. C, on observe un grossissement de la taille des grains sous l'influence de l'air humide a 1100 deg. C. Par exemple, elle passe de 0,5 a au moins 2 microns apres 500 heures d'exposition a cette temperature. On donne d'autre part les resultats d'une etude de la corrosion de frittes d'oxyde de beryllium par l'eau, en autoclave. A 250 deg. C, sous une pression de 40 kg/cm{sup 2}, l'action de l'eau reste tres

  8. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  11. Oxidation and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in SCWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Castro, L.; Blazquez, F.

    2008-01-01

    SCWRs are high-temperature, high-pressure, water-cooled reactors that operate above the thermodynamic critical point of water (374 deg C, 22.1 MPa). The SCWR offers many advantages compared to state-of- the-art LWRs including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy, the elimination of components such as steam generators and steam separators and dryers, a low coolant mass inventory resulting in smaller components, and a much higher efficiency ∼ 44% vs. 33% in current LWRs). In these systems high pressure (25 MPa) coolant enters the vessel at 280 deg C which is heated to about 500 deg C and delivered to a power conversion cycle. Supercritical water (SCW) exhibits properties significantly different from those of liquid water below the critical point. Supercritical water acting essentially as a non-polar dense gas with solvation properties approaching those of a low-polarity organic. In this conditions, can dissolve gases like oxygen to complete miscibility. Depending upon what species are present and how much oxygen is present in the solution can becomes a very aggressive oxidising environment. Most of the data on corrosion in supercritical water are from fossil plant or oxidation waste disposal systems. However there is very limited data on corrosion in low conductivity de-aerated SCW and less on stress corrosion cracking behaviour under operating conditions foreseen for SCWR. Candidate materials for structural components are materials for high temperatures and include ferritic-martensitic alloys; oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic/martensitic steels and strengthened steels by precipitation and for lower temperatures the austenitic stainless steels, such as 304 and 316, used in the LWR. Low swelling austenitic steels are also of high interest for areas with high dpa and high temperature. A review of the available information on corrosion and stress corrosion behaviour of different types of stainless steels in supercritical water at high

  12. Improving the corrosion properties of magnesium AZ31 alloy GTA weld metal using microarc oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Siva Prasad; M.Ashfaq; N.Kishore Babu; A.Sreekanth; K.Sivaprasad; V.Muthupandi

    2017-01-01

    In this work,the morphology,phase composition,and corrosion properties of microarc oxidized (MAO) gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments of AZ31 alloy were investigated.Autogenous gas tungsten arc welds were made as full penetration bead-on-plate welding under the alternating-current mode.A uniform oxide layer was developed on the surface of the specimens with MAO treatment in silicate-based alkaline electrolytes for different oxidation times.The corrosion behavior of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.The oxide film improved the corrosion resistance substantially compared to the uncoated specimens.The sample coated for 10 min exhibited better corrosion properties.The corrosion resistance of the coatings was concluded to strongly depend on the morphology,whereas the phase composition and thickness were concluded to only slightly affect the corrosion resistance.

  13. Electrodeposited Reduced Graphene Oxide Films on Stainless Steel, Copper, and Aluminum for Corrosion Protection Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulkareem Mohammed Ali Al-Sammarraie; Mazin Hasan Raheema

    2017-01-01

    The enhancement of corrosion protection of metals and alloys by coating with simple, low cost, and highly adhered layer is still a main goal of many workers. In this research graphite flakes converted into graphene oxide using modified Hammers method and then reduced graphene oxide was electrodeposited on stainless steel 316, copper, and aluminum for corrosion protection application in seawater at four temperatures, namely, 20, 30, 40, and 50°C. All corrosion measurements, kinetics, and therm...

  14. Corrosion-electrochemical characteristics of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings formed by electrolytic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Medova, I.L.; Duradzhi, V.N.; Plavnik, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The composition, structure, microhardness and corrosion-electrochemical properties of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings on titanium in 5n H 2 SO 4 , 50 deg, produced by the method of chemical-heat treatment in electrolytic plasma, containing saturation components of nitrogen and carbon, were investigated. It is shown that the coatings produced have increased hardness, possess high corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid solution at increased temperature, as to their electrochemcial behaviour they are similar to titanium carbide and nitride respectively. It is shown that high corrosion resistance is ensured by electrochemical mechanism of the oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coating protection

  15. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  16. Studies on yttrium oxide coatings for corrosion protection against molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Y.; Bhandari, Subhankar; Pragatheeswaran; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Das, A.K.; Kumar, Jay; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Yttrium oxide is resistant to corrosion by molten uranium and its alloys. Yttrium oxide is recommended as a protective oxide layer on graphite and metal components used for melting and processing uranium and its alloys. This paper presents studies on the efficacy of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings for barrier applications against molten uranium

  17. Corrosion study of the graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide-based epoxy coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, Faizan Ali; Raza, Mohsin Ali; Saad Baig, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Shoaib

    2017-12-01

    This work aims to determine the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) incorporation as filler on the corrosion protection ability of epoxy coatings in saline media. GO was derived from graphite powder following modified Hummers’ method, whereas rGO was obtained after reduction of GO with hydrazine solution. About 1 wt.% of GO or rGO were incorporated in epoxy resin by solution mixing process followed by ball milling. GO and rGO-based epoxy composite coatings were coated on mild steel substrates using film coater. The coated samples were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests after 1 and 24 h immersion in 3.5% NaCl. The results suggested that GO-based epoxy composite coatings showed high impedance and low corrosion rate.

  18. Studies on broad spectrum corrosion resistant oxide coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Corrosion resistant coating materials and their application ... technology demand such corrosion resistant coatings having a ... mill additives used are as follows: China clay, 3⋅0–10⋅0; .... stage involves modification in processing of the deve-.

  19. CFD investigating the air ingress accident for a HTGR simulation of graphite corrosion oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Chi, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A CFD model is proposed to investigate graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10. ► A postulated air ingress accident is assumed in this paper. ► Air ingress flowrate is the predicted result, instead of the preset one. ► O 2 would react with graphite on pebble surface, causing the graphite corrosion. ► No fuel exposure is predicted to be occurred under the air ingress accident. - Abstract: Through a compressible multi-component CFD model, this paper investigates the characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10 core under the postulated accident of gas duct rupture. In this accident, air in the steam generator cavity would enter into the core after pressure equilibrium is achieved between the core and the cavity, which is also called as the air ingress accident. Oxygen in the air would react with graphite on pebble surface, subsequently resulting in oxidation corrosion and challenging fuel integrity. In this paper, characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion during the air ingress accident can be reasonably captured, including distributions of graphite corrosion amount on the different cross-sections, time histories of local corrosion amount at the monitoring points and overall corrosion amount in the core, respectively. Based on the transient simulation results, the corrosion pattern and its corrosion rate would approach to the steady-state conditions as the accident continuously progresses. The total amount of graphite corrosion during a 3-day accident time is predicted to be about 31 kg with the predicted asymptotic corrosion rate. This predicted value is less than that from the previous work of Gao and Shi.

  20. Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria and Mild Steel Corrosion in Nearshore Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    sample harvested at 14 days, and 316L stainless steel controls did not show evidence of corrosion product formation at any of the time points. A...direct or indirect enzymatic reduction or oxidation of corrosion products, formation of biofilms that create corrosive microen- vironments, or...sampler prior to deployment. Cold-finish 1018 mild steel coupons and 3161. stainless steel control coupons (13 by 15 by 3 mm) were polished with a

  1. Biodegradation and corrosion behavior of manganese oxidizer Bacillus cereus ACE4 in diesel transporting pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Ganesh Babu, T.; Karutha Pandian, S.; Maruthamuthu, S.; Palaniswamy, N.; Rajendran, A.

    2007-01-01

    The degradation problem of petroleum products arises since hydrocarbon acts as an excellent food source for a wide variety of microorganisms. Microbial activity leads to unacceptable level of turbidity, corrosion of pipeline and souring of stored product. The present study emphasizes the role of Bacillus cereus ACE4 on degradation of diesel and its influence on corrosion of API 5LX steel. A demonstrating bacterial strain ACE4 was isolated from corrosion products and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that it has more than 99% similarity with B. cereus. The biodegradation and corrosion studies revealed that B. cereus degraded the aliphatic protons and aromatic protons in diesel and is capable of oxidizing ferrous/manganese into oxides. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of manganese oxidizer B. cereus ACE4 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on corrosion in a tropical country pipeline

  2. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Rip, E-mail: dongrip@hanyang.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cerium oxide nanorods were uniformly grown on diverse substrates. • Changes in growth conditions led to morphology evolution of cerium oxide nanostructures. • The grown cerium oxide nanostructures were single or poly crystalline. • Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods made the diverse substrates superhydrophobic and anti-corrosive without any surface modifiers. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  3. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cerium oxide nanorods were uniformly grown on diverse substrates. • Changes in growth conditions led to morphology evolution of cerium oxide nanostructures. • The grown cerium oxide nanostructures were single or poly crystalline. • Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods made the diverse substrates superhydrophobic and anti-corrosive without any surface modifiers. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields

  4. Corrosion of gadolinium aluminate-aluminium oxide samples in fully desalinated water at 575 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattenbach, K.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1978-07-01

    Corrosion tests have been carried out for 1 1/2 years on gadolinium aluminate/aluminium oxide samples (burnable poison for ship propulsion reactors) with and without cans at 575 K in fully desalinated water. It was found that this substance is highly corrosion-resistant. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Corrosion of carbon steel in oxidizing caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A series of tests have been completed on a range of proposed waste compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion was observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below 25μm/y. By the end of twelve months all results, except for very concentrated mixtures, were below 13 μm/y. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for waste compositions and temperatures within the test limits

  6. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance.

  7. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bechta@sbor.spb.su; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences (ISCh RAS), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B. [SPb State Electrotechnical University (SPbGETU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottomley, D. [EUROPAISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA/DEN/DSNI, Saclay (France); Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Altstadt, E. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Fichot, F. [IRSN/DPAM/SEMCA, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kymalainen, O. [FORTUM Nuclear Services Ltd., Espoo (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  8. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Lopukh, D.B.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Piluso, P.; Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W.; Altstadt, E.; Fichot, F.; Kymalainen, O.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  9. Low cost corrosion and oxidation resistant coatings for improved system reliability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to improve high-temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance of critical superalloy components in turbine engines innovative processing methods must be...

  10. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion of NiCrY-Coated Disk Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Miller, Robert A.; Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Draper, Susan L.; Nesbitt, James A.; Rogers, Richard B.; Telesman, Ignacy; Ngo, Vanda; Healy, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy disk superalloys have been designed for higher engine operating temperatures through improvement of their strength and creep resistance. Yet, increasing disk application temperatures to 704 degrees Centigrade and higher could enhance oxidation and activate hot corrosion in harmful environments. Protective coatings could be necessary to mitigate such attack. Cylindrical coated specimens of disk superalloys LSHR and ME3 were subjected to thermal cycling to produce cyclic oxidation in air at a maximum temperature of 760 degrees Centigrade. The effects of substrate roughness and coating thickness on coating integrity after cyclic oxidation were considered. Selected coated samples that had cyclic oxidation were then subjected to accelerated hot corrosion tests. This cyclic oxidation did not impair the coating's resistance to subsequent hot corrosion pitting attack.

  12. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion of NiCrY-Coated Disk Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Tim; Miller, R. A.; Sudbrack, C. K.; Draper, S. L.; Nesbitt, J.; Telesman, J.; Ngo, V.; Healy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Powder metallurgy disk superalloys have been designed for higher engine operating temperatures through improvement of their strength and creep resistance. Yet, increasing disk application temperatures to 704 C and higher could enhance oxidation and activate hot corrosion in harmful environments. Protective coatings could be necessary to mitigate such attack. Cylindrical coated specimens of disk superalloys LSHR and ME3 were subjected to thermal cycling to produce cyclic oxidation in air at a maximum temperature of 760 C. The effects of substrate roughness and coating thickness on coating integrity after cyclic oxidation were considered. Selected coated samples that had cyclic oxidation were then subjected to accelerated hot corrosion tests. The effects of this cyclic oxidation on resistance to subsequent hot corrosion attack were examined.

  13. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Carbon Steel under Different Iron Oxide Deposits in the District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sang Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of pipeline steel covered by iron oxides (α-FeOOH; Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 was investigated in simulated district heating water. In potentiodynamic polarization tests; the corrosion rate of pipeline steel is increased under the iron oxide but the increaseing rate is different due to the differnet chemical reactions of the covered iron oxides. Pitting corrosion was only observed on the α-FeOOH-covered specimen; which is caused by the crevice corrosion under the α-FeOOH. From Mott-Schottky and X-ray diffraction results; the surface reaction and oxide layer were dependent on the kind of iron oxides. The iron oxides deposit increases the failure risk of the pipeline and localized corrosion can be occurred under the α-FeOOH-covered region of the pipeline. Thus, prevention methods for the iron oxide deposit in the district pipeline system such as filtering or periodic chemical cleaning are needed.

  15. Influence of Short-time Oxidation on Corrosion Properties of Directionally Solidified Superalloys with Different Orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Luo-ning

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the corrosion performance on intersecting and longitudinal surfaces of unoxidized and oxidized directionally solidified superalloys, Ni-base directionally solidified superalloy DZ125 and Co-base directionally solidified superalloy DZ40M were selected. Oxidation behavior on both alloys with different orientations was investigated at 1050℃ at different times, simulating the oxidation process of vanes or blades in service; subsequent electrochemical performance in 3.5%NaCl aqueous solution was studied on two orientations of unoxidized and oxidized alloys, simulating the corrosion process of superalloy during downtime. The results show that grain boundaries and sub-boundaries of directionally solidified superalloys are susceptible to corrosion and thus longitudinal surface with lower area fraction of grain boundaries has higher corrosion resistance. Compared to intersecting surface of alloys, the structure of grain boundaries of longitudinal surface is less conducive to diffusion and thus the oxidation rate on longitudinal surface is lower. Formation of oxide layers on alloys after short-time oxidation provides protective effect and enhances the corrosion resistance.

  16. Water corrosion test of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasushi

    2006-07-01

    As a part of feasibility study of ODS steel cladding, its water corrosion resistance was examined under water pool condition. Although addition of Cr is effective for preventing water corrosion, excessive Cr addition leads to embrittlement due to the Cr-rich α' precipitate formation. In the ODS steel developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Cr content is controlled in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite. In this study, water corrosion test was conducted for these ODS steels, and their results were compared with that of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) Corrosion rate of 9Cr-ODS martensitic and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel are significantly small and no pitting was observed. Thus, these ODS steels have superior resistance for water corrosion under the condition of 60degC and pH8-12. (2) It was showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steel and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel have comparable water corrosion resistance to that of PNC316 and PNC-FMS at 60degC for 1,000h under varying pH of 8, 10. Water corrosion resistance of these alloys is slightly larger than that of PNC316 and PNC-FMS at pH12 without significant difference of appearance and uneven condition. (author)

  17. Correlation between zirconium oxide impedance and corrosion behavior of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Jung, Youn Ho

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation of Zr oxide impedance and corrosion behavior of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was tested in the autoclave containing 70 ppm LiOH solution at 360 .deg. C. The characteristics of the oxide on the alloys were investigated by using the electrochemical impedance spectrosocpy (EIS) method. The corrosion resistance of the alloys was evaluated from the corrosion rate determined as a function of the concentration of Nb. The equivalent circuit of the oxide was composed on the base of the spectrum from EIS measurements on the oxide layers that had formed at pre-and post-transition regions on the curve of corrosion rate. By using the capacitance characteristics of the equivalent circuit, the thickness of impervious layer, it's electrical resistance and characteristics of space charge layer were evaluated. The corrosion characteristics of the Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys were successfully explained by applying the EIS test results

  18. Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, You-Hai; Chen, Long-Qing; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2012-04-01

    A phase-field model is proposed to simulate corrosion kinetics under a dual-oxidant atmosphere. It will be demonstrated that the model can be applied to simulate corrosion kinetics under oxidation, sulfidation and simultaneous oxidation/sulfidation processes. Phase-dependent diffusivities are incorporated in a natural manner and allow more realistic modeling as the diffusivities usually differ by many orders of magnitude in different phases. Simple free energy models are then used for testing the model while calibrated free energy models can be implemented for quantitative modeling.

  19. Stress-corrosion cracking of indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate for flexible optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierros, Konstantinos A.; Morris, Nicholas J.; Ramji, Karpagavalli; Cairns, Darran R.

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of transparent conductive layers of indium tin oxide (ITO), sputtered on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, is an issue of paramount importance in flexible optoelectronic devices. These components, when used in flexible device stacks, can be in contact with acid containing pressure-sensitive adhesives or with conductive polymers doped in acids. Acids can corrode the brittle ITO layer, stress can cause cracking and delamination, and stress-corrosion cracking can cause more rapid failure than corrosion alone. The combined effect of an externally-applied mechanical stress to bend the device and the corrosive environment provided by the acid is investigated in this work. We show that acrylic acid which is contained in many pressure-sensitive adhesives can cause corrosion of ITO coatings on PET. We also investigate and report on the combined effect of external mechanical stress and corrosion on ITO-coated PET composite films. Also, it is shown that the combination of stress and corrosion by acrylic acid can cause ITO cracking to occur at stresses less than a quarter of those needed for failure with no corrosion. In addition, the time to failure, under ∼ 1% tensile strain can reduce the total time to failure by as much as a third

  20. Corrosion characteristics and oxide microstructures of Zircaloy-4 in aqueous alkali hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, J.H.; Kim, S.J.; Kim, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of Zircaloy-4 have been investigated in various aqueous solutions of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH and CsOH with equimolar M + and OH - at 350 C. The characterization of the oxides was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) on the samples which were prepared to have an equal oxide thickness in pre-transition and post-transition regimes. At a low concentration (4.3 mmol) of aqueous alkali hydroxide solutions, the corrosion rates decrease gradually as the ionic radius of cation increases. At a high concentration (32.5 mmol), the corrosion rate increases significantly in LiOH solution and slightly in NaOH solution, but in the other hydroxide solutions such as KOH, RbOH and CsOH, the corrosion rate is not accelerated. Even if the specimens have an equal oxide thickness in LiOH, NaOH and KOH solutions, the oxide microstructure formed in the LiOH solution is quite different from those formed in the NaOH or the KOH solutions. In the LiOH solution, the oxides grown in the pre-transition regime as well as in the post-transition regime have an equiaxed structure including many pores and open grain boundaries. The oxides grown in the NaOH solution have a protective columnar structure in the pre-transition regime but an equiaxed structure in the post-transition regime. On the other hand, in the KOH solution, the columnar structure is maintained from its pre-transition regime to the post-transition regime. On the basis of the above results, it can be suggested that the cation incorporation into zirconium oxide would control the oxide microstructure, the oxide growth mechanism at the metal-oxide interface and the corrosion rate in alkali hydroxide solutions. (orig.)

  1. The effect of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacterium on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Moradi-Haghighi, M.; Zarrini, G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of manganese oxidizing bacterium (MOB), namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. This bacterium was isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. Also, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies were applied to surface analysis. This study revealed the strong adhesion of the biofilm on the metal surface in the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. that enhanced the corrosion of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction patterns identified a high content of MnO 2 deposition within these biofilms. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel. - Highlights: ► A new type of manganese oxidizing bacteria, namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. was indicated. ► This bacterium can create a biofilm on the part of metal surface and affect localized corrosion. ► In the presence of biofilm, the diffusion of oxygen vacancies and manganese ions has occurred.

  2. The effect of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacterium on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H., E-mail: habib_ashassi@yahoo.com [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Physical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi-Haghighi, M. [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Physical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarrini, G. [Microbiology laboratory, Biology Department, Science Faculty, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    The present study investigated the role of manganese oxidizing bacterium (MOB), namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. This bacterium was isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. Also, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies were applied to surface analysis. This study revealed the strong adhesion of the biofilm on the metal surface in the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. that enhanced the corrosion of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction patterns identified a high content of MnO{sub 2} deposition within these biofilms. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new type of manganese oxidizing bacteria, namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. was indicated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This bacterium can create a biofilm on the part of metal surface and affect localized corrosion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the presence of biofilm, the diffusion of oxygen vacancies and manganese ions has occurred.

  3. Corrosion Behavior and Oxide Film Formation of T91 Steel under Different Water Chemistry Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. Q.; Shi, C.; Li, J.; Gao, L. X. [Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai (China); Lee, K. Y. [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-02-15

    The corrosion behavior of a ferritic/martensitic steel T91 exposed to an aqueous solution containing chloride and sulfate ions is investigated depending on the stimulated all-volatile treatment (AVT) and under oxygenated treatment (OT) conditions. The corrosion of T91 steel under OT condition is severe, while the corrosion under AVT condition is not. The co-existence of chloride and sulfate ions has antagonistic effect on the corrosion of T91 steel in both AVT and OT conditions. Unlike to corrosion resistance in the aqueous solution, OT pretreatment provides T91 steel lower oxidation-resistance than VAT pretreatment. From scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, the lower corrosion resistance in the aqueous solution by VAT conditions possibly is due to the formation of pits. In addition, the lower oxidation resistance of T91 steel pretreated by OT conditions is explained as follows: the cracks formed during the immersion under OT conditions accelerated peeling-off rate of the oxide film.

  4. Corrosion resistance and durability of superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Masuda, Yoshitake; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-04-19

    The corrosion resistant performance and durability of the superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution were investigated using electrochemical and contact angle measurements. The durability of the superhydrophobic surface in corrosive 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution was elucidated. The corrosion resistant performance of the superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The EIS measurements and appropriate equivalent circuit models revealed that the superhydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistant performance of magnesium alloy AZ31. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface. The corrosion formation mechanism of the superhydrophobic surface formed on the magnesium alloy was also proposed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Oxidation effect on steel corrosion and thermal loads during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Almjashev, V.I. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Technology Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Gusarov, V.V. [SPb State Technology University (SPbGTU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [EC-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The METCOR facility simulates vessel steel corrosion in contact with corium. • Steel corrosion rates in UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} coria accelerate above 1050 K. • However corrosion rates can also be limited by melt O{sub 2} supply. • The impact of this on in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is discussed. - Abstract: During a severe accident with core meltdown, the in-vessel molten core retention is challenged by the vessel steel ablation due to thermal and physicochemical interaction of melt with steel. In accidents with oxidizing atmosphere above the melt surface, a low melting point UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} corium pool can form. In this case ablation of the RPV steel interacting with the molten corium is a corrosion process. Experiments carried out within the International Scientific and Technology Center's (ISTC) METCOR Project have shown that the corrosion rate can vary and depends on both surface temperature of the RPV steel and oxygen potential of the melt. If the oxygen potential is low, the corrosion rate is controlled by the solid phase diffusion of Fe ions in the corrosion layer. At high oxygen potential and steel surface layer temperature of 1050 °C and higher, the corrosion rate intensifies because of corrosion layer liquefaction and liquid phase diffusion of Fe ions. The paper analyzes conditions under which corrosion intensification occurs and can impact on in-vessel melt retention (IVR)

  6. Possibility of Localized Corrosion of PWR primary side materials in oxidative decontamination condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Kim, Seon Byeong; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Primary circuit of a PWR (radionuclides uptake in the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface occurred inevitably. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the inner oxide layer as well as the outer oxide layer to achieve excellent decontamination effects. It is known that the outer oxide layers are typically composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Ni{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x})(Cr{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and is hard to decontaminate. For the dissolution of chromium-rich oxide, there have been developed an alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP). A disadvantage of the AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, NP process is highly incompatible to the corrosion of the structure materials. In this study as a part of developing decontamination process, we investigated the corrosion behavior of the structure materials such as Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP and AP oxidative decontamination conditions for the safe use of an oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination. The corrosion behavior was analyzed through the potential-pH equilibrium for the system of Cr-H{sub 2}O / Mn-H{sub 2}O at 90 .deg. C and potentiodynamic polarization in a typical AP and NP solution were evaluated. The AP or NP treated specimen surface was observed using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for an evaluation of the localized corrosion. The possibility of localized corrosion of PWR primary side materials under oxidative decontamination condition was evaluated using a potentiodynamic polarization technique, observation of localized corrosion morphology, and consideration of potential-pH diagrams at 90 .deg. C. From the results of these tests, we

  7. Galvanic Corrosion of Lead by Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxides: Potential Impacts on Drinking Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Sweet, Gregory A; Harding, Matthew D; Estabrook, Hayden; Bishop, D Paul; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-06-20

    Lead exposure via drinking water remains a significant public health risk; this study explored the potential effects of upstream iron corrosion on lead mobility in water distribution systems. Specifically, galvanic corrosion of lead by iron (oxyhydr)oxides was investigated. Coupling an iron mineral cathode with metallic lead in a galvanic cell increased lead release by 531 μg L -1 on average-a 9-fold increase over uniform corrosion in the absence of iron. Cathodes were composed of spark plasma sintered Fe 3 O 4 or α-Fe 2 O 3 or field-extracted Fe 3 O 4 and α-FeOOH. Orthophosphate immobilized oxidized lead as insoluble hydroxypyromorphite, while humic acid enhanced lead mobility. Addition of a humic isolate increased lead release due to uniform corrosion by 81 μg L -1 and-upon coupling lead to a mineral cathode-release due to galvanic corrosion by 990 μg L -1 . Elevated lead in the presence of humic acid appeared to be driven by complexation, with 208 Pb and UV 254 size-exclusion chromatograms exhibiting strong correlation under these conditions (R 2 average = 0.87). A significant iron corrosion effect was consistent with field data: lead levels after lead service line replacement were greater by factors of 2.3-4.7 at sites supplied by unlined cast iron distribution mains compared with the alternative, lined ductile iron.

  8. Corrosion and oxidation of vanadium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Wiggins, G.

    1983-10-01

    The corrosion of several V-base alloys on exposure at elevated temperatures to helium environments containing hydrogen and/or water vapor are presented. These results are utilized to discuss the consequences of the selection of certain radiation-damage resistant, V-base alloys for structural materials applications in a fusion reactor

  9. Synergetic effect of sulphur and nitrogen oxides on corrosion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The synergetic effect of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) on corrosion of galvanized iron roofing sheets has been investigated. The field studies were conducted in Ibeno and Ebocha (Niger Delta, Nigeria). Specimens of the roofing sheets were exposed for one year to outdoor environment to record the ...

  10. Evaluation of mechanically treated cerium (IV) oxides as corrosion inhibitors for galvanized steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deflorian, F., E-mail: flavio.deflorian@ing.unitn.it [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technology, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Fedel, M.; Rossi, S. [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technology, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Kamarchik, P. [PPG Industries, Coatings Innovation Center, 4325 Rosanna Drive, Allison Park, PA 15101 (United States)

    2011-09-30

    The use of cerium salts as corrosion inhibitors for hot dip galvanized steel has been object of a numerous studies in the last few years. The role of cerium ions as corrosion inhibitors was proved: cerium is able to block the cathodic sites of the metal, forming insoluble hydroxides and oxides on the zinc surface. This fact leads to a dramatic decrease of the cathodic current densities and, therefore, to a reduction the overall corrosion processes. On the other hand, the potential of cerium oxides as corrosion inhibitors was also proposed. However, the real effectiveness of this kind of anticorrosive pigments has not been clarified yet. In this work cerium (IV) oxides are considered as corrosion inhibitors for galvanized steel. The corrosion inhibition mechanism of mechanically treated (milled) CeO{sub 2} alone and in combination with milled SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was investigated. For this purpose milled CeO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} milled together and milled SiO{sub 2} particles were studied as corrosion inhibitors in water solution. Therefore, the different mechanically treated particles were dispersed in 0.1 M NaCl solution to test their effectiveness as corrosion inhibitors for galvanized steel. The galvanized steel was immersed in the different solutions and the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the different particles was measured by means of electrochemical techniques. For this purpose, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out, monitoring the evolution of the corrosion processes occurring at the metal surface with the immersion time in the solution. The effect of the different pigments was also investigated by carrying out anodic and cathodic polarization measurements. The polarization curves were acquired under conditions of varied pH. The experimental measurements suggest that the mechanical treatment performed on the SiO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2} particles promote the formation of an effective corrosion pigment

  11. Corrosion behavior of a self-sealing pore micro-arc oxidation film on AM60 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Kaihui; Song, Yingwei; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pore sealing constituents fall off and titanium oxides remain during corrosion. • Dark regions of film are corroded by migration of corrosion media through pores. • Light regions of film are corroded by transverse expansion of cracks. • Both outer and inner layers of the film provide effective protection to substrate. - Abstract: The deterioration process of a self-sealing pore micro-arc oxidation (MAO) film was investigated. The surface and cross-section corrosion morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition was detected by EDS elemental mapping and XRD. The corrosion process was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The surface of the film in dark and light regions exhibits different corrosion behavior. In the dark regions, the corrosion process mainly concentrates on the migration of corrosion media through the pores inward. In the light regions, the transverse expansion of cracks plays a key role, accompanying the exfoliation of film constituents.

  12. REACTION PRODUCTS AND CORROSION OF MOLYBDENUM ELECTRODE IN GLASS MELT CONTAINING ANTIMONY OXIDES AND SODIUM SULFATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIŘÍ MATĚJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The products on the interface of a molybdenum electrode and glass melt were investigated primarily at 1400°C in three model glass melts without ingredients, with 1 % Sb2O3 and with 1 % Sb2O3 and 0.5 % SO3 (wt. %, both under and without load by alternating current. Corrosion of the molybdenum electrode in glass melt without AC load is higher by one order of magnitude if antimony oxides are present. The corrosion continues to increase if sulfate is present in addition to antimony oxides. Isolated antimony droplets largely occur on the electrode-glass melt interface, and numerous droplets are also dissipated in the surrounding glass if only antimony oxides are present in the glass melt. A comparatively continuous layer of antimony occurs on the interface if SO3 is also present, antimony being always in contact with molybdenum sulfide. Almost no antimony droplets are dissipated in the glass melt. The total amount of precipitated antimony also increases. The presence of sulfide on the interface likely facilitates antimony precipitation. The reaction of molybdenum with antimony oxides is inhibited in sites covered by an antimony layer. The composition of sulfide layers formed at 1400°C approximates that of Mo2S3. At 1100°C, the sulfide composition approximates that of MoS4. Corrosion multiplies in the glass melt without additions through the effect of AC current, most molybdenum being separated in the form of metallic particles. Corrosion also increases in the glass melt containing antimony oxides. This is due to increased corrosion in the neighborhood of the separated antimony droplets. This mechanism also results in the loosening of molybdenum particles. The amount of precipitated antimony also increases through the effect of the AC current. AC exerts no appreciable effect on either corrosion, the character of the electrode-glass interface, or antimony precipitation in the glass melt containing SO3.

  13. Correlation between oxidation and stress corrosion cracking of U-4.5 wt.% Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, N.J.; Holloway, P.H.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms causing stress corrosion cracking on uranium alloys, the kinetics of crack propagation and oxide film growth for U-4.5 percent Nb were investigated at temperatures between 0 0 C and 200 0 C in oxygen, water vapor and oxygen-water vapor mixtures. Three regions of crack velocity rate versus stress intensity were observed in laboratory air. At low stress intensities (but above an effective K/sub ISCC/ of 22 MN/m/sup 3 / 2 /) crack velocity varied approximately as K 70 . In an intermediate stress intensity region (region II) the crack velocity was dependent upon K 4 . In the high stress intensity region, mechanical overloading was observed and crack velocities varied approximately as K 12 . Both cracking (region II) and oxidation rates were characterized by an activation energy of 7 kcal/mole. For stress corrosion cracking it was shown that oxygen was the primary stress corrodent, but a synergistic effect upon crack propagation rates was observed for oxygen-water vapor mixtures. Crack velocities were dependent upon the pressure of oxygen (P/sub O 2 //sup 1 / 3 /) and water vapor, while the oxidation rate was essentially independent of the pressure of these species. Stress sorption and oxide film formation stress corrosion cracking mechanisms were considered and reconciled with the stress corrosion and oxidation data

  14. Influence of alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides on the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, J.; Ferrier, G.A.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Joseph.Metzler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC)can cause failures of CANDU Zircaloy-4 fuel sheathing. The process occurs when a corrosive element (i.e.,iodine) interacts with a susceptible material that is under sufficient strain at a high temperature. Currently, there is an ongoing effort to improve SCC mitigation strategies for future iterations of CANDU reactors. A potential mechanism for SCC mitigation involves utilizing alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides that will sequester corrosive iodine while actively repairing a protective oxide layer on the sheath. SCC tests performed with sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O) and calcium oxide (CaO) have shown to decrease significantly the sheath degradation. (author)

  15. A point defect model for the general and pitting corrosion on iron-oxide-electrolyte interface deduced from current oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Pagitsas, M; Sazou, D

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the passive-active oscillatory region of the Fe-0.75 M H sub 2 SO sub 4 system, perturbed by adding small amounts of halide species, allow the distinction between pitting and general corrosion. Complex periodic and aperiodic current oscillations characterize pitting corrosion whereas monoperiodic oscillations of a relaxation type indicate general corrosion. A point defect model (PDM) is considered for the microscopic description of the growth and breakdown of the iron oxide film. The physicochemical processes leading to different types of corrosion can be clarified in terms of the PDM. Occupation of an anion vacancy by a halide ion results in the localized attack of the passive oxide and pitting corrosion. On the other hand, the formation of surface soluble iron complexes is related to the uniform dissolution of the passive oxide and general corrosion.

  16. Electrodeposited Reduced Graphene Oxide Films on Stainless Steel, Copper, and Aluminum for Corrosion Protection Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Mohammed Ali Al-Sammarraie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of corrosion protection of metals and alloys by coating with simple, low cost, and highly adhered layer is still a main goal of many workers. In this research graphite flakes converted into graphene oxide using modified Hammers method and then reduced graphene oxide was electrodeposited on stainless steel 316, copper, and aluminum for corrosion protection application in seawater at four temperatures, namely, 20, 30, 40, and 50°C. All corrosion measurements, kinetics, and thermodynamics parameters were established from Tafel plots using three-electrode potentiostat. The deposited films were examined by FTIR, Raman, XRD, SEM, and AFM techniques; they revealed high percentages of conversion to the few layers of graphene with confirmed defects.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of porous chromium carbide/oxide based ceramics in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.; Xin, T.; Chen, W.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    Porous chromium carbide with a high density of open pores was fabricated by a reactive sintering method. Chromium oxide ceramics were obtained by re-oxidizing the porous chromium carbides formed. Some samples were added with yttria at 5 wt. %, prior to reactive sintering to form porous structures. Corrosion tests in SCW were performed at temperatures ranging from 375 o C to 625 o C with a fixed pressure at around 25∼30 MPa. The results show that chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures up to 425 o C, above which disintegration of carbides through oxidation occurs. Porous chromium oxide samples show better corrosion resistance than porous chromium carbide, but disintegrate in SCW at around 625 o C. Among all the samples tested, chromium oxide ceramics with added yttria exhibited much better corrosion resistance compared with the pure chromium carbide/oxides. No evidence of weight change or disintegration of porous chromium oxides with 5 wt % added yttria was observed after exposure at 625 o C in SCW for 600 hours. (author)

  18. Reaction products and corrosion of molybdenum electrode in glass melt containing antimony oxides and sodium sulfate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, J.; Langrová, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2012), s. 280-285 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : antimony oxides * corrosion * glass melt * Molybdenum electrode * sulfate Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2012 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2012/pdf/2012_03_280.pdf

  19. Anti-corrosion performance of oxidized and oxygen plasma-implanted NiTi alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, Ray W.Y.; Ho, Joan P.Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys are useful orthopedic biomaterials on account of its super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the problem associated with out-diffusion of harmful nickel ions in prolonged use inside the human body raises a critical safety concern. Titanium oxide films are deemed to be chemically inert and biocompatible and hence suitable to be the barrier layers to impede the leaching of Ni from the NiTi substrate to biological tissues and fluids. In the work reported in this paper, we compare the anti-corrosion efficacy of oxide films produced by atmospheric-pressure oxidation and oxygen plasma ion implantation. Our results show that the oxidized samples do not possess improved corrosion resistance and may even fare worse than the untreated samples. On the other hand, the plasma-implanted surfaces exhibit much improved corrosion resistance. Our work also shows that post-implantation annealing can further promote the anti-corrosion capability of the samples

  20. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    OpenAIRE

    T. L. Martin; C. Coe; P. A. J. Bagot; P. Morrall; G. D. W Smith; T. Scott; M. P. Moody

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (∼5 nm) interfacia...

  1. The role of stress in self-ordered porous anodic oxide formation and corrosion of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraz, Omer Ozgur

    The phenomenon of plastic flow induced by electrochemical reactions near room temperature is significant in porous anodic oxide (PAO) films, charging of lithium batteries and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). As this phenomenon is poorly understood, fundamental insight into flow from our work may provide useful information for these problems. In-situ monitoring of the stress state allows direct correlation between stress and the current or potential, thus providing fundamental insight into technologically important deformation and failure mechanisms induced by electrochemical reactions. A phase-shifting curvature interferometry was designed to investigate the stress generation mechanisms on different systems. Resolution of our curvature interferometry was found to be ten times more powerful than that obtained by state-of-art multiple deflectometry technique and the curvature interferometry helps to resolve the conflicting reports in the literature. During this work, formation of surface patterns during both aqueous corrosion of aluminum and formation of PAO films were investigated. Interestingly, for both cases, stress induced plastic flow controls the formation of surface patterns. Pore formation mechanisms during anodizing of the porous aluminum oxide films was investigated . PAO films are formed by the electrochemical oxidation of metals such as aluminum and titanium in a solution where oxide is moderately soluble. They have been used extensively to design numerous devices for optical, catalytic, and biological and energy related applications, due to their vertically aligned-geometry, high-specific surface area and tunable geometry by adjusting process variables. These structures have developed empirically, in the absence of understanding the process mechanism. Previous experimental studies of anodizing-induced stress have extensively focused on the measurement of average stress, however the measurement of stress evolution during anodizing does not provide

  2. Characterization and corrosion behavior of ceramic coating on magnesium by micro-arc oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdu, Salih; Aytac, Aylin; Usta, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · The commercial pure magnesium was coated by micro-arc oxidation method. · The coating is composed of two layers, a porous outer layer and a dense inner layer. · A super corrosion resistance was achieved with MAO coatings. · Coating with Mg 2 SiO 4 is more resistant to corrosion than that containing Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . - Abstract: In this study, the commercial pure magnesium was coated in different aqueous solutions of Na 2 SiO 3 and Na 3 PO 4 by the micro-arc oxidation method (MAO). Coating thickness, phase composition, surface and cross sectional morphology and corrosion resistance of coatings were analyzed by eddy current method, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tafel extrapolation method, respectively. The average thickness of the coatings ranged from 52 to 74 μm for sodium silicate solution and from 64 to 88 μm for sodium phosphate solution. The dominant phases on the coatings were detected as spinal Mg 2 SiO 4 (Forsterite) and MgO (Periclase) for sodium silicate solution and Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 (Farringtonite) and MgO (Periclase) for sodium phosphate solution. SEM images reveal that the coating is composed of two layers as of a porous outer layer and a dense inner layer. The corrosion results show the coating consisting Mg 2 SiO 4 is more resistant to corrosion than that containing Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 .

  3. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing atmosphere by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel. Corrosion research under chlorine gas condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Aose, Shinichi; Kato, Toshihiro

    2002-12-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts (RIAR process) has been recently developed for spent nuclear oxide fuel and discussed in feasibility study. It is required to improve the corrosion resistance of equipments such as electrolyzer because the process is operated in severe corrosion environment. In this study, the corrosion resistance of ceramic materials was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas condition. And further consideration about the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides were evaluated in molten salt. The result of thermodynamic calculation shows most of ceramic oxides have good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride, however the standard Gibb's free energies with carbon have negative value. On the other hand, eleven kinds of ceramic materials were examined by corrosion test, then silicon nitride, mullite and cordierite have a good corrosion resistance less than 0.1 mm/y. Cracks were not observed on the materials and flexural strength did not reduce remarkably after 480 hours test in molten salt with Cl 2 -O 2 bubbling. In conclusion, these three ceramic materials are most applicable materials for the pyrochemical reprocessing process with chlorine gas condition. (author)

  4. Corrosion of NiTi wires with cracked oxide layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Racek, Jan; Šittner, Petr; Heller, Luděk; Pilch, Jan; Petrenec, M.; Sedlák, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2014), s. 2659-2668 ISSN 1059-9495. [International Conference on Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies (SMST 2013). Praha, 21.05.2013-24.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP108/12/P111; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11058 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262806 - SmartNets Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : bending * electrochemical corrosion tests * martensitic transformation * shape memory alloy * superelastic NiTi wires Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.998, year: 2014

  5. Influence of corrosive solutions on microhardness and chemistry of magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, H.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and hardness experiments were conducted on cleaved magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces. The magnesium oxide bulk crystals were cleaved to specimen size along the /001/ surface, and indentations were made on the cleaved surface in corrosive solutions containing HCl, NaOH, or HNO3 and in water without exposing the specimen to any other environment. The results indicated that chloride (such as MgCl2) and sodium films are formed on the magnesium oxide surface as a result of interactions between an HCl-containing solution and a cleaved magnesium oxide surface. The chloride films soften the magnesium oxide surface. In this case microhardness is strongly influenced by the pH value of the solution. The lower the pH, the lower the microhardness. Sodium films, which are formed on the magnesium oxide surface exposed to an NaOH containing solution, do not soften the magnesium oxide surface.

  6. Pre-oxidation and its effect on reducing high-temperature corrosion of superheater tubes during biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kvisgaard, M.; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Superheater tubes in biomass-fired power plants experience high corrosion rates due to condensation of corrosive alkali chloride-rich deposits. To explore the possibility of reducing the corrosion attack by the formation of an initial protective oxide layer, the corrosion resistance of pre......-oxidised Al and Ti-containing alloys (Kanthal APM and Nimonic 80A, respectively) was investigated under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. The alloys were pre-oxidised at 900°C for 1 week. Afterwards, pre-oxidised samples, and virgin non-pre-oxidised samples as reference, were coated...... with a synthetic deposit of KCl and exposed at 560°C for 1 week to a gas mixture typical of biomass firing. Results show that pre-oxidation could hinder the corrosion attack; however, the relative success was different for the two alloys. While corrosion attack was observed on the pre-oxidised Kanthal APM, the pre...

  7. Comparison of organic peracids in wastewater treatment: Disinfection, oxidation and corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Tero; Heyninck, Tom; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-11-15

    The use of organic peracids in wastewater treatment is attracting increasing interest. The common beneficial features of peracids are effective anti-microbial properties, lack of harmful disinfection by-products and high oxidation power. In this study performic (PFA), peracetic (PAA) and perpropionic acids (PPA) were synthesized and compared in laboratory batch experiments for the inactivation of Escherichia coli and enterococci in tertiary wastewater, oxidation of bisphenol-A and for corrosive properties. Disinfection tests revealed PFA to be a more potent disinfectant than PAA or PPA. 1.5 mg L(-1) dose and 2 min of contact time already resulted in 3.0 log E. coli and 1.2 log enterococci reduction. Operational costs of disinfection were estimated to be 0.0114, 0.0261 and 0.0207 €/m(3) for PFA, PAA and PPA, respectively. Disinfection followed the first order kinetics (Hom model or S-model) with all studied peracids. However, in the bisphenol-A oxidation experiments involving Fenton-like conditions (pH = 3.5, Fe(2+) or Cu(2+) = 0.4 mM) peracids brought no additional improvement to traditionally used and lower cost hydrogen peroxide. Corrosion measurements showed peracids to cause only a negligible corrosion rate (<6 μm year(-1)) on stainless steel 316L while corrosion rates on the carbon steel sample were significantly higher (<500 μm year(-1)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrosion behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wenhua [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Guo, Xianglong, E-mail: guoxianglong@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shen, Zhao [Department of Materials Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Zhang, Lefu, E-mail: lfzhang@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of three different Cr content oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels in supercritical water (SCW) and their passive films formed on the surface have been investigated. The results show that the dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical composition have significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the ODS ferritic steels. In 2000 ppb DO SCW at 650 °C, the 14Cr-4Al ODS steel forms a tri-layer oxide film and the surface morphologies have experienced four structures. For the tri-layer oxide film, the middle layer is mainly Fe-Cr spinel and the Al is gradually enriched in the inner layer. - Highlights: • We evaluated the corrosion resistance of three different Cr content ODS steels at 650 °C in supercritical water. • Corrosion behavior of ODS steels is rarely reported and ODS steel may be promising material for generation IV reactors. • We found total opposite phenomenon compared to Lee's work before. Our result may be more reasonable.

  9. Effect of LiOH, NaOH and KOH on corrosion and oxide microstructure of Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Kim, H.G.; Jung, Y.H.; Ruhmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term corrosion test, SIMS analysis, and TEM microstructural study were carried out to investigate the corrosion characteristics and mechanism of Zr alloys in alkali hydroxides. The corrosion tests were performed in solutions of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, and CsOH at 350 deg. C for 500 days. SIMS analysis was performed for the specimens prepared to have an equal oxide thickness. TEM studies on the specimens with an equal oxide thickness in various solutions in both pre- and post-transition regimes were also conducted. The corrosion rate in alkali hydroxide solutions was observed to decrease as the ionic radius of alkali cation was increased. The penetration depth of cation into the oxide decreases with increasing the ionic radius of cation. Even though the oxide thickness was equal, the different oxide morphologies were observed in specimens. Namely, in LiOH solution the oxide morphology was transformed early from columnar to equiaxed structure. However, in KOH solution the columnar structure was maintained up to post-transition regime. Based on the corrosion test, SIMS analysis, and microstructural study, the cation is considered to control the corrosion in a alkali hydroxide solution and its effect is dependent on the concentration of alkali and the oxide thickness. The slight acceleration of the corrosion rate at a low concentration is thought to be caused by cation incorporation into oxide while the significant acceleration at a high concentration is due to the transformation of oxide microstructure that would be induced by cation incorporation. KOH was shown not to affect significantly the corrosion and the hydrogen pickup of Zircaloy. Therefore, it has a potential for PWR application only from the point of view of Zircaloy corrosion. (author)

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Corrosion Inhibition of Niobium and Tantalum Surfaces by Carboxylated Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valbonë Mehmeti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of two different metals, niobium and tantalum, in aqueous sulfuric acid solution has been studied in the presence and absence of carboxylated graphene oxide. Potentiodynamic measurements indicate that this nanomaterial inhibits corrosion due to its adsorption on the metal surfaces. The adsorbed layer of carboxylated graphene hinders two electrochemical reactions: the oxidation of the metal and the transport of metal ions from the metal to the solution but also hydrogen evolution reaction by acting as a protective barrier. The adsorption behavior at the molecular level of the carboxylated graphene oxide with respect to Nb, NbO, Ta, and TaO (111 surfaces is also investigated using Molecular Dynamic and Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. Composition and corrosion properties of high-temperature oxide films on steel type 18-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, B.F.; Morozov, O.N.; Chernysheva, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and propeties of oxide films, formed in the process of tube production of steel type 18-10, as well as the behaviour of the steels coated with oxide films under operating conditions of NPP heat-exchange equipment at the 20-300 deg C temperatures are determined. It is found, that the films have a good adhesion to the steel surface and repeat the metal structure without interfering with, the surface defect determination. Introduction of the NaNO 2 corrosion inhibitor decreases the film destruction rate to the level of the base metal corrosion. It is found acceptable to use tubes of steel 18-10 coated with dense oxide films in the heat-exchange and water supply systems of NPP

  12. Influence of electropolishing and anodic oxidation on morphology, chemical composition and corrosion resistance of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Maciej; Greń, Katarzyna [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kukharenko, Andrey I. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg, Mira str. 19 (Russian Federation); Korotin, Danila M. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Michalska, Joanna [Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego Street 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Mosiałek, Michał [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek Street 8, 30-239 Kraków (Poland); Żak, Jerzy [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Pamuła, Elżbieta [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza Avenue 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Kurmaev, Ernst Z. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, S. Kovalevskoi Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cholakh, Seif O. [Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg, Mira str. 19 (Russian Federation); Simka, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.simka@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-09-01

    The work presents results of the studies performed on electropolishing of pure niobium in a bath that contained: sulphuric acid, hydrofluoric acid, ethylene glycol and acetanilide. After the electropolishing, the specimens were subjected to anodic passivation in a 1 mol dm{sup −3} phosphoric acid solution at various voltages. The surface morphology, thickness, roughness and chemical composition of the resulting oxide layers were analysed. Thusly prepared niobium samples were additionally investigated in terms of their corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution. The electropolished niobium surface was determined to be smooth and lustrous. The anodisation led to the growth of barrier-like oxide layers, which were enriched in phosphorus species. - Highlights: • Pure niobium was electropolished and subsequently anodised in a H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution. • Phosphorus was successfully introduced into the oxide layers after the treatment. • Corrosion resistance of niobium in Ringer's solution was improved after anodising.

  13. Influence of steam generator surface state on corrosion and oxide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazenc, Arnaud; Leclercq, Stephanie; Seyeux, Antoine; Galtayries, Anouk; Marcus, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion and release of nickel-based alloy Steam Generator tubes are partly due to their surface state. Among the most important parameters influencing the corrosion, the effect of grain size and the effect of grain crystallographic orientation have been chosen to be studied. The aim of this study is to determine how these parameters have an impact on the corrosion of Steam Generator tubes. Thermal treatments (700 deg. C and 1050 deg. C) have been performed on several samples in Alloy 690 to obtain homogeneous grain sizes, varying from 25 μm to 110 μm. Two samples have been oxidised for four days in a recirculating autoclave, reproducing primary conditions. The changes of oxide composition and thickness were examined by ToF-SIMS on samples exposed to primary water conditions. The intensity profiles versus thicknesses of characteristic oxide anions, such as CrO - , NiO - or FeO - enable us to evaluate the effect of grain size and crystallographic orientation on the formation of an enriched inner chromium layer. As regards to the grain size, there was no effect on the growth, but smaller grains led to a chromium-rich oxide layer. The effect of crystallographic orientation was observed on the oxidation kinetics and the composition of oxide scales. (authors)

  14. High-Temperature, Dual-Atmosphere Corrosion of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul; Amendola, Roberta

    2012-12-01

    High-temperature corrosion of ferritic stainless steel (FSS) surfaces can be accelerated and anomalous when it is simultaneously subjected to different gaseous environments, e.g., when separating fuel (hydrogen) and oxidant (air) streams, in comparison with single-atmosphere exposures, e.g., air only. This so-called "dual-atmosphere" exposure is realized in many energy-conversion systems including turbines, boilers, gasifiers, heat exchangers, and particularly in intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. It is generally accepted that hydrogen transport through the FSS (plate or tube) and its subsequent integration into the growing air-side surface oxide layer can promote accelerated and anomalous corrosion—relative to single-atmosphere exposure—via defect chemistry changes, such as increased cation vacancy concentrations, decreased oxygen activity, and steam formation within the growing surface oxide layers. Establishment of a continuous and dense surface oxide layer on the fuel side of the FSS can inhibit hydrogen transport and the associated effects on the air side. Minor differences in FSS composition, microstructure, and surface conditions can all have dramatic influences on dual-atmosphere corrosion behaviors. This article reviews high-temperature, dual-atmosphere corrosion phenomena and discusses implications for SOFC stacks, related applications, and future research.

  15. Corrosion of pre-oxidized nickel alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzi, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.tuzi@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Lai, Haiping [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Göransson, Kenneth [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE-721 63 Västerås (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Samples of pre-oxidized Alloy X-750 were exposed to a simulated boiling water reactor environment in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar for four weeks. The effect of alloy iron content on corrosion was investigated by comparing samples with 5 and 8 wt% Fe, respectively. In addition, the effect of two different surface pre-treatments was investigated. The microstructure of the formed oxide scales was studied using mainly electron microscopy. The results showed positive effects of an increased Fe content and of removing the deformed surface layer by pickling. After four weeks of exposure the oxide scale consists of oxides formed in three different ways. The oxide formed during pre-oxidization at 700 °C, mainly consisting of chromia, is partly still present. There is also an outer oxide consisting of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals, reaching a maximum size of 3 μm, which has formed by precipitation of dissolved metal ions. Finally, there is an inner nanocrystalline and porous oxide, with a metallic content reflecting the alloy composition, which has formed by corrosion.

  16. Cerium oxide as conversion coating for the corrosion protection of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA GULICOVSKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CeO2 coatings were formed on the aluminum after Al surface preparation, by dripping the ceria sol, previously prepared by forced hydrolysis of Ce(NO34. The anticorrosive properties of ceria coatings were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS during the exposure to 0.03 % NaCl. The morphology of the coatings was examined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM. EIS data indicated considerably larger corrosion resistance of CeO2-coated aluminum than for bare Al. The corrosion processes on Al below CeO2 coating are subjected to more pronounced diffusion limitations in comparison to the processes below passive aluminum oxide film, as the consequence of the formation of highly compact protective coating. The results show that the deposition of ceria coatings is an effective way to improve corrosion resistance for aluminum.

  17. Oxidation and corrosion of silicon-based ceramics and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, N.S.; Fox, D.S.; Smialek, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Silica scales exhibit slow growth rates and a low activation energy. Thus silica-protected materials are attractive high temperature structural materials for their potentially excellent oxidation resistance and well-documented high temperature strength. This review focuses on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and composites of these materials. It is divided into four parts: (i) Fundamental oxidation mechanisms, (ii) Special properties of silica scales, (iii) Protective coatings, and (iv) Internal oxidation behavior of composites. While the fundamental oxidation mechanism of SiC is understood, there are still many questions regarding the oxidation mechanism of Si 3 N 4 . Silica scales exhibit many unique properties as compared to chromia and alumina. These include slower growth rates, SiO(g) formation, sensitivity to water vapor and impurities, and dissolution by basic molten salts. Protective coatings can limit the deleterious effects. The fourth area-internal oxidation of fibers and fiber coatings in composites-has limited the application of these novel materials. Strategies for understanding and limiting this internal oxidation are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion protection performance of single and dual Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coating for aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhan Kumar, A.; Kwon, Sun Hwan; Jung, Hwa Chul; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2015-01-01

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coatings are known to be one of the most appropriate method for corrosion protection of magnesium (Mg) alloy. The improvement of PEO coatings and the optimization of their surface aspects are of major importance. In this current work, the influence of dual PEO coating on strip-cast AZ31 Mg alloy substrate has been evaluated with the aim of improving the surface and corrosion protection aspects. For this purpose, AZ31 Mg substrates are subjected to single and dual PEO processing in silicate and phosphate electrolyte under similar condition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed that the number of pores in PEO coating processed in silicate electrolyte is higher than others. X-ray diffraction analysis of PEO coatings showed that the surface coating is mainly comprised of Mg 2 SiO 4 , Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and MgO with different quantity based on PEO processing. Compared with the AZ31 Mg, the corrosion potential (E corr ) of both type PEO coatings was positively shifted about 250–400 mV and the corrosion current density (i corr ) was lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude as result of adequate corrosion protection to the Mg alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution. All of the observation obviously showed that the dual PEO coating provides better corrosion protection performance than their respective single due to its synergistic beneficial effect. - Highlights: • Influence of dual PEO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy substrate was evaluated. • XRD confirmed formation of thin MgO inner, Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and Mg 2 SiO 4 outer layer. • SEM results showed uniform coating with no cracks and relatively less micro pores. • Micro hardness of dual PEO coatings is higher than single PEO coatings. • Dual coating provides superior corrosion performance due to its synergistic effect

  19. Oxidative corrosion of spent UO2 fuel in vapor and dripping groundwater at 900C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of spent UO 2 fuel has been studied in experiments conducted for nearly six years. Oxidative dissolution in vapor and dripping groundwater at 90 C occurs via general corrosion at fuel-fragment surfaces. Dissolution along fuel-grain boundaries is also evident in samples contacted by the largest volumes of groundwater, and corroded grain boundaries extend at least 20 or 30 grains deep (> 200 microm), possibly throughout millimeter-sized fragments. Apparent dissolution of fuel along defects that intersect grain boundaries has created dissolution pits that are 50 to 200 nm in diameter. Dissolution pits penetrate 1-2 microm into each grain, producing a ''worm-like'' texture along fuel-grain-boundaries. Sub-micrometer-sized fuel shards are common between fuel grains and may contribute to the reactive surface area of fuel exposed to groundwater. Outer surfaces of reacted fuel fragments develop a fine-grained layer of corrosion products adjacent to the fuel (5-15 microm thick). A more coarsely crystalline layer of corrosion products commonly covers the fine-grained layer, the thickness of which varies considerably among samples (from less than 5 microm to greater than 40 microm). The thickest and most porous corrosion layers develop on fuel fragments exposed to the largest volumes of groundwater. Corrosion-layer compositions depend strongly on water flux, with uranyl oxy-hydroxides predominating in vapor experiments, and alkali and alkaline earth uranyl silicates predominating in high drip-rate experiments. Low drip-rate experiments exhibit a complex assemblage of corrosion products, including phases identified in vapor and high drip-rate experiments

  20. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics. Relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    Systematic approaches to evaluate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. First, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with two coupled models: 1.static electrochemical analysis and 2.dynamic oxide layer growth analysis. The anodic current density and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram. The ferrous ion release rate, determined by the anodic current density, was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic oxide layer growth model and then its value was used as input in the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results (corrosion rate and ECP) based on the coupled models were in good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP.

  1. Corrosion characterization of micro-arc oxidization composite electrophoretic coating on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Congjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Jiang, Bailing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Liu, Ming [General Motors China Science Lab, Shanghai 201206 (China); Ge, Yanfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China)

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • A new protective composite coatings were prepared on AZ31B Mg alloy. • The E-coat locked into MAO coat by discharge channels forming a smoother and compact surface without defects. • Comparing with MAO coat, the MAOE composite coat could provide an excellent barrier for bare Mg against corrosion attack. - Abstract: A two layer composite coating system was applied on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy by Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO) plus electrophoretic coat (E-coat) technique. The Mg sample coated with MAO plus E-coat (MAOE) was compared with bare Mg and Mg sample coated by MAO only. The surface microstructure and cross section of bare and coated Mg before and after corrosion were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion performance of bare and coated Mg was evaluated using electrochemical measurement and hydrogen evolution test. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Mg alloy was significantly improved by MAOE composite coating. The corrosion mechanism of bare and coated Mg is discussed.

  2. Electrochemical Impedance and Polarization Corrosion Studies of Tantalum Surface Modified by DC Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Sowa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tantalum has recently become an actively researched biomaterial for the bone reconstruction applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance and successful clinical records. However, a bare Ta surface is not capable of directly bonding to the bone upon implantation and requires some method of bioactivation. In this study, this was realized by direct current (DC plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO. Susceptibility to corrosion is a major factor determining the service-life of an implant. Therefore, herein, the corrosion resistance of the PEO coatings on Ta was investigated in Ringer’s solution. The coatings were formed by galvanostatic anodization up to 200, 300 and 400 V, after which the treatment was conducted potentiostatically until the total process time amounted to 5 min. Three solutions containing Ca(H2PO22, Ca(HCOO2 and Mg(CH3COO2 were used in the treatment. For the corrosion characterization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were chosen. The coatings showed the best corrosion resistance at voltages low enough so that the intensive sparking was absent, which resulted in the formation of thin films. The impedance data were fitted to the equivalent electrical circuits with two time constants, namely R(Q[R(QR] and R(Q[R(Q[RW

  3. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  4. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Yanhong, E-mail: ygu2@alaska.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Chen Chengfu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Bandopadhyay, Sukumar [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Ning Chengyun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang Yongjun [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Guo Yuanjun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-06-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  5. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yanhong; Chen Chengfu; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Ning Chengyun; Zhang Yongjun; Guo Yuanjun

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  6. Bioactivity and corrosion properties of novel coatings containing strontium by micro-arc oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Kuan-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzer-Min, E-mail: tmlee@mail.ncku.edu.t [Institute of Oral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lui, Truan-Sheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: The dental implant of titanium could be modified by anodic oxidation. It was found that incorporation of strontium ions into the matrix increase the bone formation. In this study, we try to investigate the effect of corrosion property and bioactivity on coatings containing strontium by anodic oxidation. The results suggest that coatings containing strontium on titanium by anodic oxidation has the potential to show the stability and bioactivity in the clinical use. - Abstract: Pure titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys are considered as bio-inert materials in clinical use. Bioactivity is the ability to induce bone-like apatite on the material surface. The micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique is an effective method for improving the surface properties of titanium. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioactivity and corrosion behavior of MAO coatings containing strontium, which is beneficial for biological performance. The bioactivity of materials was evaluated based on the ability to induce a bond-like apatite layer on the surface in simulated body fluid (SBF), as proposed by Kokubo et al. After the materials were soaked in SBF for 1 day, precipitates formed on the surface of MAO coating. The surface of MAO coatings was completely covered with precipitates after 7 days. The precipitates, which were found to be composed of fiber structures, were identified as the apatite phase using thin film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). The results show that MAO coatings containing strontium can induce the formation of an apatite layer on their surface. In the potentiodynamic test, MAO coatings exhibited a more noble corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) than that of titanium in SBF. In the passive region, the current density of MAO coatings was lower than that of titanium. All findings in this study indicated that MAO coatings containing strontium have good bioactivity and corrosion resistance for clinical applications.

  7. Bioactivity and corrosion properties of novel coatings containing strontium by micro-arc oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, Kuan-Chen; Lee, Tzer-Min; Lui, Truan-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The dental implant of titanium could be modified by anodic oxidation. It was found that incorporation of strontium ions into the matrix increase the bone formation. In this study, we try to investigate the effect of corrosion property and bioactivity on coatings containing strontium by anodic oxidation. The results suggest that coatings containing strontium on titanium by anodic oxidation has the potential to show the stability and bioactivity in the clinical use. - Abstract: Pure titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys are considered as bio-inert materials in clinical use. Bioactivity is the ability to induce bone-like apatite on the material surface. The micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique is an effective method for improving the surface properties of titanium. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioactivity and corrosion behavior of MAO coatings containing strontium, which is beneficial for biological performance. The bioactivity of materials was evaluated based on the ability to induce a bond-like apatite layer on the surface in simulated body fluid (SBF), as proposed by Kokubo et al. After the materials were soaked in SBF for 1 day, precipitates formed on the surface of MAO coating. The surface of MAO coatings was completely covered with precipitates after 7 days. The precipitates, which were found to be composed of fiber structures, were identified as the apatite phase using thin film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). The results show that MAO coatings containing strontium can induce the formation of an apatite layer on their surface. In the potentiodynamic test, MAO coatings exhibited a more noble corrosion potential (E corr ) than that of titanium in SBF. In the passive region, the current density of MAO coatings was lower than that of titanium. All findings in this study indicated that MAO coatings containing strontium have good bioactivity and corrosion resistance for clinical applications.

  8. 9% Cr steel high temperature oxidation. Solutions investigated for improving corrosion resistance of the steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evin, Harold Nicolas; Heintz, Olivier; Chevalier, Sebastien [UMR 5209 CNRS-Bourgogne Univ. (France). Lab. Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne; Foejer, Cecilia; Jakani, Saad; Dhont, Annick; Claessens, Serge [OCAS N.V. ArcelorMittal Global R and D, Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The improvement of high temperature oxidation resistance of low chromium content steels, such as T/P91, is of great interest in regards with their application in thermal power generating plants. Indeed, they possess good creep properties, but are facing their limits of use at temperature higher than 600 C, due to accelerated corrosion phenomena. Good knowledge of the mechanisms involved during their oxidation process is needed to prevent the degradation of the materials and to extend life time of the power plants components. Oxide layers thermally grown, on 9% Cr steels (provided by OCAS N.V), during isothermal tests between 600 C and 750 C in laboratory air under atmospheric pressure were investigated, by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxidation behaviour appeared very limited at 750 C, due to the presence of a breakaway, which can be linked to iron porous oxide grown over the surface of the samples. ''In situ'' X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed in air at 600 C after short exposures (between 5 min and 25 h). A complex mixture of iron oxide, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr (VI) species were characterized in the scales. The in-situ analyses were compared and related to XPS analyses performed on thick oxide scales formed on samples oxidized in air at 600 C for 100h. An oxidation mechanism is then proposed to understand the oxide scale growth in the temperature range 600 - 750 C. The second step of this study consists in improving the high temperature corrosion resistance of these steels without modifying their mechanical properties. Thus several solutions were investigated such as MOCVD coatings, pack cementation coatings, and tested in cycle conditions prior. (orig.)

  9. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Oxidation Layer on Fe30Mn5Al Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Xue-mei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fe30Mn5Al alloy was oxidized at 800℃ in air for 160h, the oxidation-induced layer about 15μm thick near the scale-metal interface was induced to transform to ferrite and become enriched in Fe and depletion in Mn. The effect of the oxidation-induced Mn depletion layer on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Fe30Mn5Al alloy was evaluated. The results show that in 1mol·L-1 Na2SO4 solution, the anodic polarization curve of the Mn depletion layer exhibits self-passivation, compared with Fe30Mn5Al austenitic alloy, and the corrosion potential Evs SCE is increased to -130mV from -750mV and the passive current density ip is decreased to 29μA/cm2 from 310μA/cm2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS of the Mn depletion layer has the larger diameter of capacitive arc, the higher impedance modulus|Z|, and the wider phase degree range, and the fitted polarization resistant Rt is increased to 9.9kΩ·cm2 from 2.7kΩ·cm2 by using an equivalent electric circuit of Rs-(Rt//CPE. The high insulation of the Mn depletion layer leads to an improved corrosion resistance of Fe30Mn5Al austenitic alloy.

  10. Biodiesel from “Morelos” Rice: Synthesis, Oxidative Stability, and Corrosivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zuñiga-Díaz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice bran is a by-product of great production worldwide and its use for the synthesis of biodiesel does not affect the food chain and therefore it is an excellent alternative for the production of biofuels with low carbon footprint. In this work, the synthesis of biodiesel was carried out from the raw rice bran oil of a kernel variety called “Morelos rice.” The stability and corrosivity characteristics of biodiesel were determined. Biodiesel stability was determined both under storage conditions and under accelerated oxidation conditions, and its corrosivity was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at 110°C under aerated conditions. The results showed that, due to the high instability of the rice bran, its raw oil had a high content of free fatty acids. The synthesized biodiesel showed excellent stability under storage conditions of up to five months, and its oxidative stability was much higher than that established in international standards. On the other hand, biodiesel showed low corrosivity and this was only significant once oxidative degradation began.

  11. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of AZ91D magnesium alloy with different additives and its corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Fa-he; Cao, Jiang-lin; Zhang, Zhao [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Jian-qing; Cao, Chu-nan [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2007-09-15

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of Mg-based AZ91D alloys was investigated using 50 Hz AC anodizing technique in an alkaline borate solution, which contained a new kind of organic additive and without F, P, and Cr. The anodizing technological parameters have been optimized and a kind of ivory-white smooth anodic film with high corrosion resistance was obtained. It was found that the formation of the anodic films was always coupled with sparking and oxygen evolution, whose intensity changed with the additive and anodizing voltage. All EIS plots have two capacitive loops and one low frequency inductive component. Two capacitive arcs present the barrier and porous layer of the PEO film and the inductive component in the low frequency domain is a complex behavior due to the porous structure connected to the electrolyte. EIS plots and fitting results show that a self-sealing process of the PEO firm with different additives takes place in the beginning of immersion time, then corrosion attack becomes a preponderant process to promote the degradation of the film. Tafel results show that PEO treatment decreases the corrosion current density by four, even five orders of magnitude, while additives content does not affect strongly the electrochemical corrosion behavior. Salt spray test shows that the PEO film formed with NaAlO{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} presents good corrosion resistance, over 600 h without any sealing treatment. The difference of corrosion resistance arose by additives examined by electrochemical techniques and salt spray test does not show strict corresponding relationship. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance of nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, G.; Choi, B.H.; Kim, W.; Jung, K.S.; Kwon, H.S.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, J.H.; Song, T.Y.; Shon, D.H.; Han, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development and application of ion implantation techniques for improving the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4. The corrosion resistance in nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4 under a 120 keV nitrogen ion beam at an ion dose of 3 x 10 17 cm -2 depends on the implantation temperature. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance were analyzed with the change of implantation temperature. It is shown that as implantation temperature rises from 100 to 724 C, the colour of specimen surface changes from its original colour to light yellow at 100 C, golden at 175 C, pink at 300 C, blue at 440 C and dark blue at 550 C. As the implantation temperature goes above 640 C, the colour of surface changes to light black, and the surface becomes a little rough. The corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4 implanted with nitrogen is sensitive to the implantation temperature. The pitting potential of specimens increases from 176 to 900 mV (SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 100 to 300 C, and decreases from 900 to 90 mV(SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 300 to 640 C. The microstructure, the distribution of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon elements, the oxide grain size and the feature of the precipitation in the implanted surface were investigated by optical microscope, TEM, EDS, XRD and AES. The experimental results reveal that the ZrO 2 is distributed mainly on the outer surface. The ZrN is distributed under the ZrO 2 layer. The characteristics of the distribution of ZrO 2 and ZrN in the nitrogen-implanted zircaloy-4 is influenced by the implantation temperature of the sample, and in turn the corrosion resistance is influenced. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion mechanisms of spent fuel under oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Finch, R.; Buck, E.; Bates, J.

    1997-01-01

    The release of 99 Tc can be used as a reliable marker for the extent of spent oxide fuel reaction under unsaturated high-drip-rate conditions at 90 degrees C. Evidence from leachate data and from scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) examination of reacted fuel samples is presented for radionuclide release, potential reaction pathways, and the formation of alteration products. In the ATM-103 fuel, 0.03 of the total inventory of 99 Tc is released in 3.7 years under unsaturated and oxidizing conditions. Two reaction pathways that have been identified from SEM are (1) through-grain dissolution with subsequent formation of uranyl alteration products, and (2) grain-boundary dissolution. The major alteration product identified by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM, is Na-boltwoodite, Na[(UO 2 )(SiO 3 OH)]lg-bullet H 2 O, which is formed from sodium and silicon in the water leachant

  14. Long-term corrosion inhibition mechanism of microarc oxidation coated AZ31 Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yanhong; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Chen, Cheng-fu; Ning, Chengyun; Guo, Yuanjun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion behavior is significantly affected by the long-term immersion. ► The degradation is inhibited due to the corrosion product layer. ► The corrosion resistance is enhanced by optimized MAO electrolyte concentrations. ► The corrosion inhibition mechanism is presented by a Flash animation. - Abstract: This paper addresses the long-term corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation coated Mg alloys immersed in simulated body fluid for 28 days. The coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys were produced in the electrolyte of sodium phosphate (Na 3 PO 4 ) at the concentration of 20 g/L, 30 g/L and 40 g/L, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical micrograph were used to observe the microstructure of the samples before and after corrosion. The composition of the MAO coating and corrosion products were determined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Corrosion product identification showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) was formed on the surface of the corroded samples. The ratio of Ca/P in HA determined by the X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) technique showed that HA is an acceptable biocompatible implant material. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to characterize the corrosion rate and the electrochemical impedance. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg alloys can be enhanced by optimizing the electrolyte concentrations for fabricating samples, and is enhanced after immersing the coated samples in simulated body fluid for more than 14 days. The enhanced corrosion resistance after long-term immersion is attributed to a corrosion product layer formed on the sample surface. The inhibition mechanism of the corrosion process is discussed and presented with an animation

  15. Corrosion-resistant coating technique for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ando, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are attractive materials for application as fuel cladding in fast reactors and first-wall material of fusion blanket. Recent studies have focused more on high-chromium ferritic (12-18 wt% Cr) ODS steels with attractive corrosion resistance properties. However, they have poor material workability, require complicated heat treatments for recrystallization, and possess anisotropic microstructures and mechanical properties. On the other hand, low-chromium ferritic/martensitic (8-9 wt% Cr) ODS steels have no such limitations; nonetheless, they have poor corrosion resistance properties. In our work, we developed a corrosion-resistant coating technique for a low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. The ODS steel was coated with the 304 or 430 stainless steel, which has better corrosion resistances than the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steels. The 304 or 430 stainless steel was coated by changing the canning material from mild steel to stainless steel in the conventional material processing procedure for ODS steels. Microstructural observations and micro-hardness tests proved that the stainless steels were successfully coated without causing a deterioration in the mechanical property of the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. (author)

  16. Corrosion and nanomechanical behaviors of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AA7020-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, A., E-mail: arjun_venu@hotmail.com [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Srinath, J. [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Rama Krishna, L. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005 (India); Ramesh Narayanan, P.; Sharma, S.C.; Venkitakrishnan, P.V. [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2016-04-13

    Alumina coating was deposited on AA7020 aluminum alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and nano-mechanical behaviors were examined by means of potentiodynamic polarization, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and nano-indentation tests. Potentiodynamic polarization (PP) was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating and slow strain rate test (SSRT) was used for evaluating the environmental cracking resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution. The mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) were obtained from each indentation as a function of the penetration depth across the coating cross section. The above results were compared with similar PEO coated aluminum and magnesium alloys. Results indicated that PEO coating on AA7020 alloy significantly improved the corrosion resistance. However the environmental cracking resistance was found to be only marginal. The hardness and elastic modulus values were found to be much higher when compared to the base metal and similar PEO coated 7075 aluminum alloys. The fabricated coating also exhibited good adhesive strength with the substrate similar to other PEO coated aluminum alloys reported in the literature.

  17. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (3), relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Systematic approaches for evaluating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. Firstly, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis. Anodic current density and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic double oxide layer model and then was applied as input for the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results based on the coupled models resulted good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP. (author)

  18. Effect of calcium on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of microarc oxidized Mg-xCa alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Feng, Rui; Cui, Hongwei; Gong, Benkui; Zheng, Tingting; Ji, Yarou

    2018-01-16

    Magnesium alloys are potential biodegradable implants for biomedical applications, and calcium (Ca) is one kind of ideal element being examined for magnesium alloys and biodegradable ceramic coatings owing to its biocompatibility and mechanical suitability. In this study, microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings were prepared on Mg-xCa alloys to study the effect of Ca on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Mg-xCa alloys and their surface MAO coatings. The electrochemical corrosion behavior was investigated using an electrochemical workstation, and the degradability and bioactivity were evaluated by soaking tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions. The corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The effects of Ca on the alloy phase composition, microstructure, MAO coating formation mechanism, and corrosion behavior were investigated. Results showed that the Mg-0.82Ca alloy and MAO-coated Mg-0.82Ca exhibited the highest corrosion resistance. The number and distribution of Mg 2 Ca phases can be controlled by adjusting the Ca content in the Mg-xCa alloys. The proper amount of Ca in magnesium alloy was about 0.5-0.8 wt. %. The pore size, surface roughness, and corrosion behavior of microarc oxidized Mg-xCa samples can be controlled by the number and distribution of the Mg 2 Ca phase. The corrosion behaviors of microarc oxidized Mg-Ca in SBF solutions were discussed.

  19. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors: A model for irradiation induced enhancement by local radiolysis in the porous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaignan, C; Salot, R [CEA/DRN/DTP, CENG-SECC, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    An analysis has been undertaken of the various cases of local enhancement of corrosion rate of zirconium alloys under irradiation. It is observed that in most cases a strong emission of energetic {beta}{sup -} is present leading to a local energy deposition rate higher than the core average. This suggests that the local transient radiolytic oxidizing species produced in the coolant by the {beta}{sup -} particles could contribute to corrosion enhancement, by increasing the local corrosion potential. This process is applicable to the local enhanced corrosion found in front of stainless steels structural parts, due to the contribution of Mn, and in front of Pt inserts or Cu-rich cruds. It explains also the irradiation corrosion enhancement of Cu-Zr alloys. Enhanced corrosion around neutron absorbing material is explained similarly by pair production from conversion of high energy capture photons in the cladding, leading to energetic electrons. The same process was found to be active with other highly ionizing species like {alpha} from Ni-rich alloys and fission products in homogeneous reactors. Due to the changes induced by the irradiation intensity on the concentration of the radiolytic species, the coolant chemistry, that controls the boundary conditions for oxide growth, has to be analyzed with respect to the local value of the energy deposition rate. An analysis has been undertaken which shows that, in a porous media, the water is exposed to a higher intensity than bulk water. This leads to a higher concentration of oxidizing radiolytic species at the root of the cracks of the porous oxide, and increases the corrosion rate under irradiation. This mechanism, deduced from the explanation proposed for localized irradiation enhanced corrosion, can be extended to the whole reactor core, where the general enhancement of Zr alloys corrosion under irradiation could be attributed to the general radiolysis in the porous zirconia. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  20. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Iron-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellaganesh, D.; Adam Khan, M.; Winowlin Jappes, J. T.; Sathiyanarayanan, S.

    2018-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of nickel-iron-based superalloy are studied at 900 ° and 1000 °C. The significant role of alloying elements with respect to the exposed medium is studied in detail. The mass change per unit area was catastrophic for the samples exposed at 1000 °C and gradual increase in mass change was observed at 900 °C for both the environments. The exposed samples were further investigated with SEM, EDS and XRD analysis to study the metallurgical characteristics. The surface morphology has expressed the in situ nature of the alloy and its affinity toward the environment. The EDS and XRD analysis has evidently proved the presence of protective oxides formation on prolonged exposure at elevated temperature. The predominant oxide formed during the exposure at high temperature has a major contribution toward the protection of the samples. The nickel-iron-based superalloy is less prone to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to the existing alloy in gas turbine engine simulating marine environment.

  1. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-06-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  2. Effect of intermetallic phases on the anodic oxidation and corrosion of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song-mei; Li, Ying-dong; Zhang, You; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    Intermetallic phases were found to influence the anodic oxidation and corrosion behavior of 5A06 aluminum alloy. Scattered intermetallic particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after pretreatment. The anodic film was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and its corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization in NaCl solution. The results show that the size of Al-Fe-Mg-Mn particles gradually decreases with the iron content. During anodizing, these intermetallic particles are gradually dissolved, leading to the complex porosity in the anodic film beneath the particles. After anodizing, the residual particles are mainly silicon-containing phases, which are embedded in the anodic film. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the porous anodic film layer is easily penetrated, and the barrier plays a dominant role in the overall protection. Meanwhile, self-healing behavior is observed during the long immersion time.

  3. Corrosion resistance of micro-arc oxidation coatings formed on aluminum alloy with addition of Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, Y.; Du, H. Q.; Zhao, YW

    2018-03-01

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coatings were formed on the aluminum alloy in silicate-based electrolyte without and with the addition of Al2O3. It is showed that the coating produced in 7 g l‑1 Al2O3-containing electrolyte was of the most superior corrosion resistance. Besides, the corrosion properties of the coatings were studied by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test in both 0.5 M and 1 M NaCl solution. The results proved that the coating is capable to protect the substrate from the corrosion of aggressive Cl‑ in 0.5 M NaCl after 384 h immersion. However, it can not offer protection to the aluminum alloy substrate after 384 h immersion in 1 M NaCl solution. The schematic diagrams illustrate the corrosion process and matched well with the corrosion test results.

  4. Influence of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Corrosion Behavior of Superhydrophobic Surfaces on Bare and Oxidized Aluminum Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, J F; Fang, X Z; Zhao, W J; Lei, S; Xue, M S; Wang, F J; Li, C Q; Lu, Y L; Li, W

    2018-05-22

    It is generally recognized that superhydrophobic surfaces in water may be used for corrosion resistance due to the entrapped air in the solid/liquid interface and could find potential applications in the protection of ship hull. For a superhydrophobic surface, as its immersion depth into water increases, the resultant hydrostatic pressure is also increased, and the entrapped air can be squeezed out much more easily. It is therefore predicted that high hydrostatic pressure would cause an unexpected decrease in corrosion resistance for the vessels in deep water (e.g., submarines) because of the unstable entrapped air. In this work, in order to clarify the role of hydrostatic pressure in the corrosion behavior of superhydrophobic surfaces, two typical superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) were prepared on bare and oxidized aluminum substrates, respectively, and then were immersed into the NaCl aqueous solutions with different depths of ∼0 cm (hydrostatic pressure ∼0 kPa), 10 cm (1 kPa), and 150 cm (15 kPa). It was found out for the SHSs on the oxidized Al, as the hydrostatic pressure increased, the corrosion behavior became severe. However, for the SHSs on the bare Al, their corrosion behavior was complex due to hydrostatic pressure. It was found that the corrosion resistance under 1 kPa was the highest. Further mechanism analysis revealed that this alleviated corrosion behavior under 1 kPa resulted from suppressing the oxygen diffusion through the liquid and reducing the subsequent corrosion rate as compared with 0 kPa, whereas the relatively low hydrostatic pressure (HP) could stabilize the entrapped air and hence enhance the corrosion resistance, compared with 15 kPa. The present study therefore provided a fundamental understanding for the applications of SHSs to prevent the corrosion, especially for various vessels in deep water.

  5. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi; Neralla, Sudheer; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method was developed to control corrosion, porosity, and mechanical property. • Mechanical properties of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were affected by the different electrolyte. • Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were compared with uncoated one. - Abstract: We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na_2SiO_3, KF and NaH_2PO_4·2H_2O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  6. Effect of Nano-crystalline Ceramic Coats Produced by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on Corrosion Behavior of AA5083 Aluminum Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayananth, T.; Muthupandi, V.; Rao, S. R. Koteswara

    2010-01-01

    High specific strength offered by aluminum and magnesium alloys makes them desirable in modern transportation industries. Often the restrictions imposed on the usage of these alloys are due to their poor tribological and corrosion properties. However, their corrosion properties can be further enhanced by synthesizing ceramic coating on the substrate through Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process. In this study, nano-crystalline alumina coatings were formed on the surface of AA5083 aluminum alloy test coupons using PEO process in aqueous alkali-silicate electrolyte with and without addition of sodium aluminate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the crystallite size varied between 38 and 46 nm and α- and γ- alumina were the dominant phases present in the coatings. Corrosion studies by potentiodynamic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl revealed that the electrolyte composition has an influence on the corrosion resistance of nano-crystalline oxide layer formed.

  7. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T L; Coe, C; Bagot, P A J; Morrall, P; Smith, G D W; Scott, T; Moody, M P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  8. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  9. Long-time corrosion and high-temperature oxidation of zirconium alloys applied on NPP like fuel elements cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrtilkova, V.; Novotny, L.; Lingart, S.; Doukha, R.; Yarosh, Ya.; Kolenchik, Ya.

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium is applying in nuclear energy since 50-th of last century in capacity of material for cover production for fuel elements, reactor fuel and structural parts, and mainly due to both corrosion stability and low effective cross section for thermal neutrons capture. Impurities in doping elements form and alloy production technology has influence on mechanical and corrosion properties of finite alloy. Long-time corrosion tests for several zirconium alloys in forcing autoclave under different reaction conditions were carried out. After that process kinetics was studied, mass increase, hydrogen formation, zirconium hydride forming morphology, zirconium oxide layer thickness have been determined as well

  10. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of coated AZ91 alloy by microarc oxidation for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. M.; Wang, F. H.; Xu, M. J.; Zhao, B.; Guo, L. X.; Ouyang, J. H.

    2009-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloy currently are considered as the potential biodegradable implant materials, while the accelerated corrosion rate in intro environment leads to implant failure by losing the mechanical integrity before complete restoration. Dense oxide coatings formed in alkaline silicate electrolyte with and without titania sol addition were fabricated on magnesium alloy using microarc oxidation process. The microstructure, composition and degradation behavior in simulated body fluid (SBF) of the coated specimens were evaluated. It reveals that a small amount of TiO 2 is introduced into the as-deposited coating mainly composed of MgO and Mg 2SiO 4 by the addition of titania sol into based alkaline silicate electrolytic bath. With increasing concentration of titania sol from 0 to 10 vol.%, the coating thickness decreases from 22 to 18 μm. Electrochemical tests show that the Ecorr of Mg substrate positively shifted about 300˜500 mV and icorr lowers more than 100 times after microarc oxidation. However, the TiO 2 modified coatings formed in electrolyte containing 5 and 10 vol.% titania sol indicate an increasing worse corrosion resistance compared with that of the unmodified coating, which is possibly attributed to the increasing amorphous components caused by TiO 2 involvement. The long term immersing test in SBF is consistent with the electrochemical test, with the coated Mg alloy obviously slowing down the biodegradation rate, meanwhile accompanied by the increasing damage trends in the coatings modified by 5 and 10 vol.% titania sol.

  11. Degradation of the corrosion resistance of anodic oxide films through immersion in the anodising electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rubio, M. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906-Getafe (Spain); Ocon, P., E-mail: pilar.ocon@uam.e [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Curioni, M.; Thompson, G.E.; Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Center, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M60 1QD England (United Kingdom); Lavia, A. [Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906-Getafe (Spain); Garcia, I. [Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906-Getafe (Spain); Department of Corrosion and Protection, National Center for Metallurgical Research CENIM-CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040-Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The deterioration of AA2024, AA6061 and AA7475 anodised in an environmentally-compliant tartaric acid/sulphuric acid electrolyte has been examined as a function of the immersion time in the electrolyte after termination of anodising. By transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, degradation of the porous oxide film was qualitatively observed on AA2024. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that AA2024 and AA7075 were more sensitive to prolonged immersion in the anodising electrolyte compared with AA6061, due to increased barrier layer thinning rates and increased susceptibility to localized corrosion. Salt spray tests confirmed the previous, indicating decay of anticorrosion performance for AA2024 and AA7075.

  12. Degradation of the corrosion resistance of anodic oxide films through immersion in the anodising electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rubio, M.; Ocon, P.; Curioni, M.; Thompson, G.E.; Skeldon, P.; Lavia, A.; Garcia, I.

    2010-01-01

    The deterioration of AA2024, AA6061 and AA7475 anodised in an environmentally-compliant tartaric acid/sulphuric acid electrolyte has been examined as a function of the immersion time in the electrolyte after termination of anodising. By transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, degradation of the porous oxide film was qualitatively observed on AA2024. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that AA2024 and AA7075 were more sensitive to prolonged immersion in the anodising electrolyte compared with AA6061, due to increased barrier layer thinning rates and increased susceptibility to localized corrosion. Salt spray tests confirmed the previous, indicating decay of anticorrosion performance for AA2024 and AA7075.

  13. Tribological and Corrosion Properties of Coatings Produced by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on the ZA27 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangyin; Mao, Yifan; Li, Zhijian; Wang, Linlin; DaCosta, Herbert

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a continuous and dense coating was deposited on samples of the ZA27 alloy through the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process to improve its wear and corrosion performance. A nontoxic and environmentally friendly inorganic salt, Na2SiO3, is chosen as electrolytes with different concentrations. The effect of the concentration of Na2SiO3 aqueous solutions on the coating performances was investigated. The coatings with 3Al2O3·2SiO2 (mullite), Zn2SiO4 and Al2O3 (either crystal phase or with some amorphous SiO2 phases) were formed by the PEO processes. It was found that the coating thickness increased with the increase in electrolyte concentration. However, the wear and corrosion resistance performance of the coatings did not improve as the coating's thickness increased. This was due to the fact that the coating produced with electrolytes of 10 g/L has a porous structure with large pore size. Among all the samples, coating produced by 15 g/L Na2SiO3 has the best wear and corrosion resistance, which is attributed to its continuous and dense structure with thickness of about 47 μm.

  14. Corrosion resistance and calcium–phosphorus precipitation of micro-arc oxidized magnesium for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lichen; Cui, Chunxiang, E-mail: hutcui@hebut.edu.cn; Wang, Xin; Liu, Shuangjin; Bu, Shaojing; Wang, Qingzhou; Qi, Yumin

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite (HA) powders were added to the electrolyte. • The HA powders have participated in the formation reactions of MAO coating. • The growth efficiency of MAO coating was greatly enhanced owing to the HA addition. • The specimen anodized in the HA-containing electrolyte has a better corrosion resistance. • The specimen anodized in the HA-containing electrolyte can more efficiently induce Ca–P precipitation. - Abstract: To improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium, micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coatings were prepared on magnesium substrates in an aqueous solution with and without hydroxyapatite (HA) powders addition. The micrographs of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) spectra, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis show that the HA powders added into the electrolyte have participated in the formation reactions of MAO coating and the growth efficiency of MAO coating is greatly enhanced. Potentiodynamic polarization tests and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) confirm that the specimen anodized in the HA-containing electrolyte has a better corrosion resistance than the specimen anodized in the HA-free electrolyte. Immersion tests also indicate that the specimen anodized in the HA-containing electrolyte can more efficiently induce Ca–P precipitation compared with the specimen anodized in the HA-free electrolyte.

  15. Improved corrosion resistance of cast carbon steel in sulphur oxides by Alonizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzer, M.; Dzioba, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies on the Alonizing of cast steel and of testing the corrosion resistance of this cast steel in an atmosphere containing 5 to 6% SO 2 + 50% SO 3 at 853 K are described and compared with the results obtained with unalonized cast carbon steel and high-alloy 23Cr-8Ni-2Mo cast steel. The duration of the corrosion tests was 336 hours. The aluminium diffusion layer on cast carbon steel was obtained by holding the specimens in a mixture containing 99% of powered Fe-Al and 1% of NH 4 Cl at 1323 ± 20 K. The holding time was 10 and 20 hours, respectively. The aluminium layer formed on the cast carbon steel was examined by optical microscopy and an X-ray microanalysis. After Alonizing for 10 h the layer had reached a thickness of 950 μm, and contained up to 35% Al. In a mixture of sulphur oxides corrosion rate of the alonized cast carbon steel was by about 600 times lower than of the unalonized cast carbon steel, and by about 50 times lower than that of the 23Cr-8Ni-2Mo cast steel. (orig.) [de

  16. Lifetime evaluation of superheater tubes exposed to steam oxidation, high temperature corrosion and creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, N [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O; Blum, R [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    Advanced fossil fired plants operating at high steam temperatures require careful design of the superheaters. The German TRD design code normally used in Denmark is not precise enough for the design of superheaters with long lifetimes. The authors have developed a computer program to be used in the evaluation of superheater tube lifetime based on input related to tube dimensions, material, pressure, steam temperature, mass flux, heat flux and estimated corrosion rates. The program is described in the paper. As far as practically feasible, the model seems to give a true picture of the reality. For superheaters exposed to high heat fluxes or low internal heat transfer coefficients as is the case for superheaters located in fluidized bed environments or radiant environments, the program has been extremely useful for evaluation of surface temperature, oxide formation and lifetime. The total uncertainty of the method is mainly influenced by the uncertainty of the determination of the corrosion rate. More precise models describing the corrosion rate as a function of tube surface temperature, fuel parameters and boiler parameters need to be developed. (au) 21 refs.

  17. Tribological and Corrosion Properties of Coatings Produced by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on the ZA27 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangyin; Mao, Yifan; Li, Zhijian; Wang, Linlin; DaCosta, Herbert

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuous and dense coating was deposited on samples of the ZA27 alloy through the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process to improve its wear and corrosion performance. A nontoxic and environmentally friendly inorganic salt, Na2SiO3, is chosen as electrolytes with different concentrations. The effect of the concentration of Na2SiO3 aqueous solutions on the coating performances was investigated. The coatings with 3Al2O3·2SiO2 (mullite), Zn2SiO4 and Al2O3 (either crystal phase or with some amorphous SiO2 phases) were formed by the PEO processes. It was found that the coating thickness increased with the increase in electrolyte concentration. However, the wear and corrosion resistance performance of the coatings did not improve as the coating's thickness increased. This was due to the fact that the coating produced with electrolytes of 10 g/L has a porous structure with large pore size. Among all the samples, coating produced by 15 g/L Na2SiO3 has the best wear and corrosion resistance, which is attributed to its continuous and dense structure with thickness of about 47 μm.

  18. Mössbauer study of oxide films of Fe-, Sn-, Cr- doped zirconium alloys during corrosion in autoclave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, V. P., E-mail: vpfilippov@mephi.ru; Bateev, A. B.; Lauer, Yu. A. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Mössbauer investigations were used to compare iron atom states in oxide films of binary Zr-Fe, ternary Zr-Fe-Cu and quaternary Zr-Fe-Cr-Sn alloys. Oxide films are received in an autoclave at a temperature of 350–360 °C and at pressure of 16.8 MPa. The corrosion process decomposes the intermetallic precipitates in alloys and forms metallic iron with inclusions of chromium atoms α–Fe(Cr), α–Fe(Cu), α–Fe {sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe {sub 3}O{sub 4} compounds. Some iron ions are formed in divalent and in trivalent paramagnetic states. The additional doping influences on corrosion kinetics and concentration of iron compounds and phases formed in oxide films. It was shown the correlation between concentration of iron in different chemical states and corrosion resistance of alloys.

  19. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dahye [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Kim, Yonghwan [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wonsub, E-mail: wschung1@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation was performed using dispersed CuO particles in convectional PEO electrolyte. • Thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance were examined by FT-IR spectroscopy and electrochemical methods, respectively. • Deposited copper oxide on the surface of the Al substrate was enhanced the corrosion resistance and the emissivity compared with the conventional PEO. - Abstract: A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu{sub 2}O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  20. Indium oxide thin film as potential photoanodes for corrosion protection of stainless steel under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Key Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Yu, Jianqiang, E-mail: jianqyu@qdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Sun, Kai; Zhu, Yukun [Key Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan [National Engineering Center of Marine Corrosion Protection, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 7 Nanhai Road, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: If the conduction band potential of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more negative than the corrosion potential of stainless steel, photo-induced electrons will be transferred from In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the steel, thus shifting the potential of the steel into a corrosion immunity region and preventing the steel from the corrosion. - Highlights: • Indium oxide performed novel application under visible light. • Indium oxide by sol–gel method behaved better photoelectrochemical properties. • Electrons were transferred to stainless steel from indium oxide once light on. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel by In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film under visible-light. The films were fabricated with In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, synthesized by both sol–gel (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg) and solid-state (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss) processes. The photo-induced open circuit potential and the photo-to-current efficiency measurements suggested that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be a promising candidate material for photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of metallic alloys under visible light. Moreover, the polarization curve experimental results indicated that In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film can mitigate the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel to much more negative values with a higher photocurrent density than the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss film under visible-light illumination. All the results demonstrated that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film provides a better photoelectrochemical cathodic protection for 304 stainless steel than In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss thin-film under visible-light illumination. The higher photoelectrochemical efficiency is possibly due to the uniform thin films produced with the smaller particle size of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg, which facilitates the transfer of the photo-induced electrons from bulk to the surface and suppresses the charge recombination of the electrons and holes.

  1. Effect of DC Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on Surface Characteristics and Corrosion Resistance of Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Sowa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Zr is a valve metal, the biocompatibility of which is at least on par with Ti. Recently, numerous attempts of the formation of bioactive coatings on Zr by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO in solutions that were based on calcium acetate and calcium β-glycerophosphate were made. In this study, the direct current (DC PEO of commercially pure zirconium in the solutions that contained Ca(H2PO22, Ca(HCOO2, and Mg(CH3COO2 was investigated. The treatment was conducted at 75 mA/cm2 up to 200, 300, or 400 V. Five process stages were discerned. The treatment at higher voltages resulted in the formation of oxide layers that had Ca/P or (Mg+Ca/P ratios that were close to that of hydroxyapatite (Ca/P = 1.67, determined by SEM/EDX. The corrosion resistance studies were performed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and DC polarization methods. R(Q[R(QR] circuit model was used to fit the EIS data. In general, the coatings that were obtained at 200 V were the most corrosion resistant, however, they lacked the porous structure, which is typical for PEO coatings, and is sought after in the biomedical applications. The treatment at 400 V resulted in the formation of the coatings that were more corrosion resistant than those that were obtained at 300 V. This was determined mainly by the prevailing plasma regime at the given process voltage. The pitting resistance of Zr was also improved by the treatment, regardless of the applied process conditions.

  2. High temperature oxidation and corrosion behavior of Ni-base superalloy in He environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyoeng Geun; Park, Ji Yeon; Jung, Su jin

    2010-11-01

    Ni-base superalloy is considered as a IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) material for VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor). The helium environment in VHTR contains small amounts of impure gases, which cause oxidation, carburization, and decarburization. In this report, we conducted the literature survey about the high temperature behavior of Ni-base superalloys in air and He environments. The basic information of Ni-base superalloy and the basic metal-oxidation theory were briefly stated. The He effect on the corrosion of Ni-base superalloy was also summarized. This works would provide a brief suggestion for the next research topic for the application of Ni-base superalloy to VHTR

  3. High Current Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coating Processes for Wear and Corrosion Prevention of Al 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treatments have been used in the aerospace and automotive industries because the coating formed on light metals or alloys has great hardness, high wear, corrosion, and oxidation resistance, and a low friction coefficient that improves lifetime length and provide a higher surface quality. However, the PEO treatments that are presently used for industrial applications require a long period of time to confirm the quality of the coating. For this reason, the present study seeks to increase the current density of PEO treatments to improve their efficiency and explore the performance of the obtained coatings. It was found that for high current density (0.18A/cm2) PEO treatments, smaller ratio, such as 50% and 70%, is beneficial to obtaining a better performance coating. When compared with the coating of a "normal" (current density: 0.09A/cm2) PEO treatment, it had better wear resistance; however, for corrosion resistance, it had a lower performance than the coatings obtained by the "normal" current density PEO treatment which was attributed to the negative influence of porosity increase.

  4. Development of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria using hydrogen from radiolysis or metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.F.; Sellier, R.; Marty, V.; Camaro, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of many parameters need to be studied to characterize the long term behavior of nuclear waste in a deep repository. These parameters concern the chemical effects, radiolytic effects, mechanical properties, water composition, and microbiological activity. To evaluate microbial activity in such an environment, work was focused on an inventory of key nutrients (C, H, 0, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The production of hydrogen in the nuclear waste environment leads to the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria, which modify the gas production balance. A deep repository containing bituminized waste drums implies several sources of hydrogen: - water radiolysis; -corrosion of metal containers; - radiolysis of the embedding matrix (bitumen). Two deep geological disposal conditions leading to H 2 production in a bituminized nuclear waste environment were simulated in the present study: - H 2 production by iron corrosion under anaerobic conditions was simulated by adding 10% of H 2 in the atmosphere; - H 2 production by radiolysis of bitumen matrix was approached by subjecting this material to external gamma irradiation with a dose rate near real conditions (6 Gy/h). The presence of dissolved H 2 in water allows the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria leading to: - CO 2 and N 2 production; - H 2 consumption; - lower NO 3 - concentration caused by reduction to nitrogen. In the first case, hydrogen consumption is limited by the NO 3 - release rate from the bitumen matrix. In the second case, however, under gamma radiation at a low dose rate, hydrogen production is weak, and the hydrogen is completely consumed by microorganisms. Knowledge about these hydrogen oxidizing bacteria is just beginning to emerge. Heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria adapt well to hydrogen metabolism (autotrophic metabolism) by oxidizing H 2 instead of hydrocarbons. (authors)

  5. Effect of Al and Ce oxide layers electrodeposited on OC4004 stainless steel on its corrosion characteristics in acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanova, E.; Nikolova, D.; Stoychev, D.; Stefanov, P.; Marinova, T.

    2006-01-01

    The changes in the corrosion characteristics of stainless steel OC4004 in 0.1 M HNO 3 after electrodeposition of thin Al and Ce oxide films on it has been investigated. The Ce 2 O 3 -CeO 2 layers have been found to possess a pronounced stabilizing effect on the steel passive state and on its corrosion resistance, respectively, whereas the Al 2 O 3 layers do not improve considerably the corrosion behaviour of the SS/Al 2 O 3 system. A twice-lower corrosion current was observed with a ternary SS/Al 2 O 3 /Ce 2 O 3 -CeO 2 system in the passive region, while the zones of potentials, where the steel is in a stable passive state, are not changed. The obtained results permit the assumption that the cerium oxides layer acts as an effective cathode playing a determining role with respect to the improvement of the corrosion behavior of the steel. It has been concluded that when the SS/Al 2 O 3 /Ce 2 O 3 -CeO 2 system is used in media containing nitric acid, the corrosion will proceed at potentials where the passive state of steel would not be disturbed

  6. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  7. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy formed in silicate and phosphate based electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Stoermer, M.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    PEO coatings were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation process in silicate and phosphate based electrolytes using a pulsed DC power source. The microstructure and composition of the PEO coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the PEO coatings was evaluated using open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarisation tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M NaCl solution. It was found that the electrolyte composition has a significant effect on the coating evolution and on the resulting coating characteristics, such as microstructure, composition, coating thickness, roughness and thus on the corrosion behaviour. The corrosion resistance of the PEO coating formed in silicate electrolyte was found to be superior to that formed in phosphate electrolyte in both the short-term and long-term electrochemical corrosion tests.

  8. Corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite-silicon oxide coatings on AISI 304 for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Hazoor; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate corrosion resistance of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-silicon oxide (SiO 2 ) coated AISI 304 substrates. In HA-SiO 2 coatings, 10 wt% SiO 2 and 20 wt% SiO 2 was mixed with HA. The feedstock and coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance was determined for the uncoated and coated samples. The corrosion resistance of the AISI 304 was found more after the deposition of the HA-SiO 2 coatings rather than HA coating and uncoated. All the coatings were crack free after 24 h dipping in Ringer's solution for electrochemical corrosion testing.

  9. The effect of microarc oxidation and excimer laser processing on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zr–1Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jiaoxi; Wang, Xin; Wen, Qiang; Wang, Xibing; Wang, Rongshan; Zhang, Yanwei; Xue, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of microarc oxidation (MAO) and excimer laser processing on the corrosion resistance of Zr–1Nb alloy in service environment. The pre-oxide film was fabricated on the surface of Zr–1Nb cladding tubes by MAO processing, and then subjected to KrF excimer laser irradiation. The surface morphology of the pre-oxide film was observed using a scanning electron microscope; phase compositions and quantities were determined using an X-ray diffraction; surface roughness was determined using a profilometer; and thermal expansion coefficient was measured using a dilatometer. Autoclave experiments were conducted for 94 days in an aqueous condition of 360 °C under 18.6 MPa in 0.01 mol/L LiOH solutions. The results showed that MAO + laser treatment resulted in a significant increase in the corrosion resistance of Zr–1Nb cladding tubes at high temperatures, because laser melting and etching could lead to a reduction in surface roughness and an increase in compactness of the pre-oxide film, and laser processing could promote the transformation of m-ZrO 2 phase to t-ZrO 2 phase. The best corrosion resistance was obtained when the pulse energy was 500 mJ, scanning speed was 0.13 mm/s, and pulse number was 2400. - Highlights: • Pre-oxide film was fabricated on Zr–1Nb cladding tube by MAO+ excimer laser processing. • Excimer laser processing induced the transformation of m-ZrO 2 to t-ZrO 2 . • The Rietveld quantitative analysis of the pre-oxide film was made. • We investigated the high temperature corrosion and corrosion mechanism of the oxide film. • The parameters of MAO+ excimer laser processing were optimized.

  10. The effect of microarc oxidation and excimer laser processing on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zr–1Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jiaoxi, E-mail: yangjiaoxi@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wang, Xin; Wen, Qiang; Wang, Xibing [Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wang, Rongshan; Zhang, Yanwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Xue, Wenbin [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The main purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of microarc oxidation (MAO) and excimer laser processing on the corrosion resistance of Zr–1Nb alloy in service environment. The pre-oxide film was fabricated on the surface of Zr–1Nb cladding tubes by MAO processing, and then subjected to KrF excimer laser irradiation. The surface morphology of the pre-oxide film was observed using a scanning electron microscope; phase compositions and quantities were determined using an X-ray diffraction; surface roughness was determined using a profilometer; and thermal expansion coefficient was measured using a dilatometer. Autoclave experiments were conducted for 94 days in an aqueous condition of 360 °C under 18.6 MPa in 0.01 mol/L LiOH solutions. The results showed that MAO + laser treatment resulted in a significant increase in the corrosion resistance of Zr–1Nb cladding tubes at high temperatures, because laser melting and etching could lead to a reduction in surface roughness and an increase in compactness of the pre-oxide film, and laser processing could promote the transformation of m-ZrO{sub 2} phase to t-ZrO{sub 2} phase. The best corrosion resistance was obtained when the pulse energy was 500 mJ, scanning speed was 0.13 mm/s, and pulse number was 2400. - Highlights: • Pre-oxide film was fabricated on Zr–1Nb cladding tube by MAO+ excimer laser processing. • Excimer laser processing induced the transformation of m-ZrO{sub 2} to t-ZrO{sub 2}. • The Rietveld quantitative analysis of the pre-oxide film was made. • We investigated the high temperature corrosion and corrosion mechanism of the oxide film. • The parameters of MAO+ excimer laser processing were optimized.

  11. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  12. Oxidative Corrosion of the UO 2 (001) Surface by Nonclassical Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, Joanne E.; Biwer, Craig A.; Chaka, Anne M. [Pacific Northwest; Ilton, Eugene S. [Pacific Northwest; Du, Yingge [Pacific Northwest; Bargar, John R. [Stanford Synchrotron; Eng, Peter J.

    2017-11-07

    Uranium oxide is central to every stage of the nuclear fuel cycle, from mining through fuel fabrication and use, to waste disposal and environmental cleanup. Its chemical and mechanical stability are intricately linked to the concentration of interstitial O atoms within the structure and the oxidation state of U. We have previously shown that during corrosion of the UO2 (111) surface under either 1 atm O2 gas or oxygenated water at room temperature, oxygen interstitials diffuse into the substrate to form a superlattice with three-layer periodicity. In the current study, we present results from surface x-ray scattering that reveal the structure of the oxygen diffusion profile beneath the (001) surface. The first few layers below the surface oscillate strongly in their surface-normal lattice parameters, suggesting preferential interstitial occupation of every other layer below the surface, which is geometrically consistent with the interstitial network that forms below the oxidized (111) surface. Deeper layers are heavily contracted and indicate that the oxidation front penetrates ~52 Å below the (001) surface after 21 days of dry O2 gas exposure at ambient pressure and temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates U is present as U(IV), U(V), and U(VI).

  13. A flow reactor for the flow supercritical water oxidation of wastes to mitigate the reactor corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have designed a flow tube reactor for supercritical water oxidation of wastes that confines the oxidation reaction to the vicinity of the axis of the tube. This prevents high temperatures and reactants as well as reaction products from coming in intimate contact with reactor walls. This implies a lessening of corrosion of the walls of the reactor. We display numerical simulations for a vertical reactor with conservative design parameters that illustrate our concept. We performed our calculations for the destruction of sodium nitrate by ammonium hydroxide In the presence of supercritical water, where the production of sodium hydroxide causes corrosion. We have compared these results with that for a horizontal set-up where the sodium hydroxide created during the reaction ends up on the floor of the tube, implying a higher probability of corrosion

  14. Application of secondary ion mass spectrometry to the study of a corrosion process: oxidation of uranium by water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, S.S.; Condon, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Corrosion of metals is an extremely important field with great economic and engineering implications at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. To effectively combat corrosion, one must understand the processes occurring. This paper shows the utility of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) data for elucidating the processes occurring in one particular corrosion process - the oxidation of uranium by water - and for validating a theoretical model. It had long been known that the oxidation of uranium by water is retarded by the presence of oxygen gas and the retardation has been assumed to occur by site blocking at the surface. However, when alternate isotopic exposures were made, followed by exposure to a mixture of 16 O 2 and 18 OH 2 , the rapid exchange of 16 O and 18 O occurred in the oxide layer, but the further oxidation by water in this and subsequent exposures was retarded for up to 21 hours. This shows graphically that OH 2 is not held up at the surface and that the retarding mechanism is effective at the oxide/metal interface rather than at the surface. The effectiveness of the O 2 to retard the further water oxidation was much reduced if no water-formed oxide layer were present. The effectiveness was also crystallite related. 12 refs., 5 figs

  15. High-Temperature Oxidation and Smelt Deposit Corrosion of Ni-Cr-Ti Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Schweizer, M.

    2013-08-01

    High Cr content Ni-Cr-Ti arc-sprayed coatings have been extensively applied to mitigate corrosion in black liquor recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry. In a previous article, the effects of key spray parameters on the coating's microstructure and its composition were investigated. Three coating microstructures were selected from that previous study to produce a dense, oxidized coating (coating A), a porous, low oxide content coating (coating B), and an optimized coating (coating C) for corrosion testing. Isothermal oxidation trials were performed in air at 550 and 900 °C for 30 days. Additional trials were performed under industrial smelt deposits at 400 and 800 °C for 30 days. The effect of the variation in coating microstructure on the oxidation and smelt's corrosion response was investigated through the characterization of the surface corrosion products, and the internal coating microstructural developments with time at high temperature. The effect of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the interaction between the coating and substrate was characterized, and the mechanism of interdiffusion was discussed.

  16. Synergistic Effect of Superhydrophobicity and Oxidized Layers on Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloy Surface Textured by Nanosecond Laser Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Modestov, Alexander D; Domantovsky, Alexandr G; Emelyanenko, Kirill A

    2015-09-02

    We report a new efficient method for fabricating a superhydrophobic oxidized surface of aluminum alloys with enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in sodium chloride solutions. The developed coatings are considered very prospective materials for the automotive industry, shipbuilding, aviation, construction, and medicine. The method is based on nanosecond laser treatment of the surface followed by chemisorption of a hydrophobic agent to achieve the superhydrophobic state of the alloy surface. We have shown that the surface texturing used to fabricate multimodal roughness of the surface may be simultaneously used for modifying the physicochemical properties of the thick surface layer of the substrate itself. Electrochemical and wetting experiments demonstrated that the superhydrophobic state of the metal surface inhibits corrosion processes in chloride solutions for a few days. However, during long-term contact of a superhydrophobic coating with a solution, the wetted area of the coating is subjected to corrosion processes due to the formation of defects. In contrast, the combination of an oxide layer with good barrier properties and the superhydrophobic state of the coating provides remarkable corrosion resistance. The mechanisms for enhancing corrosion protective properties are discussed.

  17. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation. (Author) 66 refs

  18. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi; Neralla, Sudheer; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-06-01

    We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na 2 SiO 3 , KF and NaH 2 PO 4 ·2H 2 O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  19. Influence of Al-Si alloy microstructure on the corrosion resistance of coatings formed by the microarc oxidation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudareva Natalia.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the high-silicon aluminum alloy initial microstructure on the quality of the coating formed by microarc oxidation (MAO has been studied. The MAO treatment is applied to AK12D samples in the initial coarse-grained state and after high pressure torsion. The following coating properties are studied: thickness, microhardness, porosity and corrosion resistance. It is established that the MAO layers properties depend on the base microstructure much. High pressure torsion applied to AK12D samples before MAO results in increase of the coating thickness by ∼ 2 times. The microhardness of coatings reduces and their corrosion resistance degrades by ∼ 10 times.

  20. Plasma electrolytic oxidation treatment mode influence on corrosion properties of coatings obtained on Zr-1Nb alloy in silicate-phosphate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrakhov, R. G.; Mukaeva, V. R.; Fatkullin, A. R.; Gorbatkov, M. V.; Tarasov, P. V.; Lazarev, D. M.; Babu, N. Ramesh; Parfenov, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    This research is aimed at improvement of corrosion properties for Zr-1Nb alloy via plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). The coatings obtained in DC, pulsed unipolar and pulsed bipolar modes were assessed using SEM, XRD, PDP and EIS techniques. It was shown that pulsed unipolar mode provides the PEO coatings having promising combination of the coating thickness, surface roughness, porosity, corrosion potential and current density, and charge transfer resistance, all contributing to corrosion protection of the zirconium alloy for advanced fuel cladding applications.

  1. The iron and cerium oxide influence on the electric conductivity and the corrosion resistance of anodized aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Kellie Provazi de

    2006-01-01

    The influence of different treatments on the aluminum system covered with aluminum oxide is investigated. The aluminum anodization in sulphuric media and in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric media was used to alter the corrosion resistance, thickness, coverage degree and microhardness of the anodic oxide. Iron electrodeposition inside the anodic oxide was used to change its electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. Direct and pulsed current were used for iron electrodeposition and the Fe(SO 4 ) 2 (NH 4 ) 2 .6H 2 O electrolyte composition was changed with the addition of boric and ascorbic acids. To the sealing treatment the CeCl 3 composition was varied. The energy dispersive x-ray (EDS), the x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (FRX) and the morphologic analysis by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) allowed to verify that, the pulsed current increase the iron content inside the anodic layer and that the use of the additives inhibits the iron oxidation. The chronopotentiometric curves obtained during iron electrodeposition indicated that the boric and ascorbic acids mixture increased the electrodeposition process efficiency. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIE), the Vickers (Hv) microhardness measurements and morphologic analysis evidenced that the sealing treatment improves the corrosion resistance of the anodic film modified with iron. The electrical impedance (EI) technique allowed to prove the electric conductivity increase of the anodized aluminum with iron electrodeposited even after the cerium low concentration treatment. Iron nanowires were prepared by using the anodic oxide pores as template. (author)

  2. Comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrocarburised AISI 4140 steel before and after post-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydarzadeh Sohi, M.; Ebrahimi, M.; Honarbakhsh Raouf, A.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrocarburised AISI 4140 steel before and after post-oxidation was investigated. Plasma nitrocarburising was carried out at 530 o C, 570 o C and 630 o C for 5 h in an atmosphere consisting of 80 vol.% N 2 , 17 vol.% H 2 and 3 vol.% CO 2 . After nitrocarburising, plasma post-oxidation was performed at 450 o C for 1 h in a gas mixture of 50 vol.% O 2 and 50 vol.% H 2 . The microstructure of the treated samples was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness techniques. Dynamic polarization test was also used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the samples. The results indicated that the compound layer was composed of ε-Fe 2-3 (N, C) and γ'-Fe 4 (N, C) phases. The amount of ε-Fe 2-3 (N, C) phase increased as the treatment temperature rose from 530 o C to 570 o C and decreased at 630 o C. The X-ray diffraction patterns of post-oxidized samples confirmed the formation of the highest amount of magnetite after post-oxidation of samples that had been nitrocarburised at 570 o C as compared with the samples that had been treated at 530 o C and 630 o C. Nitrocarburising at 570 o C followed by post-oxidation also provided the highest corrosion resistance among all treatment conditions.

  3. Guideline tests on the corrosion of sintered uranium oxide by lead and sodium about 450 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoff, A.; Pointud, R.

    1958-05-01

    Within the frame of the investigation of behaviour of a fuel element (such as UO 2 ) under irradiation, the authors report the study of the physical-chemical action of the coolant at different temperatures on the body to be irradiated. Thus, sintered uranium oxide has been submitted to corrosion by lead and by sodium during 250 hours at temperatures between 400 and 500 C. The physical characteristics of the UO 2 powder and of different sintered UO 2 pellets produced from this powder under different sintering processes are indicated, as well as the results of a spectrographic analysis of the sintered UO 2 . Corrosion devices, treatments and obtained results are reported for corrosion by lead and by sodium. In the latter case, extraction processes are discussed (using butyl alcohol, or melting in vaseline oil)

  4. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce2O3 and CeO2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  5. Electrochemical oxidation of zirconium alloys in pre-transition and post-transition kinetic regimes at corrosion in electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkov, A.A.; Shavshin, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    With the aim of investigation on oxidation of zirconium alloys (Zr+2.5% Nb) the critical thickness of beginning of spalling of froming oxide films in HCl and NHO 3 aqueous solutions was evaluated by coulometry with accelerated procedure. Some variants of predeposition of modificated oxide coatings are proposed increase pre-transition regime time and to decrease corrosion during post-transition regime. Increase in agressivity of solutions (addition of 1 vol.% HF) and UV irradiation are found to increase 3-4 times pre-transition period

  6. High temperature oxidation and corrosion in marine environments of thermal spray deposited coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.; Chrissafis, K.

    2008-01-01

    Flame spraying is a widely used technique for depositing a great variety of materials in order to enforce the mechanical or the anticorrosion characteristics of the substrate. Its high rate application is due to the rapidity of the process, its effectiveness and its low cost. In this work, flame-sprayed Al coatings are deposited on low carbon steels in order to enhance their anticorrosion performance. The main adhesion mechanism of the coating is mechanical anchorage, which can provide the necessary protection to steel used in several industrial and constructive applications. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating, the as-coated samples are subjected in a salt spray chamber and in elevated temperature environments. The examination and characterization of the corroded samples is done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The as-formed coatings are extremely rough and have a lamellic homogeneous morphology. It is also found that Al coatings provide better protection in marine atmospheres, while at elevated temperatures a thick oxide layer is formed, which can delaminate after long oxidation periods due to its low adherence to the underlying coating, thus eliminating the substrate protection

  7. Polymer thin film as coating layer to prevent corrosion of metal/metal oxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman; Kundu, Sarathi

    2018-04-01

    Thin film of polymer is used as coating layer and the corrosion of metal/metal oxide layer is studied with the variation of the thickness of the coating layer. The thin layer of polystyrene is fabricated using spin coating method on copper oxide (CuO) film which is deposited on glass substrate using DC magnetron sputtering technique. Thickness of the polystyrene and the CuO layers are determined using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) technique. CuO thin films coated with the polystyrene layer are exposed to acetic acid (2.5 v/v% aqueous CH3COOH solution) environments and are subsequently analyzed using UV-Vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface morphology of the film before and after interaction with the acidic environment is determined using AFM. Results obtained from the XRR and UV-Vis spectroscopy confirm that the thin film of polystyrene acts as an anticorrosion coating layer and the strength of the coating depends upon the polymer layer thickness at a constant acid concentration.

  8. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Collins, Boyce; Badve, Aditya; Dong, Zhongyun; Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Behaviour of steel corrosion products under neutral-oxidizing water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynova, O.I.; Petrova, T.I.; Samojlov, Yu.F.; Kharitonova, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of laboratory experiments on studying the solubility of iron and cobalt corrosion products are given. It is established that oxygen dosage doesn't influence practically on the iron corrosion product solubility but cobalt corrosion product solubility decreases, the presence of hydrogen peroxide in an initial solution leads to increase of the iron corrosion product solubility especially at 125 deg C. It is shown that hydrogen peroxide affects unambiguously the cobalt corrosion product solubility: at hydrogen peroxide concentration of about 400 μg/l at 50-275 deg C temperature their solubility is minimum

  10. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Collins, Boyce; Badve, Aditya; Dong, Zhongyun; Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. - Highlights: • Effects of plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 in vitro and in vivo • Retardation of degradation via plasma electrolytic oxidation in vitro and in vivo • Differentiation of in vitro and in vivo corrosion types and products

  11. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yongseok [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Tan, Zongqing [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States); Jurey, Chris [Luke Engineering, Wadsworth, OH 44282 (United States); Collins, Boyce [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Badve, Aditya [Business and Biology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27514 (United States); Dong, Zhongyun [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States); Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Sankar, Jagannathan [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. - Highlights: • Effects of plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 in vitro and in vivo • Retardation of degradation via plasma electrolytic oxidation in vitro and in vivo • Differentiation of in vitro and in vivo corrosion types and products.

  12. Predicting the Oxidation/Corrosion Performance of Structural Alloys in Supercritical CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Ian [Wright HT Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Kung, Steven [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States); Shingledecker, John [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2017-12-22

    This project was the first research to address oxidation of alloys under supercritical CO2 conditions relevant to a semi-open Allam Cycle system. The levels of impurities expected in the CO2 for typical operation were determined by thermodynamic and mass balance calculations, and a test rig was assembled and used to run corrosion tests at temperatures from 650 to 750°C in CO2 at 200 bar for up to 5,000h, with and without impurities. Oxidation rates were measured for seven alloys representing high-strength ferritic steels, standard austenitic steels, and Ni-based alloys with higher-temperature capabilities. The very thin, protective scales formed on the high-temperature alloys provided significant challenges in characterization and thickness measurement. The rates of mass gain and scale thickening were possibly slower when oxidizing impurities were present in the sCO2, and the scale morphologies formed on the ferritic and austenitic steels were consistent with expectations, and similar to those formed in high-pressure steam, with some potential influences of C. Some surface hardening (possibly due to carbon uptake) was identified in ferritic steels Grade 91 and VM12, and appeared more severe in commercially-pure CO2. Hardening was also observed in austenitic steel TP304H, but that in HR3C appeared anomalous, probably the result of work-hardening from specimen preparation. No hardening was found in Ni-base alloys IN617 and IN740H. An existing EPRI Oxide Exfoliation Model was modified for this application and used to evaluate the potential impact of the scales grown in sCO2 on service lifetimes in compact heat exchanger designs. Results suggested that reduction in flow area by simple oxide growth as well as by accumulation of exfoliated scale may have a major effect on the design of small-channel heat exchangers. In addition, the specific oxidation behavior of each alloy strongly influences the

  13. Enhancement of corrosion resistance for plasma nitrided AISI 4140 steel by plain air plasma post-oxidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jiqiang; Liu, Han; Ye, Xuemei [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Materials Surface Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Chai, Yating [Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States); Hu, Jing, E-mail: jinghoo@126.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Materials Surface Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Plain air was primarily used for plasma post-oxidation for AISI 4140 steel. • A thin iron oxide layer composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was formed on top of the compound layer. • The ratio of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was closely related to the post-oxidizing conditions. • Post-oxidizing at 673 K for 60 min brought out highest ratio of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and optimum corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Plasma post-oxidizing was conducted immediately after plasma nitriding in the same equipment for AISI 4140 steel, and plain air was used as the oxygen bearing gas. The cross-sectional microstructures of the treated samples were observed by optical metallography and scanning electron microcopy (SEM), and the thickness of compound layer was measured accordingly. The phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical polarization, and the surface morphology before and after polarization test was also observed by SEM. Meanwhile, standard Gibbs free energy of the oxidation reactions existed in Fe–O system was calculated. The results show that a thin iron oxide layer composed of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is formed on top of the compound layer during plasma post-oxidizing process, and the ratio of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) to hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is depended on plasma post-oxidizing temperature and time. Highest ratio of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is obtained while post-oxidizing at 673 K for 60 min due to lower standard Gibbs free energy and appropriate forming rate for the formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at this temperature. The thin oxide layer brings out significant enhancement of corrosion resistance, especially at higher ratios of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, due to the dense and adherent characteristic of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide. Surface images of the post-oxidizing specimen

  14. Development of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria using hydrogen from radiolysis or metal corrosion; Developpement de populations microbiennes oxydant l'hydrogene produit par radiolyse ou par corrosion des metaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libert, M F; Sellier, R; Marty, V; Camaro, S [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DCC/DESD/SEP), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2000-07-01

    The effect of many parameters need to be studied to characterize the long term behavior of nuclear waste in a deep repository. These parameters concern the chemical effects, radiolytic effects, mechanical properties, water composition, and microbiological activity. To evaluate microbial activity in such an environment, work was focused on an inventory of key nutrients (C, H, 0, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The production of hydrogen in the nuclear waste environment leads to the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria, which modify the gas production balance. A deep repository containing bituminized waste drums implies several sources of hydrogen: - water radiolysis; -corrosion of metal containers; - radiolysis of the embedding matrix (bitumen). Two deep geological disposal conditions leading to H{sub 2} production in a bituminized nuclear waste environment were simulated in the present study: - H{sub 2} production by iron corrosion under anaerobic conditions was simulated by adding 10% of H{sub 2} in the atmosphere; - H{sub 2} production by radiolysis of bitumen matrix was approached by subjecting this material to external gamma irradiation with a dose rate near real conditions (6 Gy/h). The presence of dissolved H{sub 2} in water allows the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria leading to: - CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} production; - H{sub 2} consumption; - lower NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration caused by reduction to nitrogen. In the first case, hydrogen consumption is limited by the NO{sub 3}{sup -} release rate from the bitumen matrix. In the second case, however, under gamma radiation at a low dose rate, hydrogen production is weak, and the hydrogen is completely consumed by microorganisms. Knowledge about these hydrogen oxidizing bacteria is just beginning to emerge. Heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria adapt well to hydrogen metabolism (autotrophic metabolism) by oxidizing H{sub 2} instead of hydrocarbons. (authors)

  15. Effect of additive on electrochemical corrosion properties of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings formed on CP Ti under different processing frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaei, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi.babaei@ut.ac.ir; Dehghanian, Changiz; Vanaki, Mojtaba

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • PEO coatings formed on Cp Ti from phosphate electrolyte with zirconate additive. • The SEM results provide information of microdischarge behavior. • The effect of additive on structure and long-term corrosion behavior was investigated. • The additive influence on coating performance varies with processing frequency. - Abstract: The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating containing zirconium oxide was fabricated on CP Ti at different processing frequencies viz., 100 Hz and 1000 Hz in a (Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3})-additive containing NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-based solution, and long-term electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Electrochemical degradation behavior of two-layered coatings formed at different frequencies was turned out to be governed by concentration of electrolyte additive. With increasing additive concentration, the coating obtained at frequency of 1000 Hz exhibited enhanced corrosion resistance. However, corrosion resistance of the coating prepared at 100 Hz was found to decrease with increased additive, which was attributed to intensified microdischarges damaging the protective effect of inner layer. Nevertheless, the electrolyte additive was found to mitigate the long-term degradation of the coatings to a significant extent.

  16. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Neralla, Sudheer [Jet-Hot LLC, Burlington, NC 27215 (United States); Sankar, Jagannathan [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method was developed to control corrosion, porosity, and mechanical property. • Mechanical properties of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were affected by the different electrolyte. • Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were compared with uncoated one. - Abstract: We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, KF and NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  17. Highly active and non-corrosive catalytic systems for the coupling reactions of ethylene oxide and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuyao; Jin, So Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Je Seung; Kim, Hoon Sik [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jongki; Lee, Won Woong [College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jung Bok [R and D Center, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Lithium halide-based molten salts (LiX-[BMIm]Br) synthesized from the reactions of lithium halides (LiX, X = Cl or Br) with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([BMIm]Br), and their catalytic performances and corrosivities were tested for the coupling reactions of ethylene oxide with carbon dioxide to produce ethylene carbonate. The activity of a molten salt was influenced with the change of halide ion. At a fixed molar amount of LiX, the activity of LiX-[BMIm]Br increased with increasing molar ratio of LiX/[BMIm]Br up to 1–1.25, and then decreased thereafter. Fast atom bombardment mass spectral analysis of LiBr-[BMIm]Br, obtained by dissolving LiBr in [BMIm]Br in a 1:1 molar ratio, implies that [Li{sub a} X{sub a+1}]{sup −} are active species for the carboxylation of ethylene oxide with LiX-[BMIm]Br. The corrosion test toward carbon steel coupons demonstrates that all the Cl-containing molten salts are corrosive, whereas the salts without containing Cl{sup −} are non-corrosive under the carboxylation condition.

  18. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of an epoxy-polyamide coating containing different ratios of micaceous iron oxide/Al pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikravesh, B.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Sarabi, A.A.; Kasiriha, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The corrosion resistance of the coating was improved using MIO and Al pigments. → The greatest coating corrosion resistance was observed at MIO/Al ratio of 10/90. → The cathodic disbonded area of the coating was decreased using MIO and Al particles. → The lowest disbonded area was observed at MIO/Al ratio of 10/90. → Al particles had high capability of reacting with the OH - ions. - Abstract: The corrosion resistance of an epoxy coating reinforced with different ratios of MIO/Al pigments was studied. The coatings properties were investigated by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), salt spray test, cathodic disbonding and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating was improved using MIO (micaceous iron oxide) and Al pigments. The corrosion resistance of the purely Al pigmented coating was considerably greater than the purely MIO pigmented coating. The cathodic disbonded area of coating was decreased using MIO and Al pigments. The decrease in disbonded area was more pronounced in the presence of Al particles.

  19. Influence of alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides on the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, J.; Ferrier, G.A.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Joseph.Metzler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates strategies to mitigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Zircaloy-4 sheathing materials. The CANLUB coatings currently used in CANDU reactors contain both alkali metal and alkaline earth metal impurities, which can exist as oxides (e.g., Na{sub 2}O and CaO). It is believed that when the corrosive fission product iodine reacts with these oxides, the iodine can be sequestered through the formation of an iodide (e.g.,NaI and CaI{sub 2}). The subsequent O{sub 2} release may repair cracks in the protective ZrO{sub 2} layer on the sheathing, shielding the Zircaloy-4 sheathing from further corrosive fission product attack. For this investigation, O{sub 2} gas, Na{sub 2}O, and CaO were separately introduced into an environment wherein slotted Zircaloy-4 rings endure mechanical stresses in iodine vapour at high temperatures. Controlled additions of O{sub 2} gas created a slight reduction in the corrosive attack on Zircaloy-4 sheathing, while the inclusion of Na{sub 2}O and CaO lead to greater reductions. (author)

  20. High-temperature Corrosion Resistance of Composite Coating Prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation Combined with Pack Cementation Aluminizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Zu-jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic film was obtained by micro-arc oxidation (MAO process on Al/C103 specimen, which was prepared by pack cementation aluminizing technology on C103 niobium alloy. With the aid of XRD and SEM equipped with EDS, chemical compositions and microstructures of the composite coatings before and after high-temperature corrosion were analyzed. The behavior and mechanism of the composite coatings in high-temperature oxidation and hot corrosion were also investigated. The results indicate that oxidation mass gain at 1000℃ for 10h of the Al/C103 specimen is 6.98mg/cm2, and it is 2.89mg/cm2 of the MAO/Al/C103 specimen. However, the mass gain of MAO/Al/C103 specimen (57.52mg/cm2 is higher than that of Al/C103 specimen (28.08mg/cm2 after oxidation 20h. After hot corrosion in 75%Na2SO4 and 25%NaCl at 900℃ for 50h, the mass gain of Al/C103 and MAO/Al/C103 specimens are 70.54mg/cm2 and 55.71mg/cm2 respectively, Al2O3 and perovskite NaNbO3 phases are formed on the surface; the diffusion of molten salt is suppressed, due to part of NaNbO3 accumulated in the MAO micropores. Therefore, MAO/Al/C103 specimen exhibits better hot corrosion resistance.

  1. Influence of desiccation procedures on the surface wettability and corrosion resistance of porous aluminium anodic oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Meng, E-mail: ZhengMeng@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sakairi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Jha, Himendra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple desiccation treatment without coating or etching produces hydrophobicity of porous anodic oxide film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment time can be shortened by controlling desiccation condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface microstructure is the key point to determine the wettability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrophobic surfaces show better corrosion resistance than oxide aluminium. - Abstract: A hydrophobic oxide film was formed on aluminium by anodizing followed by desiccation treatment. Films subjected to gradual heating and cooling exhibit larger water contact angles than samples exposed to fast heating and cooling at the same temperature. From SEM and Auger Electron Spectroscopic observations, the low wettability surface shows a regular porous morphology with no significant chemical composition differences due to the different treatments. The desiccation process improves the corrosion resistance, shown by immersion in NaCl. The change in morphology by the desiccation processes is considered a main reason to lower the wettability, which further affects the corrosion properties.

  2. Preparation of ceramic coating on Ti substrate by Plasma electrolytic oxidation in different electrolytes and evaluation of its corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhfar, M.; Dehghanian, C.; Baradaran, A.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic oxide coatings (titania) were produced on Ti by micro-arc oxidation in different aluminate and carbonate based electrolytes. This process was conducted under constant pulsed DC voltage condition. The effect of KOH and NaF in aluminate based solution was also studied. The surface morphology, growth and phase composition of coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior of the coatings was also examined by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the sparking initiation voltage (spark voltage) had a significant effect on the form and properties of coatings. Coatings obtained from potassium aluminate based solution had a lower spark voltage, higher surface homogeneity and a better corrosion resistance than the carbonate based solution. Addition of NaF instead of KOH had improper effects on the homogeneity and adhesion of coatings which in turn caused a poor corrosion protection behavior of the oxide layer. AC impedance curves showed two time constants which is an indication of the coatings with an outer porous layer and an inner compact layer.

  3. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of micro-arc oxidized Ti surface modified with hydrothermal treatment and chitosan coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupane, Madhav Prasad; Park, Il Song; Lee, Min Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the surface modification of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) by a composite/multilayer coating approach for biomedical applications. CP-Ti samples were treated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequently some of the samples were coated with chitosan (Chi) by dip coating method, while others were subjected to hydrothermal treatment (HT) followed by chitosan coating. The MAO, MAO/Chi, and MAO/HT/Chi coated Ti were characterized and their characteristics were compared with CP-Ti. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the structural and morphological characteristics. The average surface roughness was determined using a surface profilometer. The corrosion resistance of untreated and surface modified Ti in commercial saline at 298 K was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test. The results indicated that the chitosan coating is very well integrated with the MAO and MAO/HT coating by physically interlocking itself with the coated layer and almost sealed all the pores. The surface roughness of hydrothermally treated and chitosan coated MAO film was superior evidently to that with other sample groups. The corrosion studies demonstrated that the MAO, hydrothermally treated and chitosan coated sample enhanced the corrosion resistance of titanium. The result indicates that fabrication of hydrothermally treated MAO surface coatings with chitosan is a significant approach to protect the titanium from corrosion, hence enhancing the potential use of titanium as bio-implants. - Highlights: • Micro-arc oxidized (MAO) and hydrothermally treated (HT) Ti surfaces are coated with chitosan (Chi). • The MAO/HT/Chi surface exhibits pores sealing and enhanced the surface roughness. • The MAO/HT/Chi surface significantly increase the corrosion resistance. • The MAO/HT/Chi can be a potential surface of titanium for bio-implants

  4. [Corrosion property and oxide film of dental casting alloys before and after porcelain firing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Wu, Feng-ming

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the types and compositions of oxide films formed during porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) firing on three kinds of dental casting alloys, and to investigate the corrosion property of these alloys in Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium (DMEM) cell culture fluid, before and after PFM firing. Specimens of three dental casting alloys (Ni-Cr, Co-Cr and Ni-Ti) before and after PFM firing were prepared, and were immersed in DMEM cell culture fluid. After 30 days, the type and concentration of released metal ions were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for analysis of oxide film on the alloys. One way-ANOVA was adopted in data analysis. The total amount of metal ions released from the three dental alloys was found to be highest in Ni-Cr alloy [(2.829 ± 0.694) mg/L], followed by Co-Cr [(2.120 ± 0.418) mg/L] and Ni-Ti alloy [(1.211 ± 0.101) mg/L]. The amount of Ni ions released from Ni-Cr alloys [(1.531 ± 0.392) mg/L] was higher than that from Ni-Ti alloys [(0.830 ± 0.052) mg/L]. The amount of Cr, Mo ions released from Co-Cr alloy [Cr: (0.048 ± 0.011) mg/L, Mo: (1.562 ± 0.333) mg/L] was higher than that from Ni-Cr alloy [Cr: (0.034 ± 0.002) mg/L, Mo: (1.264 ± 0.302) mg/L] and Ni-Ti alloy [Cr: (0.013 ± 0.006) mg/L, Mo: (0.151 ± 0.026) mg/L] (P < 0.05). After PFM firing, the total amount of metal irons released from the three dental alloys decreased [Ni-Cr: (0.861 ± 0.054) mg/L, Co-Cr: (0.695 ± 0.327) mg/L, Ni-Ti: (0.892 ± 0.115) mg/L] (P < 0.05). In addition, XPS showed increase of Cr(2)O(3) and Mo-Ni oxide on the surface of all the alloys after PFM firing. The amount of ions released from Ni-Cr alloy was the highest among the three dental casting alloys, this means Ni-Cr alloy is prone to corrode. The PFM firing process changed the alloys' surface composition. Increased Ni, Cr and Mo were found in oxide film, and

  5. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic p...... of the vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....... polarization, acetic acid salt spray, filiform corrosion test, and tape test. The oxide films formed by steam treatment showed good corrosion resistance in NaCl solution by significantly reducing anodic and cathodic activities. The pitting potential of the surface treated with steam was a function...

  6. Interface control of atomic layer deposited oxide coatings by filtered cathodic arc deposited sublayers for improved corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, Emma, E-mail: emma.harkonen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka [DIARC-Technology Inc., Espoo (Finland); Díaz, Belén; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS (UMR 7075) – Chimie ParisTech (ENSCP), F-75005 Paris (France); Fenker, Martin [FEM Research Institute, Precious Metals and Metals Chemistry, D-73525 Schwäbisch Gmünd (Germany); Tóth, Lajos; Radnóczi, György [Research Centre for Natural Sciences HAS, (MTA TKK), Budapest (Hungary); Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Sublayers grown with filtered cathodic arc deposition (FCAD) were added under atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide coatings for interface control and improved corrosion protection of low alloy steel. The FCAD sublayer was either Ta:O or Cr:O–Ta:O nanolaminate, and the ALD layer was Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanolaminate, Al{sub x}Ta{sub y}O{sub z} mixture or graded mixture. The total thicknesses of the FCAD/ALD duplex coatings were between 65 and 120 nm. Thorough analysis of the coatings was conducted to gain insight into the influence of the FCAD sublayer on the overall coating performance. Similar characteristics as with single FCAD and ALD coatings on steel were found in the morphology and composition of the duplex coatings. However, the FCAD process allowed better control of the interface with the steel by reducing the native oxide and preventing its regrowth during the initial stages of the ALD process. Residual hydrocarbon impurities were buried in the interface between the FCAD layer and steel. This enabled growth of ALD layers with improved electrochemical sealing properties, inhibiting the development of localized corrosion by pitting during immersion in acidic NaCl and enhancing durability in neutral salt spray testing. - Highlights: • Corrosion protection properties of ALD coatings were improved by FCAD sublayers. • The FCAD sublayer enabled control of the coating-substrate interface. • The duplex coatings offered improved sealing properties and durability in NSS. • The protective properties were maintained during immersion in a corrosive solution. • The improvements were due to a more ideal ALD growth on the homogeneous FCAD oxide.

  7. Improving the corrosion resistance of Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy by micro-arc oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Y.H. [The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, B.P., E-mail: zhangbp@sxicc.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Lu, C.X. [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Geng, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, corrosion resistance of the Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy was modified by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) process. The microstructure and phase constituents of MAO layer were characterized by SEM, XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of MAO treated Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy in the simulated body fluid were characterized by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The microstructure results indicated that a kind of ceramic film was composed by MgO and MgF{sub 2} was formed on the surface of Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy after MAO treatment. The electrochemical test reveals that the corrosion resistance of MAO treated samples increase 1 order of magnitude. The mechanical intensity test showed that the MAO treated samples has suitable mechanical properties. - Highlights: • Ceramic layer which is composited by MgO and MgF{sub 2} is prepared to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy. • MAO treatment does not affect the mechanical properties of the Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy. • After 30-day immersion in SBF, the mechanical properties of MAO coated samples are still enough for bone fixed.

  8. Improving the corrosion resistance of Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy by micro-arc oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Y.H.; Zhang, B.P.; Lu, C.X.; Geng, L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, corrosion resistance of the Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy was modified by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) process. The microstructure and phase constituents of MAO layer were characterized by SEM, XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of MAO treated Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy in the simulated body fluid were characterized by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The microstructure results indicated that a kind of ceramic film was composed by MgO and MgF 2 was formed on the surface of Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy after MAO treatment. The electrochemical test reveals that the corrosion resistance of MAO treated samples increase 1 order of magnitude. The mechanical intensity test showed that the MAO treated samples has suitable mechanical properties. - Highlights: • Ceramic layer which is composited by MgO and MgF 2 is prepared to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy. • MAO treatment does not affect the mechanical properties of the Mg–4.0Zn–0.2Ca alloy. • After 30-day immersion in SBF, the mechanical properties of MAO coated samples are still enough for bone fixed

  9. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niroumandrad, S. [Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostami, M. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Flaky aluminum pigments were modified with cerium nitrate salt. • pH value of 3.0 was chosen as the optimized pH for the cerium solution. • Corrosion resistance of the pigment significantly increased after modification. • Alkaline pre-treatment prior to modification affected the cerium layer performance. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  10. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Flaky aluminum pigments were modified with cerium nitrate salt. • pH value of 3.0 was chosen as the optimized pH for the cerium solution. • Corrosion resistance of the pigment significantly increased after modification. • Alkaline pre-treatment prior to modification affected the cerium layer performance. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce 2 O 3 and CeO 2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  11. A Comparative Study of Cyclic Oxidation and Sulfates-Induced Hot Corrosion Behavior of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Cr-Ti Coatings at Moderate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenmin; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Hong, Sheng; Chen, Liyan; Qin, Yujiao

    2015-06-01

    The cyclic oxidation and sulfates-induced hot corrosion behaviors of a Ni-43Cr-0.3Ti arc-sprayed coating at 550-750 °C were characterized and compared in this study. In general, all the oxidation and hot corrosion kinetic curves of the coating followed a parabolic law, i.e., the weight of the specimens showed a rapid growth initially and then reached the gradual state. However, the initial stage of the hot corrosion process was approximately two times longer than that of the oxidation process, indicating a longer preparation time required for the formation of a protective scale in the former process. At 650 °C, the parabolic rate constant for the hot corrosion was 7.2 × 10-12 g2/(cm4·s), approximately 1.7 times higher than that for the oxidation at the same temperature. The lower parabolic rate constant for the oxidation was mainly attributed to the formation of a protective oxide scale on the surface of corroded specimens, which was composed of a mixture of NiO, Cr2O3, and NiCr2O4. However, as the liquid molten salts emerged during the hot corrosion, these protective oxides would be dissolved and the coating was corrupted acceleratedly.

  12. Oxide induced corrosion on the welded stainless steels SS 2352 and 2353

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, S.; Li Huiqin.

    1991-01-01

    The pitting corrosion properties have been investigated in welded and unwelded condition by polarization tests in sodium chloride solutions. The two steels were TIG welded without adding welding material and as shielding on the bottom side argon gas containing 2, 26 or 99 ppm oxygen was used. In some tests low breakthrough potentials were received, without discovering any pitting corrosion in the specimen surfaces. The unwelded SS 2352 steel had a critical (lowest) pitting temperature (CPT) of 5 degrees C in the more concentrated solution. For the same steel with weld pitting corrosion was obtained at 5 degrees C, which was the lowest temperature for the tests. Thus the CPT value was lower than 5 degrees C, but by looking at the pitting corrosion potentials the following conclusion could be drawn: Welding with higher oxygen content in the shielding gas implied lower pitting corrosion resistance. For the SS 2353 steel the CPT values were 25 and 27.5 degrees C for material without weld, in contact with the more concentrated and the more dilute solution respectively. Welded material was all through more sensitive to pitting corrosion, and the CPT values were 15-17.5, 15 and 5-10 degrees C for welded areas which had been gas shielded with argon containing 2, 26 and 99 ppm oxygen respectively. The result thus showed that welding with shielding gas containing maximum about 30 ppm oxygen does not substantially affect the pitting corrosion properties. Post treatment of the welding areas increased the pitting corrosion resistance. Acid pickling implied the highest pitting corrosion resistance with 15 degrees C as CPT value for the 2353 steel in the more concentrated solution. Steel brushing implied an obvious increase to the pitting corrosion resistance compared to untreated weld areas and the same statement could be done for sand blasted surfaces. (10 refs., 16 tabs., 11 figs.)

  13. Understanding corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys from subcutaneous mouse model: effect of Zn element concentration and plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Xu, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongyun; Collins, Boyce; Yun, Yeoheung; Sankar, Jagannathan

    2015-03-01

    Mg-Zn-Ca alloys are considered as suitable biodegradable metallic implants because of their biocompatibility and proper physical properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn concentration of Mg-xZn-0.3Ca (x=1, 3 and 5wt.%) alloys and surface modification by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on corrosion behavior in in vivo environment in terms of microstructure, corrosion rate, types of corrosion, and corrosion product formation. Microstructure analysis of alloys and morphological characterization of corrosion products were conducted using x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental composition and crystal structure of corrosion products were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that 1) as-cast Mg-xZn-0.3Ca alloys are composed of Mg matrix and a secondary phase of Ca2Mg6Zn3 formed along grain boundaries, 2) the corrosion rate of Mg-xZn-0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing concentration of Zn in the alloy, 3) corrosion rates of alloys treated by PEO sample are decreased in in vivo environment, and 4) the corrosion products of these alloys after in vivo tests are identified as brucite (Mg(OH)2), hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), and magnesite (MgCO3·3H2O). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  15. A corrosion-protective coating based on a solution-processable polymer-grafted graphene oxide nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Kai; Sun, Yimin; Duan, Hongwei; Guo, Xingpeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solution-processable polymer-grafted graphene nanocomposite is synthesized. • The nanocomposite exhibits synergistic properties of both building blocks. • The nanocomposite can be easily applied to form a protective coating on metals. • The coating can effectively prevent corrosion of copper substrate. - Abstract: A new type of solution-processable graphene coating has been synthesized by grafting polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) brushes on graphene oxide (GO) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). One major finding is that the PMMA-grafted GO nanocomposite exhibits synergistic properties of both building blocks, i.e., permeation inhibition of GO and solubility of PMMA in a variety of solvents, which makes it compatible with commonly used coating methods to form uniform coatings with controlled thickness. Our results demonstrate that PMMA-grafted GO coating can effectively block charge transfer at the metal–electrolyte interface and prevent corrosion of the copper substrate under aggressive saline conditions

  16. Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wu, Yekang; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Guorui; Li, Dalong; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Yu, Shengxue; Shen, Dejiu; Nash, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), potentio-dynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Detached coating samples were fabricated by an electrochemical method and more details of the internal micro-structure of coatings were clearly observed on the fractured cross-section morphologies of the samples compared to general polished cross-section morphologies. Evolution mechanisms of the coating corrosion behavior in relation to the evolution of micro-structural characteristics were discussed in detail.

  17. Improvement of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloy with Wettability Controlled Porous Oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakairi, M.; Goyal, V. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The combined process of porous type anodizing and desiccation treatment was applied to improve wettability of A1050 aluminum alloy. The water contact angles of anodized samples were increaseds considerably with desiccation treatment. However, there was no considerable effect of polishing and anodizing time on water contact angle. The corrosion behavior with the treatments was investigated electrochemically. The corrosion resistance of the samples in 3.5 mass% NaCl solutions increased with higher contact angle. Anodized and desiccated samples showed better corrosion resistance than un-desiccated samples around rest potential region.

  18. Improvement of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloy with Wettability Controlled Porous Oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakairi, M.; Goyal, V.

    2016-01-01

    The combined process of porous type anodizing and desiccation treatment was applied to improve wettability of A1050 aluminum alloy. The water contact angles of anodized samples were increaseds considerably with desiccation treatment. However, there was no considerable effect of polishing and anodizing time on water contact angle. The corrosion behavior with the treatments was investigated electrochemically. The corrosion resistance of the samples in 3.5 mass% NaCl solutions increased with higher contact angle. Anodized and desiccated samples showed better corrosion resistance than un-desiccated samples around rest potential region.

  19. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of composite MAO/sol-gel coatings on magnesium alloy AZ91D using combined micro-arc oxidation and sol-gel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Wei; Chen Baizhen; Shi Xichang; Chen Ya; Xiao Xiang

    2009-01-01

    Protective composite coatings were obtained on a magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and sol-gel technique. The coatings consisted of a MAO layer and a sol-gel layer. The microstructure and composition of the MAO coating and the composite coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-rays (EDX). Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and total immersion tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of these coatings in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results show that the sol-gel layer provides corrosion protection by physically sealing the pores in the MAO coating and acting as a barrier. The composite coatings can suppress the corrosion process by preventing the corrosive ions from transferring or diffusing to the magnesium alloy substrate. This enhances the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy AZ91D significantly

  20. 1. The application of PIE techniques to the study of the corrosion of spent oxide fuel in deep-rock groundwaters. 2. Spent fuel degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    During the autumn of 1990, papers summarizing work performed at Studsvik as part of the SKB research programme designed to study the corrosion behaviour of spent nuclear fuel in deep-rock groundwater were presented at two scientific meetings: The first paper presents results and observations of the study of the corrosion of spent oxide fuel in deep-rock ground-waters. The PIE techniques were applied to the detailed study of spent fuel both before and after water contact. The second paper represents an up-dated reporting of results obtained in the Swedish programme relevant to preferential dissolution effects, including interim results from recently stored experiments specifically designed to study possible correlations between corrosion behaviour and fuel properties conditioned by burnup and/or local power variations. Recent observations during the search for corrosion sites in fuel exposed to corrosion for about 4 years are also presented. (KAE)

  1. Evaluation of Iron Nickel Oxide Nanopowder as Corrosion Inhibitor: Effect of Metallic Cations on Carbon Steel in Aqueous NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, A. U.; Mishra, Brajendra [Colorado School of Mines, Denver (United States); Mittal, Vikas [The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of iron-nickel oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.NiO) nanopowder (FeNi) as an anti-corrosion pigment for a different application. The corrosion protection ability and the mechanism involved was determined using aqueous solution of FeNi prepared in a corrosive solution containing 3.5 wt.% NaCl. Anti-corrosion abilities of aqueous solution were determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on line pipe steel (API 5L X-80). The protection mechanism involved the adsorption of metallic cations on the steel surface forming a protective film. Analysis of EIS spectra revealed that corrosion inhibition occurred at low concentration, whereas higher concentration of aqueous solution produced induction behavior.

  2. Corrosion Behavior and Oxide Properties of Zr-Nb-Cu and Zr-Nb-Sn Alloy in High Dissolved Hydrogen Primary Water Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Ju; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The water-metal interface is regarded as rate-controlling site governing the rapid oxidation transition in high burn-up fuel. And the zirconium oxide is made in water-metal interface and its structure and phase do an important role in terms of oxide properties. During oxidation process, the protective tetragonal oxide layer develops at the interface due to accumulated high stress during oxide growth, and it turns into non-protective monoclinic oxide with increasing oxide thickness, thus decreasing the stress. It has been reported that Nb addition was proven to be very beneficial for increasing the corrosion resistance of the zirconium alloys. From a more recent study, Cu addition in Nb containing Zirconium alloy was reported to be effective for increasing corrosion resistance in water containing B and Li. According to the previous research conducted, Zr-Nb-Cu shows better corrosion resistance than Zircaloy-4. The dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentration is the key issue of primary water chemistry, and the effect of DH concentration on the corrosion rate of nickel based alloy has been researched. However, the effect of DH on the zirconium alloy corrosion mechanism was not fully investigated. In this study, the weight gain measurement, FIB-SEM analysis, and Raman spectroscopic measurement were conducted to investigate the effects of dissolved hydrogen concentration and the chemical composition on the corrosion resistance and oxide phase of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy and Zr-Nb-Sn alloy after oxidizing in a primary water environment for 20 d. The corrosion rate of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy is slow, when it is compared to Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. In SEM images, the oxide thickness of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy is measured to be around 1.06 μm it of Zr-Nb-Sn alloy is measured to be 1.15 μm. It is because of the Segregation made by Sn solute element when Sn solute element oxidized. And according to ex situ Raman spectra, Zr-Nb-Cu alloy oxide has more tetragonal zirconium oxide fraction than Zr-Nb-Sn alloy oxide.

  3. Use of high temperature thermogravimetry for the determination of oxidation, reduction, corrosion-type reactions kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, Luc; Bancel, Fabrice; Setaram

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Thermogravimetry is a very powerful technique for the investigation of gas-solid interactions, by measuring the amount of gas adsorbed on the sample or desorbed from the sample. According to the type of interaction, this amount of gas can be very small, that means that the detection of the mass variation can be very difficult to achieve. This is especially the case for certain types of oxidation, reduction and corrosion reactions in the field of metallic and ceramic materials. The good configuration for such kinetic studies is a hanged up sample, to get every face of the sample in contact with the atmosphere. In order to improve the thermogravimetric measurement, two ways can be used: increase the sample mass and especially its area, second use a symmetrical balance. As the gas-solid interaction is adsorption or desorption-type, the area of the sample is one very important parameter. For such a determination, it is important to increase as much as possible this area, that means increasing the sample size and mass. By increasing the contact area for the gas interaction, the accuracy of such a thermogravimetric measurement is largely improved. This design is very convenient for any metallic or ceramic sample that can be directly hung to the balance, without using any container. The second way of improving the test is to use a symmetrical thermogravimetric design. If the variation of mass is too weak to be measured (some micrograms for example), a symmetrical design has to be used. In such a system, a sample and a reference are hung at each beam of the balance, in two identical furnaces. Such a symmetrical technique allows to compensate the buoyancy effect that is identical on both sides. The limit of detection of the thermogravimetric measure is largely improved, allowing accurate measurements on very small variations of mass for long term basis experiments. An example of oxidation of a plate of steel at 500 celsius degree, with a slow mass gain of 1.5

  4. Thermodynamic stability of oxides in the Ni-Cr-Fe system and stress corrosion crack growth kinetics of alloy 600 in primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, D.; Cassagne, T.; Daret, J.; Santarini, G.; Mazille, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the study of stress corrosion of alloy-600, a thermodynamical study of stoichiometric simple and mixed oxides of Ni-Cr-Fe system has been performed. This theoretical work shows that the oxidation of alloy-600 is dependent on temperature and on the quantity of dissolved hydrogen

  5. Understanding corrosion behavior of Mg–Zn–Ca alloys from subcutaneous mouse model: Effect of Zn element concentration and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yongseok [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Tan, Zongqing [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Jurey, Chris [Luke Engineering, Wadsworth, OH 44282 (United States); Xu, Zhigang [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Dong, Zhongyun [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Collins, Boyce [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Sankar, Jagannathan [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Mg–Zn–Ca alloys are considered as suitable biodegradable metallic implants because of their biocompatibility and proper physical properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn concentration of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca (x = 1, 3 and 5 wt.%) alloys and surface modification by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on corrosion behavior in in vivo environment in terms of microstructure, corrosion rate, types of corrosion, and corrosion product formation. Microstructure analysis of alloys and morphological characterization of corrosion products were conducted using x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental composition and crystal structure of corrosion products were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that 1) as-cast Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys are composed of Mg matrix and a secondary phase of Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} formed along grain boundaries, 2) the corrosion rate of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing concentration of Zn in the alloy, 3) corrosion rates of alloys treated by PEO sample are decreased in in vivo environment, and 4) the corrosion products of these alloys after in vivo tests are identified as brucite (Mg(OH){sub 2}), hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O). - Highlights: • Effects of PEO and Zn concentration in Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys on biodegradation • Corrosion rate of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing Zn concentration. • Plasma electrolytic oxidation retards the biodegradation of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys.

  6. SYNTHESIS AND CORROSION PROTECTION BEHAVIOR OF EPOXYTiO2-MICACEOUS IRON OXIDE NANO - COMPOSITE COATING ON St-37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Khorram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The micro layers micaceous iron oxide and nano-TiO 2 were incorporated into the epoxy resin by mechanical mixing and sonication process. Optical micrographs showed that the number and diameter size of nanoparticle agglomerates were decreased by sonication. The structure and composition of the nanocomposite was determined using transmission electron microscopy which showed the presence of dispersed nano-TiO 2 in the polymer matrix. The anticorrosive properties of the synthesized nano-composites coating were investigated using salt spray, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization measurement. The EIS results showed that coating resistance increased by addition of micaceous iron oxide micro layers and nano-TiO 2 particles to the epoxy coatings. It was observed that higher corrosion protection of nanocomposite coatings obtained by the addition of 3 %wt micaceous iron oxide and 4%wt nano-TiO 2 into epoxy resin.

  7. Relative Humidity and the Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking in an impure Plutonium Oxide Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.; Duffey, J.; Lam, P.; Dunn, K.

    2010-05-05

    Laboratory tests to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons showed that corrosion occurred in selected samples. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The exposures were conducted in sealed containers in which the oxide-salt mixtures were loaded with about 0.6 wt % water from a humidified helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration, the composition of the salt and the moisture present in the test environment. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride and 0.6 wt% water. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas above the solid mixture, or in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either no CaCl{sub 2} or 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2}. SCC was present where the 0.6 wt % water content exceeded the value needed to fully hydrate the available CaCl{sub 2}, but was absent where the water content was insufficient. These results reveal the significance of the relative humidity in the austenitic stainless steels environment to their susceptibility to corrosion. The relative humidity in the test environment was controlled by the water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salts such as CaCl{sub 2}. For each salt or salt mixture there is a threshold

  8. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500 o C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  9. Influence of Zn injection on corrosion behavior and oxide film characteristics of 304 stainless steel in borated and lithiated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xinqiang; Liu, Xiahe; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Water chemistry of the reactor coolant system plays a major role in maintaining safety and reliability of light water reactor nuclear power plants (NPPs). Zn water chemistry into pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in order to reduce the radiation buildup in primary coolant system has been widely applied, and the reduction effect has been experimentally confirmed. Zn injection can also lessen the corrosion phenomena in high temperature pressurized water by changing oxide films formed on components materials. Both the radiation buildup and material corrosion resistance in PWR coolant system are closely dependent on the oxide films formed. However, the influence of Zn injection on the chemical composition and structure of the oxide films on their protective properties is still a matter of considerable debate. The influence of Zn injection on corrosion inhibition and environmental degradation has not been fully clarified yet. Therefore, the understanding of corrosion behaviour, oxide film characteristics and their protective property is of significance to clarify the environmentally assisted material failure problems in NPPs. In the present work, oxide films formed on nuclear-grade 304 SS exposed to borated and lithiated high temperature water environments at 300 deg. C up to 4000 h with or without 10 ppb Zn injection were investigated ex-situ. Without Zn injection, the oxide films mainly consisted of Fe 3 O 4 and FeCr 2 O 4 . With Zn injection, ZnFe 2 O 4 and ZnCr 2 O 4 were detected in the oxide films at the initial stage of immersion and ZnCr 2 O 4 became dominant after long-term immersion. It was believed that the above Zn-Fe and Zn-Cr spinel oxides were formed by substitution reactions between Zn 2+ and Fe 2+ . At the initial stage of immersion, water chemistry significantly affected the formation of the oxide films. Once a stable oxide film formed, it is rather difficult to change its structure through changing water chemistry. The potential-pH diagrams for Zn

  10. Long-term corrosion/oxidation studies under controlled humidity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    Independent of thermal loading scenarios, the waste packages at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will be exposed to environmental conditions where there is the possibility of significant water film formation occurring on the waste packages. Water films can cause aggressive aqueous film electrochemical corrosion on susceptible metals or alloys. Water film formation will be facilitated when relative humidities are high, when hygroscopic salts are present on the surfaces, when corrosion products are hygroscopic, and when particles form crevices with the surfaces (capillary effect). Also certain gaseous contaminants, such as, NO x and SO 2 , can facilitate water film formation. It should be noted that water film formation can occur at isolated spots (e.g. surface defects and salt particles) and need not cover the entire surface for electrochemical corrosion to occur. This activity will characterize the long term corrosion of metal specimens at two nominal relative humidities (50 and 85%) and at 80 C. Under the low relative humidity (50%) condition, water film formation is expected to be limited and therefore aqueous film electrochemical corrosion is expected also to be limited. Under the high relative humidity (85%) condition, significant water film formation is expected to occur under some test conditions, and subsequently aqueous film electrochemical corrosion will occur on susceptible materials

  11. Corrosion behavior of oxide-covered Cu47Ti34Zr11Ni8 (Vitreloy 101) in chloride-containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baca, N.; Conner, R.D.; Garrett, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Enrichment of Ti/Zr (as TiO 2 /ZrO 2 ) and depletion of Cu/Ni due to thermodynamically driven segregation. • Dominant corrosion mechanism is pitting. • Pit interiors were depleted of Ti and Zr due to equilibrium solubilization of oxide layer. • Corrosion can be explained by equilibrium and metal nobility arguments. - Abstract: The corrosion resistance of oxides that form in air on Vitreloy 101 (Cu 47 Ti 34 Zr 11 Ni 8 ) metallic glass ribbons in NaCl and HCl solutions was studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization. The air-exposed alloy was covered by a TiO 2 /ZrO 2 layer overlying a Cu-enriched region beneath. Ni was absent at the surface. Segregation of Ti and Zr was driven by exothermic oxide formation. Immersion in NaCl or HCl caused pitting corrosion by local Galvanic reactions that depleted less noble Ti, Zr and Ni from the pit interiors, leaving them rich in more noble Cu. Corrosion products containing Ti and Zr accumulated around the pit. Pits were most numerous in 1.0 M HCl due to TiO 2 (s)/Ti 3+ (aq) equilibrium that resulted in rapid solubilization of the oxide, creating local weaknesses and an increased rate of pit formation. On average, Ti preferentially dissolved from the oxide in accord with metal nobility arguments

  12. Manufacture and evaluation of integrated metal-oxide electrode prototype for corrosion monitoring in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an integrated metal-oxide (M/O) electrode based on an yttria-stabilized-zirconia-(YSZ)-membrane M/O electrode, which was used as a reference electrode for corrosion monitoring in high temperature water. The YSZ-membrane M/O electrode can operate at high temperatures because of the conductivity of YSZ membrane tube. We cannot utilize it for long term monitoring at a wide range of temperatures. It also has a braze juncture between the YSZ membrane and metal tubes, which may corrode in high-temperature water. This corrosion should be prevented to improve the performance of the M/O electrode. An integrated M/O electrode was developed (i.e., integrated metal-oxide electrode, IMOE) to eliminate the braze juncture and increase the conductivity of YSZ. These issues should be overcome to improve the performance of M/O electrode. So we have developed two type of IMOE prototype with sputter - deposition or thermal oxidation. In this paper we will present and discuss the performance of our IMOEs in buffer solution at room temperature. (author)

  13. Influence of Electrolyte Chemistry on Morphology and Corrosion Resistance of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings Deposited on Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Krishna, L.; Poshal, G.; Sundararajan, G.

    2010-12-01

    In the present work, micro arc oxidation (MAO) coatings were synthesized on magnesium substrate employing 11 different electrolyte compositions containing systematically varied concentrations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), potassium hydroxide (KOH), and sodium aluminate (NaAlO2). The resultant coatings were subjected to coating thickness measurement, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), image analysis, and three-dimensional (3-D) optical profilometry. The corrosion performance of the coatings was evaluated by conducting potentiodynamic polarization tests in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution. The inter-relationships between the electrolyte chemistry and the resulting chemistry and porosity of the coating, on one hand, and with the aqueous corrosion behavior of the coating, on the other, were studied. The changes in pore morphology and pore distribution in the coatings were found to be significantly influenced by the electrolyte composition. The coatings can have either through-thickness pores or pores in the near surface region alone depending on the electrolyte composition. The deleterious role of KOH especially when its concentration is >20 pct of total electrolyte constituents promoting the formation of large and deep pores in the coating was demonstrated. A reasonable correlation indicating the increasing pore volume implying the increased corrosion was noticed.

  14. Influence of chloride ion concentration on the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AM50 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of a silicate- and a phosphate-based plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AM50 magnesium alloy obtained using a pulsed DC power supply was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in NaCl solutions of different chloride ion concentrations viz., 0.01 M, 0.1 M, 0.5 M and 1 M. The surface of the PEO coated specimens after 50 h of immersion/EIS testing was examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the corrosion deterioration of PEO coated magnesium alloy in NaCl solutions was significantly influenced by chloride ion concentration. The silicate-based coating was found to offer a superior corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate than the phosphate-based coatings in lower chloride ion concentration NaCl solutions (0.01 M and 0.1 M NaCl). On the other hand both these PEO coatings were found to be highly susceptible to localized damage, and could not provide an effective corrosion protection to Mg alloy substrate in solutions containing higher chloride concentrations (0.5 M and 1 M). The extent of localized damage was observed to be more with increase in chloride concentration in both the cases.

  15. Cross-linked gelatin/nanoparticles composite coating on micro-arc oxidation film for corrosion and drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xinhua; Lu Ping; Guo Meiqing; Fang Mingzhong

    2010-01-01

    A composite coating which could control drug release and biocorrosion of magnesium alloy stent materials WE42 was prepared. This composite coating was fabricated on the surface of the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) film of the magnesium alloy, WE42, by mixing different degrees of cross-linked gelatin with well-dispersed poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation/extraction technique. Nano ZS laser diffraction particle size analyzer detected that the size of the nanoparticles to be 150-300 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyze the morphology of the nanoparticles and the composite coating. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the composite coating. Drug release was determined by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer. The corrosion resistance of the composite coating was improved by preventing the corrosive ions from diffusing to the MAO films. The drug release rate of paclitaxel (PTX) exhibited a nearly linear sustained-release profile with no significant burst releases.

  16. Cross-linked gelatin/nanoparticles composite coating on micro-arc oxidation film for corrosion and drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xinhua, E-mail: xhxu_tju@eyou.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu Ping; Guo Meiqing; Fang Mingzhong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-02-01

    A composite coating which could control drug release and biocorrosion of magnesium alloy stent materials WE42 was prepared. This composite coating was fabricated on the surface of the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) film of the magnesium alloy, WE42, by mixing different degrees of cross-linked gelatin with well-dispersed poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation/extraction technique. Nano ZS laser diffraction particle size analyzer detected that the size of the nanoparticles to be 150-300 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyze the morphology of the nanoparticles and the composite coating. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the composite coating. Drug release was determined by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer. The corrosion resistance of the composite coating was improved by preventing the corrosive ions from diffusing to the MAO films. The drug release rate of paclitaxel (PTX) exhibited a nearly linear sustained-release profile with no significant burst releases.

  17. Cross-linked gelatin/nanoparticles composite coating on micro-arc oxidation film for corrosion and drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhua; Lu, Ping; Guo, Meiqing; Fang, Mingzhong

    2010-02-01

    A composite coating which could control drug release and biocorrosion of magnesium alloy stent materials WE42 was prepared. This composite coating was fabricated on the surface of the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) film of the magnesium alloy, WE42, by mixing different degrees of cross-linked gelatin with well-dispersed poly( DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation/extraction technique. Nano ZS laser diffraction particle size analyzer detected that the size of the nanoparticles to be 150-300 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyze the morphology of the nanoparticles and the composite coating. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the composite coating. Drug release was determined by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer. The corrosion resistance of the composite coating was improved by preventing the corrosive ions from diffusing to the MAO films. The drug release rate of paclitaxel (PTX) exhibited a nearly linear sustained-release profile with no significant burst releases.

  18. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  19. The Influence Of Modified Water Chemistries On Metal Oxide Films, Activity Build-Up And Stress Corrosion Cracking Of Structural Materials In Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1998-07-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of activated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  20. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  1. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. Coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation

    El uso de interconectores metálicos en pilas de combustible de óxido sólido (SOFC en sustitución de materiales cerámicos ha sido posible gracias a la investigación y desarrollo de nuevos materiales metálicos. Inicialmente, el uso de interconectores metálicos fue limitado, debido a la elevada temperatura de trabajo, ocasionando de forma rápida la degradación del material, lo que impedía que fuesen una alternativa. A medida que la temperatura de trabajo de las SOFC descendió, el uso de interconectores metálicos demostró ser una buena alternativa, dado que son más fáciles de fabricar y más baratos que los interconectores cerámicos. Sin embargo, los interconectores metálicos continúan degradándose a pesar de descender la temperatura a la que operan las SOFC y, asimismo, los productos de corrosión favorecen las pérdidas eléctricas de la pila de combustible. Recubrimientos de níquel, cromo, aluminio, zinc, manganeso, itrio y lantano entre el interconector y los electrodos reduce dichas pérdidas eléctricas.

  2. Teaching the concepts of oxidation and reduction contextualized in the study of corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazo Santibáñez, Leontina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The contextualization of chemistry is of great importance to our society as it allows to bring this science to students of secondary education thus facilitating the learning process, so that students can identify and explain the phenomena that occur around. As a way to improve student learning, driven redox processes are contextualized through the process of corrosion of metals, which can place them in real contexts, for which there were two experiences, one on corrosion reactions that occur over an extended time due to constant contact of the coins one hundred Chilean pesos, the old and current human sweat by verifying which of the two alloys are most affected. The other experience is to determine qualitatively the degree of corrosion experienced by coins of the same value mentioned above, through two media, a dry and moist soil, respectively. Both activities were used with chemical reagents readily available..

  3. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of low modulus β-type Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) dental alloys through thermal oxidation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Gan, Xiaxia; Tang, Hongqun; Zhan, Yongzhong

    2017-07-01

    In order to obtain material with low elastic modulus, good abrasion resistance and high corrosion stability as screw for dental implant, the biomedical Zr-20Nb and Zr-20Nb-3Ti alloy with low elastic modulus were thermal oxidized respectively at 700°C for 1h and 600°C for 1.25h to obtain the compact oxidized layer to improve its wear resistance and corrosion resistance. The results show that smooth compact oxidized layer (composed of monoclinic ZrO 2 , tetragonal ZrO 2 and 6ZrO 2 -Nb 2 O 5 ) with 22.6μm-43.5μm thickness and 1252-1306HV hardness can be in-situ formed on the surface of the Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3). The adhesion of oxidized layers to the substrates is determined to be 58.35-66.25N. The oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys reveal great improvement of the pitting corrosion resistance in comparison with the un-oxidized alloys. In addition, the oxidized Zr-20Nb-3Ti exhibits sharply reduction of the corrosion rates and the oxidized Zr-20Nb shows higher corrosion rates than un-oxidized alloys, which is relevant with the content of the t-ZrO 2 . Wear test in artificial saliva demonstrates that the wear losses of the oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) are superior to pure Ti. All of the un-oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) alloys suffer from serious adhesive wear due to its high plasticity. Because of the protection from compact oxide layer with high adhesion and high hardness, the coefficients of friction and wear losses of the oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) alloys decrease 50% and 95%, respectively. The defects on the oxidized Zr-20Nb have a negative effect on the friction and wear properties. In addition, after the thermal oxidation, compression test show that elastic modulus and strength of Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) increase slightly with plastic deformation after 40% of transformation. Furthermore, stripping of the oxidized layer from the alloy matrix did not occur during the whole experiments. As the surface oxidized Zr-20Nb-3Ti alloy has a combination of excellent performance

  4. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Zheng, W. [Materials Technology Laboratory, NRCan, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500{sup o}C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  5. Investigation of surface oxide morphology in SG feedwater pipes and study of its influence on flow accelerated corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, G.; Alos-Ramos, O.; Monchecourt, D.; Mansour, C.; Delaunay, S.; Trevin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) affects carbon steel components in the secondary circuits of PWR plants. The mandatory use of the prediction tool BRT-CICERO in all its PWR plants enables EDF to perform efficient inspections programs and minimize the number of leaks in the secondary circuits. Due to the operating conditions, SG feedwater flow regulation (ARE) circuits can be affected by FAC phenomenon. Thickness loss has been reported by several plants during the last 10 years, although significant damage by FAC remains very rare. This paper describes the surface features observed on an ARE straight tube that has orange peel pattern with thickness loss on the one half of its inner surface and a thick fouling layer without much thickness loss on the other. An analysis of the oxide porosity and structure by SEM investigation has been carried out. The origin of fouling layer and its behavior in the ARE circuits environment (oxide solubility, flow stability/turbulence) have been discussed. Finally by comparing with the classic FAC models, an attempt of correlation between the presence of the fouling layer and the lower corrosion rate is proposed. (authors)

  6. Oxidation and corrosion studies of Al-implanted stainless steel AISI 321 using nuclear reaction and electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noli, F.; Misaelides, P.; Spathis, P.; Pilakouta, M.; Baumann, H.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of Al-implanted (implantation energy 40 keV, dose 10 16 -10 17 Al ions/cm 2 ) AISI 321 stainless steel samples in air has been studied at temperatures between 450 and 650degC using the 16 O(d,p) 17 O nuclear reaction. The determination of the distribution of the implanted Al atoms has been performed using the resonance at 992 keV of the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si nuclear reaction. The determined oxygen profiles indicate that the implantation of 5x10 16 and 10 17 Al ions/cm 2 leads to an improvement of the oxidation resistance of the studied steel samples. The passivation/corrosion behaviour of the Al-implanted steel samples in 0.5M aqueous sulphuric acid solution has also been investigated electrochemically using potentiodynamic and cyclovoltammetric techniques. The passivation potential values and the repassivation moving to more positive values indicate an improvement of the corrosion resistance of the Al-implanted steel samples. (orig.)

  7. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.; Schreiber, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300-360°C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N2 gas. Results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  8. Improvement of corrosion resistance of transparent conductive multilayer coating consisting of silver layers and transparent metal oxide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Katsuhiko; Yamazaki, Fumiharu; Okamura, Tomoyuki; Fukuda, Shin

    2007-01-01

    An optical filter for plasma display panel (PDP) requires an electromagnetic shield with very high ability. The authors investigated a transparent conductive multilayer coating consisting of silver (Ag) layers and transparent metal oxide layers. The durability of the multilayer sputter coating, including the silver layer, is very sensitive to the surrounding atmosphere. For example, after an exposure test they found discolored points on the multilayer sputter coatings, possibly caused by migration of silver atoms in the silver layers. In their investigation, they modified the top surface of the multilayer sputter coatings with transition metals to improve the corrosion resistance of the multilayer coating. Specifically, they deposited transition metals 0.5-2 nm thick on the top surface of the multilayer coatings by sputtering. They chose indium tin oxide (ITO) as the transparent metal oxide. They applied the multilayer sputter coatings of seven layers to a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film substrate. A cross-sectional structure of the film with the multilayer coatings is PET film/ITO/Ag/ITO/Ag/ITO/Ag/ITO. They evaluated the corrosion resistance of the films by a salt-water immersion test. In the test, they immersed the film with multilayer coatings into salt water, and then evaluated the appearance, transmittance, and electrical resistance of the multilayer coatings. They investigated several transition metals as the modifying material, and found that titanium and tantalum drastically improved the resistance of the multilayer coatings to the salt-water exposure without a significant decline in transmittance. They also investigated the relation between elapsed time after deposition of the modifying materials and resistance to the salt water. Furthermore, they investigated the effects of a heat treatment and an oxide plasma treatment on resistance to the salt water

  9. Comparison of electrochemical corrosion behaviour of MgO and ZrO2 coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of PEO coatings were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy using pulsed DC plasma electrolytic oxidation process in an alkaline phosphate and acidic fluozirconate electrolytes, respectively. The phase composition and microstructure of these PEO coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion behaviour of the coated samples was evaluated by open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in neutral 0.1 M NaCl solution. The results showed that PEO coating prepared from alkaline phosphate electrolyte consisted of only MgO and on the other hand the one formed in acidic fluozirconate solution was mainly composed of ZrO 2 , MgF 2 . Electrochemical corrosion tests indicated that the phase composition of PEO coating has a significant effect on the deterioration process of coated magnesium alloy in this corrosive environment. The PEO coating that was composed of only MgO suffered from localized corrosion in the 50 h exposure studies, whereas the PEO coating with ZrO 2 compounds showed a much superior stability during the corrosion tests and provided an efficient corrosion protection. The results showed that the preparation of PEO coating with higher chemical stability compounds offers an opportunity to produce layers that could provide better corrosion protection to magnesium alloys.

  10. Corrosion and bioactivity performance of graphene oxide coating on Ti−Nb shape memory alloys in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saud, Safaa N.; Hosseinian, Raheleh S.; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R.; Yaghoubidoust, F.; Iqbal, N.; Hamzah, E.; Ooi, C.H. Raymond

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure, corrosion, and bioactivity of graphene oxide (GO) coating on the laser-modified and -unmodified surfaces of Ti−Nb shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated. The surface morphology and chemical composition was examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface modification was carried out via a femtosecond laser with the aim to increase the surface roughness, and thus increase the adhesion property. FE-SEM analysis of the laser-treated Ti-30 at.% Nb revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the Ti-30 at.% Nb surface after being surface modified via a femtosecond laser. Furthermore, the thickness of GO was increased from 35 μm to 45 μm after the surface was modified. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies revealed that both the GO and laser/GO-coated samples exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the uncoated Ti−Nb SMA sample. However, the laser/GO-coated sample presented the highest corrosion resistance in SBF at 37 °C. In addition, during soaking in the simulated body fluid (SBF), both the GO and laser/GO coating improved the formation of apatite layer. Based on the bioactivity results, the GO coating exhibited a remarkable antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria compared with the uncoated. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Ti-30 at.% Nb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Ti-30 at.% Nb SMA were successfully produced by PM and microwave sintering. • GO were successfully coated on the surface of TiNb. • The corrosion resistance of TiNb have enhanced after surface modification and coating of GO. • The corrosion resistance increased from 620.7 to 1,760.7 Ω cm 2 with coating of GO. • The GO and laser/GO coating induce apatite formation and enhance the bioactivity

  11. Corrosion and bioactivity performance of graphene oxide coating on Ti−Nb shape memory alloys in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saud, Safaa N., E-mail: safaaengineer@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Management and Science University, 40100 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Hosseinian, Raheleh S. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Advanced Materials Research Center, Faculty of Materials Engineering, NajafAbad Branch, Islamic Azad University, NajafAbad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yaghoubidoust, F. [Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Iqbal, N. [Medical Devices & Technology Group (MEDITEG), Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Hamzah, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Ooi, C.H. Raymond [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the microstructure, corrosion, and bioactivity of graphene oxide (GO) coating on the laser-modified and -unmodified surfaces of Ti−Nb shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated. The surface morphology and chemical composition was examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface modification was carried out via a femtosecond laser with the aim to increase the surface roughness, and thus increase the adhesion property. FE-SEM analysis of the laser-treated Ti-30 at.% Nb revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the Ti-30 at.% Nb surface after being surface modified via a femtosecond laser. Furthermore, the thickness of GO was increased from 35 μm to 45 μm after the surface was modified. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies revealed that both the GO and laser/GO-coated samples exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the uncoated Ti−Nb SMA sample. However, the laser/GO-coated sample presented the highest corrosion resistance in SBF at 37 °C. In addition, during soaking in the simulated body fluid (SBF), both the GO and laser/GO coating improved the formation of apatite layer. Based on the bioactivity results, the GO coating exhibited a remarkable antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria compared with the uncoated. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Ti-30 at.% Nb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Ti-30 at.% Nb SMA were successfully produced by PM and microwave sintering. • GO were successfully coated on the surface of TiNb. • The corrosion resistance of TiNb have enhanced after surface modification and coating of GO. • The corrosion resistance increased from 620.7 to 1,760.7 Ω cm{sup 2} with coating of GO. • The GO and laser/GO coating induce apatite formation and enhance the bioactivity.

  12. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  13. Corrosion and bioactivity performance of graphene oxide coating on TiNb shape memory alloys in simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saud, Safaa N; Hosseinian S, Raheleh; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H R; Yaghoubidoust, F; Iqbal, N; Hamzah, E; Ooi, C H Raymond

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the microstructure, corrosion, and bioactivity of graphene oxide (GO) coating on the laser-modified and -unmodified surfaces of TiNb shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated. The surface morphology and chemical composition was examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface modification was carried out via a femtosecond laser with the aim to increase the surface roughness, and thus increase the adhesion property. FE-SEM analysis of the laser-treated Ti-30at.% Nb revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the Ti-30at.% Nb surface after being surface modified via a femtosecond laser. Furthermore, the thickness of GO was increased from 35μm to 45μm after the surface was modified. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies revealed that both the GO and laser/GO-coated samples exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the uncoated TiNb SMA sample. However, the laser/GO-coated sample presented the highest corrosion resistance in SBF at 37°C. In addition, during soaking in the simulated body fluid (SBF), both the GO and laser/GO coating improved the formation of apatite layer. Based on the bioactivity results, the GO coating exhibited a remarkable antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria compared with the uncoated. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Ti-30at.% Nb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  15. Effect of current density on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of microarc oxidized ZK60 magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qiongya; Yu, Huijun; Wang, Hui; Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2014-09-01

    The application of magnesium alloys as biomaterials is limited by their poor corrosion behavior. Microarc oxidation (MAO) treatment was used to prepare ceramic coatings on ZK60 magnesium alloys in order to overcome the poor corrosion resistance. The process was conducted at different current densities (3.5 and 9.0 A/dm(2)), and the effect of current density on the process was studied. The microstructure, elemental distribution, and phase composition of the MAO coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The increment of current density contributes to the increase of thickness. A new phase Mg2SiO4 was detected as the current density increased to 9.0 A/dm(2). A homogeneous distribution of micropores could be observed in the coating produced at 3.5 A/dm(2), while the surface morphology of the coating formed at 9.0 A/dm(2) was more rough and apparent microcracks could be observed. The coating obtained at 3.5 A/dm(2) possessed a better anticorrosion behavior.

  16. Corrosion control. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to train engineers and technologists not just to understand corrosion but to control it. Materials selection, coatings, chemical inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, and equipment design are covered in separate chapters. High-temperature oxidation is discussed in the final two chapters ne on oxidation theory and one on controlling oxidation by alloying and with coatings. This book treats corrosion and high-temperature oxidation separately. Corrosion is divided into three groups: (1) chemical dissolution including uniform attack, (2) electrochemical corrosion from either metallurgical or environmental cells, and (3) stress-assisted corrosion. Corrosion is logically grouped according to mechanisms rather than arbitrarily separated into different types of corrosion as if they were unrelated. For those university students and industry personnel who approach corrosion theory very hesitantly, this text will present the electrochemical reactions responsible for corrosion summed up in only five simple half-cell reactions. When these are combined on a polarization diagram, which is also explained in detail, the electrochemical processes become obvious. For those who want a text stripped bare of electrochemical theory, several noted sections can be omitted without loss of continuity. However, the author has presented the material in such a manner that these sections are not beyond the abilities of any high school graduate who is interested in technology

  17. A photoemission study of the effectiveness of nickel, manganese, and cobalt based corrosion barriers for silicon photo-anodes during water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, Robert; Bogan, Justin; McCoy, Anthony; Byrne, Conor; Hughes, Greg [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2016-05-21

    Silicon is an attractive material for solar water splitting applications due to its abundance and its capacity to absorb a large fraction of incident solar radiation. However, it has not received as much attention as other materials due to its tendency to oxidize very quickly in aqueous environments, particularly when it is employed as the anode where it drives the oxygen evolution reaction. In recent years, several works have appeared in the literature examining the suitability of thin transition metal oxide films grown on top of the silicon to act as a corrosion barrier. The film should be transparent to solar radiation, allow hole transport from the silicon surface to the electrolyte, and stop the diffusion of oxygen from the electrolyte back to the silicon. In this work, we compare Mn-oxide, Co-oxide, and Ni-oxide thin films grown using physical vapor deposition in order to evaluate which material offers the best combination of photocurrent and corrosion protection. In addition to the electrochemical data, we also present a detailed before-and-after study of the surface chemistry of the films using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This approach allows for a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms by which the corrosion barriers protect the underlying silicon, and how they degrade during the water oxidation reaction.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steel 316 L and model alloy in supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Diego, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an austenitic stainless steel type 316 L was tested in deaerated supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and 25 MPa to determine how variations in water conditions influence its stress corrosion cracking behaviour and to make progress in the understanding of mechanisms involved in SCC processes in this environment. Moreover, the influence of plastic deformation in the resistance of the material to SCC was also studied at both temperatures. In addition to this, previous oxidation experiments at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and at 25 MPa were taken into account to gain some insight in this kind of processes. Furthermore, a cold worked model alloy based on the stainless steel 316 L with some variations in the chemical composition in order to simulate the composition of the grain boundary after irradiation was tested at 400 deg. C and 25 MPa in deaerated supercritical water. (authors)

  19. Niobium–niobium oxide multilayered coatings for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for ["1"8F] production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skliarova, Hanna; Renzelli, Marco; Azzolini, Oscar; Felicis, Daniele de; Bemporad, Edoardo; Johnson, Richard R.; Palmieri, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar"® entrance foils of the targets for ["1"8F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar"®. During current investigation, magnetron sputtered niobium and niobium oxide were chosen as the candidates for protective coatings because of their superior chemical resistance. Aluminated quartz substrates allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. As far as niobium coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering are columnar, the grain boundaries provide a fast diffusion path for active species of corrosive media to penetrate and to corrode the substrate. Amorphous niobium oxide films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering showed superior barrier properties according to the corrosion tests performed. In order to prevent degrading of brittle niobium oxide at high pressures, multilayers combining high ductility of niobium with superior diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium oxide were proposed. The intercalation of niobium oxide interlayers was proved to interrupt the columnar grain growth of niobium during sputtering, resulting in improved diffusion barrier efficiency of obtained multilayers. The thin layer multilayer coating architecture with 70 nm bi-layer thickness was found preferential because of higher thermal stability. - Highlights: • Diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium, niobium oxide and their multilayers was studied. • The intercalation of niobium oxide layers interrupted the columnar grain growth of niobium. • The bilayer architectures influenced the stability of the multilayer coatings. • The thin layer multilayer coating with 70 nm double-layer was found superior.

  20. Niobium–niobium oxide multilayered coatings for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [{sup 18}F] production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarova, Hanna, E-mail: Hanna.Skliarova@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Renzelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.renzelli@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Azzolini, Oscar, E-mail: Oscar.Azzolini@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Felicis, Daniele de, E-mail: daniele.defelicis@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Bemporad, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.bemporad@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Johnson, Richard R., E-mail: richard.johnson@teambest.com [BEST Cyclotron Systems Inc., 8765 Ash Street Unit 7, Vancouver BC V6P 6T3 (Canada); Palmieri, Vincenzo, E-mail: Vincenzo.Palmieri@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Padua, Padua (Italy)

    2015-09-30

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar{sup ®} entrance foils of the targets for [{sup 18}F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar{sup ®}. During current investigation, magnetron sputtered niobium and niobium oxide were chosen as the candidates for protective coatings because of their superior chemical resistance. Aluminated quartz substrates allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. As far as niobium coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering are columnar, the grain boundaries provide a fast diffusion path for active species of corrosive media to penetrate and to corrode the substrate. Amorphous niobium oxide films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering showed superior barrier properties according to the corrosion tests performed. In order to prevent degrading of brittle niobium oxide at high pressures, multilayers combining high ductility of niobium with superior diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium oxide were proposed. The intercalation of niobium oxide interlayers was proved to interrupt the columnar grain growth of niobium during sputtering, resulting in improved diffusion barrier efficiency of obtained multilayers. The thin layer multilayer coating architecture with 70 nm bi-layer thickness was found preferential because of higher thermal stability. - Highlights: • Diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium, niobium oxide and their multilayers was studied. • The intercalation of niobium oxide layers interrupted the columnar grain growth of niobium. • The bilayer architectures influenced the stability of the multilayer coatings. • The thin layer multilayer coating with 70 nm double-layer was found superior.

  1. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  2. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Adhesive Bonding and Corrosion Performance Investigated as a Function of Aluminum Oxide Chemistry and Adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahami, S.T.; Hauffman, T.; de Kok, John M.M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The long-term strength and durability of an adhesive bond is dependent on the stability of the oxide-adhesive interface. As such, changes in the chemistry of the oxide and/or the adhesive are expected to modify the interfacial properties and affect the joint performance in practice. The upcoming

  4. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  5. The effect of TiO2 coating on biological NiTi alloys after micro-arc oxidation treatment for corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukuroglu, Ebru Emine; Sukuroglu, Suleyman; Akar, Kubra; Totik, Yasar; Efeoglu, Ihsan; Arslan, Ersin

    2017-08-01

    NiTi alloys exhibit good properties, such as shape memory behavior, high corrosion resistant, having the closest elasticity modulus of a human bone and superior biocompatibility properties. However, the surface problems that arise during the use of this alloy limit the usage in the industry and health sector. In recent years, micro-arc oxidation method is used to improve the surface properties and increase the usage of these alloys. In this study, the TiO 2 coatings were deposited on the NiTi substrates. The surface topography, morphology, crystallographic structure, and thickness of the coatings were determined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The corrosion properties were investigated using potentiostat test unit in two different media such as NaCl solution and simulated body fluid. The results show that the coated samples have higher corrosion resistance than uncoated samples in the two different media.

  6. Improving Corrosion Behavior in SCWR, LFR and VHTR Reactor Materials by Formation of a Stable Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Arthur T.; Comstock, Robert; Li, Ning; Allen, Todd; Was, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the influence of the alloy microstructure and composition on the formation of a stable, protective oxide in the environments relevant to the SCWR and LFR reactor concepts, as well as to the VHTR. It is proposed to use state-of-the art techniques to study the fine structure of these oxides to identify the structural differences between stable and unstable oxide layers. The techniques to be used are microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence, and cross-sectional transmission electron microcopy on samples prepared using focused ion beam.

  7. Inhibition of stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in 10% NaOH solutions with and with lead oxide at 315 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, D.H.; Kim, J.S.; Baek, J.S.; Kim, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Alloy 600 steam generator tube materials have experienced various degradations by corrosion such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the inner and outer diameter surface of tube, intergranular attack and pitting, and by mechanical damage such as fretting-wear and fatigue. These tube degradations not only increase the costs for tube inspection, maintenance and repair but also reduce the operation safety and the efficiency of plants. Therefore, the methodologies have been extensively developed to mitigate them. The addition of inhibitors to the coolant is a feasible method to mitigate tube degradations in operating plants. In this paper, a new inhibitor is proposed to mitigate the secondary side stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 tubes. The effect of inhibitors on the electrochemical behavior and the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 600 was evaluated in 10% sodium hydroxide solution with and without lead oxide at 315 C. The specimens of a C-ring type for stress corrosion cracking test were polarized at 150 mV above the corrosion potential for 120 hours without and with inhibitors such as titanium oxide, titanium boride, cerium boride. The chemical compositions of the films formed on the crack tip in the C-ring specimens were analyzed using a scanning Auger electron spectroscopy. The cerium boride, the most effective inhibitors, was observed to decrease the crack propagation rate more than a factor of three compared with that obtained in pure 10% NaOH solution. Furthermore, no SCC was observed in lead contaminated 10% NaOH solution by the addition of the cerium boride. (authors)

  8. Grain boundary corrosion and alteration phase formation during the oxidative dissolution of UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Buck, E.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Alteration behavior of UO 2 pellets following reaction under unsaturated drip-test conditions at 90 C for up to 10 years was examined by solid phase and leachate analyses. Sample reactions were characterized by preferential dissolution of grain boundaries between the original press-sintered UO 2 granules comprising the samples, development of a polygonal network of open channels along the intergrain boundaries, and spallation of surface granules that had undergone severe grain boundary corrosion. The development of a dense mat of alteration phases after 2 years of reaction trapped loose granules, resulting in reduced rates of particulate U release. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases that formed on the present samples was similar to that observed in surficial weathering zones of natural uraninite (UO 2 ) deposits, with alkali and alkaline earth uranyl silicates representing the long-term solubility-limiting phases for U in both systems

  9. A comparison of corrosion, tribocorrosion and electrochemical impedance properties of pure Ti and Ti6Al4V alloy treated by micro-arc oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Golozar, M. A.; Garsivaz jazi, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coatings were performed on pure Ti and Ti6Al4V samples at 180 V. The results indicated that unlike the volcanic morphology of oxide layer on pure Ti, a cortex-like morphology with irregular vermiform slots was seen on MAO/Ti6Al4V sample. According to polarization curves, the corrosion resistance of untreated samples was significantly increased by MAO process. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis showed a lower capacitance of barrier layer (led to higher resistance) for MAO/Ti specimens. This indicates that corrosive ions diffusion throughout the oxide film would be more difficult resulted in a higher corrosion resistance. Tribocorrosion results illustrated that the potential of untreated samples was dropped sharply to very low negative values. However, the lower wear volume loss was achieved for Ti6Al4V alloy. SEM images of worn surfaces demonstrated the local detachment of oxide layer within the wear track of MAO/Ti sample. Conversely, no delamination was detected in MAO/Ti6Al4V and a mild abrasive wear was the dominant mechanism.

  10. The effect of oxide microstructure on kinetic transition in out-of-pile steam corrosion test for Zircaloy-2 and Nb-added Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanikawa, Shuichi [Japan Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Etoh, Yoshinori [Japan Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In order to study the mechanism of kinetic transition of corrosion rate for zirconium alloys, oxide films formed on Zircaloy-2 (Zry-2) and Nb-added Zircaloy-2 (0.5Nb/Zry-2) in steam at 673 K and 10.3 MPa were examined with TEM and SIMS. Kinetic transition occurred at almost the same oxide thicknesses for both Zry-2 and 0.5Nb/Zry-2, but the corrosion rate after the transitions were quite different for the two alloys. Zircaloy-2 showed cyclical oxidation, while the weight gain of 0.5Nb/Zry-2 increased linearly. The morphology and crystal structure were similar for the oxides of the two alloys and both the oxide films still mainly consisted of columnar grains even after the transition. Interface layers which mainly consisted of {alpha}-Zr crystallites were observed for both alloys and the oxygen content in the interface layers increased after the transition. The solute concentrations of Fe, Cr and Ni became higher, accompanying the increase of oxygen concentrations at columnar grain boundaries in the oxide films after the transition for 0.5Nb/Zry-2. It was thought that the properties of grain boundaries of the 0.5Nb/Zry-2 oxide films changed after the transition, and the increase in oxygen diffusivity at grain boundaries caused the linear increase in weight gain. (author)

  11. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  12. Effects of cathode current density on structure and corrosion resistance of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings formed on ZK60 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Peibo; Wu Xiaohong; Guo Yun; Jiang Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    Current density is a key factor in plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process. The aim of this paper is to study the effects of cathode current density on the composition, morphology, and corrosion resistance of ceramic coatings on ZK60 magnesium alloy prepared through bi-polar plasma electrolytic oxidation in Na 3 PO 4 solution. The phase composition, morphology, and corrosion resistance were studied by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization in 3.5% NaCl solution. It is found that the as-produced coatings are only composed of MgO. The increase of cathode current density made the coatings less porous and more compact. Analysis of EIS and potentiodynamic polarization technique on the samples shows that the corrosion resistance of the coated samples is better than that of ZK60 magnesium alloy, and that a bigger cathode current density can improve the corrosion resistance of as-prepared coatings.

  13. Influence of alloying element of corrosion of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloy and impedance characteristics of its oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2000-01-01

    As a part of the advanced Zr fuel cladding development program, the autoclave corrosion test was performed on the series of Zr-0.2Nb-1.1Sn-Fe-Cu and Zr-0.4Nb-0.8Sn-Fe-Cu alloys in 70 ppm LiOH solution at 360 .deg. C. The oxide characteristics were investigated by using the Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscope(EIS) method. The corrosion resistance of the alloys was evaluated from the corrosion rate determined as a function of the concentration of main alloying elements such as Nb, Sn, Fe and Cu. The equivalent circuit was composed as a result of the spectrum from EIS measurements on the oxide layer that formed at pro- and post-transition regions. By using the capacitance characteristics of equivalent circuit, the thickness of impervious layer, it's electrical resistance and characteristics of space charge layer were evaluated. The corrosion characteristics of the Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe-Cu alloys were successfully explained by applying the EIS test results

  14. The effect of zinc injection into PWR primary coolant on the reduction of radiation buildup and corrosion control. The solubilities of zinc, nickel and cobalt spinel oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Kaori; Hirano, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    The use of zinc injection into PWR primary coolant to reduce radiation buildup has been widely studied, and te reduction effect has been experimentally confirmed. However, some items, such as the optimal concentration of zinc required to reduce radiation buildup, the corrosion control effect of zinc injection, and the influence of zinc injection on the integrity of fuel cladding, have not been clarified yet. In particular, the corrosion suppression effect of zinc remains unconfirmed. Therefore, it is necessary to measure and calculate the solubilities of zinc and nickel spinel oxides, which are formed on the surface of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary systems. In this study, in order to assess the effectiveness of zinc injection in the reduction of radiation buildup and the corrosion control of Ni-based alloy, the potential-pH diagrams for Zn-Cr-H 2 O, Ni-Cr-H 2 O, and Co-Cr-H 2 O systems at 300degC were constructed and the solubilities of Zn-Cr, Ni-Cr, and Co-Cr spinel oxides were calculated. It is concluded that under pH conditions for which NiCr 2 O 4 is stable, zinc injection is effective in corrosion control as well as in reducing radiation buildup. (author)

  15. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  16. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Sebastian, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maffiotte, C. [CIEMAT-DT edificio 30, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  17. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feliu, Sebastian; Maffiotte, C.; Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos; Barranco, Violeta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  18. The photoelectrocatalytic activity, long term stability and corrosion performance of NiMo deposited titanium oxide nano-tubes for hydrogen production in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Mehmet Erman; Mert, Başak Doğru; Kardaş, Gülfeza; Yazıcı, Birgül

    2017-11-01

    In this study, titanium oxide nano-tubes are doped with Ni and Mo particles with various chemical compositions, in order to put forth the efficiency of single and binary coatings on hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in 1 M KOH. The characterization was achieved by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The water wettability characteristics of electrode surfaces were investigated using contact angle. The long-term catalyst stability and corrosion performance were determined by current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, photoelectrochemical behavior was determined via linear sweep voltammetry. Results showed that, nano-structured Ni and Mo deposited titanium oxide nano-tubes decrease the hydrogen over potential and increase HER efficiency, it is stable over 168 h electrolysis and it exhibits higher corrosion performance.

  19. Corrosion protection by organic coatings containing polyaniline salts prepared by oxidative polymerization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohl, M.; Kalendová, A.; Černošková, E.; Bláha, Michal; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Erben, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2017), s. 1397-1410 ISSN 1945-9645 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02787S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyaniline * oxidative polymerization * organic coatings Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 1.557, year: 2016

  20. Dissolution and Protection of Aluminium Oxide in Corrosive Aqueous Media - An Ellipsometry and Reflectometry Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsson, P.M.; Postmus, B.R.; Palmqvist, A.E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution of alumina has been studied from wafers in aqueous solution by means of ellipsometry and reflectometry. It was discovered that the dissolution of aluminium oxide is promoted by ethanol amines like N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine and triethanolamine, and that this dissolution is retarded

  1. The Influence of Plasma-Based Nitriding and Oxidizing Treatments on the Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of CoCrMo Biomedical Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noli, Fotini; Pichon, Luc; Öztürk, Orhan

    2018-04-01

    Plasma-based nitriding and/or oxidizing treatments were applied to CoCrMo alloy to improve its surface mechanical properties and corrosion resistance for biomedical applications. Three treatments were performed. A set of CoCrMo samples has been subjected to nitriding at moderate temperatures ( 400 °C). A second set of CoCrMo samples was oxidized at 395 °C in pure O2. The last set of CoCrMo samples was nitrided and subsequently oxidized under the experimental conditions of previous sets (double treatment). The microstructure and morphology of the layers formed on the CoCrMo alloy were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. In addition, nitrogen and oxygen profiles were determined by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-ray, and Nuclear Reaction Analysis. Significant improvement of the Vickers hardness of the CoCrMo samples after plasma nitriding was observed due to the supersaturated nitrogen solution and the formation of an expanded FCC γ N phase and CrN precipitates. In the case of the oxidized samples, Vickers hardness improvement was minimal. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated in simulated body fluid (0.9 pct NaCl solution at 37 °C) using electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization and cyclic voltammetry). The concentration of metal ions released from the CoCrMo surfaces was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The experimental results clearly indicate that the CoCrMo surface subjected to the double surface treatment consisting in plasma nitriding and plasma oxidizing exhibited lower deterioration and better resistance to corrosion compared to the nitrided, oxidized, and untreated samples. This enhancement is believed to be due to the formation of a thicker and more stable layer.

  2. Fireside corrosion and steamside oxidation of 9-12% Cr martensitic steels exposed for long term testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jensen, S. A.; Rasmussen, F.

    2009-01-01

    MoV121 and HCM12 for the 12% Cr steels. The test tubes were welded in as part of the existing final superheaters in actual plants and exposure has been conducted over a ten year period (1994-2005). Compared to the older steel types, T92 and HCM12 utilise tungsten to improve their creep strength. From......To obtain long term corrosion and steam oxidation data for the 9-12%Cr ferritic steels, test tube sections have been exposed in Amager 3 and Avedore 1 coal fired power plants in Denmark (formerly run by ENERGI E2). Thus direct comparisons can be made for T91 and T92 for the 9% Cr steels and X20Cr...... Avedore I testing, T91 and T92 can be compared for exposure times up to similar to 48 000 h exposure. From Amager 3 testing, X20, HCM12 and T92 were tested; T92 has been exposed for up to 31 000 h and X20 and HCM12 have had 84 500 h exposure. Tube sections were removed for various exposure durations...

  3. Corrosion stability of ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide electrolyser cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palcut, Marián; Mikkelsen, Lars; Neufeld, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Long-term oxidation behaviour of eight ferritic steels with 20–29 wt.% chromium (F 20 T, TUS 220 M, AL 453, Crofer 22 APU, Crofer 22 H, Sanergy HT, E-Brite and AL 29-4C) has been studied. The samples were cut into square coupons, ground and annealed for 140–1000 h at 1173 K in flowing, wet hydrogen...

  4. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Corrosion Mitigation efforts using readily available anti- corrosion coatings to protect low carbon steel test coupons against the ... The following protective coating devices were effective: ..... 2 West, J.M (1986): Basic Corrosion and Oxidation,.

  5. Analysis of corrosive environmental factors of seabed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Seabed sediment; corrosion; environmental factors. 1. Introduction. The corrosion ... plays an important role in the corrosion behaviour of steel in sediment. Figure 2b shows the change in oxidation-reduction po- tential, Eh with distance from ...

  6. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  7. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  8. In vitro degradation and electrochemical corrosion evaluations of microarc oxidized pure Mg, Mg–Ca and Mg–Ca–Zn alloys for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yaokun; He, Siyu; Wang, Diangang, E-mail: wangdg@sdu.edu.cn; Huang, Danlan; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Siqi; Dong, Pan; Chen, Chuanzhong, E-mail: czchen@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic coatings were fabricated on pure magnesium (Mg) and self-designed Mg–0.6Ca, Mg–0.55Ca–1.74Zn alloys by microarc oxidation (MAO). The coating formation, growth and biomineralization mechanisms were discussed. The coating degradability and bioactivity were evaluated by immersion tests in trishydroxymethyl–aminomethane hydrochloric acid (Tris–HCl) buffer and simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions, respectively. The coatings and corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR). The electrochemical workstation was used to investigate the electrochemical corrosion behaviors of substrates and coatings. Results showed that Mg–0.55Ca–1.74Zn alloy exhibits the highest mechanical strength and electrochemical corrosion resistance among the three alloys. The MAO-coated Mg–0.55Ca–1.74Zn alloy has the potential to be served as a biodegradable implant. - Highlights: • Ca and Zn are suitable alloying elements in the development of novel Mg implants. • Micropore and crack are two factors affecting the MAO coating corrosion behavior. • Dissolution and precipitation of apatites on MAO coating are reversible reactions.

  9. In vitro degradation and electrochemical corrosion evaluations of microarc oxidized pure Mg, Mg–Ca and Mg–Ca–Zn alloys for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yaokun; He, Siyu; Wang, Diangang; Huang, Danlan; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Siqi; Dong, Pan; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic coatings were fabricated on pure magnesium (Mg) and self-designed Mg–0.6Ca, Mg–0.55Ca–1.74Zn alloys by microarc oxidation (MAO). The coating formation, growth and biomineralization mechanisms were discussed. The coating degradability and bioactivity were evaluated by immersion tests in trishydroxymethyl–aminomethane hydrochloric acid (Tris–HCl) buffer and simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions, respectively. The coatings and corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR). The electrochemical workstation was used to investigate the electrochemical corrosion behaviors of substrates and coatings. Results showed that Mg–0.55Ca–1.74Zn alloy exhibits the highest mechanical strength and electrochemical corrosion resistance among the three alloys. The MAO-coated Mg–0.55Ca–1.74Zn alloy has the potential to be served as a biodegradable implant. - Highlights: • Ca and Zn are suitable alloying elements in the development of novel Mg implants. • Micropore and crack are two factors affecting the MAO coating corrosion behavior. • Dissolution and precipitation of apatites on MAO coating are reversible reactions

  10. Surface coverage and corrosion inhibition effect of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on the electrochemical performance of low carbon steel in dilute acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Tolulope Loto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical analysis of the corrosion inhibition and surface protection properties of the combined admixture of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on low carbon steel in 1 M HCl and H2SO4 solution was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential measurement, optical microscopy and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Results obtained confirmed the compound to be more effective in HCl solution, with optimal inhibition efficiencies of 93.26% in HCl and 87.7% in H2SO4 acid solutions with mixed type inhibition behavior in both acids. The compound shifts the corrosion potential values of the steel cathodically in HCl and anodically in H2SO4 signifying specific corrosion inhibition behavior without applied potential. Identified functional groups of alcohols, phenols, 1°, 2° amines, amides, carbonyls (general, esters, saturated aliphatic, carboxylic acids, ethers, aliphatic amines, alkenes, aromatics, alkyl halides and alkynes within the compound completely adsorbed onto the steel forming a protective covering. Thermodynamic calculations showed physisorption molecular interaction with the steel’s surface according to Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherms. Optical microscopy images of the inhibited and uninhibited steels contrast each other with steel specimens from HCl solution showing a better morphology. Keywords: Corrosion, Inhibitor, Adsorption, Steel, Acid

  11. Study of the effect of Pyrophosphate in low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jae Gon; Kim, Eng Chan; Kim, Ki Hong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) was utilized to eliminate the drawbacks of high voltage PEO such as high cost, dimensional deformation, and porosity. Low voltage PEO produces a thin coating, which leads to low corrosion resistance. In order to solve this problem, 0.1⁓0.6 M pyrophosphates were added to a bath containing 1.4 M NaOH and 0.35 M Na_2SiO_3.PEO at 70V was conducted at 25℃ for 3 minutes. The chemical composition, morphology, and corrosion resistance of the anodized coating were analyzed. The anodized film was composed of MgO, Mg_2SiO_4, and Mg_2O_7P_2. Themorphology of the film showed a inappropriately dense structure and low porosity in the anodized layers. It is found that low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in cooperation with phosphating treatment can provide good corrosion protection for the AZ31B magnesium alloy.

  12. Study of the effect of Pyrophosphate in low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Jae Gon; Kim, Eng Chan [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Hong [Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) was utilized to eliminate the drawbacks of high voltage PEO such as high cost, dimensional deformation, and porosity. Low voltage PEO produces a thin coating, which leads to low corrosion resistance. In order to solve this problem, 0.1⁓0.6 M pyrophosphates were added to a bath containing 1.4 M NaOH and 0.35 M Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}.PEO at 70V was conducted at 25℃ for 3 minutes. The chemical composition, morphology, and corrosion resistance of the anodized coating were analyzed. The anodized film was composed of MgO, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, and Mg{sub 2}O{sub 7}P{sub 2}. Themorphology of the film showed a inappropriately dense structure and low porosity in the anodized layers. It is found that low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in cooperation with phosphating treatment can provide good corrosion protection for the AZ31B magnesium alloy.

  13. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J., E-mail: fco.javier@ciemat.es [Structural Materials Division, CIEMAT, Building 30, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D. [Structural Materials Division, CIEMAT, Building 30, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  14. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Muñoz, F. J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H 2/H 2O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  15. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H 2 /H 2 O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed-Conducting Corrosion Resistant Oxide Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramani, Vijay K. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-01-31

    An extensive search and evaluation of electrochemically stable catalyst supports (including metal oxides like RuO2-SiO2, RuO2-TiO2, and ITO was perfomed during the 4 years of the project. The suports were also catalyzed by deposition of Pt and tested for its performance and electrochemical stability in RDE and fuel cell experiments. For testing the electrochemical stability and fuel cell performance of the catalysts and supports, we have employed the protocols in use at the Department of Energy and Nissan Technological Center North America (NTCNA). The use of such procedures allows a precise and reproducible estimation of the performance and stability of the materials and permits comparisons among laboratories and DOE funded projects. RuO2-SiO2 catalyst supports showed no loss in surface area during start-stop stability tests that were performed by cycling the electrode potential between 0 V to 1.8 V for 1000 cycles. Catalyzed support (40% Pt/RuO2-SiO2; 1:1 mole ratio) were tested in a PEFC, resulting in a current density of 750 mA/cm2 at 0.6 Volts, and a maximum power density of 570 mW/cm2. Measurements were conducted at 80 ºC with 75% relative humidity of the inlet gases (H2/O2); Pt loadings were 0.4 mg/cm2 at the cathode and 0.2 mg/cm2 at the anode. Start-stop stability tests for support and catalyzed support performed in RDE and PEFC set-ups have confirmed RuO2-TiO2 support stability. The beginning of life performance was exactly equal to end of life performance (in an MEA that has been subjected to severe start-stop cycling for 10,000 start/stop cycles between 1 V to 1.5 V). This result was in sharp contrast to baseline Pt/C catalyst that showed significant performance deterioration after accelerated stability tests. The Pt/TRO showed minimal loss in performance upon exposure to start-stop cycles. The loss in cell voltage at 1 A/cm2 at 100% RH was almost 700 mV for Pt/C whereas it was only ca. 15 mV for Pt/TRO. 40% RH data (of inlet gases) revealed a similar

  17. The characteristics of TiC and oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of TiC coated graphite under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Oku, Tatsuo; Ioka, Ikuo; Umekawa, Shokichi.

    1982-07-01

    Core region of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) consists mainly of polycrystalline graphite whose mechanical properties degradated by corrosion resulting from such impurities as O 2 , H 2 O, and CO 2 in coolant He gas. Mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of TiC coated graphite under corrosive condition were examined in order to evaluate the effects of TiC coating on preventing the graphite from its degradation in service condition of the VHTR. Characteristics of TiC coating was also examined using EPMA. Holding the specimen at 1373 K for 6 hr produced strong interface between TiC coating and the graphite, however, microcracks on TiC coating was observed, the origin of which is ascribed to mismatch in thermal expansion between TiC coating and the graphite. Oxidation rate of TiC coated graphite was one-thirds of that of uncoated graphite, which demonstrated that TiC coating on the graphite improved the oxidation resistance of the graphite. However, debonding of TiC coating layer at the interface was observed after heating for 3 to 4 hr in the oxidation condition. Changes in Young's modulus of TiC coated graphite were a half of that of uncoated graphite. Flexural strength of TiC coated graphite remained at the original value up to about 4 hr oxidation, therafter it decreased abruptly as was the trend of uncoated graphite. It is concluded that TiC coating on graphite materials is very effective in improving oxidation resistance and suppressing degradation of mechanical properties of the graphite. (author)

  18. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  19. Growth of ceramic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloys by micro-arc oxidation in aluminate-fluoride solutions and evaluation of corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, H.F.; An, M.Z.

    2005-01-01

    Micro-arc oxidization of AZ91D magnesium alloys was studied in solutions containing sodium aluminate and potassium fluoride at constant applied current densities. The influence of applied current densities, concentration and constituents of the electrolyte as well as treatment time on micro-arc oxidization process was investigated, respectively; surface morphology and phase structure were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of ceramic coatings formed on magnesium alloys. XRD analyses indicate that the ceramic coatings fabricated on the surface of magnesium alloys by micro-arc oxidization are composed of spinel phase MgAl 2 O 4 and intermetallic phase Al 2 Mg; variation of treatment time arises no obvious difference to phase structure of the ceramic coatings. A few circular pores and micro-cracks are also observed to remain on the ceramic coating surface; the number of the pores is decreasing, while the diameter of the pores is apparently increasing with prolonging of treatment time. The corrosion resistance of ceramic coatings is improved more than 100 times compared with magnesium alloy substrate

  20. Effect of (NaPO3)6 concentrations on corrosion resistance of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Haihe; Cai Qizhou; Wei Bokang; Yu Bo; Li Dingjun; He Jian; Liu Ze

    2008-01-01

    Different plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coatings were prepared on AZ91D magnesium alloy in electrolytes containing various concentrations of (NaPO 3 ) 6 . The morphologies, chemical compositions and corrosion resistance of the PEO coatings were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test. The results showed that the PEO coatings were mainly composed of MgO, Mg 2 SiO 4 , MgAl 2 O 4 and amorphous compounds. As the (NaPO 3 ) 6 concentrations increased from 0 to 10 g/l, the thickness and surface roughness of the coatings approximately linearly increased; the MgO and Mg 2 SiO 4 phase increased within the concentration range of 0-3 and 0-5 g/l, and then decreased within the range of 3-10 and 5-10 g/l, respectively, while the MgAl 2 O 4 phase gradually decreased. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of the coatings increased within the range of 0-5 g/l and then decreased within the range of 5-10 g/l. The best corrosion resistance coating was obtained in electrolyte containing 5 g/l (NaPO 3 ) 6 , it had the most compact microstructure. Besides, a reasonable equivalent circuit was established, and the fitting results were consistent with the results of the EIS test

  1. Effects of Voltage on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Micro-arc Oxidation Ceramic Coatings Formed on KBM10 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J. P.; Cao, G. P.; Quan, G. F.; Wang, C.; Zhuang, J. J.; Song, R. G.

    2018-01-01

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coatings on KBM10 magnesium alloy were prepared in an electrolyte system with sodium silicate, potassium hydroxide, sodium tungstate, and citric acid. The effects of voltage on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of MAO coatings were studied using stereoscopic microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scratch tests, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the roughness of the MAO coatings, diameter, and number of pores increase with the increase in voltage. The coating formed at the voltage of 350 V exhibited the best adhesive strength when evaluated by the automatic scratch tester. The coatings were mainly composed of MgO, MgWO4, and Mg2SiO4, and the content of Mg2SiO4 increased with the increase in voltage. The corrosion resistance of MAO coatings could be improved by changing the applied voltage, and the best corrosion resistance of MAO coating was observed at the voltage of 350 V.

  2. Surface coverage and corrosion inhibition effect of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on the electrochemical performance of low carbon steel in dilute acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    2018-03-01

    Electrochemical analysis of the corrosion inhibition and surface protection properties of the combined admixture of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on low carbon steel in 1 M HCl and H2SO4 solution was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential measurement, optical microscopy and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Results obtained confirmed the compound to be more effective in HCl solution, with optimal inhibition efficiencies of 93.26% in HCl and 87.7% in H2SO4 acid solutions with mixed type inhibition behavior in both acids. The compound shifts the corrosion potential values of the steel cathodically in HCl and anodically in H2SO4 signifying specific corrosion inhibition behavior without applied potential. Identified functional groups of alcohols, phenols, 1°, 2° amines, amides, carbonyls (general), esters, saturated aliphatic, carboxylic acids, ethers, aliphatic amines, alkenes, aromatics, alkyl halides and alkynes within the compound completely adsorbed onto the steel forming a protective covering. Thermodynamic calculations showed physisorption molecular interaction with the steel's surface according to Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherms. Optical microscopy images of the inhibited and uninhibited steels contrast each other with steel specimens from HCl solution showing a better morphology.

  3. Characterization and corrosion resistance of anodic electrodeposited titanium oxide/phosphate films on Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta bioalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, Monica; Vasilescu, Cora; Drob, Silviu I.; Osiceanu, Petre; Anastasescu, Mihai; Calderon-Moreno, Jose M., E-mail: josecalderonmoreno@yahoo.com [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' Ilie Murgulescu' of the Romanian Academy, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-07-15

    In this work, the anodic galvanostatic electrodeposition of an oxidation film containing phosphates on Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy from orthophosphoric acid solution is presented. Its composition was determined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy, and its topography by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The corrosion resistance of the coated alloy in simulated human fluid (by linear polarization method and monitoring of open circuit potentials, corresponding open circuit potential gradients) as well as the characterization of the coating (by Raman spectroscopy and depth profile X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) deposited in a period of 300 h soaking in simulated human body fluid were studied. The electrodeposited film was composed of amorphous titanium dioxide and contained phosphate groups. The corrosion resistance of the coated Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy in neutral and alkaline Ringer's solutions was higher than that of the bare alloy due to the protective properties of the electrodeposited film. The corrosion parameters improved over time as result of the thickening of the surface film by the deposition from the physiological solution. The deposited coating presented a variable composition in depth: at the deeper layer nucleated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and at the outer layer amorphous calcium phosphate. (author)

  4. In vitro degradation and electrochemical corrosion evaluations of microarc oxidized pure Mg, Mg-Ca and Mg-Ca-Zn alloys for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yaokun; He, Siyu; Wang, Diangang; Huang, Danlan; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Siqi; Dong, Pan; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2015-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic coatings were fabricated on pure magnesium (Mg) and self-designed Mg-0.6Ca, Mg-0.55Ca-1.74Zn alloys by microarc oxidation (MAO). The coating formation, growth and biomineralization mechanisms were discussed. The coating degradability and bioactivity were evaluated by immersion tests in trishydroxymethyl-aminomethane hydrochloric acid (Tris-HCl) buffer and simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions, respectively. The coatings and corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR). The electrochemical workstation was used to investigate the electrochemical corrosion behaviors of substrates and coatings. Results showed that Mg-0.55Ca-1.74Zn alloy exhibits the highest mechanical strength and electrochemical corrosion resistance among the three alloys. The MAO-coated Mg-0.55Ca-1.74Zn alloy has the potential to be served as a biodegradable implant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization and corrosion resistance of anodic electrodeposited titanium oxide/phosphate films on Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta bioalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, Monica; Vasilescu, Cora; Drob, Silviu I.; Osiceanu, Petre; Anastasescu, Mihai; Calderon-Moreno, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the anodic galvanostatic electrodeposition of an oxidation film containing phosphates on Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy from orthophosphoric acid solution is presented. Its composition was determined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy, and its topography by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The corrosion resistance of the coated alloy in simulated human fluid (by linear polarization method and monitoring of open circuit potentials, corresponding open circuit potential gradients) as well as the characterization of the coating (by Raman spectroscopy and depth profile X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) deposited in a period of 300 h soaking in simulated human body fluid were studied. The electrodeposited film was composed of amorphous titanium dioxide and contained phosphate groups. The corrosion resistance of the coated Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy in neutral and alkaline Ringer's solutions was higher than that of the bare alloy due to the protective properties of the electrodeposited film. The corrosion parameters improved over time as result of the thickening of the surface film by the deposition from the physiological solution. The deposited coating presented a variable composition in depth: at the deeper layer nucleated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and at the outer layer amorphous calcium phosphate. (author)

  6. The application of photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of corrosion and oxidation mechanisms of alloys: Inconel 182, Fe/Cu(100 and U-Zr-Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Renato de

    2011-05-01

    In. this work a study of the oxidation/corrosion process of three systems of metallic materials by Photoemission Spectroscopy is presented. In the first system, it was investigated the corrosion of Ineonel 182 at simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) environment. Samples with and without surface chemical treatment were exposed to the simulated environment for until 18 weeks. The oxide layer formed on the surfaces of the samples at different conditions was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and XPS coupled with argon ion sputtering. The comparison between the oxide films grown on the samples showed that the oxide layer formed on the chemically treated sample is thinner and relatively Cr-rich. In second system it was studied the initial oxidation at room temperature of epitaxial films of Fe evapored on Cu (100). The films were deposited with two different thicknesses in order to get tbe fcc Fe (100) and bcc Fe (110) surfaces. The results, obtained by photoemission spectroscopy at the TEMPO beamline of the Synchrotron Soleil, showed the formation of distinct oxides films. The surfaces also presented different kinetics of oxidation and the (110) Fe-bcc showed highest reactivity. The analysis of the data indicated the Fe 1-x O formation on fcc Fe (100) and suggested the Fe 1-x O and FC 3 0 4 formation on (110) Fe-bcc surface. In the last system, it was investigated the initial oxidation of U-Zr-Nb alloys at room temperature. For this experiment, the alloys were exposed to oxygen in ultra high vacuum. The analysis of the U 4f peak showed the fast formation of U) 2 on the surfaces and similar kinetics of oxidation between the U and the U-Zr-Nb alloy. The alloying elements showed slower oxidation. The Zr 3d peak suggested the zr0 2 formation while the Nb 3d peak showed a remarkable enlargement that became necessary a deconvolution which indicated the formation ofNhO , Nb0 2 and N 2 0 5 . (author)

  7. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of calcium phosphate-base composite layer on titanium and its alloys via plasma electrolytic oxidation: A review paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieerad, A R; Ashra, M R; Mahmoodian, R; Bushroa, A R

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, calcium phosphate-base composites, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and carbonate apatite (CA) have been considered desirable and biocompatible coating layers in clinical and biomedical applications such as implants because of the high resistance of the composites. This review focuses on the effects of voltage, time and electrolytes on a calcium phosphate-base composite layer in case of pure titanium and other biomedical grade titanium alloys via the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. Remarkably, these parameters changed the structure, morphology, pH, thickness and crystallinity of the obtained coating for various engineering and biomedical applications. Hence, the structured layer caused improvement of the biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and assignment of extra benefits for Osseo integration. The fabricated layer with a thickness range of 10 to 20 μm was evaluated for physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological characteristics via XRD, FESEM, EDS, EIS and corrosion analysis respectively, to determine the effects of the applied parameters and various electrolytes on morphology and phase transition. Moreover, it was observed that during PEO, the concentration of calcium, phosphor and titanium shifts upward, which leads to an enhanced bioactivity by altering the thickness. The results confirm that the crystallinity, thickness and contents of composite layer can be changed by applying thermal treatments. The corrosion behavior was investigated via the potentiodynamic polarization test in a body-simulated environment. Here, the optimum corrosion resistance was obtained for the coating process condition at 500 V for 15 min in Ringer solution. This review has been summarized, aiming at the further development of PEO by producing more adequate titanium-base implants along with desired mechanical and biomedical features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  9. Investigation into the role of sodium chloride deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sodium chloride is deposited on the surface of alumina substrates and exposed to air containing 1% SO2 at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C. In all cases the sodium chloride was converted to sodium sulfate. The volatilization of sodium chloride from the original salt particles was responsible for the development of a uniform coating of sodium sulfate on the alumina substrate. At temperatures above 625 C, a liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 autectic was formed on the substrate. The mechanisms for these reactions are given. One of the main roles of NaCl in low temperature hot corrosion lies in enabling a corrosive liquid to form.

  10. Ceramic tantalum oxide thin film coating to enhance the corrosion and wear characteristics of Ti−6Al−4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmati, B., E-mail: r.bijan@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sarhan, Ahmed A.D., E-mail: ah_sarhan@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Basirun, W. Jeffrey [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Abas, W.A.B.W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-08-15

    In this research, an attempt is made to study the corrosion and wear behavior of TaO{sub 2} thin film coating deposited onto Ti−6Al−4V alloy with the highest adhesion (was achieved in the author's previous experiments using Taguchi statistical method) which leads to increase corrosion resistance, decrease debris generation and improve durability. Accordingly, pure tantalum (Ta) was deposited onto Ti−6Al−4V substrate surface as intermetallic layer then to form a TaO{sub 2} thin film, Ta was deposited onto the sample surface in the presence of oxygen by using physical vapor deposition magnetron sputtering (PVDMS). Corrosion testing was carried out in fetal bovine serum (FBS). The corrosion test in FBS medium confirmed that the corrosion resistance of the TaO{sub 2} – coated Ti−6Al−4V alloys was significantly higher than the uncoated Ti−6Al−4V substrate due to the decrease in corrosion current density (I{sub corr}) for the coated substrate with high thin-film adhesion. Wear testing was carried out on uncoated and coated Ti−6Al−4V substrates in the presence of FBS medium under 15 N load (natural walking load) at 1.09 m/s (simulated medium walking speed). The tests revealed that the specific wear ratio of TaO{sub 2} coating was significantly lower than the uncoated substrate wear ratio. The average friction coefficients obtained were 0.183 and 0.152 for uncoated substrate and TaO{sub 2} thin film coating, respectively. So, due to the noticeable corrosion and wear resistance characteristics of the TaO{sub 2} coating, it is suggested for hip joint implant. - Highlights: • The TaO{sub 2} coating has been created onto the Ti−6Al−4V surface by using PVDMS method. • The TaO{sub 2} coating has been formed on the Ti−6Al−4V sample at the highest adhesion. • The corrosion resistance of the coated Ti−6Al−4V substrate has been improved. • The wear resistance of the coated Ti−6Al−4V substrate has been increased. • The durability

  11. Corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimura, H.; Morikawa, H.; Nagano, H.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate tests are effected on zirconium in boiling nitric acid to study the influence of nitric acid concentration, of oxidizing ions (Cr and Ce) and of electric potential. Corrosion resistance is excellent and stress corrosion cracking occurs only for severe conditions: 350 mV over electric potential for corrosion with nitric acid concentration of 40 % [fr

  12. Corrosion control in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    This article looks in detail at tribology-related hazards of corrosion in irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and tries to identify and minimize problems which could contribute to disaster. First, the corrosion process is explained. Then the corrosion aspects at each of four stages in reprocessing are examined, with particular reference to oxide fuel reprocessing. The four stages are fuel receipt and storage, fuel breakdown and dissolution, solvent extraction and product concentration and waste management. Results from laboratory and plant corrosion trails are used at the plant design stage to prevent corrosion problems arising. Operational procedures which minimize corrosion if it cannot be prevented at the design stage, are used. (UK)

  13. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  14. Structure and corrosion behavior of sputter deposited cerium oxide based coatings with various thickness on Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Materials Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Huang, Jiamu, E-mail: huangjiamu@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China); Claypool, James B.; Castano, Carlos E. [Materials Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); O’Keefe, Matthew J., E-mail: mjokeefe@mst.edu [Materials Research Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Crystalline CeO{sub 2} coatings are deposited on Al 2024-T3 alloys by magnetron sputtering. • The crystal size and internal stress both increased with the thickness of CeO{sub 2} coating. • The ∼210 nm thick coating has the highest adhesion strength to the Al alloy substrate. • The ∼900 nm thick coating increased the corrosion resistance two orders of magnitude. • CeO{sub 2} coatings provide good cathodic inhibition for Al alloys by acting as physical barriers. - Abstract: Cerium oxide based coatings from ∼100 to ∼1400 nm in thickness were deposited onto Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates by magnetron sputtering of a 99.99% pure CeO{sub 2} target. The crystallite size of CeO{sub 2} coatings increased from 15 nm to 46 nm as the coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼1400 nm. The inhomogeneous lattice strain increased from 0.36% to 0.91% for the ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm thick coatings and slightly decreased to 0.89% for the ∼1400 nm thick coating. The highest adhesion strength to Al alloy substrates was for the ∼210 nm thick coating, due to a continuous film coverage and low internal stress. Electrochemical measurements indicated that sputter deposited crystalline CeO{sub 2} coatings acted as physical barriers that provide good cathodic inhibition for Al alloys in saline solution. The ∼900 nm thick CeO{sub 2} coated sample had the best corrosion performance that increased the corrosion resistance by two orders magnitude and lowered the cathodic current density 30 times compared to bare Al 2024-T3 substrates. The reduced defects and exposed surface, along with suppressed charge mobility, likely accounts for the improved corrosion performance as coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm. The corrosion performance decreased for ∼1400 nm thick coatings due in part to an increase in coating defects and porosity along with a decrease in adhesion strength.

  15. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  16. Influence of Nitinol wire surface treatment on oxide thickness and composition and its subsequent effect on corrosion resistance and nickel ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, B; Carroll, W; Rochev, Y; Hynes, M; Bradley, D; Plumley, D

    2006-10-01

    Medical implants and devices are now used successfully in surgical procedures on a daily basis. Alloys of nickel and titanium, and in particular Nitinol are of special interest in the medical device industry, because of their shape memory and superelastic properties. The corrosion behavior of nitinol in the body is also of critical importance because of the known toxicological effects of nickel. The stability of a NiTi alloy in the physiological environment is dependant primarily on the properties of the mostly TiO(2) oxide layer that is present on the surface. For the present study, a range of nitinol wires have been prepared using different drawing processes and a range of surface preparation procedures. It is clear from the results obtained that the wire samples with very thick oxides also contain a high nickel content in the oxide layer. The untreated samples with the thicker oxides show the lowest pitting potential values and greater nickel release in both long and short-term experiments. It was also found that after long-term immersion tests breakdown potentials increased for samples that exhibited lower values initially. From these results it would appear that surface treatment is essential for the optimum bioperformance of nitinol. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  17. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  18. Anodizing of aluminum with improved corrosion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, P.; Khan, I.U.

    2010-01-01

    Anodizing of aluminum was studied in sulphuric/oxalic/boric acid electroiyte system. The corrosion resistance of the anodic oxide coating of aluminum was determined by potentiodynamic polarization test and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology before and after corrosion test. It was found that the oxide coating obtained by this method showed better corrosion resistance with no significant difference in surface morphology. (author)

  19. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  20. Relationship between oxide film structures and corrosion resistance of SUS 304 L stainless steel in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo; Matsuda, Yasushi.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of various oxidation conditions on metal release of SUS304L stainless steels in deaerated pure water at 488 K was investigated. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the surface films which were formed by various oxidation treatments. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The oxidation treatment in high purity argon gas at high temperatures for short time such as 1273 K - 2 min (120S) was effective to decrease the metal dissolution, and the oxide films primarily consisted of spinel type double oxide layer containing high concentration of Mn and Cr. (2) The oxidation treatments in non-deaerated pure water at 561 K for 24∼336 h (86.4∼1209.6 ks) were furthermore effective to decrease the metal dissolution. (3) It may be concluded that the key factors controlling the metal release are thickness, structure and compactness together with compositions of surface oxide films. (author)

  1. Oxidant production from corrosion of nano- and microparticulate zero-valent iron in the presence of oxygen: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hongshin; Lee, Hye-jin; Kim, Hyung-Eun; Kweon, Jihyang; Lee, Byeong-Dae; Lee, Changha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidants from zero-valent iron were quantified in the presence of oxygen and EDTA. • The oxidant yields of nano- and microparticulate zero-valent iron were compared. • Microparticulate zero-valent iron produced higher oxidant yields. • The factors affecting the oxidant production from zero-valent iron were discussed. -- Abstract: In aqueous solution, zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe 0 ) is known to activate oxygen (O 2 ) into reactive oxidants such as hydroxyl radical and ferryl ion capable of oxidizing contaminants. However, little is known about the effect of the particle size of ZVI on the yield of reactive oxidants. In this study, the production of reactive oxidants from nanoparticulate and microparticulate ZVIs (denoted as nZVI and mZVI, respectively) was comparatively investigated in the presence of O 2 and EDTA. To quantify the oxidant yield, excess amount of methanol was employed, and the formation of its oxidation product, formaldehyde (HCHO), was monitored. The concentration of HCHO in the nZVI/O 2 system rapidly reached the saturation value, whereas that in the mZVI/O 2 system gradually increased throughout the entire reaction time. The mZVI/O 2 system exhibited higher yields of HCHO than the nZVI/O 2 system under both acidic and neutral pH conditions. The higher oxidant yields in the mZVI/O 2 system are mainly attributed to the less reactivity of the mZVI surface with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) relative to the surface of nZVI, which minimize the loss of H 2 O 2 by ZVI (i.e., the two-electron reduction of H 2 O 2 into water). In addition, the slow dissolution of Fe(II) from mZVI was found to be partially responsible for the higher oxidant yields at neutral pH

  2. The iron and cerium oxide influence on the electric conductivity and the corrosion resistance of anodized aluminium; A influencia do ferro e do oxido de cerio sobre a condutividade eletrica e a resistencia a corrosao do aluminio anodizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Kellie Provazi de

    2006-07-01

    The influence of different treatments on the aluminum system covered with aluminum oxide is investigated. The aluminum anodization in sulphuric media and in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric media was used to alter the corrosion resistance, thickness, coverage degree and microhardness of the anodic oxide. Iron electrodeposition inside the anodic oxide was used to change its electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. Direct and pulsed current were used for iron electrodeposition and the Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O electrolyte composition was changed with the addition of boric and ascorbic acids. To the sealing treatment the CeCl{sub 3} composition was varied. The energy dispersive x-ray (EDS), the x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (FRX) and the morphologic analysis by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) allowed to verify that, the pulsed current increase the iron content inside the anodic layer and that the use of the additives inhibits the iron oxidation. The chronopotentiometric curves obtained during iron electrodeposition indicated that the boric and ascorbic acids mixture increased the electrodeposition process efficiency. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIE), the Vickers (Hv) microhardness measurements and morphologic analysis evidenced that the sealing treatment improves the corrosion resistance of the anodic film modified with iron. The electrical impedance (EI) technique allowed to prove the electric conductivity increase of the anodized aluminum with iron electrodeposited even after the cerium low concentration treatment. Iron nanowires were prepared by using the anodic oxide pores as template. (author)

  3. Guideline tests on the corrosion of sintered uranium oxide by lead and sodium about 450 deg. C; Essais d'orientation sur la corrosion de l'oxyde d'uranium fritte par le plomb et le sodium aux environs de 450 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portnoff, A.; Pointud, R.

    1958-05-15

    Within the frame of the investigation of behaviour of a fuel element (such as UO{sub 2}) under irradiation, the authors report the study of the physical-chemical action of the coolant at different temperatures on the body to be irradiated. Thus, sintered uranium oxide has been submitted to corrosion by lead and by sodium during 250 hours at temperatures between 400 and 500 C. The physical characteristics of the UO{sub 2} powder and of different sintered UO{sub 2} pellets produced from this powder under different sintering processes are indicated, as well as the results of a spectrographic analysis of the sintered UO{sub 2}. Corrosion devices, treatments and obtained results are reported for corrosion by lead and by sodium. In the latter case, extraction processes are discussed (using butyl alcohol, or melting in vaseline oil)

  4. Corrosion of steel in carbonated media: The oxidation processes of chukanovite (Fe2(OH)2CO3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoulay, I.; Rémazeilles, C.; Refait, Ph.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of chukanovite does not lead to carbonated green rust. • Both lepidocrocite and goethite can result from the oxidation of chukanovite. • Violent oxidation of chukanovite by hydrogen peroxide leads to a Fe(III) oxycarbonate. • Chukanovite crystal structure withstands a partial oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). - Abstract: The oxidation of aqueous suspensions of chukanovite (Fe 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 ) obtained by mixing NaOH, FeCl 2 and Na 2 CO 3 solutions was studied. The reaction was monitored by recording the pH and the redox potential of a platinum electrode immersed in the suspension. The precipitate was analyzed at various oxidation stages by infrared spectroscopy. The end products were also characterized by X-ray diffraction. The oxidation by air of the suspensions leads to lepidocrocite and goethite without formation of an intermediate green rust compound. Violent oxidation of chukanovite by hydrogen peroxide leads to a Fe(III) oxycarbonate with a crystal structure closely related to that of chukanovite

  5. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  6. Corrosion and Wear Analysis in Marine Transport Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Urbahs, A; Savkovs, K; Rijkuris, G; Andrejeva, D

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the most common naturally occurring processes studied by thermodynamics, which includes oxidation process, metal disruption, and its chemical and electrochemical effects under environmental influence. Corrosion of metal and equipment accounts for a considerable proportion of total corrosion losses, thus providing the impetus for further investigation and developments related to corrosion protection in order to provide transport systems and industry with corrosion preventiv...

  7. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  8. Dry corrosion prediction of radioactive waste containers in long term interim storage: mechanisms of low temperature oxidation of pure iron and numerical simulation of an oxide scale growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, N.

    2006-10-01

    In the framework of research on long term behaviour of radioactive waste containers, this work consists on the one hand in the study of low temperature oxidation of iron and on the other hand in the development of a numerical model of oxide scale growth. Isothermal oxidation experiments are performed on pure iron at 300 and 400 C in dry and humid air at atmospheric pressure. Oxide scales formed in these conditions are characterized. They are composed of a duplex magnetite scale under a thin hematite scale. The inner layer of the duplex scale is thinner than the outer one. Both are composed of columnar grains, that are smaller in the inner part. The outer hematite layer is made of very small equiaxed grains. Markers and tracers experiments show that a part of the scale grows at metal/oxide interface thanks to short-circuits diffusion of oxygen. A model for iron oxide scale growth at low temperature is then deduced. Besides this experimental study, the numerical model EKINOX (Estimation Kinetics Oxidation) is developed. It allows to simulate the growth of an oxide scale controlled by mixed mechanisms, such as anionic and cationic vacancies diffusion through the scale, as well as metal transfer at metal/oxide interface. It is based on the calculation of concentration profiles of chemical species and also point defects in the oxide scale and in the substrate. This numerical model does not use the classical quasi-steady-state approximation and calculates the future of cationic vacancies at metal/oxide interface. Indeed, these point defects can either be eliminated by interface motion or injected in the substrate, where they can be annihilated, considering sinks as the climb of dislocations. Hence, the influence of substrate cold-work can be investigated. The EKINOX model is validated in the conditions of Wagner's theory and is confronted with experimental results by its application to the case of high temperature oxidation of nickel. (author)

  9. Grain boundary corrosion and alteration phase formation during the oxidative dissolution of UO{sub 2} pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Buck, E.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    Alteration behavior of UO{sub 2} pellets following reaction under unsaturated drip-test conditions at 90 C for up to 10 years was examined by solid phase and leachate analyses. Sample reactions were characterized by preferential dissolution of grain boundaries between the original press-sintered UO{sub 2} granules comprising the samples, development of a polygonal network of open channels along the intergrain boundaries, and spallation of surface granules that had undergone severe grain boundary corrosion. The development of a dense mat of alteration phases after 2 years of reaction trapped loose granules, resulting in reduced rates of particulate U release. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases that formed on the present samples was similar to that observed in surficial weathering zones of natural uraninite (UO{sub 2}) deposits, with alkali and alkaline earth uranyl silicates representing the long-term solubility-limiting phases for U in both systems.

  10. On mechanism of austenite chromium-nickel-molybdenum steels intercrystalline corrosion in weak and strong oxidizing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaskeev, A.V.; Savkina, L.Ya.; Knyazheva, V.M.; Kolotyrkin, Ya.M.; Fil'dgandler, Eh.G.; Rodin, N.N.

    1975-01-01

    Wide possibilities γ-spectrometry for kinetic investigation of intercrystalline corrosion (ICC) and also for recognizing the nature of the selectively soluble structural components at the stages of their initiation and development has been determined using 00Cr16Ni15Mo steel, containing 0,05 and 0,03%C. It is shown by γ-spectrometry, autoradiography, electrochemistry, optical and electron metallography in combination with (Cr,Fe,Mo) 23 C 6 carbide properties investigation, that ICC of sensitized 00Cr16Ni15Mo3 steel, is determined by selective dissolution of chromium and molybdenum depleted boundary regions of solid solutions. At potentials of passivation region (imitation of D method) the main cause of ICC is the selective dissolution of (Cr;Fe;Mo) 23 C 6 carbides arranged at grain boundaries. This process is facilitated in the presence of molybdenum in carbide

  11. Corrosion mechanisms of zirconium alloys - study of the initial oxidation kinetics and of the mechanical behaviour of the metal/oxide system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, M.

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear fuel claddings are made of zirconium alloys. The conditions of use lead the cladding oxidize outside. The so-formed layers behaves like a thermal barrier and prevents from using oxidized claddings with an oxide thickness larger than 100 μm. The oxidation kinetic is approximately cubic for oxide thicknesses smaller than about 2μm, linear beyond. A kinetic model has been proposed which estimates the post-transition growth rate from the kinetic parameters of the pre-transition state and morphological features of post-transition layers. This work aims at providing the necessary elements to validate this model and studying the layers around the kinetic transition, in order to determine whether the oxidation mechanisms before and after the transition are similar. Thicknesses of the 50 - 500 nm range of the oxide layers are measured by an optical method; pre-transition kinetics are thus precisely determined. The effect of the composition, the thermal treatment and the presence of oxygen in solid solution is studied. The morphological and crystallographic study of the layers show that they exhibit a lot of similarities before and after the kinetic transition. The results concerning the kinetic aspects and the morphology of the post-transition layers point out that the proposed model leads to realistic post-transition growth rates. Furthermore, the kinetic transition corresponds to the appearance of cracks in the oxide layer. The mechanical behaviour of the metal/oxide system has been modelled at different scales. When the specific behaviours of the metal and the oxide are taken into account together with the interface geometry, radial stresses appear, which are high enough to locally open cracks. The appearance and localization of cracks depend on both the interface geometry and the stress distribution in the metal/oxide system. (author)

  12. Aluminium oxide as an encapsulation material for unreprocessed nuclear fuel waste - evaluation from the viewpoint of corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Safety Project (KBS) has proposed that spent unreprocessed nuclear fuel shall be disposed of by encapsulation in canisters of high-purity alumina sintered under isostatic pressure. The canisters will have a wall thickness of 100 mm and are to be placed in vertical boreholes extending from horizontal tunnels 500 m below ground in igneous rock. In each borehole one canister is deposited embedded in a quartz sand/bentonite buffer. An expert group of 10 Swedish specialists has arrived at the following conclusions. The alumina is not thermodynamically stable in water. In pure water hydration will occur, below 100degC leading to the formation of either Al(OH) 3 in the amorphous state or crystalline gibbsite (Al 2 O 3 x 3H 2 O). Corrosion may take place by slow dissolution or flaking off of a surface layer. Various immersion tests showed that the corrosion rate will be less than 0.1 μm/year, probably one or two powers of ten lower. If the alumina canister in the storage has sufficiently large surface defects and is under sufficiently high mechanical tension the defects may grow slowly into propagating cracks, ultimately leading to fracture, so-called delayed fracture. On the basis of results from fracture mechanical studies and after introduction of safety factors with respect to possible unknown features of the delayed fracture it was judged possible to eliminate the risk of delayed fracture if the canisters pass the following production control: - Proof testing at 150 MN/m 2 , using acoustic emission technique to ensure that crack growth does not occur during the unstressing cycle. - Surface acoustic wave examination with respect to surface inclusions, canisters with inclusions larger than 100 μm within a 100 μm deep surface zone being rejected. Canisters which pass the production control mentioned are estimated to have a life of hundreds of thousands of years. (author)

  13. Effect of Sr on the bioactivity and corrosion resistance of nanoporous niobium oxide coating for orthopaedic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauline, S. Anne; Rajendran, N.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, strontium incorporated Nb 2 O 5 was synthesized in two different proportions by sol–gel methodology and was deposited on 316L SS by spin coating method. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a nanoporous morphology. The prepared Sr-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 coatings were uniform, smooth and well adherent on to the substrate 316L SS. The coatings were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the formation of Sr-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 coatings with nanoporous morphology was confirmed. Static water contact angle measurements showed an enhancement in the wettability of the obtained coatings. In vitro bioactivity test of the coated substrates showed that 0.05 M Sr-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 coating had better bioactivity compared to 0.1 M Sr-incorporated coating. Solution analysis studies confirmed the controlled release of Sr ions from the coating, which aid and enhance hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. Electrochemical studies confirmed that the coatings provided excellent corrosion protection to the base material as increased charge transfer resistance and decreased double layer capacitance was observed for the coated substrates. - Highlights: • Nanoporous Sr-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 coatings were deposited on 316L SS. • The coatings have excellent bond strength and high Vickers micro hardness value. • Nanoporous 0.05 M Sr-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 coating showed hydroxyapatite growth. • Slow release of strontium from the coating accelerated hydroxyapatite growth. • The nanoporous coatings offered excellent corrosion protection to 316L SS

  14. Effect of Sr on the bioactivity and corrosion resistance of nanoporous niobium oxide coating for orthopaedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauline, S. Anne; Rajendran, N., E-mail: nrajendran@annauniv.edu

    2014-03-01

    In this study, strontium incorporated Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was synthesized in two different proportions by sol–gel methodology and was deposited on 316L SS by spin coating method. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a nanoporous morphology. The prepared Sr-incorporated Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were uniform, smooth and well adherent on to the substrate 316L SS. The coatings were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the formation of Sr-incorporated Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings with nanoporous morphology was confirmed. Static water contact angle measurements showed an enhancement in the wettability of the obtained coatings. In vitro bioactivity test of the coated substrates showed that 0.05 M Sr-incorporated Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating had better bioactivity compared to 0.1 M Sr-incorporated coating. Solution analysis studies confirmed the controlled release of Sr ions from the coating, which aid and enhance hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. Electrochemical studies confirmed that the coatings provided excellent corrosion protection to the base material as increased charge transfer resistance and decreased double layer capacitance was observed for the coated substrates. - Highlights: • Nanoporous Sr-incorporated Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were deposited on 316L SS. • The coatings have excellent bond strength and high Vickers micro hardness value. • Nanoporous 0.05 M Sr-incorporated Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating showed hydroxyapatite growth. • Slow release of strontium from the coating accelerated hydroxyapatite growth. • The nanoporous coatings offered excellent corrosion protection to 316L SS.

  15. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate

  16. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate.

  17. Current status of studies on nodular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Satoru; Echigoya, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yutaka; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takao; Yamanaka, Tuneyasu.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on nodular corrosion formed on the outer surface of BWR fuel cladding tubes were reviewed. Main factors affecting the corrosion behavior were material and environmental conditions and combined effect. The effects of such material conditions as fabrication process, alloy elements, texture and surface treatment and environmental factors as neutron irradiation, thermo-hydrodynamic, water chemistry, purity of the coolant and contact with foreign metals on the corrosion phenomena were surveyed. Out-of-reactor corrosion test methods and models for the corrosion mechanism were also reviewed. Suppression of the accumulated annealing temperature during tube reduction process improved the nodular corrosion resistance of Zircaloys. Improved resistance for the nodular corrosion was reported for the unirradiated Zircaloys with some additives. Detailed irradiation test under the BWR conditions is needed to confirm the trend. Concerning the environmental factors, boiling on the cladding surface due to heat flux reduces the nodular corrosion susceptibility, while oxidizing radical generated from dissolved oxygen accelerates the corrosion. Concerning corrosion mechanisms, importance of such phenomena as the depleted zone of alloying elements in zirconium matrix, reduction of H + to H 2 in oxide layer, electrochemical property of precipitates, crystallographic anisotropy of oxidation rates were revealed. (author) 59 refs

  18. Shadow Corrosion Mechanism of Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullberg, Mats; Lysell, Gunnar; Nystrand, Ann-Charlotte

    2004-02-01

    Local corrosion enhancement appears on zirconium-base alloys in-core in boiling water reactors when the zirconium alloy is in close proximity to another metal. The visual appearance often resembles a shadow of the other component. The phenomenon is therefore referred to as 'shadow corrosion'. Shadow corrosion has been known for more than 25 years. Mechanisms based on either galvanic corrosion or local radiolysis effects have been proposed as explanations. Both types of mechanism have seemed to explain some facets of the phenomenon. Normally, shadow corrosion is of no practical significance. However, an enhanced and potentially serious form of shadow corrosion was discovered in 1996. This discovery stimulated new experiments that fully supported neither of the longstanding theories. Thus, there is till now no generally accepted understanding of the shadow corrosion phenomenon. The aim of the present investigation was to analyse the available data and to identify, if possible, a plausible mechanism of shadow corrosion. It was found that the experimental evidence is, with a few exceptions, remarkably consistent with a galvanic mechanism. The main exception is that shadow corrosion may occur also when the two metals are nominally electrically insulated. One way to account for the main exception could be to invoke the effect of photoconductivity. Photoconductivity results when a semiconductor or an insulator is irradiated with photons of UV or higher energy. The photons elevate electrons from the valence band to the conduction band, thereby raising the electron conductivity of the solid. In particular, photoconductivity lowers the electrical resistance of the normally insulating oxide on zirconium base alloys. Photoconductivity therefore also has the potential to explain why shadow corrosion is only seen in, or in proximity to, a nuclear reactor core. The suggested mechanism of shadow corrosion can be tested in a reasonably simple experiment in a research reactor

  19. Influence of C3H8O3 in the electrolyte on characteristics and corrosion resistance of the microarc oxidation coatings formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Di; Liu Xiangdong; Lu Kai; Zhang Yaping; Wang Huan

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic coatings were fabricated on AZ91D Mg-alloy substrate by microarc oxidation in Na 2 SiO 3 -NaOH-Na 2 EDTA electrolytes with and without C 3 H 8 O 3 addition. The effects of different concentrations of C 3 H 8 O 3 contained in the electrolyte on coatings thickness were investigated. The surface morphologies, RMS roughness, phase compositions and corrosion resistance property of the ceramic coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electrochemical corrosion test respectively. It is found that the addition of C 3 H 8 O 3 into silicate electrolyte leads to increase of the unit-area adsorptive capacity of the negative ions at anode-electrolyte interface and thus improves the compactness and corrosion resistance of the MAO coating. The coating thickness decreases gradually with the increase of concentrations of C 3 H 8 O 3 in the electrolyte. The oxide coating formed in base electrolyte containing 4 mL/L C 3 H 8 O 3 exhibits the best surface appearance, the lowest surface RMS roughness (174 nm) and highest corrosion resistance. In addition, both ceramic coatings treated in base electrolyte with and without C 3 H 8 O 3 are mainly composed of periclase MgO and forsterite Mg 2 SiO 4 phase, but no diffraction peak of Mg phase is found in the patterns.

  20. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  1. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  2. Study of the properties of plasma deposited layers of nickel-chrome-aluminium-yttrium coatings resistant to oxidation and hot corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the properties of Ni22Cr10Al1Y layers in order to obtain optimal structural - mechanical properties with the optimization of depositing parameters. Powder was deposited by the atmospheric plasma spray (APS process with the current intensity of 600, 700 and 800A, with a corresponding plasma gun power supply of 22KW, 34KW and 28KW. The evaluation of the Ni22Cr10Al1Y coating layers was made on the basis of their microhardness, tensile strength and microstructure performance. The best performance was obtained in the layers deposited with 800A and the 34KW plasma gun power supply. The coating with the best characteristics was tested to oxidation in the furnace for heat treatment without a protective atmosphere at 1100°C for one hour. The examination of the morphology of Ni22Cr10Al1Y powder particles was carried out on the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope as well as the EDS analysis of the best layers. The microstructure of the deposited coating layers was examined with a light microscope. The microstructure analysis was performed according to the TURBOMECA standard. The mechanical properties of layers were evaluated by the method HV0.3 for microhardness and by tensile testing for bond strength. The research has shown that plasma gun power supply significantly affects the mechanical properties and microstructure of coatings that are of crucial importance for the protection of components exposed to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion.

  3. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  4. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  5. Inhibition of Bio corrosion of steel coupon by sulphate reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Inhibition of Bio corrosion of steel coupon by sulphate reducing bacteria and Iron oxidizing bacteria using .... Ethanol for 24 h. The extract was ... with distilled water to get a zero reading from the meter before .... Ethanol extract of musa species peels as a green corrosion ... Eco friendly extract of banana peel as corrosion ...

  6. Influence of preliminary radiation-oxidizing treatment on the corrosion resistance of zirconium in conditions of action of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibov, A. A.; Aliyev, A. G.; Agayev, T. N.; Velibekova, G. Z.

    2004-01-01

    Today mainly water-cooled nuclear reactors predominate in atomic energetics. For safe work of nuclear reactors detection of accumulation process of explosives, formed during radiation and temperature influence on heat-carriers in contact with materials of nuclear reactors in normal and emergency regimes of work is of great importance. The main sources of molecular hydrogen formation in normal and emergency regimes are the processes of liquid and vaporous water in vapo metallic reaction [1-5]. At the result of these processes molecular hydrogen concentration in heat-carrier composition always exceeds theoretically expected concentration. One of the main ways to solve the problem of water-cooled reactors safety is detection of possibilities to raise material resistance of fuel elements and heat carrier to joint action of ionizing radiation and temperature. The second way is inhibition of radiation-catalytic activity of construction materials' surface during the process of water decomposition. It's been established, that one of the ways to raise resistance of zirconium materials to the influence of ionizing radiation is formation of thin oxide film on the surface of metals. In the given work the influence of preliminary oxidizing treatment of zirconium surface on its radiation-catalytic activity during the process of water decomposition. With this aim zirconium is exposed to preliminary influence of gamma-quantum in contact with hydrogen peroxide at different meanings of absorbed radiation dose

  7. Surface treatment and history-dependent corrosion in lead alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning; Zhang Jinsuo; Sencer, Bulent H.; Koury, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    In oxygen-controlled lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), steel corrosion may be strongly history dependent. This is due to the competition between liquid metal dissolution corrosion and oxidation as a 'self-healing' protection barrier. Such effects can be observed from corrosion testing of a variety of surface-treated materials, such as cold working, shot peening, pre-oxidation, etc. Shot peening of austenitic steels produces surface-layer microstructural damages and grain compression, which could contribute to increased Cr migration to the surface and enhance the protection through an impervious oxide. Pre-oxidation under conditions different from operating ones may form more protective oxides, reduce oxygen and metal ion migration through the oxides, and achieve better protection for longer durations. Corrosion and oxidation modeling and analysis reveal the potential for significantly reducing long-term corrosion rates by initial and early-stage conditioning of steels for Pb/LBE services

  8. Surface treatment and history-dependent corrosion in lead alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ning [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)]. E-mail: ningli@lanl.gov; Zhang Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sencer, Bulent H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Koury, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2006-06-23

    In oxygen-controlled lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), steel corrosion may be strongly history dependent. This is due to the competition between liquid metal dissolution corrosion and oxidation as a 'self-healing' protection barrier. Such effects can be observed from corrosion testing of a variety of surface-treated materials, such as cold working, shot peening, pre-oxidation, etc. Shot peening of austenitic steels produces surface-layer microstructural damages and grain compression, which could contribute to increased Cr migration to the surface and enhance the protection through an impervious oxide. Pre-oxidation under conditions different from operating ones may form more protective oxides, reduce oxygen and metal ion migration through the oxides, and achieve better protection for longer durations. Corrosion and oxidation modeling and analysis reveal the potential for significantly reducing long-term corrosion rates by initial and early-stage conditioning of steels for Pb/LBE services.

  9. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaumontet, C.; Even, P.C.; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, A.; Piedcoq, J.; Fromentin, G.; Tomé, D.; Azzout-Marniche, D.

    2015-01-01

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the

  10. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  11. Influence of corrosion layers on quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denker, A.; Bohne, W.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.; Rauschenberg, J.; Roehrich, J.; Strub, E.

    2005-01-01

    Art historians and restorers in charge of ancient metal objects are often reluctant to remove the corrosion layer evolved over time, as this would change the appearance of the artefact dramatically. Therefore, when an elemental analysis of the objects is required, this has to be done by penetrating the corrosion layer. In this work the influence of corrosion was studied on Chinese and Roman coins, where removal of oxidized material was possible. Measurements on spots with and without corrosion are presented and the results discussed

  12. Detailed investigation of Cl-corrosion initiated by deposits formed in biomass-fired boilers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, Flemming J.; Lith, S. van

    2009-10-15

    The aim was to investigate deposit-induced Cl-corrosion under well-controlled laboratory conditions, simulating the conditions in biomass-fired boilers. This has been done by exposing pieces of superheater tubes, covered by synthetic salts, at temperatures and gas mixtures simulating biomass-fired conditions. The corroded specimens have been studied in detail using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), in order to determine the corrosion rate, and to investigate the chemistry and morphology of the corrosive attack. The project has been divided into four activities: A1: Relationship between the Cl-concentration in the deposit, and the corrosion rate. A2: Influence of cation type (K+ and Na+) on the mobility of Cl in the deposit. A3: Influence of metal temperature on the corrosion rate. A4: Critical evaluation of the existing experience for minimizing corrosion in full-scale boilers firing totally or partly with biomass. (LN)

  13. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering tech- nique. .... Uncoated 316L SS exhibited poor corrosion protection ... depletion of native oxide layer present on uncoated substrate.

  14. A new approach for enhancement of the corrosion protection properties and interfacial adhesion bonds between the epoxy coating and steel substrate through surface treatment by covalently modified amino functionalized graphene oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhizkar, N.; Shahrabi, T.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The steel substrate was treated by a covalently modified amino functionalized graphene oxide (fGO) film. •Deposition of fGO film at the interface of steel and epoxy could effectively improve the adhesion strength and corrosion protection properties. •More stable and stronger interfacial bonds was obtained when treating the interface by fGO film. -- Abstract: This study introduces a novel surface treatment approach of steel substrate by covalent modification of graphene oxide (fGO) nanosheets with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to improve the adhesion and corrosion protection properties of an epoxy coating. The effect of fGO film on the epoxy coating performance was studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Pull-off adhesion, salt spray and cathodic delamination tests. Results revealed that deposition of fGO film on steel surface can effectively improve the adhesion strength and corrosion protection properties and reduce the cathodic delamination rate of the epoxy coating.

  15. Radiation-induced corrosion of stellite-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behazin, M.; Wren, J.C.

    2012-09-01

    Stellite-6 is a Co-based (58%) alloy that is used for components that require high wear-resistance, such as valve facings and ball bearings in nuclear reactors. In the reactor core, stable 59 Co can be neutron activated by absorption of a neutron to become the radioactive isotope, 60 Co. The 60 Co that is created constitutes a safety hazard for plant workers who have to perform maintenance on the reactor. One of the operational and safety issues in a nuclear reactor is the potential corrosion of Co-based alloys and the introduction of dissolved Co ions into the reactor core. While the corrosion of Stellite-6 has been studied its corrosion behaviour with ionizing radiation present has not been well established. Corrosion kinetics depend on both the aqueous redox conditions and the physical and chemical nature of the alloy surface. The high radiation fields present in a reactor core will cause water to decompose to a range of redox-active species (both highly oxidizing (e.g., ·OH, H 2 O 2 ) and highly reducing (e.g., ·eaq - , ·O 2 - )). These species can significantly influence corrosion kinetics. The effect of γ-radiation on the corrosion of Stellite-6 at pH 10.6 was investigated at temperatures ≤ 150 deg. C. Since the corrosion rate depends strongly on the type of oxide that is present on the material surface, the focus of this corrosion study was to establish the mechanism by which radiolysis affects the nature of the oxide that is present on Stellite-6. The results show that γ-radiation (at a dose rate of 5.5 kGy.h -1 ) increases the corrosion potential on Stellite-6 from -0.7 VSCE to 0.12 VSCE . The corrosion potential without irradiation present is in a potential range where oxidation is limited to the formation of a Co (OH) 2 and CoCr 2 O 4 outer oxide layer on a pre-existing Cr 2 O 3 film. The corrosion potential with irradiation is in a potential range where further oxidation of Co (OH) 2 to CoOOH also occurs. However, since CoOOH is less soluble than

  16. The resistance of titanium to pitting, microbially induced corrosion and corrosion in unsaturated conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D W; Ikeda, B M

    1997-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys (Grades-2, -12, -16) are candidate materials for Canadian nuclear waste containers on the basis of their apparent immunity to many localized corrosion processes. This simplifies markedly the effort needed to justify the use of these materials and to develop models to predict the lifetimes of containers. Here we review the pitting, microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and corrosion under unsaturated conditions, of titanium. For all these processes, the properties of the passive oxide film are paramount in determining the metal`s resistance to corrosion. A review of these oxide properties is included and the conditions to which the metal must be exposed if localized corrosion is to occur are defined. Since these conditions cannot be achieved under Canadian waste vault conditions, it can be concluded that pitting and MIC will not occur and that corrosion under unsaturated conditions is extremely unlikely. (author) 114 refs., 1 tab., 18 figs.

  17. The resistance of titanium to pitting, microbially induced corrosion and corrosion in unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys (Grades-2, -12, -16) are candidate materials for Canadian nuclear waste containers on the basis of their apparent immunity to many localized corrosion processes. This simplifies markedly the effort needed to justify the use of these materials and to develop models to predict the lifetimes of containers. Here we review the pitting, microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and corrosion under unsaturated conditions, of titanium. For all these processes, the properties of the passive oxide film are paramount in determining the metal's resistance to corrosion. A review of these oxide properties is included and the conditions to which the metal must be exposed if localized corrosion is to occur are defined. Since these conditions cannot be achieved under Canadian waste vault conditions, it can be concluded that pitting and MIC will not occur and that corrosion under unsaturated conditions is extremely unlikely. (author)

  18. Topical problems of corrosion research for nuclear power purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremias, B.

    1978-01-01

    Currently, research is focused on stress corrosion, intergranular corrosion, corrosion in water and steam, hydrogen-induced corrosion and corrosion in liquid sodium. The effort to limit stress corrosion resulted in the application of high nickel content austenitic steels. In these steels, the susceptibility to stress corrosion is mainly affected by previous heat treatment and the presence of chloride ions. Attention is also paid to medium and high-alloy chromium steels and susceptibility is studied to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion. Of low-alloy steels the 21/4Cr-1Mo type steels stabilized with Nb or nonstabilized are studied with respect to decarburization kinetics and changes in mechanical properties in the presence of hydrogen. Of nonferrous metals zirconium alloys are studied used as cladding materials for fuel elements, mainly Zircaloy 2 and 4, with regard to their resistance to high-temperature oxidation, high-pressure steam action, etc. (J.F.)

  19. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  20. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The release of the majority of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel under permanent disposal conditions will be controlled by the rate of dissolution of the UO 2 fuel matrix. In this manuscript the mechanism of the coupled anodic (fuel dissolution) and cathodic (oxidant reduction) reactions which constitute the overall fuel corrosion process is reviewed, and the many published observations on fuel corrosion under disposal conditions discussed. The primary emphasis is on summarizing the overall mechanistic behaviour and establishing the primary factors likely to control fuel corrosion. Included are discussions on the influence of various oxidants including radiolytic ones, pH, temperature, groundwater composition, and the formation of corrosion product deposits. The relevance of the data recorded on unirradiated UO 2 to the interpretation of spent fuel behaviour is included. Based on the review, the data used to develop fuel corrosion models under the conditions anticipated in Yucca Mountain (NV, USA) are evaluated

  1. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  2. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  3. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    , testing means, experimental techniques, internal corrosion of zircaloy sheath - the iodine effect, stress corrosion of nickel alloys - hydrogen influence, stress corrosion of stainless steels; C - wear corrosion: a coupled phenomenon, research in the framework of service life extension of the French electronuclear park; 3 - Corrosion in future reactors: A - corrosion in gas reactors: corrosion by helium impurities, oxidation resistance of silicon carbide, corrosion of graphite and carbon-carbon composites; B - corrosion in liquid metal reactors: sodium FBRs, lead and lead alloys reactors; C- corrosion in molten salt reactors: corrosion of Hastelloy N-type nickel alloys by molten fluorides, mass transfer in aniso-thermal fluoride systems, tellurium embrittlement, electrochemical study of pure metals corrosion in molten fluorides; 4 - Materials corrosion and alteration in the back-end of the fuel cycle: A - corrosion in concentrated nitric environment: materials behaviour, self-catalytic mechanism of nitric acid reduction; B - corrosion in unsaturated aqueous environment: metallic corrosion in unsaturated environment - application to the storage of waste containers, bitumens alteration, reinforced concrete behaviour and iron framework corrosion, concrete behaviour in severe thermal environment; C - Corrosion in saturated aqueous environment: metals corrosion in clayey environment, long-term behaviour of glasses, ceramics alteration, underwater concrete durability, clays transformation; D - materials biodegradation: microorganisms and nuclear wastes, biodegradation of bitumen, concretes and steels; 5 - Conclusion, glossary

  4. Temporal patterning of the potential induced by localized corrosion of iron passivity in acid media. Growth and breakdown of the oxide film described in terms of a point defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazou, Dimitra; Pavlidou, Maria; Pagitsas, Michael

    2009-10-21

    This work analyses the nature of temporal patterning of the anodic potential induced by chlorides during polarization of iron under current-controlled conditions in acid solutions. It is shown that potential oscillations emerged as a result of the local chloride attack of a thin oxide layer, which covers the iron surface in its passive state. The mechanism by which both the local oxide breakdown and the subsequent localized active dissolution (pitting) occur is explained by considering a point defect model (PDM) developed to describe the oxide growth and breakdown. According to the PDM, chlorides occupy oxygen vacancies resulting in the inhibition of oxide growth and autocatalytic generation of cation vacancies that destabilize the oxide layer. Simultaneous transformation of the outer surface of the inner oxide layer to non-adherent ferrous chloride or oxo-chloride species leads to a further thinning of the oxide layer and its lifting-on from the iron surface. The process repeats again yielding sustained oscillations of the anodic potential. Analysis of the oscillatory response obtained under current-controlled conditions as a function of either the current or the time allows the suggestion of a set of alternate diagnostic criteria, which might be used to characterize localized corrosion of iron in acid solutions.

  5. Corrosion and protection of magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghali, E. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgy

    2000-07-01

    The oxide film on magnesium offers considerable surface protection in rural and some industrial environments and the corrosion rate lies between that of aluminum and low carbon steels. Galvanic coupling of magnesium alloys, high impurity content such as Ni, Fe, Cu and surface contamination are detrimental for corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Alloying elements can form secondary particles which are noble to the Mg matrix, thereby facilitating corrosion, or enrich the corrosion product thereby possibly inhibiting the corrosion rate. Bimetallic corrosion resistance can be increased by fluxless melt protection, choice of compatible alloys, insulating materials, and new high-purity alloys. Magnesium is relatively insensible to oxygen concentration. Pitting, corrosion in the crevices, filiform corrosion are observed. Granular corrosion of magnesium alloys is possible due to the cathodic grain-boundary constituent. More homogeneous microstructures tend to improve corrosion resistance. Under fatigue loading conditions, microcrack initiation in Mg alloys is related to slip in preferentially oriented grains. Coating that exclude the corrosive environments can provide the primary defense against corrosion fatigue. Magnesium alloys that contain neither aluminum nor zinc are the most SCC resistant. Compressive surface residual stresses as that created by short peening increase SCC resistance. Cathodic polarization or cladding with a SCC resistant sheet alloy are good alternatives. Effective corrosion prevention for magnesium alloy components and assemblies should start at the design stage. Selective surface preparation, chemical treatment and coatings are recommended. Oil application, wax coating, anodizing, electroplating, and painting are possible alternatives. Recently, it is found that a magnesium hydride layer, created on the magnesium surface by cathodic charging in aqueous solution is a good base for painting. (orig.)

  6. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  7. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    , testing means, experimental techniques, internal corrosion of zircaloy sheath - the iodine effect, stress corrosion of nickel alloys - hydrogen influence, stress corrosion of stainless steels; C - wear corrosion: a coupled phenomenon, research in the framework of service life extension of the French electronuclear park; 3 - Corrosion in future reactors: A - corrosion in gas reactors: corrosion by helium impurities, oxidation resistance of silicon carbide, corrosion of graphite and carbon-carbon composites; B - corrosion in liquid metal reactors: sodium FBRs, lead and lead alloys reactors; C- corrosion in molten salt reactors: corrosion of Hastelloy N-type nickel alloys by molten fluorides, mass transfer in aniso-thermal fluoride systems, tellurium embrittlement, electrochemical study of pure metals corrosion in molten fluorides; 4 - Materials corrosion and alteration in the back-end of the fuel cycle: A - corrosion in concentrated nitric environment: materials behaviour, self-catalytic mechanism of nitric acid reduction; B - corrosion in unsaturated aqueous environment: metallic corrosion in unsaturated environment - application to the storage of waste containers, bitumens alteration, reinforced concrete behaviour and iron framework corrosion, concrete behaviour in severe thermal environment; C - Corrosion in saturated aqueous environment: metals corrosion in clayey environment, long-term behaviour of glasses, ceramics alteration, underwater concrete durability, clays transformation; D - materials biodegradation: microorganisms and nuclear wastes, biodegradation of bitumen, concretes and steels; 5 - Conclusion, glossary

  8. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  9. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  10. Drying characteristics of thorium fuel corrosion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.-E. E-mail: rzl@inel.gov

    2004-07-01

    The open literature and accessible US Department of Energy-sponsored reports were reviewed for the dehydration and rehydration characteristics of potential corrosion products from thorium metal and thorium oxide nuclear fuels. Mixed oxides were not specifically examined unless data were given for performance of mixed thorium-uranium fuels. Thorium metal generally corrodes to thorium oxide. Physisorbed water is readily removed by heating to approximately 200 deg. C. Complete removal of chemisorbed water requires heating above 1000 deg. C. Thorium oxide adsorbs water well in excess of the amount needed to cover the oxide surface by chemisorption. The adsorption of water appears to be a surface phenomenon; it does not lead to bulk conversion of the solid oxide to the hydroxide. Adsorptive capacity depends on both the specific surface area and the porosity of the thorium oxide. Heat treatment by calcination or sintering reduces the adsorption capacity substantially from the thorium oxide produced by metal corrosion.

  11. Corrosion problems of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbancik, L.; Kostal, M.

    Literature data are assessed on corrosion failures of steam generator tubes made of INCONEL 600 or INCOLOY 800. It was found that both alloys with high nickel content showed good stability in a corrosion environment while being sensitive to carbide formation on grain boundaries. The gradual depletion of chromium results from the material and corrosion resistance deteriorates. INCOLOY 800 whose chromium carbide precipitation on grain boundaries in pure water and steam is negligible up to 75O degC and which is not subject to corrosion attacks in the above media and in an oxidizing environment at a temperature to about 700 degC shows the best corrosion resistance. Its favourable properties were tested in long-term operation in the Peach Bottom 1 nuclear power plant where no failures due to corrosion of this material have been recorded since 1967. In view of oxygenic-acid surface corrosion, it is necessary to work in a neutral or slightly basic environment should any one of the two alloys be used for steam generator construction. The results are summed up of an analysis conducted for the Beznau I NOK reactor. Water treatment with ash-free amines can be used as prevention against chemical corrosion mechanisms, although the treatment itself does not ensure corrosion resistance of steam generator key components. (J.B.)

  12. Corrosion of titanium: Part 1: aggressive environments and main forms of degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, Davide; Brenna, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Beretta, Silvia; Bolzoni, Fabio; Ormellese, Marco; Pedeferri, MariaPia

    2017-11-11

    Titanium has outstanding corrosion resistance due to the external natural oxide protective layer formed when it is exposed to an aerated environment. Despite this, titanium may suffer different forms of corrosion in severe environments: uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, stress-corrosion cracking, fretting corrosion and erosion. In this first review, forms of corrosion affecting titanium are analyzed based on a wide literature review. For each form of corrosion, the mechanism and most severe environment are reported according to the current understanding.In the second part, this review will address the possible surface treatments that can increase corrosion resistance on commercially pure titanium: Electrochemical anodizing, thermal oxidation, chemical oxidation and bulk treatments such as alloying will be considered, highlighting the advantages of each technique.

  13. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  14. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  15. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  16. Erosion-corrosion synergistics in the low erosion regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, R.G.; Sethi, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many engineering alloys display good high temperature corrosion resistance. However, when they are used in corrosive environments where they are subjected to erosion also, the corrosion resistance has been adversely affected. The phenomenon known as erosion-corrosion is complex and requires detailed investigation of how the erosion and corrosion kinetics interact and compete. At the Kentucky Center for Energy Research Laboratory, an erosion-corrosion tester was used to perform erosion-oxidation tests on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel at 500-600 0 C using alumina abrasive at low velocities. The erosion-oxidation rate data and morphology of exposed surfaces are consistent with oxide chipping and fracturing being the mode of material loss

  17. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  18. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  19. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847])

  20. Modelling of zirconium alloys corrosion in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritskij, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Kritskij, A.V.; Stjagkin, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical parameters, that exerted effect on Zr+1%Nb alloy corrosion and deserved consideration during reactor operation, were defined and a model was developed to describe the influence of physical and chemical parameters on zirconium alloys corrosion in nuclear power plants. The model is based on the correlation between the zirconium oxide solubility in high-temperature water under the influence of the chemical parameters and the measured values of fuel cladding corrosion under LWR conditions. The intensity of fuel cladding corrosion in the primary circuits depends on the coolant water quality, growth of iron oxide deposits and vaporization portion. Mathematically, the oxidation rate can be expressed as a sum of heat and radiation components. The temperature dependence on the oxidation rate can be described by the Arrenius equation. The radiation component of Zr uniform corrosion equation is a function of several factors such as neutron fluency, the temperature the metallurgical composition and et. We assume that the main factor is the changing of water chemistry and the H 2 O 2 concentration play the determinative role. Probably, the influence of H 2 O 2 is based on the formation of unstable compound ZrO 3 ·nH 2 O and Zr(OH) 4 with high solubility. The validity of the used formulae was confirmed by corrosion measurements on WWER and RBMK fuel cladding. The model can be applied for calculating the reliability of nuclear fuel operation. (author)

  1. Corrosion of carbon steel in neutral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Noboru; Iwahori, Toru; Kurosawa, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of materials used in the construction of heat exchanger and piping system of BWR nuclear power plants and thermal power plants have been examined in neutral water at 30, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C with two concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water. In air-saturated water, the corrosion rate of carbon steel was so higher than those in deaerated conditions and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 200 deg C. The corrosion rate in deaerated water gradually increased with increasing the water temperature. Low alloy steel (2.25 Cr, 1Mo) exhibited good corrosion resistance compared with the corrosion of carbon steel under similar testing conditions. Oxide films grown on carbon steel in deaerated water at 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C for 48 and 240 hrs were attacked by dissolved oxygen in room temperature water respectively. However the oxide films formed higher than about 160 deg C showed more protective. The electrochemical behavior of carbon steel with oxide films was also similar to the effect of temperature on the stability of oxide films. (author)

  2. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  3. Moessbauer and ESCA investigations on the formation of oxidic iron phases in aqueous solution under the influence of organic corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetlich, P.; Meisel, W.; Mohs, E.

    1982-01-01

    Corrosions layers on steel grown in water of well defined hardness and chloride concentration were studied by Moessbauer and ESCA spectroscopy with particular emphasis on the influence of added organic inhibitors. Relatively thick layers were found with an unexpectedly small iron content (as FeOOH). The layers contain a remarkable amount of constituent ions from the solution and fragments of the inhibitors. The latter seem to be decomposed by the corrosive medium. It is assumed that the whole organic molecule determines the kind of transportation of the inhibitor to the iron metal, but that the inhibition itself is due to functional groups only. (orig.) [de

  4. Corrosion processes of alloyed steels in salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung

    2018-02-15

    A summary is given of the corrosion experiments with alloyed Cr-Ni steels in salt solutions performed at Research Centre Karlsruhe (today KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) in the period between 1980 and 2004. Alloyed steels show significantly lower general corrosion in comparison to carbon steels. However, especially in salt brines the protective Cr oxide layers on the surfaces of these steels are disturbed and localized corrosion takes place. Data on general corrosion rates, and findings of pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking are presented.

  5. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  6. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  7. Stress corrosion of low alloy steel forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, D.V.; Mould, P.B.; Patrick, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The catastrophic failure of a steam turbine rotor disc at Hinkley Point 'A' Power station was shown to have been caused by the growth of a stress corrosion crack to critical dimensions. This failure has promoted great interest in the stress corrosion susceptibility of medium strength low alloy steel forgings in steam environments. Consequently, initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks of typical disc steels have been investigated in steam and also in water at 95 0 C. Cracking has been shown to occur, predominantly in an intergranular manner, with growth rates of between 10 -9 and 10 -7 mm sec. -1 . It is observed that corrosion pitting and oxide penetration prior to the establishment of a stress corrosion crack in the plain samples. (author)

  8. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  9. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  10. Magnox reactor corrosion - 10 years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    The development of new and existing techniques for monitoring the extent of corrosion within the core of Magnox reactors is described. Access through standpipes, use of manipulators, bolt examination, measurement of surface oxide thickness and interfacial oxide, material sampling and crack detection and thread strain in bolts is considered. (U.K.)

  11. Improving pitting corrosion resistance of aluminum by anodizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, P.; Khan, I.U.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Anodizing of aluminum was studied in sulphuric/citric/boric acid electrolyte system to improve pitting corrosion resistance. Maximum oxide film thickness was obtained using 5% sulphuric acid, 3% citric acid and 0.5% boric acid electrolyte composition. The corrosion resistance of aluminum sample was determined to find the effectiveness of oxide coating by potentiodynamic polarization test. The surface morphology of aluminum samples was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion test. It was found that the coated aluminum sample obtained by anodizing in sulphuric/citric/boric acid electrolyte system exhibited better pitting corrosion resistance with no significant difference in surface morphology. (author)

  12. Oxidation-resistant cermet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Chromium metal alloys and chromium oxide ceramic are combined to produce cermets with oxidation-resistant properties. Application of cermets includes use in hot corrosive environments requiring strong resistive materials.

  13. Corrosion potential monitoring in nuclear power environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molander, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: corrosion monitoring. The corrosion potential is usually an important parameter or even the prime parameter for many types of corrosion processes. One typical example of the strong influence of the corrosion potential on corrosion performance is stress corrosion of sensitized stainless steel in pure high temperature water corresponding to boiling water conditions. The use of in-plant monitoring to follow the effect of hydrogen addition to mitigate stress corrosion in boiling water reactors is now a well-established technique. However, different relations between the corrosion potential of stainless steel and the oxidant concentration have been published and only recently an improved understanding of the electrochemical reactions and other conditions that determine the corrosion potential in BWR systems have been reached. This improved knowledge will be reviewed in this paper. Electrochemical measurements has also been performed in PWR systems and mainly the feedwater system on the secondary side of PWRs. The measurements performed so far have shown that electrochemical measurements are a very sensitive tool to detect and follow oxygen transients in the feedwater system. Also determinations of the minimum hydrazine dosage to the feedwater have been performed. However, PWR secondary side monitoring has not yet been utilized to the same level as BWR hydrogen water chemistry surveillance. The future potential of corrosion potential monitoring will be discussed. Electrochemical measurements are also performed in other reactor systems and in other types of reactors. Experiences will be briefly reviewed. In a BWR on hydrogen water chemistry and in the PWR secondary system the corrosion potentials show a large variation between different system parts. To postulate the material behavior at different locations the local chemical and electrochemical conditions must be known. Thus, modeling of chemical and electrochemical conditions along

  14. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  15. The effects of corrosion conditions and cold work on the nodular corrosion of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung

    1992-02-01

    The nodular corrosion of Zircaloy-4 was investigated on the effects of corrosion conditions and cold work. Variation of steam pressures, heat-up environments and prefilms were considered and cold work effects were also studied. The corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 was dependent on pressure between 1 and 100 atm and it followed the cubic law as W=16.85 x P 0.31 for plate specimens and W=12.69 x P 0.27 for tube specimens, where W is weight gain (mg/dm 2 ) and P is the steam pressure (atm). The environment variation in autoclave during heat-up period did not affect the early stage of nodular corrosion. The prefilm, which was formed at 500 .deg. C under 1 atm steam for 4 hours, restrained the formation of the initial small nodules. The oxide film formed under 1 atm steam showed no difference of electrical resistivity from the oxides formed under 100 atm steam pressure. Cold work specimens showed the higher resistivity against nodular corrosion than as-received specimens. The corrosion resistance arising from cold work seems to be due to the texture changes by the cold work. The results showed that cold work can affect the later stage of uniform corrosion and the early stage of nodular corrosion, namely, the nodule initiation stage

  16. An evaluation of corrosion resistant alloys by field corrosion test in Japanese refuse incineration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Yuuzou; Nakamura, Masanori; Shibuya, Eiichi; Yukawa, Kenichi

    1995-01-01

    As the first step for development of the corrosion resistant superheater tube materials of 500 C, 100 ata used in high efficient waste-to-energy plants, field corrosion tests of six conventional alloys were carried out at metal temperatures of 450 C and 550 C for 700 and 3,000 hours in four typical Japanese waste incineration plants. The test results indicate that austenitic alloys containing approximately 80 wt% [Cr+Ni] show excellent corrosion resistance. When the corrosive environment is severe, intergranular corrosion of 40∼200 microm depth occurs in stainless steel and high alloyed materials. It is confirmed quantitatively that corrosion behavior is influenced by environmental corrosion factors such as Cl concentration and thickness of deposits on tube surface, metal temperature, and flue gas temperature. The excellent corrosion resistance of high [Cr+Ni+Mo] alloys such as Alloy 625 is explained by the stability of its protective oxide, such that the time dependence of corrosion nearly obeys the parabolic rate law

  17. Corrosion of copper containers prior to saturation of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.

    1997-12-01

    The buffer material surrounding the containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault will partially desiccate as a result of the elevated temperature at the container surface. This will lead to a period of corrosion in a moist air atmosphere. Corrosion will either take the form of slow oxidation if the container surface remains dry or aqueous electrochemical corrosion if the surface is wetted by a thin liquid film. The relevant literature is reviewed, from which it is concluded that corrosion should be uniform in nature, except if the surface is wetted, in which case localized corrosion is a possibility. A quantitative analysis of the extent and rate of uniform corrosion during the unsaturated period is presented. Two bounding cases are considered: first, the case of slow oxidation in moist air following either logarithmic or parabolic oxide-growth kinetics and, second, the case of electrochemically based corrosion occurring in a thin liquid film uninhibited by the growth of corrosion products. (author)

  18. Corrosion Compatibility Studies on Inconel-600 in NP Decontamination Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    It is well known that corrosion and contamination process in the primary cooling circuit of nuclear reactors are essentially interrelated: the contaminant isotopes are mostly corrosion products activated in the reactor core, and the contamination takes place on the out-core of Inconel-600 surface. This radionuclide uptake takes place up to the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface. So, it is necessary to remove inner oxide layer as well as outer oxide layer for excellent decontamination effects. The outer oxide layers are composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Ni{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x})(Cr{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and become hard to be decontaminated. Alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP) oxidative phase has been used to dissolve the chromium-rich oxide. A disadvantage of AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, that of NP process is the high corrosion rate for Ni-base alloys. Therefore, for the safe use of oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination, it is necessary to reformulate the NP chemicals for decrease of corrosion rate. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications. To evaluate the general corrosion properties, weight change of NP treated specimens was measured. NP treated specimen surface was observed using optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the evaluation of the localized corrosion. The effect of additives on the corrosion of the specimens was also evaluated. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications

  19. Corrosion Compatibility Studies on Inconel-600 in NP Decontamination Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that corrosion and contamination process in the primary cooling circuit of nuclear reactors are essentially interrelated: the contaminant isotopes are mostly corrosion products activated in the reactor core, and the contamination takes place on the out-core of Inconel-600 surface. This radionuclide uptake takes place up to the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface. So, it is necessary to remove inner oxide layer as well as outer oxide layer for excellent decontamination effects. The outer oxide layers are composed of Fe 3 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 . On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr 2 O 3 , (Ni 1-x Ni x )(Cr 1-y Fe y ) 2 O 4 , and FeCr 2 O 4 . Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and become hard to be decontaminated. Alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP) oxidative phase has been used to dissolve the chromium-rich oxide. A disadvantage of AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, that of NP process is the high corrosion rate for Ni-base alloys. Therefore, for the safe use of oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination, it is necessary to reformulate the NP chemicals for decrease of corrosion rate. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications. To evaluate the general corrosion properties, weight change of NP treated specimens was measured. NP treated specimen surface was observed using optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the evaluation of the localized corrosion. The effect of additives on the corrosion of the specimens was also evaluated. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications. It is revealed that Inconel-600 specimen is more

  20. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  1. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 5. Evaluation of wall thinning rate with the coupled model of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Wall thinning rates due to FAC were calculated with the coupled model of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified danger zone. Anodic and cathodic current densities and ECPs were calculated with the static electrochemistry model and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was used as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Thickness of oxide film and its characteristics determined by the dynamic double oxide layer model were used for the electrochemistry model to determine the resistances of cathodic current from the bulk to the surface and anodic current from the surface to the bulk. Two models were coupled to determine local corrosion rate and ECP for various corrosive conditions. The calculated results of the coupled models had good agreement with the measured ones. (author)

  2. Corrosion of aluminum components and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, S.T.; Khalique, A.; Malik, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum has versatile physical properties, mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, and is used in special applications like aerospace, automobiles and other strategic industries. The outdoor exposed structural components of aluminum have very good corrosion resistance due to the thick oxide layer (0.2 -0.4 micro). This study involves the corrosion of aluminum based components, though aluminum is protected by an oxide layer but due to extreme weather and environmental conditions the oxide layer was damaged. The corroded product was removed, pits or cavities formed due to the material removal were filled with epoxy resins and acrylic-based compounds containing fibreglass as reinforcement. Optimum results were obtained with epoxy resins incorporated with 5% glass fibers. The inner surface of the components was provided further protection with a cellulose nitrate compound. (author)

  3. Corrosion protection and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating applied on the steel substrate pre-treated by a sol-gel based silane coating filled with amino and isocyanate silane functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizkar, Nafise; Ramezanzadeh, Bahram; Shahrabi, Taghi

    2018-05-01

    This research has focused on the effect of graphene oxide (GO) nano-fillers embedded in the sol-gel based silane coating on the corrosion protection and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating applied on the steel substrate pre-treated by silane coatings. For this purpose, a mixture of Methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) silane precursors was used for preparation of composite matrix and the GO nanosheets, which are covalently functionalized with 3-(Triethoxysilyl)propyl isocyanate (TEPI, IGO nano-fillers) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES, AGO nano-fillers), were used as filler. The GO, AGO and IGO nanosheets were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Visible analysis and field emission-scanning electron microscopy techniques. The performance of the silane/epoxy coatings was investigated by pull-off adhesion, cathodic delamination, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results revealed that AGO and IGO nano-fillers significantly improved the corrosion resistance and adhesion properties of the top epoxy coating due to better compatibility with silane matrix, excellent barrier properties and the formation of covalent bonds with the top epoxy coating.

  4. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3-2 and NO-3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10-4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  5. Corrosion of thin, magnetron sputtered Nb_2O_5 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, Marina Fuser; Geribola, Guilherme Altomari; Scheidt, Guilherme; Gonçalves de Araújo, Edval; Lopes de Oliveira, Mara Cristina; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Niobium oxide based films were obtained by DC magnetron sputtering. • Different deposition times were tested. • The best corrosion resistance was obtained for the Nb_2O_5 film produced at 15′. • Film porosity determines the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Niobium oxide based thin films were deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrates using reactive DC magnetron sputtering. Structure, composition and corrosion resistance of the niobium oxide films were studied. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The concentration of niobium and oxygen in the films was obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The film structure was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry. The corrosion resistance of the substrate was improved by the Nb_2O_5 layers. The best protective performance was achieved for the deposition time of 15 min.

  6. Investigation of corrosion and ion release from titanium dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ektessabi, A.M.; Mouhyi, J.; Louvette, P.; Sennerby, L.

    1997-01-01

    A thin passive titanium dioxide, in its stoichiometric form, has a very high corrosion resistance, but the same conclusion can not be made on corrosion resistance of a surface which is not stoichiometrically titanium dioxide, or even a surface which is a composition of various elements and oxides. In practice, the implants available on the market have an oxide surface contaminated with other elements. The aim of this paper is to correlate clinical observations that show the deterioration of Ti made implants after certain period of insertion in the patients, and in vitro corrosion resistance of Ti implants with surface passive oxide layer. For this purpose, surface analysis of the retrieved failed implants were performed and in vivo animal experiments with relation to ion release from implants were done. Finally, on the basis of the clinical observation, in vivo animal test, and in vitro electrochemical corrosion test, a model is proposed to explain the corrosion and ion release from the Ti implant. (author)

  7. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature......The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  8. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  9. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  10. Corrosion of oxide dispersion strengthened iron–chromium steels and tantalum in fluoride salt coolant: An in situ compatibility study for fusion and fusion–fission hybrid reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph; Ferreira, James; Serrano de Caro, Magdalena; Rubenchik, Alexander; Kimura, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► ODS steel corrosion in molten fluoride salts was studied in situ using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ► Steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface. ► The addition of tungsten to ODS steels increases corrosion resistance measurably at 600 °C. - Abstract: Primary candidate classes of materials for future nuclear power plants, whether they be fission, fusion or hybrids, include oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels which rely on a dispersion of nano-oxide particles in the matrix for both mechanical strength and swelling resistance, or tantalum alloys which have an inherent neutron-induced swelling resistance and high temperature strength. For high temperature operation, eutectic molten lithium containing fluoride salts are attractive because of their breeding capability as well as their relatively high thermal capacity, which allow for a higher average operating temperature that increases power production. In this paper we test the compatibility of Flinak (LiF–NaF–KF) salts on ODS steels, comparing the performance of current generation ODS steels developed at Kyoto University with the commercial alloy MA956. Pure tantalum was also tested for comparative purposes. In situ data was obtained for temperatures ranging from 600 to 900 °C using a custom-built high temperature electrochemical impedance spectroscopy cell. Results for ODS steels show that steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface, however an increase in temperature to 900 °C causes this layer to break up and aggressive attack to occur. Performance of current generation ODS steels surpassed that of the MA956 ODS steel, with an in situ impedance behavior similar or better than that of pure tantalum.

  11. [Corrosion resistant properties of different anodized microtopographies on titanium surfaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangjun, Huo; Li, Xie; Xingye, Tong; Yueting, Wang; Weihua, Guo; Weidong, Tian

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the corrosion resistant properties of titanium samples prepared by anodic oxidation with different surface morphologies. Pure titanium substrates were treated by anodic oxidation to obtain porous titanium films in micron, submicron, and micron-submicron scales. The surface morphologies, coating cross-sectional morphologies, crystalline structures, and surface roughness of these samples were characterized. Electrochemical technique was used to measure the corrosion potential (Ecorr), current density of corrosion (Icorr), and polarization resistance (Rp) of these samples in a simulated body fluid. Pure titanium could be modified to exhibit different surface morphologies by the anodic oxidation technique. The Tafel curve results showed that the technique can improve the corrosion resistance of pure titanium. Furthermore, the corrosion resistance varied with different surface morphologies. The submicron porous surface sample demonstrated the best corrosion resistance, with maximal Ecorr and Rp and minimal Icorr. Anodic oxidation technology can improve the corrosion resistance of pure titanium in a simulated body fluid. The submicron porous surface sample exhibited the best corrosion resistance because of its small surface area and thick barrier layer.

  12. Erosion-corrosion of structural materials of wet steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomarov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    A model of erosion-corrosion wear of elements of a wet steam zone and a condensate-feeding path of turbines is considered. It is shown that diffusion of impurities and corrosion products in pores of an oxide layer is the control mechanism under conditions of laminar flow of a media. Processes of mass transfer are controlling factors in turbulent flow

  13. Corrosion of aluminium in soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruga, M; Hasenay, D

    1996-04-01

    The corrosion of aluminium (Al) in several brands of soft drinks (cola- and citrate-based drinks) has been studied, using an electrochemical method, namely potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion of Al in soft drinks is a very slow, time-dependent and complex process, strongly influenced by the passivation, complexation and adsorption processes. The corrosion of Al in these drinks occurs principally due to the presence of acids: citric acid in citrate-based drinks and orthophosphoric acid in cola-based drinks. The corrosion rate of Al rose with an increase in the acidity of soft drinks, i.e. with increase of the content of total acids. The corrosion rates are much higher in the cola-based drinks than those in citrate-based drinks, due to the facts that: (1) orthophosphoric acid is more corrosive to Al than is citric acid, (2) a quite different passive oxide layer (with different properties) is formed on Al, depending on whether the drink is cola or citrate based. The method of potentiodynamic polarization was shown as being very suitable for the study of corrosion of Al in soft drinks, especially if it is combined with some non-electrochemical method, e.g. graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

  14. Steamgenerators corrosion monitoring and chemical cleanings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otchenashev, G.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important secondary side water chemistry objectives is optimization of chemistry conditions to reduce materials corrosion and their products transport into steam generators. Corrosion products (mainly iron and copper oxides) can form deposits on the SG's tubes and essentially decrease their operating resource. The transport of corrosion products by the constant flowrate of feed and blowdown water depends only on their content in these streams. All the internal surfaces (walls, collectors, tubes) were covered with the tough deposit firmly connected with the surface. Corrosion under this deposit was not detected. In some places sludge unconnected with the surface was detected. The lower tubes are located the more unconnected sludge was detected. On SG bottom near the hatch the sludge thickness was about 3 cm. (R.P.)

  15. Techniques for the identification of corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents the different techniques that can be used to identify corrosion/oxidation products through determination of either their composition or their structure, chemical analysis and spectrochemical analysis are commonly used to determine the composition of gross corrosion products. Surface anaLysis techniques such as electron microprobe, AES, ESCA, SIMS, ISS, neutron activation analysis, etc., can be used not only to detect the concentration of the various elements present, but also to obtain the concentration profiles of these elements through the corrosion products. The structure of corrosion products is normally determined with the aid of either X-ray or electron diffraction techniques. This paper describes the basic principles, typical characteristics, limitations and the types of information that can be obtained from each of the techniques along with some typical examples. (author) [pt

  16. An X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) study of the Sn L_3 edge in zirconium alloy oxide films formed during autoclave corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, Helen; Baxter, Felicity; Babu, R. Prasath; Denecke, Melissa A.; Gass, Mhairi; Steuwer, Axel; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Preuss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Characterisation of tin speciation in zirconium alloy metal and oxide films using Sn L_3-XANES. • Chemical environment of tin in Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™ oxide films shown to be similar. • Tin in the oxide films is present in both the di- and tetravalent states and oxidises progressively with oxide-layer growth. - Abstract: Application of Sn L_3-XANES to study the oxidation state of alloying additions of tin (1–1.2 wt%) in <2 μm oxide layers formed on nuclear grade zirconium alloy has been demonstrated. Data obtained for metallic and corroded ZIRLO™ (1 wt% Sn) and Zircaloy-4 (1.2 wt% Sn) indicate tin has a similar chemical speciation in both metal alloys but this differs in the oxidised surface layers. By recording XANES at various incident angles to vary the photon penetration depth and amount of the oxide layer probed in the measurement, the authors found evidence that the oxidation of tin progresses with increasing oxide thickness.

  17. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  18. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  19. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  20. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports

  1. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  2. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  3. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  4. Tank vent processing system having a corrosion preventive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Shoichi; Sato, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion of a tank vent processing device by injecting an oxygen gas. Constitution: Oxygen gas and phosphorous at high temperature are poured into a tank vent processing device and amorphous oxide layers optimum to the prevention of external corrosion are formed to the inner surface of the device. Since the corrosion preventive device using the oxygen gas injection can be constituted as a relatively simple device, it is more economical than constituting a relatively large tank vent processing device with corrosion resistant stainless steels. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. ASSET, An Information System for Alloy Corrosion in High Temperature Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. C. John; A. D. Pelton; A. L. Young; W. T. Thompson; I. G. Wright

    2001-01-01

    A large database for corrosion data and a corrosion prediction information system for metals and alloys corroding in high-temperature gases have been created. Corrosion data for about 75 commercial alloys, 4600 corrosion data measurements, and six million exposure hours have been compiled into an information system, ASSET. ASSET allows prediction of sound metal thickness losses for metals and alloys corroding by several common corrosion mechanisms at high-temperatures as functions of gas composition, temperature, time, and alloy. This paper presents examples of predicted metal losses of alloys corroding in standard conditions for several corrosion mechanisms expected in high-temperature gases. ASSET also provides a comprehensive capability to analyze the thermochemical interactions between alloys, corrosion products and exposure conditions. Some of the uses of the data compilation and the corrosion prediction feature are illustrated for oxidizing, sulfidizing, sulfidizing/oxidizing , and carburizing conditions

  6. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  7. Effect of yttrium chromite doping on its resistance to high-temperature salt and gas corrosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryshich, I.V.; Poryadchenko, N.E.; Rakitskij, A.N.; Bega, N.D.

    1996-01-01

    Effect of yttrium chromite doping with 2-4 group metal oxides on the corrosion resistance in the air at 1300 C during 5 hours and in sodium chloride and sulfate melts at 900 C during 20 hours is investigated. A notable increase of corrosion resistance is achieved under complex doping with zirconium and magnesium oxides in a quantity, close to solubility in yttrium oxide and solubility by aluminium oxide. Doping with calcium and strontium oxides in the quantities, dose to solubility in yttrium oxide does not produce any notable effect, and at higher concentrations it reduces the corrosion resistance in media indicated. Refs. 8, refs. 2, tabs. 1

  8. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  9. Influence of preoxidation on high temperature corrosion of a Ni-based alloy under conditions relevant to biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    . Complementary characterization methods were employed to study samples after preoxidation as well as after corrosion exposure. The oxides obtained by the preoxidation treatments protected the alloy during corrosion exposure at 560 °C for a period of 168 h. In contrast, non-preoxidized samples suffered corrosion...... attack and formed porous non-protective oxides containing the alloying elements, Ni, Cr, Ti and Al. The influence of the preoxidation layers on the corrosion mechanism is discussed....

  10. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  11. Uniform and localized corrosion modelling by means of probabilistic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Brokate, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical modelling is complementary tool for corrosion prediction. The objective of this work is to develop a corrosion model by means of a probabilistic cellular automata approach at a mesoscopic scale. In this work, we study the morphological evolution and kinetics of corrosion. This model couples electrochemical oxidation and reduction reactions. Regarding kinetics, cellular automata models are able to describe current as a function of the applied potential for a redox reaction on an inert electrode. The inclusion of probabilities allows the description of the stochastic nature of anodic and cathodic reactions. Corrosion morphology has been studied in different context: generalised corrosion, pitting corrosion and corrosion in an occluded environment. a general tendency of two regimes is found. a first regime of uniform corrosion where the anodic and cathodic reactions occur homogeneously over the surface. a second regime of localized corrosion when there is a spatial separation of anodic and cathodic zones, with an increase of anodic reaction rate. (author) [fr

  12. Corrosion-product inventory: the Bruce-B secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Price, J.; Brett, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion inspection and corrosion-product characterization in water and steam systems are important for component and systems maintenance in nuclear power stations. Corrosion products are produced, released and redeposited at various sites in the secondary system. Depending on the alloys used in the condenser and feedwater heaters, particulate iron oxides and hydroxides can account for about 95-99% of the total corrosion-product transport. Where brass or cupro-nickel alloys are present, copper and zinc contribute significantly to the total transport and deposition. Particulates are transported by the feedwater to the steam generators, where they accumulate and can cause a variety of problems, such as loss of heat transfer capability through deposition on boiler tubes, blockage of flow through boiler-tube support plates and accelerated corrosion in crevices, either in deep sludge piles or at blocked tube supports. The influx of oxidized corrosion products may have a particularly adverse effect on the redox environment of steam generator tubing, thereby increasing the probability of localized corrosion and other degradation mechanisms. In this paper, there is a description of a survey of general corrosion deposits in Bruce-B, Units 5-8, which helps to identify the origin, evolution and inventory of corrosion products along the secondary system of Candu reactors

  13. Corrosion behavior of Ti–39Nb alloy for dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fojt, Jaroslav, E-mail: fojtj@vscht.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Joska, Ludek [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Malek, Jaroslav [UJP Praha, Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Prague-Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Sefl, Vaclav [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus–high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti–39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. - Highlights: • Alloy Ti–39Nb shows excellent corrosion resistance in physiological solution. • Corrosion resistance of Ti–39Nb alloy is significantly higher than that of titanium in the presence of fluoride ions. • The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicates a porous passive layer. • Passive layer of the alloy is enriched by niobium.

  14. Corrosion behavior of Ti–39Nb alloy for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus–high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti–39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. - Highlights: • Alloy Ti–39Nb shows excellent corrosion resistance in physiological solution. • Corrosion resistance of Ti–39Nb alloy is significantly higher than that of titanium in the presence of fluoride ions. • The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicates a porous passive layer. • Passive layer of the alloy is enriched by niobium

  15. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-01-01

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H 2 formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO 2 and UH 3

  16. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-03-20

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H{sub 2} formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}.

  17. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of zirconium in molten alkali metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of zirconium during its interaction with molten lithium, sodium, and potassium carbonates containing from 1 to 5 wt % additives to the salt phase are studied in a temperature range of 500-800°C using gravimetry, corrosion potential measurement, and anodic polarization. The substances decreasing the corrosion losses due to the strengthening and thickening of an oxide film (lithium, sodium, potassium hydroxides) are used as passivators. Sodium chloride, fluoride, and sulfate serve as corrosion stimulators (activators).

  18. Water vapor effects on the corrosion of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estill, J.C.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    Critical relative humidity for AISI 1020 carbon steel is 75-85% RH at 65 C. Aggressive electrochemical corrosion occurs above 85% RH, while dry oxidation occurs below 75% RH. The reddish-brown product is probably Fe2O3 or its hydrate; the black oxide layer, Fe3O4. The face surfaces had little or no corrosion, while the mill-machined edges were corroded with nonuniform reddish-brown areas

  19. Relationship between corrosion and the biological sulfur cycle: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, B.J.; Ray, R.I.; Pope, R.K.

    2000-04-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused by microbiologically mediated oxidation and reduction of sulfur and sulfur compounds is complicated by the variety of potential metabolic-energy sources and by-products; the coexistence of reduced and oxidized sulfur species; competing reactions with inorganic and organic compounds; and the versatility and adaptability of microorganisms in biofilms. The microbial ecology of sulfur-rich environments is poorly understood because of the association of aerobes and anaerobes and the mutualism or succession of heterotrophs to autotrophs. The physical scale over which the sulfur cycle influences corrosion varies with the environment. The complete sulfur cycle of oxidation and reduction reactions can take place in macroenvironments, including sewers and polluted harbors, or within the microenvironment of biofilms. In this review, reactions of sulfur and sulfur compounds resulting in corrosion were discussed in the context of environmental processes important to corrosion.

  20. Contribution of cellular automata to the understanding of corrosion phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zenkri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a stochastic CA modelling approach of corrosion based on spatially separated electrochemical half-reactions, diffusion, acido-basic neutralization in solution and passive properties of the oxide layers. Starting from different initial conditions, a single framework allows one to describe generalised corrosion, localised corrosion, reactive and passive surfaces, including occluded corrosion phenomena as well. Spontaneous spatial separation of anodic and cathodic zones is associated with bare metal and passivated metal on the surface. This separation is also related to local acidification of the solution. This spontaneous change is associated with a much faster corrosion rate. Material morphology is closely related to corrosion kinetics, which can be used for technological applications.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of metallic containers during long term interim storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, C.; Feron, D.; Mazaudier, F.; Terlain, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two main corrosion phenomena are encountered in long term interim storage conditions: dry oxidation by the air when the temperature of high level nuclear wastes containers is high enough (roughly higher than 100 C) and corrosion phenomena as those encountered in outdoor atmospheric corrosion when the temperature of the container wall is low enough and so condensation is possible on the container walls. Results obtained with dry oxidation in air lead to predict small damages (less than 1μm on steels over 100 years at 100 C) and no drastic changes with pollutants. For atmospheric corrosion, first developments deal with a pragmatic method that gives assessments of the indoor atmospheric corrosivities. (author)

  2. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  3. DFT Study of Azole Corrosion Inhibitors on Cu2O Model of Oxidized Copper Surfaces: II. Lateral Interactions and Thermodynamic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Gustinčič

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of imidazole, triazole, and tetrazole—used as simple models of azole corrosion inhibitors—on various Cu 2 O(111- and Cu 2 O(110-type surfaces was characterized using density functional theory (DFT calculations with the focus on lateral intermolecular interactions and the thermodynamic stability of various adsorption structures. To this end, an ab initio thermodynamics approach was used to construct two-dimensional phase diagrams for all three molecules. The impact of van der Waals dispersion interactions on molecular adsorption bonding was also addressed. Lateral intermolecular interactions were found to be the most repulsive for imidazole and the least for tetrazole, for which they are usually even slightly attractive. Both non-dissociative and dissociative adsorption modes were considered and although dissociated molecules bind to surfaces more strongly, none of the considered structures that involve dissociated molecules appear on the phase diagrams. Our results show that the three azole molecules display a strong tendency to preferentially adsorb at reactive coordinatively unsaturated (CUS Cu surface sites and stabilize them. According to the calculated phase diagrams for Cu 2 O(111-type surfaces, the three azole molecules adsorb to specific CUS sites, designated as Cu CUS , under all conditions at which molecular adsorption is stable. This tentatively suggests that their corrosion inhibition capability may stem, at least in part, from their ability to passivate reactive surface sites. We further comment on a specific drawback due to neglect of configurational entropy that is usually utilized within the ab initio thermodynamics approach. We analyze the issue for Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption models and show that when configurational entropy is neglected, the ab initio thermodynamics approach is too hasty to predict phase-transition like behavior.

  4. General corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    This short paper seeks to provide a summary of the main knowledge about the general corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water. In pure water or slightly alkaline deaerated water, steels develop a protective coating of magnetite in a double layer (Potter and Mann oxide) or a single layer (Bloom oxide). The morphology of the oxide layer and the kinetics of corrosion depend on the test parameters controlling the solubility of iron. The parameters exercising the greatest influence are partial hydrogen pressure and mass transfer: hydrogen favours the solubilization of the magnetite; the entrainment of the dissolved iron prevents a redeposition of magnetite on the surface of the steel. Cubic or parabolic in static conditions, the kinetics of corrosion tends to be linear in dynamic conditions. In dynamic operation, corrosion is at least one order of magnitude lower in water with a pH of 10 than in pure water with a pH of 7. The activation energy of corrosion is 130 kJ/mol (31 kcal/mol). This results in the doubling of corrosion at around 300 deg C for a temperature increase of 15 deg C. Present in small quantities (100-200 ppb), oxygen decreases general corrosion but increases the risk of pitting corrosion - even for a low chloride content - and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion-fatigue. The steel composition has probably an influence on the kinetics of corrosion in dynamic conditions; further work would be required to clarify the effect of some residual elements. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Preparation and corrosion resistance of a nanocomposite plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on Mg-1%Ca alloy formed in aluminate electrolyte containing titania nano-additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daroonparvar, Mohammadreza; Yajid, M. A. M.; Yusof, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Titania nanoparticles were utilized as suspension in alkaline aluminate electrolyte to form nanocomposite coatings on magnesium alloy containing 1 wt% calcium by plasma electrolytic oxidation process. Microhardness, wettability, potentiodynamic polarization, wettability, electrochemical impedance...

  6. Evaluation of Corrosion Resistance of Nanotubular Oxide Layers on the Ti13Zr13Nb Alloy in Physiological Saline Solution / Ocena Odporności Korozyjnej Nanotubularnych Struktur Tlenkowych Na Stopie Ti13Zr13Nb W Środowisku Płynów Ustrojowych”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smołka A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of corrosion resistance of the self-organized nanotubular oxide layers on the Ti13Zr13Nb alloy, has been carried out in 0.9% NaCl solution at the temperature of 37ºC. Anodization process of the tested alloy was conducted in a solution of 1M (NH42SO4 with the addition of 1 wt.% NH4F. The self-organized nanotubular oxide layers were obtained at the voltage of 20 V for the anodization time of 120 min. Investigations of surface morphology by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM revealed that as a result of the anodization under proposed conditions, the single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs can be formed of diameters that range from 10 to 32 nm. Corrosion resistance studies of the obtained nanotubular oxide layers and pure Ti13Zr13Nb alloy were carried out using open circuit potential, anodic polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS methods. It was found that surface modification by electrochemical formation of the selforganized nanotubular oxide layers increases the corrosion resistance of the Ti13Zr13Nb alloy in comparison with pure alloy.

  7. Grain boundary corrosion of copper canister material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennell, P.A.H.; Graham, A.J.; Smart, N.R.; Sofield, C.J.

    2001-03-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container fitted inside a corrosion-resistant copper canister. During fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow they will tend to concentrate impurities within the copper at the new grain boundaries. The work described in this report was undertaken to determine whether there is any possibility of enhanced corrosion at grain boundaries within the copper canister. The potential for grain boundary corrosion was investigated by exposing copper specimens, which had undergone different heat treatments and hence had different grain sizes, to aerated artificial bentonite-equilibrated groundwater with two concentrations of chloride, for increasing periods of time. The degree of grain boundary corrosion was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. AFM showed no increase in grain boundary 'ditching' for low chloride groundwater. In high chloride groundwater the surface was covered uniformly with a fine-grained oxide. No increases in oxide thickness were observed. No significant grain boundary attack was observed using optical microscopy either. The work suggests that in aerated artificial groundwaters containing chloride ions, grain boundary corrosion of copper is unlikely to adversely affect SKB's copper canisters

  8. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy's treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation

  9. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  10. Residual stresses in high temperature corrosion of pure zirconium using elasto-viscoplastic model: Application to the deflection test in monofacial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettré, D.; Bouvier, S.; Favergeon, J.; Kurpaska, L.

    2015-12-01

    The paper is devoted to modeling residual stresses and strains in an oxide film formed during high temperature oxidation. It describes the deflection test in isothermal high-temperature monofacial oxidation (DTMO) of pure zirconium. The model incorporates kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and takes into account elastic, viscoplastic, growth and chemical strains. Different growth strains models are considered, namely, isotropic growth strains given by Pilling-Bedworth ratio, anisotropic growth strains defined by Parise and co-authors and physically based model for growth strain proposed by Clarke. Creep mechanisms based on dislocation slip and core diffusion, are used. A mechanism responsible for through thickness normal stress gradient in the oxide film is proposed. The material parameters are identified using deflection tests under 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C. The effect of temperature on creep and stress relaxation is analyzed. Numerical sensitivity study of the DTMO experiment is proposed in order to investigate the effects of the initial foil thickness and platinum coating on the deflection curves.

  11. Development of corrosion resistant materials for an electrolytic reduction process of a spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong-Hyeon Lee; Soo-Haeng Cho; Jeong-Gook Oh; Eung-Ho Kim

    2008-01-01

    New alloys were designed and prepared to improve their corrosion resistance in an electrolytic reduction environment for a spent oxide fuel on the basis of a thermodynamical assessment. A considerable solubility of Si was confirmed in the Ni alloys and their corrosion resistance was drastically increased with the addition of Si. It was confirmed that a protective oxide layer was formed during a corrosion test due to a reaction among the alloying elements such as Cr, Al and Si. (authors)

  12. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively. Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance.

  13. Corrosion on Mars: An Investigation of Corrosion Mechanisms Under Relevant Simulated Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Johansen, Michael R.; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    , showed that there is an interaction between the small amount of oxygen present in the Mars gas and the alloy when there is a scratch that removes the protective aluminum oxide film. Further studies are needed to consider many other important components of the Mars environment that can affect this interaction such as: the effect of oxidants, the effect of radiation on their oxidizing properties and the possible catalytic effects of the clays present in the Martian regolith. The results of this one-year project provide strong justification for further investigation of the corrosion mechanism of materials relevant to long-term surface operations in support of future human exploration missions on Mars.

  14. Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Das Chintamani; Gaonkar, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  15. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  16. The corrosion of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Swam, L.F.P.; Shann, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of thermo-mechanical processing of cladding on the corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in commercial PWRs that have been investigated. Visual observations and nondestructive measurements at poolside, augmented by observations in the hot cell, indicate that the initial black oxide transforms into a grey or tan later white oxide layer at a thickness of 10 to 15 μm independent of the thermal processing history of the tubing. At an oxide layer thickness of 60 to 80 μm, the oxide may spall depending somewhat on the particular oxide morphology formed and possibly on the frequency of power and temperature changes of the fuel rods. Because spalling of oxide lowers the metal-to-oxide interface temperature of fuel rods, it reduces the corrosion rate and is beneficial from that point of view. To determine the effect of thermo-mechanical processing on in-reactor corrosion of Zircaloy-4, oxide thickness measurements at poolside and in the hot cell have been analyzed with the MATPRO corrosion model. A calibrated corrosion parameter in this model provides a measure of the corrosion susceptibility of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. It was found necessary to modify the MATPRO equations with a burnup dependent term to obtain a near constant value of the corrosion parameter over a burnup range of approximately 10 to 45 MWd/kgU. Different calculational tests were performed to confirm that the modified model accurately predicts the corrosion behavior of fuel rods

  17. Mechanism of pitting corrosion protection of metals and alloys in new-generation water treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grachev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article authors set out a principle of pitting corrosion protection, suggested a new class of multilayer materials with high corrosion resistance. They substantiated the choice of the layers for the multilayer material designed for exploitation in oxidizing and non-oxidizing environment. The sphere of application of the multilyer materials was defined.

  18. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  19. SRB seawater corrosion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  20. Surface Corrosion Resistance in Turning of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the issues associated with implant surface modification. We propose a method to form the oxide film on implant surfaces by dry turning to generate heat and injecting oxygen-rich gas at the turning-tool flank. The morphology, roughness, composition, and thickness of the oxide films in an oxygen-rich atmosphere were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical profiling, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion resistance of the modified surfaces. The corrosion resistance trends, analyzed relative to the oxide film thickness, indicate that the oxide film thickness is the major factor affecting the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in a simulated body fluid (SBF. Turning in an oxygen-rich atmosphere can form a thick oxide film on the implant surface. The thickness of surface oxide films processed at an oxygen concentration of 80% was improved to 4.6 times that of films processed at an oxygen concentration of 21%; the free corrosion potential shifted positively by 0.357 V, which significantly improved the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in the SBF. Therefore, the proposed method may (partially replace the subsequent surface oxidation. This method is significant for biomedical development because it shortens the process flow, improves the efficiency, and lowers the cost.

  1. Plant corrosion: prediction of materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strutt, J.E.; Nicholls, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen papers have been compiled forming a book on computer-based approaches to corrosion prediction in a wide range of industrial sectors, including the chemical, petrochemical and power generation industries. Two papers have been selected and indexed separately. The first describes a system operating within BNFL's Reprocessing Division to predict materials performance in corrosive conditions to aid future plant design. The second describes the truncation of the distribution function of pit depths during high temperature oxidation of a 20Cr austenitic steel in the fuel cladding in AGR systems. (U.K.)

  2. Pitting corrosion on a copper canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Beverskog, B.

    1996-02-01

    It is demonstrated that normal pitting can occur during oxidizing conditions in the repository. It is also concluded that a new theory for pitting corrosion has to be developed, as the present theory is not in accordance with all practical and experimental observations. A special variant of pitting, based on the growth of sulfide whiskers, is suggested to occur during reducing conditions. However, such a mechanism needs to be demonstrated experimentally. A simple calculational model of canister corrosion was developed based on the results of this study. 69 refs, 3 figs

  3. Pitting corrosion of zirconium in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Shayeb, H.A.; Abd El Wahab, F.M.; Abd Elk Meguid, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The open circuit potentials of the Zr electrode are followed as a function of time in various aqueous solutions till attainment of steady state values.The results are discussed on the basis of oxide film thickening and repair. Pitting corrosion of Zr was examined in chloride solutions using the potentiodynamic technique. The effect of some inorganic and organic additives was also investigated for inhibiting the pitting corrosion of Zr and the relative performance is presented and discussed. (author). 21 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. Assessing corrosion in oil refining and petrochemical processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. John

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the development of an information system used to manage corrosion of metals and alloys by high temperature gases found in many different oil refining, petrochemical, power generation, and chemical processes. The database currently represents about 7.9 million h of exposure time for about 5,500 tests with 89 commercial alloys for a temperature range of 200 - 1,200°C. The system manages corrosion data from well-defined exposures and determines corrosion product stabilities. New models used in the analysis of thermochemical data for the Fe-Ni-Cr-Co-C-O-S-N-H system are being compiled. All known phases based upon combinations of the elements have been analyzed to allow complete assessments of corrosion product stabilities. Use of these data allows prediction of stable corrosion products and hence identification of the possible dominant corrosion mechanisms. The system has the potential to be used in corrosion research, alloy development, failure analysis, lifetime prediction, and process operations evaluations. The corrosion mechanisms emphasized are oxidation, sulfidation, sulfidation/oxidation, and carburization.

  5. Simulation of the chemical state of irradiated oxide fuel; influence of the internal corrosion on the mechanical properties of Zry-4 tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1979-03-01

    Zircaloy is not compatible with oxide fuel nor with some fission product elements. Therefore, chemical interaction between the irradiated oxide fuel and the Zry cladding material take place, especially at temperatures that can be reached during reactor incidents (ATWS, LOCA). In order to find out which influence the chemical interaction between the fission products and the Zry cladding material have on the mechanical properties of Zry-4 tubing out-of-pile burst experiments and creep rupture tests have been performed at temperatures >=600 0 C with short tube specimens containing simulated fission products. First of all, assessments of the chemical state of irradiated oxide fuel were performed and a method is described for introducing simulated fission product species into fresh oxide fuel for irradiation tests. As the test results of the out-of-pile studies show, only iodine can lead to a low ductility failure of the Zry-tubing at temperatures >=600 0 C. However, the influence of iodine on the deformation behavior of Zry-tubing can be neglected above 850 0 C. (orig.) [de

  6. Protection of stainless-steels against corrosion in sulphidizing environments by Ce oxide coatings: X-ray absorption and thermogravimetric studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.; Fuggle, J.C.; van der Laan, G.; Esteva, J.-M.; Karnatak, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper a study is reported concerning ceramic coatings containing cerium oxide, prepared by the sol-gel method, used to protect Incoloy 800H against sulphidation. When the coating is sintered in air at 850°C good protection is obtained. In an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the

  7. Corrosion of well casings in compressed air energy storage environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, R.P.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine corrosive effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) environments on several well casing materials to aid in material selections. A literature search on corrosion behavior of well casing material in similar environments revealed that corrosion rates of 0.20 to 0.25 mm/y might be expected. This information was employed in designing the laboratory study. Unstressed electrically isolate samples of various carbon steels were autoclaved at varying humidities, temperatures, and exposure durations to simulate anticipated environments in the well bore during CAES operation. All compressed air tests were run at 12.1 MPa. Temperatures varied from 323/sup 0/K to 573/sup 0/K, and humidity varied from 100% to completely dry air. The effects of salts in the humidified air were also studied. Results indicated that typical well casings of carbon steel as used in oil, gas, and water production wells adequately withstand the anticipated CAES reservoir environment. An acceptable corrosion rate arrived at by these laboratory simulations was between 0.0015 and 0.15 mm/y. Corrosion was caused by metal oxidation that formed a protective scale of iron oxide. Higher temperatures, humidity rates, or salinity content of the humid air increased corrosion. Corrosion also increased on a metal coupon in contact with a sandstone sample, possibly due to crevice corrosion. For each of these factors either singularly or collectively, the increased corrosion rates were still acceptable with the maximum measured at 0.15 mm/y. When coupons were reused in an identical test, the corrosion rates increased beyond the anticipated values that had been determined by extrapolation from one-time runs. Fine cracking of the protective scale probably occurred due to thermal variations, resulting in increased corrosion rates and a greater potential for particulates, which could plug the reservoir.

  8. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  9. Effects of external stresses on hot corrosion behavior of stainless steel TP347HFG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jiapeng; Zhou, Qulan; Li, Na; Liu, Zhuhan; Liu, Taisheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot corrosion tests of TP347HFG under different stresses were conducted. • The corrosion resistance was strengthened by the exertion of tensile stresses. • External stresses promoted faster formation of the protective Cr_2O_3 layer. • Specimens under critical stress 40 MPa condition present the best resistance. - Abstract: Hot corrosion experiments of alloy TP347HFG under different stresses were conducted. Corroded specimens were examined by means of corrosion products, morphology and compositional changes in corrosion scales. The corrosion behavior was strongly associated with the formation of oxides layers. The corrosion resistance was strengthened by the external stress. It seemed that the exertion of stresses caused many micro cracks and defects, which acted as faster and easier diffusion paths for Cr atoms to diffuse to the surface, and thus, promote faster formation of the protective Cr_2O_3 oxide layer. Critical stress 40 MPa was found, specimens under which present the best resistance.

  10. Zinc-The key to preventing corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff L.

    2011-01-01

    Centuries before it was identified as an element, zinc was used to make brass (an alloy of zinc and copper) and for medicinal purposes. Metallic zinc and zinc oxide were produced in India sometime between the 11th and 14th centuries and in China in the 17th century, although the discovery of pure metallic zinc is credited to the German chemist Andreas Marggraf, who isolated the element in 1746. Refined zinc metal is bluish-white when freshly cast; it is hard and brittle at most temperatures and has relatively low melting and boiling points. Zinc alloys readily with other metals and is chemically active. On exposure to air, it develops a thin gray oxide film (patina), which inhibits deeper oxidation (corrosion) of the metal. The metal's resistance to corrosion is an important characteristic in its use.

  11. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  12. Semi-empirical corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem Elahi, Waseem; Atif Rana, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in Pressurize Water Reactors (PWRs) bears corrosion due to fast neutron flux, coolant temperature, and water chemistry. The thickness of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube may be decreased due to the increase in corrosion penetration which may affect the integrity of the fuel rod. The tin content and inter-metallic particles sizes has been found significantly in the magnitude of oxide thickness. In present study we have developed a Semiempirical corrosion model by modifying the Arrhenius equation for corrosion as a function of acceleration factor for tin content and accumulative annealing. This developed model has been incorporated into fuel performance computer code. The cladding oxide thickness data obtained from the Semi-empirical corrosion model has been compared with the experimental results i.e., numerous cases of measured cladding oxide thickness from UO 2 fuel rods, irradiated in various PWRs. The results of the both studies lie within the error band of 20μm, which confirms the validity of the developed Semi-empirical corrosion model. Key words: Corrosion, Zircaloy-4, tin content, accumulative annealing factor, Semi-empirical, PWR. (author)

  13. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  14. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  15. Microbial induced corrosion in French concept of nuclear waste underground disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.; Crusset, D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a short overview of how the bacteria, that may influence the corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys, are taken into account in the French concept of geological repository. It is important to underline that microbial induced corrosion is not a new corrosion phenomena but the presence of bacteria may modify (increase or decrease) anodic or cathodic corrosion reactions. In aerobic conditions, high corrosion rates may be obtained due to the bio-oxidation of pyrites. Under anaerobic conditions (longer period), bacteria may have negative (localised corrosion) or positive (consumption of hydrogen) effects. The mixed conditions (with and without oxygen) may be the most dangerous period for localised corrosion of metals and alloys due to the coupling and galvanic corrosion phenomena enhanced by aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The first conclusions lead to consider that MIC is a 'short term' issue rather than a long term one. (authors)

  16. Long term integrity of reactor pressure vessel and primary containment vessel after the severe accidents in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Leaching property of spent oxide fuel segment and corrosion property of a carbon steel under artificial seawater immersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    Primary containment vessel (PCV), reactor pressure vessel and pedestal in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power station units 1 through 3 have been exposed to severe thermal, chemical and mechanical conditions due to core meltdown events and seawater injections for emergent core cooling. These components will be immersed in diluted seawater with dissolved fission products under irradiation until the end of debris removal. Fresh water injected into the cores contacts with debris to cool, dissolves or erodes their constituents, mixed with retained water, and becomes 'accumulated water' with radioactive nuclides. We have focused the leaching of fission products into the accumulated water under lower temperature (323 K). FUGEN spent oxide fuel segments were immersed to determine the leaching factor of fission product and actinide elements. Since PCV made from carbon steel is one of the most important boundaries to prevent from fission products release, corrosion behavior has been paid attention to evaluate their integrity. Carbon steel specimens were immersion- and electrochemical-tested in diluted seawater with simulants of the accumulated water at 323 K in order to evaluate the effect of fission products in particular cesium and radiation. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the bactericidal characteristics of nano-copper oxide or functionalized zeolite coating for bio-corrosion control in concrete sewer pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haile, T.; Nakhla, G.; Allouche, E.; Vaidya, S.

    2010-01-01

    The bactericidal characteristics of nano-copper oxide or functionalized zeolite coated concrete pipes against Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans were studied by measuring the temporal variation of bacterial dry cell weight measurement, cellular Adenosine Triphosphate production, as well as oxygen uptake rate of the aforementioned bacterium. Uncorroded (UC), severely corroded (SC), and moderately corroded (MC) concrete pipes were electrochemically coated with a nano-copper oxide, while another uncorroded concrete pipe was used to apply functionalized zeolite coating (Z2). Specimens were characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Oxygen uptake rate of the bacterium was the highest in UC followed by the MC. Oxygen uptake rate and cellular Adenosine Triphosphate decreased progressively in Z2 and SC throughout the duration of the experiment due to decline in live bacterial cell. The maximum bacterial specific growth rate was 1.1 x 10 -2 day -1 for both UC and MC, with a decay rates varying from 1.4 x 10 -2 to 2.6 x 10 -2 day -1 . The minimum concentration limits for the inhibition of the bacterium in the nano-copper oxide coated concrete pipes ranged from 2.3 mg to 2.6 mg Cu per mg dry cell weight.

  18. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  19. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    Alloys 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revet -se tside lf necessary and identify by block number) ~ lThe sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion of cobalt and...Figures 12 and 13. The Na2 SO 4 was observed to form puddles on the oxide-covered specimen surface. An oxide slag was usually suspended in the... slag (black arrows) were suspended (30 sees at 1000°C in air). b) After washing the Na2SO 4 from the specimen, the exposed oxide surface was highly

  20. A copper container corrosion model for the in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1996-11-01

    Copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault are expected to undergo uniform corrosion and, possibly, pitting. The corrosion behaviour of the containers will be dictated by the evolution of environmental conditions within the disposal vault. The environment will evolve from an early warm, oxidizing phase, during which fast uniform corrosion and pitting may occur, to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions, during which the container will only be susceptible to slow uniform corrosion. The results of corrosion and electrochemical studies of the uniform corrosion of Cu in O 2 -containing Cl - solutions are discussed and a detailed reaction mechanism presented. The relevant literature on pitting corrosion is briefly reviewed and models for the prediction of pit depth discussed. The potential for microbially influenced corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking is discussed, as are vapour-phase corrosion and the effects of β-radiation. The use of natural analogues for justifying long-term corrosion predictions is also considered. Finally, a model for uniform corrosion and pitting is presented and container lifetimes predicted. Copper containers having a minimum wall thickness of 25.4 mm are not predicted to fail by corrosion in periods 6 a. Thus, despite the assumption of poor rock quality made here, the safety of the entire disposal concept can be assured by the use of a long-lived container. (author). 125 refs., 1 tab., 24 figs

  1. Corrosion prevention of iron with novel organic inhibitor of hydroxamic acid and UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Huihua; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Qian, Pu; Xia Zhengbin; Ishikawa, Ikuo; Suzuki, Toshishige M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion prevention by self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of monomer and polymer inhibitor on iron covered with air-formed oxide films was investigated by cyclic voltammetry in borate buffer solution. Anti-corrosion efficiency of the SAM-coated Fe electrodes depends on UV irradiation duration on Fe electrodes prior to coating and inhibitor concentration to form SAM. The 1-h UV-irradiated Fe electrodes coated with SAM exhibits the most effective corrosion resistance despite the anti-corrosion efficiency of air-formed films on Fe was linearly increased with UV irradiation. The addition of monomer in polymer solution improves the stability and corrosion resistance of SAM

  2. Corrosion evaluation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo.

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of ± 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs

  3. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  4. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  5. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Review about corrosion of superheaters tubes in biomass plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlanga-Labari, C.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2006-01-01

    The design of new biomass-fired power plants with increased steam temperature raises concerns of high-temperature corrosion. The high potassium and chlorine contents in many biomass, specially in wheat straw, are potentially harmful elements with regard to corrosion. Chlorine may cause accelerated corrosion resulting in increased oxidation, metal wastage, internal attack, void formations and loose non-adherent scales. The most severe corrosion problems in biomass-fired systems are expected to occur due to Cl-rich deposits formed on superheater tubes. In the first part of this revision the corrosion mechanism proposed are described in function of the conditions and compounds involved. The second part is focused on the behaviour of the materials tested so far in the boiler and in the laboratory. First the traditional commercial alloys are studied and secondly the new alloys and the coasting. (Author). 102 refs

  7. Standard practice for preparing, cleaning, and evaluating corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers suggested procedures for preparing bare, solid metal specimens for tests, for removing corrosion products after the test has been completed, and for evaluating the corrosion damage that has occurred. Emphasis is placed on procedures related to the evaluation of corrosion by mass loss and pitting measurements. (Warning—In many cases the corrosion product on the reactive metals titanium and zirconium is a hard and tightly bonded oxide that defies removal by chemical or ordinary mechanical means. In many such cases, corrosion rates are established by mass gain rather than mass loss.) 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see 1 and 7.2.

  8. New water guidelines developed to battle nuclear corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses methods of preventing degradation of nuclear steam generators due to a combination of impurities and corrosion products in the secondary system. Explains that tube and support-plate corrosion has been the main concern, manifesting itself primarily in the recirculating units used in PWR systems. Points out that the battle against corrosion is closely linked to control of ionic impurities, alkalinity, oxidants, and sludge-copper and iron corrosion products, primarily-in condensate and feedwater systems. Examines a set of secondary-water-chemistry guidelines developed by the Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG). Presents diagram showing changes at Salem 1 to arrest corrosion, including condenser retubing, addition of condensate polisher and recirculation loop. Table indicates how preventive measures at Salem 1, affected secondary-water chemistry

  9. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  10. The effect of water vapor on the corrosion of carbon steel at 65 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Estill, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    AISI 1020 carbon steel was exposed to air at various relative humidities at 65 degrees C. A ''critical relative humidity'' (CRH) of 75--85% was determined. The CRH is the transitional relative humidity where oxidation/corrosion changes from dry oxidation to aqueous film electrochemical corrosion. Short term testing suggests that aqueous film electrochemical corrosion results in the formation of an inner oxide of Fe 3 O 4 , and an outer oxide of a powdery Fe 2 O 3 and/or Fe 2 O 3 ·xH 2 O

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of the tubing materials for nuclear steam generators in an environment containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Uh Chul; Lee, Eun Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    Steam generator tube materials show a high susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in an environment containing lead species and some nuclear power plants currently have degradation problems associated with lead-induced stress corrosion cracking in a caustic solution. Effects of an applied potential on SCC is tested for middle-annealed Alloy 600 specimens since their corrosion potential can be changed when lead oxide coexists with other oxidizing species like copper oxide in the sludge. In addition, all the steam generator tubing materials used for nuclear power plants being operated and currently under construction in Korea are tested in a caustic solution with lead oxide. (author)

  12. Atomic level characterization in corrosion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Philippe; Maurice, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Atomic level characterization brings fundamental insight into the mechanisms of self-protection against corrosion of metals and alloys by oxide passive films and into how localized corrosion is initiated on passivated metal surfaces. This is illustrated in this overview with selected data obtained at the subnanometre, i.e. atomic or molecular, scale and also at the nanometre scale on single-crystal copper, nickel, chromium and stainless steel surfaces passivated in well-controlled conditions and analysed in situ and/or ex situ by scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A selected example of corrosion modelling by ab initio density functional theory is also presented. The discussed aspects include the surface reconstruction induced by hydroxide adsorption and formation of two-dimensional (hydr)oxide precursors, the atomic structure, orientation and surface hydroxylation of three-dimensional ultrathin oxide passive films, the effect of grain boundaries in polycrystalline passive films acting as preferential sites of passivity breakdown, the differences in local electronic properties measured at grain boundaries of passive films and the role of step edges at the exposed surface of oxide grains on the dissolution of the passive film. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  13. Review about corrosion of superheaters tubes in biomass plants; Revision sobre la corrosion de tubos sobrecalentadores en plantas de biomasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlanga-Labari, C.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2006-07-01

    The design of new biomass-fired power plants with increased steam temperature raises concerns of high-temperature corrosion. The high potassium and chlorine contents in many biomass, specially in wheat straw, are potentially harmful elements with regard to corrosion. Chlorine may cause accelerated corrosion resulting in increased oxidation, metal wastage, internal attack, void formations and loose non-adherent scales. The most severe corrosion problems in biomass-fired systems are expected to occur due to Cl-rich deposits formed on superheater tubes. In the first part of this revision the corrosion mechanism proposed are described in function of the conditions and compounds involved. The second part is focused on the behaviour of the materials tested so far in the boiler and in the laboratory. First the traditional commercial alloys are studied and secondly the new alloys and the coasting. (Author). 102 refs.

  14. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar (Southwest Research Institute)

    2007-09-29

    -base alloys, stainless steels and copper-nickel alloys and (2) the effects of heat treatment on localized corrosion. Excellent agreement with experimental data has been obtained for alloys in various environments, including acids, bases, oxidizing species, inorganic inhibitors, etc. Further, a probabilistic model has been established for predicting the long-term damage due to localized corrosion on the basis of short-term inspection results. This methodology is applicable to pitting, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Finally, a comprehensive model has been developed for predicting sensitization of Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-W-N alloys and its effect on localized corrosion. As a vehicle for the commercialization of this technology, OLI Systems has developed the Corrosion Analyzer, a software tool that is already used by many companies in the chemical process industry. In process design, the Corrosion Analyzer provides the industry with (1) reliable prediction of the tendency of base alloys for localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and (2) understanding of how to select alloys for corrosive environments. In process operations, the software will help to predict the remaining useful life of equipment based on limited input data. Thus, users will also be able to identify process changes, corrosion inhibition strategies, and other control options before costly shutdowns, energy waste, and environmental releases occur. With the Corrosion Analyzer, various corrosion mitigation measures can be realistically tested in a virtual laboratory.

  15. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  16. Predicting corrosion product transport in nuclear power stations using a solubility-based model for flow-accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.; Cheluget, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    A general model of solubility-driven flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel was derived based on the assumption that the solubilities of ferric oxyhydroxide and magnetite control the rate of film dissolution. This process involves the dissolution of an oxide film due to fast-flowing coolant unsaturated in iron. The soluble iron is produced by (i) the corrosion of base metal under a porous oxide film and (ii) the dissolution of the oxide film at the fluid-oxide film interface. The iron released at the pipe wall is transferred into the bulk flow by turbulent mass transfer. The model is suitable for calculating concentrations of dissolved iron in feedtrain lines. These iron levels were used to calculate sludge transport rates around the feedtrain. The model was used to predict sludge transport rates due to flow accelerated corrosion of major feedtrain piping in a CANDU reactor. The predictions of the model compare well with plant measurements

  17. Effects of Alloying Elements (Cr, Mn) on Corrosion Properties of Carbon Steel in Synthetic Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Youngmin; Kim, Heesan

    2016-01-01

    Effects of alloying elements, manganese and chromium, on corrosion resistance of carbon steel were examined using weight loss test and electrochemical tests (polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) in synthetic seawater at 60 ℃. The results from the weight loss test showed that chromium effectively improved corrosion resistance of carbon steel during the entire immersion time, but manganese improved corrosion resistance after the lowered corrosion resistance at the beginnings of immersion. Unlike the weight loss test, the electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance did not increase with immersion time, in all the specimens. This disagreement is explained by the presence of rust involved in electrochemical reaction during electrochemical tests. The analysis of rust with transmission electron microscopy (TEM)−energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the amorphous-like rust layer located at the metal/rust interface with enriched alloying element (Cr, Mn) prevents diffusion of corrosive species into a metal/rust interface effectively, which leads to increased corrosion resistance. The initial corrosion behaviour is also affected by the rust types. In other words, manganese accelerated the formation of spinel oxides, negatively affecting corrosion resistance. Meanwhile, chromium accelerated the formation of goethite but impeded the formation of spinel oxides, positively affecting the corrosion resistance. From the above results, the corrosion resistance of steel is closely related with a rust type.

  18. Effects of Alloying Elements (Cr, Mn) on Corrosion Properties of Carbon Steel in Synthetic Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Youngmin; Kim, Heesan [Hongik University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Effects of alloying elements, manganese and chromium, on corrosion resistance of carbon steel were examined using weight loss test and electrochemical tests (polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) in synthetic seawater at 60 ℃. The results from the weight loss test showed that chromium effectively improved corrosion resistance of carbon steel during the entire immersion time, but manganese improved corrosion resistance after the lowered corrosion resistance at the beginnings of immersion. Unlike the weight loss test, the electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance did not increase with immersion time, in all the specimens. This disagreement is explained by the presence of rust involved in electrochemical reaction during electrochemical tests. The analysis of rust with transmission electron microscopy (TEM)−energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the amorphous-like rust layer located at the metal/rust interface with enriched alloying element (Cr, Mn) prevents diffusion of corrosive species into a metal/rust interface effectively, which leads to increased corrosion resistance. The initial corrosion behaviour is also affected by the rust types. In other words, manganese accelerated the formation of spinel oxides, negatively affecting corrosion resistance. Meanwhile, chromium accelerated the formation of goethite but impeded the formation of spinel oxides, positively affecting the corrosion resistance. From the above results, the corrosion resistance of steel is closely related with a rust type.

  19. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorek, Jolanta; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Jones, Walis; Krzak, Justyna

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented. PMID:29373540

  20. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Gąsiorek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented.

  1. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorek, Jolanta; Szczurek, Anna; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Jones, Walis; Krzak, Justyna

    2018-01-26

    Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented.

  2. Lead corrosion evaluation in high activity nuclear waste container (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, R.; Lanzani, L.; Bruzzoni, P.; Cufre, W.; Semino, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a study of high activity nuclear waste canister corrosion in a deep geological disposal. In this canister design, the vitrified nuclear waste stainless steel container is shielded by a 100 mm thick lead wall. For mechanical resistance, the canister will also have a thin carbon steel external liner. Experimental and mathematical modeling studies are aimed to asses the corrosion kinetics of the carbon steel liner in first instance and then, once this liner has been corroded away, the corrosion kinetics of the main lead barrier. Being that oxygen reduction is the main cathodic reaction that supports the anodic oxidation of iron, a model is described predicting the rate of oxygen consumption in a sealed deep nuclear waste disposal vault as a result of the canister corrosion. Oxidation processes other than container corrosion, and that can account also for oxygen depletion, are not taken into consideration. Corrosion experimental studies on lead and its alloys in groundwater are also reported. These experiments are aimed to improve the corrosion resistance of commercial lead in groundwater. (author)

  3. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally red