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Sample records for oxidation biological trickling

  1. Water Quality of Trickling Biological Periwinkle Shells Filter for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried on the design, efficiency and economics of trickling biological periwinkle shells filter in recirculating aquaculture systems for catfish production. The designed biofilter and other system components were constructed, assembled and commissioned for pilot catfish production. The system with the designed ...

  2. The gas-solid trickle-flow reactor for the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulphide: a trickle-phase model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver, A.B.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1987-01-01

    The oxidation of H2S by O2 producing elemental sulphur has been studied at temperatures of 100–300°C and at atmospheric pressure in a laboratory-scale gas-solid trickle-flow reactor. In this reactor one of the reaction products, i.e. sulphur, is removed continuously by flowing solids. A porous,

  3. Exploration on trickle leaching of uranium ore by refreshed liquor of bacterial oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shian; Huang Xiangfu; Fan Baotuan

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptation of the domesticated thiobacillus ferroxidans to the trickle leaching conditions of uranium ore. When the bacterial leaching liquor through multiple cycles of oxidation and regeneration was used to return to the trickle leaching, the following results were obtained: the extraction rate was more than 95%, the acid consumption was saved by 30%, and the consumed 2.0% pyrolusite (MnO 2 40%) was eliminated. The following problems are discussed: the basic principle, process and some factors influencing the process of the trickle leaching of uranium ore using regenerated liquor of bacterial oxidation, counter-current trickle leaching mode, oxidation and regeneration techniques of bacterial leaching liquor and other technological problems on the process of uranium extraction by thiobacillus ferroxidans

  4. Biological treatment of wastewaters from a dye manufacturing company using a trickling filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornaros, M.; Lyberatos, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effectiveness of a biological trickling filter for the treatment of wastewaters produced by a company manufacturing organic dyes and varnishes. The combined wastewater effluent was fed to a pilot-scale trickling filter in two feeding modes, continuously and as a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The biodegradability of the diluted wastewaters that were subjected to physicochemical treatment, using Ca(OH) 2 and FeSO 4 , was initially studied using a continuously operated trickling filter. The system efficiency ranged up to 60-70% for a hydraulic loading of 1.1 m 3 /m 2 day and up to 80-85% for a hydraulic loading 0.6 m 3 /m 2 day. A stable chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 60-70% was achieved even in the case of undiluted wastewater at a hydraulic loading of 1.1 m 3 /m 2 day. The effectiveness of biological treatment of a mixture of the company's main wastewater streams was also examined. The microorganisms developed in the trickling filter were able to efficiently remove COD levels up to 36,000 mg/L, under aerobic conditions at pH values between 5.5 and 8.0. Depending on the operating conditions of the system, about 30-60% of the total COD removal was attributed to air stripping caused by the air supply at the bottom of the filter, whereas the rest of the COD was clearly removed through biological action. The proposed biological treatment process based on a trickling filter, which was operated either continuously or even better in an SBR mode, appears as a promising pretreatment step for coping with dye manufacturing wastewaters in terms of removing a significant portion of the organic content

  5. Continuous biological waste gas treatment in stirred trickle-bed reactor with discontinuous removal of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzis, A; Heits, H; Wübker, S; Heinze, U; Friedrich, C; Werner, U

    1998-02-20

    A new reactor for biological waste gas treatment was developed to eliminate continuous solvents from waste gases. A trickle-bed reactor was chosen with discontinuous movement of the packed bed and intermittent percolation. The reactor was operated with toluene as the solvent and an optimum average biomass concentration of between 5 and 30 kg dry cell weight per cubic meter packed bed (m3pb). This biomass concentration resulted in a high volumetric degradation rate. Reduction of surplus biomass by stirring and trickling caused a prolonged service life and prevented clogging of the trickle bed and a pressure drop increase. The pressure drop after biomass reduction was almost identical to the theoretical pressure drop as calculated for the irregular packed bed without biomass. The reduction in biomass and intermittent percolation of mineral medium resulted in high volumetric degradation rates of about 100 g of toluene m-3pb h-1 at a load of 150 g of toluene m-3pb h-1. Such a removal rate with a trickle-bed reactor was not reported before. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Trickle bed reactor for the oxidation of phenol over active carbon catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbiye, Nigus; Font Capafons, Josep; Fortuny Sanromá, Agustín; Bengoa, Christophe José; Fabregat Llangotera, Azael; Stüber, Frank Erich

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol using activated carbon has been performed in a laboratory trickle bed reactor over a wide range of operating variables (PO2, T, FL and Cph,o) and hydrodynamic conditions. The influence of different start-up procedures (saturation of activated carbon) has also been tested. Further improvement of activity and stability has been checked for by using dynamic TBR operation concept or impregnated Fe/carbon catalyst. The results obtained confi...

  7. High performance biological methanation in a thermophilic anaerobic trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strübing, Dietmar; Huber, Bettina; Lebuhn, Michael; Drewes, Jörg E; Koch, Konrad

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance energy efficiency of biological methanation of CO 2 and H 2 , this study investigated the performance of a thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic trickle bed reactor (ATBR) (58.1L) at ambient pressure. With a methane production rate of up to 15.4m 3 CH4 /(m 3 trickle bed ·d) at methane concentrations above 98%, the ATBR can easily compete with the performance of other mixed culture methanation reactors. Control of pH and nutrient supply turned out to be crucial for stable operation and was affected significantly by dilution due to metabolic water production, especially during demand-orientated operation. Considering practical applications, inoculation with digested sludge, containing a diverse biocenosis, showed high adaptive capacity due to intrinsic biological diversity. However, no macroscopic biofilm formation was observed at thermophilic conditions even after 313days of operation. The applied approach illustrates the high potential of thermophilic ATBRs as a very efficient energy conversion and storage technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in a trickle bed reactor over a Pt/TiO2 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugans, Clayton B; Akgerman, Aydin

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol was studied in a batch and a trickle bed reactor using 4.45% Pt/TiO2 catalyst in the temperature range 150-205 degrees C. Kinetic data were obtained from batch reactor studies and used to model the reaction kinetics for phenol disappearance and for total organic carbon disappearance. Trickle bed experiments were then performed to generate data from a heterogeneous flow reactor. Catalyst deactivation was observed in the trickle bed reactor, although the exact cause was not determined. Deactivation was observed to linearly increase with the cumulative amount of phenol that had passed over the catalyst bed. Trickle bed reactor modeling was performed using a three-phase heterogeneous model. Model parameters were determined from literature correlations, batch derived kinetic data, and trickle bed derived catalyst deactivation data. The model equations were solved using orthogonal collocations on finite elements. Trickle bed performance was successfully predicted using the batch derived kinetic model and the three-phase reactor model. Thus, using the kinetics determined from limited data in the batch mode, it is possible to predict continuous flow multiphase reactor performance.

  9. ANALYSIS OF TRICKLE BED AND PACKED BUBBLE COLUMN BIOREACTORS FOR COMBINED CARBON OXIDATION AND NITRIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliuta I.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological removal of nitrogen and carbon by combined nitrification-oxidation in gas-liquid trickle-bed reactors (TBRs and packed bubble columns (PBCs was analyzed theoretically using a transient two-dimensional model. The model describes TBR and PBC performances at steady state as well as their transient response to a pulse or step increase in inlet methanol and NH4+-nitrogen concentrations. The hydrodynamic parameters were determined from residence time distribution measurements, using an imperfect pulse method for time-domain analysis of nonideal pulse tracer response. A transient diffusion model of the tracer in the porous particle coupled with the piston-dispersion-exchange model was used to interpret the residence time distribution curves obtained. Gas-liquid mass transfer parameters were determined by a stationary method based on the least-squares fit of the calculated concentration profiles in gas phase to the experimental values. Analysis of steady-state performances showed that under like operating conditions, the TBR outperforms the PBC in terms of conversions. A pulse change in the inlet methanol or NH4+-nitrogen concentration causes a negligible transient change in the outlet methanol concentration and a negligible or high transient change in the outlet NH4+-nitrogen concentration. A step change in the inlet methanol concentration causes the negligible transient change in the methanol outlet concentration and a relatively important transient change in the NH4+-nitrogen outlet concentration. A step increase in the NH4+-nitrogen inlet concentration induces a drastic transient change in the NH4+-nitrogen outlet concentration but a negligible transient change in the methanol outlet concentration.

  10. Influence of operating pressure on the biological hydrogen methanation in trickle-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Timo; Lindner, Jonas; Bär, Katharina; Mörs, Friedemann; Graf, Frank; Lemmer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of pressures up to 9bar absolute on the productivity of trickle-bed reactors for biological methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, experiments were carried out in a continuously operated experimental plant with three identical reactors. The pressure increase promises a longer residence time and improved mass transfer of H 2 due to higher gas partial pressures. The study covers effects of different pressures on important parameters like gas hourly space velocity, methane formation rate, conversion rates and product gas quality. The methane content of 64.13±3.81vol-% at 1.5bar could be increased up to 86.51±0.49vol-% by raising the pressure to 9bar. Methane formation rates of up to 4.28±0.26m 3 m -3 d -1 were achieved. Thus, pressure increase could significantly improve reactor performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Kinetics of catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol in trickle bed reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-ming; Zhao, Jian-fu; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Xiu-hua; Zhou, Yang-yuan

    2004-05-01

    By using a trickle bed reactor which was designed by the authors, the catalytic wet air oxidation reaction of phenol on CuO/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was studied. The results showed that in mild operation conditions (at temperature of 180 degrees C, pressure of 3 MPa, liquid feed rate of 1.668 L x h(-1) and oxygen feed rate of 160 L x h(-1)), the removal of phenol can be over 90%. The curve of phenol conversion is similar to "S" like autocatalytic reaction, and is accordance with chain reaction of free radical. The kinetic model of pseudo homogenous reactor fits the catalytic wet air oxidation reaction of phenol. The effects of initial concentration of phenol, liquid feed rate and temperature for reaction also were investigated.

  12. Yield optimization in a cycled trickle-bed reactor: ethanol catalytic oxidation as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayude, A.; Haure, P. [INTEMA, CONICET, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Cassanello, M. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, PINMATE, Departamento de Industrias, FCEyN, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martinez, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, FI-UNLP-CINDECA, La Plata (Argentina)

    2012-05-15

    The effect of slow ON-OFF liquid flow modulation on the yield of consecutive reactions is investigated for oxidation of aqueous ethanol solutions using a 0.5 % Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} commercial catalyst in a laboratory trickle-bed reactor. Experiments with modulated liquid flow rate (MLFR) were performed under the same hydrodynamic conditions (degree of wetting, liquid holdup) as experiments with constant liquid flow rate (CLFR). Thus, the impact of the duration of wet and dry cycles as well as the period can be independently investigated. Depending on cycling conditions, acetaldehyde or acetic acid production is favored with MLFR compared to CLFR. Results suggest both the opportunity and challenge of finding a way to tune the cycling parameters for producing the most appropriate product. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Effect of Different Operating Temperatures on the Biological Hydrogen Methanation in Trickle Bed Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lemmer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the reactor efficiency, this study investigated the influence of temperature on the biological hydrogen methanation (BHM in trickle-bed reactors (TBR. Rising temperatures increase the metabolic activity of methanogenic microorganisms, thus leading to higher reactor specific methane formation rates (MFR. In order to quantify the potential for improved performance, experiments with four different operating temperatures ranging from 40 to 55 °C were carried out. Methane content increased from 88.29 ± 2.12 vol % at 40 °C to 94.99 ± 0.81 vol % at 55 °C with a stable biological process. Furthermore, a reactor specific methane formation rate (MFR of up to 8.85 ± 0.45 m3 m−3 d−1 was achieved. It could be shown that the microorganisms were able to adapt to higher temperatures within hours. The tests showed that TBR performance with regard to BHM can be significantly increased by increasing the operating temperature.

  14. Practice of the counter-current trickle leaching of uranium ore by refreshed liquor of bacterial oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shian; Huang Xiangfu; Fan Baotuan

    1995-01-01

    The uranium ore of the Mine No. 753 is a high-silicate type primary one, in which the tetravalent uranium accounts for 85%, and the uranium grade is in the range of 0.36% to 0.442%. To reduce the engineering investment and the operating cost a four-stage counter-current trickle leaching pilot-plant test was carried out with the leaching time 50 days and acid consumption 38 kg per ton of ore, and the recovery of more than 95% was obtained. Using the counter-current trickle leaching mode and controlling the limit concentration of the harmful matters in the bacterial leaching liquor, the latter can be effectively oxidized by the synchronical regeneration. A trickle leaching comparative test of 25 ton ore single heap also gave a good result of more than 95% in extraction rate, and 30% acid consumption was saved and the 2.0% pyrolusite (containing MnO 2 40%) was eliminated. This process is feasible in technology and worth-while in economy for treating the uranium ore of Mine No. 753, and provides a new method of uranium ore trickle leaching

  15. Biological biogas upgrading capacity of a hydrogenotrophic community in a trickle-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachbauer, Lydia; Voitl, Gregor; Bochmann, Günther; Fuchs, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Data on long term operation of a system supplied with real biogas are presented. • Ex-situ biological methanation is feasible for biogas upgrading. • Gas quality obtained complies with strictest direct grid injection criteria. • Biomethane can act as flexible storage for renewable surplus electricity. - Abstract: The current study reports on biological biogas upgrading by means of hydrogen addition to obtain biomethane. A mesophilic (37 °C) 0.058 m"3 trickle-bed reactor with an immobilized hydrogenotrophic enrichment culture was operated for a period of 8 months using a substrate mix of molecular hydrogen (H_2) and biogas (36–42% CO_2). Complete CO_2 conversion (> 96%) was achieved up to a H_2 loading rate of 6.5 m_n"3 H_2/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d, corresponding to 2.3 h gas retention time. The optimum H_2/CO_2 ratio was determined to be between 3.67 and 4.15. CH_4 concentrations above 96% were achieved with less than 0.1% residual H_2. This gas quality complies even with tightest standards for grid injection without the need for additional CO_2 removal. If less rigid standards must be fulfilled H_2 loading rates can be almost doubled (10.95 versus 6.5 m_n"3 H_2/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d) making the process even more attractive. At this H_2 loading the achieved methane productivity was 2.52 m_n"3 CH_4/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d. In terms of biogas this corresponds to an upgrading capacity of 6.9 m_n"3 biogas/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d. The conducted experiments demonstrate that biological methanation in an external reactor is well feasible for biogas upgrading under the prerequisite that an adequate H_2 source is available.

  16. A kinetic study of biological Cr(VI) reduction in trickling filters with different filter media types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermou, E.; Vayenas, D.V.

    2007-01-01

    Two pilot-scale trickling filters were used in order to estimate Cr(VI) reduction through biological mechanisms in biofilm reactors operated in SBR mode with recirculation using different filter media types, i.e. plastic media and calcitic gravel. The feed concentrations of Cr(VI) examined were about 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 mg/l, while the concentration of the organic carbon was constant at 400 mg/l, in order to avoid carbon limitations in the bulk liquid. Maximum reduction rates of 4.8 and 4.7 g Cr(VI)/d were observed for feed Cr(VI) concentration of about 5 mg Cr(VI)/l, for the filters with the plastic support material and the gravel media, respectively. The reduction rates were significantly affected by the feed Cr(VI) concentration in both bioreactors. A dual-enzyme kinetic model was used in order to describe Cr(VI) reduction by aerobically grown mixed cultures. Model predictions were found to correspond very closely to experimental quantitative observations of Cr(VI) reduction at both pilot-scale trickling filters used

  17. Transesterification of rapeseed oil for biodiesel production in trickle-bed reactors packed with heterogeneous Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yong-Lu; Tian, Song-Jiang; Li, Shu-Fen; Wang, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Min-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A conventional trickle bed reactor and its modified type both packed with Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalysts were studied for biodiesel production by transesterification of rapeseed oil and methanol. The effects of the methanol usage and oil flow rate on the FAME yield were investigated under the normal pressure and methanol boiling state. The oil flow rate had a significant effect on the FAME yield for the both reactors. The modified trickle bed reactor kept over 94.5% FAME yield under 0.6 mL/min oil flow rate and 91 mL catalyst bed volume, showing a much higher conversion and operational stability than the conventional type. With the modified trickle bed reactor, both transesterification and methanol separation could be performed simultaneously, and glycerin and methyl esters were separated additionally by gravity separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidation of SO{sub 2} in a trickle bed reactor packed with activated carbon at low liquid flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyadal, Y.; Oguz, H. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    In this study, the oxidation of SO{sub 2} on activated carbon (AcC) by using distilled water and air was carried out in a laboratory scale trickle bed reactor (TBR). Distilled water and air containing 1.7% (v/v) SO{sub 2} were fed co-currently downward through a fixed bed of AcC particles in a range of 1-7 cm{sup 3}/s and 10-27 cm{sup 3}/s, respectively. H{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions were the products obtained in the liqiuid phase. Steady-state experiments were performed in a column of 0.15 m packing height and 0.047 m column diameter at 20 C and atmospheric pressure. (orig.)

  19. Prevention of clogging in a biological trickle-bed reactor removing toluene from contaminated air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F J; Hartmans, S

    1996-04-05

    Removal of organic compounds like toluene from waste gases with a trickle-bed reactor can result in clogging of the reactor due to the formation of an excessive amount of biomass. We therefore limited the amount of nutrients available for growth, to prevent clogging of the reactor. As a consequence of this nutrient limitation a lower removal rate was observed. However, when a fungal culture was used to inoculate the reactor, the toluene removal rate under nutrient limiting conditions was higher. Over a period of 375 days, an average removal rate of 27 g C/(m(3) h) was obtained with the reactor inoculated with the fungal culture. From the carbon balance over the reactor and the nitrogen availability it was concluded that, under these nutrient-limited conditions, large amounts of carbohydrates are probably formed. We also studied the application of a NaOH wash to remove excess biomass, as a method to prevent clogging. Under these conditions an average toluene removal rate of 35 g C/(m(3) h) was obtained. After about 50 days there was no net increase in the biomass content of the reactor. The amount of biomass which was formed in the reactor equaled the amount removed by the NaOH wash.

  20. "Rinse and trickle": a protocol for TEM preparation and investigation of inorganic fibers from biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Capella, Silvana; Rinaudo, Caterina; Belluso, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a sample preparation protocol that allows inorganic fibers and particulate matter extracted from different biological samples to be characterized morphologically, crystallographically and chemically by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). The method does not damage or create artifacts through chemical attacks of the target material. A fairly rapid specimen preparation is applied with the aim of performing as few steps as possible to transfer the withdrawn inorganic matter onto the TEM grid. The biological sample is previously digested chemically by NaClO. The salt is then removed through a series of centrifugation and rinse cycles in deionized water, thus drastically reducing the digestive power of the NaClO and concentrating the fibers for TEM analysis. The concept of equivalent hydrodynamic diameter is introduced to calculate the settling velocity during the centrifugation cycles. This technique is applicable to lung tissues and can be extended to a wide range of organic materials. The procedure does not appear to cause morphological damage to the fibers or modify their chemistry or degree of crystallinity. The extrapolated data can be used in interdisciplinary studies to understand the pathological effects caused by inorganic materials.

  1. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  2. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A.; García, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. ► Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Chromotrope 2R removal. ► Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. ► The catalyst proved to bare-usable after in situ regeneration. -- Abstract: Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg–Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min −1 and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min −1 , respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T r = 0.098 g Ni min mL −1 . After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T r = 0.098 g Ni min mL −1 , attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity

  3. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallet, Ana [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ovejero, Gabriel, E-mail: govejero@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodríguez, Araceli [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Peres, José A. [Centro de Química de Vila Real, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); García, Juan, E-mail: juangcia@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. ► Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Chromotrope 2R removal. ► Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. ► The catalyst proved to bare-usable after in situ regeneration. -- Abstract: Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg–Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min{sup −1} and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min{sup −1}, respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}. After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}, attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity.

  4. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  5. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A; García, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg-Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min(-1) and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min(-1), respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1). After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1), attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling of non-catalytic reactors in a gas-solid trickle flow reactor: Dry, regenerative flue gas desulphurization using a silica-supported copper oxide sorbent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.H.A.; Kiel, J.H.A.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional, two-phase dispersed plug flow model has been developed to describe the steady-state performance of a relatively new type of reactor, the gas-solid trickle flow reactor (GSTFR). In this reactor, an upward-flowing gas phase is contacted with as downward-flowing dilute solids phase

  7. Biological applications of graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2016-01-01

    Graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. However, the lower water-solubility and the irreversible aggregation due to the strong π-π stacking hinder the wide application of graphene nanosheets in biomedical field. Thus, graphene oxide (GO), one derivative of graphene, has been used more frequently in the biological system owing to its relatively higher water solubility and biocompatibility. Recently, it has been demonstrated that nanomaterials with different functional groups on the surface can be used to bind the drug molecules with high affinity. GO has different functional groups such as H, OH and O on its surface; it can be a potential candidate as a drug carrier. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene like structures are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles spin polarized calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on DNA/RNA nucleobases on graphene oxide. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene oxide by applied charging.

  8. Phenol wastewater remediation: advanced oxidation processes coupled to a biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubalcaba, A; Suárez-Ojeda, M E; Stüber, F; Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Metcalfe, I; Font, J; Carrera, J; Fabregat, A

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, there are increasingly stringent regulations requiring more and more treatment of industrial effluents to generate product waters which could be easily reused or disposed of to the environment without any harmful effects. Therefore, different advanced oxidation processes were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial effluents containing phenol. Wet air oxidation and Fenton process were tested batch wise, while catalytic wet air oxidation and H2O2-promoted catalytic wet air oxidation processes were studied in a trickle bed reactor, the last two using over activated carbon as catalyst. Effluent characterisation was made by means of substrate conversion (using high liquid performance chromatography), chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon. Biodegradation parameters (i.e. maximum oxygen uptake rate and oxygen consumption) were obtained from respirometric tests using activated sludge from an urban biological wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The main goal was to find the proper conditions in terms of biodegradability enhancement, so that these phenolic effluents could be successfully treated in an urban biological WWTP. Results show promising research ways for the development of efficient coupled processes for the treatment of wastewater containing toxic or biologically non-degradable compounds.

  9. Biological iron oxidation by Gallionella spp. in drinking water production under fully aerated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxidation under neutral conditions (pH 6.5-8) may be a homo- or heterogeneous chemically- or a biologically-mediated process. The chemical oxidation is supposed to outpace the biological process under slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7-8). The iron oxidation kinetics and growth of Gallionella spp. - obligatory chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers - were assessed in natural, organic carbon-containing water, in continuous lab-scale reactors and full-scale groundwater trickling filters in the Netherlands. From Gallionella cell numbers determined by qPCR, balances were made for all systems. The homogeneous chemical iron oxidation occurred in accordance with the literature, but was retarded by a low water temperature (13 °C). The contribution of the heterogeneous chemical oxidation was, despite the presence of freshly formed iron oxyhydroxides, much lower than in previous studies in ultrapure water. This could be caused by the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on the iron oxide surfaces. In the oxygen-saturated natural water with a pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.7, Gallionella spp. grew uninhibited and biological iron oxidation was an important, and probably the dominant, process. Gallionella growth was not even inhibited in a full-scale filter after plate aeration. From this we conclude that Gallionella spp. can grow under neutral pH and fully aerated conditions when the chemical iron oxidation is retarded by low water temperature and inhibition of the autocatalytic iron oxidation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative efficiency of trickle and furrow irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, M.; Qureshi, R.H.; Sandhu, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of furrow and trickle methods of irrigation to know their relative efficiency with respect to water applied and fertilizer used on tomatoes, cauliflower and lettuce as test crops using canal water, showed a significant saving of about 44 and 41 per cent respectively for irrigation water and fertilizer applied with trickle as compared to furrow irrigation. Trickle irrigated crops also showed a better response as regards the rate of survival, crop growth and time of maturity

  11. Biological removal of algae in an integrated pond system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meiring, PGJ

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A system of oxidation ponds in series with a biological trickling filter is described. It was known that this arrangement was incapable of reducing effectively the levels of algae present in the pond liquid even though nitrification was effected...

  12. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulig, W.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, P.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 199, Sep (2016), s. 144-160 ISSN 0009-3084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cholesterol * oxidation * oxysterols * biological membranes * biophysical properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  13. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  14. Studies on the biological oxidation - The oxidation of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán Barrón, E. S.; Guzmán Barrón, Alberto; Klemperer, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Biological fluids can be divided according to their behavior toward ascorbic acid into two groups: those having an inhibitory mechanism that protects the ascorbic acid oxidation, and those lacking this mechanism. Animal fluids and some of vegetable origin (those containing dosables amounts of ascorbic acid) corresponding to the first group. Ascorbic acid is protected from oxidation in the fluids by the action of copper catalyst. Fluids from plants (those that contain very little ascorbic acid...

  15. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low...... and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have...

  16. Enhanced nitrogen removal in trickling filter plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y; Constantinou, A; Griffiths, P

    2013-01-01

    The Beaudesert Sewage Treatment Plant (STP), originally built in 1966 and augmented in 1977, is a typical biological trickling filter (TF) STP comprising primary sedimentation tanks (PSTs), TFs and humus tanks. The plant, despite not originally being designed for nitrogen removal, has been consistently achieving over 60% total nitrogen reduction and low effluent ammonium concentration of less than 5 mg NH3-N/L. Through the return of a NO3(-)-rich stream from the humus tanks to the PSTs and maintaining an adequate sludge age within the PSTs, the current plant is achieving a substantial degree of denitrification. Further enhanced denitrification has been achieved by raising the recycle flows and maintaining an adequate solids retention time (SRT) within the PSTs. This paper describes the approach to operating a TF plant to achieve a high degree of nitrification and denitrification. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated through the pilot plant trial. The results from the pilot trial demonstrate a significant improvement in nitrogen removal performance whilst maximising the asset life of the existing infrastructure. This shows great potential as a retrofit option for small and rural communities with pre-existing TFs that require improvements in terms of nitrogen removal.

  17. EVALUATION OF TRICKLE-BED AIR BIOFILTER PERFORMANCE FOR STYRENE REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale trickle-bed air biofilter (TBAB) was evaluated for the removal of styrene from a waste gas stream. Six-millimeter (6 mm) Celite pellets (R-635) were used as the biological attachment medium. The operating parameters considered in the study included the styrene vol...

  18. Fate of dissolved organic nitrogen in two stage trickling filter process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Halis; Kasi, Murthy; Wadhawan, Tanush; Bye, Christopher; Blonigen, Mark; Khan, Eakalak

    2012-10-15

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) represents a significant portion of nitrogen in the final effluent of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Biodegradable portion of DON (BDON) can support algal growth and/or consume dissolved oxygen in the receiving waters. The fate of DON and BDON has not been studied for trickling filter WWTPs. DON and BDON data were collected along the treatment train of a WWTP with a two-stage trickling filter process. DON concentrations in the influent and effluent were 27% and 14% of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN). The plant removed about 62% and 72% of the influent DON and BDON mainly by the trickling filters. The final effluent BDON values averaged 1.8 mg/L. BDON was found to be between 51% and 69% of the DON in raw wastewater and after various treatment units. The fate of DON and BDON through the two-stage trickling filter treatment plant was modeled. The BioWin v3.1 model was successfully applied to simulate ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, TDN, DON and BDON concentrations along the treatment train. The maximum growth rates for ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria, and AOB half saturation constant influenced ammonia and nitrate output results. Hydrolysis and ammonification rates influenced all of the nitrogen species in the model output, including BDON. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrogen Removal in a Full-Scale Domestic Wastewater Treatment Plant with Activated Sludge and Trickling Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Nourmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, more stringent effluent requirements concerning the nutrients effluent values have been imposed by legislation and social concern. In this study, efficiency of total nitrogen removal in activated sludge and trickling filter processes (AS/TF was investigated in Tehran North wastewater treatment plant. Biological system in this site was included, anoxic selector tank, aeration tank, final sedimentation, and trickling filter. A part of treated wastewater before chlorination was mixed with supernatant of dewatered sludge and fed to the trickling filter. Supernatant of dewatered sludge with high concentration of NH4-N was diluted by treated wastewater to provide complete nitrification in trickling filter Produced nitrate in trickling filter was arrived to the anoxic tank and converted to nitrogen gas by denitrification. According to the study result, low concentration of organic carbone and high concentration of NH4-N led to nitrification in TF, then nitrate denitrification to nitrogen gas occurred in selector area. NH4-N concentration decreased from 26.8 mg/L to 0.29 mg/L in TF, and NO3-N concentration increased from 8.8 mg/L to 27 mg/L in TF. Consequently, the total nitrogen decreased approximately to 50% in biological process. This efficiency has been observed in returned flow around 24% from final sedimentation into TF. It was concluded that, in comparison with biological nutrient removal processes, this process is very efficient and simple.

  20. Pulsing flow in trickle bed columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Jan Rudolf

    1981-01-01

    In the operation of a packed column with cocurrent downflow of gas and liquid (trickle bed) several flowpatterns can be observed depending on the degree of interaction between gas and liquid. At low liquid and gas flow rates - low interaction - gascontinuous flow occurs. In this flowregime, the

  1. Styrene biofiltration in a trickle-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Novak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological treatment of styrene waste gas in a trickle-bed filter (TBF was investigated. The bioreactor consisted of a two-part glass cylinder (ID 150 mm filled with 25 mm polypropylene Pall rings serving as packing material. The bed height was 1m. Although the laboratory temperature was maintained at 22 ºC, the water temperature in the trickle-bed filter was slightly lower (about 18 ºC.The main aim of our study was to observe the effect of empty-bed residence time (EBRT on bioreactor performance at a constant pollutant concentration over an extended time period. The bioreactor was inoculated with a mixed microbial consortium isolated from a styrene-degrading biofilter that had been running for the previous two years. After three weeks of acclimation period, the bioreactor was loaded with styrene (100 mg.m-3. EBRT was in the range of 53 s to 13 s. A maximum elimination capacity (EC of 11.3 gC.m-3.h-1 was reached at an organic loading (OL rate of 18.6 gC.m-3.h-1.

  2. Profiling the biological activity of oxide nanomaterials with mechanistic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burello, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present three mechanistic models for profiling the potential biological and toxicological effects of oxide nanomaterials. The models attempt to describe the reactivity, protein adsorption and membrane adhesion processes of a large range of oxide materials and are based on properties

  3. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulig, W.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 199, SI (2016), s. 144-160 ISSN 0009-3084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR GA15-14292S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : cholesterol * oxidation * oxysterols Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  4. Variação dos parâmetros físicos, químicos e biológicos da água em um sistema de irrigação localizada Variation of physical, chemical and biological parameters of water in a trickle irrigation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio A. P. Ribeiro

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo pesquisar, uma fonte hídrica superficial utilizada em um sistema de irrigação por gotejamento, com o fim de se analisar a variação temporal, durante um ano, dos principais parâmetros físicos, químicos e biológicos da sua água e que causam problemas de entupimento nos emissores: sólidos suspensos, turbidez, pH, ferro, sulfetos, condutividade elétrica, sólidos dissolvidos, dureza, índice de Langelier, algas e bactérias Os critérios para avaliação das impurezas presentes na água de irrigação se basearam em estudos realizados por Bucks & Nakayama (1986, no sentido de dar uma orientação de caracter quantitativo que propuseram uma classificação da água, indicando critérios para avaliação do risco de entupimento dos emissores nos sistemas de irrigação localizada. Os resultados mostraram que os parâmetros químicos apresentaram médio risco de obstrução aos emissores, foram pH, ferro e sulfetos, enquanto os parâmetros físicos e biológicos analisados indicaram baixo risco de entupimento dos emissores. Constatou-se correlação dos resultados entre os parâmetros físicos, turbidez e sólidos suspensos totais e o parâmetro biológico algas, com sólidos suspensos totais.This work had the objective to study a superficial water source utilized in a trickle irrigation system. The principal physical, chemical and biological parameters of the irrigation water that caused problems of obstrution in emitters: pH, turbidity, suspensded solids, dissolved solids, EC, hardness, Langelier index, algae and bacterium were analysed during the year. The evaluation criterion of the impurities present in the irrigation water were based on the studies conducted by Bucks & Nakayama (1986, in order to give quantitative orientation of risk of obstruction of drippers in trickle irrigation systems. The chemical factors which showed moderate clogging risk to the emitters were: pH, total iron and sulphite

  5. Performance and optimisation of trickling filters on eel farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, A.; Heul, van der J.W.; Nijhof, M.

    1998-01-01

    The design of trickling filters used on commercial eel farms differs considerably with respect to dimensions, hydraulic and substrate loads and filter medium applied. In this paper, a model, developed for ammonium removal in a pilot-scale trickling filter, has been validated for a range of

  6. A Computerized Approach to Trickle-Process, Random Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braucht, G. Nicholas; Reichardt, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    Procedures for implementing random assignment with trickle processing and ways they can be corrupted are described. A computerized method for implementing random assignment with trickle processing is presented as a desirable alternative in many situations and a way of protecting against threats to assignment validity. (SLD)

  7. Advantages of forced non-steady operated trickle-bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelhouwer, J.G.; Piepers, H.W.; Drinkenburg, A.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    Trickle-bed reactors are usually operated in the steady state trickle flow regime. Uneven liquid distribution and the formation of hot spots are the most serious problems experienced during trickle flow operation. In this paper, we advocate the use of non-steady state operation of trickle-bed

  8. Integrated detoxification methodology of hazardous phenolic wastewaters in environmentally based trickle-bed reactors: Experimental investigation and CFD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Rodrigo J.G.; Almeida, Teresa S.A.; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M.

    2011-01-01

    Centralized environmental regulations require the use of efficient detoxification technologies for the secure disposal of hazardous wastewaters. Guided by federal directives, existing plants need reengineering activities and careful analysis to improve their overall effectiveness and to become environmentally friendly. Here, we illustrate the application of an integrated methodology which encompasses the experimental investigation of catalytic wet air oxidation and CFD simulation of trickle-bed reactors. As long as trickle-bed reactors are determined by the flow environment coupled with chemical kinetics, first, on the optimization of prominent numerical solution parameters, the CFD model was validated with experimental data taken from a trickle bed pilot plant specifically designed for the catalytic wet oxidation of phenolic wastewaters. Second, several experimental and computational runs were carried out under unsteady-state operation to evaluate the dynamic performance addressing the TOC concentration and temperature profiles. CFD computations of total organic carbon conversion were found to agree better with experimental data at lower temperatures. Finally, the comparison of test data with simulation results demonstrated that this integrated framework was able to describe the mineralization of organic matter in trickle beds and the validated consequence model can be exploited to promote cleaner remediation technologies of contaminated waters.

  9. Integrated detoxification methodology of hazardous phenolic wastewaters in environmentally based trickle-bed reactors: Experimental investigation and CFD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rodrigo J G; Almeida, Teresa S A; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2011-05-15

    Centralized environmental regulations require the use of efficient detoxification technologies for the secure disposal of hazardous wastewaters. Guided by federal directives, existing plants need reengineering activities and careful analysis to improve their overall effectiveness and to become environmentally friendly. Here, we illustrate the application of an integrated methodology which encompasses the experimental investigation of catalytic wet air oxidation and CFD simulation of trickle-bed reactors. As long as trickle-bed reactors are determined by the flow environment coupled with chemical kinetics, first, on the optimization of prominent numerical solution parameters, the CFD model was validated with experimental data taken from a trickle bed pilot plant specifically designed for the catalytic wet oxidation of phenolic wastewaters. Second, several experimental and computational runs were carried out under unsteady-state operation to evaluate the dynamic performance addressing the TOC concentration and temperature profiles. CFD computations of total organic carbon conversion were found to agree better with experimental data at lower temperatures. Finally, the comparison of test data with simulation results demonstrated that this integrated framework was able to describe the mineralization of organic matter in trickle beds and the validated consequence model can be exploited to promote cleaner remediation technologies of contaminated waters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidative metabolites of lycopene and their biological functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain a better understanding of the beneficial biological activities of lycopene on cancer prevention, a greater knowledge of the metabolism of lycopene is needed. In particular, the identification of lycopene metabolites and oxidation products in vivo; the importance of tissue specific lycopene c...

  11. A Numerical Model for Trickle Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Richard M.; Colella, Phillip; Crutchfield, William Y.; Day, Marcus S.

    2000-12-01

    Trickle bed reactors are governed by equations of flow in porous media such as Darcy's law and the conservation of mass. Our numerical method for solving these equations is based on a total-velocity splitting, sequential formulation which leads to an implicit pressure equation and a semi-implicit mass conservation equation. We use high-resolution finite-difference methods to discretize these equations. Our solution scheme extends previous work in modeling porous media flows in two ways. First, we incorporate physical effects due to capillary pressure, a nonlinear inlet boundary condition, spatial porosity variations, and inertial effects on phase mobilities. In particular, capillary forces introduce a parabolic component into the recast evolution equation, and the inertial effects give rise to hyperbolic nonconvexity. Second, we introduce a modification of the slope-limiting algorithm to prevent our numerical method from producing spurious shocks. We present a numerical algorithm for accommodating these difficulties, show the algorithm is second-order accurate, and demonstrate its performance on a number of simplified problems relevant to trickle bed reactor modeling.

  12. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer in trickle leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Suoqing; Xiang Qinfang; Guo Jianzheng

    1995-01-01

    The initial research results of the hydrodynamic behavior and mass transfer of the trickle leaching process are summarized. It was shown that the dropping mode, the height of uranium ore heap and the flow rate of the dropping fluid affect the mass transfer of the trickle leaching process. Based on the concept of the keeping form of liquid in ore particle bed and the diffusion in porous medium, a mass transfer pattern, i.e. 'double-membrane transfer process' controlled by porous diffusion, was presented and proved for trickle leaching process

  13. Treatment of slaughter wastewater by coagulation sedimentation-anaerobic biological filter and biological contact oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Yu, P. F.; Fu, J. X.; Ji, X. Q.; Jiang, T.

    2017-08-01

    The optimal process parameters and conditions for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater by coagulation sedimentation-AF - biological contact oxidation process were studied to solve the problem of high concentration organic wastewater treatment in the production of small and medium sized slaughter plants. The suitable water temperature and the optimum reaction time are determined by the experiment of precipitation to study the effect of filtration rate and reflux ratio on COD and SS in anaerobic biological filter and the effect of biofilm thickness and gas water ratio on NH3-N and COD in biological contact oxidation tank, and results show that the optimum temperature is 16-24°C, reaction time is 20 min in coagulating sedimentation, the optimum filtration rate is 0.6 m/h, and the optimum reflux ratio is 300% in anaerobic biological filter reactor. The most suitable biological film thickness range of 1.8-2.2 mm and the most suitable gas water ratio is 12:1-14:1 in biological contact oxidation pool. In the coupling process of continuous operation for 80 days, the average effluent’s mass concentrations of COD, TP and TN were 15.57 mg/L, 40 mg/L and 0.63 mg/L, the average removal rates were 98.93%, 86.10%, 88.95%, respectively. The coupling process has stable operation effect and good effluent quality, and is suitable for the industrial application.

  14. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals by chlorine dioxide in biologically treated wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, G.; Grabic, R.; Ledin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Biologically treated wastewater spiked with a mixture of 56 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was treated with 0–20mg/L chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in laboratory-scale experiments. Wastewater effluents were collected from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with extended......O2, while in high COD effluent a significant increase in API oxidation was observed after treatment with 8mg/L ClO2. This study illustrates the successful degradation of several APIs during treatment of wastewater effluents with chlorine dioxide....

  15. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant C. Nelson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1 To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2 To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3 To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine.

  16. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation

  17. Gas-solid trickle flow hydrodynamics in a packed column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kuczynski, M.

    1987-01-01

    The pressure gradient and the static and the dynamic hold-up have been measured for a system consisting of a Fluid Cracking Catalyst (FCC) of 30–150 × 10−6 m diameter, trickling over a packed bed and with a gas streaming in countercurrent flow. The experiments were carried out at ambient conditions

  18. The Performance of Structured Packings in Trickle-Bed Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped

  19. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk

    2005-01-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water

  20. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water.

  1. Trickle Down Technology: A Distance Education Approach to Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Angie

    The Trickle Down Technology Project offered the impetus needed to change the way both K-12 and university educators capitalize on technology in the classroom. The project had three key components: the modeling of technology in the university classroom; online technology workshops; and interactive communication among inservice and preservice…

  2. A Randomization Procedure for "Trickle-Process" Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jerry

    1977-01-01

    This note suggests a solution to the problem of achieving randomization in experimental settings where units deemed eligible for treatment "trickle in," that is, appear at any time. The solution permits replication of the experiment in order to test for time-dependent effects. (Author/CTM)

  3. Educational Change by Commission: Attempting "Trickle Down" Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Rick; Wimpelberg, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    The processes and procedures of national commissions on education are discussed. Elements of commonality are presented with a review of competing explanations of the popularity of such commissions. A sociopolitical thesis of educational reform through commissions is advanced, based on the "trickle down" theory of economics. (SLD)

  4. Thymol Hydrogenation in Bench Scale Trickle Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudas, J.; Hanika, Jiří; Lepuru, J.; Barkhuysen, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2005), s. 255-262 ISSN 0352-9568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : thymol hydrogenation * trickle bed reactor * gas-liquid-solid reaction Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.632, year: 2005

  5. Trickle Bed Reactor Operation under Forced Liquid Feed Rate Modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanika, Jiří; Jiřičný, Vladimír; Karnetová, P.; Kolena, J.; Lederer, J.; Skála, D.; Staněk, Vladimír; Tukač, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2007), s. 192-198 ISSN 1451-9372 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : trickle -bed reactor * period * feed rate Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  6. Dicyclopentadiene Hydrogenation in Trickle Bed Reactor under Forced Periodic Control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skála, D.; Hanika, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2008), s. 215-218 ISSN 1336-7242 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : periodic control * trickle -bed reactor * dicyclopentadiene Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  7. Particle size distribution in effluent of trickling filters and in humus tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, W; Günthert, F W

    2001-11-01

    Particles and aggregates from trickling filters must be eliminated from wastewater. Usually this happens through sedimentation in humus tanks. Investigations to characterize these solids by way of particle size measurements, image analysis and particle charge measurements (zeta potential) are made within the scope of Research Center for Science and Technology "Fundamentals of Aerobic biological wastewater treatment" (SFB 411). The particle size measuring results given within this report were obtained at the Ingolstadt wastewater treatment plant, Germany, which served as an example. They have been confirmed by similar results from other facilities. Particles flushed out from trickling filters will be partially destroyed on their way to the humus tank. A large amount of small particles is to be found there. On average 90% of the particles are smaller than 30 microm. Particle size plays a decisive role in the sedimentation behaviour of solids. Small particles need sedimentation times that cannot be provided in settling tanks. As a result they cause turbidity in the final effluent. Therefore quality of sewage discharge suffers, and there are hardly advantages of the fixed film reactor treatment compared to the activated sludge process regarding sedimentation behaviour.

  8. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF ≤ SPEF. The SPEF process using an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 35 mg L(-1), current density of 25 mA cm(-2), pH of 2.8 and 25 °C reached removals of 86% on DOC and 68% on COD after 240 min, regarding the biologically treated effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total

  9. Transition between trickle flow and pulse flow in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Mechielsen, S.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reactor pressure in the range of 0.2–2.0 MPa on the transition between the trickle-flow and the pulse-flow regime has been investigated for the non-foaming water—nitrogen and aqueous 40% ethyleneglycol—nitrogen systems. Most models and flow charts which are all based on atmospheric

  10. Biological drinking water treatment of anaerobic groundwater in trickling filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, W.W.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water production from anaerobic groundwater is usually achieved by so called conventional techniques such as aeration and sand filtration. The notion conventional implies a long history and general acceptation of the application, but doesn’t necessarily mean a thorough understanding of the

  11. The design of trickling biological periwinkle shells filter for closed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and economics of biofilter in reirculating aquaculture systems using local material ... The system with the designed biofilter served as the treatment system, while the ... The selected system recirculation rate was 10 times per hour, while the ...

  12. Biological iron(II) oxidation as pre-treatment to limestone neutralisation of acid water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available at investigating the effect of surface area of the medium that supports bacterial growth on the rate of biological iron (II) oxidation. The study showed that the biological iron (II) oxidation rate is directly proportional to the square root of the medium specific...

  13. Circulating biologically active oxidized phospholipids show on-going and increased oxidative stress in older male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Liu

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Oxidatively modified phospholipids are increased in the circulation during common, mild oxidant stresses of aging, or in male compared to female animals. Turnover of these biologically active phospholipids by rapid transport into liver and kidney is unchanged, so circulating levels reflect continuously increased production.

  14. A 34 ampere-hour nickel-cadmium minimum trickle charge testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The current rates used for trickle charging batteries are critical in maintaining a full charge and in preventing an overcharge condition. The importance of the trickle charge rate comes from the design, maintenance and operational requirements of an electrical power system. The results of minimum trickle charge testing performed on six 34 ampere-hour, nickel-cadmium cells manufactured by General Electric are described. The purpose of the testing was to identify the minimum trickle charge rates at temperatures of 15 C and 30 C.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of copper oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillani, Saquf; Jelani, Mohsan; Hassan, Najam Ul; Ahmad, Shahbaz; Hafeez, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    The development of synthetic methods has been broadly accepted as an area of fundamental importance to the understanding and application of nanoscale materials. It allows the individual to modulate basic parameters such as morphology, particle size, size distributions, and composition. Several methods have been developed to synthesize CuO nanostructures with diverse morphologies, sizes, and dimensions using different chemical and physical based approaches. In this work, CuO nanostructures have been synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and simple chemical deposition method. The characterization of these products has been carried out by the x-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Biological activity such as antibacterial nature of synthesized CuO is also explored. XRD peaks analysis revealed the monoclinic crystalline phase of copper oxide nanostructures. While the rod-like and particle-like morphologies have been observed in SEM results. FTIR spectra have confirmed the formation of CuO nanoparticles by exhibiting its characteristic peaks corresponding to 494 cm‑1 and 604 cm‑1. The energy band gap of the as-prepared CuO nanostructures determined from UV–vis spectra is found to be 2.18 eV and 2.0 eV for precipitation and chemically deposited samples respectively. The antibacterial activity results described that the synthesized CuO nanoparticles showed better activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The investigated results suggested the synthesis of highly stable CuO nanoparticles with significant antibacterial activities.

  16. The influence of the reactor pressure on the hydrodynamics in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the reactor pressure on the liquid hold-up in the trickle-flow regime and on the transition between trickle-flow and pulse-flow has been investigated in a trickle-flow column operating up to 6.0 MPa with water, and nitrogen or helium as the gas phase. The effect of the gas velocity

  17. Nature and characteristics of pulsing flow in trickle-bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelhouwer, J.G.; Piepers, H.W.; Drinkenburg, A.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsing flow is well known for its advantages in terms of an increase in mass and heat transfer rates, complete catalyst wetting and a decrease in axial dispersion compared to trickle flow. The operation of a trickle-bed reactor in the pulsing flow regime is favorable in terms of a capacity increase

  18. Hydrodynamics in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle bed at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Middelkamp, J.; Huisman, W.J.; Huisman, W.J.; de Baas, C.M.; de Baas, C.M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    Data on design and operation of trickle beds at elevated pressures are scarce. In this study the influence of the gas density on the liquid holdup, the pressure drop, and the transition between trickle and pulse flow has been investigated in a tricklebed reactor operating up to 7.5 MPa and with

  19. Nitrogen removal from wastewater by a catalytic oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T L; Macinnes, J M; Cliffe, K R

    2001-06-01

    The ammonia-containing waste produced in industries is usually characterized by high concentration and high temperature, and is not treatable by biological methods directly. In this study, a hydrophobic Pt/SDB catalyst was first used in a trickle-bed reactor to remove ammonia from wastewater. In the reactor, both stripping and catalytic oxidation occur simultaneously. It was found that higher temperature and higher oxygen partial pressure enhanced the ammonia removal. A reaction pathway, which involves oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, which then further reacts with ammonia to produce nitrogen and water, was confirmed. Small amounts of by-products, nitrites and nitrates were also detected in the resultant reaction solution. These compounds came from the absorption of nitrogen oxides. Both the minimum NO2- selectivity and maximum ammonia removal were achieved when the resultant pH of treated water was near 7.5 for a feed of unbuffered ammonia solution.

  20. [Biological consequences of oxidative stress induced by pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosicka-Maciąg, Emilia

    2011-06-17

    Pesticides are used to protect plants and numerous plant products. They are also utilized in several industrial branches. These compounds are highly toxic to living organisms. In spite of close supervision in the use of pesticides there is a serious risk that these agents are able to spread into the environment and contaminate water, soil, food, and feedstuffs. Recently, more and more studies have been focused on understanding the toxic mechanisms of pesticide actions. The data indicate that the toxic action of pesticides may include the induction of oxidative stress and accumulation of free radicals in the cell. Long-lasting or acute oxidative stress disturbs cell metabolism and is able to produce permanent changes in the structure of proteins, lipids, and DNA. The proteins that are oxidized may lose or enhance their activity. Moreover, the proteins oxidized are able to form aggregates that inhibit the systems responsible for protein degradation and lead to alterations of proteins in the cell. Once oxidized, lipids have the capacity to damage and depolarize cytoplasmic membranes. Free oxygen radicals are harmful to DNA including damage to single nitric bases, DNA strand breaks and adduct production. Many studies indicate that oxidative stress may accelerate development of numerous diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative ones such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease and may also be responsible for infertility.

  1. Possible domestication of uranium oxides using biological assistance reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slah Hidouri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium has been defined in material research engineering field as one of the most energetic radioactive elements in the entire Mendeleev periodic table. The manipulation of uranium needs higher theories and sophisticated apparatus even in nuclear energy extraction or in many other chemical applications. Above the nuclear exploitation level, the chemical conventional approaches used, require a higher temperature and pressure to control the destination of ionic form. However, it has been discovered later that at biological scale, the manipulation of this actinide is possible under friendly conditions. The review summarizes the relevant properties of uranium element and a brief characterization of nanoparticles, based on some structural techniques. These techniques reveal the common link between chemical approaches and biological assistance in nanoparticles. Also, those biological entities have been able to get it after reduction. Uranium is known for its ability to destroy ductile materials. So, if biological cell can really reduce uranium, then how does it work?

  2. Trickle or clumped infection process? A stochastic model for the infection process of the parasitic roundworm of humans, Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Martin; Hall, Andrew; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2010-10-01

    The importance of the mode of acquisition of infectious stages of directly-transmitted parasitic helminths has been acknowledged in population dynamics models; hosts may acquire eggs/larvae singly in a "trickle" type manner or in "clumps". Such models have shown that the mode of acquisition influences the distribution and dynamics of parasite loads, the stability of host-parasite systems and the rate of emergence of anthelmintic resistance, yet very few field studies have allowed these questions to be explored with empirical data. We have analysed individual worm weight data for the parasitic roundworm of humans, Ascaris lumbricoides, collected from a three-round chemo-expulsion study in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with the aim of discerning whether a trickle or a clumped infection process predominates. We found that hosts tend to harbour female worms of a similar weight, indicative of a clumped infection process, but acknowledged that unmeasured host heterogeneities (random effects) could not be completely excluded as a cause. Here, we complement our previous statistical analyses using a stochastic infection model to simulate sizes of individual A. lumbricoides infecting a population of humans. We use the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) as a quantitative measure of similarity among simulated worm sizes and explore the behaviour of this statistic under assumptions corresponding to trickle or clumped infections and unmeasured host heterogeneities. We confirm that both mechanisms are capable of generating aggregates of similar-sized worms, but that the particular pattern of ICCs described pre- and post-anthelmintic treatment in the data is more consistent with aggregation generated by clumped infections than by host heterogeneities alone. This provides support to the notion that worms may be acquired in clumps. We discuss our results in terms of the population biology of A. lumbricoides and highlight the significance of our modelling approach for the study of the

  3. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Gupta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.7127.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.7127.31-37 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7127][Cited by: Scopus 1 | ] 

  4. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bansal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37 ][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  5. Influence of heterotrophic microbial growth on biological oxidation of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, E.A.; Silverstein, J. [University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2002-12-15

    Experiments were carried out to examine the possibility that enhanced growth of heterotrophic (non-iron-oxidising) bacteria would inhibit pyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans by out-competing the more slowly growing autotrophs for oxygen, nutrients or even attachment sites on the mineral surface. Glucose was added to microcosms containing pyrite, acidic mineral solution and cultures of A-ferrooxidans and Acidiphilium acidophilus under various experimental conditions. Results suggest that encouraging the growth of heterotrophic microorganisms under acid mine drainage conditions may be a feasible strategy for decreasing both the rate and the extent of sulfide mineral oxidation. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Cell biology of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niftrik, L.A.M.P. van

    2008-01-01

    Anammox bacteria perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation to dinitrogen gas and belong to the phylum Planctomycetes. Whereas most Prokaryotes consist of one compartment, the cytoplasm bounded by the cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall, the species within this phylum are compartmentalized by intracellular

  7. Biological indication of nitric oxides; Zum bioindikativen Nachweis von Stickoxiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotti, E.; Kaemmerer, D.; Mangold, U.; Tempes, D.; Arndt, U.

    1992-12-31

    The authors demonstrate the need for a nitrogen oxide bio-indicator and suggest to use nitrate reductase activity in exposed plant leaves to be established in vivo as the action criterium. Studies on the suitability of different plants and cultivation conditions are presented. Their results are taken to show that large-leaved plants like sunflower or tomato grown with ammonia as the only nitrogen source are best suited for bio-indication of nitric oxides. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Beitrag zeigt die Notwendigkeit eines Bioindikators fuer Stickoxide auf und schlaegt als Wirkungskriterium die Nitratreduktase-Aktivitaet in den Blaettern exponierter Pflanzen, ermittelt mit der in-vivo-Methode, vor. Untersuchungen zur Eignung verschiedener Pflanzen und Anzuchtbedingungen werden vorgestellt. Aus ihnen ist abzuleiten, dass mit Ammonium als einziger Stickstoffquelle angezogene grossblaettrige Kulturpflanzen, etwa Sonnenblume oder Tomate, am ehesten fuer den bioindikativen Nachweis von Stickoxiden geeignet sind. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of drop versus trickle-feeding systems for crated or group-penned gestating sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, L E; McGlone, J J

    2006-04-01

    A total of 160 gilts were used to evaluate the effects of pen vs. crated housing systems and drop- vs. trickle-fed feeding systems on sow productivity, occurrence of lesions during farrowing and weaning, immune measures, and behavioral responses during 2 consecutive gestation periods. Of the 160 eligible gilts, 117 farrowed in parity 1, and of those, 72 farrowed in parity 2. The gilts were randomly assigned to represent 1 of 4 factorially arranged treatment groups: pen drop-fed, crate drop-fed, pen trickle-fed, or crate trickle-fed. Replicate blocks were used for each parity with 5 sows per block initially in each treatment. At weaning, sows housed in pens had greater (P trickle-feeding system. Lesions scores and all other productivity measures did not differ among treatments. An interaction was observed for percentage of neutrophil phagocytosis (P trickle-fed sows, but in crates, drop-fed sows had a tendency for lower phagocytosis than trickle-fed sows. All other immune measures were not different among treatments. The occurrence of oral-nasal-facial (ONF) behaviors (chewing, rooting, and rubbing) and active behaviors increased, and lying behavior decreased (P trickle-feeding systems. None of the environments evaluated were associated with significant physiological stress responses among the sows. Thus, sows were able to adapt within each environment through behavioral mechanisms without the need to invoke major physiological adjustments.

  9. Biologic Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Resistance to Drugs: What Is Hidden Behind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pantelidou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress can be defined as the homeostatic, nonspecific defensive response of the organism to challenges. It is expressed by morphological, biochemical, and functional changes. In this review, we present biological and oxidative stress, as well as their interrelation. In addition to the mediation in biologic stress (central nervous, immune, and hormonal systems and oxidative stress, the effect of these phenomena on xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is also examined. It is concluded that stress decreases drug response, a result which seems to be mainly attributed to the induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. A number of mechanisms are presented. Structure-activity studies are also discussed. Vitamin E, as well as two synthetic novel compounds, seem to reduce both oxidative and biological stress and, consequently, influence drug response and metabolism.

  10. Liquid dispersion in trickle-bed reactors with gas-liquid cocurrent downflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.F.; Ng, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The flow pattern can deviate from ideal plug flow in both trickling and pulsing flows. The liquid dispersion in those flow regimes are investigated separately, as the mechanisms causing the deviation of flow pattern from plug flow are different. In trickling flow, the dispersion of the liquid phase occurs in the flow path which is determined with computer-generated packed column. Dispersion in pulsing flow is studied with a combination of the method of characteristics and analysis of liquid dispersion in the liquid slug and gas pulse. The axial dispersion coefficients are then determined based on Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, liquid dispersion in trickle beds containing porous packings is also discussed

  11. Improved biological performance of magnesium by micro-arc oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Ma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium and its alloys have recently been used in the development of lightweight, biodegradable implant materials. However, the corrosion properties of magnesium limit its clinical application. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the degradation behavior and biomechanical properties of magnesium materials treated with micro-arc oxidation (MAO, which is a new promising surface treatment for developing corrosion resistance in magnesium, and to provide a theoretical basis for its further optimization and clinical application. The degradation behavior of MAO-treated magnesium was studied systematically by immersion and electrochemical tests, and its biomechanical performance when exposed to simulated body fluids was evaluated by tensile tests. In addition, the cell toxicity of MAO-treated magnesium samples during the corrosion process was evaluated, and its biocompatibility was investigated under in vivo conditions. The results of this study showed that the oxide coating layers could elevate the corrosion potential of magnesium and reduce its degradation rate. In addition, the MAO-coated sample showed no cytotoxicity and more new bone was formed around it during in vivo degradation. MAO treatment could effectively enhance the corrosion resistance of the magnesium specimen and help to keep its original mechanical properties. The MAO-coated magnesium material had good cytocompatibility and biocompatibility. This technique has an advantage for developing novel implant materials and may potentially be used for future clinical applications.

  12. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    in accumulation of nitrate rather than nitrite and a significant decline in pH. As a consequence, ammonia is removed more efficiently, but heterotrophic oxidation of odorous compounds might be inhibited.  To identify the controlling mechanisms of nitrite oxidation, full-scale biological air filters were...... activity resulting in a lowered pH and thus a decreased FA concentration, promoting further growth of NOB. Yet, in some cases a situation with a nitrate-to-nitrite ratio of 1 and moderate pH remained stable even under varying air load and water supply, suggesting that additional mechanisms were involved......In biological air filters ammonia is removed due to the action of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) resulting in nitrite accumulation exceeding 100 mM. Among filters treating exhaust air from pig facilities successful establishment of Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) sometimes occurs, resulting...

  13. Biological degradation of partially oxidated constituents of stabilized sapropel; Biologischer Abbau teiloxidierter Inhaltsstoffe stabilisierter Faulschlaemme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheminski, A.; Krull, R.; Hempel, D.C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Bioverfahrenstechnik

    1999-07-01

    Partial oxidation of sapropel with ozone destroys the cell walls of microorganisms in sludge and releases the cell constituents. Substances that are not biologically degraded because of the size or structure of their molecules are transformed into smaller, water-soluble and biologically degradable fractions by the reaction with ozone. The experiments aim to render the partially oxidated sewage sludge constituents highly biologically degradable using a minimum of oxidation agents. For the experiments described, stabilized sapropels with low biological activity are used. Hence the ozone is mainly used for the partial oxidation of recalcitrant constituents. (orig.) [German] Durch partielle Oxidation von Faulschlaemmen mit Ozon werden die Zellwaende der Mikroorganismen im Schlamm zerstoert und die Zellinhaltsstoffe freigesetzt. Dabei werden Substanzen, die aufgrund ihrer Molekuelgroesse oder -struktur biologisch nicht abgebaut werden, durch die Reaktion mit Ozon in kleinere, wasserloesliche und biologisch abbaubare Bruchstuecke ueberfuehrt. Ziel der Versuche ist es, durch den Einsatz moeglichst geringer Mengen an Oxidationsmitteln eine hohe biologische Abbaubarkeit der teiloxidierten Klaerschlamminhaltsstoffe zu erreichen. Fuer die hier vorgestellten Experimente wurden stabilisierte Faulschlaemme mit geringer biologischer Aktivitaet eingesetzt. Dadurch wird das Ozon vorwiegend zur Teiloxidation recalcitranter Inhaltsstoffe genutzt. (orig.)

  14. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namratha Pai Kotebagilu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates—RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80% and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton’s reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals.

  15. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Carmen S.D.; Madeira, Luis M.; Boaventura, Rui A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5 h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD 5 and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  16. Rational use of water in trickle irrigation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, J. C. C.; da Silva Junior, H. M.

    2012-04-01

    In trickle irrigation systems, the design is based on the pre-established emission uniformity (EU) which is the combined result of the equipment characteristics and its hydraulic configuration. However, this desired value of the EU may not be confirmed by the final project (in field conditions) and neither by the yield uniformity. However, the most important is to assure yield uniformity with rational use of water. The hypotheses of this research were: a) the EU of a trickle irrigation system at field conditions is equal to the emission uniformity pre-established in the design; b) EU has always the lowest value when compared with other indicators of uniformity; c) the discharge variation coefficient is not equal to production variation coefficient in the operational unit; d) the productivity variation coefficient is more dependent on water depth applied than the EU. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships among EU used in the irrigation system design, water depth applied and the final yield uniformity. The uniformity indicators evaluated were: EU, distribution uniformity (UD) and the index proposed by Barragan & Wu (2005). They were compared estimating the performance of a trickle irrigation system applied in a citrus orchard with dimensions of 400m x 600m. The design of the irrigation system was optimized by a Linear Programming model. The tree rows were leveled in the larger direction and the spacing adopted in the orchard was 7m x 4m. The manifold line was always operating on a slope condition. The sensitivity analysis involved different slopes, 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12%, and different values of emission uniformity, 60, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90 and 94%. The citrus yield uniformity was evaluated by the variation coefficient. The emission uniformity (EU) after design differed from the EU pre-established, more sharply in the initial values lower than 90%. Comparing the uniformity indexes, the EU always generated lower values when compared with the UD and with the index

  17. Metabolic oxidative stress in cancer biology and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) exhibit increased glycolysis and pentose cycle activity. These metabolic alterations were thought to arise from damage to the respiratory mechanism and cancer cells were thought to compensate for this defect by increasing glycolysis (Science 132:309). In addition to its role in ATP production, glucose metabolism results in the formation of pyruvate and NADPH which both play an integral role in peroxide detoxification (Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 899:349). Recently, cancer cells have been shown to have enhanced susceptibility to glucose deprivation-induced oxidative stress, relative to normal cells, that is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS; Biochem.J. 418:29-37). These results support the hypothesis that cancer cells may have a defect in mitochondrial respiration leading to increased steady-state levels of ROS (i.e., O 2 and H 2 O 2 ) and glucose metabolism may be increased to provide reducing equivalents to compensate for this defect. The application of these findings to developing new combined modality cancer therapy protocols will be discussed. (author)

  18. Design and operation of nitrifying trickling filters in recirculating aquaculture: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eding, E.H.; Kamstra, A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Huisman, E.A.; Klapwijk, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the main mechanisms and parameters affecting design and performance of trickling filters in aquaculture. Relationships between nitrification rates and easily accessible process parameters, like bulk phase concentration of TAN, O2, organic matter (COD), nitrite, temperature,

  19. Nitrate leaching beneath a containerized nursery crop receiving trickle or overhead irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, D J; Brand, M H

    2001-01-01

    Container production of nursery crops is intensive and a potential source of nitrogen release to the environment. This study was conducted to determine if trickle irrigation could be used by container nursery producers as an alternative to standard overhead irrigation to reduce nitrogen release into the environment. The effect of overhead irrigation and trickle irrigation on leachate nitrate N concentration, flow-weighted nitrate N concentration, leachate volume, and plant growth was investigated using containerized rhododendron (Rhododendron catawbiense Michx. 'Album') supplied with a controlled-release fertilizer and grown outdoors on top of soil-monolith lysimeters. Leachate was collected over two growing seasons and overwinter periods, and natural precipitation was allowed as a component of the system. Precipitation accounted for 69% of the water entering the overhead-irrigated system and 80% of the water entering the trickle-irrigated system. Leachate from fertilized plants exceeded the USEPA limit of 10 mg L(-1) at several times and reached a maximum of 26 mg L(-1) with trickle irrigation. Average annual loss of nitrate N in leachate for fertilized treatments was 51.8 and 60.5 kg ha(-1) for the overhead and trickle treatments, respectively. Average annual flow-weighted concentration of nitrate N in leachate of fertilized plants was 7.2 mg L(-1) for overhead irrigation and 12.7 mg L(-1) for trickle irrigation. Trickle irrigation did not reduce the amount of nitrate N leached from nursery containers when compared with overhead irrigation because precipitation nullified the potential benefits of reduced leaching fractions and irrigation inputs provided under trickle irrigation.

  20. Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions and methanolic extract of Philonotis hastate (Duby Wijk & MargaDant). ... The fractions and methanolic extract exhibited moderate antioxidant potentials with various models. The flavonoid contents of the methanol extract and fractions ranged between 1.70 ...

  1. Novel Insights into the Electrochemical Detection of Nitric Oxide in Biological Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín; Hrbáč, J.; Kuchta, R.; Kadlec, J.; Kubala, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 8-12 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GP13-40882P Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : nitric oxide * electrochemical detector * biological systems Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  2. Improvement of biological properties of titanium by anodic oxidation and ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Baoe [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Li, Ying [Stomatological Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Li, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Fu, Xiaolong; Li, Changyi [Stomatological Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Wang, Hongshui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Liu, Shimin [Business School, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Guo, Litong [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Xin, Shigang [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liang, Chunyong, E-mail: liangchunyong@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Li, Haipeng, E-mail: lhpcx@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Anodic oxidation was applied to produce a homogeneous and uniform array of nanotubes of about 70 nm on the titanium (Ti) surface, and then, the nanotubes were irradiated by ultraviolet. The bioactivity of the Ti surface was evaluated by simulated body fluid soaking test. The biocompatibility was investigated by in vitro cell culture test. The results showed that bone-like apatite was formed on the anodic oxidized and UV irradiated Ti surface, but not on the as-polished Ti surface after immersion in simulated body fluid for two weeks. Cells cultured on the anodic oxidized Ti surface showed enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation, also presented an up-regulated gene expression of osteogenic markers OPG, compared to those cultured on the as-polished Ti surface. After UV irradiation, the cell behaviors were further improved, indicating better biocompatibility of Ti surface. Based on these results, it can be concluded that anodic oxidation improved the biological properties (bioactivity and biocompatibility) of Ti surface, while UV irradiation improved the biocompatibility to a better extent. The improved biological properties were attributed to the nanostructures as well as the enhanced hydrophilicity. Therefore, anodic oxidation combined with UV irradiation can be used to enhance the biological properties of Ti-based implants.

  3. Studies on urine treatment by biological purification using Azolla and UV photocatalytic oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Min; Bian, Zuliang; Liu, Chung-Chu

    The amount of water consumed in space station operations is very large. In order to reduce the amount of water which must be resupplied from Earth, the space station needs to resolve the problems of water supply. For this reason, the recovery, regeneration and utilization of urine of astronauts are of key importance. Many investigations on this subject have been reported. Our research is based on biological absorption and, purification using UV photocatalytic oxidation techniques to achieve comprehensive treatment for urine. In the treatment apparatus we created, the urine solution is used as part of the nutrient solution for the biological components in our bioregenerative life support system. After being absorbed, the nutrients from the urine were then decomposed, metabolized and purified which creates a favorable condition for the follow-up oxidation treatment by UV photocatalytic oxidation. After these two processes, the treated urine solution reached Chinese national standards for drinking water quality (GB5749-1985).

  4. Oxidative Stress and Adipocyte Biology: Focus on the Role of AGEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Boyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major health problem that is usually associated with obesity, together with hyperglycemia and increased advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs formation. Elevated AGEs elicit severe downstream consequences via their binding to receptors of AGEs (RAGE. This includes oxidative stress and oxidative modifications of biological compounds together with heightened inflammation. For example, albumin (major circulating protein undergoes increased glycoxidation with diabetes and may represent an important biomarker for monitoring diabetic pathophysiology. Despite the central role of adipose tissue in many physiologic/pathologic processes, recognition of the effects of greater AGEs formation in this tissue is quite recent within the obesity/diabetes context. This review provides a brief background of AGEs formation and adipose tissue biology and thereafter discusses the impact of AGEs-adipocyte interactions in pathology progression. Novel data are included showing how AGEs (especially glycated albumin may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage in adipocytes and its potential links to diabetes progression.

  5. Coupling Fenton and biological oxidation for the removal of nitrochlorinated herbicides from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, S; Polo, A M; Tobajas, M; Rodriguez, J J; Mohedano, A F

    2014-02-01

    The combination of Fenton and biological oxidation for the removal of the nitrochlorinated herbicides alachlor, atrazine and diuron in aqueous solution has been studied. The H2O2 dose was varied from 20 to 100% of the stoichiometric amount related to the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD). The effluents from Fenton oxidation were analyzed for ecotoxicity, biodegradability, total organic carbon (TOC), COD and intermediate byproducts. The chemical step resulted in a significant improvement of the biodegradability in spite of its negligible or even slightly negative effect on the ecotoxicity. Working at 60% of the stoichiometric H2O2 dose allowed obtaining highly biodegradable effluents in the cases of alachlor and atrazine. That dose was even lower (40% of the stoichiometric) for diuron. The subsequent biological treatment was carried out in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and the combined Fenton-biological treatment allowed up to around 80% of COD reduction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of biological hydrogen sulfide oxidation coupled with two-stage upflow filtration for groundwater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Audrey D; Raymer, Blake J; Jahn, Johna

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide in groundwater can be oxidized by aerobic bacteria to form elemental sulfur and biomass. While this treatment approach is effective for conversion of hydrogen sulfide, it is important to have adequate control of the biomass exiting the biological treatment system to prevent release of elemental sulfur into the distribution system. Pilot scale tests were conducted on a Florida groundwater to evaluate the use of two-stage upflow filtration downstream of biological sulfur oxidation. The combined biological and filtration process was capable of excellent removal of hydrogen sulfide and associated turbidity. Additional benefits of this treatment approach include elimination of odor generation, reduction of chlorine demand, and improved stability of the finished water.

  7. Degradation of azo dyes by sequential Fenton's oxidation and aerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantak, Nilesh P.; Chaudhari, Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    A two stage sequential Fenton's oxidation followed by aerobic biological treatment train was used to achieve decolorization and to enhance mineralization of azo dyes, viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Reactive Blue 13 (RB13), and Acid Orange 7 (AO7). In the first stage, Fenton's oxidation process was used while in the second stage aerobic sequential batch reactors (SBRs) were used as biological process. Study was done to evaluate effect of pH on Fenton's oxidation process. Results reveal that pH 3 was optimum pH for achieving decolorization and dearomatization of dyes by Fenton's process. Degradation of dye was assessed by COD reduction and reduction in aromatic amines (naphthalene chromophores) which was measured by reduction in absorbance at 200 nm. More than 95% of color was removed with Fenton's oxidation process in all dyes. In overall treatment train 81.95, 85.57, and 77.83% of COD reduction was achieved in RB5, RB13, and AO7 dyes, respectively. In the Fenton's oxidation process 56, 24.5, and 80% reduction in naphthalene group was observed in RB5, RB13, and AO7, respectively, which further increased to 81.34, 68.73, and 92% after aerobic treatment. Fenton's oxidation process followed by aerobic SBRs treatment sequence seems to be viable method for achieving significant degradation of azo dye

  8. The biological age linked to oxidative stress modifies breast cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Freire, María Del Mar; Blanco-Gómez, Adrián; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Gómez-Vecino, Aurora; Galvis-Jiménez, Julie Milena; Martín-Seisdedos, Carmen; Isidoro-García, María; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Patino-Alonso, María Carmen; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Mao, Jian-Hua; Prieto, Carlos; Castellanos-Martín, Andrés; Kaderali, Lars; Pérez-Losada, Jesús

    2018-03-14

    The incidence of breast cancer increases with age until menopause, and breast cancer is more aggressive in younger women. The existence of epidemiological links between breast cancer and aging indicates that both processes share some common mechanisms of development. Oxidative stress is associated with both cancer susceptibility and aging. Here we observed that ERBB2-positive breast cancer, which developed in genetically heterogeneous ERBB2-positive transgenic mice generated by a backcross, is more aggressive in chronologically younger than in older mice (differentiated by the median survival of the cohort that was 79 weeks), similar to what occurs in humans. In this cohort, we estimated the oxidative biological age using a mathematical model that integrated several subphenotypes directly or indirectly related to oxidative stress. The model selected the serum levels of HDL-cholesterol and magnesium and total AKT1 and glutathione concentrations in the liver. The grade of aging was calculated as the difference between the predicted biological age and the chronological age. This comparison permitted the identification of biologically younger and older mice compared with their chronological age. Interestingly, biologically older mice developed more aggressive breast cancer than the biologically younger mice. Genomic regions on chromosomes 2 and 15 linked to the grade of oxidative aging were identified. The levels of expression of Zbp1 located on chromosome 2, a gene related to necroptosis and inflammation, positively correlated with the grade of aging and tumour aggressiveness. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression of genes linked to the inflammation and the response to infection pathways was enriched in the livers of biologically old mice. This study shows part of the complex interactions between breast cancer and aging. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas treatment in trickle-bed biofilters: biomass, how much is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C; Suidan, M T; Sorial, G A; Smith, F L; Biswas, P; Smith, P J; Brenner, R C

    1997-06-20

    The objective of this article is to define and validate a mathematical model that desribes the physical and biological processes occurring in a trickle-bed air biofilter for waste gas treatment. This model considers a two-phase system, quasi-steady-state processes, uniform bacterial population, and one limiting substrate. The variation of the specific surface area with bacterial growth is included in the model, and its effect on the biofilter performance is analyzed. This analysis leads to the conclusion that excessive accumulation of biomass in the reactor has a negative effect on contaminant removal efficiency. To solve this problem, excess biomass is removed via full media fluidization and backwashing of the biofilter. The backwashing technique is also incorporated in the model as a process variable. Experimental data from the biodegradation of toluene in a pilot system with four packed-bed reactors are used to validate the model. Once the model is calibrated with the estimation of the unknown parameters of the system, it is used to simulate the biofilter performance for different operating conditions. Model predictions are found to be in agreement with experimental data. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 54: 583-594, 1997.

  10. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemagno, C.D.; Peters, R.W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  11. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemagno, C. D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Peters, R. W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-07-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  12. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Thomas J; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-08-03

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16-13 s(-1), these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock.

  13. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  14. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  15. Development of a trickle bed reactor of electro-Fenton process for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yangming [Key Laboratory of Reservoir Aquatic Environment, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liuhong@cigit.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Reservoir Aquatic Environment, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); Shen, Zhemin, E-mail: zmshen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Wenhua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • An electrochemical trickle bed reactor was composed of C-PTFE-coated graphite chips. • The trickle bed reactor had a high H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production rate in a dilute electrolyte. • An azo dye was effectively decomposed by the electro-Fenton process in the reactor. -- Abstract: To avoid electrolyte leakage and gas bubbles in the electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) reactors using a gas diffusion cathode, we developed a trickle bed cathode by coating a layer composed of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (C-PTFE) onto graphite chips instead of carbon cloth. The trickle bed cathode was optimized by single-factor and orthogonal experiments, in which carbon black, PTFE, and a surfactant were considered as the determinant of the performance of graphite chips. In the reactor assembled by the trickle bed cathode, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was generated with a current of 0.3 A and a current efficiency of 60%. This performance was attributed to the fine distribution of electrolyte and air, as well as the effective oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the electrolyte–cathode interface. In terms of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation and current efficiency, the developed trickle bed reactor had a performance comparable to that of the conventional E-Fenton reactor using a gas diffusion cathode. Further, 123 mg L{sup −1} of reactive brilliant red X-3B in aqueous solution was decomposed in the optimized trickle bed reactor as E-Fenton reactor. The decolorization ratio reached 97% within 20 min, and the mineralization reached 87% within 3 h.

  16. Development of a trickle bed reactor of electro-Fenton process for wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Yangming; Liu, Hong; Shen, Zhemin; Wang, Wenhua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An electrochemical trickle bed reactor was composed of C-PTFE-coated graphite chips. • The trickle bed reactor had a high H 2 O 2 production rate in a dilute electrolyte. • An azo dye was effectively decomposed by the electro-Fenton process in the reactor. -- Abstract: To avoid electrolyte leakage and gas bubbles in the electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) reactors using a gas diffusion cathode, we developed a trickle bed cathode by coating a layer composed of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (C-PTFE) onto graphite chips instead of carbon cloth. The trickle bed cathode was optimized by single-factor and orthogonal experiments, in which carbon black, PTFE, and a surfactant were considered as the determinant of the performance of graphite chips. In the reactor assembled by the trickle bed cathode, H 2 O 2 was generated with a current of 0.3 A and a current efficiency of 60%. This performance was attributed to the fine distribution of electrolyte and air, as well as the effective oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the electrolyte–cathode interface. In terms of H 2 O 2 generation and current efficiency, the developed trickle bed reactor had a performance comparable to that of the conventional E-Fenton reactor using a gas diffusion cathode. Further, 123 mg L −1 of reactive brilliant red X-3B in aqueous solution was decomposed in the optimized trickle bed reactor as E-Fenton reactor. The decolorization ratio reached 97% within 20 min, and the mineralization reached 87% within 3 h

  17. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in tradi...

  18. Standard operating procedure for combustion of 14C - samples with OX-500 biological material oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure is for the purpose of safe operation of OX-500 biological material oxidizer. For ease of operation, the operation flow chart (including testing the system and sample combustion) and end of day maintenance flow chart were simplified. The front view, diagrams and switches are duly copied from operating manual. Steps on sample preparation are also included for biotic and a biotic samples. This operating procedure is subjected to future reviews

  19. Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Bradley B; Herrmann, Jonathan; Bargar, John R; van den Bedem, Henry; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Francis, Christopher A

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the molecular ecology and environmental determinants of ammonia-oxidizing organisms is critical to understanding and predicting the global nitrogen (N) and carbon cycles, but an incomplete biochemical picture hinders in vitro studies of N-cycling enzymes. Although an integrative structural and dynamic characterization at the atomic scale would advance our understanding of function tremendously, structural knowledge of key N-cycling enzymes from ecologically relevant ammonia oxidizers is unfortunately extremely limited. Here, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for examining the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing organisms, particularly uncultivated Thaumarchaeota, through (meta)genome-driven structural biology of the enzymes ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and nitrite reductase (NirK). © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Development of a trickle bed reactor of electro-Fenton process for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yangming; Liu, Hong; Shen, Zhemin; Wang, Wenhua

    2013-10-15

    To avoid electrolyte leakage and gas bubbles in the electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) reactors using a gas diffusion cathode, we developed a trickle bed cathode by coating a layer composed of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (C-PTFE) onto graphite chips instead of carbon cloth. The trickle bed cathode was optimized by single-factor and orthogonal experiments, in which carbon black, PTFE, and a surfactant were considered as the determinant of the performance of graphite chips. In the reactor assembled by the trickle bed cathode, H2O2 was generated with a current of 0.3A and a current efficiency of 60%. This performance was attributed to the fine distribution of electrolyte and air, as well as the effective oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the electrolyte-cathode interface. In terms of H2O2 generation and current efficiency, the developed trickle bed reactor had a performance comparable to that of the conventional E-Fenton reactor using a gas diffusion cathode. Further, 123 mg L(-1) of reactive brilliant red X-3B in aqueous solution was decomposed in the optimized trickle bed reactor as E-Fenton reactor. The decolorization ratio reached 97% within 20 min, and the mineralization reached 87% within 3h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mathematical modeling of a three-phase trickle bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The transient behavior in a three-phase trickle bed reactor system (N2/H2O-KCl/activated carbon, 298 K, 1.01 bar was evaluated using a dynamic tracer method. The system operated with liquid and gas phases flowing downward with constant gas flow Q G = 2.50 x 10-6 m³ s-1 and the liquid phase flow (Q L varying in the range from 4.25x10-6 m³ s-1 to 0.50x10-6 m³ s-1. The evolution of the KCl concentration in the aqueous liquid phase was measured at the outlet of the reactor in response to the concentration increase at reactor inlet. A mathematical model was formulated and the solutions of the equations fitted to the measured tracer concentrations. The order of magnitude of the axial dispersion, liquid-solid mass transfer and partial wetting efficiency coefficients were estimated based on a numerical optimization procedure where the initial values of these coefficients, obtained by empirical correlations, were modified by comparing experimental and calculated tracer concentrations. The final optimized values of the coefficients were calculated by the minimization of a quadratic objective function. Three correlations were proposed to estimate the parameters values under the conditions employed. By comparing experimental and predicted tracer concentration step evolutions under different operating conditions the model was validated.

  2. Population dynamics of Trichuris suis in trickle-infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejsum, P; Thamsborg, S M; Petersen, H H; Kringel, H; Fredholm, M; Roepstorff, A

    2009-05-01

    The population dynamics of Trichuris suis in pigs was studied during long-term experimental infections. Twenty-three 10-week-old pigs were inoculated with 5 T. suis eggs/kg/day. Seven, 8, and 8 pigs were necropsied at weeks 4, 8, and 14 post-start of infection (p.i.), respectively. The median numbers of worms in the colon were 538 (min-max: 277-618), 332 (14-1140) and 0 (0-4) at 4, 8, and 14 weeks p.i. respectively, suggesting an increased aggregation of the worms with time and acquisition of nearly sterile immunity. The serum levels of T. suis specific antibodies (IgG1, IgG2 and IgA) peaked at week 8 p.i. By week 14 p.i. the IgG2 and IgA antibody levels remained significantly elevated above the level of week 0. The population dynamics of T. suis trickle infections in pigs is discussed with focus on interpretation of diagnostic and epidemiological data of pigs, the use of pigs as a model for human Trichuris trichiura infections and the novel approach of using T. suis eggs in the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Biofiltration of Chloroform in a Trickle Bed Air Biofilter Under ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, the application of biofiltration is investigated for controlled removal of gas phase chloroform through cometabolic degradation with ethanol. A trickle bed air biofilter (TBAB) operated under acidic pH 4 is subjected to aerobic biodegradation of chloroform and ethanol. The TBAB is composed of pelleted diatomaceous earth filter media inoculated with filamentous fungi species, which served as the principle biodegrading microorganism. The removal efficiencies of 5 ppmv of chloroform mixed with different ratios of ethanol as cometabolite (25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppmv) ranged between 69.9 and 80.9%. The removal efficiency, reaction rate kinetics, and the elimination capacity increased proportionately with an increase in the cometabolite concentration. The carbon recovery from the TBAB amounted to 69.6% of the total carbon input. It is postulated that the remaining carbon contributed to excess biomass yield within the system. Biomass control strategies such as starvation and stagnation were employed at different phases of the experiment. The chloroform removal kinetics provided a maximum reaction rate constant of 0.0018 s−1. The highest ratio of chemical oxygen demand (COD)removal/nitrogenutilization was observed at 14.5. This study provides significant evidence that the biodegradation of a highly chlorinated methane can be favored by cometabolism in a fungi-based TBAB. Chloroform is volatile hazardous chemical emitted from publicly owned treatment

  4. Nitrogen utilization and biomass yield in trickle bed air biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daekeun; Sorial, George A

    2010-10-15

    Nitrogen utilization and subsequent biomass yield were investigated in four independent lab-scale trickle bed air biofilters (TBABs) fed with different VOCs substrate. The VOCs considered were two aromatic (toluene, styrene) and two oxygenated (methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)). Long-term observations of TBABs performances show that more nitrogen was required to sustain high VOC removal, but the one fed with a high loading of VOC utilized much more nitrogen for sustaining biomass yield. The ratio N(consumption)/N(growth) was an effective indicator in evaluating nitrogen utilization in the system. Substrate VOC availability in the system was significant in determining nitrogen utilization and biomass yield. VOC substrate availability in the TBAB system was effectively identified by using maximum practical concentrations in the biofilm. Biomass yield coefficient, which was driven from the regression analysis between CO(2) production rate and substrate consumption rate, was effective in evaluating the TBAB performance with respect to nitrogen utilization and VOC removal. Biomass yield coefficients (g biomass/g substrate, dry weight basis) were observed to be 0.668, 0.642, 0.737, and 0.939 for toluene, styrene, MEK, and MIBK, respectively. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasmodium sporozoites trickle out of the injection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Coppi, Alida; Snounou, Georges; Sinnis, Photini

    2007-05-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites make a remarkable journey from the skin, where they are deposited by an infected Anopheline mosquito, to the liver, where they invade hepatocytes and develop into exoerythrocytic stages. Although much work has been done to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which sporozoites invade hepatocytes, little is known about the interactions between host and parasite before the sporozoite enters the blood circulation. It has always been assumed that sporozoites rapidly exit the injection site, making their interactions with the host at this site, brief and difficult to study. Using quantitative PCR, we determined the kinetics with which sporozoites leave the injection site and arrive in the liver and found that the majority of infective sporozoites remain in the skin for hours. We then performed sub-inoculation experiments which confirmed these findings and showed that the pattern of sporozoite exit from the injection site resembles a slow trickle. Last, we found that drainage of approximately 20% of the sporozoite inoculum to the lymphatics is associated with a significant enlargement of the draining lymph node, a response not observed after intravenous inoculation. These findings indicate that there is ample time for host and parasite to interact at the inoculation site and are of relevance to the pre-erythrocytic stage malaria vaccine effort.

  6. Research on the Aerodynamic Resistance of Trickle Biofilter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvydas Zagorskis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A four – section trickle biofilter was constructed for experimental research. The filter was filled with the packing material of artificial origin. The material consists of plastic balls having a large surface area. The dependence of biofilter aerodynamic resistance on supply air flow rate and the number of filter sections was determined. The aerodynamic resistance of the biofilter was measured in two cases. In the first case, the packing material of the filter was dry, whereas in the second case it was wet. The experimental research determined that an increase in the air flow rate from 0.043 m/s to 0.076 m/s causes an increase in biofilter aerodynamic resistance from 30.5 to 62.5 Pa after measuring four layers of dry packing material. In case of wet packing material, biofilter aerodynamic resistance after measuring four layers of plastic balls increases from 42.1 to 90.4 Pa.Article in Lithuanian

  7. In vitro biological test of resistance to oxidation: application to identification of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blache, D.; Prost, M.; Raffi, J.

    1991-01-01

    The test presented here for the identification of ionized food is a direct application of a biological test of resistance to oxidation, put on for an evaluation of antioxidant properties of pharmaceutic molecules and for the study of free radicals in biology. Consequently, the main part of this datum is relative to this biological test. We only point out, when necessary, how we plan to use it for food items. Our aim in this paper is to present a simple biological test (SPIRAL Patent Pending) to measure the total anti oxidative defence status of individuals utilizing some easy to handle cells: circulating cells. In this presentation, we only limited to red blood cells, but any cell could be used after suitable adaptation of the procedure. The first experiments carried out on irradiated foods are promising, even for foodstuffs in liquid state, but we have surely to do a lot of new ones in order to improve the specificity of this test with regard to irradiation and to define with which food it can be used. (9 refs; 15 figs)

  8. Nitric oxide synthesis and biological functions of nitric oxide released from ruthenium compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Pereira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During three decades, an enormous number of studies have demonstrated the critical role of nitric oxide (NO as a second messenger engaged in the activation of many systems including vascular smooth muscle relaxation. The underlying cellular mechanisms involved in vasodilatation are essentially due to soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC modulation in the cytoplasm of vascular smooth cells. sGC activation culminates in cyclic GMP (cGMP production, which in turn leads to protein kinase G (PKG activation. NO binds to the sGC heme moiety, thereby activating this enzyme. Activation of the NO-sGC-cGMP-PKG pathway entails Ca2+ signaling reduction and vasodilatation. Endothelium dysfunction leads to decreased production or bioavailability of endogenous NO that could contribute to vascular diseases. Nitrosyl ruthenium complexes have been studied as a new class of NO donors with potential therapeutic use in order to supply the NO deficiency. In this context, this article shall provide a brief review of the effects exerted by the NO that is enzymatically produced via endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS activation and by the NO released from NO donor compounds in the vascular smooth muscle cells on both conduit and resistance arteries, as well as veins. In addition, the involvement of the nitrite molecule as an endogenous NO reservoir engaged in vasodilatation will be described.

  9. New proposition on performance evaluation of hydrophobic Pt catalyst packed in trickle bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masami; Kitamoto, Asashi; Takashima, Yoichi.

    1983-01-01

    On the evaluation of the performance of the hydrophobic Pt catalyst packed in the trickle-bed test column, the conventionally defined (Ksub(y)a) and the newly defined (Ksub(f))sub (G) are compared with each other as a measure of the overall D-transfer coefficient. The value of (Ksub(y)a) varies in a wide range in accordance with the length of the test column. On the other hand (Ksub(f))sub (G sub (l = L)) has a finite value in the test column longer than about 0.5 m. By considering the values of ksub(g) and ksub(l) which are the constituents of (Ksub(f))sub (G), it is possible to improve the hydrophobic Pt catalyst trickle bed and to design the H 2 /H 2 O-isotopic exchange trickle-bed column packed with this catalyst. (author)

  10. Biological markers of oxidative stress: Applications to cardiovascular research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a common mediator in pathogenicity of established cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, it likely mediates effects of emerging, less well-defined variables that contribute to residual risk not explained by traditional factors. Functional oxidative modifications of cellular proteins, both reversible and irreversible, are a causal step in cellular dysfunction. Identifying markers of oxidative stress has been the focus of many researchers as they have the potential to act as an “integrator” of a multitude of processes that drive cardiovascular pathobiology. One of the major challenges is the accurate quantification of reactive oxygen species with very short half-life. Redox-sensitive proteins with important cellular functions are confined to signalling microdomains in cardiovascular cells and are not readily available for quantification. A popular approach is the measurement of stable by-products modified under conditions of oxidative stress that have entered the circulation. However, these may not accurately reflect redox stress at the cell/tissue level. Many of these modifications are “functionally silent”. Functional significance of the oxidative modifications enhances their validity as a proposed biological marker of cardiovascular disease, and is the strength of the redox cysteine modifications such as glutathionylation. We review selected biomarkers of oxidative stress that show promise in cardiovascular medicine, as well as new methodologies for high-throughput measurement in research and clinical settings. Although associated with disease severity, further studies are required to examine the utility of the most promising oxidative biomarkers to predict prognosis or response to treatment.

  11. Biologically active polymers from spontaneous carotenoid oxidation: a new frontier in carotenoid activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Johnston

    Full Text Available In animals carotenoids show biological activity unrelated to vitamin A that has been considered to arise directly from the behavior of the parent compound, particularly as an antioxidant. However, the very property that confers antioxidant activity on some carotenoids in plants also confers susceptibility to oxidative transformation. As an alternative, it has been suggested that carotenoid oxidative breakdown or metabolic products could be the actual agents of activity in animals. However, an important and neglected aspect of the behavior of the highly unsaturated carotenoids is their potential to undergo addition of oxygen to form copolymers. Recently we reported that spontaneous oxidation of ß-carotene transforms it into a product dominated by ß-carotene-oxygen copolymers. We now report that the polymeric product is biologically active. Results suggest an overall ability to prime innate immune function to more rapidly respond to subsequent microbial challenges. An underlying structural resemblance to sporopollenin, found in the outer shell of spores and pollen, may allow the polymer to modulate innate immune responses through interactions with the pattern recognition receptor system. Oxygen copolymer formation appears common to all carotenoids, is anticipated to be widespread, and the products may contribute to the health benefits of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables.

  12. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  13. The biological treatment of petroleum tank draw waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Jose L. [Envirosystems Supply, Inc., Hollywood, FL (United States); Stephens, Greg [Plantation Pipeline, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This work reviews and summarizes the performance of a biological process (followed by the state-of-the-art) for the removal of organic compounds in petroleum tank draw waters. Trickling filter and the extended aeration modification of activated sludge were selected as the biological processes tested in pilot units. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The biological treatment of petroleum tank draw waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Jose L [Envirosystems Supply, Inc., Hollywood, FL (United States); Stephens, Greg [Plantation Pipeline, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This work reviews and summarizes the performance of a biological process (followed by the state-of-the-art) for the removal of organic compounds in petroleum tank draw waters. Trickling filter and the extended aeration modification of activated sludge were selected as the biological processes tested in pilot units. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Hydrodynamics in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle bed at elevated pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Middelkamp, J.; Huisman, W.J.; Huisman, W.J.; de Baas, C.M.; de Baas, C.M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    Data on design and operation of trickle beds at elevated pressures are scarce. In this study the influence of the gas density on the liquid holdup, the pressure drop, and the transition between trickle and pulse flow has been investigated in a tricklebed reactor operating up to 7.5 MPa and with nitrogen or helium as the gas phase. Gas-liquid interfacial areas have been determined up to 5.0 MPa by means of CO2 absorption from CO2/N2 gas mixtures into amine solutions. A comparison of the result...

  16. Trickle Arteriography: Demonstration of Thrombi in the Origin of the Internal Carotid Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh, A. E.

    1970-01-01

    Thrombi developing within the origin of the internal carotid artery may be demonstrated by a slow trickle injection of highly concentrated contrast medium, which lingers in pools around the thrombus on the dependent wall of the vessel. With this technique thrombi have been detected which could not be visualized on conventional arteriography because they were obscured by the density of the vascular shadow produced by the forceful injection usually employed in carotid angiography. In addition, trickle arteriography is useful for assessing the position and extent of atheromatous plaques and the contrast stasis associated with them. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:5526613

  17. Effect of organic nitrogen concentration on the efficiency of trickling filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Łukasz; Drewnowski, Jakub; Fernandez-Morales, F. J.

    2018-02-01

    The study was conducted in Poland at six selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) based on the trickling filters Bioclere® technology. The aim of the study was to find the relationship between the influent organic nitrogen concentration and the purification efficiency expressed as effluent COD concentration. In the tests performed, the COD to BOD5 relationship was close to 2 and the ratio of BOD5 to TN was lower than 4. The research indicated that this specific chemical composition of raw wastewater causes appearance of filamentous bacteria on the surface of trickling filter filling and strongly affect the effluent quality.

  18. Treatment of high strength distillery wastewater (cherry stillage) by integrated aerobic biological oxidation and ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, F J; Alvarez, P M; Rodríguez, E M; García-Araya, J F; Rivas, J

    2001-01-01

    The performance of integrated aerobic digestion and ozonation for the treatment of high strength distillery wastewater (i.e., cherry stillage) is reported. Experiments were conducted in laboratory batch systems operating in draw and fill mode. For the biological step, activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment facility was used as inoculum, showing a high degree of activity to distillery wastewater. Thus, BOD and COD overall conversions of 95% and 82% were achieved, respectively. However, polyphenol content and absorbance at 254 nm (A(254)) could not be reduced more than 35% and 15%, respectively, by means of single biological oxidation. By considering COD as substrate, the aerobic digestion process followed a Contois' model kinetics, from which the maximum specific growth rate of microorganisms (mu(max)) and the inhibition factor, beta, were then evaluated at different conditions of temperature and pH. In the combined process, the effect of a post-ozonation stage was studied. The main goals achieved by the ozonation step were the removal of polyphenols and A(254). Therefore, ozonation was shown to be an appropriate technology to aid aerobic biological oxidation in the treatment of cherry stillage.

  19. Advanced oxidation process-biological system for wastewater containing a recalcitrant pollutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, I; Malato, S; Sánchez-Pérez, J A; Maldonado, M I; Gernjak, W; Pérez-Estrada, L A

    2007-01-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), ozonation and photo-Fenton, combined with a pilot aerobic biological reactor at field scale were employed for the treatment of industrial non-biodegradable saline wastewater (TOC around 200 mgL(-1)) containing a biorecalcitrant compound, alpha-methylphenylglycine (MPG), at a concentration of 500 mgL(-1). Ozonation experiments were performed in a 50-L reactor with constant inlet ozone of 21.9 g m(-3). Solar photo-Fenton tests were carried out in a 75-L pilot plant made up of four compound parabolic collector (CPC) units. The catalyst concentration employed in this system was 20 mgL(-1) of Fe2+ and the H2O2 concentration was kept in the range of 200-500mgL(-1). Complete degradation of MPG was attained after 1,020 min of ozone treatment, while only 195 min were required for photo-Fenton. Samples from different stages of both AOPs were taken for Zahn-Wellens biocompatibility tests. Biodegradability enhancement of the industrial saline wastewater was confirmed (>70% biodegradability). Biodegradable compounds generated during the preliminary oxidative processes were biologically mineralised in a 170-L aerobic immobilised biomass reactor (IBR). The global efficiency of both AOP/biological combined systems was 90% removal of an initial TOC of over 500 mgL(-1).

  20. Combined oxidative and biological treatment of separated streams of tannery wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, G.; Nieto, J. [Environmental Science Center EULA - Chile, Univ. of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Mansilla, H.D. [Lab. of Renewable Resources, Univ. of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Bornhardt, C. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Univ. of La Frontera, Temuco (Chile)

    2003-07-01

    Leather tanning effluents are a source of severe environmental impacts. In particular, the unhairing stage, belonging to the beamhouse processes, generates an alkaline wastewater with high concentrations of organic matter, sulphides, suspended solids, and salts, which shows significant toxicity. The objective of this work was to evaluate the biodegradation of this industrial wastewater by combined oxidative and biological treatments. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent was used as batch pre-treatment. The relationships of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Fe{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/COD were 9 and 4, respectively, reaching an organic matter removal of about 90%. Subsequently, the oxidised beamhouse effluent was fed to an activated sludge system, at increasing organic load rates (OLR), in the range of 0.4 to 1.6 g COD/L.d. The biological organic matter removal of the pre-treated wastewater ranged between 35% and 60% for COD, and from 60% to 70% for BOD. Therefore, sequential AOP pretreatment and biological aerobic treatment increased the overall COD removal up to 96%, compared to 60% without pretreatment. Bioassays with D. magna and D. pulex showed that this kind of treatment achieves only a partial toxicity removal of the tannery effluent. (orig.)

  1. Sulfur-centered reactive intermediates derived from the oxidation of sulfur compounds of biological interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedinzadeh, Z. [Lab. de Chimie Physique, UMR, Univ. Rene Descartes, Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    Sulphur compounds play a central role in the structure and activity of many vital systems. In the living cell, sulfur constitutes an essential part of the defense against oxidative damage and is transformed into a variety of sulfur free radical species. Many studies of the chemistry of sulfur-centered radicals using pulse radiolysis and photolysis techniques to detect and measure the kinetics of these radicals have been published and reviewed. This paper discusses the present state of research on the formation and reactivity of certain sulfur-centered radicals [RS{sup .}, RSS{sup .}, RS{sup .+}, (RSSR){sup .+}] and their implications for biological systems. (author)

  2. Sulfur-centered reactive intermediates derived from the oxidation of sulfur compounds of biological interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedinzadeh, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Sulphur compounds play a central role in the structure and activity of many vital systems. In the living cell, sulfur constitutes an essential part of the defense against oxidative damage and is transformed into a variety of sulfur free radical species. Many studies of the chemistry of sulfur-centered radicals using pulse radiolysis and photolysis techniques to detect and measure the kinetics of these radicals have been published and reviewed. This paper discusses the present state of research on the formation and reactivity of certain sulfur-centered radicals [RS . , RSS . , RS .+ , (RSSR) .+ ] and their implications for biological systems. (author)

  3. Antibiotic abatement in different advanced oxidation processes coupled with a biological sequencing batch biofilm reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esplugas, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Benito, J.; Sans, C.

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, the lack of fresh water is becoming a major concern. Recently, the present of recalcitrant products such as pharmaceuticals has caused a special interest due to their undefined environmental impact. Among these antibiotics are one of the numerous recalcitrant pollutants present in surface waters that might not be completely removed in the biological stage of sewage treatment plants because of their antibacterial nature. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) have proved to be highly efficient for the degradation of most organic pollutants in wastewaters. (Author)

  4. Oxidative decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents using L-Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, Ellen; McGuire, Raymond

    2002-08-05

    A decontamination method has been developed using a single reagent that is effective both against chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents. The new reagent, "L-Gel", consists of an aqueous solution of a mild commercial oxidizer, Oxone, together with a commercial fumed silica gelling agent, Cab-O-Sil EH-5. L-Gel is non-toxic, environmentally friendly, relatively non-corrosive, maximizes contact time because of its thixotropic nature, clings to walls and ceilings, and does not harm carpets or painted surfaces. The new reagent also addresses the most demanding requirements for decontamination in the civilian sector, including availability, low maintenance, ease of application and deployment by a variety of dispersal mechanisms, minimal training and acceptable expense. Experiments to test the effectiveness of L-Gel were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and independently at four other locations. L-Gel was tested against all classes of chemical warfare agents and against various biological warfare agent surrogates, including spore-forming bacteria and non-virulent strains of real biological agents. Testing showed that L-Gel is as effective against chemical agents and biological materials, including spores, as the best military decontaminants.

  5. Destination of organic pollutants during electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater using boron-doped diamond anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuping; Ni, Jinren; Wei, Junjun; Xing, Xuan; Li, Hongna

    2011-05-15

    Electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater was performed in a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode system. After electrolysis of 12h, the COD was decreased from 532 to 99 mg L(-1) (destination of organic pollutants during electrochemical oxidation process was carefully investigated by molecular weight distribution measurement, resin fractionation, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, HPLC and GC-MS analysis, and toxicity test. As results, most organic pollutants were completely removed by electrochemical oxidation and the rest was primarily degraded to simpler compounds (e.g., carboxylic acids and short-chain alkanes) with less toxicity, which demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater with BDD anode was very effective and safe. Especially, the performance of BDD anode system in degradation of large molecular organics such as humic substances makes it very promising in practical applications as an advanced treatment of biologically-pretreated wastewaters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Destination of organic pollutants during electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater using boron-doped diamond anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiuping; Ni, Jinren; Wei, Junjun; Xing, Xuan; Li, Hongna

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater was performed in a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode system. After electrolysis of 12 h, the COD was decreased from 532 to 99 mg L -1 ( -1 , the National Discharge Standard of China). More importantly, the destination of organic pollutants during electrochemical oxidation process was carefully investigated by molecular weight distribution measurement, resin fractionation, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, HPLC and GC-MS analysis, and toxicity test. As results, most organic pollutants were completely removed by electrochemical oxidation and the rest was primarily degraded to simpler compounds (e.g., carboxylic acids and short-chain alkanes) with less toxicity, which demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater with BDD anode was very effective and safe. Especially, the performance of BDD anode system in degradation of large molecular organics such as humic substances makes it very promising in practical applications as an advanced treatment of biologically-pretreated wastewaters.

  7. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control.

  8. Hydrodynamic behaviour of a gas—solid counter-current packed column at trickle flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, A.W.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1979-01-01

    Trickle flow of a more or less fluidized catalyst through a packed column is a promising new gas—solid counter-current operation. The hydrodynamic, behaviour of such a column, filled with dumped PALL rings, has been investigated, while some results have been obtained with RASCHIG rings and

  9. The hydrodynamic behaviour of gas—solid trickle flow over a regularly stacked packing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver, A.B.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1986-01-01

    The hydrodynamic properties of counter-current gas—solid flow over a regularly stacked packing at trickle flow conditions have been studied. The flow properties of the solids phase were examined, using five types of solid particles with a mean particle diameter ranging from 70 to 880 μm and a

  10. Mass transfer between gas and particles in a gas-solid trickle flow reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.H.A.; Kiel, J.H.A.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1992-01-01

    Gas-solids mass transfer was studied for counter-current flow of gas and millimetre-sized solid particles over an inert packing at dilute phase or trickle flow conditions. Experimental data were obtained from the adsorption of water vapour on 640 and 2200 ¿m diameter molecular sieve spheres at

  11. The heat-transfer performance of gas—solid trickle flow over a regularly stacked packing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver, A.B.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1986-01-01

    The heat-transfer behaviour of a countercurrent gas—solid trickle flow contactor is studied, using coarse sand particles as the solids phase. Experimental data on the overall heat-transfer rate constant between the gas flow and the solid particle flow were obtained in a 0.15 m square cross-section

  12. How to prevent runaways in trickle-bed reactors for Pygas hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kronberg, Alexandre E.

    2002-01-01

    In the past, several runaways have occurred in Trickle-Bed Reactors (TBR) used for the hydrogenation of pyrolysis gasoline as produced in ethylene cracking installations. This phenomenon has been studied in the framework of a special program in the Netherlands, which is administered by the National

  13. Experimental single and trickle infections of cattle with Taenia saginata: Studies of immunodiagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, H.O.; Grønvold, J.; Maeda, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Two groups of 12 calves were given either a single infection dose of 30,000 Taenia saginata eggs (group A) or trickle infected with 12 x 2500 T saginata eggs (group B). The calves were killed 16, 22 or 54 weeks after infection and the numbers of viable and dead parasites were counted by slicing...

  14. Enlargement of the pulsing flow regime by periodic operation of a trickle-bed reactor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelhouwer, J.G.; Piepers, H.W.; Drinkenburg, A.A.H.

    1999-01-01

    Potential advantages of pulsing flow in trickle-bed reactors include capacity increase and elimination of hot spots through the enhanced mass and heat transfer rates. A disadvantage of naturally occurring pulsing flow is the necessity of relatively high gas and liquid flow rates, especially at

  15. Hydrodynamics in a pressurized cocurrent gas-liquid trickle bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, Wino J.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of gas density on total external liquid hold-up, pressure drop and gas-liquid interfacial area, under trickle-flow conditions, and the transition to pulse flow have been investigated with nitrogen or helium as the gas phase up to 7.5 MPa. It is concluded that the hydrodynamics depends

  16. Biofiltration of Chloroform in a Trickle Bed Air Biofilter Under Acidic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, the application of biofiltration is investigated for controlled removal of gas phase chloroform through cometabolic degradation with ethanol. A trickle bed air biofilter (TBAB) operated under acidic pH 4 is subjected to aerobic biodegradation of chloroform and etha...

  17. "Trickle-Down" Reform: Hispanics, Higher Education, and the Excellence Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcon, John J.; de la Luz Reyes, Maria

    1991-01-01

    Recent excellence-in-education reform measures have created greater restrictions on the access of Hispanics to higher education. Suggests that reformers expect reform benefits to "trickle down" to minorities after first benefiting mainstream students. The idea of excellence must include that of educational equity. (CJS)

  18. Methanol synthesis in a countercurrent gas-solid-solid trickle flow reactor. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczynski, M.; Oyevaar, M.H.; Pieters, R.T.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis of methanol from CO and H2 was executed in a gas-solid-solid trickle flow reactor. The reactor consisted of three tubular reactor sections with cooling sections in between. The catalyst was Cu on alumina, the adsorbent was a silica-alumina powder and the experimental range 498–523 K,

  19. Evaluation of Bamboo Porous Pipe as Line Source Emitter in Trickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts to evaluate the use of bamboo as porous pipe (line source) emitter in trickle irrigation at the Cross River University of Technology Teaching and Research Farm Obubra. Two sets of bamboo laterals: opened and plugged ends were used for the trial. The experiment was conducted using four different ...

  20. evaluation of bamboo porous pipe as line source emitter in trickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHRISTY

    This paper attempts to evaluate the use of bamboo as porous pipe (line source) emitter in trickle irrigation at the Cross River University of Technology Teaching and Research Farm Obubra. Two sets of bamboo laterals: opened and plugged ends were used for the trial. The experiment was conducted using four different ...

  1. Trust in direct leaders and top leaders: A trickle-up model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, C Ashley; Ostroff, Cheri

    2017-04-01

    Low levels of employee trust in top leaders pose challenges to organizations with respect to retention, performance, and profits. This research examines how trust in top leaders can be fostered through the relationships individuals have with their direct leaders. We propose a trickle-up model whereby trust in direct leaders exerts an upward influence on trust in top leaders. Drawing on the group value model, we predict that direct leaders' procedural justice serves as the key mechanism in facilitating the trickle-up process. Further, this process should be particularly strong for employees high on vertical collectivism, and the trickled-up trust in top leaders should exert a stronger impact on employees' overall performance in the organization than trust in direct leaders. Multiphase and multisource data from 336 individuals support these hypotheses. The findings advance our understanding of trust and leadership by highlighting that trust in leaders at different levels does not form independently and that trust in leaders trickles up across hierarchical levels. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Biodegradation of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) using a granular activated carbon trickling filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Converse, B.M.; Schroeder, E.D.; Chang, D.P.Y.

    1999-07-01

    A pilot scale trickling filter was constructed using granular activated carbon (GAC) as the packing medium and inoculated with a microbial culture known to degrade MTBE. The packing dimensions were 0.076 m in diameter and 0.22 m deep. The unit operated with recycling flow for two months before a biofilm was observed on the GAC. After two additional months the biofilm had visibly spread throughout the packing. A few pieces of GAC were placed in a sealed bottle with MTBE-contaminated water and nutrients. Headspace analysis performed over 14 days confirmed that MTBE degradation was occurring. The trickling filter was converted to continuous flow and operated for one month at a nominal flow rate of 0.1 L/min and a hydraulic loading rate of 32 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-d. Samples were collected for analysis at the spray nozzle and at the bottom of the trickling filter. Fractional removal varied with influent MTBE concentration, temperature and liquid flow rate. Percent MTBE removal was as high as 85%. A mechanical failure resulted in the trickling filter bed drying and percent removal dropping to less than 1 percent. However, the system recovered within five days.

  3. CO2 capture in a continuous gas–solid trickle flow reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, Rens; Hilbers, T.J.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the selection, design and experimental validation of a gas–solid trickle flow adsorber for post-combustion CO2 capture using a supported amine sorbents (Lewatit® VP OC 1065). The experimental work presented here summarizes over 300 h of operating experience, which is equivalent

  4. Modelling of an adiabatic trickle-bed reactor with phase change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez Castelan, Carlos Eduardo; Hidalgo-Vivas, Angelica; Brix, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a modelling approach of the behavior of trickle-bed reactors used for catalytic hydrotreating of oil fractions. A dynamic plug-flow heterogeneous one-dimensional adiabatic model was used to describe the main reactions present in the hydrotreating process: hydrodesulfurization...

  5. Kalman-filter model for determining block and trickle SNM losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, R.E.; Durst, M.J.; Smiriga, N.G.

    1982-07-01

    This paper describes an integrated decision procedure for deciding whether a diversion of SNM has occurred. Two possible types of diversion are considered: a block loss during a single time period and a cumulative trickle loss over several time periods. The methodology used is based on a compound Kalman filter model. Numerical examples illustrate our approach

  6. The function of a toluene-degrading bacterial community in a waste gas trickling filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.R.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    oligonucleotide 16S ribosomal RNA probe targeting the toluene-degrading species Pseudomonas putida, and by computer simulations (AQUASIM) of the biofilm growth based on a food web model. Biofilms were taken from a lab-scale trickling filter for treatment of toluene-polluted air. The biofilm growth...

  7. Combination of Advanced Oxidation Processes and biological treatments for wastewater decontamination-A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oller, I.; Malato, S.; Sanchez-Perez, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for development of alternative water reuse technologies, mainly focused on agriculture and industry. In this context, Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) are considered a highly competitive water treatment technology for the removal of those organic pollutants not treatable by conventional techniques due to their high chemical stability and/or low biodegradability. Although chemical oxidation for complete mineralization is usually expensive, its combination with a biological treatment is widely reported to reduce operating costs. This paper reviews recent research combining AOPs (as a pre-treatment or post-treatment stage) and bioremediation technologies for the decontamination of a wide range of synthetic and real industrial wastewater. Special emphasis is also placed on recent studies and large-scale combination schemes developed in Mediterranean countries for non-biodegradable wastewater treatment and reuse. The main conclusions arrived at from the overall assessment of the literature are that more work needs to be done on degradation kinetics and reactor modeling of the combined process, and also dynamics of the initial attack on primary contaminants and intermediate species generation. Furthermore, better economic models must be developed to estimate how the cost of this combined process varies with specific industrial wastewater characteristics, the overall decontamination efficiency and the relative cost of the AOP versus biological treatment.

  8. Bacterial community involved in the nitrogen cycle in a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating UASB effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Conell, E F A; Almeida, P G S; Martins, K E L; Araújo, J C; Chernicharo, C A L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent was investigated by pyrosequencing. Bacterial community composition considerably changed along the reactor and over the operational period. The dominant phyla detected were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes. The abundance of denitrifiers decreased from the top to the bottom and it was consistent with the organic matter concentration gradients. At lower loadings (organic and nitrogen loading rates), the abundance of anammox bacteria was higher than that of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the upper portion of the reactor, suggesting that aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation occurred. Nitrification occurred in all the compartments, while anammox bacteria prominently appeared even in the presence of high organic carbon to ammonia ratios (around 1.0-2.0 gCOD gN(-1)). The results suggest that denitrifiers, nitrifiers, and anammox bacteria coexisted in the reactor; thus, different metabolic pathways were involved in ammonium removal in the post-UASB reactor sponge-based.

  9. Single multivalent vaccination boosted by trickle larval infection confers protection against experimental lymphatic filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, SK; Ramaswamy, K

    2013-01-01

    The multivalent vaccine BmHAT, consisting of the Brugia malayi infective larval (L3) antigens heat shock protein12.6 (HSP12.6), abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2) and tetraspanin large extra cellular loop (TSP-LEL), was shown to be protective in rodent models from our laboratory. We hypothesize that since these antigens were identified using protective antibodies from immune endemic normal individuals, the multivalent vaccine can be augmented by natural L3 infections providing protection to the vaccinated host. This hypothesis was tested using single dose of DNA and Protein or Protein alone of the BmHAT vaccination in gerbils followed by live trickle L3 infection as booster dose. Vaccine-induced protection in gerbils was determined by worm establishment, micropore chamber assay and by antibody dependant cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Results were compared with the traditional prime-boost vaccination regimen. Gerbils vaccinated with BmHAT and boosted with L3 trickle infection were protected 51% (BmHAT DNA-Protein) and 48% (BmHAT Protein) respectively. BmHAT vaccination plus L3 trickle booster generated significant titer of antigen-specific IgG antibodies comparable to the traditional prime boost vaccination approach. BmHAT vaccination plus L3 trickle booster also generated antigen-specific cells in the spleen of vaccinated animals and these cells secreted predominantly IFN-γ and IL-4 in response to the vaccine antigens. These studies thus show that single dose of BmHAT multivalent vaccination followed by L3 trickle booster infection can confer significant protection against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:23735679

  10. Single multivalent vaccination boosted by trickle larval infection confers protection against experimental lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, S K; Ramaswamy, K

    2013-07-18

    The multivalent vaccine BmHAT, consisting of the Brugia malayi infective larval (L3) antigens heat shock protein12.6 (HSP12.6), abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2) and tetraspanin large extra cellular loop (TSP-LEL), was shown to be protective in rodent models from our laboratory. We hypothesize that since these antigens were identified using protective antibodies from immune endemic normal individuals, the multivalent vaccine can be augmented by natural L3 infections providing protection to the vaccinated host. This hypothesis was tested using single dose of DNA and protein or protein alone of the BmHAT vaccination in gerbils followed by live trickle L3 infection as booster dose. Vaccine-induced protection in gerbils was determined by worm establishment, micropore chamber assay and by antibody dependant cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Results were compared with the traditional prime-boost vaccination regimen. Gerbils vaccinated with BmHAT and boosted with L3 trickle infection were protected 51% (BmHAT DNA-protein) and 48% (BmHAT protein) respectively. BmHAT vaccination plus L3 trickle booster generated significant titer of antigen-specific IgG antibodies comparable to the traditional prime boost vaccination approach. BmHAT vaccination plus L3 trickle booster also generated antigen-specific cells in the spleen of vaccinated animals and these cells secreted predominantly IFN-γ and IL-4 in response to the vaccine antigens. These studies thus show that single dose of BmHAT multivalent vaccination followed by L3 trickle booster infection can confer significant protection against lymphatic filariasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multilayer microfluidic systems with indium-tin-oxide microelectrodes for studying biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hsiang-Chiu; Chen, Hsin; Lyau, Jia-Bo; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary semiconductor and micromachining technologies have been exploited to develop lab-on-a-chip microsystems, which enable parallel and efficient experiments in molecular and cellular biology. In these microlab systems, microfluidics play an important role for automatic transportation or immobilization of cells and bio-molecules, as well as for separation or mixing of different chemical reagents. However, seldom microlab systems allow both morphology and electrophysiology of biological cells to be studied in situ . This kind of study is important, for example, for understanding how neuronal networks grow in response to environmental stimuli. To fulfill this application need, this paper investigates the possibility of fabricating multi-layer photoresists as microfluidic systems directly above a glass substrate with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes. The microfluidic channels are designed to guide and trap biological cells on top of ITO electrodes, through which the electrical activities of cells can be recorded or elicited. As both the microfluidic system and ITO electrodes are transparent, the cellular morphology is observable easily during electrophysiological studies. Two fabrication processes are proposed and compared. One defines the structure and curing depth of each photoresist layer simply by controlling the exposure time in lithography, while the other further utilizes a sacrificial layer to defines the structure of the bottom layer. The fabricated microfluidic system is proved bio-compatible and able to trap blood cells or neurons. Therefore, the proposed microsystem will be useful for studying cultured cells efficiently in applications such as drug-screening. (paper)

  12. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  13. Stability of silver nanoparticles: agglomeration and oxidation in biological relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Laura E.; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2017-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are the most used nanomaterial in consumer products due to the intrinsic antimicrobial capacity of silver. However, Ag-NP may be also harmful to algae, aquatic species, mammalian cells, and higher plants because both Ag+ and nanoparticles are responsible of cell damages. The oxidative dissolution of Ag-NP would proceed to completion under oxic conditions, but the rate and extent of the dissolution depend on several factors. This work correlates the effect of the capping agent (albumin and citrate) with the stability of Ag-NP towards agglomeration in simulated body fluid (SBF) and oxidation in the presence of ROS species (H2O2). Capping provides colloidal stability only through electrostatic means, whereas albumin acts as bulky ligands giving steric and electrostatic repulsion, inhibiting the agglomeration in SBF. However, citrate capping protects Ag-NP from dissolution to a major extent than albumin does because of its reducing power. Moreover, citrate in solution minimizes the oxidation of albumin-coated Ag-NP even after long incubation times. H2O2-induced dissolution proceeds to completion with Ag-NP incubated in SBF, while incubation in citrate leads to an incomplete oxidation. In short, albumin is an excellent capping agent to minimize Ag-NP agglomeration whereas citrate provides a mild-reductive medium that prevents dissolution in biological relevant media as well as in the presence of ROS species. These results provide insight into how the surface properties and media composition affect the release of Ag+ from Ag-NP, related to the cell toxicity and relevant to the storage and lifetime of silver-containing nanomaterials.

  14. Stability of silver nanoparticles: agglomeration and oxidation in biological relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenti, Laura E.; Giacomelli, Carla E., E-mail: giacomel@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, Instituto de Investigaciones en Físico Química de Córdoba (INFIQC) CONICET-UNC, Departamento de Fisicoquímica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas (Argentina)

    2017-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are the most used nanomaterial in consumer products due to the intrinsic antimicrobial capacity of silver. However, Ag-NP may be also harmful to algae, aquatic species, mammalian cells, and higher plants because both Ag{sup +} and nanoparticles are responsible of cell damages. The oxidative dissolution of Ag-NP would proceed to completion under oxic conditions, but the rate and extent of the dissolution depend on several factors. This work correlates the effect of the capping agent (albumin and citrate) with the stability of Ag-NP towards agglomeration in simulated body fluid (SBF) and oxidation in the presence of ROS species (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Capping provides colloidal stability only through electrostatic means, whereas albumin acts as bulky ligands giving steric and electrostatic repulsion, inhibiting the agglomeration in SBF. However, citrate capping protects Ag-NP from dissolution to a major extent than albumin does because of its reducing power. Moreover, citrate in solution minimizes the oxidation of albumin-coated Ag-NP even after long incubation times. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced dissolution proceeds to completion with Ag-NP incubated in SBF, while incubation in citrate leads to an incomplete oxidation. In short, albumin is an excellent capping agent to minimize Ag-NP agglomeration whereas citrate provides a mild-reductive medium that prevents dissolution in biological relevant media as well as in the presence of ROS species. These results provide insight into how the surface properties and media composition affect the release of Ag{sup +} from Ag-NP, related to the cell toxicity and relevant to the storage and lifetime of silver-containing nanomaterials.

  15. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  16. Phytosterol oxidation products in enriched foods: Occurrence, exposure, and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Birgit; Guth, Sabine; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Steinberg, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Dietary intake of phytosterols/phytostanols and their fatty acid esters results in a reduction of the LDL and total plasma cholesterol levels. Therefore, these constituents are added to a broad spectrum of foods. As in the case of cholesterol, thermo-oxidative treatment of phytosterols may result in the formation of phytosterol oxidation products (POPs), i.e. keto-, hydroxy-, and epoxy-derivatives. This review summarizes and evaluates the current knowledge regarding POPs in the light of the potentially increasing dietary exposure to these constituents via the consumption of foods enriched with phytosterols/phytostanols and their esters. Data on the occurrence of POPs and approaches to assess the potential intake of POPs resulting from the consumption of enriched foods are described. The knowledge on the uptake of POPs and the presently available data on the impact of the consumption of enriched foods on the levels of POPs in humans are discussed. Biological effects of POPs, such as potential proatherogenic properties or the loss of the cholesterol-lowering effects compared to nonoxidized phytosterols, are discussed. Finally, knowledge gaps are outlined and recommendations for further research needed for a safety assessment of POPs are presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Enhance wastewater biological treatment through the bacteria induced graphene oxide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Jin, Ziheng; Wang, Dian; Wang, Yuanpeng; Lu, Yinghua

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between bacteria and graphene-family materials like pristine graphene, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is such an elusive issue that its implication in environmental biotechnology is unclear. Herein, two kinds of self-assembled bio-rGO-hydrogels (BGHs) were prepared by cultivating specific Shewanella sp. strains with GO solution for the first time. The microscopic examination by SEM, TEM and CLSM indicated a porous 3D structure of BGHs, in which live bacteria firmly anchored and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) abundantly distributed. Spectra of XRD, FTIR, XPS and Raman further proved that GO was reduced to rGO by bacteria along with the gelation process, which suggests a potential green technique to produce graphene. Based on the characterization results, four mechanisms for the BGH formation were proposed, i.e., stacking, bridging, rolling and cross-linking of rGO sheets, through the synergistic effect of activities and EPS from special bacteria. More importantly, the BGHs obtained in this study were found able to achieve unique cleanup performance that the counterpart free bacteria could not fulfill, as exemplified in Congo red decolorization and Cr(VI) bioreduction. These findings therefore enlighten a prospective application of graphene materials for the biological treatment of wastewaters in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, A., E-mail: ana.maria.nowak@gmail.com [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Szade, J.; Talik, E.; Ratuszna, A. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Ostafin, M. [Agricultural University of Cracow, Department of Microbiology, Krakow (Poland); Peszke, J. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu{sub 2}O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu{sub 2}O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological evaluation of highly stable diversely functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Sahu, Sumanta K.; Banerjee, Indranil; Das, Manasmita; Mishra, Debashish; Maiti, Tapas K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report the design and synthesis of a series of well-dispersed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) using chitosan as a surface modifying agent to develop a potential T 2 contrast probe for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and thiol functionalities were introduced on chitosan-coated magnetic probe via simple reactions with small reactive organic molecules to afford a series of biofunctionalized nanoparticles. Physico-chemical characterizations of these functionalized nanoparticles were performed by TEM, XRD, DLS, FTIR, and VSM. The colloidal stability of these functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated in presence of phosphate buffer saline, high salt concentrations and different cell media for 1 week. MRI analysis of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell lines treated with nanoparticles elucidated that the amine-functionalized nanoparticles exhibited higher amount of signal darkening and lower T 2 relaxation in comparison to the others. The cellular internalization efficacy of these functionalized SPIONs was also investigated with HeLa cancer cell line by magnetically activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence microscopy and results established selectively higher internalization efficacy of amine-functionalized nanoparticles to cancer cells. These positive attributes demonstrated that these nanoconjugates can be used as a promising platform for further in vitro and in vivo biological evaluations.

  20. Nitric oxide, a double edged sword in cancer biology: searching for therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Bronte, Vincenzo; Nitti, Donato

    2007-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic molecule critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. The last decade has witnessed major advances in dissecting NO biology and its role in cancer pathogenesis. However, the complexity of the interactions between different levels of NO and several aspects of tumor development/progression has led to apparently conflicting findings. Furthermore, both anti-NO and NO-based anticancer strategies appear effective in several preclinical models. This paradoxical dichotomy is leaving investigators with a double challenge: to determine the net impact of NO on cancer behavior and to define the therapeutic role of NO-centered anticancer strategies. Only a comprehensive and dynamic view of the cascade of molecular and cellular events underlying tumor biology and affected by NO will allow investigators to exploit the potential antitumor properties of drugs interfering with NO metabolism. Available data suggest that NO should be considered neither a universal target nor a magic bullet, but rather a signal transducer to be modulated according to the molecular makeup of each individual cancer and the interplay with conventional antineoplastic agents. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mentha suaveolens Ehrh. (Lamiaceae) Essential Oil and Its Main Constituent Piperitenone Oxide: Biological Activities and Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božović, Mijat; Pirolli, Adele; Ragno, Rino

    2015-05-13

    Since herbal medicines play an important role in the treatment of a wide range of diseases, there is a growing need for their quality control and standardization. Mentha suaveolens Ehrh. (MS) is an aromatic herb with fruit and a spearmint flavor, used in the Mediterranean areas as a traditional medicine. It has an extensive range of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hypotensive and insecticidal properties, among others. This study aims to review the scientific findings and research reported to date on MS that prove many of the remarkable various biological actions, effects and some uses of this species as a source of bioactive natural compounds. On the other hand, piperitenone oxide (PO), the major chemical constituent of the carvone pathway MS essential oil, has been reported to exhibit numerous bioactivities in cells and animals. Thus, this integrated overview also surveys and interprets the present knowledge of chemistry and analysis of this oxygenated monoterpene, as well as its beneficial bioactivities. Areas for future research are suggested.

  2. Biokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles: toxicokinetics, biological fates, and protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi SJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Jin Choi,1 Jin-Ho Choy2 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's University, 2Center for Intelligent Nano Bio Materials (CINBM, Department of Bioinspired Science and Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Biokinetic studies of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles involve systematic and quantitative analyses of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in plasma and tissues of whole animals after exposure. A full understanding of the biokinetics provides basic information about nanoparticle entry into systemic circulation, target organs of accumulation and toxicity, and elimination time, which is important for predicting the long-term toxic potential of nanoparticles. Biokinetic behaviors can be dependent on physicochemical properties, dissolution property in biological fluids, and nanoparticle–protein interaction. Moreover, the determination of biological fates of ZnO nanoparticles in the systemic circulation and tissues is critical in interpreting biokinetic behaviors and predicting toxicity potential as well as mechanism. This review focuses on physicochemical factors affecting the biokinetics of ZnO nanoparticles, in concert with understanding bioavailable fates and their interaction with proteins. Keywords: ZnO nanoparticles, biokinetics, distribution, excretion, fate, interaction

  3. Modeling Nitrous Oxide Production during Biological Nitrogen Removal via Nitrification and Denitrification: Extensions to the General ASM Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles

    2011-01-01

    on N2O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO2– participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among......Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N2O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N2O...

  4. Characterization of an immobilized cell, trickle bed reactor during long term butanol (ABE) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C H; Okos, M R; Wankat, P C

    1990-06-20

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was performed continuously in an immobilized cell, trickle bed reactor for 54 days without, degeneration by maintaining the pH above 4.3. Column clogging was minimized by structured packing of immobilization matrix. The reactor contained two serial glass columns packed with Clostridium acetobutylicum adsorbed on 12- and 20-in.-long polyester sponge strips at total flow rates between 38 and 98.7 mL/h. Cells were initially grown at 20 g/L glucose resulting in low butanol (1.15 g/L) production encouraging cell growth. After the initial cell growth phase a higher glucose concentration (38.7 g/L) improved solvent yield from 13.2 to 24.1 wt%, and butanol production rate was the best. Further improvement in solvent yield and butanol production rate was not observed with 60 g/L of glucose. However, when the fresh nutrient supply was limited to only the first column, solvent yield increased to 27.3 wt% and butanol selectivity was improved to 0.592 as compared to 0.541 when fresh feed was fed to both columns. The highest butanol concentration of 5.2 g/L occurred at 55% conversion of the feed with 60 g/L glucose. Liquid product yield of immobilized cells approached the theoretical value reported in the literature. Glucose and product concentration profiles along the column showed that the columns can be divided into production and inhibition regions. The length of each zone was dependent upon the feed glucose concentration and feed pattern. Unlike batch fermentation, there was no clear distinction between acid and solvent production regions. The pH dropped, from 6.18-6.43 to 4.50-4.90 in the first inch of the reactor. The pH dropped further to 4.36-4.65 by the exit of the column. The results indicate that the strategy for long term stable operation with high solvent yield requires a structured packing of biologically stable porous matrix such as polyester sponge, a pH maintenance above 4.3, glucose concentrations up to 60 g/L and

  5. Redox and Ionic Homeostasis Regulations against Oxidative, Salinity and Drought Stress in Wheat (A Systems Biology Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Hussain Shah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology and omics has provided a comprehensive understanding about the dynamics of the genome, metabolome, transcriptome, and proteome under stress. In wheat, abiotic stresses trigger specific networks of pathways involved in redox and ionic homeostasis as well as osmotic balance. These networks are considerably more complicated than those in model plants, and therefore, counter models are proposed by unifying the approaches of omics and stress systems biology. Furthermore, crosstalk among these pathways is monitored by the regulation and streaming of transcripts and genes. In this review, we discuss systems biology and omics as a promising tool to study responses to oxidative, salinity, and drought stress in wheat.

  6. Nickel-hydrogen battery state of charge during low rate trickle charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, C.; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, J.; Jackson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA AXAF-I program requires high battery state of charge at launch. Traditional approaches to providing high state of charge, during prelaunch operations, require significant battery cooling. The use of active cooling, in the AXAF-I prelaunch environment, was considered and proved to be difficult to implement and very expensive. Accordingly alternate approaches were considered. An approach utilizing adiabatic charging and low rate trickle charge, was investigated and proved successful.

  7. Nickel-hydrogen battery state of charge during low rate trickle charging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurie, C.; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, J.; Jackson, L. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The NASA AXAF-I program requires high battery state of charge at launch. Traditional approaches to providing high state of charge, during prelaunch operations, require significant battery cooling. The use of active cooling, in the AXAF-I prelaunch environment, was considered and proved to be difficult to implement and very expensive. Accordingly alternate approaches were considered. An approach utilizing adiabatic charging and low rate trickle charge, was investigated and proved successful.

  8. CFD Model of HDS Catalyst Tests in Trickle-Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Tukač, V.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate hydrodynamic influence on experimental HDS catalyst activity measurement carried out in pilot scale trickle-bed reactor. Hydrodynamic data were evaluated by RTD method in laboratory glass model of pilot reactor. Mathematical models of the process were formulated both like 1D pseudohomogeneou and 3D heterogeneous ones. The aim of this work was to forecast interaction between intrinsic reaction kinetic, hydrodynamics and mass transfer.

  9. Experimental and Computational Study of Multiphase Flow Hydrodynamics in 2D Trickle Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, H.; Ben Salem, I.; Kurnia, J. C.; Rabbani, S.; Shamim, T.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Trickle bed reactors are largely used in the refining processes. Co-current heavy oil and hydrogen gas flow downward on catalytic particle bed. Fine particles in the heavy oil and/or soot formed by the exothermic catalytic reactions deposit on the bed and clog the flow channels. This work is funded by the refining company of Abu Dhabi and aims at mitigating pressure buildup due to fine deposition in the TBR. In this work, we focus on meso-scale experimental and computational investigations of the interplay between flow regimes and the various parameters that affect them. A 2D experimental apparatus has been built to investigate the flow regimes with an average pore diameter close to the values encountered in trickle beds. A parametric study is done for the development of flow regimes and the transition between them when the geometry and arrangement of the particles within the porous medium are varied. Liquid and gas flow velocities have also been varied to capture the different flow regimes. Real time images of the multiphase flow are captured using a high speed camera, which were then used to characterize the transition between the different flow regimes. A diffused light source was used behind the 2D Trickle Bed Reactor to enhance visualizations. Experimental data shows very good agreement with the published literature. The computational study focuses on the hydrodynamics of multiphase flow and to identify the flow regime developed inside TBRs using the ANSYS Fluent Software package. Multiphase flow inside TBRs is investigated using the "discrete particle" approach together with Volume of Fluid (VoF) multiphase flow modeling. The effect of the bed particle diameter, spacing, and arrangement are presented that may be used to provide guidelines for designing trickle bed reactors.

  10. Effect of residual H2O2 from advanced oxidation processes on subsequent biological water treatmen : A laboratory batch study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, F.; van Halem, D.; Liu, G.; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, K.; van der Hoek, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    H2O2 residuals from advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) may have critical impacts on the microbial ecology and performance of subsequent biological treatment processes, but little is known. The objective of this study was to evaluate how H2O2 residuals influence sand systems with an emphasis on

  11. Conversion and Estrogenicity of 17β-estradiol During Photolytic/Photocatalytic Oxidation and Catalytic Wet-air Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistan, Mirjana; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), produced by human body and excreted into municipal wastewaters, belongs to the group of endocrine disrupting compounds that are resistant to biological degradation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of E2 removal from aqueous solutions by means of catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) and photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation. CWAO experiments were conducted in a trickle-bed reactor at temperatures up to 230 °C and oxygen partial pressure of 10 bar over TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 solids. Photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in a batch slurry reactor employing a TiO2 P-25 (Degussa) catalyst under visible or UV light. HPLC analysis and yeast estrogen screen assay were used to evaluate the removal of E2 and estrogenicity of treated samples. The latter was completely removed during photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation under UV (365 nm) light and photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. In CWAO experiments, complete removal of both E2 and estrogenicity from the feed solution were noticed in the presence of TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts.

  12. The occurrence and removal of phthalates in a trickle filter STW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Roly; May, Eric; Williams, John

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the fate of phthalates in a trickle filter sewage treatment works. A wide variety of phthalates were researched of which only two were present in significant amounts. Mean concentrations of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP) measured throughout the system were 23.6 and 25.0 microg/l in raw sewage, 22.0 and 24.8 microg/l in primary, 14.6 and 0.60 microg/l in trickle filter, 18.6 and 0.10 microg/l in humus tank and 18.5 and 0.40 microg/l in reedbed effluents, respectively. Removal by the trickle filter was constantly high for DEP (94-99%) whereas DEHP was variable (<1-44%). Mean concentrations of DEHP and DEP in raw sludge were 30.2 and 1.60 microg/g dry wt, respectively. A mass balance for DEHP was calculated using data from field studies and estimates of sludge production at the works. The mass balance approach helped to provide information that could be used to improve the design and operation of sewage treatment works.

  13. Biofilm structure and mass transfer in a gas phase trickle-bed biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Suidan, M T; Alonso, C; Yu, T; Kim, B J; Kim, B R

    2001-01-01

    Mass transport phenomena occurring in the biofilms of gas phase trickle-bed biofilters are investigated in this study. The effect of biofilm structure on mass transfer mechanisms is examined using experimental observation from the operating of biofilters, microelectrode techniques and microscopic examination. Since the biofilms of biofilters used for waste gas treatment are not completely saturated with water, there is not a distinguishable liquid layer outside the biofilm. Results suggest that due to this characteristic, gas phase substrates (such as oxygen or volatile organic compounds) may not be limited by the aqueous phase because transport of the compound into the biofilm can occur directly through non-wetted areas. On the other hand, for substrates that are present only in the liquid phase, such as nitrate, the mass transfer limitation is more serious because of the limited liquid supply. Microscopic observations show that a layered structure with void spaces exists within the biofilm. Oxygen concentration distributions along the depth of the biofilms are examined using an oxygen microelectrode. Results indicate that there are some high dissolved oxygen zones inside the biofilm, which suggests the existence of passages for oxygen transfer into the deeper sections of the biofilm in a gas phase trickle-bed biofilter. Both the low gas-liquid mass transfer resistance and the resulting internal structure contribute to the high oxygen penetration within the biofilms in gas phase trickle-bed biofilters.

  14. Cerium oxide nanozyme modulate the ‘exercise’ redox biology of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Aditya; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Gangwar, Anamika; Bhargava, Neelima; Dubey, Amarish; Roy, Manas; Srivastava, Gaurav; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2017-05-01

    ‘Exercise’ is a double-edged sword for the skeletal muscle. Small amount of ROS generated during mild exercise, is essential for normal force generation; whereas large quantity of ROS generated during intense exercise, may cause contractile dysfunction, resulting in muscle weakness and fatigue. One of the key question in skeletal muscle physiology is ‘could antioxidant therapy improve the skeletal muscle endurance? A question, which has resulted in contradictory experimental findings till this date. This work has addressed this ‘very question’ using a synthetic, inorganic, antioxidant nano-material viz., ‘cerium oxide nanozyme’ (CON). It has been introduced in the rat by intramuscular injection, and the skeletal muscle endurance has been evaluated. Intramuscular injections of CON, concurrent with exercise, enhanced muscle mass, glycogen and ATP content, type I fiber ratio, thus resulting in significantly higher muscle endurance. Electron microscope studies confirmed the presence of CON in the vicinity of muscle mitochondria. There was an increase in the number and size of the muscle mitochondria in the CON treated muscle, following exercise, as compared to the untreated group with only exercised muscle. Quantitative proteomics data and subsequent biological network analysis studies, identified higher levels of oxidative phosphorylation, TCA cycle output and glycolysis in CON supplemented exercised muscle over only exercised muscle. This was further associated with significant increase in the mitochondrial respiratory capacity and muscle contraction, primarily due to higher levels of electron transport chain proteins like NDUFA9, SDHA, ATP5B and ATP5D, which were validated by real-time PCR and western blotting. Along with this, persistence of CON in muscle was evaluated with ICP-MS analysis, which revealed clearance of the particles after 90 d, without exhibiting any inflammation or adverse affects on the health of the experimental animals. Thus a

  15. Colour and organic removal of biologically treated coffee curing wastewater by electrochemical oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejankiwar, Rajesh S; Lokesh, K S; Gowda, T P Halappa

    2003-05-01

    The treatment of biologically treated wastewater of coffee-curing industry by the electrochemical oxidation using steel anode was investigated. Bench-scale experiments were conducted for activated sludge process on raw wastewater and the treated effluents were further treated by electrochemical oxidation method for its colour and organic content removal. The efficiency of the process was determined in terms of removal percentage of COD, BOD and colour during the course of reaction. Several operating parameters like time, pH and current density were examined to ascertain their effects on the treatment efficiency. Steel anode was found to be effective for the COD and colour removal with anode efficiency of 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) and energy consumption 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD at pH 9. The decrease in pH from 9 to 3 found to increase the anode efficiency from 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) to 0.144 kWh x kg(-1) of COD while decrease the energy consumption from 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD to 12.86 kWh x kg(-1) of COD. The pH of 5 was considered an ideal from the present treatment process as it avoids the addition of chemicals for neutralization of treated effluents and also economical with respect to energy consumption. An empirical relation developed for relationship between applied current density and COD removal efficiency showed strong predictive capability with coefficient of determination of 96.5%.

  16. Structure and Oxidation of Pyrrole Adducts Formed between Aflatoxin B2a and Biological Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Blake R; Selim, Mustafa I

    2017-06-19

    Aflatoxin B 2a has been shown to bind to proteins through a dialdehyde intermediate under physiological conditions. The proposed structure of this adduct has been published showing a Schiff base interaction, but adequate verification using structural elucidation instrumental techniques has not been performed. In this work, we synthesized the aflatoxin B 2a amino acid adduct under alkaline conditions, and the formation of a new product was determined using high performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The resulting accurate mass was used to generate a novel proposed chemical structure of the adduct in which the dialdehyde forms a pyrrole ring with primary amines rather than the previously proposed Schiff base interaction. The pyrrole structure was confirmed using 1 H, 13 C, correlation spectroscopy, heteronuclear single quantum correlation, and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation NMR and tandem mass spectrometry. Reaction kinetics show that the reaction is overall second order and that the rate increases as pH increases. Additionally, this study shows for the first time that aflatoxin B 2a dialdehyde forms adducts with phosphatidylethanolamines and does so through pyrrole ring formation, which makes it the first aflatoxin-lipid adduct to be structurally identified. Furthermore, oxidation of the pyrrole adduct produced a product that was 16 m/z heavier. When the aflatoxin B 2a -lysine (ε) adduct was oxidized, it gave a product with an accurate mass, mass fragmentation pattern, and 1 H NMR spectrum that match aflatoxin B 1 -lysine, which suggest the transformation of the pyrrole ring to a pyrrolin-2-one ring. These data give new insight into the fate and chemical properties of biological adducts formed from aflatoxin B 2a as well as possible interferences with known aflatoxin B 1 exposure biomarkers.

  17. Biological Resistance and Application Properties of Particleboards Containing Nano-Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Reinprecht

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Special particleboards (PBs proposed for kitchens, bathrooms, hospitals, and some other specific products for interiors should have a sufficient resistance against bacteria, molds, and decaying fungi. This work deals about effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO added into melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF glue in the amounts of 0, 2, 6, 12, or 24% wt. on selected biological, moisture, and strength properties of laboratory-produced one-layer PBs. The nano-ZnO-treated PBs had a higher biological resistance: (1 against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus by up to ca. 70% and the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli by up to 50%, since their bacterial activities at using 1.0 McFarland bacterial inoculum decreased from 0.38–0.40 by up to 0.12–0.19  ×  108 CFU/ml; (2 against the molds Penicillium brevicompactum and Aspergillus niger by up to ca. 50–63%, since their growth intensities (0–4 on the top surfaces of treated PBs decreased according to a modified EN 15457 from 2.33–2.67 by up to 1.17–1.0; (3 against the brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana by up to 85.7%, since their weight losses reduced according to a modified ENV 12038 from 17.4% by up to 2.5%. The presence of nano-ZnO in PBs uninfluenced their swelling, water absorption, and bending strength; however, it decreased their internal bond strength by up to 38.8%.

  18. Ventilation versus biology: What is the controlling mechanism of nitrous oxide distribution in the North Atlantic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Mercedes; García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Steinfeldt, Reiner; Ríos, Aida F.; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2017-04-01

    The extent to which water mass mixing and ocean ventilation contribute to nitrous oxide (N2O) distribution at the scale of oceanic basins is poorly constrained. We used novel N2O and chlorofluorocarbon measurements along with multiparameter water mass analysis to evaluate the impact of water mass mixing and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) on N2O distribution along the Observatoire de la variabilité interannuelle et décennale en Atlantique Nord (OVIDE) section, extending from Portugal to Greenland. The biological N2O production has a stronger impact on the observed N2O concentrations in the water masses traveling northward in the upper limb of the AMOC than those in recently ventilated cold water masses in the lower limb, where N2O concentrations reflect the colder temperatures. The high N2O tongue, with concentrations as high as 16 nmol kg-1, propagates above the isopycnal surface delimiting the upper and lower AMOC limbs, which extends from the eastern North Atlantic Basin to the Iceland Basin and coincides with the maximum N2O production rates. Water mixing and basin-scale remineralization account for 72% of variation in the observed distribution of N2O. The mixing-corrected stoichiometric ratio N2O:O2 for the North Atlantic Basin of 0.06 nmol/μmol is in agreement with ratios of N2O:O2 for local N2O anomalies, suggesting than up to 28% of N2O production occurs in the temperate and subpolar Atlantic, an overlooked region for N2O cycling. Overall, our results highlight the importance of taking into account mixing, O2 undersaturation when water masses are formed and the increasing atmospheric N2O concentrations when parameterizing N2O:O2 and biological N2O production in the global oceans.

  19. The potential for biologically catalyzed anaerobic methane oxidation on ancient Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J; Larowe, Douglas E; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Amend, Jan P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the potential for the biologically mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction on ancient Mars. Seven distinct fluids representative of putative martian groundwater were used to calculate Gibbs energy values in the presence of dissolved methane under a range of atmospheric CO2 partial pressures. In all scenarios, AOM is exergonic, ranging from -31 to -135 kJ/mol CH4. A reaction transport model was constructed to examine how environmentally relevant parameters such as advection velocity, reactant concentrations, and biomass production rate affect the spatial and temporal dependences of AOM reaction rates. Two geologically supported models for ancient martian AOM are presented: a sulfate-rich groundwater with methane produced from serpentinization by-products, and acid-sulfate fluids with methane from basalt alteration. The simulations presented in this study indicate that AOM could have been a feasible metabolism on ancient Mars, and fossil or isotopic evidence of this metabolic pathway may persist beneath the surface and in surface exposures of eroded ancient terrains.

  20. Electro persulphate oxidation for polishing of biologically treated palm oil mill effluent (POME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mohammed J K; Wei, Chong Jia; Aun, Ng Choon; Abu Amr, Salem S

    2017-05-15

    Malaysia alone produces more than 49 million m 3 palm oil mill effluent per year. Biological treated palm oil mill effluent via ponding system often fails to fulfill the regulatory discharge standards. This is due to remaining of non-biodegradable organics in the treated effluent. Thus, the aim of this study was to resolve such issue by using electro persulphate oxidation process, for the first time, as a post treatment of palm oil mill effluent. Central composite design in response surface methodology was used to analyze and optimize the interaction of operational variables (i.e., current density, contact time, initial pH and persulphate dosage) targeted on maximum treatment efficiency. The significance of quadratic model of each response was determined by analysis of variance, where all models indicated sufficient significance with p-value < 0.0001. Optimum operational conditions with 45 mA/cm 2 of current density, 45 min of contact time, pH 4 and 0.892 g of S 2 O 8 2- proved that 77.70% of Chemical Oxygen Demand, 97.96% of colour as well as 99.72% of Suspended Solids removal were achieved. The final pH of 5.88 of the effluent was obtained that fulfilled the limit and suitable for direct discharge to the natural environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical and biological characterization of coatings formed on Ti-15Mo alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazek-Kęsik, Alicja; Krok-Borkowicz, Małgorzata; Pamuła, Elżbieta; Simka, Wojciech

    2014-10-01

    β-Type titanium alloys are considered the future materials for bone implants. To improve the bioactivity of Ti-15Mo, the surface was modified using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process. Tricalcium phosphate (TCP, Ca3PO4), wollastonite (CaSiO3) and silica (SiO2) were selected as additives in the anodizing bath to enhance the bioactivity of the coatings formed during the PEO process. Electrochemical analysis of the samples was performed in Ringer's solution at 37°C. The open-circuit potential (EOCP) as a function of time, corrosion potential (ECORR), corrosion current density (jCORR) and polarization resistance (Rp) of the samples were determined. Surface modification improved the corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo in Ringer's solution. In vitro studies with MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were performed for 1, 3 and 7 days. After 24h, the cells were well adhered on the entire surfaces, and their number increased with increasing culture time. The coatings formed in basic solution with wollastonite exhibited better biological performance compared with the as-ground sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stability and effectiveness against bacterial adhesion of poly(ethylene oxide) coatings in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosjen, Astrid; de Vries, Joop; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J

    2005-05-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coatings have been shown to reduce the adhesion of different microbial strains and species and thus are promising as coatings to prevent biomaterial-centered infection of medical implants. Clinically, however, PEO coatings are not yet applied, as little is known about their stability and effectiveness in biological fluids. In this study, PEO coatings coupled to a glass substratum through silyl ether bonds were exposed for different time intervals to saliva, urine, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a reference at 37 degrees C. After exposure, the effectiveness of the coatings against bacterial adhesion was assessed in a parallel plate flow chamber. The coatings appeared effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion for 24, 48, and 0.5 h in PBS, urine, and saliva, respectively. Using XPS and contact-angle measurements, the variations in effectiveness could be attributed to conditioning film formation. The overall short stability results from hydrolysis of the coupling of the PEO chains to the substratum. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quinoxaline 1, 4-di-N-oxides: Biological activities and mechanisms of actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyue eCheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinoxaline 1, 4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs have manifold biological properties, including antimicrobial, antitumoral, antitrypanosomal and antiinflammatory/antioxidant activities. These diverse activities endow them broad applications and prospects in human and veterinary medicines. As QdNOs arouse widespread interest, the evaluation of their medicinal chemistry is still in progress. In the meantime, adverse effects have been reported in some of the QdNO derivatives. For example, genotoxicity and bacterial resistance have been found in QdNO antibacterial growth promoters, conferring urgent need for discovery of new QdNO drugs. However, the modes of actions of QdNOs are not fully understood, hindering the development and innovation of these promising compounds. Here, QdNOs are categorized based on the activities and usages, among which the antimicrobial activities are consist of antibacterial, antimycobacterial and anticandida activities, and the antiprotozoal activities include antitrypanosomal, antimalarial, antitrichomonas and antiamoebic activities. The structure-activity relationship and the mode of actions of each type of activity of QdNOs are summarized, and the toxicity and the underlying mechanisms are also discussed, providing insight for the future research and development of these fascinating compounds.

  4. Influence of SiO2 and graphene oxide nanoparticles on efficiency of biological removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili-Faraj, Seyyed Hamid; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen

    2017-11-01

    The effects of the presence of synthesized silica (SS) and exfoliated graphene oxide (EGO) on the removal of sulfide ion with activated sludge (AS) are experimentally investigated. The maximum removal efficiency of sulfide ion for AS without nanoparticles, and the samples with SS and EGO nanoparticles were 81%, 88% and 79%, respectively. Moreover, the maximum elimination capacity (EC max ) for the bioreactor with SS-nanoparticles is 7542 mg/L s, while the EC max of AS and EGO samples were 7075 and 6625 mg/L s, respectively. Two filamentous microbial strains as Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are discerned that removed sulfide ion in the presence of nanoparticles. The measurement of mixture liquor volatile suspended solid that indicates the biomass growth rate during the test shows that the bioreactor containing SS-nanoparticles has more biomass content than the other samples. Our findings indicate that SS-nanoparticles with 0.1% wt. concentration in the bioreactor have no negative effects on the efficiency of the biological removal of sulfide and the presence of SS-nanoparticles even enhances the performance of the bioreactor. On the other side, a bioreactor with EGO nanosheets, as highly antibacterial nanoparticles, with 0.02% wt. concentration significantly influences the microbial growth and reduces sulfide removal efficiency.

  5. Biological water-oxidizing complex: a nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide in a protein environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Moghaddam, Atefeh Nemati; Yang, Young Nam; Aro, Eva-Mari; Carpentier, Robert; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2012-10-01

    The resolution of Photosystem II (PS II) crystals has been improved using isolated PS II from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus. The new 1.9 Å resolution data have provided detailed information on the structure of the water-oxidizing complex (Umena et al. Nature 473: 55-61, 2011). The atomic level structure of the manganese-calcium cluster is important for understanding the mechanism of water oxidation and to design an efficient catalyst for water oxidation in artificial photosynthetic systems. Here, we have briefly reviewed our knowledge of the structure and function of the cluster.

  6. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  7. Destination of organic pollutants during electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater using boron-doped diamond anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiuping [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, the Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing100871 (China); Ni, Jinren, E-mail: nijinren@iee.pku.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, the Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing100871 (China); Wei, Junjun; Xing, Xuan; Li, Hongna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, the Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing100871 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater was performed in a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode system. After electrolysis of 12 h, the COD was decreased from 532 to 99 mg L{sup -1} (<100 mg L{sup -1}, the National Discharge Standard of China). More importantly, the destination of organic pollutants during electrochemical oxidation process was carefully investigated by molecular weight distribution measurement, resin fractionation, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, HPLC and GC-MS analysis, and toxicity test. As results, most organic pollutants were completely removed by electrochemical oxidation and the rest was primarily degraded to simpler compounds (e.g., carboxylic acids and short-chain alkanes) with less toxicity, which demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of biologically-pretreated dye wastewater with BDD anode was very effective and safe. Especially, the performance of BDD anode system in degradation of large molecular organics such as humic substances makes it very promising in practical applications as an advanced treatment of biologically-pretreated wastewaters.

  8. Trickle-bed root culture bioreactor design and scale-up: growth, fluid-dynamics, and oxygen mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Divakar; Curtis, Wayne R

    2004-10-20

    Trickle-bed root culture reactors are shown to achieve tissue concentrations as high as 36 g DW/L (752 g FW/L) at a scale of 14 L. Root growth rate in a 1.6-L reactor configuration with improved operational conditions is shown to be indistinguishable from the laboratory-scale benchmark, the shaker flask (mu=0.33 day(-1)). These results demonstrate that trickle-bed reactor systems can sustain tissue concentrations, growth rates and volumetric biomass productivities substantially higher than other reported bioreactor configurations. Mass transfer and fluid dynamics are characterized in trickle-bed root reactors to identify appropriate operating conditions and scale-up criteria. Root tissue respiration goes through a minimum with increasing liquid flow, which is qualitatively consistent with traditional trickle-bed performance. However, liquid hold-up is much higher than traditional trickle-beds and alternative correlations based on liquid hold-up per unit tissue mass are required to account for large changes in biomass volume fraction. Bioreactor characterization is sufficient to carry out preliminary design calculations that indicate scale-up feasibility to at least 10,000 liters.

  9. Kinetics of the removal of mono-chlorobenzene vapour from waste gases using a trickle bed air biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Anil K; Sundaramurthy, J; Balomajumder, C

    2006-10-11

    The performance of a trickle bed air biofilter (TBAB) in the removal of mono-chlorobenzene (MCB) was evaluated in concentrations varying from 0.133 to 7.187 g m(-3) and at empty bed residence time (EBRT) varying from 37.7 to 188.52 s. More than 90% removal efficiency in the trickle bed air biofilter was achieved for the inlet MCB concentration up to 1.069 g m(-3) and EBRT less than 94.26 s. The trickle bed air biofilter was constructed with coal packing material, inoculated with a mixed consortium of activated sludge obtained from sewage treatment plant. The continuous performance of the removal of MCB in the trickle bed air biofilter was monitored for various gas concentrations, gas flow rates, and empty bed residence time. The experiment was conducted for a period of 75 days. The trickle bed air biofilter degrading MCB with an average elimination capacity of 80 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained. The effect of starvation was also studied. After starvation period of 8 days, the degradation was low but recovered within a short period of time. Using macrokinetic determination method, the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant K(m) and maximum reaction rate, r(max) evaluated as 0.121 g m(-3) s(-1) and 7.45 g m(-3), respectively.

  10. Effects of concentration of Ag nanoparticles on surface structure and in vitro biological responses of oxide layer on pure titanium via plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ki Ryong; Kim, Yeon Sung; Kim, Gye Won [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 425-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hae Woong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Gun, E-mail: younggun@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Hyuk, E-mail: dhshin@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 425-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were embedded into the oxide surface without any compositional changes. • Oxide layer from the electrolyte with 0.1 g/l Ag nanoparticles could disinfect all bacteria. • With increasing Ag nanoparticles, bone-forming ability and cell proliferation rate decrease. - Abstract: This study was to investigate how Ag nanoparticles with various concentrations affect the surface structure and in vitro biological properties of oxide layers on the pure titanium produced by a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process. For this aim, PEO processes were carried out at an AC current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} for 300 s in potassium pyrophosphate (K{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) electrolytes containing 0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 g/l Ag nanoparticles. Structural investigations using scanning electron microscopy evidenced that the oxide layers showed the successful incorporation of Ag nanoparticles, and the topographical deformation of the porous surface was found when the concentration of Ag nanoparticles was more than 0.1 g/l. Based on the anti-bacterial activity of all oxide layers, the Ag nanoparticles uniformly spread were of considerable importance in triggering the disinfection of E. coli bacteria. The bone forming abilities and cell (MC3T3-E1) proliferation rates of oxide layers produced in electrolytes containing 0 and 0.1 g/l Ag nanoparticles were higher than those containing 0.3 and 0.5 g/l Ag nanoparticles. Consequently, the oxide layer on pure titanium via PEO process in the electrolyte with 0.1 g/l Ag nanoparticles exhibited better the bioactivity accompanying the anti-bacterial activity.

  11. Oxidative damage to biological macromolecules in Prague bus drivers and garagemen: impact of air pollution and genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagryantseva, Yana; Novotna, Bozena; Rossner, Pavel; Chvatalova, Irena; Milcova, Alena; Svecova, Vlasta; Lnenickova, Zdena; Solansky, Ivo; Sram, Radim J

    2010-11-10

    DNA integrity was investigated in the lymphocytes of 50 bus drivers, 20 garagemen and 50 controls using the comet assay with excision repair enzymes. In parallel, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 15-F(2t)-isoprostane levels in the urine and protein carbonyl levels in the plasma were assessed as markers of oxidative damage to DNA, lipids and proteins. Exposure to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (cPAHs) and volatile compounds was measured by personal samplers for 48 and 24h, respectively, before the collection of biological specimens. Both exposed groups exhibited a higher levels of DNA instability and oxidative damage to biological macromolecules than the controls. The incidence of oxidized lesions in lymphocyte DNA, but not the urinary levels of 8-oxodG, correlated with exposure to benzene and triglycerides increased this damage. Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins was associated with exposure to cPAHs and the lipid peroxidation levels positively correlated with age and LDL cholesterol, and negatively with vitamin C. The carriers of at least one variant hOGG1 (Cys) allele tended to higher oxidative damage to lymphocyte DNA than those with the wild genotype, while XPD23 (Gln/Gln) homozygotes were more susceptible to the induction of DNA strand breaks. In contrast, GSTM1 null variant seemed to protect DNA integrity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Nomura, T.; Kojima, S.

    2000-01-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted α-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O 2 - to H 2 O 2 , the question as to whether the resultant H 2 O 2 is further detoxicated into H 2 O and O 2 or not must still be evaluated. Hence, we studied

  13. Designing deoxidation inhibiting encapsulation of metal oxide nanostructures for fluidic and biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Moumita, E-mail: ghoshiisc@gmail.com [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Centre for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); IV. Institute of Physics, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ghosh, Siddharth [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Seibt, Michael [IV. Institute of Physics, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schaap, Iwan A.T. [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Institute of Biological Chemistry, Biophysics and Bioengineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Christoph F. [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Mohan Rao, G. [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: To retain atomic structure and morphology of ZnO nanostructures (caused by deoxidation of ZnO) in water/bio-fluids, we propose and demonstrate a robust and inexpensive encapsulation technique using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant. - Highlights: • Aqueous solutions of ZnO nanorods with and without surfactant are prepared. • With time ZnO nanorods show structural deterioration in different aqueous solutions. • Crystallinity of ZnO nanorods in absence of aqueous solution remain unaffected. • Encapsulation of bio-compatible surfactant in alchohol avoid ZnO deoxidation. • Crystallinity and structure of ZnO nanorods after encapsulation remain unaffected. - Abstract: Due to their photoluminescence, metal oxide nanostructures such as ZnO nanostructures are promising candidates in biomedical imaging, drug delivery and bio-sensing. To apply them as label for bio-imaging, it is important to study their structural stability in a bio-fluidic environment. We have explored the effect of water, the main constituent of biological solutions, on ZnO nanostructures with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) studies which show ZnO nanorod degeneration in water. In addition, we propose and investigate a robust and inexpensive method to encapsulate these nanostructures (without structural degradation) using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant in non-aqueous medium, which was not reported earlier. This new finding is an immediate interest to the broad audience of researchers working in biophysics, sensing and actuation, drug delivery, food and cosmetics technology, etc.

  14. Chromium oxide (51Cr2O3 used as biological marker was not absorbed by fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Z. Sakita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate absorption of radio-labeled chromium oxide (51Cr2O3, used as biological marker in nutrition studies with Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. An experimental diet with approximately 58 µCi of specific activity of the element was encapsulated and fed daily to 35 adult Nile tilapia; a group of 35 fish was used as control feeding on a basal diet. At the beginning of the experiment five fish from each group were randomly selected and blood samples were drawn from control (BC and experimental fish (BE. Fish were then euthanized by anesthetic overdoses and samples of the liver tissue (LT, renal tissue (RT, stomach without content (S, intestine without content (I, gills tissue (GT, muscle tissue (fillet; MT, visceral fat (VF, content of the digestive tract (CTDE and water aquarium were collected from the experimental fish. The procedure was repeated daily for one week. Simple linear regressions were adjusted - days of collection vs. determination coefficients, and were established for statistical comparisons of the measured activity of 51Cr readings in sampled blood and tissues (logarithmic transformation for samples of the control and experimental fish. No differences (P>0.05 were detected between samples from BC fish and BE, RT, VF, MT and LT of treated fish, but samples of GT, I, S, CTDE and WA from the tanks holding fish which received the experimental diet differed from control (P<0.05. The experimental results indicate that the trivalent chromium in the form of 51Cr2O3 was not significantly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, gills or another possible route of absorption under these experimental conditions and with Nile tilapia. Therefore, this marker was shown to be inert and can be safely used in nutrition studies.

  15. Critical Difference and Biological Variation in Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Nutritional Status in Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan A Lewis

    Full Text Available The longitudinal monitoring of oxidative stress (OS in athletes may enable the identification of fatigued states and underperformance. The application of OS biomarker monitoring programs in sport are hindered by reliability and repeatability of in-the-field testing tools, the turnaround of results, and the understanding of biological variation (BV. Knowledge of BV and critical difference values (CDV may assist with data interpretation in the individual athlete.We aimed firstly to assess the repeatability of the clinical point of care redox test, Free Oxygen Radical Test (FORT and the Free Oxygen Radical Defence (FORD in trained participants and elite athletes and secondly to calculate the analytical, BV, CDV and index of individuality (II for FORT, FORD, red blood cell glutathione, lutein, α and γ-tocopherol. Part 1: Fifteen elite athletes were sampled in duplicate for calculation of the repeatability of the FORT and FORD tests. Part 2: Twelve well-trained athletes had venous samples drawn every 2 hours from 0800 to 1800 for calculation of BV, CDV, II for FORT, FORD, RBC GSH, lutein, α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol.Repeatability of the FORT and FORD assay was 3.9% and 3.7% respectively. Biomarker CDV ranged from 12.8% to 37%, with a circadian effect for FORT, α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol (p<0.01, with all biomarker indices of individuality < 0.8 arbitrary units.We report that the use of the novel redox test in athletes is practical, and the generation of BV and CDV for biomarkers of OS enhances the interpretation of physiologically meaningful changes in individuals above the use of clinical reference ranges alone.

  16. Investigation of the effect of biologically active threo-Ds-isocitric acid on oxidative stress in Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, Igor G; Karpukhina, Olga V; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Samoilenko, Vladimir A; Inozemtsev, Anatoly N

    2018-01-02

    The effect of biologically active form (threo-Ds-) of isocitric acid (ICA) on oxidative stress was studied using the infusorian Paramecium caudatum stressed by hydrogen peroxide and salts of some heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd). ICA at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 mM favorably influenced the infusorian cells with oxidative stress induced by the toxicants studied. The maximal antioxidant effect of ICA was observed at its concentration 10 mM irrespective of the toxicant used (either H 2 O 2 or heavy metal ions). ICA was found to be a more active antioxidant than ascorbic acid. Biologically active pharmaceutically pure threo-Ds-ICA was produced through cultivation of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica and isolated from the culture liquid in the form of crystalline monopotassium salt with a purity of 99.9%.

  17. Biological oxidation of dissolved methane in effluents from anaerobic reactors using a down-flow hanging sponge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment plants discharge dissolved methane, which is usually not recovered. To prevent emission of methane, which is a greenhouse gas, we utilized an encapsulated down-flow hanging sponge reactor as a post-treatment to biologically oxidize dissolved methane. Within 3 weeks after reactor start-up, methane removal efficiency of up to 95% was achieved with a methane removal rate of 0.8 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) at an HRT of 2 h. After increasing the methane-loading rate, the maximum methane removal rate reached 2.2 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) at an HRT of 0.5 h. On the other hand, only about 10% of influent ammonium was oxidized to nitrate during the first period, but as airflow was increased to 2.5 L day(-1), nitrification efficiency increased to approximately 70%. However, the ammonia oxidation rate then decreased with an increase in the methane-loading rate. These results indicate that methane oxidation occurred preferentially over ammonium oxidation in the reactor. Cloning of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes as well as phylogenetic and T-RFLP analyses revealed that type I methanotrophs were the dominant methane oxidizers, whereas type II methanotrophs were detected only in minor portion of the reactor. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High rates of denitrification and nitrous oxide emission in arid biological soil crusts from the Sultanate of Oman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abed, Raeid M M; Lam, Phyllis; De Beer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of process rate determination, microsensor profiling and molecular techniques, we demonstrated that denitrification, and not anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), is the major nitrogen loss process in biological soil crusts from Oman. Potential denitrification rates were 584...... that nitrogen loss via denitrification is a dominant process in crusts from Oman, which leads to N 2 O gas emission and potentially reduces desert soil fertility....

  19. Experimental study of the application of two trickle media for inlet air pre-cooling of natural draft dry cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Suoying; Guan, Zhiqiang; Gurgenci, Hal; Hooman, Kamel; Lu, Yuanshen; Alkhedhair, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two trickle media were experimentally studied in a low-speed wind tunnel. • Correlations for cooling efficiency and pressure drop were developed. • Both trickle media were proven to have relatively low pressure drops. • Both trickle media had severe water entrainment at large air velocities. - Abstract: This paper is part two of a broader investigation into pre-cooling the air that enters natural draft dry cooling towers. Evaporative cooling of air is to some extent different from evaporative cooling of water. Two trickle media (Trickle125 and Trickle100) originally designed for evaporative cooling of water were studied in an open-circuit wind tunnel for evaporative cooling of air. Three medium thicknesses (200, 300 and 450 mm) and two water flow rates (10 and 5 l/min per m 2 horizontally exposed surface area) were used in the tests. The air velocities ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 m/s. The cooling efficiency and the pressure drop of the two media were curve fitted to yield a set of correlations. The pressure drop ranges for Trickle125 and Trickle100 were 0.7–50 Pa and 0.6–41.6 Pa, respectively. The cooling efficiencies of Trickle125 and Trickle100 fell within 15.7–55.1% and 11–44.4%, respectively. Generally, media with large effective surfaces provide high cooling efficiencies and high pressure drops; there is a trade-off between cooling efficiency and pressure drop when selecting a particular medium for a specific application. The water entrainment off the media was detected with water-sensitive papers, and both media had severe water entrainment at large air velocities

  20. Modeling nitrous oxide production during biological nitrogen removal via nitrification and denitrification: extensions to the general ASM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F

    2011-09-15

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N(2)O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N(2)O dynamics during both nitrification and denitrification in biological N removal. Six additional processes and three additional reactants, all involved in known biochemical reactions, have been added. The validity and applicability of the model is demonstrated by comparing simulations with experimental data on N(2)O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO(2)(-) participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among the four denitrification steps, the last one (N(2)O reduction to N(2)) seems to be inhibited first when O(2) is present. Overall, N(2)O production can account for 0.1-25% of the consumed N in different nitrification and denitrification systems, which can be well simulated by the proposed model. In conclusion, we provide a modeling structure, which adequately captures N(2)O dynamics in autotrophic nitrification and heterotrophic denitrification driven biological N removal processes and which can form the basis for ongoing refinements.

  1. Biologically relevant oxidants and terminology, classification and nomenclature of oxidatively generated damage to nucleobases and 2-deoxyribose in nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadet, Jean; Loft, Steffen; Olinski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    A broad scientific community is involved in investigations aimed at delineating the mechanisms of formation and cellular processing of oxidatively generated damage to nucleic acids. Perhaps as a consequence of this breadth of research expertise, there are nomenclature problems for several of the ...

  2. Trickle/pulse flow regime transition in downflow packed tower involving foaming liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodhi Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most of past studies in foaming trickle bed reactors aimed at the improvement of efficiency and operational parameters leads to high economic advantages. Conventionally most of the industries rely on frequently used gas continuous flow (GCF where operational output is satisfactory but not yields efficiently as in pulsing flow (PF and foaming pulsing flow (FPF. Hydrodynamic characteristics like regime transitions are significantly influenced by foaming nature of liquid as well as gas and liquid flow rates. This study’s aim was to demonstrate experimentally the effects of liquid flow rate, gas flow rates and liquid surface tension on regime transition. These parameters were analyzed for the air-aqueous Sodium Lauryl Sulphate and air-water systems. More than 240 experiments were done to obtain the transition boundary for trickle flow (GCF to foaming pulsing flow (PF/FPF by use excessive foaming 15-60 ppm surfactant compositions. The trickle to pulse flow transition appeared at lower gas and liquid flow rates with decrease in liquid surface tension. All experimental data had been collected and drawn in the form of four different transitional plots which are compared and drawn by using flow coordinates proposed by different researchers. A prominent decrease in dynamic liquid saturation was observed especially during regime transitional change. The reactor two phase pressure evident a sharp rise to verify the regime transition shift from GCF to PF/FPF. Present study reveals, the regime transition boundary significantly influenced by any change in hydrodynamic as well as physiochemical properties including surface tension.

  3. Radioisotope tracer study in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, H.J.; Pendharkar, A.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Isotope Applications Div, Bombay (India); Prasad, J.S.; Maiti, R.N.; Chawla, R.; Lahri, R.N.; Ram Babu, D. [Engineers India Limited, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Berne, Ph. [CEA Grenoble, DTEN/SAT, 38 (France)

    2001-07-01

    Trickle bed reactor (TBR) is a reactor in which a liquid and a gas phase flow concurrently downwards through a fixed bed of catalyst particles while the reaction takes place. The trickle bed reactors find a number of applications in petroleum refining, chemical. petro-chemical and bio-chemical processes due to their suitability for hydro-processing operations.The knowledge of radial distribution, mean residence time (MRT). liquid holdup and degree of axial mixing is a basic requirement to evaluate the reactor performance of a TBR, its optimal size, the physical and chemical interactions and the pumping requirements. Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase facilitate the determination of these parameters. This paper describes the measurement of RTD of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor operating at high pressure. Kerosene and nitrogen were used as liquid and gas phase, respectively. Porous alumina catalyst particles were used as packing. Bromine-82 as para-di-bromo benzene was used as a tracer to measure RTD of organic liquid phase. The RTD of kerosene was measured as a function of liquid and gas flow rates and pressure. The axial dispersion model with exchange between active and dead zones was proposed and used to simulate the measured RTD data and model parameters i.e mean residence time ({tau}), Peclet Number (Pe), dynamic fraction of the liquid ({phi}) and the number of transfer units (N) were obtained. The results of the simulations indicated intermediate degree of axial mixing of liquid phase. The RTD predicted by the axial dispersion model with exchange between active and dead zones fits well to the experimentally measured RTD data and thus is a suitable model to describe the dynamics of the liquid phase in TBRs filled with porous catalyst particles. (authors)

  4. Design and performance of a trickle-bed bioreactor with immobilized hybridoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, H A; Scharer, J M; Bols, N C; Moo-Young, M

    1992-01-01

    A trickle-bed system employing inert matrices of vermiculite or polyurethane foam packed in the downcomer section of a split-flow air-lift reactor has been developed for hybridoma culture to enhance antibody productivity. This quiescent condition favoured occlusion and allowed the cells to achieve densities twelve fold greater (12.8 x 10(6) cells/ml reactor for polyurethane foam) than in free cell suspension. The reactor was operated in a cyclic batch mode whereby defined volumes of medium were periodically withdrawn and replaced with equal volumes of fresh medium. The pH of the medium was used as the indicator of the feeding schedule. Glucose, lactate and ammonia concentrations reached a stationary value after 5 days. With vermiculite packing, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) concentration of 2.4 mg/l was achieved after 12 days. The MAb concentration declined then increased to a value of 1.8 mg/l. In the polyurethane foam average monoclonal antibody (MAb) concentrations reached a stationary value of 1.1 mg/l in the first 20 days and increased to a new stationary state value of 2.1 mg/l for the remainder of the production. MAb productivity in the trickle-bed reactor was 0.3 mg/l.d (polyurethane foam) and 0.18 mg/l.d (vermiculite) in comparison to 0.12 mg/l.d for free cell suspension. This trickle-bed system seems to be an attractive way of increasing MAb productivity in culture.

  5. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namratha Pai Kotebagilu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%, methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%, and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55% in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r=0.816 and low-density lipoprotein (r=0.948 and Costus speciosus in brain (r=0.977, polyphenols, and r=0.949, flavonoids correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates.

  6. Local liquid velocity measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs) using the x-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar Mohd Salleh, Khairul; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of a new technique to measure local liquid velocity (VLL) for multiphase flows in trickle bed reactors (TBRs) (gas-liquid-solid system). In the studied TBR, the liquid phase is represented by water, gas by air and 3 mm expanded polystyrene beads as the solid packing. Three different superficial liquid velocities (VSL) and a constant superficial gas velocity (VSG) were used in the packed bed with an internal diameter of 4.25 cm. While the liquid is moving into the packed bed, tracking particles of 106-125 μm diameter (16.45% difference) are injected. The movement of the tracking particles is monitored and digitally recorded by a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector. In this experiment, x-rays were used as the radiation source. Four replications were made with fresh packing. Comparable observations can be found from other published techniques (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging). Results from this study indicate that, at VSL = 0.13 cm s-1, the measured VLL can reach up to 51 times that of its VSL, while for VSL = 0.27 cm s-1, the measured VLL reached up to 35 times higher than the VSL and for VSL = 0.39 cm s-1, the VLL reached up to 39.8 times higher than its VSL. Through statistical analysis, the implementation of such a method is found to be reproducible throughout the experiments. The mean per cent difference in the measured VLL was 10% and 5% for lower implemented VSL of 0.13 and 0.27 cm s-1, respectively. At higher VSL (0.39 cm s-1), the particle tracer was greatly distributed and carried away by the high liquid flow rate. The variance or the range of the measured VLL does not vary for all replications in every VSL, which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental measurements, regardless of the VSL.

  7. The hydrodynamic behaviour of gas—solid trickle flow over a regularly stacked packing

    OpenAIRE

    Verver, A.B.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1986-01-01

    The hydrodynamic properties of counter-current gas—solid flow over a regularly stacked packing at trickle flow conditions have been studied. The flow properties of the solids phase were examined, using five types of solid particles with a mean particle diameter ranging from 70 to 880 μm and a particle density from 800 to 7800 kg m−3. Data on the solids hold-up and the pressure drop caused by the solids flow were obtained from experiments in a test column of 0.10 m square cross-section. A part...

  8. Experimental analysis and evaluation of the mass transfer process in a trickle-bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, J.D.; Lima, F.R.A.; Abreu, C.A.M.; Knoechelmann, A.

    2003-01-01

    A transient experimental analysis of a three-phase descendent-cocurrent trickle-bed H2O/CH4-Ar/g -Al2O3 system was made using the stimulus-response technique, with the gas phase as a reference. Methane was used as a tracer and injected into the argon feed and the concentration vs time profiles were obtained at the entrance and exit of the bed, which were maintained at 298K and 1.013 10(5) Pa. A mathematical model for the tracer was developed to estimate the axial dispersion overall gas-liquid...

  9. When supervisors perceive non-work support: test of a trickle-down model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Yu; Lee, Shao-Jen; Hu, Changya; Yang, Chun-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Using the trickle-down model as the theoretical foundation, we explored whether subordinates' perceived supervisory non-work support (subordinates' PSNS) mediates the relationship between supervisors' perception of higher-level managers' non-work support (supervisors' PSNS) and subordinates' organizational citizenship behaviors. Using dyadic data collected from 132 employees and their immediate supervisors, we found support for the aforementioned mediation process. Furthermore, supervisors' perceived in-group/out-group membership of subordinates moderated the aforementioned supervisors' PSNS-subordinates' PSNS relationship, such that this relationship is stronger for out-group subordinates. Theoretical and practical implications and future research directions are discussed.

  10. The Behavior of Pilot Trickle-Bed Reactor under Periodic Operation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tukač, V.; Šimíčková, M.; Chyba, V.; Lederer, J.; Kolena, J.; Hanika, Jiří; Jiřičný, Vladimír; Staněk, Vladimír; Stavárek, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 62, 18-20 (2007), s. 4891-4895 ISSN 0009-2509. [International Symposium on Chemical Reaction Engineering - From Science to Innovative Engineering /19./. Potsdam/Berlin, 03.09.2006-06.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Grant - others:CYCLOP(XE) G1RD/CT2000/00225 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : olefine hydrogenation * pilot-scale * trickle-bed reactor Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.775, year: 2007

  11. Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria: occurrence and relevance in biological drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Rapid sand filtration (RSF) is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwater around the world. It consists of groundwater aeration followed by passage through a sand filter. The oxidation and removal of ferrous iron, which is commonly found in anoxic groundwaters, is often believed to be a fully...... role of FeOB in iron removal at waterworks using RSF technologies....... physicochemical process. However, persistently low temperatures in RSF across Denmark may negatively affect the kinetics of chemical oxidation. The slower chemical oxidation of ferrous iron may increase the chances for iron bioconversion by neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), which are found naturally...

  12. Involvement of Nitric Oxide on Bothropoides insularis Venom Biological Effects on Murine Macrophages In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon R P P B de Menezes

    Full Text Available Viperidae venom has several local and systemic effects, such as pain, edema, inflammation, kidney failure and coagulopathy. Additionally, bothropic venom and its isolated components directly interfere on cellular metabolism, causing alterations such as cell death and proliferation. Inflammatory cells are particularly involved in pathological envenomation mechanisms due to their capacity of releasing many mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO. NO has many effects on cell viability and it is associated to the development of inflammation and tissue damage caused by Bothrops and Bothropoides venom. Bothropoides insularis is a snake found only in Queimada Grande Island, which has markedly toxic venom. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the biological effects of Bothropoides insularis venom (BiV on RAW 264.7 cells and assess NO involvement. The venom was submitted to colorimetric assays to identify the presence of some enzymatic components. We observed that BiV induced H2O2 production and showed proteolytic and phospholipasic activities. RAW 264.7 murine macrophages were incubated with different concentrations of BiV and then cell viability was assessed by MTT reduction assay after 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours of incubation. A time- and concentration-dependent effect was observed, with a tendency to cell proliferation at lower BiV concentrations and cell death at higher concentrations. The cytotoxic effect was confirmed after lactate dehydrogenase (LDH measurement in the supernatant from the experimental groups. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that necrosis is the main cell death pathway caused by BiV. Also, BiV induced NO release. The inhibition of both proliferative and cytotoxic effects with L-NAME were demonstrated, indicating that NO is important for these effects. Finally, BiV induced an increase in iNOS expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that B. insularis venom have proliferative and cytotoxic effects on macrophages, with

  13. Neutrophilic Iron Oxidizing Bacteria: Occurrence and Relevance in Biological Drinking Water Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Rapid sand filtration (RSF) is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwater around the world. It consists of groundwater aeration followed by passage through a sand filter. The oxidation and removal of ferrous iron, which is commonly found in anoxic groundwaters, is often believed to be a fully......, neutrophilic iron oxidizers were present at the level of up to 7 105 cells per gram sediment. The spatial abundance and diversity of FeOB inferred by DGGE fingerprinting differed greatly both between and within individual sand filters. The results suggest a larger than assumed role of FeOB in iron removal...... physicochemical process. However, persistently low temperatures in RSF across Denmark may negatively affect the kinetics of chemical oxidation. The slower chemical oxidation of ferrous iron may increase the chances for iron bioconversion by neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), which are found naturally...

  14. Optimization and scale up of trickling bed bioreactors for degradation of volatile organic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, I.

    1996-01-01

    For optimization and scale up of trickling bed bioreactors used in waste gas cleaning following investigations were made: the degradation of toluene was measured in reactors with various volumes and diameter to high ratios. The degradation of toluene was investigated in bioreactors with different carrier materials. It turned out, that the increase of the elimination capacity with the height of the reactor depends on the carrier material. At low gas velocities PU-foam allows higher elimination capacities than pallrings, VSP and DINPAC. On the other hand for PU-foam there is a permanent danger of clogging. The other materials allowed a stable operation for several months. Mass transfer of toluene was studied by absorption experiments in a 100 litre plant without microorganisms. The experiments lead to a henry coefficient of 0,23 (kg/m3)g/(kg/m3)l. Mass transfer coefficients were calculated between 3,6 and 5,2 depending an the space velocity of the gas and the trickling density of the water phase. The degradation of ethyl acetate, toluene and heptane was investigated considering the different water solubility of these substances. Further on degradation of toluene and heptane in several mixtures was investigated. (author)

  15. Trickle-Charge: a New Operational Mode for PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozanecki, W.; Colocho, W.S.; Decker, F.-J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Grady, C.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.K.; Turner, J.L.; Weaver, M.; Wienands, U.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    In regular top-up-and-coast operation, PEP-II average luminosity is about 70-75% of the peak luminosity due to detector ramp-down and ramp-up times plus the time it takes to top-up both beams. We recently commissioned a new operational mode where the Low Energy Ring is injected continuously without ramping down the detector. The benefits--increased luminosity lifetime and roughly half the number of top-ups per shift--were expected to give an increase in delivered luminosity of about 15% at the same peak luminosity; this was confirmed in test runs. In routine trickle operation, however, it appears that the increase in delivered luminosity is more than twice that due to an increase in availability credited to the more stable operating conditions during trickle operation. Further gains were made when continuous injection was extended to the high energy ring as well. In this paper we will present our operational experience as well as some of the diagnostics we use to monitor and maintain tuning of the machine in order to control injection background and protect the detector

  16. Trickle-down boundary conditions in aeolian dune-field pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2015-12-01

    One the one hand, wind-blown dune-field patterns emerge within the overarching boundary conditions of climate, tectonics and eustasy implying the presence of these signals in the aeolian geomorphic and stratigraphic record. On the other hand, dune-field patterns are a poster-child of self-organization, in which autogenic processes give rise to patterned landscapes despite remarkable differences in the geologic setting (i.e., Earth, Mars and Titan). How important are climate, tectonics and eustasy in aeolian dune field pattern formation? Here we develop the hypothesis that, in terms of pattern development, dune fields evolve largely independent of the direct influence of 'system-scale' boundary conditions, such as climate, tectonics and eustasy. Rather, these boundary conditions set the stage for smaller-scale, faster-evolving 'event-scale' boundary conditions. This 'trickle-down' effect, in which system-scale boundary conditions indirectly influence the event scale boundary conditions provides the uniqueness and richness of dune-field patterned landscapes. The trickle-down effect means that the architecture of the stratigraphic record of dune-field pattern formation archives boundary conditions, which are spatially and temporally removed from the overarching geologic setting. In contrast, the presence of an aeolian stratigraphic record itself, reflects changes in system-scale boundary conditions that drive accumulation and preservation of aeolian strata.

  17. Changes in protein expression in the sheep abomasum following trickle infection with Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Alan D; Brown, Jeremy K; Craig, Nicky M; Pate, Judith; McLean, Kevin; Inglis, Neil F; Knox, David; Knight, Pamela A

    2012-03-01

    Continual low-level exposure of sheep to the helminth Teladorsagia circumcincta elicits a temporary protective immunity, where factors in the immune abomasal mucosa prevent penetration of infective larvae, but which is essentially lost within 6 weeks of cessation of parasite challenge. Here, a proteomic approach was used to identify proteins that are differentially regulated in immune compared to naïve sheep, as potential key mediators of immunity. Six naïve sheep and 12 sheep trickle-infected with T. circumcincta were treated with anthelmintic, and the naïve (control) and 6 immune sheep were killed 7 days later. The remaining 6 sheep (immune waning) were killed 42 days after anthelmintic treatment. Abomasal tissue samples were subjected to 2D-gel electrophoresis and densitometric analysis. Selected spots (n=73) were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and confirmatory Western blotting was carried out for 10 proteins. Spots selectively up-regulated in immune versus control, but not immune waning versus control sheep, included galectin-15 and thioredoxin, which were confirmed by Western blotting. In immune sheep, serum albumin was significantly down-regulated and albumin proteolytic cleavage fragments were increased compared to controls. Unexpectedly, albumin mRNA was relatively highly expressed in control mucosa, down-regulated in immune, and was immunolocalized to mucus-producing epithelial cells. Thus we have identified differential expression of a number of proteins following T. circumcincta trickle infection that may play a role in host protection and inhibition of parasite establishment.

  18. Phosphorus kinetics in calves experimentally submitted to a trickle infection with Cooperia punctata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvandini, H; Rodrigues, R R; Gennari, S M; McManus, C M; Vitti, D M S S

    2009-07-07

    Ten male Holstein calves (74.3+/-3.2 kg LW) were used for a trial with trickle infection with Cooperia punctata to evaluate phosphorus (P) kinetics. Five calves were inoculated with 10,000 L(3) stage larvae per week during 35 days, while the other group of five calves was kept as a control. On the 29th day each calf was intravenously injected with 29.6 MBq of a (32)P solution. Blood samples were taken at 24 h periods for 7 days, after which all calves were slaughtered and worms burdens. Faeces, urine and tissue samples were taken for analysis using isotopic dilution and modeling techniques. The number of eggs per gram of faeces (EPG) was 1920+/-168 on 28th day and the total number of worms burdens was 11,131+/-1500. Infected calves showed lower feed intake and live weight gain, as well as lower P intake, absorption and retention than control calves. The P flows between body compartments were lower for blood to gastrointestinal tract (TGI), TGI to blood, blood to soft tissues, bone balance and soft tissue balance in infected calves when compared to the control. The trickle infection of C. punctata affected P metabolism due to the decrease in P retained and live weight due to fall in feed intake.

  19. The susceptibility differences of buffalo and Ongole calves against trickle infection with Fasciola gigantica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ening Wiedosari

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available A pen trial was carried out in order to determine the susceptibility differences of a trickle infection with Fasciola gigantica in buffalo and Ongole calves. Treated animals were infected orally with 15 metacercariae of F. gigantica twice weekly for 32 weeks and were slaughtered at 36 weeks. The results showed that buffalo calves had significantly lower fluke burdens than Ongole calves (P<0 .01 . All of the infected Ongole calves had fasciola eggs in their faeces 18 weeks after the commencement of infection. In contrast, eggs were detected only in 3 out of 7 infected buffalo calves at week 20, in 4 at week 28 and in 6 at week 30. Faeces of the seventh buffalo remained free of eggs until week 36. Rates of growth were reduced by 25%and 10,3% in infected Ongole and buffalo calves respectively . Circulating blood eosinophilia ofboth hosts, ahallmark of helminth infections, increased following infection, but values in buffaloes was greater than Ongole calves mainly in week 4 and 8 after infection (P<0.01. These results might be concluded that the susceptibility of buffalo calves to trickle infection with F. gigantica was lower compared to Ongole calves.

  20. Applications of Structural Biology and Bioinformatics in the Investigation of Oxidative Stress-Related Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bersch, Beate; Groves, Matthew; Johann, Klare; Torda, Andrew; Ortiz, Dario; Laher, I.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated dysfunction of certain biological processes is implicated in different diseases in humans, including cardiovascular, cancer, or neurodegenerative disorders. Not only human cells and tissues are affected by ROS but also all other biological systems, including

  1. Performance and population analysis of a non-sterile trickle bed reactor inoculated with Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, a thermophilic hydrogen producer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, van J.W.; Geelhoed, J.S.; Goorissen, H.P.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Stams, A.J.M.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-axenic operation of a 400 L trickle bed reactor inoculated with the thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, yielded 2.8 mol H2/mol hexose converted. The reactor was fed with a complex medium with sucrose as the main substrate, continuously flushed with nitrogen gas, and operated at

  2. Analysis of the mucosal immune responses induced by single and trickle infections with the bovine abomasal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihi, B; van Meulder, F; Vancoppernolle, S; Rinaldi, M; Chiers, K; van den Broeck, W; Goddeeris, B M; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E; Geldhof, P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide more information on the kinetics of the immunological changes occurring in the abomasal mucosa after single and trickle infections with the bovine parasite Ostertagia ostertagi. The time course analysis of gene expression revealed that the major changes coincided with the emergence of adult worms from the gastric glands. These changes consisted of a simultaneous upregulation of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines. In addition, a single O. ostertagi infection elicited an upregulation of the epithelial-derived cytokine IL33, while TSLP expression levels were not impacted. Apart from the massive increase in inflammatory cytokines IL6, IL17 and IL21, O. ostertagi infection also elicited an upregulation of the immunosuppressors TGFB, IL10 and ARG1, as well as NK and γδ-T cell markers. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factors granulysin, perforin and granzyme B were upregulated following an O. ostertagi infection. Analysis of cytokine transcript levels in animals receiving trickle infections for 60 days showed a similar trend as observed following a single infection except for IL33, IL6, GATA-3, TBX21 and NCR1, which were no longer upregulated after trickle infections. Finally, the long trickle infections were associated with mucosal eosinophilia and mastocytosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A model for a countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium reactions. The methanol synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kuczynski, M.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical background for a novel, countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium gas reactions is presented. A one-dimensional, steady-state reactor model is developed. The influence of the various process parameters on the reactor performance is discussed. The physical

  4. Axial dispersion of gas and solid phases in a gas—solid packed column at trickle flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, A.W.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1979-01-01

    Axial dispersion of gas and solid phases in a gas—solid packed column at trickle flow, a promising new countercurrent operation, was evaluated using residence time distribution (RTD) experiments. The column was packed with dumped Pall rings, the gas phase was air at ambient conditions and the solid

  5. Performance and population analysis of a non-sterile trickle bed reactor inoculated with caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, a thermophilic hydrogen producer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, J.W. van; Geelhoed, J.S.; Goorissen, H.P.; Meesters, K.P.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-axenic operation of a 400 L trickle bed reactor inoculated with the thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, yielded 2.8 molH 2mol hexose converted. The reactor was fed with a complex medium with sucrose as the main substrate, continuously flushed with nitrogen gas, and operated at

  6. Co-oxidation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with some biologically active compounds (BAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubergrits, M.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Oxidation of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) initiated by UV or gamma irradiation was promoted by benz(a)anthracene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and inhibited by pyrene, dibenz(a,c)anthracene, and asymmetric benz(a)antharacene. The effects of these BAC commonly occurring together with BP in industrial wastes, increased with their concentrations. Phenol and 3-methylcholanthrene strongly promoted BP oxidation when present at low concentrations and inhibited it at high concentrations. Consistent promoting effect was also observed in BP co-oxidation with adipic acid, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavon, and vitamin E, whereas succinic, azelaic, ferulic, gallic, and chlorogenic acids, rutin, and vitamin C acted as inhibitors. Most saturated dicarboxylic acids studied did not affect BP oxidation at 1:1 acid-BP molar ratio. The kinetics of 7,12-DMBA photooxidation inhibition by some metabolic intermediates, e.g., DMBA endo-peroxide, were also studied.

  7. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  8. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  9. Removal of the antiviral agent oseltamivir and its biological activity by oxidative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestankova, Hana; Schirmer, Kristin; Escher, Beate I.; Gunten, Urs von

    2012-01-01

    The antiviral agent oseltamivir acid (OA, the active metabolite of Tamiflu ® ) may occur at high concentrations in wastewater during pandemic influenza events. To eliminate OA and its antiviral activity from wastewater, ozonation and advanced oxidation processes were investigated. For circumneutral pH, kinetic measurements yielded second-order rate constants of 1.7 ± 0.1 × 10 5 and 4.7 ± 0.2 × 10 9 M −1 s −1 for the reaction of OA with ozone and hydroxyl radical, respectively. During the degradation of OA by both oxidants, the antiviral activity of the treated aqueous solutions was measured by inhibition of neuraminidase activity of two different viral strains. A transient, moderate (two-fold) increase in antiviral activity was observed in solutions treated up to a level of 50% OA transformation, while for higher degrees of transformation the activity corresponded to that caused exclusively by OA. OA was efficiently removed by ozonation in a wastewater treatment plant effluent, suggesting that ozonation can be applied to remove OA from wastewater. - Highlights: ► Oseltamivir acid (OA) is oxidized by ozone and hydroxyl radical. ► Kinetics: We determined rate constants for the reaction with these oxidants. ► The specific activity of OA as neuraminidase inhibitor disappeared during oxidation. ► Ozonation and advanced oxidation can effectively remove OA from wastewaters. - Ozone and hydroxyl radical treatment processes can degrade aqueous oseltamivir acid and remove its antiviral activity.

  10. Effective protection of biological membranes against photo-oxidative damage: Polymeric antioxidant forming a protecting shield over the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertins, Omar; Mathews, Patrick D; Gomide, Andreza B; Baptista, Mauricio S; Itri, Rosangela

    2015-10-01

    We have prepared a chitosan polymer modified with gallic acid in order to develop an efficient protection strategy biological membranes against photodamage. Lipid bilayers were challenged with photoinduced damage by photosensitization with methylene blue, which usually causes formation of hydroperoxides, increasing area per lipid, and afterwards allowing leakage of internal materials. The damage was delayed by a solution of gallic acid in a concentration dependent manner, but further suppressed by the polymer at very low concentrations. The membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles was covered with this modified macromolecule leading to a powerful shield against singlet oxygen and thus effectively protecting the lipid membrane from oxidative stress. The results have proven the discovery of a promising strategy for photo protection of biological membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the old trickling filters at Daspooort wastewater treatment works

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wilsenach, J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available _(sup+)-N) and nitrite-nitrogen (NO(sub2)(sup-)-N). These reactors were subsequently monitored by conducting stoichiometric analyses of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(sub4)(sup+)-N, NO(sub2)(sup-)-N, and nitrate-nitrogen (NO(sub3)(sup...

  12. Advanced oxidation protein products and malondialdehyde - the new biological markers of oxidative stress - are elevated in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Tansel; Goktas, Bulent; Mutlu, Mehmet F; Mutlu, Ilknur; Bilgihan, Ayse; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) as markers for oxidative stress to evaluate cardiovascular risk in pre- and postmenopausal women and to compare the results with malondialde-hyde (MDA) levels. Twenty premenopausal women and 84 naturally postmenopausal patients were enrolled in the study. AOPP and MDA plasma levels were measured. The postmenopausal group was further subdivided into two groups: postmenopausal age of 40-49 and of 50-59 years. AOPP and MDA levels were compared between premenopausal, 40-49 and 50-59 year old menopausal women. Plasma AOPP and MDA levels in postmenopausal women were increased when compared with their premeno-pausal peers (123.83 ± 55.51 μmol/L vs. 61.59 ± 16.42 μmol/L and 6.50 ± 1.05 μmol/L vs. 5.98 ± 0.77 μmol/L; respectively). Mean plasma AOPP levels in the two menopausal age groups were both significantly higher from the premenopausal group (118.64 ± 59.1 μmol/L vs. 61.59 ± 16.42 μmol/L and 132.31 ± 48.97 μmol/L vs. 61.59 ± 16.42 μmol/L; respectively). No significant difference was found in mean AOPP levels between postmenopausal subjects of 40-49 and 50-59 years age (118.64 ± 59.12 μmol/L vs. 132.31 ± 48.97 μmol/L). Mean plasma MDA levels of each of two postmenopausal age groups were both significantly higher from the premenopausal group (6.50 ± 1.04 μmol/L vs. 5.98 ± 0.77 μmol/L and 6.50 ± 1.10 μmol/L vs. 5.98 ± 0.77 μmol/L; respectively). However, no statistically significant difference between the two postmenopausal age groups (6.50 ± 1.04 μmol/L vs. 6.50 ± 1.10 μmol/L) was found. AOPP and MDA levels are elevated in postmenopausal women as compared to their premenopausal peers, suggesting they can be used as markers for cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women.

  13. A Photo-triggered and photo-calibrated nitric oxide donor: Rational design, spectral characterizations, and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haihong; Liu, Yuxin; Zhou, Zhongneng; Guo, Chunlei; Wang, Hong-Yin; Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Xueli; Zhang, Ziqian; Wu, Fu-Gen; Wang, Haolu; Chen, Daijie; Yang, Dahai; Liang, Xiaowen; Chen, Jinquan; Zhou, Shengmin; Liang, Xin; Qian, Xuhong; Yang, Youjun

    2018-04-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) donors are valuable tools to probe the profound implications of NO in health and disease. The elusive nature of NO bio-relevance has largely limited the use of spontaneous NO donors and promoted the development of next generation NO donors, whose NO release is not only stimulated by a trigger, but also readily monitored via a judiciously built-in self-calibration mechanism. Light is without a doubt the most sensitive, versatile and biocompatible method of choice for both triggering and monitoring, for applications in complex biological matrices. Herein, we designed and synthesized an N-nitroso rhodamine derivative (NOD560) as a photo-triggered and photo-calibrated NO donor to address this need. NOD560 is essentially non-fluorescent. Upon irradiation by green light (532 nm), it efficiently release NO and a rhodamine dye, the dramatic fluorescence turn-on from which could be harnessed to conveniently monitor the localization, flux, and dose of NO release. The potentials of NOD560 for in vitro biological applications were also exemplified in in vitro biological models, i.e. mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration suppression. NOD560 is expected to complement the existing NO donors and find widespread applications in chemical biological studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Full scale application of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters for treatment of rejection water with high ammonia concentrations from sludge dewatering. Final report; Untersuchungen zur autotrophen Stickstoffentfernung aus ammoniumreichem Filtratwasser der Schlammentwaesserung mit grosstechnischer Realisierung in Tropfkoerpern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumueller, B.; Metzger, J.W.; Pinnekamp, J.

    2003-07-01

    At many municipal wastewater treatment plants a considerable fraction of nitrogen is recirculated from the anaerobic sludge dewatering. This amounts up to 20% of the total influent nitrogen load of the wastewater treatment plant. The separate treatment of this sludge liquor creates new capacities for the treatment plant and improves effluent quality. A new process for treatment of this sludge liquor with ammonium-nitrogen concentrations above 600 mg/l is the autotrophic denitrification after partial nitritation. At the University of Stuttgart the first semi-technical trickling filter plant was built by which autotrophic denitrification was achieved. At the wastewater treatment plant of Sindelfingen the first full-scale implementation of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters has been designed and built. In a first trickling filter 60% of ammonia is transformed to nitrite. The investigations showed, that a few mg/l of free ammonia in this trickling filter were sufficient to inhibit the nitratation but not the nitritation. To achieve this, operating conditions as pH and temperature are of great importance. The concentration of free ammonia should be kept constant because there is an adaption of the microorganisms to free ammonia. After a decrease of the free ammonia concentration the inhibition of the nitratation declines. By thermally killing the biomass and restarting the process, can guarantee a total inhibition of the nitratation, while the concentration of free ammonia is low. In the second, closed trickling filter (anoxic conditions) ammonium is converted autotrophically to nitrogen with nitrite as electron acceptor. It was possible to set up the anoxic ammonium oxidation in full scale without inoculating the process. The very slow growth of the anammox-bacteria leads to a long adaptation phase of the process. All operating conditions such as anoxic conditions, high temperature and a concentration of nitrite below 70 mg/l have to be observed

  15. Biological durability and oxidative potential of a stonewool mineral fibre compared to crocidolite asbestos fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippeli, S. [Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie, Labor fuer Biochemische Toxikologie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen-Weihenstephan, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Dornisch, K. [Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie, Labor fuer Biochemische Toxikologie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen-Weihenstephan, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Kaiser, S. [Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie, Labor fuer Biochemische Toxikologie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen-Weihenstephan, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Draeger, U. [Deutsche Rockwool Mineralwoll GmbH, Karl-Schneider-Strasse 14-18, D-45966 Gladbeck (Germany); Elstner, E.F. [Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie, Labor fuer Biochemische Toxikologie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen-Weihenstephan, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Experiments are described concerning the differences in redox properties and biodurability of natural asbestos fibres and an experimental stonewool fibre incubated in Gamble solution and reconstructed surfactant fluid. Crocidolite exhibits a significantly higher oxidative potential compared to the tested stonewool fibres. The oxidative acitivity of both types of fibres is not constant during incubation over several weeks, but rather shows a sinoidal curve including reactivities much higher than those at the beginning of the incubation. A continuous loss of mass is concluded not to be definitively connected with a continuous loss of toxicity. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  16. Selective oxidation of methionine residues in apolipoprotein A-I and its potential biological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzenboeck, U.; Waldeck, R.; Rye, K.A.; Sloane, T.; Kritharides, L.; Stocker, R.

    1998-01-01

    The earliest stages of HDL oxidation are accompanied by the oxidation of specific Met residues in apolipoprotein AI and AII and the formation of Met sulfoxides (Met(O)) has been proposed to play a significant role in the reduction and hence detoxification of lipid hydroperoxides associated with HDL. Oxidation of HDL may generally decrease the anti-atherogenic properties of this lipoprotein, although both, the inhibition and the enhancement of cholesterol removal from cells has been reported for different types of oxidation. In light of these findings we have investigated the secondary structure, lipid affinity, LCAT activation and cholesterol-efflux promoting properties of native and selectively oxidized apo A-I(apo A-I +32 , containing Met(O) at Met l12 and Met l48 ) in purified or reconstituted forms. Data obtained by circular dichroism revealed that selective oxidation of Met residues 112 and 148 does not alter alpha helicity of the protein in solution, indicating that this oxidation is not sufficient to influence significantly this type of secondary structure of apo A-I in its 'lipid-free' form. The lipid affinity of native apo A-I and apo A-I +32 was determined as the rate of clearance of DMPC multilamellar to small unilamellar vesicles. Compared with the native protein, apo A-I +32 induced a 2-3 fold faster rate of clearance, suggesting that the increased hydrophilicity due Met(O) increased the rate for protein-lipid interactions. Met residues 112 and 148 reside in the hydrophobic faces of helices 5 and 7, and both these regions have been suggested to be important for both, LCAT activation and cholesterol efflux. Kinetic experiments have revealed that the affinity for LCAT is comparable for HDL reconstituted with either apo A-I or apo A-I +32 . Efflux of [ 3 H]-cholesterol from lipid-laden human monocytederived macrophages to isolated apolipoproteins was enhanced for apo A-I +32 compared with apo A-I, consistent with the DMPC clearance data. Together these

  17. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C H; Okos, M R; Wankat, P C

    1989-06-05

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was successfully carried out in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor. The reactor was composed of two serial columns packed with Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 entrapped on the surface of natural sponge segments at a cell loading in the range of 2.03-5.56 g dry cells/g sponge. The average cell loading was 3.58 g dry cells/g sponge. Batch experiments indicated that a critical pH above 4.2 is necessary for the initiation of cell growth. One of the media used during continuous experiments consisted of a salt mixture alone and the other a nutrient medium containing a salt mixture with yeast extract and peptone. Effluent pH was controlled by supplying various fractions of the two different types of media. A nutrient medium fraction above 0.6 was crucial for successful fermentation in a trickle bed reactor. The nutrient medium fraction is the ratio of the volume of the nutrient medium to the total volume of nutrient plus salt medium. Supplying nutrient medium to both columns continuously was an effective way to meet both pH and nutrient requirement. A 257-mL reactor could ferment 45 g/L glucose from an initial concentration of 60 g/L glucose at a rate of 70 mL/h. Butanol, acetone, and ethanol concentrations were 8.82, 5.22, and 1.45 g/L, respectively, with a butanol and total solvent yield of 19.4 and 34.1 wt %. Solvent productivity in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor was 4.2 g/L h, which was 10 times higher than that obtained in a batch fermentation using free cells and 2.76 times higher than that of an immobilized CSTR. If the nutrient medium fraction was below 0.6 and the pH was below 4.2, the system degenerated. Oxygen also contributed to the system degeneration. Upon degeneration, glucose consumption and solvent yield decreased to 30.9 g/L and 23.0 wt %, respectively. The yield of total liquid product (40.0 wt %) and butanol selectivity (60.0 wt %) remained almost constant. Once the cells were degenerated

  18. A predictive model of iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation tuning Z-potential in aqueous environment for biological application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldassarre, Francesca; Cacciola, Matteo; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most used magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical and biotechnological field because of their nontoxicity respect to the other metals. The investigation of iron oxide nanoparticles behaviour in aqueous environment is important for the biological applications in terms of polydispersity, mobility, cellular uptake and response to the external magnetic field. Iron oxide nanoparticles tend to agglomerate in aqueous solutions; thus, the stabilisation and aggregation could be modified tuning the colloids physical proprieties. Surfactants or polymers are often used to avoid agglomeration and increase nanoparticles stability. We have modelled and synthesised iron oxide nanoparticles through a co-precipitation method, in order to study the influence of surfactants and coatings on the aggregation state. Thus, we compared experimental results to simulation model data. The change of Z-potential and the clusters size were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering. We developed a suitable numerical model to predict the flocculation. The effects of Volume Mean Diameter and fractal dimension were explored in the model. We obtained the trend of these parameters tuning the Z-potential. These curves matched with the experimental results and confirmed the goodness of the model. Subsequently, we exploited the model to study the influence of nanoparticles aggregation and stability by Z-potential and external magnetic field. The highest Z-potential is reached up with a small external magnetic influence, a small aggregation and then a high suspension stability. Thus, we obtained a predictive model of Iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation that will be exploited for the nanoparticles engineering and experimental setup of bioassays

  19. A predictive model of iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation tuning Z-potential in aqueous environment for biological application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldassarre, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.baldassarre@unisalento.it [University of Salento, Department of Cultural Heritage (Italy); Cacciola, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.cacciola@unirc.it [University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, DICEAM (Italy); Ciccarella, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.ciccarella@unisalento.it [University of Salento, Department of Innovation Engineering (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most used magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical and biotechnological field because of their nontoxicity respect to the other metals. The investigation of iron oxide nanoparticles behaviour in aqueous environment is important for the biological applications in terms of polydispersity, mobility, cellular uptake and response to the external magnetic field. Iron oxide nanoparticles tend to agglomerate in aqueous solutions; thus, the stabilisation and aggregation could be modified tuning the colloids physical proprieties. Surfactants or polymers are often used to avoid agglomeration and increase nanoparticles stability. We have modelled and synthesised iron oxide nanoparticles through a co-precipitation method, in order to study the influence of surfactants and coatings on the aggregation state. Thus, we compared experimental results to simulation model data. The change of Z-potential and the clusters size were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering. We developed a suitable numerical model to predict the flocculation. The effects of Volume Mean Diameter and fractal dimension were explored in the model. We obtained the trend of these parameters tuning the Z-potential. These curves matched with the experimental results and confirmed the goodness of the model. Subsequently, we exploited the model to study the influence of nanoparticles aggregation and stability by Z-potential and external magnetic field. The highest Z-potential is reached up with a small external magnetic influence, a small aggregation and then a high suspension stability. Thus, we obtained a predictive model of Iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation that will be exploited for the nanoparticles engineering and experimental setup of bioassays.

  20. The Checkpoint Immunotherapy Revolution: What Started as a Trickle Has Become a Flood, Despite Some Daunting Adverse Effects; New Drugs, Indications, and Combinations Continue to Emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Walter

    2016-03-01

    What started as a trickle of new agents that help the body's immune system fight cancer has now become a flood, despite some daunting adverse effects. This report discusses the new drugs, indications, and combinations that continue to emerge.

  1. Combined chemical-biological treatment for prevention/rehabilitation of clogged wells by an iron-oxidizing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gino, Efrat; Starosvetsky, Jeanna; Kurzbaum, Eyal; Armon, Robert

    2010-04-15

    Groundwater wells containing large concentrations of ferrous iron face serious clogging problems as a result of biotic iron oxidation. Following a short time after their start off, wells get clogged, and their production efficiency drop significantly up to a total obstruction, making cleanup and rehabilitation an economic burden. The present study was undertaken to test an experimental combined treatment (chemical and biological) for future prevention or rehabilitation of clogged wells. Sphaerotilus natans (an iron-oxidizing bacterium) freshly isolated from a deep well was grown to form biofilms on two systems: coupons and sand buried miniature wedge wire screen baskets. A combined chemical-biological treatment, applied at laboratory scale by use of glycolic acid (2%) and isolated bacteriophages against Sphaerotilus natans (SN1 and ER1-a newly isolated phage) at low multiplicity of infection (MOI), showed inhibition of biofilm formation and inactivation of the contaminant bacteria. In addition to complete inactivation of S. natans planktonic bacteria by the respective phages, earlier biofilm treatment with reduced glycolic acid concentration revealed efficient exopolysaccharide (EPS) digestion allowing phages to be increasingly efficient against biofilm matrix bacteria. Utilization of this combined treatment revealed clean surfaces of a model stainless steel wedge wire screen baskets (commonly used in wells) for up to 60 days.

  2. Inclusion of products of physicochemical oxidation of organic wastes in matter recycling of biological-technical life support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Kudenko, Yurii; Trifonov, Sergei; Ushakova, Sofya

    Inclusion of products of human and plant wastes' `wet' incineration in 22 medium using alter-nating current into matter recycling of biological-technical life support system (BTLSS) has been considered. Fluid and gaseous components have been shown to be the products of such processing. In particular, the final product contained all necessary for plant cultivation nitrogen forms: NO2, NO3, NH4+. As the base solution included urine than NH4+ form dominated. At human solid wastes' mineralization NO2 NH4+ were registered in approximately equal amount. Comparative analysis of mineral composition of oxidized human wastes' and standard Knop solutions has been carried out. On the grounds of that analysis the dilution methods of solutions prepared with addition of oxidized human wastes for their further use for plant irrigation have been suggested. Reasonable levels of wheat productivity cultivated at use of given solutions have been obtained. CO2, N2 and O2 have been determined to be the main gas components of the gas admixture emitted within the given process. These gases easily integrate in matter recycling process of closed ecosystem. The data of plants' cultivation feasibility in the atmosphere obtained after closing of gas loop including physicochemical facility and vegetation chamber with plants-representatives of LSS phototrophic unit has been received. Conclusion of advance research on creation of matter recycling process in the integrated physical-chemical-biological model system has been drawn.

  3. Formation and colloidal behaviour of elemental sulphur produced from the biological oxidation of hydrogensulphide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.H.

    1996-01-01


    The formation and aggregation of elemental sulphur from the microbiological oxidation of hydrogensulphide (H 2 S) by a mixed population of aerobic Thiobacillus -like bacteria has been investigated. Sulphide is

  4. Biological Significance of the Suppression of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We discovered that induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC clones generated from aged tissue donors (A-iPSCs fail to suppress oxidative phosphorylation. Compared to embryonic stem cells (ESCs and iPSCs generated from young donors (Y-iPSCs, A-iPSCs show poor expression of the pluripotent stem cell-specific glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3 and impaired glucose uptake, making them unable to support the high glucose demands of glycolysis. Persistent oxidative phosphorylation in A-iPSCs generates higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which leads to excessive elevation of glutathione (a ROS-scavenging metabolite and a blunted DNA damage response. These phenotypes were recapitulated in Y-iPSCs by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK or supplying citrate to activate oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, oxidative phosphorylation in A-iPSC clones depletes citrate, a nuclear source of acetyl group donors for histone acetylation; this consequently alters histone acetylation status. Expression of GLUT3 in A-iPSCs recovers the metabolic defect, DNA damage response, and histone acetylation status.

  5. Stability and effectiveness against bacterial adhesion of poly(ethylene oxide) coatings in biological fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, Astrid; de Vries, Jacob; van der Mei, HC; Norde, W; Busscher, HJ

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coatings have been shown to reduce the adhesion of different microbial strains and species and thus are promising as coatings to prevent biomaterial-centered infection of medical implants. Clinically, however, PEO coatings are not yet applied, as little is known about

  6. Stability and effectiveness against bacterial adhesion of poly(ethylene oxide) coatings in biological fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, A.; Vries, de J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coatings have been shown to reduce the adhesion of different microbial strains and species and thus are promising as coatings to prevent biomaterial-centered infection of medical implants. Clinically, however, PEO coatings are not yet applied, as little is known about

  7. A Classical Potential to Model the Adsorption of Biological Molecules on Oxidized Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi

    2011-02-08

    The behavior of titanium implants in physiological environments is governed by the thin oxide layer that forms spontaneously on the metal surface and mediates the interactions with adsorbate molecules. In order to study the adsorption of biomolecules on titanium in a realistic fashion, we first build up a model of an oxidized Ti surface in contact with liquid water by means of extensive first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Taking the obtained structure as reference, we then develop a classical potential to model the Ti/TiOx/water interface. This is based on the mapping with Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials of the adsorption energy landscape of single water and ammonia molecules on the rutile TiO2(110) surface. The interactions with arbitrary organic molecules are obtained via standard combination rules to established biomolecular force fields. The transferability of our potential to the case of organic molecules adsorbing on the oxidized Ti surface is checked by comparing the classical potential energy surfaces of representative systems to quantum mechanical results at the level of density functional theory. Moreover, we calculate the heat of immersion of the TiO2 rutile surface and the detachment force of a single tyrosine residue from steered molecular dynamics simulations, finding good agreement with experimental reference data in both cases. As a first application, we study the adsorption behavior of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide on the oxidized titanium surface, focusing particularly on the calculation of the free energy of desorption.

  8. Assessing the application of advanced oxidation processes, and their combination with biological treatment, to effluents from pulp and paper industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merayo, Noemí; Hermosilla, Daphne; Blanco, Laura; Cortijo, Luis; Blanco, Angeles

    2013-11-15

    The closure of water circuits within pulp and paper mills has resulted in a higher contamination load of the final mill effluent, which must consequently be further treated in many cases to meet the standards imposed by the legislation in force. Different treatment strategies based on advanced oxidation processes (ozonation and TiO2-photocatalysis), and their combination with biological treatment (MBR), are herein assessed for effluents of a recycled paper mill and a kraft pulp mill. Ozone treatment achieved the highest efficiency of all. The consumption of 2.4 g O3 L(-1) resulted in about a 60% COD reduction treating the effluent from the kraft pulp mill at an initial pH=7; although it only reached about a 35% COD removal for the effluent of the recycled paper mill. Otherwise, photocatalysis achieved about a 20-30% reduction of the COD for both type of effluents. In addition, the effluent from the recycled paper mill showed a higher biodegradability, so combinations of these AOPs with biological treatment were tested. As a result, photocatalysis did not report any significant COD reduction improvement whether being performed as pre- or post-treatment of the biological process; whereas the use of ozonation as post-biological treatment enhanced COD removal a further 10%, summing up a total 90% reduction of the COD for the combined treatment, as well as it also supposed an increase of the presence of volatile fatty acids, which might ultimately enable the resultant wastewater to be recirculated back to further biological treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Air purification from a mixture VOCs in the pilot-scale trickle-bed bioreactor (TBB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarzyński Rafał

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of the air bio-purification from the mixture of two volatile organic compounds (styrene and p-xylene was studied. The process was carried out in a pilot-scale trickle-bed bioreactor installation designed to purify ∼200 m3h-1 of the polluted air. The bioreactor operated at concurrent flow of gas and liquid (mineral salt solution through packing (polypropylene Ralu rings covered with a thin layer of microorganisms (bacterial consortium of Pseudomonas sp. E-022150 and Pseudomonas putida mt-2. The experiments, carried out for various values of a reactor load with pollutant, confirmed the great efficiency of the investigated process. At the tested bed load with pollution (inlet specific pollutant load was changed within the range of 41 – 84 gm-3 h -1, styrene conversion degree changed within the range of 80-87% and p-xylene conversion degree within the range of 42-48%.

  10. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women’s shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context. PMID:27144595

  11. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus

    2015-01-01

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens...... or egg excretion with specific antibody levels. We set out to investigate the association between worm load and T. suis and A. suum specific serum antibody levels (IgG1, IgG2 and IgA) against excretory-secretory products of adults and third stage larvae, respectively, measured at 0, 7 and 14 weeks p.......i. in a trickle-infected F1-resource-population of crossbred pigs (n=195). Furthermore, we wanted to determine the heritability of these antibody isotypes during the course of infection. Most pigs remained infected with A. suum throughout the experiment while they expelled T. suis between 7 and 14 weeks post...

  12. Catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongkia, Atittahn; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai; Suriye, Kongkiat; Nonkhamwong, Anuwat

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation. The effects of cycle period and split on relative conversion, which is defined as styrene conversion obtained from periodic operation over that from steady state operation, were examined at various operating conditions including gas and average liquid flow rates, pressure and temperature. The experimental results reveal that both cycle period and split have strong influence on the catalytic performance. The fast mode (short cycle period) is a favorable condition. The improvement by the periodic operation becomes less pronounced for operations at high average liquid flow rate, pressure and temperature. From this study, a maximum improvement of styrene conversion of 18% is observed

  13. Deuterium exchange between hydrogen and water in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enright, J.T.; Chuang, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    The catalyzed exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water has been studied as the basis for a heavy water production process. Platinum catalyst which had been waterproofed with Teflon was tested in a 0.2 m diameter trickle bed reactor at pressures and temperatures up to 6 MPa and 440 K. Extensive experimental data were used to test a model of the system which was developed from fundamental principles. It was found that mass transfer plays a very important role in the overall exchange and the conventional theory of vapour/liquid mass transfer does not adequately describe the absorption process. Modelling of the data has resulted in the postulation of a second method of mass transfer whereby HDO transfers directly from the catalyst to the bulk liquid phase. (author)

  14. Hydrogen sulfide removal from air by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in a trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M; Gómez, J M; Cantero, D; Páca, J; Halecký, M; Kozliak, E I; Sobotka, M

    2009-09-01

    A strain of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans immobilized in polyurethane foam was utilized for H(2)S removal in a bench-scale trickle-bed reactor, testing the limits of acidity and SO(4) (2-) accumulation. The use of this acidophilic strain resulted in remarkable stability in the performance of the system. The reactor maintained a >98-99 % H(2)S removal efficiency for c of up to 66 ppmv and empty bed residence time 98 % H(2)S was achieved under steady-state conditions, over the pH range of 0.44-7.30. Despite the accumulation of acidity and SO(4) (2-) (up to 97 g/L), the system operated without inhibition.

  15. Experimental analysis and evaluation of the mass transfer process in a trickle-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Silva

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A transient experimental analysis of a three-phase descendent-cocurrent trickle-bed H2O/CH4-Ar/g -Al2O3 system was made using the stimulus-response technique, with the gas phase as a reference. Methane was used as a tracer and injected into the argon feed and the concentration vs time profiles were obtained at the entrance and exit of the bed, which were maintained at 298K and 1.013 10(5 Pa. A mathematical model for the tracer was developed to estimate the axial dispersion overall gas-liquid mass transfer and liquid-solid mass transfer coefficients. Experimental and theoretical results were compared and shown to be in good agreement. The model was validated by two additional experiments, and the values of the coefficients obtained above were confirmed.

  16. Catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongkia, Atittahn; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suriye, Kongkiat; Nonkhamwong, Anuwat [SCG Chemicals Co. Ltd., Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-03-15

    We investigated the catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation. The effects of cycle period and split on relative conversion, which is defined as styrene conversion obtained from periodic operation over that from steady state operation, were examined at various operating conditions including gas and average liquid flow rates, pressure and temperature. The experimental results reveal that both cycle period and split have strong influence on the catalytic performance. The fast mode (short cycle period) is a favorable condition. The improvement by the periodic operation becomes less pronounced for operations at high average liquid flow rate, pressure and temperature. From this study, a maximum improvement of styrene conversion of 18% is observed.

  17. Air purification from a mixture VOCs in the pilot-scale trickle-bed bioreactor (TBB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzyński, Rafał; Gąszczak, Agnieszka; Janecki, Daniel; Bartelmus, Grażyna

    2017-10-01

    The efficiency of the air bio-purification from the mixture of two volatile organic compounds (styrene and p-xylene) was studied. The process was carried out in a pilot-scale trickle-bed bioreactor installation designed to purify ˜200 m3h-1 of the polluted air. The bioreactor operated at concurrent flow of gas and liquid (mineral salt solution) through packing (polypropylene Ralu rings) covered with a thin layer of microorganisms (bacterial consortium of Pseudomonas sp. E-022150 and Pseudomonas putida mt-2). The experiments, carried out for various values of a reactor load with pollutant, confirmed the great efficiency of the investigated process. At the tested bed load with pollution (inlet specific pollutant load was changed within the range of 41 - 84 gm-3 h -1), styrene conversion degree changed within the range of 80-87% and p-xylene conversion degree within the range of 42-48%.

  18. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Galak

    Full Text Available How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  19. Biofiltration of 1,1,1-trichloroethane by a trickle-bed air biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chungsying; Chang, Kwotsair

    2003-09-01

    The performance of a trickle-bed air biofilter (TBAB) in the removal of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCLE) was evaluated in concentrations varying from 0.025 to 0.049 g/m3 and at empty-bed residence time (EBRT) varying from 20 to 90 s. Nearly complete TCLE removal could be achieved for influent carbon loading between 0.98 and 5.88 g/m3 h. The TBAB appeared efficient for controlling TCLE emission under low-carbon-loading conditions. Carbon recoveries higher than 95% were achieved, demonstrating the accuracy of results. The carbon mass rate of the liquid effluent was approximately two orders of magnitude less than that of the effluent CO2, indicating that dissolved TCLE and its derivatives in leachate were present in negligible amounts in the TBAB.

  20. Trickle-down effects of supervisor perceptions of interactional justice: a moderated mediation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Maureen L; Schminke, Marshall; Mayer, David M

    2013-07-01

    Supervisors' perceptions of how fairly they are treated by their own supervisors can influence their subordinates' perceptions, attitudes, and behavior. We present a moderated mediation model that demonstrates how work group structure can enhance or constrain these effects. Results show supervisors' perceptions of the fairness of the interactional treatment they receive relate to their subordinates' perceptions of interactional justice climate, and this relationship is stronger in work groups with more organic structures. Furthermore, consistent with the moderated mediation prediction, interactional justice climate mediates the relationship between supervisors' perceptions of interactional justice and outcomes when work group structures are more organic. We discuss the implications of the findings for research on justice and trickle-down effects. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Performance analysis of a trickle irrigation subunit installed in an apple orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soccol Olívio José

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to evaluate the "xique-xique" irrigation system of a trickle irrigated subunit. Initial results showed that the system's performance was average, any Emission Uniformity, Statistical Uniformity and Coefficient of Global Variation were 74.51, 77.69, and 22.31%, respectively. The efficiency parameters were below expectations, and values of Application Efficiency (Ae, Storage Efficiency (Se, Deep Percolation (Dp, Deficit Degree (DD and Adequacy Degree (a were 100, 47.83, 0, 52.17 and 0% respectively. By adopting new management procedures, it was possible to improve the system's efficiency, reaching values of 90.20, 91.68, 9.80, 8.32 and 52.87% for Ae, Se, Dp, DD and "a", respectively.

  2. Optimisation of hydrogenation reactors with heterogeneous catalysts operated in trickle phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoche, M. [CRI KataLeuna GmbH, Leuna (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Maldistribution in trickle phase reactors is to be blamed for hot spot formation and non-ideal reaction. For a simple and quick evaluation, a virtually divided reactor model is presented for a better understanding and analysis of the consequences of liquid maldistribution. Based on this modelization, different methods are described to resolve microscopic and macroscopic maldistribution. The same model provides information to produce guidelines for reactor loading and evaluating the uneven effects of coking. It is shown that areas with specifically high liquid loads may suffer from insufficient gas supply and might therewith prevent a proper stoechiometric conversion of the gas with the liquid. In areas with lower liquid load, the gas has less hydraulic resistance and bypasses the effective reaction zone. (orig.)

  3. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  4. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanna, Muna; Warith, Mostafa; Fernandes, Leta

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH 4 ) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH 4 and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH 4 oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 deg. C without any NMOCs the V max value was 35.0 μg CH 4 h -1 g wetwt -1 . This value was reduced to 19.1 μg CH 4 h -1 g wetwt -1 when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH 4 in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated.

  5. Bobbing of Oxysterols: Molecular Mechanism for Translocation of Tail-Oxidized Sterols through Biological Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulig, W.; Mikkolainen, H.; Olžyńska, Agnieszka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Hof, Martin; Vattulainen, I.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Rog, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2018), s. 1118-1123 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : biological membranes * alcohols * cell membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  6. Bacterial community dynamics during start-up of a trickle-bed bioreactor degrading aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, M; Amann, R; Ludwig, W; Hekmat, D; Schleifer, K H

    1998-03-01

    This study was performed with a laboratory-scale fixed-bed bioreactor degrading a mixture of aromatic compounds (Solvesso100). The starter culture for the bioreactor was prepared in a fermentor with a wastewater sample of a care painting facility as the inoculum and Solvesso100 as the sole carbon source. The bacterial community dynamics in the fermentor and the bioreactor were examined by a conventional isolation procedure and in situ hybridization with fluorescently labeled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides. Two significant shifts in the bacterial community structure could be demonstrated. The original inoculum from the wastewater of the car factory was rich in proteobacteria of the alpha and beta subclasses, while the final fermentor enrichment was dominated by bacteria closely related to Pseudomonas putida or Pseudomonas mendocina, which both belong to the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. A second significant shift was observed when the fermentor culture was transferred as inoculum to the trickle-bed bioreactor. The community structure in the bioreactor gradually returned to a higher complexity, with the dominance of beta and alpha subclass proteobacteria, whereas the gamma subclass proteobacteria sharply declined. Obviously, the preceded pollutant adaptant did not lead to a significant enrichment of bacteria that finally dominated in the trickle-bed bioreactor. In the course of experiments, three new 16S as well as 23S rRNA-targeted probes for beta subclass proteobacteria were designed, probe SUBU1237 for the genera Burkholderia and Sutterella, probe ALBO34a for the genera Alcaligenes and Bordetella, and probe Bcv13b for Burkholderia cepacia and Burkholderia vietnamiensis. Bacteria hybridizing with the probe Bcv13b represented the main Solvesso100-degrading population in the reactor.

  7. Mathematical modeling of wastewater decolorization in a trickle-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skybová, T; Přibyl, M; Pocedič, J; Hasal, P

    2012-02-20

    This work focuses on mathematical modeling of removal of organic dyes from textile industry waste waters by a white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus in a trickle-bed bioreactor. We developed a mathematical model of biomass and decolorization process dynamics. The model comprises mass balances of glucose and the dye in a fungal biofilm and a liquid film. The biofilm is modeled using a spatially two-dimensional domain. The liquid film is considered as homogeneous in the direction normal to the biofilm surface. The biomass growth, decay and the erosion of the biofilm are taken into account. Using experimental data, we identified values of key model parameters: the dye degradation rate constant, biofilm corrugation factor and liquid velocity. Considering the dye degradation rate constant 1×10⁻⁵ kg m⁻³ s⁻¹, we found optimal values of the corrugation factor 0.853 and 0.59 and values of the liquid velocity 5.23×10⁻³ m s⁻¹ and 6.2×10⁻³ m s⁻¹ at initial dye concentrations 0.09433 kg m⁻³ and 0.05284 kg m⁻³, respectively. A good agreement between the simulated and experimental data using estimated values of the model parameters was achieved. The model can be used to simulate the performance of laboratory scale trickle-bed bioreactor operated in a batch regime or to estimate values of principal parameters of the bioreactor system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological consilience of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in plants: Gases of primordial earth linking plant, microbial and animal physiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Hideo; Cohen, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in the mammalian body through the enzymatic activities of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). A growing number of studies have revealed that biogenic H2S produced in tissues is involved in a variety of physiological responses in mammals including vasorelaxation and neurotransmission. It is now evident that mammals utilize H2S to regulate multiple signaling systems, echoing the research history of the gaseous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) that had previously only been recognized for their cytotoxicity. In the human diet, meats (mammals, birds and fishes) and vegetables (plants) containing cysteine and other sulfur compounds are the major dietary sources for endogenous production of H2S. Plants are primary producers in ecosystems on the earth and they synthesize organic sulfur compounds through the activity of sulfur assimilation. Although plant H2S-producing activities have been known for a long time, our knowledge of H2S biology in plant systems has not been updated to the extent of mammalian studies. Here we review recent progress on H2S studies, highlighting plants and bacteria. Scoping the future integration of H2S, NO and O2 biology, we discuss a possible linkage between physiology, ecology and evolutional biology of gas metabolisms that may reflect the historical changes of the Earth's atmospheric composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-enzymatic lipid oxidation products in biological systems: assessment of the metabolites from polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigor, Claire; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Pinot, Edith; Oger, Camille; Vercauteren, Joseph; Le Faouder, Pauline; Galano, Jean-Marie; Lee, Jetty Chung-Yung; Durand, Thierry

    2014-08-01

    Metabolites of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids notably omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids have become important biomarkers of lipid products. Especially the arachidonic acid-derived F2-isoprostanes are the classic in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in biological systems. In recent years other isoprostanes from eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, adrenic and α-linolenic acids have been evaluated, namely F3-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes and F1-phytoprostanes, respectively. These have been gaining interest as complementary specific biomarkers in human diseases. Refined extraction methods, robust analysis and elucidation of chemical structures have improved the sensitivity of detection in biological tissues and fluids. Previously the main reliable instrumentation for measurement was gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), but now the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and immunological techniques is gaining much attention. In this review, the types of prostanoids generated from non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of some important omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and biological samples that have been determined by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS are discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Mid-Ir Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer for Biological Trace Nitric Oxide Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Vincent; Ragab, Ahemd; Stsiapura, Vitali; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2011-06-01

    S-nitrosothiols have received much attention in biochemistry and medicine as donors of nitrosonium ion (NO^+) and nitric oxide (NO) - physiologically active molecules involved in vasodilation and signal transduction. Determination of S-nitrosothiols content in cells and tissues is of great importance for fundamental research and medical applications. We will report on our ongoing development of a instrument to measure trace levels of nitric oxide gas (NO), released from S-nitrosothiols after exposure to UV light (340 nm) or reaction with L-Cysteine+CuCl mixture. The instrument uses the method of cavity ring-down spectroscopy, probing rotationally resolved lines in the vibrational fundamental transition near 5.2 μm. The laser source is a continuous-wave, room temperature external cavity quantum cascade laser. An acousto-optic modulator is used to abruptly turn off the optical power incident on the cavity when the laser and cavity pass through resonance.

  11. Evaluation of electro-oxidation of biologically treated landfill leachate using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Ran Xiaoni; Wu Xiaogang; Zhang Daobin

    2011-01-01

    Box-Behnken statistical experiment design and response surface methodology were used to investigate electrochemical oxidation of mature landfill leachate pretreated by sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Titanium coated with ruthenium dioxide (RuO 2 ) and iridium dioxide (IrO 2 ) was used as the anode in this study. The variables included current density, inter-electrode gap and reaction time. Response factors were ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency and COD removal efficiency. The response surface methodology models were derived based on the results. The predicted values calculated with the model equations were very close to the experimental values and the models were highly significant. The organic components before and after electrochemical oxidation were determined by GC-MS.

  12. Electrochemical oxidation of biological pretreated and membrane separated landfill leachate concentrates on boron doped diamond anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Bo, E-mail: 357436235@qq.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yu, Zhiming, E-mail: zhiming@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Wei, Qiuping, E-mail: qiupwei@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Long, HangYu, E-mail: 55686385@qq.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xie, Youneng, E-mail: 1187272844@qq.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yijia, E-mail: 503630433@qq.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • High quality boron-doped diamond film electrodes were synthesized on Nb substrates. • Electrochemical oxidation on boron-doped diamond anode is an effective method for treating landfill leachate concentrates. • Optimal operating conditions for electrochemical oxidation of landfill leachate concentrates is determined. • 87.5% COD removal and 74.06% NH{sub 3}−N removal were achieved after 6 h treatment. - Abstract: In the present study, the high quality boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes with excellent electrochemical properties were deposited on niobium (Nb) substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. The electrochemical oxidation of landfill leachate concentrates from disc tube reverse osmosis (DTRO) process over a BDD anode was investigated. The effects of varying operating parameters, such as current density, initial pH, flow velocity and cathode material on degradation efficiency were also evaluated following changes in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium nitrogen (NH{sub 3}−N). The instantaneous current efficiency (ICE) was used to appraise different operating conditions. As a result, the best conditions obtained were as follows, current density 50 mA cm{sup −2}, pH 5.16, flow velocity 6 L h{sup −1}. Under these conditions, 87.5% COD and 74.06% NH{sub 3}−N removal were achieved after 6 h treatment, with specific energy consumption of 223.2 kWh m{sup −3}. In short, these results indicated that the electrochemical oxidation with BDD/Nb anode is an effective method for the treatment of landfill leachate concentrates.

  13. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, A. G.; Barison, A.; Oliveira, V. S.; Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A.; Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T.; Schreiner, W. H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV–Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the μM range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation–reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V 2 O 5 form.

  14. Biological versus mineralogical chromium reduction: potential for reoxidation by manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Elizabeth C; Chen, Lixia; Hansel, Colleen M; Krumholz, Lee R; Elwood Madden, Andrew S; Lan, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(vi), present predominantly as CrO4(2-) in water at neutral pH) is a common ground water pollutant, and reductive immobilization is a frequent remediation alternative. The Cr(iii) that forms upon microbial or abiotic reduction often co-precipitates with naturally present or added iron (Fe), and the stability of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitate is a function of its mineral properties. In this study, Fe-Cr solids were formed by microbial Cr(vi) reduction using Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1 in the presence of the Fe-bearing minerals hematite, aluminum substituted goethite (Al-goethite), and nontronite (NAu-2, Clay Minerals Society), or by abiotic Cr(vi) reduction by dithionite reduced NAu-2 or iron sulfide (FeS). The properties of the resulting Fe-Cr solids and their behavior upon exposure to the oxidant manganese (Mn) oxide (birnessite) differed significantly. In microcosms containing strain RCH1 and hematite or Al-goethite, there was significant initial loss of Cr(vi) in a pattern consistent with adsorption, and significant Cr(vi) was found in the resulting solids. The solid formed when Cr(vi) was reduced by FeS contained a high proportion of Cr(iii) and was poorly crystalline. In microcosms with strain RCH1 and hematite, Cr precipitates appeared to be concentrated in organic biofilms. Reaction between birnessite and the abiotically formed Cr(iii) solids led to production of significant dissolved Cr(vi) compared to the no-birnessite controls. This pattern was not observed in the solids generated by microbial Cr(vi) reduction, possibly due to re-reduction of any Cr(vi) generated upon oxidation by birnessite by active bacteria or microbial enzymes. The results of this study suggest that Fe-Cr precipitates formed in groundwater remediation may remain stable only in the presence of active anaerobic microbial reduction. If exposed to environmentally common Mn oxides such as birnessite in the absence of microbial activity, there is the potential

  15. Nanocomposites of iridium oxide and conducting polymers as electroactive phases in biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral-Vico, J; Sánchez-Redondo, S; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2014-05-01

    Much effort is currently devoted to implementing new materials in electrodes that will be used in the central nervous system, either for functional electrostimulation or for tests on nerve regeneration. Their main aim is to improve the charge capacity of the electrodes, while preventing damaging secondary reactions, such as peroxide formation, occurring while applying the electric field. Thus, hybrids may represent a new generation of materials. Two novel hybrid materials are synthesized using three known biocompatible materials tested in the neural system: polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and iridium oxide (IrO2). In particular, PPy-IrO2 and PEDOT-IrO2 hybrid nanocomposite materials are prepared by chemical polymerization in hydrothermal conditions, using IrO2 as oxidizing agent. The reaction yields a significant ordered new hybrid where the conducting polymer is formed around the IrO2 nanoparticles, encapsulating them. Scanning electron microscopy and backscattering techniques show the extent of the encapsulation. Both X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies identify the components of the phases, as well as the absence of impurities. Electrochemical properties of the final phases in powder and pellet form are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Biocompatibility is tested with MTT toxicity tests using primary cultures of cortical neurons grown in vitro for 6 and 9days. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological groundwater denitrification systems: Lab-scale trials aimed at nitrous oxide production and emission assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodici, Marco; Avona, Alessia; Laudicina, Vito Armando; Viviani, Gaspare

    2018-07-15

    Bio-trenches are a sustainable option for treating nitrate contamination in groundwater. However, a possible side effect of this technology is the production of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that can be found both dissolved in the liquid effluent as well as emitted as off gas. The aim of this study was to analyze NO 3 - removal and N 2 O production in lab-scale column trials. The column contained olive nut as organic carbon media. The experimental study was divided into three phases (I, II and III) each characterized by different inlet NO 3 - concentrations (30, 50, 75mgNO 3 -NL -1 respectively). Sampling ports deployed along the length of the column allowed to observe the denitrification process as well as the formation and consumption of intermediate products, such as nitrite (NO 2 - ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O). In particular, it was observed that N 2 O production represent only a small fraction of removed NO 3 - during Phase I and II, both for dissolved (0.007%) and emitted (0.003%) phase, and it was recorded a high denitrification efficiency, over 99%. Nevertheless, significantly higher values were recorded for Phase 3 concerning emitted phase (0.018%). This fact is due to increased inlet concentration which resulted in a carbon limitation and in a consequent decrease in denitrification efficiency (76%). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular and Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Glüer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles (SPIO are used in different ways as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: Particles with high nonspecific uptake are required for unspecific labeling of phagocytic cells whereas those that target specific molecules need to have very low unspecific cellular uptake. We compared iron-oxide particles with different core materials (magnetite, maghemite, different coatings (none, dextran, carboxydextran, polystyrene and different hydrodynamic diameters (20–850 nm for internalization kinetics, release of internalized particles, toxicity, localization of particles and ability to generate contrast in MRI. Particle uptake was investigated with U118 glioma cells und human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, which exhibit different phagocytic properties. In both cell types, the contrast agents Resovist, B102, non-coated Fe3O4 particles and microspheres were better internalized than dextran-coated Nanomag particles. SPIO uptake into the cells increased with particle/iron concentrations. Maximum intracellular accumulation of iron particles was observed between 24 h to 36 h of exposure. Most particles were retained in the cells for at least two weeks, were deeply internalized, and only few remained adsorbed at the cell surface. Internalized particles clustered in the cytosol of the cells. Furthermore, all particles showed a low toxicity. By MRI, monolayers consisting of 5000 Resovist-labeled cells could easily be visualized. Thus, for unspecific cell labeling, Resovist and microspheres show the highest potential, whereas Nanomag particles are promising contrast agents for target-specific labeling.

  18. The Effects of Different External Carbon Sources on Nitrous Oxide Emissions during Denitrification in Biological Nutrient Removal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Jing; Hou, Hongxun

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different external carbon sources (acetate and ethanol) on the nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions during denitrification in biological nutrient removal processes. Results showed that external carbon source significantly influenced N2O emissions during the denitrification process. When acetate served as the external carbon source, 0.49 mg N/L and 0.85 mg N/L of N2O was produced during the denitrificaiton processes in anoxic and anaerobic/anoxic experiments, giving a ratio of N2O-N production to TN removal of 2.37% and 4.96%, respectively. Compared with acetate, the amount of N2O production is negligible when ethanol used as external carbon addition. This suggested that ethanol is a potential alternative external carbon source for acetate from the point of view of N2O emissions.

  19. Compact and energy-saving trickle film ice storage unit; Rieselfilm-Eisspeicheranlage baut kompakt und spart Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompetzki, F. [Zimmer Edelstahl GmbH, Nuernberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Ice storages are well established in industrial refrigeration systems. The contribution describes new, compact trickle film ice storages with plate heat exchangers. These systems need less refrigerant and consume up to 30% less energy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Eisspeicher haben sich in der industriellen Kaeltetechnik seit langem bewaehrt. Neue Impulse erhaelt diese Technik jetzt durch kompakt aufgebaute Rieselfilm-Eisspeicher mit Plattenwaermeaustauscher. Aufgrund ihrer Konzeption benoetigen sie bei gleicher Leistung deutlich weniger Kaeltemittel und verbrauchen bis zu 30% weniger Energie. (orig.)

  20. Protective immune responses with trickle infections of third-stage filarial larvae of Wuchereria bancrofti in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekariah, G R; Monteiro, Y M; Netto, A; Deshpande, L; Subrahmanyam, D

    1989-01-01

    Groups of inbred BALB/c mice were immunized with trickle doses of 20 live third-stage larvae (L3) of Wuchereria bancrofti each subcutaneously or with 150 microg of sonicated microfilarial antigens emulsified in Freund's adjuvant intramuscularly. An antibody response was distinctly seen after seven trickle doses of L3 and following with the sonicated microfilarial immunization. Due to the non-permissive nature of inbred mice to W. bancrofti infections, a novel immunization approach was adopted using appropriate age- and sex-matched controls. The anti-L3 response in terms of antibody-dependent cell-mediated adhesion and killing was assessed in the immunized animals by implanting live L3 in micropore chambers subcutaneously. About 75% L3 W. bancrofti were affected in animals sensitized with seven trickle doses of L3. When sensitizations were continued, as high as 92% of L3 were seen affected with ten trickle doses compared with 27% in age-matched controls. Immunization with sonicated microfilarial antigen affected about 70% of L3 as opposed to only 12% in controls. A positive correlation was observed in the antibody response with protectivity. This method of induction and assessment of the anti-L3 response involving a small set of animals has not only allowed quantification of affected L3 but has also enabled us to visualize larval conditions in immunologically activated animals. The micropore chamber system, would be useful in monitoring the induction of protective immune response against W. bancrofti in inbred mice. Experimentation on large numbers of animals is required to elucidate further the response of mice towards L3 and also to pinpoint the putative protective antigens. PMID:12412764

  1. Preliminary characterization and biological reduction of putative biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, S; Igric, P; Takahashi, Y; Sakai, Y; Fortin, D; Hannington, M D; Schwarz-Schampera, U

    2009-01-01

    Sediment samples were obtained from areas of diffuse hydrothermal venting along the seabed in the Tonga sector of the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean. Sediments from Volcano 1 and Volcano 19 were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be composed primarily of the iron oxyhydroxide mineral, two-line ferrihydrite. XRD also suggested the possible presence of minor amounts of more ordered iron (hydr)oxides (including six-line ferrihydrite, goethite/lepidocrocite and magnetite) in the biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from Volcano 1; however, Mössbauer spectroscopy failed to detect any mineral phases more crystalline than two-line ferrihydrite. The minerals were precipitated on the surfaces of abundant filamentous microbial structures. Morphologically, some of these structures were similar in appearance to the known iron-oxidizing genus Mariprofundus spp., suggesting that the sediments are composed of biogenic iron oxides. At Volcano 19, an areally extensive, active vent field, the microbial cells appeared to be responsible for the formation of cohesive chimney-like structures of iron oxyhydroxide, 2-3 m in height, whereas at Volcano 1, an older vent field, no chimney-like structures were apparent. Iron reduction of the sediment material (i.e. BIOS) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was measured, in vitro, as the ratio of [total Fe(II)]:[total Fe]. From this parameter, reduction rates were calculated for Volcano 1 BIOS (0.0521 day(-1)), Volcano 19 BIOS (0.0473 day(-1)), and hydrous ferric oxide, a synthetic two-line ferrihydrite (0.0224 day(-1)). Sediments from both BIOS sites were more easily reduced than synthetic ferrihydrite, which suggests that the decrease in effective surface area of the minerals within the sediments (due to the presence of the organic component) does not inhibit subsequent microbial reduction. These results indicate that natural, marine BIOS are easily reduced in the presence of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, and that the

  2. Investigation of flow dynamics of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.

    2016-01-01

    A radiotracer investigation was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). The main objectives of the investigation were to investigate radial and axial mixing of the liquid phase, and evaluate performance of the liquid distributor/redistributor at different operating conditions. Mean residence times (MRTs), holdups (H) and fraction of flow flowing along different quadrants were estimated. The analysis of the measured RTD curves indicated radial non-uniform distribution of liquid phase across the beds. The overall RTD of the liquid phase, measured at the exit of the reactor was simulated using a multi-parameter axial dispersion with exchange model (ADEM), and model parameters were obtained. The results of model simulations indicated that the TBR behaved as a plug flow reactor at most of the operating conditions used in the investigation. The results of the investigation helped to improve the existing design as well as to design a full-scale industrial TBR for petroleum refining applications. - Highlights: • Residence time distributions of liquid phase were measured in a trickle bed reactor. • Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer. • Mean residence times, holdups and radial distribution of liquid phase were quantified. • Axial dispersion with exchange model was used to simulate the measured data. • The trickle bed reactor behaved as a plug flow reactor.

  3. Usability of ECT for quantitative and qualitative characterization of trickle-bed flow dynamics experiencing filtration conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibirna, C.; Fortin, A. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). GIREF; Edouard, D.; Larachi, F. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of using electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) as an imaging method for trickle-bed reaction processes was examined in this study. In particular, the advantages and disadvantages of using ECT to characterize the flow dynamics in a four-phase trickle bed reactor were investigated. This work was part of a larger study to extend the service life of catalyst beds used during the hydrotreatment of some oil fractions, such as Athabasca bitumen. A better understanding of the flow dynamics and clogging physics in trickle-bed reactors is needed in order to prevent clogging in the catalyst bed. This study focused on several aspects of the ECT as a non-intrusive imaging method for such processes. This paper described the experimental setup in detail. The ECT equipment allowed for up to 100 tomograms per second to be recorded. The clogging experiments lasted about 30 hours from a completely clean catalyst bed to a stable, non-filtering clogging state. A series of algorithms for ECT image reconstruction were presented. Truncated and filtered single value decomposition (SVD) and Landweber methods were found to be the most appropriate. ECT was shown to be faster and less expensive than nuclear ionizing, non-ionizing and other tomography methods. However, the main advantage of ECT was its non-intrusive attributes. It was also suggested that the complex technologies involved in ECT still require further refinement and better calibration methods. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Characterization and removal of specific organic constituents in an UASB-trickling-filter system treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Patrícia Procópio; Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto de Lemos

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of specific organic constituents (carbohydrates, proteins and lipids) in raw sewage and in the anaerobic and aerobic effluents of a demo-scale (500 inhabitants) UASB- trickling-filter system. The evaluation of such parameters was carried out for two operating conditions, either without sludge recirculation (experiment I) from the trickling filter to the UASB reactor or with sludge recirculation (experiment II), for sludge thickening and stabilization, in the anaerobic reactor. The results showed that the contribution of acetic acid, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids amounted for approximately 70% of the total COD fed to the UASB during experiment I, whereas during experiment II these constituents amounted for only around 40% of the total COD. Although very high BOD and COD overall removal efficiencies were observed for the treatment system (around 90% and 80%, respectively), it was possible to infer that these efficiencies were mainly related to the removal of carbohydrates and lipids (around 80% removal), and of other non-identified constituents. The removal of proteins was much lower (around 50% removal), and the relative contribution of proteins to the total COD increased along the treatment course, being responsible for most of the residual COD of the treatment units. In the present system configuration, the UASB reactor played a major role in the removal of carbohydrates, whereas the trickling filter was very effective in the removal of lipids. The return of aerobic sludge for thickening and stabilization in the UASB reactor did not affect its performance.

  5. Use of shredded tire chips and tire crumbs as packing media in trickling filter systems for landfill leachate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, B; Warith, M A

    2008-08-01

    Scrap tire stockpiles are breeding grounds for pests, mosquitoes and west Nile viruses and, thereby, become a potential health risk. This experimental study was carried out in six stages to determine the suitability of shredded tire materials in a trickling filter system to treat landfill leachate. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH3-N removals were obtained in the range of 81 to 96%, 76 to 90% and 15 to 68%, respectively. The removal of organics appears to be largely related to total dissolved solids reduction in leachate. A sudden increase, from time to time, in organic content of effluent could be attributed to biomass sloughing and clogging in the trickling filters. However, tire crumbs exhibited more consistent organics removal throughout the experimental program. Due to the high surface area of shredded tire chips and crumbs, a layer of biomass, 1-2 mm thick, was attached to them and was sloughed off at an interval of 21 days. Apart from that, as shredded tires are comparatively cheaper than any other usable packing material, tire chips and tire crumbs appeared to be quite promising as packing media in trickling filters for landfill leachate treatment.

  6. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dixon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol between 151–296 nM in parts of the oligotrophic North Atlantic, with corresponding microbial uptake rates between 2–146 nM d−1, suggesting turnover times as low as 1 day (1–25 days in surface waters of the oligotrophic tropical North East Atlantic. Methanol is mainly (≥97% used by microbes for obtaining energy in oligotrophic regions, which contrasts with shelf and coastal areas where between 20–50% can be used for cell growth. Comparisons of microbial methanol oxidation rates with parallel determinations of bacterial leucine uptake suggest that methanol contributes on average 13% to bacterial carbon demand in the central northern Atlantic gyre (maximum of 54%. In addition, the contribution that methanol makes to bacterial carbon demand varies as a power function of chlorophyll a concentrations; suggesting for concentrations <0.2 μg l−1 that methanol can make a significant contribution to bacterial carbon demand. However, our low air to sea methanol flux estimates of 7.2–13 μmol m−2 d−1 suggest that the atmosphere is not a major methanol source. We conclude that there must be a major, as yet unidentified, in situ oceanic methanol source in these latitudes which we suggest is sunlight driven decomposition of organic matter.

  7. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO4(2-) reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100-mu-m) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured...

  8. Oxidation of Mixed Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients in Biologically Treated Wastewater by ClO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moradas, Gerly; Fick, Jerker; Ledin, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Biologically treated wastewater containing a mixture of 53 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs)was treated with 0-20 mg/l chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution. Wastewater effluents were taken from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with (low COD) and one without (high COD) extended...... removed at 5 mg/l ClO2 dose. Removal of the same APIs from the high COD effluent was observed when the ClO2 dose was increased to 1.25 mg/l and an increase in API removal only after treatment with 8 mg/l ClO2. This illustrates that treatment of wastewater effluents with chlorine dioxide has potential...

  9. Application of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in stabilization process of biological molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossien Salmani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Co-precipitation method is an easy way to prepare magnetic nanoparticles of iron with a large surface and small particle size, which increases the ability of these particles to act as a suitable carrier for enzyme stabilization. Adequate modification of the surface of these nanoparticles enhances their ability to bind to biological molecules. The immobilized protein or enzyme on magnetic nanoparticles are more stable against structural changes, temperature and pH in comparison with un-stabilized structures, and it is widely used in various sciences, including protein isolation and purification, pharmaceutical science, and food analysis. Stabilization based on the covalent bonds and physical absorption is nonspecific, which greatly limits their functionality. The process of stabilization through bio-mediums provide a new method to overcome the selectivity problem.

  10. Characterization of mechanical and biological properties of 3-D scaffolds reinforced with zinc oxide for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Feng

    Full Text Available A scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have highly interconnected porous structure, appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this work, we fabricated well-interconnected porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffolds via selective laser sintering (SLS. We found that the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds were improved by doping of zinc oxide (ZnO. Our data showed that the fracture toughness increased from 1.09 to 1.40 MPam(1/2, and the compressive strength increased from 3.01 to 17.89 MPa when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. It is hypothesized that the increase of ZnO would lead to a reduction in grain size and an increase in density of the strut. However, the fracture toughness and compressive strength decreased with further increasing of ZnO content, which may be due to the sharp increase in grain size. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated by analyzing the adhesion and the morphology of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on the surfaces of the scaffolds. The scaffolds exhibited better and better ability to support cell attachment and proliferation when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. Moreover, a bone like apatite layer formed on the surfaces of the scaffolds after incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF, indicating an ability of osteoinduction and osteoconduction. In summary, interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds doped with ZnO were successfully fabricated and revealed good mechanical and biological properties, which may be used for bone repair and replacement potentially.

  11. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure in Portuguese airline pilots: study of a possible correlation with oxidative biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo; Folgosa, Filipe; Soares, Paulo; Pereira, Alice S; Garcia, Raquel; Gestal-Otero, Juan Jesus; Tavares, Pedro; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have sought to understand the health effects of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. However, only few biologic markers or associations with disease outcomes have so far been identified. In the present study, 22 long- and 26 medium-haul male Portuguese airline pilots and 36 factory workers who did not fly regularly were investigated. The two groups were comparable in age and diet, were non-smokers, never treated with ionizing radiation and other factors. Cosmic radiation exposure in pilots was quantified based on direct monitoring of 51 flights within Europe, and from Europe to North and South America, and to Africa. Indirect dose estimates in pilots were performed based on the SIEVERT (Système informatisé d'évaluation par vol de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aériens) software for 6,039 medium- and 1,366 long-haul flights. Medium-haul pilots had a higher cosmic radiation dose rate than long-haul pilots, that is, 3.3 ± 0.2 μSv/h and 2.7 ± 0.3 μSv/h, respectively. Biological tests for oxidative stress on blood and urine, as appropriate, at two time periods separated by 1 year, included measurements of antioxidant capacity, total protein, ferritin, hemoglobin, creatinine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Principal components analysis was used to discriminate between the exposed and unexposed groups based on all the biological tests. According to this analysis, creatinine and 8OHdG levels were different for the pilots and the unexposed group, but no distinctions could be made among the medium- and the long-haul pilots. While hemoglobin levels seem to be comparable between the studied groups, they were directly correlated with ferritin values, which were lower for the airline pilots.

  12. Some problems of biological effects under the combined action of nitrogen oxides, their metabolites and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenchenko, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The progress of power engineering envisages the intensive construction of nuclear-energy plants, where an organic or nuclear fuel is used. Nowadays the concept of nuclear-energy plant with the coolant based on dissociating N 2 O 4 is being developed. A great deal of radioactive and chemical products escapes into surroundings as the result of the power plants being in service. Their action on organisms is performed simultaneously, that could have an essential effect on the quantitative and qualitative regularities of response. The estimation of the combined effect of nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite and nitrate and radiation has been carried out on the base of the investigation into methemoglobin formation, genetic effects and the pathomorphological changes in lungs. The formation of methemoglobin has been studied on rats in 1, 3, 7 and 15 days after the single total irradiation of 300 and 700 R doses at the gamma-installation (UGU-420) using a radioactive 60 Co. Methemoglobin was determined in the interval of 15-180 min after NaNO 2 administration in the dosage of 7.0 mg per 100 g body weight. The irradiation essentially affects the process of methemoglobin formation and its reduction. The methemoglobin content in the blood of radiation exposed animals exceeds the value, that could be expected to obtain by summing up its concentration under the separate effects of nitrite and irradiation. The genetic effects of sodium nitrite and nitrate and X-radiation have been studied on the Drosophila. The one-day flies were exposed to the radiation dose of 1500 R in the medium with the sodium nitrite or nitrate contents of 0.1 or 1.0 g/l, respectively. The combined action estimated through the frequency of the dominant lethal mutation, recessive coupled with a lethal mutation sex, viability and fecundity definitely differs from the expected summing values of the separate effect indices of radiation and toxic factors. The morpho- and functional changes in the rat lungs (the

  13. Relative Water Uptake as a Criterion for the Design of Trickle Irrigation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communar, G.; Friedman, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    Previously derived analytical solutions to the 2- and 3-dimensional water flow problems describing trickle irrigation are not being widely used in practice because those formulations either ignore root water uptake or refer to it as a known input. In this lecture we are going to describe a new modeling approach and demonstrate its applicability for designing the geometry of trickle irrigation systems, namely the spacing between the emitters and drip lines. The major difference between our and previous modeling approaches is that we refer to the root water uptake as to the unknown solution of the problem and not as to a known input. We postulate that the solution to the steady-state water flow problem with a root sink that is acting under constant, maximum suction defines un upper bound to the relative water uptake (water use efficiency) in actual transient situations and propose to use it as a design criterion. Following previous derivations of analytical solutions we assume that the soil hydraulic conductivity increases exponentially with its matric head, which allows the linearization of the Richards equation, formulated in terms of the Kirchhoff matric flux potential. Since the transformed problem is linear, the relative water uptake for any given configuration of point or line sources and sinks can be calculated by superposition of the Green's functions of all relevant water sources and sinks. In addition to evaluating the relative water uptake, we also derived analytical expressions for the steam functions. The stream lines separating the water uptake zone from the percolating water provide insight to the dependence of the shape and extent of the actual rooting zone on the source- sink geometry and soil properties. A minimal number of just 3 system parameters: Gardner's (1958) alfa as a soil type quantifier and the depth and diameter of the pre-assumed active root zone are sufficient to characterize the interplay between capillary and gravitational effects on

  14. Fate of 15N fertilizer applied to trickle-irrigated grapevines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajrasuliha, S.; Rolston, D.E.; Louie, D.T.

    1998-01-01

    Information on fate of nitrogen applied to vines is needed to improve fertilizer management. Nitrogen-15 enriched ammonium and nitrate fertilizers were applied in the spring through a trickle irrigation system to six Thompson Seedless vines of a vineyard on the West Side of the San Joaquin Valley of California. At fruit harvest, all above-ground plant parts were removed and analyzed for 15 N. Soil around each vine was also sampled and analyzed for 15 N in the inorganic and organic N fractions. Spatial patterns of fertilizer N for soil inorganic and organic N were analyzed using a median polish technique which indicated large variability with respect to direction, distance, and depth. There was a tendency for the fertilizer N from NH 4 to be located directly beneath emitters than from the NO 3 . Nitrogen from the NH 4 application penetrated to only the 150-cm depth, whereas some N from the NO 3 application reached 210 to 240 cm. Most of the organic fertilizer N for both NO 3 and NH 4 applications was in the top 60 cm of soil where the vine roots were likely of greatest density. Overall recovery of fertilizer N was also quite variable, probably due to variability in soil physical properties and uneven surface application of water and fertilizer due to local surface ponding. Although not statistically significant, uptake of fertilizer N by above-ground plant components was slightly higher for the NH 4 application (24.2% of applied N) than the NO 3 application (21.5%). Soil organic N had significantly (95% level) higher N from NH 4 (19% of applied N) than from NO 3 (13%). This probably occurred due to longer residence time of N from NH 4 within the top 60 cm, where the bulk of roots and microbial activity existed, than for NO 3 . Overall, about 67% to 79% of the fertilizer N applied in spring remained in the soil at harvest, and the vines took up the rest. There was no indication of significant N leaching below 2.4 m or denitrification of fertilizer N for the trickle

  15. Nitric Oxide-Related Biological Pathways in Patients with Major Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranyi

    Full Text Available Major depression is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and increased mortality following myocardial infarction. However, biomarkers of depression and increased cardiovascular risk are still missing. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate, whether nitric-oxide (NO related factors for endothelial dysfunction, such as global arginine bioavailability, arginase activity, L-arginine/ADMA ratio and the arginine metabolites asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA might be biomarkers for depression-induced cardiovascular risk.In 71 in-patients with major depression and 48 healthy controls the Global Arginine Bioavailability Ratio (GABR, arginase activity (arginine/ornithine ratio, the L-arginine/ADMA ratio, ADMA, and SDMA were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Psychiatric and laboratory assessments were obtained at baseline at the time of in-patient admittance and at the time of hospital discharge.The ADMA concentrations in patients with major depression were significantly elevated and the SDMA concentrations were significantly decreased in comparison with the healthy controls. Even after a first improvement of depression, ADMA and SDMA levels remained nearly unchanged. In addition, after a first improvement of depression at the time of hospital discharge, a significant decrease in arginase activity, an increased L-arginine/ADMA ratio and a trend for increased global arginine bioavailability were observed.Our study results are evidence that in patients with major depression ADMA and SDMA might be biomarkers to indicate an increased cardiovascular threat due to depression-triggered NO reduction. GABR, the L-arginine/ADMA ratio and arginase activity might be indicators of therapy success and increased NO production after remission.

  16. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  17. Acid-curing and ferric-trickle leaching effluent used in closed circuit uranium extractive process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Suoqing; Xiang Qinfang; Guo Jianzheng; Lu Guizhu; Su Yanru

    1998-01-01

    The new uranium ore process consists of crushing ore, mixing crushed ore with strong acid in rotating drums and curing the mixture in piles, trickle-leaching the ore beds with ferric solution, extracting uranium from pregnant solution with tertiary amine, precipitating product and disposing residue tailings. All the process effluent is used in closed circuit. There will be no process water to be discharged in the flowsheet except the tailings carrying off 15% water because during leaching moisture content of the ore rises to 15%. Tailings produced by the process are moist and friable, and can be disposed of on a pile or returned to the mine. Main technical parameters of the process: (a) water consumption is 0.2∼0.3 m 3 /t ore, electric power consumption is 20∼30 kW·h/t ore; (b) ore crushing up to -5∼-7 mm, leaching period is 12∼45 d, U content of residue is 0.01%∼0.02%, producing pregnant solution is 0.3∼0.5 m 3 /t ore, which is 1/5∼1/8 that of conventional agitation leaching process; (c) organic agent consumption is 1/5∼1/8 that of the conventional agitation process. All the research results above are tested by the pilot-plant test and industrial test. The new process has been applied to recovery of uranium in the mine located at northeast of China

  18. Selective adhesion of wastewater bacteria to Pleurotus ostreatus mycelium in a trickle-bed bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čeněk Novotný

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on spontaneous colonization of fungal mycelium by invading microorganisms in a trickle-bed fungal bioreactor operating under semi-sterile conditions. Pleurotus ostreatus was grown under the flow of synthetic wastewater containing activated sludge bacteria and the microbial consortium developed in the reactor was characterized. Genotype and phenotype profile of the reactor-invading, bacterial consortium was clearly distinctive from that of the original activated sludge. The bacterial consortium from the reactor contained a higher portion of bacteria capable of cellobiose utilization and a small amount of bacteria with the ability to utilize benzoic acids. The invading bacteria had no effect on the dye decolorization performance of the fungal reactor. Five bacterial strains colonizing P. ostreatus reactor cultures were isolated and identified as species of the genera Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Except for Bacillus cereus all strains displayed a potential to inhibit fungal growth on solid media (14 to 51 % inhibition which was comparable or higher than that of the reference bacterial strains. The pH- and media composition-dependence of the growth inhibition was demonstrated.

  19. Start-up and performance characteristics of a trickle bed reactor degrading toluene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Misiaczek

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate toluene degradation in a trickle bed reactor when the loading was carried out by changing the air flow rate. The biofiltration system was inoculated with a mixed microbial population, adapted to degradation of hydrophobic compounds. Polypropylene high flow rings were used as a packing material. The system was operated for a period of 50 days at empty bed residence times ranging from 106s to 13s and with a constant inlet concentration of toluene of 100 mg.m-3. The reactor showed high removal efficiency at higher contact times and increasing elimination capacity with higher air-flow rates. The highest EC value reached was 9.8 gC.m-3.h-1 at EBRT = 13s. During the experiment, the consumption of NaOH solution was also measured. No significant variation of this value was found and an average value of 3.84 mmol of NaOH per gram of consumed carbon was recorded.

  20. Continuous xylanase production with Aspergillus nidulans under pyridoxine limitation using a trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Michael; Prade, Rolf A; Segato, Fernando; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    A trickle bed reactor (TBR) with recycle was designed and tested using Aspergillus nidulans with a pyridoxine marker and over-expressing/secreting recombinant client xylanase B (XynB). The pyridoxine marker prevented the fungus from synthesizing its own pyridoxine and fungus was unable to grow when no pyridoxine was present in the medium; however, enzyme production was unaffected. Uncontrolled mycelia growth that led to clogging of the TBR was observed when fungus without a pyridoxine marker was used for XynB production. Using the fungus with pyridoxine marker, the TBR was operated continuously for 18 days and achieved a XynB output of 41 U/ml with an influent and effluent flow rate of 0.5 ml/min and a recycle flow rate of 56 ml/min. Production yields in the TBR were 1.4 times greater than a static tray culture and between 1.1 and 67 times greater than yields for SSF enzyme production stated in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Liquid distribution in trickle-bed reactor; Distribution du liquide en reacteur a lit ruisselant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcandelli, C.; Wild, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS-ENSIC), Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique, 54 - Nancy (France); Lamine, A.S. [CNRS-Universite de Paris-Nord, Lab. d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, 93 - Villetaneuse (France); Bernard, J.R. [Elf Antar France, Centre de Recherche Elf de Solaize, 69 - Solaize (France)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop techniques to qualify the efficiency of liquid distribution in trickle-bed reactors, using cold mockups. The experimental setup consists mainly in a 0.3-m-ID packed-bed column with three different plates used to vary the quality of inlet liquid distribution. Liquid distribution has been qualified using several techniques: global pressure drop measurements, global RTD (Residence-Time Distribution) of the liquid, local heat transfer probes, capacitance tomography, collector at the bottom of the reactor with nine equal zones. The bed pressure drop and the overall external liquid saturation decrease when the maldistribution increases; quantitative information is however difficult to obtain this way. Global RTD of the liquid allows quantifying of the average liquid distribution in the bed. The local thermal sensors give an indication of local liquid velocity and indicate possible local maldistribution of the liquid (scale mm) even when global distribution is good. Concerning the results obtained with the collector, a maldistribution index is defined ranging from 0 (ideal distribution) to 1 (worst possible distribution), and the influence of the different operating parameters (gas and liquid velocities, particle shape) is discussed. (authors)

  2. Ethanol production during semi-continuous syngas fermentation in a trickle bed reactor using Clostridium ragsdalei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarapalli, Mamatha; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Phillips, John R; Lewis, Randy S; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2016-06-01

    An efficient syngas fermentation bioreactor provides a mass transfer capability that matches the intrinsic kinetics of the microorganism to obtain high gas conversion efficiency and productivity. In this study, mass transfer and gas utilization efficiencies of a trickle bed reactor during syngas fermentation by Clostridium ragsdalei were evaluated at various gas and liquid flow rates. Fermentations were performed using a syngas mixture of 38% CO, 28.5% CO2, 28.5% H2 and 5% N2, by volume. Results showed that increasing the gas flow rate from 2.3 to 4.6sccm increased the CO uptake rate by 76% and decreased the H2 uptake rate by 51% up to Run R6. Biofilm formation after R6 increased cells activity with over threefold increase in H2 uptake rate. At 1662h, the final ethanol and acetic acid concentrations were 5.7 and 12.3g/L, respectively, at 200ml/min of liquid flow rate and 4.6sccm gas flow rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using a trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Wilkins, Mark R

    2018-05-01

    An A. nidulans strain with a pyridoxine marker was used for continuous production of aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO) in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). Modified medium with reduced zinc, no copper, and 5 g/L ascorbic acid that reduced melanin production and increased AAO productivity under growth limited conditions was used. Two air flow rates, 0.11 L/min (0.1 vvm) and 1.1 L/min (1.0 vvm) were tested. More melanin formation and reduced protein productivity were observed with air flow rate of 1.1 L/min. Three random packings were used as support for the fungus inside the TBR column, two of which were hydrophobic and one which was hydrophilic, and three different dilution rates were tested. The use of GEA BCN 030 hydrophobic packing resulted in greater AAO yield and productivity than the other packings. Increasing dilution rates favored melanin formation and citric, lactic and succinic acid accumulation, which decreased AAO yield and productivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential of resource recovery in UASB/trickling filter systems treating domestic sewage in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressani-Ribeiro, T; Brandt, E M F; Gutierrez, K G; Díaz, C A; Garcia, G B; Chernicharo, C A L

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to present perspectives for energy (thermal and electric) and nutrient (N and S) recovery in domestic sewage treatment systems comprised of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors followed by sponge-bed trickling filters (SBTF) in developing countries. The resource recovery potential was characterized, taking into account 114 countries and a corresponding population of 968.9 million inhabitants living in the tropical world, which were grouped into three desired ranges in terms of cities' size. For each of these clusters, a technological arrangement flow-sheet was proposed, depending on their technical and economic viability from our best experience. Considering the population living in cities over 100, 000 inhabitants, the potential of energy and nutrient recovery via the sewage treatment scheme would be sufficient to generate electricity for approximately 3.2 million residents, as well as thermal energy for drying purposes that could result in a 24% volume reduction of sludge to be transported and disposed of in landfills. The results show that UASB/SBTF systems can play a very important role in the sanitation and environmental sector towards more sustainable sewage treatment plants.

  5. Performance of plastic- and sponge-based trickling filters treating effluents from an UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, P G S; Marcus, A K; Rittmann, B E; Chernicharo, C A L

    2013-01-01

    The paper compares the performance of two trickling filters (TFs) filled with plastic- or sponge-based packing media treating the effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The UASB reactor was operated with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.2 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1), and the OLR applied to the TFs was 0.30-0.65 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) (COD: chemical oxygen demand). The sponge-based packing medium (Rotosponge) gave substantially better performance for ammonia, total-N, and organic matter removal. The superior TF-Rotosponge performance for NH(4)(+)-N removal (80-95%) can be attributed to its longer biomass and hydraulic retention times (SRT and HRT), as well as enhancements in oxygen mass transfer by dispersion and advection inside the sponges. Nitrogen removals were significant (15 mgN L(-1)) in TF-Rotosponge when the OLRs were close to 0.75 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1), due to denitrification that was related to solids hydrolysis in the sponge interstices. For biochemical oxygen demand removal, higher HRT and SRT were especially important because the UASB removed most of the readily biodegradable organic matter. The new configuration of the sponge-based packing medium called Rotosponge can enhance the feasibility of scaling-up the UASB/TF treatment, including when retrofitting is necessary.

  6. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  7. Pathology and clinicopathology of buffalo against trickle infection with Fasciola gigantica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ening Wiedosari

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Eleven male buffalo calves were divided into infected group of 7 animals and non-infected control group of 4 animals. The infected group was then inoculated with trickle doses of 15 Inetacercariae of Fasciola gigantica twice weekly for 32 weeks and killed 36 weeks after first infection. There were no clinical symptoms observed . Infected and non-infected buffaloes, had similar values of packed cell volume, haemoglobin and red blood cell counts . In infected buffaloes, plasma glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity increased in proportion to the dregree of hepatocyte destruction level and evidence of necrosis caused by the migrating of immature flukes through the parenchyma prior to their entry into the bile ducts. While the values of plasma glutamyl transpeptidase showed only a minimal rise with a small peak in week 20 as evidenced by histological observation that infected caused limited damage to epithelial surface of the bile duct . These results indicates that, the resistance mechaninisms of buffalo against fasciolosis infection occurred in the liver or before flukes entering into the bile ducts. These results seem to indicate that, in buffalo, resistance mechanisms to fasciolosis infection occured in the liver or before flukes entry into the bile ducts.

  8. Simulation of trickle irrigation, an extension to the US Geological Survey's computer program VS2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for simulating water movement through unsaturated porous media in response to a constant rate of application from a surface source. Because the rate at which water can be absorbed by soil is limited, the water will pond; therefore the actual surface area over which the water is applied may change with time and in general will not be known beforehand. An iterative method is used to determine the size of this ponded area at any time. This method will be most useful for simulating trickling irrigation, but also may be of value for simulating movement of water is soils as the result of an accidental spill. The method is an extension to the finite difference computer program VS2D developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, which simulates water movement through variably saturated porous media. The simulated region can be a vertical, 2-dimensional cross section for treatment of a surface line source or an axially symmetric, 3-dimensional cylinder for a point source. Five test problems, obtained from the literature , are used to demonstrate the ability of the method to accurately match analytical and experimental results. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Measurement of liquid holdup and axial dispersion in trickle bed reactors using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Saroha, A.K.; Nikam, K.D.P.

    2000-01-01

    The holdup and axial dispersion of aqueous phase has been measured in trickle bed reactors as a function of liquid and gas flow rates using radioisotope tracer technique. Experiments were carried out in the glass column of inner diameter of 15.2x10 -2 m column for air-water system using three different types of packings i.e. non-porous glass beads, porous catalyst of tablet and extrudate shape. The range of liquid and gas flow rates used were 8.3x10 -5 - 3.3x1- -4 m 3 /s and 0 - 6.67x10 -4 m 3 /s, respectively. Residence time distributions of liquid phase and gas phase were measured and mean residence times were determined. The values of liquid holdup were calculated from the measured mean residence times. It was observed that the liquid holdup increases with increase in liquid flow rates and was independent of increase in gas flow rates used in the study. Two-parameter axial dispersion model was used to simulate measured residence time distribution data and values of mean residence time and Peclet number were obtained. It was observed that the values of Peclet number increases with increase in liquid flow rate for glass beads and tablets and remains almost constant for extrudates. The values of mean residence time obtained from model simulation were found to be in good agreement with the values measured experimentally. (author)

  10. Treatment of Benzene and n-Hexane Mixtures in Trickle-Bed Air Biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ashraf Aly; Sorial, George A

    2011-02-01

    Trickle-bed air biofilters (TBABs) are suitable for treatment of hydrophilic volatile organic compounds, but they pose a challenge for hydrophobic compounds. Three laboratory-scale TBABs were used for the treatment of an airstream contaminated with different ratios of n-hexane and benzene mixtures. The ratios studied were 1:1, 2:1, and 1:3 n-hexane:benzene by volume. Each TBAB was operated at a pH of 4 and a temperature of 20 °C. The use of acidic-buffered nutrient solution was targeted for changing the microorganism consortium to fungi as the main biodegradation element. The experimental plan was designed to investigate the long-term performance of the TBABs with an emphasis on different mixture loading rates, removal efficiency with TBAB depth, volatile suspended solids, and carbon mass balance closure. n-Hexane loading rate was kept constant in the TBABs for comparison reasons and ranged from 4 to 22 g/(m 3 .hr). Corresponding benzene loadings ranged from 4 to 43 g/(m 3 .hr). Generally, benzene behavior in the TBAB was superior to that of n-hexane because of its higher solubility. n-Hexane showed improved performance in the 2:1 mixing ratio as compared with the other two ratios. [Box: see text].

  11. Evaluation of trickle-bed air biofilter performance for MEK removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhangli; Kim, Daekeun; Sorial, George A

    2004-10-18

    A lab-scale trickle-bed air biofilter (TBAB) was operated to evaluate the removal of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) from waste gas. Three biomass control strategies were investigated, namely, backwashing and two non-use periods (starvation and stagnant). Five volumetric loading rates from 0.70 to 7.04 kg COD/m(3)day were employed. Backwashing once a week removed the excess biomass and obtained long-term, stable performance over 99% removal efficiency for loading rates less than 5.63 kg COD/m(3)day. The two non-use periods could also sustain 99% removal efficiency and could be employed as another means of biomass control for loading rates up to 3.52 kg COD/m(3)day. The non-use periods did not delay the recovery when the loading rate did not exceed 3.52 kg COD/m(3)day. The pseudo-first-order removal rate constant decreased with increase in volumetric loading rate. The effect of non-use periods on removal rate showed apparent transition from positive to negative with the increase in loading rate.

  12. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F., E-mail: brunordebien@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Geografia. Lab. de Geomorfologia; Moreira, Rubens M., E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  13. Mass transfer in liquid phase catalytic exchange column of trickle bed type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Iwai, Yasunori; Okuno, Kenji

    1995-09-01

    The mechanism of mass transfer in a liquid phase catalytic exchange column was discussed for a trickle bed type. A new model has been proposed on the basis of this mass transfer mechanism; and several problems for the previous reported models were pointed out in the derivation of the model. An overall rate equation was first derived from the vapor-hydrogen exchange in the model. The mass transfer for the vapor-hydrogen exchange was decomposed to the following three steps: the mass transfer in a gas boundary layer on a catalyst particle; the mass transfer within the pores in the catalyst; and the chemical reaction on the surface of the catalyst. The water-vapor scrubbing process was considered as a series of the mass transfers in gas and liquid boundary layers on the wetted surfaces of the catalyst and packings or wall of the column. Significant subjects to be studied were proposed from the viewpoint of the validity of the model and the optimization of the column. (author)

  14. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassee, Flemming R.; Campbell, Arezoo; Boere, A. John F.; McLean, Steven G.; Duffin, Rodger; Krystek, Petra; Gosens, Ilse; Miller, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cerium oxide (CeO 2 ) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE −/− ) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m 3 , 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Results: Addition of CeO 2 to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6–8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. Conclusions: These results imply that addition of CeO 2 nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

  15. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassee, Flemming R., E-mail: flemming.cassee@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Campbell, Arezoo, E-mail: acampbell@westernu.edu [Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA (United States); Boere, A. John F., E-mail: john.boere@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); McLean, Steven G., E-mail: smclean1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk [BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duffin, Rodger, E-mail: Rodger.Duffin@ed.ac.uk [MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Krystek, Petra, E-mail: petra.krystek@philips.com [Philips Innovation Services, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gosens, Ilse, E-mail: Ilse.gosens@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Miller, Mark R., E-mail: Mark.Miller@ed.ac.uk [BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Background: Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m{sup 3}, 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Results: Addition of CeO{sub 2} to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. Conclusions: These results imply that addition of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

  16. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassee, Flemming R; Campbell, Arezoo; Boere, A John F; McLean, Steven G; Duffin, Rodger; Krystek, Petra; Gosens, Ilse; Miller, Mark R

    2012-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO(2)) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m(3), 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Addition of CeO(2) to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. These results imply that addition of CeO(2) nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  18. Biological effects and oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana following exposure to uranium and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horemans, N.; Saenen, E.; Vandenhove, H.; Vanhoudt, N.; Wannijn, J.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Vangronsveld, J.; Cuypers, A. [Hasselt University (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    leaves, no inductions of the NADPH oxidases or LOX were observed. This possibly indicates that the oxidative stress in the leaves is generated via root-to-shoot signalling since U and Cu are almost completely retained in the roots. Under both U and Cu stress and both in roots and shoots, microRNA398b/c is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) response. As expected from previous research, the expression levels of MIR398b/c increased under U stress while they decreased under Cu stress. This led to a decreased expression of the Cu-requiring Cu/Zn SODs when Cu is below a critical threshold, while their expression will increase under Cu excess. In the multi-pollution setup, the response is comparable to the response observed under Cu stress. In conclusion, it seems that there is an enhanced production of ROS after exposure to U+Cu as compared to the single stressor conditions. However, additional experiments, e.g. with different U and Cu concentrations, are needed to further elucidate the interactions between U and Cu. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  19. Temporal variations in the gene expression levels of cyanobacterial anti-oxidant enzymes through geological history: implications for biological evolution during the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, M.; Furukawa, R.; Yokobori, S. I.; Tajika, E.; Yamagishi, A.

    2016-12-01

    A significant rise in atmospheric O2 levels during the GOE (Great Oxidation Event), ca. 2.45-2.0 Ga, must have caused a great stress to biosphere, enforcing life to adapt to oxic conditions. Cyanobacteria, oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that had been responsible for the GOE, are at the same time one of the organisms that would have been greatly affected by the rise of O2 level in the surface environments. Knowledge on the evolution of cyanobacteria is not only important to elucidate the cause of the GOE, but also helps us to better understand the adaptive evolution of life in response to the GOE. Here we performed phylogenetic analysis of an anti-oxidant enzyme Fe-SOD (iron superoxide dismutase) of cyanobacteria, to assess the adaptive evolution of life under the GOE. The rise of O2 level must have increased the level of toxic reactive oxygen species in cyanobacterial cells, thus forced them to change activities or the gene expression levels of Fe-SOD. In the present study, we focus on the change in the gene expression levels of the enzyme, which can be estimated from the promoter sequences of the gene. Promoters are DNA sequences found upstream of protein encoding regions, where RNA polymerase binds and initiates transcription. "Strong" promoters that efficiently interact with RNA polymerase induce high rates of transcription, leading to high levels of gene expression. Thus, from the temporal changes in the promoter sequences, we can estimate the variations in the gene expression levels during the geological time. Promoter sequences of Fe-SOD at each ancestral node of cyanobacteria were predicted from phylogenetic analysis, and the ancestral promoter sequences were compared to the promoters of known highly expressed genes. The similarity was low at the time of the emergence of cyanobacteria; however, increased at the branching nodes diverged 2.4 billon years ago. This roughly coincided with the onset of the GOE, implying that the transition from low to high gene

  20. Denitrifying capabilities of Tetrasphaera and their contribution towards nitrous oxide production in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ricardo; Ribera-Guardia, Anna; Santos, Jorge; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M; Pijuan, Maite; Oehmen, Adrian

    2018-06-15

    Denitrifying enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems can be an efficient means of removing phosphate (P) and nitrate (NO 3 - ) with low carbon source and oxygen requirements. Tetrasphaera is one of the most abundant polyphosphate accumulating organisms present in EBPR systems, but their capacity to achieve denitrifying EBPR has not previously been determined. An enriched Tetrasphaera culture, comprising over 80% of the bacterial biovolume was obtained in this work. Despite the denitrification capacity of Tetrasphaera, this culture achieved only low levels of anoxic P-uptake. Batch tests with different combinations of NO 3 - , nitrite (NO 2 - ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) revealed lower N 2 O accumulation by Tetrasphaera as compared to Accumulibacter and Competibacter when multiple electron acceptors were added. Electron competition was observed during the addition of multiple nitrogen electron acceptors species, where P uptake appeared to be slightly favoured over glycogen production in these situations. This study increases our understanding of the role of Tetrasphaera-related organisms in denitrifying EBPR systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical oxidation of recalcitrant organic compounds in biologically treated municipal solid waste leachate in a flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xuejun; Cheng, Zhiliang; Chen, Bo; Zhu, Xincai

    2013-10-01

    Biologically-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate still contains many kinds of bio-recalcitrant organic matter. A new plate and frame electrochemical reactor was designed to treat these materials under flow conditions. In the electrochemical oxidation process, NH3 and color could be easily removed by means of electro-generated chlorine/hypochlorite within 20 min. The effects of major process parameters on the removal of organic pollutants were investigated systematically. Under experimental conditions, the optimum operation parameters were current density of 65 mA/cm2, flow velocity of 2.6 cm/sec in electrode gap, and initial chloride ion concentration of 5000 mg/L. The COD in the leachate could be reduced below 100 mg/L after 1 hr of treatment. The kinetics and mechanism of COD removal were investigated by simultaneously monitoring the COD change and chlorine/hypochlorite production. The kinetics of COD removal exhibited a two-stage kinetic model, and the decrease of electro-generated chlorine/hypochlorite production was the major mechanism for the slowing down of the COD removal rate in the second stage. The narrowing of the electrode gap is beneficial for COD removal and energy consumption.

  2. Luminescent passive-oxidized silicon quantum dots as biological staining labels and their cytotoxicity effects at high concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hanada, Sanshiro; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Hiruoka, Masaki; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Miyasaka, Ryosuke; Tilley, Richard D; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) hold some advantages over conventional organic fluorescent dyes. Due to these advantages, they are becoming increasingly popular in the field of bioimaging. However, recent work suggests that cadmium based QDs affect cellular activity. As a substitute for cadmium based QDs, we have developed photoluminescent stable silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) with a passive-oxidation technique. Si-QDs (size: 6.5 ± 1.5 nm) emit green light, and they have been used as biological labels for living cell imaging. In order to determine the minimum concentration for cytotoxicity, we investigated the response of HeLa cells. We have shown that the toxicity of Si-QDs was not observed at 112 μg ml -1 and that Si-QDs were less toxic than CdSe-QDs at high concentration in mitochondrial assays and with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Especially under UV exposure, Si-QDs were more than ten times safer than CdSe-QDs. We suggest that one mechanism for the cytotoxicity is that Si-QDs can generate oxygen radicals and these radicals are associated with membrane damages. This work has demonstrated the suitability of Si-QDs for bioimaging in lower concentration, and their cytotoxicity and one toxicity mechanism at high concentration

  3. In vitro and in vivo measurements of the dissolution parameters of uranium and plutonium mixed oxides in biological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matton, S.

    1999-01-01

    During the mixed-oxide fuel fabrication process, inhalation is potentially the main route of internal contamination. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends experimental measurement of parameters such as size and dissolution rate for specific industrial compounds. First, we validated the use of PERALS (Photon Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) for alpha measurement in biological samples which, in some cases, could improve detection limit. We characterised physical chemical properties in terms of size, specific area and activity of 3 different powders: MOX made according to either the MIMAS process, which showed heterogeneous chemical composition, or the SOLGEL, which showed homogeneous chemical composition and industrial PuO 2 . Their dissolution parameters, f r and s s , as defined in the simplest model proposed by ICRP 66 were measured in vivo, after inhalation in the rat, and in vitro. The statistical variation of these values were expressed as standard deviation. Moreover, in vitro studies demonstrated variation of the s s value depending on the duration of the incubation. We also developed methods to characterise interactions between UO 2 particles and phosphate ions which could be involved in the actinide toxicity. (author) [fr

  4. Development of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for biological nitrogen removal in domestic wastewater treatment (Case study: Surabaya City, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, I. Made Wahyu; Soedjono, Eddy Setiadi; Fitriani, Nurina

    2017-11-01

    Domestic wastewater effluent is the main contributor to diverse water pollution problems. The contaminants contained in the wastewater lead the low quality of water. The presence of ammonium and nitrate along with phosphorus are potentially cause eutrophication and endanger aquatic life. Excess nutrients, mostly N and P is the main cause of eutrophication which is result in oxygen depletion, biodiversity reduction, fish kills, odor and increased toxicity. Most of the domestic wastewater in Surabaya City still contains nitrogen that exceeded the threshold. The range of ammonium and orthophosphate concentration in the domestic wastewater is between 6.29 mg/L - 38.91 mg/L and 0.44 mg/L - 1.86 mg/L, respectively. An advance biological nitrogen removal process called anammox is a sustainable and cost effective alternative to the basic method of nitrogen removal, such as nitrification and denitrification. Many research have been conducted through anammox and resulted promisingly way to remove nitrogen. In this process, ammonium will be oxidized with nitrite as an electron acceptor to produce nitrogen gas and low nitrate in anoxic condition. Anammox requires less oxygen demand, no needs external carbon source, and low operational cost. Based on its advantages, anammox is possible to apply in domestic wastewater treatment in Surabaya with many further studies.

  5. Iron-sulfur clusters as biological sensors: the chemistry of reactions with molecular oxygen and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crack, Jason C; Green, Jeffrey; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E

    2014-10-21

    Iron-sulfur cluster proteins exhibit a range of physicochemical properties that underpin their functional diversity in biology, which includes roles in electron transfer, catalysis, and gene regulation. Transcriptional regulators that utilize iron-sulfur clusters are a growing group that exploit the redox and coordination properties of the clusters to act as sensors of environmental conditions including O2, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and metabolic nutritional status. To understand the mechanism by which a cluster detects such analytes and then generates modulation of DNA-binding affinity, we have undertaken a combined strategy of in vivo and in vitro studies of a range of regulators. In vitro studies of iron-sulfur cluster proteins are particularly challenging because of the inherent reactivity and fragility of the cluster, often necessitating strict anaerobic conditions for all manipulations. Nevertheless, and as discussed in this Account, significant progress has been made over the past decade in studies of O2-sensing by the fumarate and nitrate reduction (FNR) regulator and, more recently, nitric oxide (NO)-sensing by WhiB-like (Wbl) and FNR proteins. Escherichia coli FNR binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster under anaerobic conditions leading to a DNA-binding dimeric form. Exposure to O2 converts the cluster to a [2Fe-2S] form, leading to protein monomerization and hence loss of DNA binding ability. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies have shown that the conversion proceeds via at least two steps and involves a [3Fe-4S](1+) intermediate. The second step involves the release of two bridging sulfide ions from the cluster that, unusually, are not released into solution but rather undergo oxidation to sulfane (S(0)) subsequently forming cysteine persulfides that then coordinate the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Studies of other [4Fe-4S] cluster proteins that undergo oxidative cluster conversion indicate that persulfide formation and coordination may be more common than previously

  6. A novel theory: biological processes mostly involve two types of mediators, namely general and specific mediators Endogenous small radicals such as superoxide and nitric oxide may play a role of general mediator in biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jian

    2005-01-01

    A great number of papers have shown that free radicals as well as bioactive molecules can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, but the biological actions and chemical reactivity of the free radicals are quite different from that of the bioactive molecules, and that a wide variety of bioactive molecules can be easily modified by free radicals due to having functional groups sensitive to redox, and the significance of the interaction between the free radicals and the bioactive molecules in biological processes has been confirmed by the results of some in vitro and in vivo studies. Based on these evidence, this article presented a novel theory about the mediators of biological processes. The essentials of the theory are: (a) mediators of biological processes can be classified into general and specific mediators; the general mediators include two types of free radicals, namely superoxide and nitric oxide; the specific mediators include a wide variety of bioactive molecules, such as specific enzymes, transcription factors, cytokines and eicosanoids; (b) a general mediator can modify almost any class of the biomolecules, and thus play a role of mediator in nearly every biological process via diverse mechanisms; a specific mediator always acts selectively on certain classes of the biomolecules, and may play a role of mediator in different biological processes via a same mechanism; (c) biological processes are mostly controlled by networks of their mediators, so the free radicals can regulate the last consequence of a biological process by modifying some types of the bioactive molecules, or in cooperation with these bioactive molecules; the biological actions of superoxide and nitric oxide may be synergistic or antagonistic. According to this theory, keeping the integrity of these networks and the balance between the free radicals and the bioactive molecules as well as the balance between the free radicals and the free radical scavengers

  7. Effect of application rates and media types on nitrogen and surfactant removal in trickling filters applied to the post-treatment of effluents from UASB reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, P. G. S. de; Taveres, F. v. F.; Chernicharo, C. A. I.

    2009-07-01

    Tricking filters are a very promising alternative for the post treatment of effluents from UASB reactors treating domestic sewage,especially in developing countries. Although a fair amount of information is already available regarding organic mater removal in this combined system, very little is known in relation to nitrogen and surfactant removal in trickling filters post-UASB reactors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect evaluate and compare the effect of different application rates and packing media types on trickling filters applied to the post-treatment of effluents from UASB reactors, regarding the removal of ammonia nitrogen and surfactants. (Author)

  8. Effect of application rates and media types on nitrogen and surfactant removal in trickling filters applied to the post-treatment of effluents from UASB reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, P. G. S. de; Taveres, F. v. F.; Chernicharo, C. A. I.

    2009-01-01

    Tricking filters are a very promising alternative for the post treatment of effluents from UASB reactors treating domestic sewage,especially in developing countries. Although a fair amount of information is already available regarding organic mater removal in this combined system, very little is known in relation to nitrogen and surfactant removal in trickling filters post-UASB reactors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect evaluate and compare the effect of different application rates and packing media types on trickling filters applied to the post-treatment of effluents from UASB reactors, regarding the removal of ammonia nitrogen and surfactants. (Author)

  9. Removal of the Inert Organic Fraction of Municipal Wastewater Using the Integrated Activated Sludge/Trickling Filter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehraban sadeghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of phenol and chlorinated compounds, fatty acids, tannin, lignin, and their by-products into receptive waters poses serious hazards for the aquatic life. In this study, the efficiency of a tow-step process of activated sludge-trickling filter (AS/TF in the removal of inert chemical materials that defy conventional treatment processes was investigated. For this purpose, an integrated activated sludge process (industrial scale was used sequentially with a trickling filter (pilot scale. Inside a tank with an effective volume of 6.87 m3 was installed 5.78 m3 of polypropylene 2HX media with a specific area of 240 m2/m3. The hydraulic loading rate (HLR of the trickling filter during the startup period (90 days was 3.6 m3/h which was raised to 3.6-6 m3/h in the operation period (120 days, with the best effluent quality achieved at HLR=5.4 m3/h. For the purposes of the experiments in this study, four reactors, each 1256 cm3 in volume, were fed the WWTP effluent and concurrently a glucose substrate containing a COD content equal to that fed to the four reactors was fed into two identical reactors; all the reactors were subsequently run for 480 h in aerobic conditions. Nutrients, pH, and DO (as environmental control indicators as well as soluble and total COD were measured twice daily. The effluent values of soluble inert materials (SI, total soluble COD (STO, degradable suspended materials (XSO, degradable COD (CSO, refractory suspended materials (XI, and degradable soluble materials (SSO for AS were calculated as 40, 227, 94, 281, 251, and 187, respectively, while the same parameters for the AS/TF were 20, 227, 104, 311, 241, and 207 mg/l, respectively. The results showed that the activated sludge process when combined with the trickling filter has a twofold capability, compared to when used alone, in removing inert COD. It was also shown that treatment levels in conventional WWTPs can be improved by integrating conventional treatment

  10. Experience from the application of an aerated trickle column to the removal of volatile organic substances and radon from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broz, Z.; Kuthan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experience from the use of aerated trickle columns containing oriented polypropylene netting is described. The columns are applied to the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons and petroleum substances from polluted ground water and to the elimination of radon from drinking water in water treatment plants. One column has been in continuous use since 1989 in open space to remove petroleum substances, another has been in use in a water treatment plant since 1990 to eliminate radon. The facility features high reliability. (M.D.). 5 tabs., 5 figs., 12 refs

  11. Local liquid velocity measurement of Trickle Bed Reactor using Digital Industrial X-ray Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar

    Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are fixed beds of particles in which both liquid and gas flow concurrently downward. They are widely used to produce not only fuels but also lubrication products. The measurement and the knowledge of local liquid velocities (VLL) in TBRs is less which is essential for advancing the understanding of its hydrodynamics and for validation computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Therefore, this work focused on developing a new, non-invasive, statistically reliable technique that can be used to measure local liquid velocity (VLL) in two-dimensions (2-D). This is performed by combining Digital Industrial X-ray Radiography (DIR) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) techniques. This work also make possible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) VLL measurements that can be taken in TBRs. Measurements taken through both the combined and the novel technique, once validated, were found to be comparable to another technique (a two-point fiber optical probe) currently being developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology. The results from this study indicate that, for a gas-liquid-solid type bed, the measured VLL can have a maximum range that is between 35 and 51 times that of its superficial liquid velocity (VSL). Without the existence of gas, the measured VLL can have a maximum range that is between 4 and 4.7 times that of its VSL. At a higher V SL, the particle tracer was greatly distributed and became carried away by a high liquid flow rate. Neither the variance nor the range of measured VLL varied for any of the replications, confirming the reproducibility of the experimental measurements used, regardless of the VSL . The liquid's movement inside the pore was consistent with findings from previous studies that used various techniques.

  12. Removal of benzene under acidic conditions in a controlled Trickle Bed Air Biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ashraf Aly; Sorial, George A

    2010-12-15

    Trickle Bed Air Biofilters (TBABs) are considered to be economical and environmental-friendly for treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Hydrophilic VOCs are easily degradable while hydrophobic ones pose a great challenge for adequate treatment due to the transfer of the VOC to the liquid phase. In this study the utilization of acidic pH is proposed for the treatment of benzene vapors. The acidic pH would encourage the growth of fungi as the main consortium. A TBAB operated at pH 4 was used for the treatment of an air stream contaminated with benzene under different loading rates ranging from 37 to 76.8 g/(m(3)h). The purpose of introducing fungi was to compare the performance with traditional TBAB operating under neutral pH in order to assess the biodegradation of benzene in mixtures with other compounds favoring acidic conditions. The experimental plan was designed to assess long-term performance with emphasis based on different benzene loading rates, removal efficiency with TBAB depth, and carbon mass balance closure. At benzene loading rate of 64 g/(m(3)h), the removal efficiency was 90%. At the maximum loading rate of 77 g/(m(3)h), the removal efficiency was 75% marking the maximum elimination capacity for the TBAB at 58.8 g/(m(3)h). Operating at acidic pH successfully supported the degradation of benzene in TBAB. It is worthwhile to note that benzene appears in mixtures with n-hexane and toluene, which are reported to be better degraded under such conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biodegradation of mono-chlorobenzene by using a trickle bed air biofilter (TBAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Anil K; Majumder, C B; Singh, Dhananjay; Bala, Shashi

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, performance of the trickle bed airbiofilter (TBAB) for treating mono-chlorobenzene (MCB) was evaluated for various influent volatile organic compound (VOC) loadings using coal and mixed consortium of activated sludge as the packing material. Microbial acclimation to MCB was achieved by exposing the system continuously for 31 d to an average inlet MCB concentration of 0.688 g m(-3) at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 188 s. The TBAB achieved maximum removal efficiency of 87% at an EBRT of 188 s for an inlet concentration of 0.681 g m(-3), which is quite significance than the values reported in the literature. Elimination capacities of MCB increased with an increase of the influent VOC loading, but an opposite trend was observed for the removal efficiency The maximum elimination capacity of the biofilter was 110.75 g m(-3) hr(-1) at an inlet MCB concentration of 1.47 g m(-3). The effect of starvation on the TBAB was also studied. After starvation, the TBAB lost its ability to degrade MCB initially However the biofilter recovered very quickly Evaluation of the concentration profile along the bed height indicated that the bottom section of TBAB has the best performance for all concentrations. By using Wani's method of macrokinetic determination based on simple Monod kinetics, the maximum removal rate of MCB, r(max) and saturation constant K(m) was to be found as 1.304 g m(-3)s(-1) and 113.446 g m(-3), respectively.

  14. Roughness and temperature effects on the filter media of a trickling filter for nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Ohara, Tetsuya; Hinobayashi, Jouji; Hashimoto, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The performance of trickling filters using two types of plastic media with the same material, the same shape and different roughness was evaluated during a temperature-decreasing period to understand the roughness and temperature effects on the filter media. Real restaurant wastewater was used for the experiments. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and nitrification performance of plastic media with a rough surface (LT-15) was superior to that with a smooth surface (KT-15). Because the biomass of microorganisms attached on the LT-15 was twice that attached on the KT-15, the larger biomass attached on the LT-15 was thought to be responsible for the higher performance. During the operation, the COD loading and water temperature varied in the range from 0.37 to 1.9 kg m(-3) d(-1) and 17.0--10.0 degrees C, respectively. However, the COD removal performance was not dependent on the COD loading or water temperature. On the contrary, the COD loading and the water temperature influenced the nitrification performance. Although a nitrification efficiency of 100% was recorded at a COD loading of 0.37 kg m(-3) d(-1), it deteriorated to 17-28% at higher COD loading. Moreover, a decline in the water temperature decreased the nitrification performance. The temperature-activity coefficient for nitrification was estimated to be 1.096. Based on this value, it was inferred that the COD loading should be set at less than 0.20 kg m(-3) d(-1) for the complete nitrification of the restaurant wastewater in winter, when the water temperature usually drops to around 10 degrees C.

  15. Photo-Fenton oxidation of 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole: a by-product from biological breakdown of some pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Bianca M; Marinho, Belisa A; Moreira, Francisca C; Dezotti, Márcia W C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims to assess the removal of 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole (AMI), a recalcitrant by-product resulting from the biological breakdown of some pharmaceuticals, applying a solar photo-Fenton process assisted by ferrioxalate complexes (SPFF) (Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 /oxalic acid/UVA-Vis) and classical solar photo-Fenton process (SPF) (Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 /UVA-Vis). The oxidation ability of SPFF was evaluated at different iron/oxalate molar ratios (1:3, 1:6, and 1:9, with [total iron] = 3.58 × 10 -2  mM and [oxalic acid] = 1.07 × 10 -1 , 2.14 × 10 -1 and 3.22 × 10 -1  mM, respectively) and pH values (3.5-6.5), using low iron contents (2.0 mg Fe 3+ L -1 ). Additionally, the use of other organic ligands such as citrate and ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) was tested. The oxidation power of the classical SPF was assessed at different pH values (2.8-4.0) using 2.0 mg Fe 2+ per liter. Furthermore, the effect of AMI concentration (2-20 mg L -1 ), presence of inorganic ions (Cl - , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , HCO 3 - , NH 4 + ), and radical scavengers (sodium azide and D-mannitol) on the SPF method at pH 3.5 was also assessed. Experiments were done using a lab-scale photoreactor with a compound parabolic collector (CPC) under simulated solar radiation. A pilot-scale assay was conducted using the best operation conditions. While at near neutral pH, an iron/oxalate molar ratio of 1:9 led to the removal of 72 % of AMI after 90 min of SPFF, at pH 3.5, an iron/oxalate molar ratio of 1:3 was enough to achieve complete AMI degradation (below the detection limit) after 30 min of reaction. The SPF process at pH 3.5 underwent a slower AMI degradation, reaching total AMI degradation after 40 min of reaction. The scale up of SPF process showed a good reproducibility. Oxalic and oxamic acids were identified as the main low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids detected during the pilot-scale SPF reaction. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  16. Use of oxidative and reducing vapor generation for reducing the detection limits of iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vtorushina, Eh.A.; Saprykin, A.I.; Knapp, G.

    2009-01-01

    Procedures of microwave combustion in an oxygen flow and microwave acid decomposition of biological samples were optimized for the subsequent determination of iodine. A new method was proposed for the generation of molecular iodine from periodate iona using hydrogen peroxide as a reductant. Procedures were developed for determining iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) using oxidative and reducing vapor generation; these allowed the detection limit for iodine to be lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The developed procedures were used to analyze certified reference materials of milk (Skim Milk Powder BCR 150) and seaweed (Sea Lettuce BCR 279) and a Supradyn vitamin complex

  17. Anthelmintic effect of carob pods and sainfoin hay when fed to lambs after experimental trickle infections with Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Lopez, Celia; Manolaraki, Foteini; Saratsis, Anastasios; Saratsi, Katerina; Stefanakis, Alexandros; Skampardonis, Vasileios; Voutzourakis, Nikolaos; Hoste, Hervé; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the in vivo anthelmintic activity of sainfoin hay (Onobrychis viciifolia) and carob pod meal (Ceratonia siliqua) against gastrointestinal nematodes. Seven days before infection, 64 naive lambs were assigned to four different groups: Group S received sainfoin hay and group CAR was fed with carob pods. The remaining lambs received lucerne hay (Medicago sativa) and were assigned to positive (non-treated, NT) and negative (treated, T) control groups (treatment with albendazole). On day 0, lambs were artificially trickle infected for 6 weeks, with a mixture of infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. Parasitological and pathophysiological parameters were measured repeatedly during the 2-month study. Compared to the NT group, decreases in egg excretion were observed in the CAR and S groups with significant differences only found for sainfoin (p < 0.05). At necropsy, group S showed decreases in the total worm numbers of both nematode species with significant differences for H. contortus. In contrast, no differences were noticed for the CAR group. Compared to the NT group, lower values for fecundity of female H. contortus were found in the S and CAR groups, however differences were non-significant. No differences in body weight gains were found between groups. Consistent results were found showing significantly higher packed cell volume (PCV) values in the T and S groups compared to NT and CAR groups. Overall, these results confirm a positive effect associated with the feeding of lambs with tanniniferous resources on host resilience (PCV values) and against gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes by affecting some biological traits of worm populations (e.g. eggs per gram of faeces and worm numbers). However, the anthelmintic effects differed between the two tannin-containing resources, which might be associated with the quantity and/or quality of secondary metabolites (condensed tannins and/or other

  18. Anthelmintic effect of carob pods and sainfoin hay when fed to lambs after experimental trickle infections with Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arroyo-Lopez Celia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the in vivo anthelmintic activity of sainfoin hay (Onobrychis viciifolia and carob pod meal (Ceratonia siliqua against gastrointestinal nematodes. Seven days before infection, 64 naive lambs were assigned to four different groups: Group S received sainfoin hay and group CAR was fed with carob pods. The remaining lambs received lucerne hay (Medicago sativa and were assigned to positive (non-treated, NT and negative (treated, T control groups (treatment with albendazole. On day 0, lambs were artificially trickle infected for 6 weeks, with a mixture of infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. Parasitological and pathophysiological parameters were measured repeatedly during the 2-month study. Compared to the NT group, decreases in egg excretion were observed in the CAR and S groups with significant differences only found for sainfoin (p < 0.05. At necropsy, group S showed decreases in the total worm numbers of both nematode species with significant differences for H. contortus. In contrast, no differences were noticed for the CAR group. Compared to the NT group, lower values for fecundity of female H. contortus were found in the S and CAR groups, however differences were non-significant. No differences in body weight gains were found between groups. Consistent results were found showing significantly higher packed cell volume (PCV values in the T and S groups compared to NT and CAR groups. Overall, these results confirm a positive effect associated with the feeding of lambs with tanniniferous resources on host resilience (PCV values and against gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes by affecting some biological traits of worm populations (e.g. eggs per gram of faeces and worm numbers. However, the anthelmintic effects differed between the two tannin-containing resources, which might be associated with the quantity and/or quality of secondary metabolites (condensed tannins and

  19. Effect of residual H2O2 from advanced oxidation processes on subsequent biological water treatment: A laboratory batch study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; van Halem, Doris; Liu, Gang; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, Karin; van der Hoek, Jan Peter

    2017-10-01

    H 2 O 2 residuals from advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) may have critical impacts on the microbial ecology and performance of subsequent biological treatment processes, but little is known. The objective of this study was to evaluate how H 2 O 2 residuals influence sand systems with an emphasis on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal, microbial activity change and bacterial community evolution. The results from laboratory batch studies showed that 0.25 mg/L H 2 O 2 lowered DOC removal by 10% while higher H 2 O 2 concentrations at 3 and 5 mg/L promoted DOC removal by 8% and 28%. A H 2 O 2 dosage of 0.25 mg/L did not impact microbial activity (as measured by ATP) while high H 2 O 2 dosages, 1, 3 and 5 mg/L, resulted in reduced microbial activity of 23%, 37% and 37% respectively. Therefore, DOC removal was promoted by the increase of H 2 O 2 dosage while microbial activity was reduced. The pyrosequencing results illustrated that bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria. The presence of H 2 O 2 showed clear influence on the diversity and composition of bacterial communities, which became more diverse under 0.25 mg/L H 2 O 2 but conversely less diverse when the dosage increased to 5 mg/L H 2 O 2 . Anaerobic bacteria were found to be most sensitive to H 2 O 2 as their growth in batch reactors was limited by both 0.25 and 5 mg/L H 2 O 2 (17-88% reduction). In conclusion, special attention should be given to effects of AOPs residuals on microbial ecology before introducing AOPs as a pre-treatment to biological (sand) processes. Additionally, the guideline on the maximum allowable H 2 O 2 concentration should be properly evaluated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological therapy of strontium-substituted bioglass for soft tissue wound-healing: responses to oxidative stress in ovariectomised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebahi, S; Oudadesse, H; Jardak, N; Khayat, I; Keskes, H; Khabir, A; Rebai, T; El Feki, H; El Feki, A

    2013-07-01

    New synthetic biomaterials are constantly being developed for wound repair and regeneration. Bioactive glasses (BG) containing strontium have shown successful applications in tissue engineering account of their biocompatibility and the positive biological effects after implantation. This study aimed to assess whether BG-Sr was accepted by the host tissue and to characterize oxidative stress biomarker and antioxidant enzyme profiles during muscle and skin healing. Wistar rats were divided into five groups (six animals per group): the group (I) was used as negative control (T), after ovariectomy, groups II, III, IV and V were used respectively as positive control (OVX), implanted tissue with BG (OVX-BG), BG-Sr (OVX-BG-Sr) and presented empty defects (OVX-NI). Soft tissues surrounding biomaterials were used to estimate superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. Our results show that 60 days after operation, treatment of rats with BG-Sr significantly increased MDA concentration and caused an increase of SOD, CAT and GPx activities in both skin and muscular tissues. BG-Sr revealed maturation of myotubes followed a normal appearance of muscle regenerated with high density and mature capillary vessels. High wound recovery with complete re-epithelialization and regeneration of skin was observed. The results demonstrate that the protective action against reactive oxygen species (ROS) was clearly observed in soft tissue surrounding BG-Sr. Moreover, the potential use of BG-Sr rapidly restores the wound skin and muscle structural and functional properties. The BG advantages such as ion release might make BG-Sr an effective biomaterial choice for antioxidative activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular biology based assessment of green tea effects on oxidative stress and cardiac remodelling in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Lorenzo A; Vertolli, Ugo; Davis, Paul A; Maso, Lucia Dal; Pagnin, Elisa; Ravarotto, Verdiana; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Lupia, Mario; Seccia, Teresa M; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease, the most common cause for morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), has prompted the exploration of multiple approaches to improve outcomes. Cardiovascular risk factors such as oxidative stress (OxSt) and cardiac remodelling are common in ESRD and dialysis patients. Green tea (GT) is well recognized as reducing OxSt. This 6 months study evaluated in 20 ESRD patients under chronic dialysis, the effect of GT treatment (1 g/day as commercially available capsule) on cellular and plasma OxSt and proliferation related markers using a molecular biology approach. Mononuclear cell p22(phox), Haeme Oxygenase (HO)-1 protein expression, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 status were evaluated in dialysis patients at baseline, after 3 and 6 months of GT treatment by Western blot analysis and plasma oxLDL by ELISA. Cardiac remodelling was assessed by echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) mass determination at baseline and at the end of the study. GT treatment reduced p22(phox) and pERK1/2 from baseline while HO-1 increased. At baseline, LV mass correlated with both p22(phox) and oxLDL. GT treatment decreased LV mass from baseline, which correlated with oxLDL. 9 patients had LV hypertrophy at baseline, which, at 6 months, was normalized in 5 and reduced in 3, showing a parallel decrease of p22(phox), pERK1/2, oxLDL and increase of HO-1. Treatment with GT decreased the expression of OxSt-related proteins tightly associated with cardiovascular disease and decreased LV mass. It appears highly likely that the addition of GT can provide a benefit in terms of cardiovascular protection in dialysis patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes as nanofeatured scaffolds for the assisted deposition of nanohydroxyapatite: characterization and biological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues BV

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bruno VM Rodrigues,1,* Nelly CS Leite,1,* Bruno das Neves Cavalcanti,2 Newton S da Silva,3 Fernanda R Marciano,1 Evaldo J Corat,4 Thomas J Webster,5,6 Anderson O Lobo11Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Institute of Research and Development (IP&D, University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil; 2Department of Cardiology, Restorative Sciences and Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Laboratory of Cell Biology and Tissue, Institute of Research and Development (IP&D, University of Vale Do Paraiba (UNIVAP, 4Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials, National Institute for Space Research, Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil; 5Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 6Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp is an emergent bioceramic that shows similar chemical and crystallographic properties as the mineral phase present in bone. However, nHAp presents low fracture toughness and tensile strength, limiting its application in bone tissue engineering. Conversely, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs have been widely used for composite applications due to their excellent mechanical and physicochemical properties, although their hydrophobicity usually impairs some applications. To improve MWCNT wettability, oxygen plasma etching has been applied to promote MWCNT exfoliation and oxidation and to produce graphene oxide (GO at the end of the tips. Here, we prepared a series of nHAp/MWCNT-GO nanocomposites aimed at producing materials that combine similar bone characteristics (nHAp with high mechanical strength (MWCNT-GO. After MWCNT production and functionalization to produce MWCNT-GO, ultrasonic irradiation was employed to precipitate nHAp onto the MWCNT-GO scaffolds (at 1–3 wt%. We employed various techniques to

  3. A Proposed Computed Tomography Contrast Agent Using Carboxybetaine Zwitterionic Tantalum Oxide Nanoparticles: Imaging, Biological, and Physicochemical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Paul F; Butts, Matthew D; Roberts, Jeannette C; Colborn, Robert E; Torres, Andrew S; Lee, Brian D; Yeh, Benjamin M; Bonitatibus, Peter J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to produce and evaluate a proposed computed tomography (CT) contrast agent based on carboxybetaine zwitterionic (CZ)-coated soluble tantalum oxide (TaO) nanoparticles (NPs). We chose tantalum to provide superior imaging performance compared with current iodine-based clinical CT contrast agents. We developed the CZ coating to provide biological and physical performance similar to that of current iodinated contrast agents. In addition, the aim of this study was to evaluate the imaging, biological, and physicochemical performance of this proposed contrast agent compared with clinically used iodinated agents. We evaluated CT imaging performance of our CZ-TaO NPs compared with that of an iodinated agent in live rats, imaged centrally located within a tissue-equivalent plastic phantom that simulated a large patient. To evaluate vascular contrast enhancement, we scanned the rats' great vessels at high temporal resolution during and after contrast agent injection. We performed several in vivo CZ-TaO NP studies in healthy rats to evaluate tolerability. These studies included injecting the agent at the anticipated clinical dose (ACD) and at 3 times and 6 times the ACD, followed by longitudinal hematology to assess impact to blood cells and organ function (from 4 hours to 1 week). Kidney histological analysis was performed 48 hours after injection at 3 times the ACD. We measured the elimination half-life of CZ-TaO NPs from blood, and we monitored acute kidney injury biomarkers with a kidney injury assay using urine collected from 4 hours to 1 week. We measured tantalum retention in individual organs and in the whole carcass 48 hours after injection at ACD. Carboxybetaine zwitterionic TaO NPs were synthesized and analyzed in detail. We used multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance to determine surface functionality of the NPs. We measured NP size and solution properties (osmolality and viscosity) of the agent over a range of tantalum concentrations

  4. Dinitrosyl iron complexes and S-nitrosothiols are two possible forms for stabilization and transport of nitric oxide in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, A F

    1998-07-01

    The physicochemical properties, mechanisms of synthesis and decomposition of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) with thiol-containing ligands and of S-nitrosothiols (RS-NO), and the potential role of these compounds in storage and transport of NO in biological systems are reviewed. Special attention is given to the phenomenon of mutual transformation of DNIC and RS-NO catalyzed by Fe2+. Each Fe2+ binds two neutral NO molecules in the DNICs, catalyzes their mutual oxidation--reduction with formation of nitrous oxide and nitrosonium ions appearing in the DNICs. These ions S-nitrosate thiol-compounds with RS-NO formation. Fe2+ binds two RS-NO molecules and catalyzes their mutual oxidation--reduction followed by decomposition of the resulting molecules. Mutual conversion of DNICs and RS-NO regulated by iron, thiol, and NO levels is suggested to provide NO transport in cells and tissues.

  5. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  6. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Kim, Jungkwon [Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences Department, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrera, Julian [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Metcalfe, Ian S. [Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials Department, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Font, Josep [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.font@urv.cat

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P{sub O{sub 2}} were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P{sub O{sub 2}}, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD{sub RB}) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  7. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julian; Metcalfe, Ian S.; Font, Josep

    2007-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P O 2 ) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P O 2 were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P O 2 , which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD RB ) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture

  8. Advanced oxidation protein products — biological marker of oxidative stress = Zaawansowane produkty utleniania białek – biologiczne markery stresu oksydacyjnego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cwynar

    2016-09-01

      ABSTRACT Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs are mostly derivatives of oxidatively modified albumin. The results of many experimental studies confirm intensification of oxidative modifications of proteins and an increase in concentration of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs in different pathological conditions, particularly those with well documented involvement of oxidative stress in their etiopathogenesis, but also those where its role is not yet well understood. Currently intensive research is carried out on the possibility of using AOPPs as useful indicators for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of diseases.   Keywords: advanced oxidation protein products, autoimmune disease, oxidative stress   STRESZCZENIE Zaawansowane produkty utleniania białek (AOPPs, to najczęściej pochodne zmodyfikowanej oksydacyjnie albuminy. Wyniki licznych badań doświadczalnych potwierdzają nasilenie oksydacyjnych modyfikacji białek i wzrost stężenia zaawansowanych produktów utleniania białek (AOPPs w różnych stanach patologicznych, szczególnie tych o dobrze udokumentowanym udziale stresu oksydacyjnego w ich etiopatogenezie, ale także takich, w których jego rola nie jest jeszcze dobrze poznana.. Obecnie trwają intensywne badania nad możliwością wykorzystania AOPPs, jako użytecznych wskaźników do diagnozowania, prognozowania oraz monitorowania chorób.   Słowa kluczowe: zaawansowane produkty utleniania białek, choroby autoimmunologiczne, stres oksydacyjny

  9. Development of an experimental radioisotope based process tomography system for research applications in a cold trickle bed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sau, Madhusudan; Kumar, Pravesh; Kumar, Umesh; Acharya, Rajesh; Singh, Gursharan

    2009-01-01

    In chemical and petrochemical engineering applications, random and structured packing are used in process columns to enhance the heat and mass transfer between two phases. The packing used in such columns is meant to obtain a high specific interfacial area. It is of paramount importance for scale-up and design of trickle bed process columns, to understand and predict the complex multiphase fluid dynamics. In simplified terms, the phase holdup, solid packing distribution in terms of density and gas and liquid velocities among other important parameters need to be qualitatively and quantitatively understood. In the petrochemical industry, many processes are carried out using fixed bed reactors with concurrent upward and downward gas and liquid flows. In order to characterize the liquid and gas flow distribution through a mock-up column, data on planar and volume density distribution using computed tomographic measurements are very helpful. The paper describes the development efforts of a multi-detector 137 Cs radioisotope based in-situ tomography scanner suitable for 600mm dia. cold trickle bed reactor. The development work is at present in progress. The schematics and development of the scanner gantry is described in this paper. (author)

  10. The Performance of the Trickle Bed Reactor Packed with the Pt/SDBC Catalyst Mixture for the CECE Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seungwoo Paek; Do-Hee Ahn; Heui-Joo Choi; Kwang-Rag Kim; Hongsuk Chung; Sung-Paal Yim; Minsoo Lee; Kyu-Min Song; Soon Hwan Sohn

    2006-01-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) process with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy waste water streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. The CECE process is composed of an electrolysis cell and a LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column. This paper describes the experimental results of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst for the development of the LPCE column of the CECE process. The hydrophobic Pt/SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) catalyst has been developed by Korean researchers for the LPCE column of WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility). An experimental apparatus was constructed for the various experiments with the different parameters, such as hydrogen flow rate, temperature, and the structure of the mixed catalyst column. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring). The performance of the catalyst bed was expressed as an overall rate constant Kya. To improve the performance of the trickle bed, the modification of the catalyst bed design (changing the shape of the catalyst complex and diluting with inert) has been investigated. (author)

  11. Experimental and Computational Study of the Hydrodynamics of Trickle Bed Flow Reactor Operating Under Different Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, S.; Ben Salem, I.; Nadeem, H.; Kurnia, J. C.; Shamim, T.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure drop estimation and prediction of liquid holdup play a crucial role in design and operation of trickle bed reactors. Experiments are performed for Light Gas Oil (LGO)-nitrogen system in ambient temperature conditions in an industrial pilot plant with reactor height 0.79 m and diameter of 0.0183 m and pressure ranging from atmospheric to 10 bars. It was found that pressure drop increased with increase in system pressure, superficial gas velocity and superficial liquid velocity. It was demonstrated in the experiments that liquid holdup of the system increases with the increase in superficial liquid velocity and tends to decrease with increase in superficial gas velocity which is in good agreement with existing literature. Similar conditions were also simulated using CFD-software FLUENT. The Volume of Fluid (VoF) technique was employed in combination with "discrete particle approach" and results were compared with that of experiments. The overall pressure drop results were compared with the different available models and a new comprehensive model was proposed to predict the pressure drop in Trickle Bed Flow Reactor.

  12. Extraction of uranium from coarse ore and acid-curing and ferric sulphate-trickle leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Suoqing

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of the problems in the technology of the traditional uranium hydrometallurgy and the limitations of thin layer leaching process (TLL), a new leaching system-acid-curing and ferric sulphate-trickle leaching (AFL) process (NGJ in Chinese) has developed for extraction of uranium from the coarse ore. The ferric sulphate solution was used for trickling the acid-cured uranium ore and the residual leaching reaction incomplete in TLL process can be improved in this process. And the AFL process has a wide applicability to China's uranium ores, being in competition with the traditional agitation leaching process for treating coarse ores. The uranium ore processing technology based on the AFL process will become one of the new basic technologies of uranium hydrometallurgy. A series of difficulties will be basically overcome associated with fine grinding because of its elimination in the presented process. Moreover, the situation of the present uranium hydrometallurgy can be also changed owing to without technological effluent discharge

  13. Impact of post-infiltration soil aeration at different growth stages of sub-surface trickle-irrigated tomato plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Jia, Zong-xia; Niu, Wen-Quan; Wang, Jing-wei

    2016-07-01

    Sensitivity to low rhizosphere soil aeration may change over time and therefore plant response may also depend on different growth stages of a crop. This study quantified effects of soil aeration during 5 different periods, on growth and yield of trickle-irrigated potted single tomato plants. Irrigation levels were 0.6 to 0.7 (low level) or 0.7 to 0.8 (high level) of total water holding capacity of the pots. Soil was aerated by injecting 2.5 l of air into each pot through the drip tubing immediately after irrigation. Fresh fruit yield, above ground plant dry weight, plant height, and leaf area index response to these treatments were measured. For all these 4 response variables, means of post-infiltration aeration between 58 to 85 days after sowing were 13.4, 43.5, 13.7, and 37.7% higher than those for the non-aerated pots, respectively. The results indicated that: post-infiltration soil aeration can positively impact the yield and growth of sub-surface trickle-irrigated potted tomato plants; positive effects on plant growth can be obtained with aeration during the whole growth period or with aeration for partial periods; positive growth effects of partial periods of aeration appears to persist and result in yield benefit.

  14. The trickle-down effect of predictability: Secondary task performance benefits from predictability in the primary task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ewa Król

    Full Text Available Predictions optimize processing by reducing attentional resources allocation to expected or predictable sensory data. Our study demonstrates that these saved processing resources can be then used on concurrent stimuli, and in consequence improve their processing and encoding. We illustrate this "trickle-down" effect with a dual task, where the primary task varied in terms of predictability. The primary task involved detection of a pre-specified symbol that appeared at some point of a short video of a dot moving along a random, semi-predictable or predictable trajectory. The concurrent secondary task involved memorization of photographs representing either emotionally neutral or non-neutral (social or threatening content. Performance in the secondary task was measured by a memory test. We found that participants allocated more attention to unpredictable (random and semi-predictable stimuli than to predictable stimuli. Additionally, when the stimuli in the primary task were more predictable, participants performed better in the secondary task, as evidenced by higher sensitivity in the memory test. Finally, social or threatening stimuli were allocated more "looking time" and a larger number of saccades than neutral stimuli. This effect was stronger for the threatening stimuli than social stimuli. Thus, predictability of environmental input is used in optimizing the allocation of attentional resources, which trickles-down and benefits the processing of concurrent stimuli.

  15. Monitoring of itaconic acid hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor using fiber-optic coupled near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joseph; Turner, Paul H

    2003-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been applied to determine the conversion of itaconic acid in the effluent stream of a trickle bed reactor. Hydrogenation of itaconic to methyl succinic acid was carried out, with the trickle bed operating in recycle mode. For the first time, NIR spectra of itaconic and methyl succinic acids in aqueous solution, and aqueous mixtures withdrawn from the reactor over a range of reaction times, have been recorded using a fiberoptic sampling probe. The infrared spectra displayed a clear isolated absorption band at a wavenumber of 6186 cm(-1) (wavelength 1.617 microm) resulting from the =C-H bonds of itaconic acid, which was found to decrease in intensity with increasing reaction time. The feature could be more clearly observed from plots of the first derivatives of the spectra. A partial least-squares (PLS) model was developed from the spectra of 13 reference samples and was used successfully to calculate the concentration of the two acids in the reactor effluent solution. Itaconic acid conversions of 23-29% were calculated after 360 min of reaction time. The potential of FT-NIR with fiber-optic sampling for remote monitoring of three-phase catalytic reactors and validation of catalytic reactor models is highlighted in the paper.

  16. The trickle-down effect of predictability: Secondary task performance benefits from predictability in the primary task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Magdalena Ewa; Król, Michał

    2017-01-01

    Predictions optimize processing by reducing attentional resources allocation to expected or predictable sensory data. Our study demonstrates that these saved processing resources can be then used on concurrent stimuli, and in consequence improve their processing and encoding. We illustrate this "trickle-down" effect with a dual task, where the primary task varied in terms of predictability. The primary task involved detection of a pre-specified symbol that appeared at some point of a short video of a dot moving along a random, semi-predictable or predictable trajectory. The concurrent secondary task involved memorization of photographs representing either emotionally neutral or non-neutral (social or threatening) content. Performance in the secondary task was measured by a memory test. We found that participants allocated more attention to unpredictable (random and semi-predictable) stimuli than to predictable stimuli. Additionally, when the stimuli in the primary task were more predictable, participants performed better in the secondary task, as evidenced by higher sensitivity in the memory test. Finally, social or threatening stimuli were allocated more "looking time" and a larger number of saccades than neutral stimuli. This effect was stronger for the threatening stimuli than social stimuli. Thus, predictability of environmental input is used in optimizing the allocation of attentional resources, which trickles-down and benefits the processing of concurrent stimuli.

  17. The results of the lipids peroxidation products on the DNA bases as biological markers of the oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falletti, O.

    2007-10-01

    Different ways of DNA damages have been studied, among these ones the direct way of DNA damages formation by the reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). This way leads to the formation of oxidative DNA damages. In 1990, works have suggested an indirect way of DNA damages formation, the lipids peroxidation. Instead of oxidizing directly DNA, the R.O.S. oxide the lipids present in the cells and their membranes; The products coming from this degradation are able to provoke DNA damages. This way has not been studied very much. The work of this thesis is axed on this DNA theme and lipids peroxidation. In the first chapter, we begin by presenting DNA and the direct way of oxidative damages formation by the R.O.S.Then, we speak about the cell lipids suffering oxidation reactions and the different ways of lipids oxidation. Then, we present how the lipid peroxidation is a source of damages for DNA. (N.C.)

  18. Trickling Down: Are Rural and Rural Poor Family Incomes Responsive to Regional Economic Growth? Institute for Research on Poverty, Discussion Papers No. 210-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bruce A.

    The past decade has seen a number of studies of how the poverty incidence (the percentage of families below the poverty line) of certain demographic groups changes in response to economic growth. The question of whether regional economic growth trickles down to rural and rural poor families was examined by statistically estimating the relationship…

  19. Development of a protective immunity against Ostertagia leptospicularis in trickle-infected sheep and parallel changes of serum gastrin, pepsinogen and antibody levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertzberg, H.; Schallig, H. D.; Deplazes, P.

    1999-01-01

    Nine lambs, approximately 9 months of age were allocated to three groups (A, B, C), with three animals in each. Sheep in Groups A and B were trickle-infected with doses of 1000 third-stage larvae (L3) of Ostertagia leptospicularis (five times per week) over periods of 7.5 and 10.5 weeks,

  20. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in tumor biology: the two sides of the same coin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lechner, Matthias; Lirk, Philipp; Rieder, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is one of three key enzymes generating nitric oxide (NO) from the amino acid l-arginine. iNOS-derived NO plays an important role in numerous physiological (e.g. blood pressure regulation, wound repair and host defence mechanisms) and pathophysiological

  1. The oxidative potential and biological effects induced by PM10 obtained in Mexico City and at a receptor site during the MILAGRO Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, Raul; Serrano, Jesus; Gomez, Virginia; Foy, Benjamin de; Miranda, Javier; Garcia-Cuellar, Claudia; Vega, Elizabeth; Vazquez-Lopez, Ines; Molina, Luisa T.; Manzano-Leon, Natalia; Rosas, Irma; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a field campaign that studied the impact of Mexico City pollution plume at the local, sub-regional and regional levels, we studied transport-related changes in PM 10 composition, oxidative potential and in vitro toxicological patterns (hemolysis, DNA degradation). We collected PM 10 in Mexico City (T 0 ) and at a suburban-receptor site (T 1 ), pooled according to two observed ventilation patterns (T 0 → T 1 influence and non-influence). T 0 samples contained more Cu, Zn, and carbon whereas; T 1 samples contained more of Al, Si, P, S, and K (p 4 -2 increased in T 1 during the influence periods. Oxidative potential correlated with Cu/Zn content (r = 0.74; p 1 PM 10 induced greater hemolysis and T 0 PM 10 induced greater DNA degradation. Influence/non-influence did not affect oxidative potential nor biological effects. Results indicate that ventilation patterns had little effect on intrinsic PM 10 composition and toxicological potential, which suggests a significant involvement of local sources. - Highlights: → Transport-related changes in PM 10 composition, oxidative potential and in vitro toxicity were studied. → Cu, Zn, and carbon levels were predominant in urban PM 10 ; receptor site PM 10 was rich in soil elements. → SO 4 -2 was the only component increased in PM 10 from the receptor during the influence periods. → PM 10 oxidative potential correlates with Cu/Zn content but not with studied biological effects. → Ventilation patterns had little effect on PM 10 composition and toxicity. - Mexico City ventilation patterns had little effect on the intrinsic PM 10 composition and toxicological potential, which suggests a significant involvement of local sources as opposed to downwind transport.

  2. Deuterium exchange reaction in a trickle bed packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seungwoo Paek; Heui-Joo Choi; DO-Hee Ahn; Kwang-Rag Kim; Minsoo Lee; Sung-Paal Yim; Hongsuk Chung

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water on the platinum supported catalysts provides a useful step for separating hydrogen isotopes such as deuterium and tritium. The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy waste water streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. This paper deals with the experiments for the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst in order to develop the catalytic column of the CECE. Hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst was packed wet into the column and water was injected at the top through a liquid distributor and trickled through a catalyst mixture. Hydrogen gas passed up the column and deuterium was transferred to water stream flowing counter currently. The temperature of the column was controlled to maintain at 60 deg. C using water jackets around the reactor and equilibrator, a feed waster heater, and a circulation water heater. A metal bellows pump was used to circulate the hydrogen gas at the typical flow rate of 60 LPM.The reactor pressure was controlled to maintain at 135 kPa (abs) by a water column. Gas samples were drawn off from the top and bottom of the column. The difference in deuterium concentration between the inlet and outlet gas samples was analyzed using Gas

  3. Deuterium exchange reaction in a trickle bed packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seungwoo Paek [KAERI (Korea, Republic of); Heui-Joo Choi; DO-Hee Ahn; Kwang-Rag Kim; Minsoo Lee; Sung-Paal Yim; Hongsuk Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water on the platinum supported catalysts provides a useful step for separating hydrogen isotopes such as deuterium and tritium. The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy waste water streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. This paper deals with the experiments for the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst in order to develop the catalytic column of the CECE. Hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst was packed wet into the column and water was injected at the top through a liquid distributor and trickled through a catalyst mixture. Hydrogen gas passed up the column and deuterium was transferred to water stream flowing counter currently. The temperature of the column was controlled to maintain at 60 deg. C using water jackets around the reactor and equilibrator, a feed waster heater, and a circulation water heater. A metal bellows pump was used to circulate the hydrogen gas at the typical flow rate of 60 LPM.The reactor pressure was controlled to maintain at 135 kPa (abs) by a water column. Gas samples were drawn off from the top and bottom of the column. The difference in deuterium concentration between the inlet and outlet gas samples was analyzed using Gas

  4. Oxidation of atenolol, propranolol, carbamazepine and clofibric acid by a biological Fenton-like system mediated by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Radjenović, Jelena; Caminal, Gloria; Petrović, Mira; Vicent, Teresa; Barceló, Damià

    2010-01-01

    Biological advanced oxidation of the pharmaceuticals clofibric acid (CA), carbamazepine (CBZP), atenolol (ATL) and propranolol (PPL) is reported for the first time. Extracellular oxidizing species were produced through a quinone redox cycling mechanism catalyzed by an intracellular quinone reductase and any of the ligninolytic enzymes of Trametes versicolor after addition of the lignin-derived quinone 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DBQ) and Fe(3+)-oxalate in the medium. Time-course experiments with approximately 10mg L(-1) of initial pharmaceutical concentration resulted in percent degradations above 80% after 6h of incubation. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals was only observed under DBQ redox cycling conditions. A similar degradation pattern was observed when CBZP was added at the environmentally relevant concentration of 50 microg L(-1). Depletion of DBQ due to the attack of oxidizing agents was assumed to be the main limiting factor of pharmaceutical degradation. The main degradation products, that resulted to be pharmaceutical hydroxylated derivatives, were structurally elucidated. The detected 4- and 7-hydroxycarbamazepine intermediates of CBZP degradation were not reported to date. Total disappearance of intermediates was observed in all the experiments at the end of the incubation period. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetic modeling of hydrocracking reaction in a trickle-bed reactor with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, BalSang; Park, Myung-June; Kim, Young-A; Park, Eun Duck [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jeongsik [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A kinetic model is developed to predict the entire distribution of hydrocarbon products for the hydrocracking reaction with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts in a trickle-bed reactor. Operating conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and wax and H{sub 2} flow rates were varied to evaluate their effects on conversion and distribution, and kinetic parameters were estimated using the experimental data that covers the window of operating conditions. The comparison between experimental data and simulated results corroborated the validity of the developed model, and the quantitative prediction of the reactor performance was clearly demonstrated. To make evident the usefulness of the model, an optimization method, genetic algorithm (GA), was applied, and the optimal condition for the maximum production of C{sub 10}-C{sub 17} was successfully calculated.

  6. Deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in a trickle-bed column packed with novel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D. H.; Baek, S. W.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    The activity of a novel catalyst (Pt/SDBC) for deuterium exchange reaction between water and hydrogen streams in a trickle bed was measured. The performance of the catalyst was compared with a commercial catalyst with same metal content. The catalytic activity for the bed of wet-proofed catalyst diluted with hydrophillic packing material also measured. The Pt/SDBC catalyst shows higher activity in the liquid phase reaction than the commercial catalyst as measured in the vapor phase reaction. The performance for 50% dilution of the Pt/SDBC catalyst bed with hydrophillic packing material is better than that of the 100% bed due to more liquid holdup and better water distribution

  7. Dreams, themes and particle beams--an oncologist's perspective on technology trickle-down from the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, R

    2014-04-01

    11 years ago, the European Network for Light Ion Therapy (ENLIGHT) was established as a multidisciplinary network of engineers, physicists and clinicians with a common interest in the development of hadron therapy in Europe. ENLIGHT is coordinated from the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN), the home of the Large Hadron Collider. The network has evolved into a mature platform for research, with more than 100 researchers working in CERN and its allied research centres. One of the benefits of hosting this network at CERN is the ability to translate hardware and software developments, originally developed in the High Energy Physics domain, into clinical applications. From the perspective of a clinical radiation oncologist within the network, this commentary reviews the ways in which leading edge technological developments in detectors and solid state physics, Monte-Carlo simulation, grid computing and accelerator design have trickled down into real-world clinical applications.

  8. Kinetic modeling of hydrocracking reaction in a trickle-bed reactor with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, BalSang; Park, Myung-June; Kim, Young-A; Park, Eun Duck; Han, Jeongsik; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model is developed to predict the entire distribution of hydrocarbon products for the hydrocracking reaction with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts in a trickle-bed reactor. Operating conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and wax and H 2 flow rates were varied to evaluate their effects on conversion and distribution, and kinetic parameters were estimated using the experimental data that covers the window of operating conditions. The comparison between experimental data and simulated results corroborated the validity of the developed model, and the quantitative prediction of the reactor performance was clearly demonstrated. To make evident the usefulness of the model, an optimization method, genetic algorithm (GA), was applied, and the optimal condition for the maximum production of C 10 -C 17 was successfully calculated

  9. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using sewage sludge based activated carbon supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Sewage sludge of biological wastewater treatment plant was converted into sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) with ZnCl₂ as activation agent, which supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts (including SBAC) to improve the performance of ozonation of real biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated catalytic ozonation with the prepared catalysts significantly enhanced performance of pollutants removal and the treated wastewater was more biodegradable and less toxic than that in ozonation alone. On the basis of positive effect of higher pH and significant inhibition of radical scavengers in catalytic ozonation, it was deduced that the enhancement of catalytic activity was responsible for generating hydroxyl radicals and the possible reaction pathway was proposed. Moreover, the prepared catalysts showed superior stability and most of toxic and refractory compounds were eliminated at successive catalytic ozonation runs. Thus, the process with economical, efficient and sustainable advantages was beneficial to engineering application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of trickle-bed reactor for ethanol production from syngas using Clostridium ragsdalei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarapalli, Mamatha

    The conversion of syngas components (CO, CO2 and H2) to liquid fuels such as ethanol involves complex biochemical reactions catalyzed by a group of acetogens such as Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium carboxidivorans and Clostridium ragsdalei. The low ethanol productivity in this process is associated with the low solubility of gaseous substrates CO and H2 in the fermentation medium. In the present study, a 1-L trickle-bed reactor (TBR) was analyzed to understand its capabilities to improve the mass transfer of syngas in fermentation medium. Further, semi-continuous and continuous syngas fermentations were performed using C. ragsdalei to evaluate the ability of the TBR for ethanol production. In the mass transfer studies, using 6-mm glass beads, it was found that the overall mass transfer coefficient (kLa/V L) increased with the increase in gas flow rate from 5.5 to 130.5 sccm. Further, an increase in the liquid flow rate in the TBR decreased the kLa/VL due to the increase in liquid hold up volume (VL) in the packing. The highest kLa/VL values of 421 h-1 and 178 h-1 were achieved at a gas flow rate of 130.5 sccm for 6-mm and 3-mm glass beads, respectively. Semi-continuous fermentations were performed with repetitive medium replacement in counter-current and co-current modes. In semi-continuous fermentations with syngas consisting of 38% CO, 5% N2, 28.5% CO2 and 28.5% H2 (by volume), the increase in H2 conversion (from 18 to 55%) and uptake (from 0.7 to 2.2 mmol/h) were observed. This increase was attributed to more cell attachment in the packing that reduced CO inhibition to hydrogenase along the column length and increased the H2 uptake. The maximum ethanol produced during counter-current and co-current modes were 3.0 g/L and 5.7 g/L, respectively. In continuous syngas fermentation, the TBR was operated at dilution rates between 0.006 h-1and 0.012 h -1 and gas flow rates between 1.5 sccm and 18.9 sccm. The highest ethanol concentration of 13 g/L was achieved at

  11. The oxidative potential and biological effects induced by PM{sub 10} obtained in Mexico City and at a receptor site during the MILAGRO Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, Raul [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City (Mexico); Serrano, Jesus [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Gomez, Virginia [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Foy, Benjamin de [Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Miranda, Javier [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Garcia-Cuellar, Claudia [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City (Mexico); Vega, Elizabeth [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico); Vazquez-Lopez, Ines [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City (Mexico); Molina, Luisa T. [Molina Center for Energy and the Environment, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Manzano-Leon, Natalia [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City (Mexico); Rosas, Irma [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R., E-mail: osornio@ualberta.ca [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City (Mexico); Department of Paediatrics, University of Alberta, 1048 RTF, 8308 114 St, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    As part of a field campaign that studied the impact of Mexico City pollution plume at the local, sub-regional and regional levels, we studied transport-related changes in PM{sub 10} composition, oxidative potential and in vitro toxicological patterns (hemolysis, DNA degradation). We collected PM{sub 10} in Mexico City (T{sub 0}) and at a suburban-receptor site (T{sub 1}), pooled according to two observed ventilation patterns (T{sub 0} {yields} T{sub 1} influence and non-influence). T{sub 0} samples contained more Cu, Zn, and carbon whereas; T{sub 1} samples contained more of Al, Si, P, S, and K (p < 0.05). Only SO{sub 4}{sup -2} increased in T{sub 1} during the influence periods. Oxidative potential correlated with Cu/Zn content (r = 0.74; p < 0.05) but not with biological effects. T{sub 1} PM{sub 10} induced greater hemolysis and T{sub 0} PM{sub 10} induced greater DNA degradation. Influence/non-influence did not affect oxidative potential nor biological effects. Results indicate that ventilation patterns had little effect on intrinsic PM{sub 10} composition and toxicological potential, which suggests a significant involvement of local sources. - Highlights: > Transport-related changes in PM{sub 10} composition, oxidative potential and in vitro toxicity were studied. > Cu, Zn, and carbon levels were predominant in urban PM{sub 10}; receptor site PM{sub 10} was rich in soil elements. > SO{sub 4}{sup -2} was the only component increased in PM{sub 10} from the receptor during the influence periods. > PM{sub 10} oxidative potential correlates with Cu/Zn content but not with studied biological effects. > Ventilation patterns had little effect on PM{sub 10} composition and toxicity. - Mexico City ventilation patterns had little effect on the intrinsic PM{sub 10} composition and toxicological potential, which suggests a significant involvement of local sources as opposed to downwind transport.

  12. A shortcut to wide-ranging biological actions of dietary polyphenols: modulation of the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Nunes, Carla; Pereira, Cassilda; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, João

    2014-08-01

    Dietary polyphenols are complex, natural compounds with recognized health benefits. Initially attractive to the biomedical area due to their in vitro antioxidant properties, the biological implications of polyphenols are now known to be far from their acute ability to scavenge free radicals but rather to modulate redox signaling pathways. Actually, it is now recognized that dietary polyphenols are extensively metabolized in vivo and that the chemical, biophysical and biological properties of their metabolites are, in most cases, quite different from the ones of the parent molecules. Hence, the study of the metabolic, absorptive and signaling pathways of both phenolics and derivatives has become a major issue. In this paper we propose a short-cut for the systemic effects of polyphenols in connection with nitric oxide (˙NO) biology. This free radical is a ubiquitous signaling molecule with pivotal functions in vivo. It is produced through an enzymatic pathway and also through the reduction of dietary nitrate and nitrite in the human stomach. At acidic gastric pH, dietary polyphenols, in the form they are conveyed in foods and at high concentration, not only promote nitrite reduction to ˙NO but also embark in a complex network of chemical reactions to produce higher nitrogen oxides with signaling functions, namely by inducing post-translational modifications. Modified endogenous molecules, such as nitrated proteins and lipids, acquire important physiological functions. Thus, local and systemic effects of ˙NO such as modulation of vascular tone, mucus production in the gut and protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury are, in this sense, triggered by dietary polyphenols. Evidence to support the signaling and biological effects of polyphenols by modulation of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway will be herein provided and discussed. General actions of polyphenols encompassing absorption and metabolism in the intestine/liver are short-cut via the production of

  13. Elimination of the effects of interferents on the quantitative determination of deuterium oxide in biological samples by infrared photometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.N.; Hentges, E.J.; Trenkle, A.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications to a procedure utilising sample purification by lyophilisation and automated infrared analysis were necessary to measure accurately the deuterium oxide content of various tissues and gastrointestinal tract contents of ruminants. Volatile fatty acids produced in the digestive tract of ruminants interfered with the measurement of deuterium oxide by infrared analysis. The volatile fatty acids were removed from samples by making the pH of the samples basic prior to lyophilisation. Contaminants in water extracted from tissues by lyophilisation of samples allowed the removal of the contaminants. The precision (Ssub(x-circumflex)) attained with this procedure was 3-6 mg l -1 for the range of deuterium oxide concentrations between 120 and 800 mg l -1 . (author)

  14. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerre, A B; Skammelsen Schmidt, A

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates `losses` of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation.

  15. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Skammelsen Schmidt, A.

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates 'losses' of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation

  16. Viral induced oxidative and inflammatory response in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis with identification of potential drug candidates: A systematic review using systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Puneet; Gupta, Renu; Kushwaha, Suman; Agarwal, Rachna; Saso, Luciano; Kukreti, Shrikant; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2018-04-19

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is genetically complex with multifactorial etiology. Here, we aim to identify the potential viral pathogens leading to aberrant inflammatory and oxidative stress response in AD along with potential drug candidates using systems biology approach. We retrieved protein interactions of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau protein (MAPT) from NCBI and genes for oxidative stress from NetAge, for inflammation from NetAge and InnateDB databases. Genes implicated in aging were retrieved from GenAge database and two GEO expression datasets. These genes were individually used to create protein-protein interaction network using STRING database (score≥0.7). The interactions of candidate genes with known viruses were mapped using virhostnet v2.0 database. Drug molecules targeting candidate genes were retrieved using the Drug-Gene Interaction Database (DGIdb). Data mining resulted in 2095 APP, 116 MAPT, 214 oxidative stress, 1269 inflammatory genes. After STRING PPIN analysis, 404 APP, 109 MAPT, 204 oxidative stress and 1014 inflammation related high confidence proteins were identified. The overlap among all datasets yielded eight common markers (AKT1, GSK3B, APP, APOE, EGFR, PIN1, CASP8 and SNCA). These genes showed association with hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpes virus 8 and Human papillomavirus (HPV). Further, screening of drugs targeting candidate genes, and possessing anti-inflammatory property, antiviral activity along with suggested role in AD pathophysiology yielded 12 potential drug candidates. Our study demonstrated the role of viral etiology in AD pathogenesis by elucidating interaction of oxidative stress and inflammation causing candidate genes with common viruses along with the identification of potential AD drug candidates. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Biological desulfurisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, B.J. [UOP LLC (United States); Benschop, A.; Janssen, A. [Paques Natural Solutions (Netherlands); Kijlstra, S. [Shell Global Solutions (Netherlands)

    2001-03-01

    This article focuses on the biological THIOPAQ process for removing hydrogen sulphide from refinery gases and recovering elemental sulphur. Details are given of the process which absorbs hydrogen sulphide-containing gas in alkaline solution prior to oxidation of the dissolved sulphur to elemental sulphur in a THIOPAQ aerobic biological reactor, with regeneration of the caustic solution. Sulphur handling options including sulphur wash, the drying of the sulphur cake, and sulphur smelting by pressure liquefaction are described. Agricultural applications of the biologically recovered sulphur, and application of the THIOPAQ process to sulphur recovery are discussed.

  18. Applicability of new spin trap agent, 2-diphenylphosphinoyl-2-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole N-oxide, in biological system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakawa, Tomohiro; Sato, Keizo; Muramoto, Yosuke; Mitani, Yoshihiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-01-01

    Electron spin resonance using spin-trapping is a useful technique for detecting direct reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide (O 2 .- ). However, the widely used spin trap 2,2-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole N-oxide (DMPO) has several fundamental limitations in terms of half-life and stability. Recently, the new spin trap 2-diphenylphosphinoyl-2-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole N-oxide (DPhPMPO) was developed by us. We evaluated the biological applicability of DPhPMPO to analyze O 2 .- in both cell-free and cellular systems. DPhPMPO had a larger rate constant for O 2 .- and formed more stable spin adducts for O 2 .- than DMPO in the xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) system. In the phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophil system, the detection potential of DPhPMPO for O 2 .- was significantly higher than that of DMPO (k DMPO = 13.95 M -1 s -1 , k DPhPMPO = 42.4 M -1 s -1 ). These results indicated that DPhPMPO is a potentially good candidate for trapping O 2 .- in a biological system

  19. Effects of C/N ratio on nitrous oxide production from nitrification in a laboratory-scale biological aerated filter reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Zhu, Yinying; Fan, Leilei; Ai, Hainan; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Chen, Mei

    2017-03-01

    Emission of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) during biological wastewater treatment is of growing concern. This paper reports findings of the effects of carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio on N 2 O production rates in a laboratory-scale biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor, focusing on the biofilm during nitrification. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and microelectrode technology were utilized to evaluate the mechanisms associated with N 2 O production during wastewater treatment using BAF. Results indicated that the ability of N 2 O emission in biofilm at C/N ratio of 2 was much stronger than at C/N ratios of 5 and 8. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the microbial community structures differed completely after the acclimatization at tested C/N ratios (i.e., 2, 5, and 8). Measurements of critical parameters including dissolved oxygen, oxidation reduction potential, NH 4 + -N, NO 3 - -N, and NO 2 - -N also demonstrated that the internal micro-environment of the biofilm benefit N 2 O production. DNA analysis showed that Proteobacteria comprised the majority of the bacteria, which might mainly result in N 2 O emission. Based on these results, C/N ratio is one of the parameters that play an important role in the N 2 O emission from the BAF reactors during nitrification.

  20. Biological floating bed and bio-contact oxidation processes for landscape water treatment: simultaneous removal of Microcystis aeruginosa, TOC, nitrogen and phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun Feng; Liang, Dong Hui; Fu, Le; Wei, Li; Ma, Min

    2018-06-13

    The aim of this study was to identify algicidal bacteria J25 against the Microcystis aeruginosa (90.14%), Chlorella (78.75%), Scenedesmus (not inhibited), and Oscillatoria (90.12%). Meanwhile, we evaluate the SOD activity and efficiency of denitrification characteristics with Acinetobacter sp. J25. A novel hybrid bioreactor combined biological floating bed with bio-contact oxidation (BFBO) was designed for treating the landscape water, and the average removal efficiencies of nitrate-N, ammonia-N, nitrite-N, TN, TP, TOC, and algal cells were 91.14, 50, 87.86, 88.83, 33.07, 53.95, and 53.43%, respectively. A 454-pyrosequencing technology was employed to investigate the microbial communities of the BFBO reactor samples. The results showed that Acinetobacter sp. J25 was the dominant contributor for effective removal of N, algal cells, and TOC in the BFBO reactor. And the relative abundance of Acinetobacter showed increase trend with the delay of reaction time. Graphical abstract Biological floating bed and bio-contact oxidation (BFBO) as a novel hybrid bioreactor designed for simultaneous removal Microcystis aeruginosa, TOC, nitrogen, and phosphorus. And high-throughput sequencing data demonstrated that Acinetobacter sp. J25 was the dominate species in the reactor and played key roles in the removal of N, TOC, and M. aeruginosa. Proposed reaction mechanism of the BFBO.

  1. Differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of atorvastatin calcium in pharmaceutical and biological samples using a vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago Almeida; Zanin, Hudson; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Corat, Evaldo José; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-06-07

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide (VACNT-GO) electrode is proposed, and its ability to determine atorvastatin calcium (ATOR) in pharmaceutical and biological samples by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) is evaluated. VACNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method and then treated with oxygen plasma to produce the VACNT-GO electrode. The oxygen plasma treatment exfoliates the carbon nanotube tips exposing graphene foils and inserting oxygen functional groups, these effects improved the VACNT wettability (super-hydrophobic) which is crucial for its electrochemical application. The electrochemical behaviour of ATOR on the VACNT-GO electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry, which showed that it underwent an irreversible oxidation process at a potential of +1.08 V in pHcond 2.0 (0.2 mol L(-1) buffer phosphate solution). By applying DPAdSV under optimized experimental conditions the analytical curve was found to be linear in the ATOR concentration range of 90 to 3.81 × 10(3) nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 9.4 nmol L(-1). The proposed DPAdSV method was successfully applied in the determination of ATOR in pharmaceutical and biological samples, and the results were in close agreement with those obtained by a comparative spectrophotometric method at a confidence level of 95%.

  2. The Solutions Data Base Component of the Water Pollution Abatement Subsystem (WPAS) of the Pollution Abatement Management System. (PAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    currently materials such as plastics (which have superior qualities over rock) are employed. There are two types of fined film reactors : trickling ...Removal Microscreeni ng Screening Drying Beds Comminution Inci nerati on Equal ization Landfills Flotation Oil Separation Thickening (gravity) Aerationi...Biological Unit Processes Trickling Filters Oxidation Ditch Lagoons Digestion - Aerated - Aerobic -Anaerobic -Anaerobic Nitrification - Denitrification

  3. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee, Flemming R.; Campbell, Arezoo; Boere, A. John F.; McLean, Steven G.; Duffin, Rodger; Krystek, Petra; Gosens, Ilse; Miller, Mark R.

    Bacground: Cerium oxide (CeO 2) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE -/-) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7mg/m

  4. Summary of the physical chemical analyses of mixed oxide nuclear fuel as they might influence biological behavior and internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve representative materials that might be accidentally released during the fabrication of mixed-oxide nuclear fuel pellets were studied using x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence, alpha spectroscopy and in vitro dissolution methods. The results are related to a postulated exposure accident and to inhalation experiments using laboratory animals. 19 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs

  5. Participation of oxidized sulfur center in intramolecular free radical processes in the model organic compounds of biological importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogocki, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as prion diseases (Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease) and Alzheimer's disease is strongly associated with the presence of β-amyloid peptide (βA) and prion protein (hPrP) in the brain tissue. Both macromolecules contain methionine (Met) residues. Their presence seems to be responsible for unique redox properties of βA and hPrP. These residues may undergo relatively easy autooxidation and/or metal-catalysed oxidation. The presented studies were focused on the potential function of Met residues as antioxidants or pro-oxidants and on their role in radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins. The role of S-, O-, N- and C-centered radicals generated in various oligopeptides containing Met and relevant model compounds has been examined in detail with respect to formation of 2c-3e bonds, redox processes, fragmentation and their mutual interconversion. In order to achieve these goals several experimental radiation, photochemical, and molecular modelling methods were applied. The experimental and molecular modelling results show significant influence of functional neighbouring groups and conformational flexibility of a peptide backbone on the oxidative reduction pathway in oligopeptides containing single and multiple Met residues. The results presented here allow for better understanding of the known propensities of βA and hPrP to reduce transition metals and to form reactive oxygen species and free radicals. (author)

  6. Oxidative damage to biological macromolecules in Prague bus drivers and garagemen: Impact of air pollution and genetic polymorphisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bagryantseva, Yana; Novotná, Božena; Rössner ml., Pavel; Chvátalová, Irena; Milcová, Alena; Švecová, Vlasta; Lněničková, Zdena; Solanský, I.; Šrám, Radim

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 199, č. 1 (2010), s. 60-68 ISSN 0378-4274 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B3/8/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : air pollution * bud drivers * oxidative stress Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.581, year: 2010

  7. Biological digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosevear, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the biological degradation of non-radioactive organic material occurring in radioactive wastes. The biochemical steps are often performed using microbes or isolated enzymes in combination with chemical steps and the aim is to oxidise the carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur to their respective oxides. (U.K.)

  8. Does elite success trigger mass participation in table tennis? An analysis of trickle-down effects in Germany, France and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Jan; Gaum, Christian

    2017-08-02

    There is a widespread belief that success at the elite level leads to increasing mass participation in sports. However, this assumption is merely supported by empirical evidence and is analyzed here for the case of table tennis. Therefore long-term data (1964-2014) on participation in Germany, France and Austria is statistically tested for effects of success by the countries' athletes at international competitions. Results indicate that no general trickle-down effect can be confirmed for table tennis in the countries observed. Rather, findings are ambivalent, as a strong positive effect was found for the Austrian case, but a paradox relation for the German case, where elite success has been accompanied by decreasing participation in the last decades. Accordingly, as an "automatic" trickle-down effect is unlikely, more specific analyses and strategies seem necessary to use elite success as a lever for the promotion of the sport.

  9. Effect of advanced oxidation on N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation and microbial ecology during pilot-scale biological activated carbon filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Stanford, Ben; Dickenson, Eric; Khunjar, Wendell O; Homme, Carissa L; Rosenfeldt, Erik J; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2017-04-15

    Water treatment combining advanced oxidative processes with subsequent exposure to biological activated carbon (BAC) holds promise for the attenuation of recalcitrant pollutants. Here we contrast oxidation and subsequent biofiltration of treated wastewater effluent employing either ozone or UV/H 2 O 2 followed by BAC during pilot-scale implementation. Both treatment trains largely met target water quality goals by facilitating the removal of a suite of trace organics and bulk water parameters. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation was observed in ozone fed BAC columns during biofiltration and to a lesser extent in UV/H 2 O 2 fed columns and was most pronounced at 20 min of empty bed contact time (EBCT) when compared to shorter EBCTs evaluated. While microbial populations were highly similar in the upper reaches, deeper samples revealed a divergence within and between BAC filtration systems where EBCT was identified to be a significant environmental predictor for shifts in microbial populations. The abundance of Nitrospira in the top samples of both columns provides an explanation for the oxidation of nitrite and corresponding increases in nitrate concentrations during BAC transit and support interplay between nitrogen cycling with nitrosamine formation. The results of this study demonstrate that pretreatments using ozone versus UV/H 2 O 2 impart modest differences to the overall BAC microbial population structural and functional attributes, and further highlight the need to evaluate NDMA formation prior to full-scale implementation of BAC in potable reuse applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Bacterial Communities of Full-Scale Biologically Active, Granular Activated Carbon Filters Are Stable and Diverse and Potentially Contain Novel Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope Wilkinson, Katheryn; Strait, Jacqueline M.; Hozalski, Raymond M.; Sadowksy, Michael J.; Hamilton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB. PMID:26209671

  11. Controlled biomass formation and kinetics of toluene degradation in a bioscrubber and in a reactor with a periodically moved trickle-bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübker, S M; Laurenzis, A; Werner, U; Friedrich, C

    1997-08-20

    The kinetics of degradation of toluene from a model waste gas and of biomass formation were examined in a bioscrubber operated under different nutrient limitations with a mixed culture. The applicability of the kinetics of continuous cultivation of the mixed culture was examined for a special trickle-bed reactor with a periodically moved filter bed. The efficiency of toluene elimination of the bioscrubber was 50 to 57% and depended on the toluene mass transfer as evident from a constant productivity of 0.026 g dry cell weight/L . h over the dilution rate. Under potassium limitation the biomass productivity was reduced by 60% to 0.011 g dry cell weight/L . h at a dilution rate of 0.013/h. Conversely, at low dilution rates the specific toluene degradation rates increased. Excess biomass in a trickle-bed reactor causes reduction of interfacial area and mass transfer, and increase in pressure drop. To avoid these disadvantages, the trickle-bed was moved periodically and biomass was removed with outflowing medium. The concentration of steady state biomass fixed on polyamide beads decreased hyperbolically with the dilution rate. Also, the efficiency of toluene degradation decreased from 72 to 56% with increasing dilution rate while the productivity increased. Potassium limitation generally caused a reduction in biomass, productivity, and yield while the specific degradation increased with dilution rate. This allowed the application of the principles of the chemostat to the trickle-bed reactor described here, for toluene degradation from waste gases. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55: 686-692, 1997.

  12. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological durability and oxidative potential of man-made vitreous fibres as compared to crocidolite asbestos fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippeli, S.; Dornisch, K.; Elstner, E.F. [Lehrstuhl fuer Phytopathologie, Technische Univ. Muenchen-Weihenstephan, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Wiethege, T.; Mueller, K.M. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Universitaetsklinik, Inst. fuer Pathologie, Bochum (Germany); Gillissen, A. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik II, Kardiologie, Pneumologie, Bonn (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    In this study we investigated relationships between redox properties and biodurability of crocidolite asbestos fibres and three different man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF): traditional stone wool fibres (MMVF 21), glass fibres (MMVF 11) and refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). Each fibre type was incubated up to 22 weeks in four different incubation media: gamble solution (GS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4, representing blood plasma without proteins, and surfactant-like solution (SLS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4. During incubation time aliquots of incubation mixtures were removed and analysed in a biochemical model reaction, mimicking activated phagocytes. In addition, changes of fibre morphology and chemical composition were examined using SEM- and EDX-technology. In the presence of crocidolite asbestos fibres and MMVF 21 the formation of OH-radicals according to the Haber-Weiss sequence could be demonstrated, whereas MMVF 11 and RCF showed no reactivity. Crocidolite asbestos fibres exhibited a significant higher activity compared with the stone wool fibres at the onset of incubation. The oxidative capacities of these fibre types were shown to depend on both specific surface area and iron content. The oxidative potentials of crocidolite asbestos fibres as well as MMVF 21 were not constant during incubation over several weeks in each incubation medium. The reactivities showed sinoidal curves including reactivities much higher than those at the onset of incubation time. These irregular changes of oxidative capacity may be explained by changes of the redox state of fibre surface-complexed iron. Furthermore our results showed clear differences between incubation of fibres in GS and SLS, respectively, indicating that phospholipids play an important part in fibre dissolution behaviour and oxidative reactivity. (orig.)

  14. Trimethylamine-N-oxide: its hydration structure, surface activity, and biological function, viewed by vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Hunger, Johannes; Backus, Ellen H G; Mizukami, Wataru; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2017-03-08

    The osmolyte molecule trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes the structure of proteins. As functional proteins are generally found in aqueous solutions, an important aspect of this stabilization is the interaction of TMAO with water. Here, we review, using vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, recent studies on the structure and dynamics of TMAO with its surrounding water molecules. This article ends with an outlook on the open questions on TMAO-protein and TMAO-urea interactions in aqueous environments.

  15. Oxidative Stress Regulation on Endothelial Cells by Hydrophilic Astaxanthin Complex: Chemical, Biological, and Molecular Antioxidant Activity Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zuluaga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An imbalance in the reactive oxygen species (ROS homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of oxidative stress-related diseases. Astaxanthin, a xanthophyll carotenoid with high antioxidant capacities, has been shown to prevent the first stages of oxidative stress. Here, we evaluate the antioxidant capacities of astaxanthin included within hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD-A to directly and indirectly reduce the induced ROS production. First, chemical methods were used to corroborate the preservation of astaxanthin antioxidant abilities after inclusion. Next, antioxidant scavenging properties of CD-A to inhibit the cellular and mitochondrial ROS by reducing the disturbance in the redox state of the cell and the infiltration of lipid peroxidation radicals were evaluated. Finally, the activation of endogenous antioxidant PTEN/AKT, Nrf2/HO-1, and NQOI gene and protein expression supported the protective effect of CD-A complex on human endothelial cells under stress conditions. Moreover, a nontoxic effect on HUVEC was registered after CD-A complex supplementation. The results reported here illustrate the need to continue exploring the interesting properties of this hydrophilic antioxidant complex to assist endogenous systems to counteract the ROS impact on the induction of cellular oxidative stress state.

  16. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by biologically active iron thiosemicarbazone complexes: relevance to iron-chelator-induced methemoglobinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Maram T; Rodríguez, Carlos; Richardson, Des R; Martínez, Manuel; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin has been found to be facilitated by low molecular weight iron(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes. This deleterious reaction, which produces hemoglobin protein units unable to bind dioxygen and occurs during the administration of iron chelators such as the well-known 3-aminopyridine-2-pyridinecarbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP; Triapine), has been observed in the reaction with Fe(III) complexes of some members of the 3-AP structurally-related thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from di-2-pyridyl ketone (HDpxxT series). We have studied the kinetics of this oxidation reaction in vitro using human hemoglobin and found that the reaction proceeds with two distinct time-resolved steps. These have been associated with sequential oxidation of the two different oxyheme cofactors in the α and β protein chains. Unexpected steric and hydrogen-bonding effects on the Fe(III) complexes appear to be the responsible for the observed differences in the reaction rate across the series of HDpxxT ligand complexes used in this study.

  17. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A Viviana; Deodato, Elder L; Cardoso, Janine S; Oliveira, Eliza F; Machado, Sérgio L; Toma, Helena K; Leitão, Alvaro C; de Pádula, Marcelo

    2010-06-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO(2) is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO(2)-UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO(2) associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO(2) plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO(2) protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO(2) plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO(2) plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A. Viviana, E-mail: alicia.pinto@incqs.fiocruz.br [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Deodato, Elder L. [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cardoso, Janine S. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Eliza F.; Machado, Sergio L.; Toma, Helena K. [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leitao, Alvaro C. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Padula, Marcelo de [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-06-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO{sub 2} is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO{sub 2}-UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO{sub 2} associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO{sub 2} plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO{sub 2} protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO{sub 2} plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO{sub 2} plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine.

  19. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A. Viviana; Deodato, Elder L.; Cardoso, Janine S.; Oliveira, Eliza F.; Machado, Sergio L.; Toma, Helena K.; Leitao, Alvaro C.; Padula, Marcelo de

    2010-01-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO 2 is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO 2 -UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO 2 associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO 2 plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO 2 protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO 2 plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO 2 plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine.

  20. Improving fuel quality by whole crude oil hydrotreating: A kinetic model for hydrodeasphaltenization in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarullah, A.T.; Mujtaba, I.M.; Wood, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Asphaltene contaminant must be removed to a large extent from the fuel to meet the regulatory demand. ► Kinetics for hydrodeasphaltenization are estimated via experimentation and modeling. ► Using the kinetic parameters, a full process model for the trickle bed reactor (TBR) is developed. ► The model is used for simulating the behavior of the TBR to get further insight of the process. ► The influences of operating conditions in the hydrodeasphaltenization process are reported. -- Abstract: Fossil fuel is still a predominant source of the global energy requirement. Hydrotreating of whole crude oil has the ability to increase the productivity of middle distillate fractions and improve the fuel quality by simultaneously reducing contaminants such as sulfur, nitrogen, vanadium, nickel and asphaltene to the levels required by the regulatory bodies. Hydrotreating is usually carried out in a trickle bed reactor (TBR) where hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodemetallization (HDM) and hydrodeasphaltenization (HDAs) reactions take place simultaneously. To develop a detailed and a validated TBR process model which can be used for design and optimization of the hydrotreating process, it is essential to develop kinetic models for each of these reactions. Most recently, the authors have developed kinetic models for all of these chemical reactions except that of HDAs. In this work, a kinetic model (in terms of kinetic parameters) for the HDAs reaction in the TBR is developed. A three phase TBR process model incorporating the HDAs reactions with unknown kinetic parameters is developed. Also, a series of experiments has been conducted in an isothermal TBR under different operating conditions affecting the removal of asphaltene. The unknown kinetic parameters are then obtained by applying a parameter estimation technique based on minimization of the sum of square errors (SSEs) between the experimental and predicted concentrations of

  1. Cytochrome P450s: mechanisms and biological implications in drug metabolism and its interaction with oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome monooxygenases P450 enzymes (CYPs) are terminal oxidases, belonging to the multi-gene family of heme-thiolate enzymes and located in multiple sites of ER, cytosol and mitochondria. CYPs act as catalysts in drugs metabolism. This review highlights the mitochondrial and microsomal CYPs metabolic functions, CYPs mediated ROS generation and its feedback, bioactivation of drugs and related hypersensitivity, metabolic disposition as well as the therapeutic approaches. CYPs mediated drugs bioactivation may trigger oxidative stress and cause pathophysiology. Almost all drugs show some adverse reactions at high doses or accidental overdoses. Drugs lead to hypersensitivity reactions while metabolic predisposition to drug hypersensitivity exaggerates it. Mostly different intermediate bioactive products of CYPs mediated drug metabolism is the principal issue in this respect. On the other hand, CYPs are the main source of ROS. Their generation and feedback are of major concern of this review. Besides drug metabolism, CYPs also contribute significantly to carcinogen metabolism. Ultimately other enzymes in drug metabolism and antioxidant therapy are indispensible. Importance of this field: In a global sense, understanding of exact mechanism can facilitate pharmaceutical industries' challenge of developing drugs without toxicity. Ultimate message: This review would accentuate the recent advances in molecular mechanism of CYPs mediated drug metabolism and complex cross-talks between various restorative novel strategies evolved by CYPs to sustain the redox balance and limit the source of oxidative stress.

  2. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-01-01

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 /ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  3. The importance of biological oxidation of iron in the aerobic cells of the Wheal Jane pilot passive treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G; Swash, P; Kotilainen, S

    2005-02-01

    The passive treatment system designed to treat the mine water discharge of the abandoned Wheal Jane tin mine in Cornwall consisted of a sequence of artificial wetland cells, an anaerobic cell and a final series of rock filters. Three systems were operated which differed only in the pre-treatment of the mine water before discharge to the aerobic wetland cells. The aerobic cells were designed to promote aerobic oxidation and precipitation of iron which could exceed a concentration of 100 mg/l in the raw mine water discharge. The largest investment of land area was to the artificial wetland cells and it was important to understand the processes of oxidation and precipitation of iron so that the performance of this aspect the pilot passive treatment plant (PPTP) could be managed as efficiently as possible. The generally low pH of the influent mine water and inevitable trend of decreasing pH due to hydrolysis of Fe(III) meant that distinguishing between biotic and abiotic mechanisms was fundamental for further design planning of passive treatment systems. This paper describes these observations.

  4. Evaluation of Fenton Oxidation Process Coupled with Biological Treatment for the Removal of Reactive Black 5 from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Bahmani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of azo dyes is difficult due to their complex structures and low BOD to COD ratios. In the present study, the efficiency of using Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + Fe2+ as a pretreatment process to enhance microbial transformation of reactive black 5 (RB5 in an aqueous system was evaluated. The RB5 with an initial concentration of 250 mg/L was decolorized up to 90% in 60 h by using a bacterial consortium. Fenton’s reagent at a Fe2+ concentration of 0.5 mM and H2O2 concentration of 2.9 mM (molar ratio, 1:5.8 was most effective for decolorization at pH = 3.0. The extent of RB5 removal by the combined Fenton–biotreatment was about 2 times higher than that of biotreatment alone. The production of some aromatic amines intermediates implied partial mineralization of the RB5 in Fenton treatment alone; in addition, decreasing of GC-MS peaks suggested that dearomatization occurred in Fenton-biological process. Fenton pretreatment seems to be a cost–effective option for the biotreatment of azo dyes, due mainly to the lower doses of chemicals, lower sludge generation, and saving of time. Our results demonstrated positive effects of inoculating bacterial consortium which was capable of dye biodegradation with a Fenton’s pretreatment step as well as the benefits of low time required for the biological process. In addition, the potential of field performance of Fenton-biological process because of using bacterial consortium is an other positive effect of it.

  5. Graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes as nanofeatured scaffolds for the assisted deposition of nanohydroxyapatite: characterization and biological evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Bruno VM; Leite, Nelly CS; Cavalcanti, Bruno das Neves; da Silva, Newton S; Marciano, Fernanda R; Corat, Evaldo J; Webster, Thomas J; Lobo, Anderson O

    2016-01-01

    Bruno VM Rodrigues,1,* Nelly CS Leite,1,* Bruno das Neves Cavalcanti,2 Newton S da Silva,3 Fernanda R Marciano,1 Evaldo J Corat,4 Thomas J Webster,5,6 Anderson O Lobo11Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Institute of Research and Development (IP&D), University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil; 2Department of Cardiology, Restorative Sciences and Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Laboratory of Cell Biology and Tis...

  6. Formation of superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns by combination of nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide for biological droplet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kaizuma, Yoshihiro; Konishi, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    In this letter, we report a technology for fabricating superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns using a combination of a nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide. In our previous study, we used a combination of hydrophobic and superhydrophilic materials. However, it was difficult to split low-surface-tension liquids such as biological liquids into droplets solely using hydrophobic/hydrophilic patterns. In this study, the contact angle of the hydrophobic region was enhanced from 109.3° to 155.6° by performing nanostructure imprinting on a damage-reduced perfluoropolymer. The developed superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns allowed the splitting of even those media that contained fetal bovine serum into droplets of a desired shape.

  7. Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-based electrochemical sensor for the sensitive determination of ferulic acid in A. sinensis and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Linjie [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gou, Yuqiang [Lanzhou Military Command Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gao, Xia; Zhang, Pei; Chen, Wenxia; Feng, Shilan [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Hu, Fangdi, E-mail: hufd@lzu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Yingdong, E-mail: lydj412@163.com [Gansu College of Tradition Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as a new voltammetric sensor for the determination of ferulic acid (FA). The morphology and microstructure of the modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy analysis, and the electrochemical effective surface areas of the modified electrodes were also calculated by chronocoulometry method. Sensing properties of the electrochemical sensor were investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). It was found that ERGO was electrodeposited on the surface of GCE by using potentiostatic method. The proposed electrode exhibited electrocatalytic activity to the redox of FA because of excellent electrochemical properties of ERGO. The transfer electron number (n), electrode reaction rate constant (k{sub s}) and electron-transfer coefficient (α) were calculated as 1.12, 1.24 s{sup −1}, and 0.40, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the oxidation peak current was proportional to FA concentration at 8.49 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} to 3.89 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} with detection limit of 2.06 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. This fabricated sensor also displayed acceptable reproducibility, long-term stability, and high selectivity with negligible interferences from common interfering species. The voltammetric sensor was successfully applied to detect FA in A. sinensis and biological samples with recovery values in the range of 99.91%-101.91%. - Highlights: • A novel ERGO–based electrochemical sensor of FA was successfully fabricated by using one-step electrodeposition method. • The electrode reaction was an adsorption–diffusion mixed controlled process. • The low detection limit with good selectivity and sensitivity were obtained. • This method was applied for the determination of FA in A. sinensis and biological samples.

  8. The Method of Coating Fe₃O₄ with Carbon Nanoparticles to Modify Biological Properties of Oxide Measured in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Tomasz; Dudek, Mariusz; Dziekan, Natalia; Jaworski, Sławomir; Przewozik, Aleksandra; Soszka, Emilia; Koperkiewicz, Anna; Koczoń, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    The coating of nanoparticles on materials for medical application [e.g., the coating of Fe3O4 nanopowder (IONP) with a carbon nanolayer] serves to protect and modify the selected biological, physical, and chemical properties of the coated material. Increases in chemical stability, changes in biocompatibility, and a modified surface structure are examples of the effects caused by the formation of carbon coatings. In the current study, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a carbon nanolayer (IONP@C) in a plasmochemical reactor (using radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods) under various experimental conditions. Based on data from X-ray diffraction, Raman, and IR spectroscopy, the best processing parameters were determined in order to produce a carbon coating that would not change the structure of the IONP. The materials with the best cover, i.e., a uniform carbon nanolayer, were used in cytotoxic tests to investigate their biological properties using the human HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cell line and chicken embryo red blood cells as an in vitro model. The obtained results proved the low cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 micropowder and IONP in contrast to IONP@C, which reduced cell viability, increased hemolysis, and generally was more toxic than bare Fe3O4.

  9. Fundamental Insights into Propionate Oxidation in Microbial Electrolysis Cells Using a Combination of Electrochemical, Molecular biology and Electron Balance Approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-11-01

    Increasing demand for freshwater and energy is pushing towards the development of alternative technologies that are sustainable. One of the realistic solutions to address this is utilization of the renewable resources like wastewater. Conventional wastewater treatment processes can be highly energy demanding and can fails to recover the full potential of useful resources such as energy in the wastewater. As a consequence, there is an urgent necessity for sustainable wastewater treatment technologies that could harness such resources present in wastewaters. Advanced treatment process based on microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) have a great potential for the resources recovery through a sustainable wastewater treatment process. METs rely on the abilities of microorganisms that are capable of transferring electrons extracellularly by oxidizing the organic matter in the wastewater and producing electrical current for electricity generation (MFC) or H2 and CH4 production (MEC). Propionate is an important volatile fatty acid (VFA) (24-70%) in some wastewaters and accumulation of this VFA can cause a process failure in a conventional anaerobic digestion (AD) system. To address this issue, MECs were explored as a novel, alternative wastewater treatment technology, with a focus on a better understanding of propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs. Having such knowledge could help in the development of more robust and efficient wastewater treatment systems to recover energy and produce high quality effluents. Several studies were conducted to: 1) determine the paths of electron flow in the anode of propionate fed MECs low (4.5 mM) and high (36 mM) propionate concentrations; 2) examine the effect of different set anode potentials on the electrochemical performance, propionate degradation, electron fluxes, and microbial community structure in MECs fed propionate; and 3) examine the temporal

  10. Biological compatibility test on films of added SEO [poly(dimethyl siloxane)-co-poly(ethylene oxide)] PVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogero, Sizue O.; Souza-Bazzi, Aurea de; Higa, Olga Z.

    1999-01-01

    Membranes composed by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), agar and water crosslinked by ionizing radiation, can have the mechanical properties improved by the addition of copolymers. Due to the hydrophilic property also by the medical grade as it is supplied, the copolymer poly(dimethyl siloxane)-co-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) was added to the PVP membranes. Varied concentrations of SEO were used in the preparation of PVP membranes by electron beam irradiation at dose rate of 25 kGy. For testing the bicompatibility of the SEO composed membrane the in vitro assay of cytotoxicity, with Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO), was carried out. However, the membranes showed a cytotoxic characteristic in cell culture, which was stronger as the amount of SEO increased in the composition. (author)

  11. Quantification of chlorine in zirconium oxide and biological samples by instrumental NAA utilizing PCF of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Amol D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.; Balaji Rao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Recently studies on chlorine contents in various samples are being pursued due to its corrosive nature. Chlorine present at trace level in various finished products as well as powder is used as a raw material for production of different types of zircaloys used as structural materials in nuclear technology. As a part of quality assurance program, it is necessary to quantify chlorine accurately with suitable and simple technique. In the present work we have applied instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) utilizing its short-lived activation product ( 38 Cl, 37 min, 1642 and 2168 keV) for its estimation. Pneumatic Carrier Facility (PCF) of Dhruva reactor, BARC was used sample irradiation of zirconium oxide dry powder, synthetic wax and IAEA RMs 1515 (Apple leaves) and Lichen 336. (author)

  12. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  13. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-10-10

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed.

  14. Optimization of three FISH procedures for in situ detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria in biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlekovic, Marko; Schmid, Markus C; Schmider-Poignee, Nadja; Spring, Stefan; Pilhofer, Martin; Gaul, Tobias; Fiandaca, Mark; Löffler, Frank E; Jetten, Mike; Schleifer, K-H; Lee, Natuschka M

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using fluorochrome-labeled DNA oligonucleotide probes has been successfully applied for in situ detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. However, application of the standard FISH protocols to visualize anammox bacteria in biofilms from a laboratory-scale wastewater reactor produced only weak signals. Increased signal intensity was achieved either by modifying the standard FISH protocol, using peptide nucleic acid probes (PNA FISH), or applying horse radish peroxidase- (HRP-) labeled probes and subsequent catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). A comparative analysis using anammox biofilm samples and suspended anammox biomass from different laboratory wastewater bioreactors revealed that the modified standard FISH protocol and the PNA FISH probes produced equally strong fluorescence signals on suspended biomass, but only weak signals were obtained with the biofilm samples. The probe signal intensities in the biofilm samples could be enhanced by enzymatic pre-treatment of fixed cells, and by increasing the hybridization time of the PNA FISH protocol. CARD-FISH always produced up to four-fold stronger fluorescent signals but unspecific fluorescence signals, likely caused by endogenous peroxidases as reported in several previous studies, compromised the results. Interference of the development of fluorescence intensity with endogenous peroxidases was also observed in cells of aerobic ammonium oxidizers like Nitrosomonas europea, and sulfate-reducers like Desulfobacter postgatei. Interestingly, no interference was observed with other peroxidase-positive microorganisms, suggesting that CARD-FISH is not only compromised by the mere presence of peroxidases. Pre-treatment of cells to inactivate peroxidase with HCl or autoclavation/pasteurization failed to inactive peroxidases, but H(2)O(2) significantly reduced endogenous peroxidase activity. However, for optimal inactivation, different H(2)O(2

  15. Graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes as nanofeatured scaffolds for the assisted deposition of nanohydroxyapatite: characterization and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno Vm; Leite, Nelly Cs; Cavalcanti, Bruno das Neves; da Silva, Newton S; Marciano, Fernanda R; Corat, Evaldo J; Webster, Thomas J; Lobo, Anderson O

    2016-01-01

    Nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) is an emergent bioceramic that shows similar chemical and crystallographic properties as the mineral phase present in bone. However, nHAp presents low fracture toughness and tensile strength, limiting its application in bone tissue engineering. Conversely, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been widely used for composite applications due to their excellent mechanical and physicochemical properties, although their hydrophobicity usually impairs some applications. To improve MWCNT wettability, oxygen plasma etching has been applied to promote MWCNT exfoliation and oxidation and to produce graphene oxide (GO) at the end of the tips. Here, we prepared a series of nHAp/MWCNT-GO nanocomposites aimed at producing materials that combine similar bone characteristics (nHAp) with high mechanical strength (MWCNT-GO). After MWCNT production and functionalization to produce MWCNT-GO, ultrasonic irradiation was employed to precipitate nHAp onto the MWCNT-GO scaffolds (at 1-3 wt%). We employed various techniques to characterize the nanocomposites, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and gas adsorption (the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method). We used simulated body fluid to evaluate their bioactivity and human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) to evaluate cytocompatibility. We also investigated their bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. TEM analysis revealed homogeneous distributions of nHAp crystal grains along the MWCNT-GO surfaces. All nanocomposites were proved to be bioactive, since carbonated nHAp was found after 21 days in simulated body fluid. All nanocomposites showed potential for biomedical applications with no cytotoxicity toward osteoblasts and impressively demonstrated a bactericidal effect without the use of antibiotics. All of the aforementioned properties make these materials very attractive for bone tissue engineering applications, either as a

  16. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a well dispersed suspension of gallium-68-labeled magnetic nanosheets of graphene oxide for in vivo coincidence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Rahighi, Reza [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Tayyebi, Ahmad [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Engineering

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were hybridized with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) to form magnetic GO (MGO) and were further labeled by [{sup 68}Ga]GaCl{sub 3} as a potential drug delivery system. Paper chromatography, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to characterize the trinary composite ([{sup 68}Ga] rate at MGO). Biological evaluations of the prepared nanocomposite were performed in normal Sprague Dawley rats and it was found to be a possible host for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The results showed that the grafting of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on nanocomposite reduced the unwanted liver and spleen uptakes and increased the ratio of kidney/liver uptake from 0.037 to 1.07, leading to the fast removal of radioactive agent and less imposed radiation to patients. The high level of hydrogen bonding caused by the presence of functional groups is responsible for this effect. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in vital organs of rat (especially brain), efficient iron oxide grafting, fast wash-out, the short half-life gallium-68 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, this nanocomposite could be a suitable candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and imaging applications.

  17. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles grafted N-isopropylacrylamide/chitosan copolymer for the extraction and determination of letrozole in human biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaj Moazen, Mercede; Ahmad Panahi, Homayon

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used for the extraction of a drug from an aqueous solution. In the current study, the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized via a facile coprecipitation approach, and then modified by (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane followed by grafting thermosensitive polymer N-isopropylacrylamide and biopolymer chitosan. Structure, morphology, size, thermal resistance, specific surface area, and magnetic properties of the grafted nanosorbent were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, specific surface area analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry. The effective parameters on sorption/desorption of letrozole on grafted magnetic nanosorbent were evaluated. The best sorption of letrozole via the grafted nanosorbent occurred at 20°C at an optimum pH of 7. The extraction of trace letrozole in human biological fluids is investigated and revealed 89.1 and 97.8% recovery in plasma and urine, respectively. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a well dispersed suspension of gallium-68-labeled magnetic nanosheets of graphene oxide for in vivo coincidence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad; Rahighi, Reza; Tayyebi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were hybridized with Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles (NPs) to form magnetic GO (MGO) and were further labeled by ["6"8Ga]GaCl_3 as a potential drug delivery system. Paper chromatography, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to characterize the trinary composite (["6"8Ga] rate at MGO). Biological evaluations of the prepared nanocomposite were performed in normal Sprague Dawley rats and it was found to be a possible host for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The results showed that the grafting of Fe_3O_4 NPs on nanocomposite reduced the unwanted liver and spleen uptakes and increased the ratio of kidney/liver uptake from 0.037 to 1.07, leading to the fast removal of radioactive agent and less imposed radiation to patients. The high level of hydrogen bonding caused by the presence of functional groups is responsible for this effect. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in vital organs of rat (especially brain), efficient iron oxide grafting, fast wash-out, the short half-life gallium-68 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, this nanocomposite could be a suitable candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and imaging applications.

  19. Effect of biologically synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles on metabolism and antioxidant activity to the crop plants Solanum lycopersicum and Brassica oleracea var. botrytis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajey; Singh, N B; Hussain, Imtiyaz; Singh, Himani

    2017-11-20

    Study on the ecological effect of metal oxide nanomaterials (NMs) has quickly amplified over the precedent years because it is assumed that these NMs will sooner or later be released into the environment. The present study deals with biologically oriented process for the green synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) by using Morus alba leaf extract as reducing agent. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed the monoclinic phase and 20-40nm size respectively. The presence of reducing and capping agents revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The seedlings of Brassica oleracea var. botrytis and Solanum lycopersicum were exposed to 10, 50, 100, and 500mgL -1 concentrations of CuO NPs in the sand medium. Bioaccumulation of Cu was also investigated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Plant exposure to 100 and 500mgL -1 of CuO NPs has resulted in significant reduction of total chlorophyll and sugar content in the two test plants while 10mgL -1 of NPs slightly increased the pigment and sugar content in tomato plants only. Augmentation of lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, and antioxidant enzyme activity was observed in a dose dependent manner upon plants exposure to CuO NPs. Deposition of lignin in roots of both plants treated with the highest concentration of CuO NPs was observed. Histochemical analysis of leaves of treated plant with nitroblue tetrazolium and 3 ' 3 ' diaminobenzidine showed a concentration dependent increase in superoxide and hydrogen peroxide formation in leaves. The green synthesis of CuO NPs was carried out by using Morus alba leaf extract. Accumulation of NPs more actively by tomato plants as compared to cauliflower was possibly due to the difference in root morphology. The histochemical visualization highlights the spatial organization of oxidant biochemistry occurring in response to metal stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of flow dynamics of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Sharma, V K

    2016-10-01

    A radiotracer investigation was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). The main objectives of the investigation were to investigate radial and axial mixing of the liquid phase, and evaluate performance of the liquid distributor/redistributor at different operating conditions. Mean residence times (MRTs), holdups (H) and fraction of flow flowing along different quadrants were estimated. The analysis of the measured RTD curves indicated radial non-uniform distribution of liquid phase across the beds. The overall RTD of the liquid phase, measured at the exit of the reactor was simulated using a multi-parameter axial dispersion with exchange model (ADEM), and model parameters were obtained. The results of model simulations indicated that the TBR behaved as a plug flow reactor at most of the operating conditions used in the investigation. The results of the investigation helped to improve the existing design as well as to design a full-scale industrial TBR for petroleum refining applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetalation reactions of residue oils over CoMo/aluminum borate catalysts in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, M.C.; Chen, Y.W.; Kang, B.C.; Wu, J.C.; Leu, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a series of aluminum borates (AB) with various Al/B mole ratios is prepared by the precipitation method. The results indicated that the exhibited properties are dependent on the Al/B ratio of the material. The monodisperse pore size distributions of these samples simply that it is a true microcomposite structure rather than a mixture of the individual materials. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetalation (HDM) of heavy Kuwait atmospheric residuum over CoMo/AB catalysts were carried out in a bench-scale trickle bed reactor at 663 K and 7582 kPa. The weight hourly space velocity of residue oils was 1.5, and the hydrogen flow rate was kept constant at 300 mL/min (STP). The results showed that these catalysts are much more active than the conventional CoMo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst in HDS and HDM reactions. The results of desulfurization activity are mainly interpreted on the basis of difference in dispersion and the interaction of Mo species with the support. The demetalation activity was strongly influenced by the intraparticle diffusion of metal porphyrins

  2. A comparison of mass transfer coefficients between trickle-bed, hollow fiber membrane and stirred tank reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, James J; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Devarapalli, Mamatha; Phillips, John R; Lewis, Randy S; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2013-04-01

    Trickle-bed reactor (TBR), hollow fiber membrane reactor (HFR) and stirred tank reactor (STR) can be used in fermentation of sparingly soluble gasses such as CO and H2 to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals. Gas fermenting reactors must provide high mass transfer capabilities that match the kinetic requirements of the microorganisms used. The present study compared the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (K(tot)A/V(L)) of three reactor types; the TBR with 3 mm and 6 mm beads, five different modules of HFRs, and the STR. The analysis was performed using O2 as the gaseous mass transfer agent. The non-porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) HFR provided the highest K(tot)A/V(L) (1062 h(-1)), followed by the TBR with 6mm beads (421 h(-1)), and then the STR (114 h(-1)). The mass transfer characteristics in each reactor were affected by agitation speed, and gas and liquid flow rates. Furthermore, issues regarding the comparison of mass transfer coefficients are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance and population analysis of a non-sterile trickle bed reactor inoculated with Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, a thermophilic hydrogen producer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Groenestijn, J.W.; Meesters, K.P.M. [TNO Quality of Life, P.O. Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Geelhoed, J.S.; Goorissen, H.P.; Stams, A.J.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein, Wageningen (Netherlands); Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group (Netherlands)

    2009-04-01

    Non-axenic operation of a 400 L trickle bed reactor inoculated with the thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, yielded 2.8 mol/H2/mol hexose converted. The reactor was fed with a complex medium with sucrose as the main substrate, continuously flushed with nitrogen gas, and operated at 73C. The volumetric productivity was 22 mmol/H2/(L filterbed h). Acetic acid and lactic acid were the main by-products in the liquid phase. Production of lactic acid occurred when hydrogen partial pressure was elevated above 2% and during suboptimal fermentation conditions that also resulted in the presence of mono- and disaccharides in the effluent. Methane production was negligible. The microbial community was analyzed at two different time points during operation. Initially, other species related to members of the genera Thermoanaerobacterium and Caldicellulosiruptor were present in the reactor. However, these were out-competed by C. saccharolyticus during a period when sucrose was completely used and no saccharides were discharged with the effluent. In general, the use of pure cultures in non-sterile industrial applications is known to be less useful because of contamination. However, our results show that the applied fermentation conditions resulted in a culture of a single dominant organism with excellent hydrogen production characteristics.

  4. Performance and population analysis of a non-sterile trickle bed reactor inoculated with Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, a thermophilic hydrogen producer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenestijn, J W; Geelhoed, J S; Goorissen, H P; Meesters, K P M; Stams, A J M; Claassen, P A M

    2009-04-01

    Non-axenic operation of a 400 L trickle bed reactor inoculated with the thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, yielded 2.8 mol H2/mol hexose converted. The reactor was fed with a complex medium with sucrose as the main substrate, continuously flushed with nitrogen gas, and operated at 73 degrees C. The volumetric productivity was 22 mmol H2/(L filterbed h). Acetic acid and lactic acid were the main by-products in the liquid phase. Production of lactic acid occurred when hydrogen partial pressure was elevated above 2% and during suboptimal fermentation conditions that also resulted in the presence of mono- and disaccharides in the effluent. Methane production was negligible. The microbial community was analyzed at two different time points during operation. Initially, other species related to members of the genera Thermoanaerobacterium and Caldicellulosiruptor were present in the reactor. However, these were out-competed by C. saccharolyticus during a period when sucrose was completely used and no saccharides were discharged with the effluent. In general, the use of pure cultures in non-sterile industrial applications is known to be less useful because of contamination. However, our results show that the applied fermentation conditions resulted in a culture of a single dominant organism with excellent hydrogen production characteristics.

  5. The performance of a trickle-bed reactor packed with a Pt/SDBC catalyst mixture for the CECE process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Seungwoo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Choi, Heui-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Lee, Minsoo; Yim, Sung-Paal; Chung, Hongsuk; Song, Kyu-Min; Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2007-01-01

    The combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) process with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy wastewater streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. A hydrophobic platinum/styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer (Pt/SDBC) catalyst which was developed for the liquid-phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column of the Wolsong tritium removal facility (WTRF) has been tested in a trickle bed reactor for the design of the CECE process. An experimental apparatus has been built for the testing of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of a hydrophobic catalyst and a hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve the liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. Many tests have been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to measure the activity of the catalyst, K y a (1 s -1 ), under various operating conditions. K y a increases with the hydrogen flow rates in the range of 0.4-1.6 m s -1 at STP. The height of the catalyst column was determined from these K y a values according to the reaction temperatures and hydrogen flow rates

  6. The performance of a trickle-bed reactor packed with a Pt/SDBC catalyst mixture for the CECE process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, Seungwoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: swpaek@kaeri.re.kr; Ahn, Do-Hee; Choi, Heui-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Lee, Minsoo; Yim, Sung-Paal; Chung, Hongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyu-Min; Sohn, Soon Hwan [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, 103-16 Munji-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) process with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy wastewater streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. A hydrophobic platinum/styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer (Pt/SDBC) catalyst which was developed for the liquid-phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column of the Wolsong tritium removal facility (WTRF) has been tested in a trickle bed reactor for the design of the CECE process. An experimental apparatus has been built for the testing of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of a hydrophobic catalyst and a hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve the liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. Many tests have been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to measure the activity of the catalyst, K{sub y}a (1 s{sup -1}), under various operating conditions. K{sub y}a increases with the hydrogen flow rates in the range of 0.4-1.6 m s{sup -1} at STP. The height of the catalyst column was determined from these K{sub y}a values according to the reaction temperatures and hydrogen flow rates.

  7. Investigation of hydrodynamic behavior of a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor packed with hydrophobic catalyst using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan, Sadhana; Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Mahajani, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Exchange of isotopes of hydrogen between aqueous phase and hydrogen gas is one of the most efficient methods for separation of hydrogen isotopes and is commonly used for production of heavy water or removal of tritium from tritiated water effluents. The isotope exchange reaction can be effectively executed in a counter-current trickle bed reactor (TBR) packed with a novel metal (Pt, Pd, Ni) based hydrophobic catalyst as the conventional novel metal based hydrophilic catalysts become ineffective after they come in contact with liquid effluents. The overall exchange reaction in the TBR mainly consists of a gas-liquid mass transfer process that transfers reactants from liquid to gaseous phase followed by an isotopic exchange reaction between the reactants in gaseous phase in presence of a solid hydrophobic catalyst. However, due to water repellent nature of the catalyst, poor liquid distribution in the reactor is normally observed that deteriorates the gas-liquid mass transfer. Therefore, it was thought that if a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and a suitable hydrophilic mass transfer packing is used to fill the TBR column then, it can improve the distribution or mixing of the liquid and gas phase and thus improve the gas-liquid mass transfer and overall performance of the reactor and needs to be confirmed

  8. Capacity Decline and Characteristics Changes of Lithium-ion Cells with Large Capacity during Trickle Charge at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Toshio

    Large-scale 40-Ah Li-ion cells have been developed for use in industrial applications. To contribute to techniques for ascertaining the state of these cells and detecting deterioration during actual use, we produce a cell whose capacity is reduced by trickle charging at high temperature, and we determine the relationship between the cell's properties such as its capacity and charging/discharging characteristics when the capacity is reduced. When the capacity of a Li-ion cell is reduced, the discharge voltage also decreases. We show that the residual capacity is well correlated to the discharge voltage and to the duration of continuous discharge before reaching a fixed end-voltage. We also show that the constant-current constant-voltage charging characteristics are maintained even when the capacity is degraded, and that the constant-current charging time and discharge voltage are closely related to the residual capacity. We confirm that the reaction coefficient of the capacity degradation formula can be calculated from the capacity change characteristics at multiple temperatures, and that an 8°C change in temperature causes the lifetime to decrease by half.

  9. A two-stage combined trickle bed reactor/biofilter for treatment of styrene/acetone vapor mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Tomas; Halecky, Martin; Paca, Jan; Zapotocky, Lubos; Gelbicova, Tereza; Vadkertiova, Renata; Kozliak, Evguenii; Jones, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Performance of a two-stage biofiltration system was investigated for removal of styrene-acetone mixtures. High steady-state acetone loadings (above C(in)(Ac) = 0.5 g.m(-3) corresponding to the loadings > 34.5 g.m(-3).h(-1)) resulted in a significant inhibition of the system's performance in both acetone and styrene removal. This inhibition was shown to result from the acetone accumulation within the upstream trickle-bed bioreactor (TBR) circulating mineral medium, which was observed by direct chromatographic measurements. Placing a biofilter (BF) downstream to this TBR overcomes the inhibition as long as the biofilter has a sufficient bed height. A different kind of inhibition of styrene biodegradation was observed within the biofilter at very high acetone loadings (above C(in)(Ac) = 1.1 g.m(-3) or 76 g.m(-3).h(-1) loading). In addition to steady-state measurements, dynamic tests confirmed that the reactor overloading can be readily overcome, once the accumulated acetone in the TBR fluids is degraded. No sizable metabolite accumulation in the medium was observed for either TBR or BF. Analyses of the biodegradation activities of microbial isolates from the biofilm corroborated the trends observed for the two-stage biofiltration system, particularly the occurrence of an inhibition threshold by excess acetone.

  10. Integrated biological and advanced oxidation based treatment of hexamine bearing wastewater: Effect of cow-dung as a co-substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Mandeep Kumar; Mittal, Atul K., E-mail: akmittal@civil.iitd.ac.in

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Treatment by biological process and Fenton’s reagent. • Cow dung as co-substrate. • Hydrolysis of wastewater improved treatment. - Abstract: This work examines the treatment of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) bearing effluent from N, N-dinitroso pentamethylene tetra-mine producing industrial plants in India. Chemical treatment using Fenton’s reagent and aerobic treatment using batch reactors with co-substrate were investigated. Aerobic batch reactors integrated with advanced oxidation process of Fenton’s reagent provides effective treatment of HMT effluents. Influence of Fenton’s reagent dose reaction/contact and effect of varying co-substrate with effluent initial concentration was observed. Higher dose 100 mL of Fenton’s reagent with higher reaction time 20 h resulted better degradation (34.88%) of wastewater. HMT hydrolyzes in acidic environment to ammonia and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde under normal conditions is toxic for biological treatment processes. When hydrolysis and acidification in the reactors are accompanied by low pH, aerobic batch reactors with use of co-substrates glucose, sucrose, and cow-dung extract separately in different proportion to wastewater ranging from 0.67 to 4.00, degraded wastewater effectively. Higher proportion of co-substrate to wastewater resulted better degradation. The relationships between nitrate, pH, turbidity and COD are discussed.

  11. Integrated biological and advanced oxidation based treatment of hexamine bearing wastewater: Effect of cow-dung as a co-substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Mandeep Kumar; Mittal, Atul K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Treatment by biological process and Fenton’s reagent. • Cow dung as co-substrate. • Hydrolysis of wastewater improved treatment. - Abstract: This work examines the treatment of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) bearing effluent from N, N-dinitroso pentamethylene tetra-mine producing industrial plants in India. Chemical treatment using Fenton’s reagent and aerobic treatment using batch reactors with co-substrate were investigated. Aerobic batch reactors integrated with advanced oxidation process of Fenton’s reagent provides effective treatment of HMT effluents. Influence of Fenton’s reagent dose reaction/contact and effect of varying co-substrate with effluent initial concentration was observed. Higher dose 100 mL of Fenton’s reagent with higher reaction time 20 h resulted better degradation (34.88%) of wastewater. HMT hydrolyzes in acidic environment to ammonia and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde under normal conditions is toxic for biological treatment processes. When hydrolysis and acidification in the reactors are accompanied by low pH, aerobic batch reactors with use of co-substrates glucose, sucrose, and cow-dung extract separately in different proportion to wastewater ranging from 0.67 to 4.00, degraded wastewater effectively. Higher proportion of co-substrate to wastewater resulted better degradation. The relationships between nitrate, pH, turbidity and COD are discussed.

  12. Reduction of graphene oxide by resveratrol: a novel and simple biological method for the synthesis of an effective anticancer nanotherapeutic molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Eun Su Kim, Jung Hyun Park, Jin-Hoi Kim Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objective: Graphene represents a monolayer or a few layers of sp2-bonded carbon atoms with a honeycomb lattice structure. Unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of graphene have attracted great interest in various fields including electronics, energy, material industry, and medicine, where it is used for tissue engineering and scaffolding, drug delivery, and as an antibacterial and anticancer agent. However, graphene cytotoxicity for ovarian cancer cells is still not fully investigated. The objective of this study was to synthesize graphene using a natural polyphenol compound resveratrol and to investigate its toxicity for ovarian cancer cells.Methods: The successful reduction of graphene oxide (GO to graphene was confirmed by UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy were employed to evaluate particle size and surface morphology of GO and resveratrol-reduced GO (RES-rGO. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from GO surface and to ensure the formation of graphene. We also performed a comprehensive analysis of GO and RES-rGO cytotoxicity by examining the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, activation of caspase-3, apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase activity of ovarian cancer cells.Results: The results also show that resveratrol effectively reduced GO to graphene and the properties of RES-rGO nanosheets were comparable to those of chemically reduced graphene. Biological experiments showed that GO and RES-rGO caused a dose-dependent membrane leakage and oxidative stress in cancer cells, and reduced their viability via apoptosis confirmed by the upregulation of apoptosis executioner caspase-3.Conclusion: Our data demonstrate a single, simple green

  13. The effect of graphene oxide on surface features, biological performance and bio-stability of calcium phosphate coating applied by pulse electrochemical deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathyunes, Leila; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar

    2018-04-01

    In the current study, the effect of second phase of graphene oxide (GO) on the surface features and biological behavior of calcium phosphate (CaP) coating was evaluated. To do so, the GO-CaP composite coating was applied on TiO2 nanotubular arrays using pulse electrochemical deposition. The SEM and AFM images showed that, the CaP-based coating with uniform and refined microstructure could be formed through its compositing with GO sheets. The biological assessment of the coatings was also conducted by cell culture test and MTT assay. Based on findings, the GO-CaP coating showed the better biocompatibility compared to the CaP coating. This could be owing to the fact that the composite coating provided the lower roughness, moderately wettable surface with a contact angle of 23.5° ± 2.6° and the higher stability in the biological environments because of being involved with only the stable phase of CHA. However, in the CaP coating, spreading of cells could be limited by the plate-like crystals with larger size. The higher solubility of the CaP coating in the cell culture medium possibly owing to the existence of some metastable CaP phases like OCP in addition to the dominant phase of CHA in this coating could be another reason for its less biocompatibility. At last, the CaP coating showed the higher apatite-forming ability in SBF solution after its compositing with GO.

  14. Evaluation of biodiesel fuel and a diesel oxidation catalyst in an underground metal mine : Part 3 : Biological and chemical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, S.T. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Gratz, L.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics

    1998-07-24

    A collaborative, international, multidisciplinary effort led to the evaluation of the effects of using a 50 per cent biodiesel fuel blend and an advanced-type diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) on underground metal mine air quality. The location selected for the field trials was the Creighton Mine 3 in Sudbury, Ontario, operated by Inco. Specifically, part 3 of the study evaluated the effects of using a biodiesel blend fuel on potentially health-related diesel particulate matter (DPM) components, with a special emphasis on polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and mutagenic activity. High volume sampler filters containing submicrometer particles were examined, and comparisons made for DPM and DPM component concentrations. The downwind concentrations of DPM were reduced by 20 per cent with the use of the blend biodiesel fuel as compared with the number 2 diesel fuel with an advanced-type DOC. Significant reductions in solids (up to 30 per cent) and up to 75 per cent in the case of mutagenic activity were noted. Significant reductions in the DPM components potentially harmful to human health should result from the use of this blended fuel combined with an advanced-type DOC in an underground environment. 23 refs., 19 tabs.

  15. Cytoprotective effect against UV-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress: role of new biological UV filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, T; Dutot, M; Martin, C; Beaudeux, J-L; Boucher, C; Enee, E; Baudouin, C; Warnet, J-M; Rat, P

    2007-03-01

    The majority of chemical solar filters are cytotoxic, particularly on sensitive ocular cells (corneal and conjunctival cells). Consequently, a non-cytotoxic UV filter would be interesting in dermatology, but more especially in ophthalmology. In fact, light damage to the eye can be avoided thanks to a very efficient ocular antioxidant system; indeed, the chromophores absorb light and dissipate its energy. After middle age, a decrease in the production of antioxidants and antioxidative enzymes appears with accumulation of endogenous molecules that are phototoxic. UV radiations can induce reactive oxygen species formation, leading to various ocular diseases. Because most UV filters are cytotoxic for the eye, we investigated the anti-UV properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil in order to propose it as a potential vehicle, free of toxicity, with a natural UV filter action in ophthalmic formulation. Calophyllum inophyllum oil, even at low concentration (1/10,000, v/v), exhibited significant UV absorption properties (maximum at 300nm) and was associated with an important sun protection factor (18-22). Oil concentrations up to 1% were not cytotoxic on human conjunctival epithelial cells, and Calophyllum inophyllum oil appeared to act as a cytoprotective agent against oxidative stress and DNA damage (85% of the DNA damage induced by UV radiations were inhibited with 1% Calophyllum oil) and did not induce in vivo ocular irritation (Draize test on New Zealand rabbits). Calophyllum inophyllum oil thus exhibited antioxidant and cytoprotective properties, and therefore might serve, for the first time, as a natural UV filter in ophthalmic preparations.

  16. The combined effect of uranium and gamma radiation on biological responses and oxidative stress induced in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Horemans, Nele; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Uranium never occurs as a single pollutant in the environment, but always in combination with other stressors such as ionizing radiation. As effects induced by multiple contaminants can differ markedly from the effects induced by the individual stressors, this multiple pollution context should not be neglected. In this study, effects on growth, nutrient uptake and oxidative stress induced by the single stressors uranium and gamma radiation are compared with the effects induced by the combination of both stressors. By doing this, we aim to better understand the effects induced by the combined stressors but also to get more insight in stressor-specific response mechanisms. Eighteen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were exposed for 3 days to 10 μM uranium and 3.5 Gy gamma radiation. Gamma radiation interfered with uranium uptake, resulting in decreased uranium concentrations in the roots, but with higher transport to the leaves. This resulted in a better root growth but increased leaf lipid peroxidation. For the other endpoints studied, effects under combined exposure were mostly determined by uranium presence and only limited influenced by gamma presence. Furthermore, an important role is suggested for CAT1/2/3 gene expression under uranium and mixed stressor conditions in the leaves.

  17. Computational Flow Modeling of Hydrodynamics in Multiphase Trickle-Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rodrigo J. G.; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M.

    2008-05-01

    This study aims to incorporate most recent multiphase models in order to investigate the hydrodynamic behavior of a TBR in terms of pressure drop and liquid holdup. Taking into account transport phenomena such as mass and heat transfer, an Eulerian k-fluid model was developed resulting from the volume averaging of the continuity and momentum equations and solved for a 3D representation of the catalytic bed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model predicts hydrodynamic parameters quite well if good closures for fluid/fluid and fluid/particle interactions are incorporated in the multiphase model. Moreover, catalytic performance is investigated with the catalytic wet oxidation of a phenolic pollutant.

  18. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P [Albuquerque, NM; Bunker, Bruce C [Albuquerque, NM; Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  19. The trickle before the torrent-diffraction data from X-ray lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Filipe R N C; Hajdu, Janos

    2016-08-01

    Today Scientific Data launched a collection of publications describing data from X-ray free-electron lasers under the theme 'Structural Biology Applications of X-ray Lasers'. The papers cover data on nanocrystals, single virus particles, isolated cell organelles, and living cells. All data are deposited with the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) and available to the scientific community to develop ideas, tools and procedures to meet challenges with the expected torrents of data from new X-ray lasers, capable of producing billion exposures per day.

  20. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (V{sub LL}) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): Validation of the technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar, E-mail: kmfgf@mst.edu; Lee, Hyoung Koo [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Fulton Hall, 310 W. 14th St., Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 143 Schrenk Hall, 400 W. 11th St., Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Al Dahhan, Muthanna H. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Fulton Hall, 310 W. 14th St., Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 143 Schrenk Hall, 400 W. 11th St., Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (V{sub LL}) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the V{sub LL} within TBRs.

  1. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (VLL) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): Validation of the technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Al Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2014-06-01

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (VLL) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the VLL within TBRs.

  2. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (VLL) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): Validation of the technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul; Al Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2014-01-01

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (V LL ) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the V LL within TBRs

  3. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (V(LL)) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): validation of the technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Al Dahhan, Muthanna H

    2014-06-01

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (V(LL)) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the V(LL) within TBRs.

  4. Reduction of graphene oxide by resveratrol: a novel and simple biological method for the synthesis of an effective anticancer nanotherapeutic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kim, Eun Su; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Graphene represents a monolayer or a few layers of sp2-bonded carbon atoms with a honeycomb lattice structure. Unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of graphene have attracted great interest in various fields including electronics, energy, material industry, and medicine, where it is used for tissue engineering and scaffolding, drug delivery, and as an antibacterial and anticancer agent. However, graphene cytotoxicity for ovarian cancer cells is still not fully investigated. The objective of this study was to synthesize graphene using a natural polyphenol compound resveratrol and to investigate its toxicity for ovarian cancer cells. Methods The successful reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to graphene was confirmed by UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy were employed to evaluate particle size and surface morphology of GO and resveratrol-reduced GO (RES-rGO). Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from GO surface and to ensure the formation of graphene. We also performed a comprehensive analysis of GO and RES-rGO cytotoxicity by examining the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, activation of caspase-3, apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase activity of ovarian cancer cells. Results The results also show that resveratrol effectively reduced GO to graphene and the properties of RES-rGO nanosheets were comparable to those of chemically reduced graphene. Biological experiments showed that GO and RES-rGO caused a dose-dependent membrane leakage and oxidative stress in cancer cells, and reduced their viability via apoptosis confirmed by the upregulation of apoptosis executioner caspase-3. Conclusion Our data demonstrate a single, simple green approach for the synthesis of highly water-dispersible functionalized graphene nanosheets, suggesting a possibility of replacing toxic hydrazine by a natural and safe phenolic

  5. Trickle-down evolution: an approach to getting major evolutionary adaptive changes into textbooks and curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padian, Kevin

    2008-08-01

    Although contemporary high school and college textbooks of biology generally cover the principles and data of microevolution (genetic and populational change) and speciation rather well, coverage of what is known of the major changes in evolution (macroevolution), and how the evidence is understood is generally poor to nonexistent. It is critical to improve this because acceptance of evolution by the American public rests on the understanding of how we know what we know about the emergence of major new taxonomic groups, and about their adaptations, behaviors, and ecologies in geologic time. An efficient approach to this problem is to improve the illustrations in college textbooks to show the consilience of different lines of fossil, morphological, and molecular evidence mapped on phylogenies. Such "evograms" will markedly improve traditional illustrations of phylogenies, "menageries," and "companatomies." If "evograms" are installed at the college level, the basic principles and evidence of macroevolution will be more likely taught in K-12, thus providing an essential missing piece in biological education.

  6. Studies on the Biotribological and Biological Behavior of Thermally Oxidized Ti6Al4V for Use in Artificial Cervical Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Li, Junhui; Lu, Junzhe; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Liao, Zhenhua; Feng, Pingfa; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-05-01

    The artificial cervical disk was simplified and considered as a ball-on-socket model with the material configuration of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and Ti6Al4V (PE-on-TC4). In order to improve the wear resistance, an optimized thermal oxidation (TO) coating was applied on TC4 component. The long-term wear behavior of the model was assessed in vitro using a wear simulator under 10 million cycles (MC) testing intervals. The biological behavior was investigated by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) cell attachment and cell viability/proliferation assays, respectively. The total average wear rate for PE/TC4 pair was found to be 0.81 mg/MC, whereas the same was about 0.96 mg/MC for PE/TO pair. The wear rate of the metal has been neglected in comparison with that of the mating polymer. PE component was found to suffer severe damage characterized by scratches, fatigue cracks and arc-shaped wear grooves on the edge zone of ball. The dominant wear mechanism was abrasion for metal component while the dominant failure mechanism was a mix of plowing, fatigue and plastic deformation for polymer component. TO coating improved the cell attachment property of TC4, and the cell viability results were also quite good. TO coating protected TC4 from being plowed and avoided the release of toxic metal ions. However, this intensified the wear of PE component. Considering the biotribological and biological behavior in totality, TO coating could still be promising when applied in articulation surfaces.

  7. Evaluation of trickle-bed air biofilter performance under periodic stressed operating conditions as a function of styrene loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daekeun; Cai, Zhangli; Sorial, George A

    2005-02-01

    Trickle-bed air biofilters (TBABs) are suitable for treating volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a significantly high practical loading because of their controlled environmental conditions. The application of TBAB for treating styrene-contaminated air under periodic backwashing and cyclical nonuse periods at a styrene loading of 0.64-3.17 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/m3 x day was the main focus of this study. Consistent long-term efficient performance of TBAB strongly depended on biomass control. A periodic in situ upflow with nutrient solution under media fluidization, that is, backwashing, was approached in this study. Two different nonuse periods were employed to simulate a shutdown for equipment repair or during weekends and holidays. The first is a starvation period without styrene loading, and the second is a stagnant period, which reflects no flow passing through the biofilter. For styrene loadings up to 1.9 kg COD/m3 x day, removal efficiencies consistently above 99% were achieved by conducting a coordinated biomass control strategy, that is, backwashing for 1 hr once per week. Under cyclical nonuse periods for styrene loadings up to 1.27 kg COD/m3 x day, stable long-term performance of the biofilter was maintained at more than 99% removal without employing backwashing. No substantial impact of nonuse periods on the biofilter performance was revealed. However, a coordinated biomass control by backwashing subsequently was unavoidable for attaining consistently high removal efficiency at a styrene loading of 3.17 kg COD/m3 x day. As styrene loading was increased, reacclimation of the biofilter to reach the 99% removal efficiency following backwashing or the nonuse periods was delayed. After the non-use periods, the response of the biofilter was a strong function of the biomass in the bed. No significant difference between the effects of the two different nonuse periods on TBAB performance was observed during the study period.

  8. From trickle to flood: the large-scale, cryptic invasion of California by tropical fruit flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nikos T; Plant, Richard E; Carey, James R

    2013-10-07

    Since 1954, when the first tropical tephritid fruit fly was detected in California, a total of 17 species in four genera and 11 386 individuals (adults/larvae) have been detected in the state at more than 3348 locations in 330 cities. We conclude from spatial mapping analyses of historical capture patterns and modelling that, despite the 250+ emergency eradication projects that have been directed against these pests by state and federal agencies, a minimum of five and as many as nine or more tephritid species are established and widespread, including the Mediterranean, Mexican and oriental fruit flies, and possibly the peach, guava and melon fruit flies. We outline and discuss the evidence for our conclusions, with particular attention to the incremental, chronic and insidious nature of the invasion, which involves ultra-small, barely detectable populations. We finish by considering the implications of our results for invasion biology and for science-based invasion policy.

  9. Graphene Oxide Directed One-Step Synthesis of Flowerlike Graphene@HKUST-1 for Enzyme-Free Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide in Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Yizhen; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Zhang, Yanhui; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-11-30

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF)-based electroactive nanocomposite containing graphene fragments and HKUST-1 was synthesized via a facile one-step solvothermal method using graphene oxide (GO), benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (BTC), and copper nitrate (Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ) as the raw materials. The morphology and structure characterization revealed that the GO could induce the transformation of HKUST-1 from octahedral structure to the hierarchical flower shape as an effective structure-directing agent. Also, it is interesting to find out that the GO was torn into small fragments to participate in the formation of HKUST-1 and then transformed into the reduction form during the solvothermal reaction process, which dramatically increased the surface area, electronic conductivity, and redox-activity of the material. Electrochemical assays showed that the synergy of graphene and HKUST-1 in the nanocomposite leaded to high electrocatalysis, fast response, and excellent selectivity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Based on these remarkable advantages, satisfactory results were obtained when the nanocomposite was used as a sensing material for electrochemical determination of H 2 O 2 in the complex biological samples such as human serum and living Raw 264.7 cell fluids.

  10. Racial differences in sensitivity to behavioral integrity: attitudinal consequences, in-group effects, and "trickle down" among Black and non-Black employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Tony; Friedman, Ray; Liu, Leigh Anne; McLean Parks, Judi

    2007-05-01

    Recent research has suggested that employees are highly affected by perceptions of their managers' pattern of word-action consistency, which T. Simons (2002) called behavioral integrity (BI). The authors of the present study suggest that some employee racial groups may be more attentive to BI than others. They tested this notion using data from 1,944 employees working at 107 different hotels and found that Black employees rated their managers as demonstrating lower BI than did non-Black employees. Mediation analyses were consistent with the notion that these differences in perceived BI in turn account for cross-race differences in trust in management, interpersonal justice, commitment, satisfaction, and intent to stay. Results of hierarchical linear modeling were consistent with the idea that middle managers' perceptions of their senior managers' BI "trickle down" to affect line employee perceptions of the middle managers and that this trickle-down effect is stronger for Black employees. The authors interpret these results as indicative of heightened sensitivity to managers' BI on the part of Black employees. They also found a reverse in-group effect, in that Black employees were substantially more critical of Black managers than were non-Black employees. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Efficacy of repeated trickle applications of oxalic acid in syrup for varroosis control in Apis mellifera: influence of meteorological conditions and presence of brood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacandritsos, Nicolaos; Papanastasiou, Iosif; Saitanis, Costas; Nanetti, Antonio; Roinioti, Erifylli

    2007-09-01

    Oxalic acid field trails for the control of varroosis (Varroa destructor) were carried out in an apiary located on the Mt. Imittos (Attica, Greece). The colonies received four successive applications (approximately one every 16 days) with 4.2% oxalic acid (OA) and 60% sugar solution by trickling method with two alternative types of syringes (an automatic self-filling dosing and a single-use) from the broodright to broodless period. The results indicate that the first three applications (from 6th October to 25th November-broodright period) resulted in 65.3% cumulative mite mortality, while only the last application (after the 26th November-broodless period) resulted in 77.3% mite mortality. Very low outern temperatures reduce to the minimum the bee movability, which may result into a slower development of the OA efficacy. No poor colony growth or queen loss were observed even if the bee colonies were received the four successive OA applications with the last one taken place at a very low outern temperature (6.2 degrees C). The trickling method using an automatic-filling syringe seems to be a very quick way for applying oxalic acid in large apiaries (approximately 150hives/h).

  12. Field evaluation of urea fertilizer and water use efficiency by tomato under trickle fertigation and furrow irrigation in the Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagheb, N.; Hobbi, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Urea fertilizer and water use efficiency by tomato (Early Urbana VF) were studied in a sandy loam soil, comparing trickle fertigation and conventional furrow irrigation -- band fertilization systems. During the period of 1995-1998, a conventional treatment, NS, with band application of 50, 150 and 100 kg N as urea, P as diammonium phosphate and K as potassium sulfate respectively was carried out. The average concentration of N in the total irrigation water was 0, 38, 76 and 114 mg/L for the N0, N1, N2 and N3 fertigation treatments, respectively. All fertigation treatments also received equally 24 and 16 mg/L P and K, respectively. An increase of K for the conventional treatment to 1200 kg/ha in 1998 coincided with the increase of the same element to 190 mg/L for the trickle irrigated treatments. To evaluate the urea-N use efficiency, the plants of isotope subplots received 2% 15 N a.e. urea. The soil moisture in all treatments was measured by the neutron moisture gauge. During the first 3 years of experimentation there was no significant difference between the yields of the treatments. For the years 1995 through 1997 the average tomato yield was low in comparison to the yield shown in most reports. The yield variance among treatments and years was negligible. The highest fruit yield, 27.3 t/ha for the N1 treatment was observed in 1997. In this experiment, the low yield and urea-N use efficiency can be primarily attributed to unbalanced applied fertilizers in the trickle irrigation system. The highest urea-N use efficiency was 12.3% for the fertigation N1 treatment in 1997. In the 1998, a repetition of the experiment with increasing K rates for all treatments at the same experimental site, led to a considerable increase in yield and urea-N use efficiency as compared to previous years. The tomato fresh fruit yield attained for N0, N1, N2, N3 and NS respectively 84, 76, 69, 36 and 26 t/ha. Based on the 14N/15N ratio analysis of the dry matter the urea-N use efficiency

  13. Airborne toluene removal for minimizing occupational health exposure by means of a trickle-bed biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, Massimo; Torretta, Vincenzo; Viotti, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the experimental results on a biotrickling pilot plant, with a water scrubber as pre-treatment, finalized to the treatment of an airborne toluene stream in a working place. The air stream was characterized by a very high variability of the inlet concentrations of toluene (range: 4.35-68.20 mg Nm(-3)) with an average concentrations of 16.41 mg Nm(-3). The pilot plant has proved its effectiveness in toluene removal, along a 90-day experimentation period, in steady-state conditions. The scrubbing pre-treatment has achieved an average removal efficiency of 69.9 %, but in particular it has proven its suitability in the rough removal of the toluene peak concentrations, allowing a great stability to the following biological process. The biotrickling stage has achieved an additional average removal efficiency of 75.6 %, confirming the good biodegradability of toluene. The biofilm observation by a scanning confocal laser microscope has evidenced a biofilm thickness of 650 μm fully penetrated by toluene degrading bacteria. Among the micro-population Pseudomonas putida resulted the dominant specie. This bacterium can therefore be considered the responsible for most of the toluene degradation. The whole experimented process has determined an average 92.7 % for toluene removal efficiency. This result meets the most stringent limits and recommendations for occupational safety, given by authoritative organizations in the USA and EU; it also meets the odorous threshold concentration of 11.1 mg Nm(-3).

  14. Effects of cultivated wild ginseng pharmacopuncture on lowering lipid and oxidative capacity in biochemical and molecular biological study in obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ju Choi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was carried out to identified the effects of distilled cultivated wild ginseng pharmacopuncture to the obesity. Methods : Cultivated wild ginseng pharmacopuncture was administered on the points of chung-wan(CV12, Ch'ŏnch'u(ST25, and Chok-samni(ST36 on lowering lipid and oxidative capacity in biochemical and molecular biological aspects were investigated in obese rats fed with high fat diet. Results : 1. The contents of plasma β-lipoprotein showed a tendency to decrease in the pharmacopuncture groups compared to the control group. In the pharmacopuncture groups, the values of ST25 and ST36 pharmacopuncture groups showed lower value. 2. The contents of plasma free fatty acids showed a tendency to decrease in pharmacopuncture groups compared to the control group. However, in the pharmacopuncture groups, the values were not significantly different. 3. Plasma triglyceride and glucose showed lower value in the ST25 pharmacopuncture groups compared with the other groups. 4. The activity of AST showed a tendency to decrease in the pharmacopuncture groups. However, the activity of ALT was not significantly different in all the treatment groups. 5. Plasma total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol showed lower value in the ST25 and ST36 pharmacopuncture groups and HDL-cholesterol showed higher value in the CV12 pharmacopuncture groups than that of the other treatment groups. 6. Liver total cholesterol values didn't show significant difference in all the treatment groups, and triglyceride showed lower value in the pharmacopuncture groups. 7. The contents of plasma TBARS showed lower value in the ST25 pharmacopuncture group and contents of liver TBARS showed a tendency to decrease in the pharmacopuncture groups. However these values didn't show significant difference in the pharmaco puncture groups. 8. Liver super oxide dismutase activity showed higher value in the ST25 and ST36 pharmacopuncture groups, and the value of liver

  15. Impact of exogenous organic carbon on the removal of chemicals of concern in the high rate nitrifying trickling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Lei; van den Akker, Ben; Du, Jun; Kookana, Rai S; Fallowfield, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The application of fixed bed high rate nitrifying trickling filters (NTFs) for the removal of track organic chemicals of concern (CoC) is less well known than their application to nutrient removal in water treatment. Particularly, the effect of exogenous organic carbon substrate (sucrose) loading on the performance of NTFs is not well understood. A laboratory-scale NTF system was operated in recirculation mode, with the objective of removing ammonia and CoC simultaneously. The efficiency of a high rate NTF for removal both of low concentration of ammonia (5 mg NH4-N L(-1)) and different concentrations of CoC in the presence of an exogenous organic carbon substrate (30 mg total organic carbon (TOC) L(-1)) was investigated. In the presence of exogenous organic carbon, the results demonstrated that the high rate NTF was able to successfully remove most of the CoCs investigated, with the removal ranging from 20.2% to 87.54%. High removal efficiencies were observed for acetaminophen (87.54%), bisphenol A (86.60%), trimethoprim (86.24%) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (80.60%). It was followed by the medium removal efficiency for N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide (61.31%) and atrazine (56.90%). In contrast, the removal of caffeine (28.43%) and benzotriazole (20.20%) was poorer in the presence of exogenous organic carbon. The removal efficiency for CoC was also compared with the results obtained in our previous study in the absence of exogenous organic carbon. The results showed that the addition of exogenous organic carbon was able to improve the removal of some of the CoC. Significant TOC percentage removals (45.68%-84.43%) and ammonia removal rate (mean value of 0.44 mg NH4-N L(-1) h(-1)) were also achieved in this study. The findings from this study provide valuable information for optimising the efficiency of high rate NTF for the removal of ammonia, CoC and TOC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Local liquid velocity measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs) using the x-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salleh, Khairul Anuar Mohd; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of a new technique to measure local liquid velocity (V LL ) for multiphase flows in trickle bed reactors (TBRs) (gas–liquid–solid system). In the studied TBR, the liquid phase is represented by water, gas by air and 3 mm expanded polystyrene beads as the solid packing. Three different superficial liquid velocities (V SL ) and a constant superficial gas velocity (V SG ) were used in the packed bed with an internal diameter of 4.25 cm. While the liquid is moving into the packed bed, tracking particles of 106–125 μm diameter (16.45% difference) are injected. The movement of the tracking particles is monitored and digitally recorded by a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor detector. In this experiment, x-rays were used as the radiation source. Four replications were made with fresh packing. Comparable observations can be found from other published techniques (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging). Results from this study indicate that, at V SL = 0.13 cm s −1 , the measured V LL  can reach up to 51 times that of its V SL , while for V SL = 0.27 cm s −1 , the measured V LL  reached up to 35 times higher than the V SL and for V SL = 0.39 cm s −1 , the V LL  reached up to 39.8 times higher than its V SL . Through statistical analysis, the implementation of such a method is found to be reproducible throughout the experiments. The mean per cent difference in the measured V LL was 10% and 5% for lower implemented V SL   of 0.13 and 0.27 cm s −1 , respectively. At higher V SL  (0.39 cm s −1 ), the particle tracer was greatly distributed and carried away by the high liquid flow rate. The variance or the range of the measured V LL  does not vary for all replications in every V SL , which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental measurements, regardless of the V SL . (paper)

  17. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris: Heritabilities and associations with parasitological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus; Göring, Harald Heinz Herbert; Skallerup, Per; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-07-30

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens or egg excretion with specific antibody levels. We set out to investigate the association between worm load and T. suis and A. suum specific serum antibody levels (IgG1, IgG2 and IgA) against excretory-secretory products of adults and third stage larvae, respectively, measured at 0, 7 and 14 weeks p.i. in a trickle-infected F1-resource-population of crossbred pigs (n=195). Furthermore, we wanted to determine the heritability of these antibody isotypes during the course of infection. Most pigs remained infected with A. suum throughout the experiment while they expelled T. suis between 7 and 14 weeks post infection (p.i.). Parasite specific IgG1 and IgA were significantly (P<0.001) elevated after 7 and 14 weeks of infection, whereas parasite specific IgG2 levels only changed slightly at 14 weeks p.i.. However, the observed association between specific antibody isotype levels and faecal egg counts and macroscopic worm load was weak. The relative heritabilities of the different parasite specific isotypes were assessed and resulted in significant heritability estimates for parasite specific IgG1 and IgA. The highest heritabilities were found for A. suum specific IgG1 (h(2)=0.41 and 0.46 at 7 and 14 weeks p.i., respectively). Thus, the present study demonstrates that host genetic factors influence the IgG1 and IgA antibody isotype responses specific to two of the most common gastrointestinal nematodes of swine whereas specific antibody levels were poorly associated with egg excretion and the presence of macroscopic worms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Treatment of an actual slaughterhouse wastewater by integration of biological and advanced oxidation processes: Modeling, optimization, and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustillo-Lecompte, Ciro Fernando; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2016-11-01

    Biological and advanced oxidation processes are combined to treat an actual slaughterhouse wastewater (SWW) by a sequence of an anaerobic baffled reactor, an aerobic activated sludge reactor, and a UV/H2O2 photoreactor with recycle in continuous mode at laboratory scale. In the first part of this study, quadratic modeling along with response surface methodology are used for the statistical analysis and optimization of the combined process. The effects of the influent total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, the flow rate, the pH, the inlet H2O2 concentration, and their interaction on the overall treatment efficiency, CH4 yield, and H2O2 residual in the effluent of the photoreactor are investigated. The models are validated at different operating conditions using experimental data. Maximum TOC and total nitrogen (TN) removals of 91.29 and 86.05%, respectively, maximum CH4 yield of 55.72%, and minimum H2O2 residual of 1.45% in the photoreactor effluent were found at optimal operating conditions. In the second part of this study, continuous distribution kinetics is applied to establish a mathematical model for the degradation of SWW as a function of time. The agreement between model predictions and experimental values indicates that the proposed model could describe the performance of the combined anaerobic-aerobic-UV/H2O2 processes for the treatment of SWW. In the final part of the study, the optimized combined anaerobic-aerobic-UV/H2O2 processes with recycle were evaluated using a cost-effectiveness analysis to minimize the retention time, the electrical energy consumption, and the overall incurred treatment costs required for the efficient treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential Responses of Dinitrogen Fixation, Diazotrophic Cyanobacteria and Ammonia Oxidation Reveal a Potential Warming-Induced Imbalance of the N-Cycle in Biological Soil Crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Zhou

    Full Text Available N2 fixation and ammonia oxidation (AO are the two most important processes in the nitrogen (N cycle of biological soil crusts (BSCs. We studied the short-term response of acetylene reduction assay (ARA rates, an indicator of potential N2 fixation, and AO rates to temperature (T, -5°C to 35°C in BSC of different successional stages along the BSC ecological succession and geographic origin (hot Chihuahuan and cooler Great Basin deserts. ARA in all BSCs increased with T until saturation occurred between 15 and 20°C, and declined at 30-35°C. Culture studies using cyanobacteria isolated from these crusts indicated that the saturating effect was traceable to their inability to grow well diazotrophically within the high temperature range. Below saturation, temperature response was exponential, with Q10 significantly different in the two areas (~ 5 for Great Basin BSCs; 2-3 for Chihuahuan BSCs, but similar between the two successional stages. However, in contrast to ARA, AO showed a steady increase to 30-35°C in Great Basin, and Chihuhuan BSCs showed no inhibition at any tested temperature. The T response of AO also differed significantly between Great Basin (Q10 of 4.5-4.8 and Chihuahuan (Q10 of 2.4-2.6 BSCs, but not between successional stages. Response of ARA rates to T did not differ from that of AO in either desert. Thus, while both processes scaled to T in unison until 20°C, they separated to an increasing degree at higher temperature. As future warming is likely to occur in the regions where BSCs are often the dominant living cover, this predicted decoupling is expected to result in higher proportion of nitrates in soil relative to ammonium. As nitrate is more easily lost as leachate or to be reduced to gaseous forms, this could mean a depletion of soil N over large landscapes globally.

  20. STUDY ON USING A TRICKLE-BED BIOREACTOR FOR REDUCING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATED BY PKN ORLEN S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kamiński

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies conducted by Ekoinwentyka sp. z o.o. concerning the possibility of using a trickle-bed bioreactor for reducing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted by PKN ORLEN S.A. wastewater treatment plant were presented and discussed. During the one-month trial, inlet and outlet concentrations of VOCs, H2S and NH3 were analysed and the efficiency of bio-purification process was determined on their basis. The obtained results confirmed the effectiveness of the applied technology under the given conditions, simultaneously demonstrating the validity of conducting further technological analysis to derive the design assumptions of the bioreactor on the industrial scale.

  1. Modelagem e simulação de um reator trickle-bed para hidrogenação de propeno

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Simion Hunger

    2002-01-01

    Neste trabalho foi modelado um reator catalítico heterogêneo, pressurizado, adiabático e provido de reciclo. O leito deste reator está dividido em duas partes, sendo que a primeira opera como um reator trickle-bed, enquanto a segunda opera como um reator de leito fixo, onde os regentes estão em fase líquida. Um Sistema de Hidrogenação de Propeno em operação no Pólo Petroquímico do Sul foi utilizado para fornecer os dados necessários à validação do modelo proposto. Neste sistema, a reação de h...

  2. Differential responses of dinitrogen fixation, diazotrophic cyanobacteria and ammonia oxidation reveal a potential warming-induced imbalance of the N-cycle in biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Smith, Hilda J.; Giraldo Silva, Ana; Belnap, Jayne; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    N2 fixation and ammonia oxidation (AO) are the two most important processes in the nitrogen (N) cycle of biological soil crusts (BSCs). We studied the short-term response of acetylene reduction assay (ARA) rates, an indicator of potential N2 fixation, and AO rates to temperature (T, -5°C to 35°C) in BSC of different successional stages along the BSC ecological succession and geographic origin (hot Chihuahuan and cooler Great Basin deserts). ARA in all BSCs increased with T until saturation occurred between 15 and 20°C, and declined at 30–35°C. Culture studies using cyanobacteria isolated from these crusts indicated that the saturating effect was traceable to their inability to grow well diazotrophically within the high temperature range. Below saturation, temperature response was exponential, with Q10 significantly different in the two areas (~ 5 for Great Basin BSCs; 2–3 for Chihuahuan BSCs), but similar between the two successional stages. However, in contrast to ARA, AO showed a steady increase to 30–35°C in Great Basin, and Chihuhuan BSCs showed no inhibition at any tested temperature. The T response of AO also differed significantly between Great Basin (Q10 of 4.5–4.8) and Chihuahuan (Q10 of 2.4–2.6) BSCs, but not between successional stages. Response of ARA rates to T did not differ from that of AO in either desert. Thus, while both processes scaled to T in unison until 20°C, they separated to an increasing degree at higher temperature. As future warming is likely to occur in the regions where BSCs are often the dominant living cover, this predicted decoupling is expected to result in higher proportion of nitrates in soil relative to ammonium. As nitrate is more easily lost as leachate or to be reduced to gaseous forms, this could mean a depletion of soil N over large landscapes globally.

  3. Cooperia punctata trickle infections: parasitological parameters and evaluation of a Cooperia recombinant 14.2 kDa protein ELISA for estimating cumulative exposure of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuda, A P; Kooyman, F N J; Ploeger, H W; Vieira-Bressan, M C R; de Vries, E; Eysker, M

    2002-04-30

    Three groups of four calves each were trickle infected with three different levels of Cooperia punctata: 310 (group A), 1250 (group B) and 5000 (group C) third stage infective larvae (L3) twice a week over a 17-week period. Group D was the non-infected control group. Parasitological parameters as faecal egg counts (epg), worm burdens, size of worms and number of eggs per female were collected and the differences between the groups compared. Serological analyses were also conducted to investigate the efficiency of a recombinant C. oncophora CoES 14.2kDa protein in an ELISA to detect C. punctata antibodies. Group C had higher faecal egg counts until week 9 when the values decreased to those in group B. Mean faecal egg counts in group A were always lower than in the two other infected groups. The worm burdens were highest in group C, and lowest in group A, although the number of worms as a percentage of total larval intake was higher for the lower group. The mean length of the worms was shorter and the number of eggs per female lower for group C than for both other groups. ELISA using the CoES 14.2kDa proved to be efficient in measuring C. punctata antibodies. For group C it took 4 weeks to get increased levels of antibodies and this was one and 2 months more for groups B and A, respectively. Overall, there was a congruent relation between C. punctata antibodies and the cumulative exposure to the three different levels of trickle infections.

  4. Biological treatment of aqueous effluents in a bacterial bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-14

    Biological treatment of aqueous effluents in a bacterial bed is carried out effectively for refinery waters having a low five-day BOD by using a plastic packing to support the bacteria in place of the less reliable pozzolana (volcanic ash) formerly employed. Such biofilters, developed by Lurgi S.A., are more sensitive to BOD overloading than activated sludge beds, so that very stable operating conditions are required. In these bacterial beds, the water trickles over the plastic packing and becomes oxygenated, which leads to degradation of undesirable substances in the water. In the refinery, this process can give excellent results when properly carried out, but the biofilter may generate suspended matter under unsatisfactory operating conditions, and is therefore usually placed upstream from the flocculation and filtration units. To date, all installations have remained below the required standard limit of 30 mg/l. of suspended matter.

  5. A trickle instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Benjamin

    2005-11-01

    We address the problem of the free fall of a long, horizontal and narrow liquid layer squeezed in a vertical open Hele-Shaw cell. The layer destabilizes as it falls down, evolving into a series of liquid blobs linked together by thin bridges, which ultimately break, leaving the initially connex fluid layer as a set a disjointed drops. The mechanism of this instability is the onset of a vertical pressure gradient due to the curvature difference of the moving contact line between the advancing interface and the rear interface. This instability, whose growth rate scales with a non-trivial power of the capillary number, amplifies indifferently a broad band of wavenumbers because of the flat shape of its dispersion relation in the thin layer limit. We will finally comment on the nature of the final fragmentation process and drop size distributions.

  6. The 2013 Discovery Award from the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine: Selected Discoveries from the Butterfield Laboratory of Oxidative Stress and Its Sequelae in Brain in Cognitive Disorders Exemplified by Alzheimer Disease and Chemotherapy Induced Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D. Allan

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective review on discoveries of the roles of oxidative stress in brain of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD) and animal models thereof as well as brain from animal models of chemotherapy induced cognitive impairment (CICI) results from the author receiving the 2013 Discovery Award from the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine. The paper reviews our laboratory's discovery of: protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in AD brain regions rich in amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) but not in Aβ-poor cerebellum; redox proteomics as a means to identify oxidatively modified brain proteins in AD and its earlier forms that are consistent with the pathology, biochemistry, and clinical presentation of these disorders; how Aβ in in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies can lead to oxidative modification of key proteins that also are oxidatively modified in AD brain; the role of the single methionine residue of Aβ(1-42) in these processes; and some of the potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. CICI affects a significant fraction of the 14 million American cancer survivors, and due to diminished cognitive function, reduced quality of life of the persons with CICI (called “chemobrain” by patients) often results. A proposed mechanism for CICI employed the prototypical ROS-generating and non-blood brain barrier (BBB)-penetrating chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (Dox, also called adriamycin, ADR). Because of the quinone moiety within the structure of Dox, this agent undergoes redox cycling to produce superoxide free radical peripherally. This, in turn, leads to oxidative modification of the key plasma protein, Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1). Oxidized ApoA1 leads to elevated peripheral TNFα, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that crosses the BBB to induce oxidative stress in brain parenchyma that affects negatively brain mitochondria. This subsequently leads to apoptotic cell death resulting in CICI. This review outlines aspects of CICI consistent

  7. Role of electrolyte composition on structural, morphological and in-vitro biological properties of plasma electrolytic oxidation films formed on zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M, Sandhyarani; T, Prasadrao; N, Rameshbabu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Uniform oxide films were formed on zirconium by plasma electrolytic oxidation. • Silicate in electrolyte alter the growth of m-ZrO 2 from (1 ¯ 11) to (2 0 0) orientation. • Addition of KOH to electrolyte improved the corrosion resistance of oxide films. • Silicon incorporated oxide films showed higher surface roughness and wettability. • Human osteosarcoma cells were strongly adhered and spreaded on all the oxide films. - Abstract: Development of oxide films on metallic implants with a good combination of corrosion resistance, bioactivity and cell adhesion can greatly improve its biocompatibility and functionality. Thus, the present work is aimed to fabricate oxide films on metallic Zr by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in methodically varied concentrations of phosphate, silicate and KOH based electrolyte systems using a pulsed DC power source. The oxide films fabricated on Zr are characterized for its phase composition, surface morphology, chemical composition, roughness, wettability, surface energy, corrosion resistance, apatite forming ability and osteoblast cell adhesion. Uniform films with thickness varying from 6 to 11 μm are formed. XRD patterns of all the PEO films showed the predominance of monoclinic zirconia phase. The film formed in phosphate + KOH electrolyte showed superior corrosion resistance, which can be ascribed to its pore free morphology. The films formed in silicate electrolyte showed higher apatite forming ability with good cell adhesion and spreading over its surface which is attributed to its superior surface roughness and wettability characteristics. Among the five different electrolyte systems employed in the present study, the PEO film formed in an electrolyte system with phosphate + silicate + KOH showed optimum corrosion resistance, apatite forming ability and biocompatibility

  8. Evaluation of the simultaneous removal of recalcitrant drugs (bezafibrate, gemfibrozil, indomethacin and sulfamethoxazole) and biodegradable organic matter from synthetic wastewater by electro-oxidation coupled with a biological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Nava, Odín; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo; Loera, Octavio; González, Ignacio

    2016-12-01

    Pharmaceutical degradation in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) represents a challenge since municipal wastewater and hospital effluents contain pharmaceuticals in low concentrations (recalcitrant and persistent in WWTP) and biodegradable organic matter (BOM) is the main pollutant. This work shows the feasibility of coupling electro-oxidation with a biological system for the simultaneous removal of recalcitrant drugs (bezafibrate, gemfibrozil, indomethacin and sulfamethoxazole (BGIS)) and BOM from wastewater. High removal efficiencies were attained without affecting the performance of activated sludge. BGIS degradation was performed by advanced electrochemical oxidation and the activated sludge process for BOM degradation in a continuous reactor. The selected electrochemical parameters from microelectrolysis tests (1.2 L s(-1) and 1.56 mA cm(-2)) were maintained to operate a filter press laboratory reactor FM01-LC using boron-doped diamond as the anode. The low current density was chosen in order to remove drugs without decreasing BOM and chlorine concentration control, so as to avoid bulking formation in the biological process. The wastewater previously treated by FM01-LC was fed directly (without chemical modification) to the activated sludge reactor to remove 100% of BGIS and 83% of BOM; conversely, the BGIS contained in wastewater without electrochemical pre-treatment were persistent in the biological process and promoted bulking formation.

  9. Changes in Oxidative Stress Markers and Biological Markers of Muscle Injury with Aging at Rest and in Response to an Exhaustive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Hammouda, Omar; Matran, Regis; Robin, Sophie; Fabre, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate whether oxidative stress markers and biomarkers of muscle injury would be affected by aging at rest and in response to an incremental exhaustive exercise. Methods Fifteen young (20.3±2.8 years) and fifteen older adults (65.1±3.5 years) performed an incremental cycle ergometer test to exhaustion. Before and after exercise, oxidative stress [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), ascorbic acid, α-Tocopherol, malondialdehyde (MDA)] and muscle injury [creatine kinase (CK), lactate deshydrogenase (LDH)] biomarkers were assessed. Results At rest, there was no difference in oxidative stress markers and LDH level between the groups, however CK was significantly higher in the young group than the elderly group (pantioxidant efficiency and an increase in oxidative stress damage. Furthermore, older adults would not more susceptible to exercise-induced muscle injury than young people. PMID:24618679

  10. Direct and controllable nitric oxide delivery into biological media and living cells by a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrynin, D; Friedman, G [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Arjunan, K; Clyne, A Morss [School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fridman, A, E-mail: alisam@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-02-23

    Nitric oxide has great potential for improving wound healing through both inflammatory and vascularization processes. Nitric oxide can be produced in high concentrations by atmospheric pressure thermal plasmas. We measured the physical characteristics and nitric oxide production of a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma, as well as plasma-produced nitric oxide delivery into liquid and endothelial cells. The plasma temperature was calculated as 9030 {+-} 320 K by the Boltzmann method, which was adequate to produce nitric oxide, although the average gas temperature was near room temperature. The plasma produced significant UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide, but these were prevented from reaching the cells by adding a straight or curved tube extension to the plasma device. Plasma-produced nitric oxide in gas reached 2000 ppm and rapidly diffused into liquid and cells. Cells remained viable following plasma treatment and showed a linear increase in cGMP concentration with plasma treatment, indicating an intracellular functional response to PHD plasma NO. These data suggest that this plasma may provide a novel method for delivering NO locally and directly for enhanced wound healing.

  11. Direct and controllable nitric oxide delivery into biological media and living cells by a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrynin, D; Friedman, G; Arjunan, K; Clyne, A Morss; Fridman, A

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide has great potential for improving wound healing through both inflammatory and vascularization processes. Nitric oxide can be produced in high concentrations by atmospheric pressure thermal plasmas. We measured the physical characteristics and nitric oxide production of a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma, as well as plasma-produced nitric oxide delivery into liquid and endothelial cells. The plasma temperature was calculated as 9030 ± 320 K by the Boltzmann method, which was adequate to produce nitric oxide, although the average gas temperature was near room temperature. The plasma produced significant UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide, but these were prevented from reaching the cells by adding a straight or curved tube extension to the plasma device. Plasma-produced nitric oxide in gas reached 2000 ppm and rapidly diffused into liquid and cells. Cells remained viable following plasma treatment and showed a linear increase in cGMP concentration with plasma treatment, indicating an intracellular functional response to PHD plasma NO. These data suggest that this plasma may provide a novel method for delivering NO locally and directly for enhanced wound healing.

  12. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  13. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chang-Mao, E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h{sup -1}.

  14. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h -1 .

  15. Improved biological performance of low modulus Ti-24Nb-4Zr-7.9Sn implants due to surface modification by anodic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y. [School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Gao, B., E-mail: gaobo_fmmu@163.com [School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, R. [Fengtai Health Center of Navy Outpatient Department, Beijing 100071 (China); Wu, J.; Zhang, L.J. [School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Hao, Y.L.; Tao, X.J. [Institute of Metal Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Dental implants are usually made from commercially pure titanium or titanium alloys. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatment to low modulus Ti-24Nb-4Zr-7.9Sn (TNZS) on cell and bone responses. The TNZS alloy samples were modified using anodic oxidation (AD). Surface oxide properties were characterized by using various surface analytic techniques, involving scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and surface profilometer. During the AD treatment, porous titanium oxide layer was formed and Ca ions were incorporated into the oxide layer. The viability and morphology of osteoblasts on Ca-incorporated TNZS were studied. The bone responses of Ca-incorporated TNZS were evaluated by pull-out tests and morphological analysis after implantation in rabbit tibiae. The non-treated Ti and TNZS samples were used as the control. Significant increases in cell viability and pull-out forces (p < 0.05) were observed for Ca-incorporated TNZS implants compared with those for the control groups. Porous structures supplied positive guidance cues for osteoblasts to attach. The enhanced cell and bone responses to Ca-incorporated TNZS implants could be explained by the surface chemistry and microtopography.

  16. Exploring the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of four-electron electrochemical reactions: electrocatalysis of oxygen evolution by metal oxides and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent C-C

    2016-08-10

    Finding fundamental and general mechanisms for electrochemical reactions, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and reduction of CO2, plays vital roles in developing the desired electrocatalysts for facilitating solar fuel production. Recently, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have shown that there is a universal scaling relation of adsorption energy between key intermediate species, HO(ad) and HOO(ad), on the surface of metal oxides as OER electrocatalysts. In this paper, a kinetic and thermodynamic model for the four-electron electrochemical reaction based on previous OER mechanisms proposed by DFT calculations is developed to further investigate the electrocatalytic properties over a wide range of metal oxides and photosystem II. The OER activity of metal oxides (i.e. electrocatalytic current) calculated from the DFT-calculated equilibrium potentials with kinetic properties, such as the rate constants for interfacial electron transfer and catalytic turnover, can lead to a volcano-shaped trend that agrees with the results observed in experiments. In addition, the kinetic aspects of the impact on the electrocatalysts are evaluated. Finally, comparing the results of metal oxides and photosystem II, and fitting experimental voltammograms give further insights into kinetic and thermodynamic roles. Here, the general guidelines for designing OER electrocatalysts with unified kinetic and thermodynamic properties are presented.

  17. Differences in the adsorption behaviour of poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers onto model polystyrene nanoparticles assessed by isothermal titration microcalorimetry correspond to the biological differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolnik, S; Heald, C R; Garnett, M G; Illum, L; Davis, S S

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption behaviour of a tetrafunctional copolymer of poly (ethylene oxide)-poly (propylene oxide) ethylene diamine (commercially available as Poloxamine 908) and a diblock copolymer of poly (lactic acid)-poly (ethylene oxide) (PLA/PEG 2:5) onto a model colloidal drug carrier (156 nm sized polystyrene latex) is described. The adsorption isotherm, hydrodynamic thickness of the adsorbed layers and enthalpy of the adsorption were assessed. The close similarity in the conformation of the poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains (molecular weight 5,000 Da) in the adsorbed layers of these two copolymers was demonstrated by combining the adsorption data with the adsorbed layer thickness data. In contrast, the results from isothermal titration microcalorimetry indicated a distinct difference in the interaction of the copolymers with the polystyrene colloid surface. Poloxamine 908 adsorption to polystyrene nanopar