WorldWideScience

Sample records for oxidase subunit ii

  1. Cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene in mitochondria of Oenothera has no intron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Brennicke, Axel

    1983-01-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene has been localized in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera berteriana and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The coding sequence contains 777 bp and, unlike the corresponding gene in Zea mays, is not interrupted by an intron. No TGA codon is found within the open reading frame. The codon CGG, as in the maize gene, is used in place of tryptophan codons of corresponding genes in other organisms. At position 742 in the Oenothera sequence the TGG of maize is changed into a CGG codon, where Trp is conserved as the amino acid in other organisms. Homologous sequences occur more than once in the mitochondrial genome as several mitochondrial DNA species hybridize with DNA probes of the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:16453484

  2. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2) gene in giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, S S; Zhu, Y; Lan, D; Li, D S; Pang, H Z; Wang, Y; Li, D Y; Wei, R P; Zhang, H M; Wang, C D; Hu, Y D

    2017-01-23

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Ursidae), has a unique bamboo-based diet; however, this low-energy intake has been sufficient to maintain the metabolic processes of this species since the fourth ice age. As mitochondria are the main sites for energy metabolism in animals, the protein-coding genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chains, particularly cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in electron transfer, could play an important role in giant panda metabolism. Therefore, the present study aimed to isolate, sequence, and analyze the COX2 DNA from individuals kept at the Giant Panda Protection and Research Center, China, and compare these sequences with those of the other Ursidae family members. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the COX2 gene had three point mutations that defined three haplotypes, with 60% of the sequences corresponding to haplotype I. The neutrality tests revealed that the COX2 gene was conserved throughout evolution, and the maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, using homologous sequences from other Ursidae species, showed clustering of the COX2 sequences of giant pandas, suggesting that this gene evolved differently in them.

  3. Metallothionein 2A affects the cell respiration by suppressing the expression of mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Olga; Gurjanova, Karina; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Kulp, Maria; Karro, Niina; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are involved in a broad range of cellular processes and play a major role in protection of cells towards various stressors. Two functions of MTs, namely the maintaining of the homeostasis of transition metal ions and the redox balance, are directly linked to the functioning of mitochondria. Dyshomeostasis of MTs is often related with malfunctioning of mitochondria; however, the mechanism by which MTs affect the mitochondrial respiratory chain is still unknown. We demonstrated that overexpression of MT-2A in HEK cell line decreased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the cells. HEK cells overexpressing MT-2A demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and lower cellular ATP levels. MT-2A did not affect the number of mitochondria, but reduced specifically the level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II protein, which resulted in lower activity of the complex IV.

  4. Oxidative inhibition of the vascular Na+-K+ pump via NADPH oxidase-dependent β1-subunit glutathionylation: implications for angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Weisbrod, Robert M; Hansen, Thomas; Ravaie, Ramtin; Nunez, Andrea; Liu, Yi B; Fry, Natasha; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Sweadner, Kathleen J; Cohen, Richard A; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-12-01

    Glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump's β1-subunit is a key molecular mechanism of physiological and pathophysiological pump inhibition in cardiac myocytes. Its contribution to Na(+)-K(+) pump regulation in other tissues is unknown, and cannot be assumed given the dependence on specific β-subunit isoform expression and receptor-coupled pathways. As Na(+)-K(+) pump activity is an important determinant of vascular tone through effects on [Ca(2+)]i, we have examined the role of oxidative regulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump in mediating angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in vascular reactivity. β1-subunit glutathione adducts were present at baseline and increased by exposure to Ang II in rabbit aortic rings, primary rabbit aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and human arterial segments. In VSMCs, Ang II-induced glutathionylation was associated with marked reduction in Na(+)-K(+)ATPase activity, an effect that was abolished by the NADPH oxidase inhibitory peptide, tat-gp91ds. In aortic segments, Ang II-induced glutathionylation was associated with decreased K(+)-induced vasorelaxation, a validated index of pump activity. Ang II-induced oxidative inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and decrease in K(+)-induced relaxation were reversed by preincubation of VSMCs and rings with recombinant FXYD3 protein that is known to facilitate deglutathionylation of β1-subunit. Knock-out of FXYD1 dramatically decreased K(+)-induced relaxation in a mouse model. Attenuation of Ang II signaling in vivo by captopril (8 mg/kg/day for 7 days) decreased superoxide-sensitive DHE levels in the media of rabbit aorta, decreased β1-subunit glutathionylation, and enhanced K(+)-induced vasorelaxation. Ang II inhibits the Na(+)-K(+) pump in VSMCs via NADPH oxidase-dependent glutathionylation of the pump's β1-subunit, and this newly identified signaling pathway may contribute to altered vascular tone. FXYD proteins reduce oxidative inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+) pump and may have an

  5. Apoptotic role of TGF-β mediated by Smad4 mitochondria translocation and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lijuan; Qiu, Tao; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2011-07-01

    Smad4, originally isolated from the human chromosome 18q21, is a key factor in transducing the signals of the TGF-β superfamily of growth hormones and plays a pivotal role in mediating antimitogenic and proapoptotic effects of TGF-β, but the mechanisms by which Smad4 induces apoptosis are elusive. Here we report that Smad4 directly translocates to the mitochondria of apoptotic cells. Smad4 gene silencing by siRNA inhibits TGF-β-induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells and UV-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Cell fractionation assays demonstrated that a fraction of Smad4 translocates to mitochondria after long time TGF-β treatment or UV exposure, during which the cells were under apoptosis. Smad4 mitochondria translocation during apoptosis was also confirmed by fluorescence observation of Smad4 colocalization with MitoTracker Red. We searched for mitochondria proteins that have physical interactions with Smad4 using yeast two-hybrid screening approach. DNA sequence analysis identified 34 positive clones, five of which encoded subunits in mitochondria complex IV, i.e., one clone encoded cytochrome c oxidase COXII, three clones encoded COXIII and one clone encoded COXVb. Strong interaction between Smad4 with COXII, an important apoptosis regulator, was verified in yeast by β-gal activity assays and in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation assays. Further, mitochondrial portion of cells was isolated and the interaction between COXII and Smad4 in mitochondria upon TGF-β treatment or UV exposure was confirmed. Importantly, targeting Smad4 to mitochondria using import leader fusions enhanced TGF-β-induced apoptosis. Collectively, the results suggest that Smad4 promote apoptosis of the cells through its mitochondrial translocation and association with mitochondria protein COXII. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequence variation in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I and II genes of two commonly found blow fly species, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siew Hwa; Aris, Edah Mohd; Surin, Johari; Omar, Baharudin; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2009-08-01

    The mitochondiral DNA region encompassing the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) genes of two Malaysian blow fly species, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) were studied. This region, which spans 2303bp and includes the COI, tRNA leucine and partial COII was sequenced from adult fly and larval specimens, and compared. Intraspecific variations were observed at 0.26% for Ch. megacephala and 0.17% for Ch. rufifacies, while sequence divergence between the two species was recorded at a minimum of 141 out of 2303 sites (6.12%). Results obtained in this study are comparable to published data, and thus support the use of DNA sequence to facilitate and complement morphology-based species identification.

  7. Angiotensin II inhibits the Na+-K+ pump via PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Caroline N; Figtree, Gemma A; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Chia, Karin K M; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2009-04-01

    The sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) pump, pivotal in cardiac myocyte function, is inhibited by angiotensin II (ANG II). Since ANG II activates NADPH oxidase, we tested the hypothesis that NADPH oxidase mediates the pump inhibition. Exposure to 100 nmol/l ANG II increased superoxide-sensitive fluorescence of isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. The increase was abolished by pegylated superoxide dismutase (SOD), by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, and by myristolated inhibitory peptide to epsilon-protein kinase C (epsilonPKC), previously implicated in ANG II-induced Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition. A role for epsilonPKC was also supported by an ANG II-induced increase in coimmunoprecipitation of epsilonPKC with the receptor for the activated kinase and with the cytosolic p47(phox) subunit of NADPH oxidase. ANG II decreased electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current in voltage-clamped myocytes. The decrease was abolished by SOD, by the gp91ds inhibitory peptide that blocks assembly and activation of NADPH oxidase, and by epsilonPKC inhibitory peptide. Since colocalization should facilitate NADPH oxidase-dependent regulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump, we examined whether there is physical association between the pump subunits and NADPH oxidase. The alpha(1)-subunit coimmunoprecipitated with caveolin 3 and with membrane-associated p22(phox) and cytosolic p47(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits at baseline. ANG II had no effect on alpha(1)/caveolin 3 or alpha(1)/p22(phox) interaction, but it increased alpha(1)/p47(phox) coimmunoprecipitation. We conclude that ANG II inhibits the Na(+)-K(+) pump via PKC-dependent NADPH oxidase activation.

  8. The cytochrome oxidase subunit I and subunit III genes in Oenothera mitochondria are transcribed from identical promoter sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Schobel, Werner; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1987-01-01

    Two loci encoding subunit III of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) in Oenothera mitochondria have been identified from a cDNA library of mitochondrial transcripts. A 657-bp sequence block upstream from the open reading frame is also present in the two copies of the COX subunit I gene and is presumably involved in homologous sequence rearrangement. The proximal points of sequence rearrangements are located 3 bp upstream from the COX I and 1139 bp upstream from the COX III initiation codons. The 5'-termini of both COX I and COX III mRNAs have been mapped in this common sequence confining the promoter region for the Oenothera mitochondrial COX I and COX III genes to the homologous sequence block. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:15981332

  9. Submitochondrial distributions and stabilities of subunits 4, 5, and 6 of yeast cytochrome oxidase in assembly defective mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, D M; Tzagoloff, A

    1997-08-04

    The concentration and submitochondrial distribution of the subunit polypeptides of cytochrome oxidase have been studied in wild type yeast and in different mutants impaired in assembly of this respiratory complex. All the subunit polypeptides of the enzyme are associated with mitochondrial membranes of wild type cells, except for a small fraction of subunits 4 and 6 that is recovered in the soluble protein fraction of mitochondria. Cytochrome oxidase mutants consistently display a severe reduction in the steady-state concentration of subunit 1 due to its increased turnover. As a consequence, most of subunit 4, which normally is associated with subunit 1, is found in the soluble fraction. A similar shift from membrane-bound to soluble subunit 6 is seen in mutants blocked in expression of subunit 5a. In contrast, null mutations in COX6 coding for subunit 6 promote loss of subunit 5a. The absence of subunit 5a in the cox6 mutant is the result of proteolytic degradation rather than regulation of its expression by subunit 6. The possible role of the ATP-dependent proteases Rca1p and Afg3p in proteolysis of subunits 1 and 5a has been assessed in strains with combined mutations in COX6, RCA1, and/or AFG3. Immunochemical assays indicate that another protease(s) must be responsible for most of the proteolytic loss of these proteins.

  10. The beta subunit of casein kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Piontek, K; Schmidt-Spaniol, I

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the beta subunit of pig and mouse CKII were isolated. The porcine cDNA was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used for the production of anti-CKII-beta subunit specific antibodies....

  11. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Gentekaki, Eleni; Yi, Zhenzhen; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  12. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  13. NDUFA4 Mutations Underlie Dysfunction of a Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit Linked to Human Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D.S. Pitceathly

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX, complex IV deficiency remains genetically undetermined in many cases. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed in a consanguineous pedigree with isolated COX deficiency linked to a Leigh syndrome neurological phenotype. Unexpectedly, affected individuals harbored homozygous splice donor site mutations in NDUFA4, a gene previously assigned to encode a mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit. Western blot analysis of denaturing gels and immunocytochemistry revealed undetectable steady-state NDUFA4 protein levels, indicating that the mutation causes a loss-of-function effect in the homozygous state. Analysis of one- and two-dimensional blue-native polyacrylamide gels confirmed an interaction between NDUFA4 and the COX enzyme complex in control muscle, whereas the COX enzyme complex without NDUFA4 was detectable with no abnormal subassemblies in patient muscle. These observations support recent work in cell lines suggesting that NDUFA4 is an additional COX subunit and demonstrate that NDUFA4 mutations cause human disease. Our findings support reassignment of the NDUFA4 protein to complex IV and suggest that patients with unexplained COX deficiency should be screened for NDUFA4 mutations.

  14. Mam33 promotes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Gabrielle A; Henry, Michael F

    2015-08-15

    Three mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, Cox1, Cox2, and Cox3, comprise the core of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. Gene-specific translational activators ensure that these respiratory chain subunits are synthesized at the correct location and in stoichiometric ratios to prevent unassembled protein products from generating free oxygen radicals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nuclear-encoded proteins Mss51 and Pet309 specifically activate mitochondrial translation of the largest subunit, Cox1. Here we report that Mam33 is a third COX1 translational activator in yeast mitochondria. Mam33 is required for cells to adapt efficiently from fermentation to respiration. In the absence of Mam33, Cox1 translation is impaired, and cells poorly adapt to respiratory conditions because they lack basal fermentative levels of Cox1. © 2015 Roloff and Henry. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Exploring the Utility of Partial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit 1 for DNA Barcoding of Gobies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Bae Jeon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gobiids are hyperdiverse compared with other teleost groups, with about 2,000 species occurring in marine, freshwater, and blackish habitats, and they show a remarkable variety of morphologies and ecology. Testing the effectiveness of DNA barcodes on species that have emerged as a result of radiation remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we used the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI sequences from 144 species of gobies and related species to evaluate the performance of distance-based DNA barcoding and to conduct a phylogenetic analysis. The average intra-genus genetic distance was considerably higher than that obtained in previous studies. Additionally, the interspecific divergence at higher taxonomic levels was not significantly different from that at the intragenus level, suggesting that congeneric gobies possess substantial interspecific sequence divergence in their COI gene. However, levels of intragenus divergence varied greatly among genera, and we do not provide sufficient evidence for using COI for cryptic species delimitation. Significantly more nucleotide changes were observed at the third codon position than that at the first and the second codons, revealing that extensive variation in COI reflects synonymous changes and little protein level variation. Despite clear signatures in several genera, the COI sequences did resolve genealogical relationships in the phylogenetic analysis well. Our results support the validity of COI barcoding for gobiid species identification, but the utilization of more gene regions will assist to offer a more robust gobiid species phylogeny.

  16. Loss of the smallest subunit of cytochrome c oxidase, COX8A, causes Leigh-like syndrome and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Kerstin; Kudin, Alexei P; Zsurka, Gábor; Kornblum, Cornelia; Reimann, Jens; Stüve, Burkhard; Waltz, Stephan; Hattingen, Elke; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Rüb, Cornelia; Voos, Wolfgang; Kopatz, Jens; Neumann, Harald; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2016-02-01

    Isolated cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) deficiency is one of the most frequent respiratory chain defects in humans and is usually caused by mutations in proteins required for assembly of the complex. Mutations in nuclear-encoded structural subunits are very rare. In a patient with Leigh-like syndrome presenting with leukodystrophy and severe epilepsy, we identified a homozygous splice site mutation in COX8A, which codes for the ubiquitously expressed isoform of subunit VIII, the smallest nuclear-encoded subunit of complex IV. The mutation, affecting the last nucleotide of intron 1, leads to aberrant splicing, a frame-shift in the highly conserved exon 2, and decreased amount of the COX8A transcript. The loss of the wild-type COX8A protein severely impairs the stability of the entire cytochrome c oxidase enzyme complex and manifests in isolated complex IV deficiency in skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, similar to the frequent c.845_846delCT mutation in the assembly factor SURF1 gene. Stability and activity of complex IV could be rescued in the patient's fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of wild-type COX8A. Our findings demonstrate that COX8A is indispensable for function of human complex IV and its mutation causes human disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Urotensin II inhibits skeletal muscle glucose transport signaling pathways via the NADPH oxidase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Wang

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated that the urotensin (UII and its receptor are up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of mice with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but the significance of UII in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of UII on NADPH oxidase and glucose transport signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of mice with T2DM and in C2C12 mouse myotube cells. KK/upj-AY/J mice (KK mice were divided into the following groups: KK group, with saline treatment for 2 weeks; KK+ urantide group, with daily 30 µg/kg body weight injections over the same time period of urantide, a potent urotensin II antagonist peptide; Non-diabetic C57BL/6J mice were used as normal controls. After urantide treatment, mice were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, in addition to measurements of the levels of ROS, NADPH oxidase and the phosphorylated AKT, PKC and ERK. C2C12 cells were incubated with serum-free DMEM for 24 hours before conducting the experiments, and then administrated with 100 nM UII for 2 hours or 24 hours. Urantide treatment improved glucose tolerance, decreased the translocation of the NADPH subunits p40-phox and p47-phox, and increased levels of the phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK. In contrast, UII treatment increased ROS production and p47-phox and p67-phox translocation, and decreased the phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and p38MAPK; Apocynin abrogated this effect. In conclusion, UII increased ROS production by NADPH oxidase, leading to the inhibition of signaling pathways involving glucose transport, such as AKT/PKC/ERK. Our data imply a role for UII at the molecular level in glucose homeostasis, and possibly in skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM.

  18. Molecular cloning of the human casein kinase II α subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, H.; Heller-Harrison, R.; Buxton, J.; Czech, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding the α subunit of casein kinase II and a partial cDNA encoding the rat homologue were isolated by using a Drosophila casein kinase II cDNA probe. The 2.2-kb human cDNA contains a 1.2-kb open reading frame, 150 nucleotides of 5' leader, and 850 nucleotides of 3' noncoding region. Except for the first 7 deduced amino acids that are missing in the rat cDNA, the 328 amino acids beginning with the amino terminus are identical between human and rat. The Drosophila enzyme sequence is 90% identical with the human casein kinase II sequence, and there is only a single amino acid difference between the published partial bovine sequence and the human sequence. In addition, the C-terminus of the human cDNA has an extra 53 amino acids not present in Drosophila. Northern analysis of rat and human RNA showed predominant bands of 5.5, 3.1, and 1.8 kb. In rat tissues, brain and spleen had the highest levels of casein kinase II α subunit specific RNA, while skeletal muscle showed the lowest. Southern analysis of human cultured cell and tissue genomic DNA using the full-length cDNA probe revealed two bands with restriction enzymes that have no recognition sites within the cDNA and three to six bands with enzymes having single internal sites. These results are consistent with the possibility that two genes encode the α subunits

  19. A putative novel nuclear-encoded subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex in trypanosomatids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslov, D. A.; Zíková, Alena; Kyselová, Iveta; Lukeš, Julius

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 125, 1-2 (2002), s. 113-125 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/00/1212 Grant - others:NIH(US) AI40634 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrion * kinetoplast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.911, year: 2002

  20. Molecular characterization of Taenia multiceps isolates from Gansu Province, China by sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen Hui; Jia, Wan Zhong; Qu, Zi Gang; Xie, Zhi Zhou; Luo, Jian Xun; Yin, Hong; Sun, Xiao Lin; Blaga, Radu; Fu, Bao Quan

    2013-04-01

    A total of 16 Taenia multiceps isolates collected from naturally infected sheep or goats in Gansu Province, China were characterized by sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene. The complete cox1 gene was amplified for individual T. multiceps isolates by PCR, ligated to pMD18T vector, and sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated that out of 16 T. multiceps isolates 10 unique cox1 gene sequences of 1,623 bp were obtained with sequence variation of 0.12-0.68%. The results showed that the cox1 gene sequences were highly conserved among the examined T. multiceps isolates. However, they were quite different from those of the other Taenia species. Phylogenetic analysis based on complete cox1 gene sequences revealed that T. multiceps isolates were composed of 3 genotypes and distinguished from the other Taenia species.

  1. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1-based human RNA quantification to enhance mRNA profiling in forensic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA analysis offers many potential applications in forensic science, and molecular identification of body fluids by analysis of cell-specific RNA markers represents a new technique for use in forensic cases. However, due to the nature of forensic materials that often admixed with nonhuman cellular components, human-specific RNA quantification is required for the forensic RNA assays. Quantification assay for human RNA has been developed in the present study with respect to body fluid samples in forensic biology. The quantitative assay is based on real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial RNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and capable of RNA quantification with high reproducibility and a wide dynamic range. The human RNA quantification improves the quality of mRNA profiling in the identification of body fluids of saliva and semen because the quantification assay can exclude the influence of nonhuman components and reduce the adverse affection from degraded RNA fragments.

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF PARAMECIUM BURSARIA SYNGENS THROUGH MOLECULAR MARKERS – COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE SUBUNIT I (COI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Zagata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations and proving the correlation between distributions and belonging to any of five syngens. Ten strains of Paramecium bursaria belonging to five different syngens and strain of Paramecium multimicronucleatum were investigated using molecular marker — mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI. According to results, obtained in this study, using phylogenetic methods like Neighbor Joining (NJ and Maximum Likelihood (ML, relationship between analyzing strains through their clustering in clusters and correlation between strains belonging to any syngen and syngen’s distribution was confirmed. Phylograms constructed using NJ and ML methods revealed strains’ grouping in five clusters. Results which were obtained revealed usefulness of COI as a biomarker, which is important in identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens. This reports to a great potential of COI as a molecular marker and obtaining dependable results through combination of molecular methods with classical ones.

  3. Ebselen and congeners inhibit NADPH oxidase 2-dependent superoxide generation by interrupting the binding of regulatory subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M E; Min, Jaeki; Ganesh, Thota; Diebold, Becky; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Zhu, Yerun; McCoy, James; Sun, Aiming; Snyder, James P; Fu, Haian; Du, Yuhong; Lewis, Iestyn; Lambeth, J David

    2012-06-22

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) are a primary source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function in normal physiology and, when overproduced, in pathophysiology. Recent studies using mice deficient in Nox2 identify this isoform as a novel target against Nox2-implicated inflammatory diseases. Nox2 activation depends on the binding of the proline-rich domain of its heterodimeric partner p22phox to p47phox. A high-throughput screen that monitored this interaction via fluorescence polarization identified ebselen and several of its analogs as inhibitors. Medicinal chemistry was performed to explore structure-activity relationships and to optimize potency. Ebselen and analogs potently inhibited Nox1 and Nox2 activity but were less effective against other isoforms. Ebselen also blocked translocation of p47phox to neutrophil membranes. Thus, ebselen and its analogs represent a class of compounds that inhibit ROS generation by interrupting the assembly of Nox2-activating regulatory subunits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Disparate phenotypic effects from the knockdown of various Trypanosoma brucei cytochrome c oxidase subunits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gnipová, Anna; Panicucci, Brian; Paris, Zdeněk; Verner, Zdeněk; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius; Zíková, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 2 (2012), s. 90-98 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960901; GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * RNA interference * Mitochondrion * Respiratory complexes * Cytochrome c oxidase Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112001065#

  5. Tissue- and Condition-Specific Isoforms of Mammalian Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunits: From Function to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Sinkler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidase (COX is the terminal enzyme of the electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from cytochrome c to oxygen. COX consists of 14 subunits, three and eleven encoded, respectively, by the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Tissue- and condition-specific isoforms have only been reported for COX but not for the other oxidative phosphorylation complexes, suggesting a fundamental requirement to fine-tune and regulate the essentially irreversible reaction catalyzed by COX. This article briefly discusses the assembly of COX in mammals and then reviews the functions of the six nuclear-encoded COX subunits that are expressed as isoforms in specialized tissues including those of the liver, heart and skeletal muscle, lung, and testes: COX IV-1, COX IV-2, NDUFA4, NDUFA4L2, COX VIaL, COX VIaH, COX VIb-1, COX VIb-2, COX VIIaH, COX VIIaL, COX VIIaR, COX VIIIH/L, and COX VIII-3. We propose a model in which the isoforms mediate the interconnected regulation of COX by (1 adjusting basal enzyme activity to mitochondrial capacity of a given tissue; (2 allosteric regulation to adjust energy production to need; (3 altering proton pumping efficiency under certain conditions, contributing to thermogenesis; (4 providing a platform for tissue-specific signaling; (5 stabilizing the COX dimer; and (6 modulating supercomplex formation.

  6. Downregulation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 7A1 expression is important in enhancing cell proliferation in adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Nawneet; Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Dubey, Ravi C.; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial Dysfunction has been implicated in multiple human diseases, including cancer. Among all cancer, lung cancer is the most common type of cancer worldwide with low survival rates. Mammals possess multiple subunits of the mitochondrial enzyme Cytochrome C oxidase (COX). The COX subunits are expressed in a tissue specific manner and have been implicated in cancer cell metabolism although their molecular and regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. In this study, we aimed at identifying novel gene signatures in lung cancer. We performed extensive analysis of seven different Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets pertaining to different stages of lung adenocarcinoma and identified that multiple subunits of COX genes are differentially expressed in these patients. Amongst all COX genes, the expression of COX7A1 gene was observed to be highly down regulated in these patients. In order to validate the GEO datasets, we looked at the expression of multiple COX genes using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Our results confirmed that COX 7A1 gene expression was indeed highly reduced in these cells. Overexpression of COX7A1 in human lung cancer cells led to inhibition of cell proliferation and increase in cell death via apoptosis. These results indicated that low level of COX7A1 gene expression is essential to regulate cell viability and inhibit cell death in lung adenocarcinoma. Our study has identified COX7A1 as a novel gene that might play a crucial role in the etiology of lung adenocarcinoma and can serve as a biomarker for lung cancer disease progression.

  7. Genetic diversity of Taenia asiatica from Thailand and other geographical locations as revealed by cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantaphruti, Malinee Thairungroj; Thaenkham, Urusa; Watthanakulpanich, Dorn; Phuphisut, Orawan; Maipanich, Wanna; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Pubampen, Somjit; Sanguankiat, Surapol

    2013-02-01

    Twelve 924 bp cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) mitochondrial DNA sequences from Taenia asiatica isolates from Thailand were aligned and compared with multiple sequence isolates from Thailand and 6 other countries from the GenBank database. The genetic divergence of T. asiatica was also compared with Taenia saginata database sequences from 6 different countries in Asia, including Thailand, and 3 countries from other continents. The results showed that there were minor genetic variations within T. asiatica species, while high intraspecies variation was found in T. saginata. There were only 2 haplotypes and 1 polymorphic site found in T. asiatica, but 8 haplotypes and 9 polymorphic sites in T. saginata. Haplotype diversity was very low, 0.067, in T. asiatica and high, 0.700, in T. saginata. The very low genetic diversity suggested that T. asiatica may be at a risk due to the loss of potential adaptive alleles, resulting in reduced viability and decreased responses to environmental changes, which may endanger the species.

  8. Utility of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis using PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Norose, Kazumi; Li, Kexin; Hikosaka, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa. Since this parasite causes severe clinical symptoms in immunocompromised patients, early diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is essential. PCR is currently used for early diagnosis, but there is no consensus regarding the most effective method for amplifying Toxoplasma DNA. In this study, we considered the utility of the cytochrome c subunit I (cox1) gene, which is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of this parasite, as a novel target of PCR for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. To do this, we compared its copy number per haploid nuclear genome and the detection sensitivity of cox1-PCR with the previously reported target genes B1 and 18S rRNA and the AF146527 repeat element. We found that the copy number of cox1 was high and that the PCR using cox1 primers was more efficient at amplifying Toxoplasma DNA than the other PCR targets examined. In addition, PCR using clinical samples indicated that the cox1 gene would be useful for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. These findings suggest that use of cox1-PCR would facilitate the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...

  10. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Loera-Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12% harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn’t been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  11. Effect of GLP-1 on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits in the kidney of type 1 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-jin LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist, on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits NOX4 and p22phox and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF in the kidney of streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic rats, and explore the protective effects and mechanisms of exenatide on the kidney of diabetic rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into control group (group A, n=7 and diabetic model group (n=23. Type 1 diabetic model was reproduced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. It was successful in 19 rats. Diabetic rats were randomly divided into diabetic control group (group B, n=10 and diabetic with treatment of exenatide group (group C, n=9. Rats in group C were injected subcutaneously with exenatide in dose of 5μg/kg twice daily. Rats in group A and B were given equivalent volume of normal saline by subcutaneous injection. All rats were sacrificed after eight weeks. The mRNA expression of renal p22phox and NOX4 were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. The protein expression of CTGF was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results The levels of blood glucose, lipids, creatinine, and urea nitrogen, the albumin excretion rate, kidney index, the mRNA expressions of renal NOX4 and p22phox, and the protein expression of renal CTGF were significantly increased in group B compared with that in group A (P0.05. Conclusion Exenatide can decrease the expressions of renal NOX4, p22phox and CTGF, decline the index of urinary protein, and alleviate the kidney hypertrophy in type 1 diabetic rats, implying that exenatide exerted a protective effect on the kidney.

  12. [Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene in sarcosaphagous flies from 14 provinces in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Cai, Jifeng; Wen, Jifang; Guo, Yadong

    2010-08-01

    To detect the 278 bp region of gene of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) in mitochondral DNA (mtDNA) of sarcosaphagous flies, identify the species of sarcosaphagous flies, and provide reference for forensic application. Samples were collected in Baotou and Chifeng of Inner Mongolia, Tianjin, Nanning, Fuzhou, Linyi of Shandong, Shijiazhuang, Yinchuan, Lanzhou, Huairou of Beijing, Xinxiang and Nanyang of Henan, Datong of Shanxi, Wuhu of Anhui, Quzhou of Zhejiang, Changsha, Zhuzhou and Yongzhou of Hunan. A total of 38 flies were randomly collected from rabbits, dogs and pigs which were set outdoors, then the flies' mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were extracted by the improved small insects DNA homogenate method. Amplification was conducted by Perkin-Elmer 9600 thermal cycler, then vertical non-denaturing 7% polyacrylamide gelectrophoresis. PCR products were purified using the nucleic acid purification kit. Sequences of both strands were obtained by direct sequence of the double-stranded PCR product using one of the PCR primers and the ABI PRISM big dye terminator cycle sequencing dit. Sequence reactions were electrophorsed on ABI Model 3730 DNA Sequencers. A UPGMA tree was contrasted using the maximum composite likelihood method in MEGA4. The 38 sarcosaphagous flies belonged to 3 families(Muscidae, Calliphoridae, and Sarcophagidae), 10 genuses (Musca Linnaeus, Hydrotaea Robineau-Desvoidy, Aldrichina Townsend, Hemipyrellia Townsend, Achoetandrus Bezzi, Protophormia Townsend, Chrysomya Robineau-Desvoidy, Lucilia Robineau-Desvoidy, Helicophagella Enderlein, and Boettcherisca Rohdendorf), and 12 species [Musca domestica (Linnaeus), Hydrotaea (Ophyra) capensis (Wiedemann), Lucilia caesar (Linnaeus), Lucilia illustris (Meigen), Aldrichina graham (Aldrich), Hemipyrellia ligurriens, Achoetandrus (Chrysomya) rufifacies (Macquary), Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), Lucilia sericata (Meigen), Helicophagella melanura (Meigen), and

  13. Effects of telmisartan on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits in the myocardium of type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-wei LI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of telmisartan on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits p22phox and NOX4 in the myocardiam of type 2 diabetic rats.Methods Thirty-six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: normal control group(group A,n=10,diabetic model group(n=26.Type 2 diabetic model was established by high-fat and high-sugar diet followed by intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of streptozotocin(STZ.After the model was reproduced successfully,20 diabetic rats were randomly divided into diabetic subgroup(group B,n=10 and telmisartan-treated subgroup(group C,n=10.Rats in group C were orally administered telmisartan(5mg/kg/d,and rats in group A and B were given equivalent volume of normal saline.All rats were sacrificed 12 weeks after treatment.The mRNA expressions of myocardial p22phox and NOX4 were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR,and the protein expressions of myocardial connective tissue growth factor(CTGF and copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase(Cu-Zn-SOD were detected by immunohistochemical staining.Results Compared with group A,the ratio of heart/body weight,the mRNA expression of myocardial p22phox and NOX4,and the protein expression of myocardial CTGF increased significantly in group B,and the protein expression of myocardial Cu-Zn-SOD decreased significantly(P 0.05.Conclusions Telmisartan can down-regulate the over-expression of myocardial NOX4 and p22phox mRNA in type 2 diabetic rats,lessen the myocardial damage induced by oxidative stress,thus plays a protective role in the myocardium of diabetic rats.

  14. EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats: role of NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Zahid Rasul; Silva, Grazielle C; Ribeiro, Thais Porto; León-González, Antonio J; Kassem, Mohamad; Mirajkar, Abdur; Alvi, Azhar; Abbas, Malak; Zgheel, Faraj; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Auger, Cyril

    2017-12-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid:docosahexaenoic acid (EPA:DHA) 6:1, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid formulation, has been shown to induce a sustained formation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase-derived NO, a major vasoprotective factor. This study examined whether chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents hypertension and endothelial dysfunction induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in rats. Male Wister rats received orally corn oil or EPA:DHA 6:1 (500 mg kg -1 per day) before chronic infusion of Ang II (0.4 mg kg -1 per day). Systolic blood pressure was determined by tail cuff sphingomanometry, vascular reactivity using a myograph, oxidative stress using dihydroethidium and protein expression by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Ang II-induced hypertension was associated with reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxations of secondary branch mesenteric artery rings affecting the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)- and the NO-mediated relaxations, both of which were improved by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS-2870. The Ang II treatment induced also endothelium-dependent contractile responses (EDCFs), which were abolished by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin. An increased level of vascular oxidative stress and expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p47 phox and p22 phox ), COX-1 and COX-2, endothelial NO synthase and Ang II type 1 receptors were observed in the Ang II group, whereas SK Ca and connexin 37 were downregulated. Intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction by improving both the NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations, and by reducing EDCFs and the expression of target proteins. The present findings indicate that chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats, most likely by preventing NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

  15. Neuron-specific specificity protein 4 bigenomically regulates the transcription of all mitochondria- and nucleus-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Dhar, Shilpa; Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-11-01

    Neurons are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism for their energy supply, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key energy-generating enzyme in the mitochondria. A unique feature of COX is that it is one of only four proteins in mammalian cells that are bigenomically regulated. Of its thirteen subunits, three are encoded in the mitochondrial genome and ten are nuclear-encoded on nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multisubunit, bigenomic enzyme poses a distinct challenge. In recent years, we found that nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) mediate such bigenomic coordination. The latest candidate is the specificity factor (Sp) family of proteins. In N2a cells, we found that Sp1 regulates all 13 COX subunits. However, we discovered recently that in primary neurons, it is Sp4 and not Sp1 that regulates some of the key glutamatergic receptor subunit genes. The question naturally arises as to the role of Sp4 in regulating COX in primary neurons. The present study utilized multiple approaches, including chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, knockdown and over-expression of Sp4, as well as functional assays to document that Sp4 indeed functionally regulate all 13 subunits of COX as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B. The present study discovered that among the specificity family of transcription factors, it is the less known neuron-specific Sp4 that regulates the expression of all 13 subunits of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) enzyme in primary neurons. Sp4 also regulates the three mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M) and a COX assembly protein SURF-1 in primary neurons. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. A CK2 site is reversibly phosphorylated in the photosystem II subunit CP29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testi, Maria Grazia; Croce, Roberta; Polverino-De Laureto, Patrizia; Bassi, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of protein function. In chloroplast thylakoids several photosystem II subunits, including the major antenna light-harvesting complex II and several core complex components, are reversibly phosphorylated depending on the redox state of

  17. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  18. A CK2 site is reversibly phosphorylated in the photosystem II subunit CP29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, M G; Croce, R; Polverino-De Laureto, P; Bassi, R

    1996-12-16

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of protein function. In chloroplast thylakoids several photosystem II subunits, including the major antenna light-harvesting complex II and several core complex components, are reversibly phosphorylated depending on the redox state of the electron carriers. A previously unknown reversible phosphorylation event has recently been described on the CP29 subunit which leads to conformational changes and protection from cold stress (Bergantino, E., Dainese, P., Cerovic, Z. Sechi, S. and Bassi, R. (1995) J. Biol Chem. 270, 8474-8481). In this study, we have identified the phosphorylation site on the N-terminal, stroma-exposed domain, showing that it is located in a sequence not homologous to the other members of the Lhc family. The phosphorylated sequence is unique in chloroplast membranes since it meets the requirements for CK2 (casein kinase II) kinases. The possibility that this phosphorylation is involved in a signal transduction pathway is discussed.

  19. Molecular Identification of Necrophagous Muscidae and Sarcophagidae Fly Species Collected in Korea by Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I Nucleotide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of insect species is an important task in forensic entomology. For more convenient species identification, the nucleotide sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene have been widely utilized. We analyzed full-length COI nucleotide sequences of 10 Muscidae and 6 Sarcophagidae fly species collected in Korea. After DNA extraction from collected flies, PCR amplification and automatic sequencing of the whole COI sequence were performed. Obtained sequences were analyzed for a phylogenetic tree and a distance matrix. Our data showed very low intraspecific sequence distances and species-level monophylies. However, sequence comparison with previously reported sequences revealed a few inconsistencies or paraphylies requiring further investigation. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report of COI nucleotide sequences from Hydrotaea occulta, Muscina angustifrons, Muscina pascuorum, Ophyra leucostoma, Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, Sarcophaga harpax, and Phaonia aureola.

  20. Age-related decline of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit expression in the auditory cortex of the mimetic aging rat model associated with the common deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yi; Hu, Yujuan; Peng, Wei; Sun, Yu; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Xueyan; Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Honglian; Kong, Weijia

    2012-12-01

    The age-related deterioration in the central auditory system is well known to impair the abilities of sound localization and speech perception. However, the mechanisms involved in the age-related central auditory deficiency remain unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions accumulated with age in the auditory system. Also, a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) deficiency has been proposed to be a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study was designed to explore the changes of CcO activity and to investigate the possible relationship between the mtDNA common deletion (CD) and CcO activity as well as the mRNA expression of CcO subunits in the auditory cortex of D-galactose (D-gal)-induced mimetic aging rats at different ages. Moreover, we explored whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were involved in the changes of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded CcO subunits in the auditory cortex during aging. Our data demonstrated that d-gal-induced mimetic aging rats exhibited an accelerated accumulation of the CD and a gradual decline in the CcO activity in the auditory cortex during the aging process. The reduction in the CcO activity was correlated with the level of CD load in the auditory cortex. The mRNA expression of CcO subunit III was reduced significantly with age in the d-gal-induced mimetic aging rats. In contrast, the decline in the mRNA expression of subunits I and IV was relatively minor. Additionally, significant increases in the mRNA and protein levels of PGC-1α, NRF-1 and TFAM were observed in the auditory cortex of D-gal-induced mimetic aging rats with aging. These findings suggested that the accelerated accumulation of the CD in the auditory cortex may induce a substantial decline in CcO subunit III and lead to a significant decline in the Cc

  1. Light induces translocation of NF-κB p65 to the mitochondria and suppresses expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III) in the rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Hiroshi, E-mail: htomita@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Soft-Path Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, 1-1 Seiryo, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574 (Japan); Tabata, Kitako, E-mail: ktabata@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Takahashi, Maki, E-mail: mqdelta@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Nishiyama, Fumiaki, E-mail: t2114018@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Sugano, Eriko, E-mail: sseriko@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Soft-Path Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) plays various roles in cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. In the rat retina, NF-κB activity increases after exposure to damaging light, resulting in degeneration of photoreceptors. Here, we report that in dark-adapted rats exposed for 6 h to bright white light, the p65 subunit of retinal NF-κB translocates to the mitochondria, an event associated with a decrease in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III). However, sustained exposure for 12 h depleted p65 from the mitochondria, and enhanced COX III expression. Treatment with the protective antioxidant PBN prior to light exposure prevents p65 depletion in the mitochondria and COX III upregulation during prolonged exposure, and apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that COX III expression is sensitive to the abundance of NF-κB p65 in the mitochondria, which, in turn, is affected by exposure to damaging light. - Highlights: • Damaging light exposure of the retina induces NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation. • NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation is associated with the decrease of COX III expression. • Prolonged light exposure depletes mitochondrial p65 resulting in the increase in COX III expression. • NF-κB p65 and COX III expression play an important role in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

  2. Light induces translocation of NF-κB p65 to the mitochondria and suppresses expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III) in the rat retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroshi; Tabata, Kitako; Takahashi, Maki; Nishiyama, Fumiaki; Sugano, Eriko

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) plays various roles in cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. In the rat retina, NF-κB activity increases after exposure to damaging light, resulting in degeneration of photoreceptors. Here, we report that in dark-adapted rats exposed for 6 h to bright white light, the p65 subunit of retinal NF-κB translocates to the mitochondria, an event associated with a decrease in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III). However, sustained exposure for 12 h depleted p65 from the mitochondria, and enhanced COX III expression. Treatment with the protective antioxidant PBN prior to light exposure prevents p65 depletion in the mitochondria and COX III upregulation during prolonged exposure, and apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that COX III expression is sensitive to the abundance of NF-κB p65 in the mitochondria, which, in turn, is affected by exposure to damaging light. - Highlights: • Damaging light exposure of the retina induces NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation. • NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation is associated with the decrease of COX III expression. • Prolonged light exposure depletes mitochondrial p65 resulting in the increase in COX III expression. • NF-κB p65 and COX III expression play an important role in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

  3. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Guadall, Anna; Orriols, Mar; Navas, Miquel; Aguiló, Silvia; de Diego, Alicia; Navarro, María A; García-Dorado, David; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) controls matrix remodeling, a key process that underlies cardiovascular diseases and heart failure; however, a lack of suitable animal models has limited our knowledge with regard to the contribution of LOX to cardiac dysfunction. Here, we assessed the impact of LOX overexpression on ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in a transgenic LOX (TgLOX) mouse model with a strong cardiac expression of human LOX. TgLOX mice exhibited high expression of the transgene in cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, which are associated with enhanced LOX activity and H 2 O 2 production and with cardiofibroblast reprogramming. LOX overexpression promoted an age-associated concentric remodeling of the left ventricle and impaired diastolic function. Furthermore, LOX transgenesis aggravated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, which triggered a greater fibrotic response that was characterized by stronger collagen deposition and cross-linking and high expression of fibrotic markers. In addition, LOX transgenesis increased the Ang II-induced myocardial inflammatory infiltrate, exacerbated expression of proinflammatory markers, and decreased that of cardioprotective factors. Mechanistically, LOX overexpression enhanced oxidative stress and potentiated the Ang II-mediated cardiac activation of p38 MAPK while reducing AMPK activation. Our findings suggest that LOX induces an age-dependent disturbance of diastolic function and aggravates Ang II-induced hypertrophy, which provides novel insights into the role of LOX in cardiac performance.-Galán, M., Varona, S., Guadall, A., Orriols, M., Navas, M., Aguiló, S., de Diego, A., Navarro, M. A., García-Dorado, D., Rodríguez-Sinovas, A., Martínez-González, J., Rodriguez, C. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy. © FASEB.

  4. Improving Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol production and tolerance via RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zilong; Jiang, Rongrong

    2017-01-01

    Classical strain engineering methods often have limitations in altering multigenetic cellular phenotypes. Here we try to improve Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol tolerance and productivity by reprogramming its transcription profile through rewiring its key transcription component RNA polymerase II (RNAP II), which plays a central role in synthesizing mRNAs. This is the first report on using directed evolution method to engineer RNAP II to alter S. cerevisiae strain phenotypes. Error-prone PCR was employed to engineer the subunit Rpb7 of RNAP II to improve yeast ethanol tolerance and production. Based on previous studies and the presumption that improved ethanol resistance would lead to enhanced ethanol production, we first isolated variant M1 with much improved resistance towards 8 and 10% ethanol. The ethanol titers of M1 was ~122 g/L (96.58% of the theoretical yield) under laboratory very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, 40% increase as compared to the control. DNA microarray assay showed that 369 genes had differential expression in M1 after 12 h VHG fermentation, which are involved in glycolysis, alcoholic fermentation, oxidative stress response, etc. This is the first study to demonstrate the possibility of engineering eukaryotic RNAP to alter global transcription profile and improve strain phenotypes. Targeting subunit Rpb7 of RNAP II was able to bring differential expression in hundreds of genes in S. cerevisiae , which finally led to improvement in yeast ethanol tolerance and production.

  5. Interaction mode between catalytic and regulatory subunits in glucosidase II involved in ER glycoprotein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tadashi; Toshimori, Takayasu; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kato, Koichi

    2016-11-01

    The glycoside hydrolase family 31 (GH31) α-glucosidases play vital roles in catabolic and regulated degradation, including the α-subunit of glucosidase II (GIIα), which catalyzes trimming of the terminal glucose residues of N-glycan in glycoprotein processing coupled with quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Among the known GH31 enzymes, only GIIα functions with its binding partner, regulatory β-subunit (GIIβ), which harbors a lectin domain for substrate recognition. Although the structural data have been reported for GIIα and the GIIβ lectin domain, the interaction mode between GIIα and GIIβ remains unknown. Here, we determined the structure of a complex formed between GIIα and the GIIα-binding domain of GIIβ, thereby providing a structural basis underlying the functional extension of this unique GH31 enzyme. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  6. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene reveals the unique evolution of the giant panda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yao-Dong; Pang, Hui-Zhong; Li, De-Sheng; Ling, Shan-Shan; Lan, Dan; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Yun; Li, Di-Yan; Wei, Rong-Ping; Zhang, He-Min; Wang, Cheng-Dong

    2016-11-05

    As the rate-limiting enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays a crucial role in biological metabolism. "Living fossil" giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is well-known for its special bamboo diet. In an effort to explore functional variation of COX1 in the energy metabolism behind giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet, we looked at genetic variation of COX1 gene in giant panda, and tested for its selection effect. In 1545 base pairs of the gene from 15 samples, 9 positions were variable and 1 mutation leaded to an amino acid sequence change. COX1 gene produces six haplotypes, nucleotide (pi), haplotype diversity (Hd). In addition, the average number of nucleotide differences (k) is 0.001629±0.001036, 0.8083±0.0694 and 2.517, respectively. Also, dN/dS ratio is significantly below 1. These results indicated that giant panda had a low population genetic diversity, and an obvious purifying selection of the COX1 gene which reduces synthesis of ATP determines giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet. Phylogenetic trees based on the COX1 gene were constructed to demonstrate that giant panda is the sister group of other Ursidae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of NoxD/Pro41 as the homologue of the p22phox NADPH oxidase subunit in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Isabelle; Lalucque, Hervé; Siegmund, Ulrike; Silar, Philippe; Brun, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) are membrane complexes that produce O2(-). Researches in mammals, plants and fungi highlight the involvement of Nox-generated ROS in cell proliferation, differentiation and defense. In mammals, the core enzyme gp91(phox)/Nox2 is associated with p22(phox) forming the flavocytochrome b558 ready for activation by a cytosolic complex. Intriguingly, no homologue of the p22(phox) gene has been found in fungal genomes, questioning how the flavoenzyme forms. Using whole genome sequencing combined with phylogenetic analysis and structural studies, we identify the fungal p22(phox) homologue as being mutated in the Podospora anserina mutant IDC(509). Functional studies show that the fungal p22(phox), PaNoxD, acts along PaNox1, but not PaNox2, a second fungal gp91(phox) homologue. Finally, cytological analysis of functional tagged versions of PaNox1, PaNoxD and PaNoxR shows clear co-localization of PaNoxD and PaNox1 and unravel a dynamic assembly of the complex in the endoplasmic reticulum and in the vacuolar system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of Cu(II)-reconstituted ACC Oxidase using experimental and theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkali-Tahéri, Nadia; Tachon, Sybille; Orio, Maylis; Bertaina, Sylvain; Martinho, Marlène; Robert, Viviane; Réglier, Marius; Tron, Thierry; Dorlet, Pierre; Simaan, A Jalila

    2017-06-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACCO) is a non heme iron(II) containing enzyme that catalyzes the final step of the ethylene biosynthesis in plants. The iron(II) ion is bound in a facial triad composed of two histidines and one aspartate (H177, D179 and H234). Several active site variants were generated to provide alternate binding motifs and the enzymes were reconstituted with copper(II). Continuous wave (cw) and pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed and models for the copper(II) binding sites were deduced. In all investigated enzymes, the copper ion is equatorially coordinated by the two histidine residues (H177 and H234) and probably two water molecules. The copper-containing enzymes are inactive, even when hydrogen peroxide is used in peroxide shunt approach. EPR experiments and DFT calculations were undertaken to investigate substrate's (ACC) binding on the copper ion and the results were used to rationalize the lack of copper-mediated activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Catalytic aspects of a copper(II) complex: biological oxidase to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BISWAJIT CHOWDHURY

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... made with a Jasco model V-730 UV-Vis spectrophotometer. ..... Ligand-induced coordination changes ... Fet3 protein from yeast, a multinuclear copper oxidase ... of mutants of the multicopper oxidase Fet3p Biochem-.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zeugodacus tau (Insecta: Tephritidae) and differentiation of Z. tau species complex by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Song, Sze-Looi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2017-01-01

    The tephritid fruit fly Zeugodacus tau (Walker) is a polyphagous fruit pest of economic importance in Asia. Studies based on genetic markers indicate that it forms a species complex. We report here (1) the complete mitogenome of Z. tau from Malaysia and comparison with that of China as well as the mitogenome of other congeners, and (2) the relationship of Z. tau taxa from different geographical regions based on sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. The complete mitogenome of Z. tau had a total length of 15631 bp for the Malaysian specimen (ZT3) and 15835 bp for the China specimen (ZT1), with similar gene order comprising 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes-PCGs, 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes) and a non-coding A + T-rich control region (D-loop). Based on 13 PCGs and 15 mt-genes, Z. tau NC_027290 (China) and Z. tau ZT1 (China) formed a sister group in the lineage containing also Z. tau ZT3 (Malaysia). Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of cox1 gene indicates that the taxa from China, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, and Z. tau sp. A from Thailand belong to Z. tau sensu stricto. A complete cox1 gene (or 13 PCGs or 15 mt-genes) instead of partial sequence is more appropriate for determining phylogenetic relationship.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zeugodacus tau (Insecta: Tephritidae and differentiation of Z. tau species complex by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Sen Yong

    Full Text Available The tephritid fruit fly Zeugodacus tau (Walker is a polyphagous fruit pest of economic importance in Asia. Studies based on genetic markers indicate that it forms a species complex. We report here (1 the complete mitogenome of Z. tau from Malaysia and comparison with that of China as well as the mitogenome of other congeners, and (2 the relationship of Z. tau taxa from different geographical regions based on sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. The complete mitogenome of Z. tau had a total length of 15631 bp for the Malaysian specimen (ZT3 and 15835 bp for the China specimen (ZT1, with similar gene order comprising 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes-PCGs, 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes and a non-coding A + T-rich control region (D-loop. Based on 13 PCGs and 15 mt-genes, Z. tau NC_027290 (China and Z. tau ZT1 (China formed a sister group in the lineage containing also Z. tau ZT3 (Malaysia. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of cox1 gene indicates that the taxa from China, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, and Z. tau sp. A from Thailand belong to Z. tau sensu stricto. A complete cox1 gene (or 13 PCGs or 15 mt-genes instead of partial sequence is more appropriate for determining phylogenetic relationship.

  12. The Characteristics of Cytochrome C Oxidase Gene Subunit I in Wild Silkmoth Cricula trifenestrata Helfer and Its Evaluation for Species Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to assess the characteristics of partial gene of cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI of wild silkmoth Cricula trifenestrata, and to detect the diagnostic sites from these gene for evaluation as species marker. A total of fifteen larvae of C. tifenestrata were collected from Bogor, Purwakarta, and Bantul Regencies. Genomic DNA was extracted from silk gland of individual larvae, then amplified by PCR method and sequenced. DNA sequencing was done to characterize their nucleotide and amino acid contents. The results showed that 595 nucleotides at the 5 ‘end of COI gene of C. tifenestrata was conserved at the species level, but varies at the family level. Nucleotide dominated by thymine and adenine bases (± 70%. There were 25 diagnostic sites for C. tifenestrata, and four diagnostic sites for genus level. One hundred eigthty nine (189 amino acids were alignment, and only one percent of the genes was varied among species. The 107th amino acid (valine and 138th (threonine were diagnostics amino acid for C. tifenestrata. Based on nucleotides and amino acids sequences, the phylogeny showed that C. tifenestrata lied on the same nodes with Antheraea, so the Saturniidae family is monophyletic.

  13. Genetic structure of the snakehead murrel, Channa striata (channidae) based on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene: Influence of historical and geomorphological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsari, Amirul Firdaus Jamaluddin; Jamaluddin, Jamsari Amirul Firdaus; Pau, Tan Min; Siti-Azizah, Mohd Nor

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of a partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene were used to assess the manner in which historical processes and geomorphological effects may have influenced genetic structuring and phylogeographic patterns in Channa striata. Assaying was based on individuals from twelve populations in four river systems, which were separated into two regions, the eastern and western, of the biodiversely rich state of Perak in central Peninsular Malaysia. In 238 specimens, a total of 368-bp sequences with ten polymorphic sites and eleven unique haplotypes were detected. Data on all the twelve populations revealed incomplete divergence due to past historical coalescence and the short period of separation. Nevertheless, SAMOVA and F(ST) revealed geographical structuring existed to a certain extent in both regions. For the eastern region, the data also showed that the upstream populations were genetically significantly different compared to the mid- and downstream ones. It is inferred that physical barriers and historical processes played a dominant role in structuring the genetic dispersal of the species. A further inference is that the Grik, Tanjung Rambutan and Sungkai are potential candidates for conservation and aquaculture programmes since they contained most of the total diversity in this area.

  14. Genetic structure of the snakehead murrel, Channa striata (channidae based on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene: influence of historical and geomorphological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamsari Amirul Firdaus Jamaluddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide sequences of a partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene were used to assess the manner in which historical processes and geomorphological effects may have influenced genetic structuring and phylogeographic patterns in Channa striata. Assaying was based on individuals from twelve populations in four river systems, which were separated into two regions, the eastern and western, of the biodiversely rich state of Perak in central Peninsular Malaysia. In 238 specimens, a total of 368-bp sequences with ten polymorphic sites and eleven unique haplotypes were detected. Data on all the twelve populations revealed incomplete divergence due to past historical coalescence and the short period of separation. Nevertheless, SAMOVA and F ST revealed geographical structuring existed to a certain extent in both regions. For the eastern region, the data also showed that the upstream populations were genetically significantly different compared to the mid- and downstream ones. It is inferred that physical barriers and historical processes played a dominant role in structuring the genetic dispersal of the species. A further inference is that the Grik, Tanjung Rambutan and Sungkai are potential candidates for conservation and aquaculture programmes since they contained most of the total diversity in this area.

  15. Genetic characterization of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox 1) gene of the zoonotic parasitic nematode, Ancylostoma ceylanicum from humans, dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Chua, Kek Heng; Traub, Rebecca; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2013-10-01

    Ancylostoma ceylanicum is the only zoonotic hookworm species that is able to produce patent infections in humans with the majority of cases reported in South East Asia. Over the past few years, there have been an increasing number of studies investigating the prevalence of this parasitic zoonosis using molecular diagnostic tools and a single genetic locus as marker for species identification. As there can be limitations in using a single genetic locus for epidemiological studies and genetic discrimination, the complementary use of a more variable locus will provide additional evidence to support the zoonotic exchange of hookworm species between humans and animals. In the present study, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) sequence of A. ceylanicum from positive human and animal fecal samples were determined and compared with published reference sequences. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that isolates of A. ceylanicum were divided into two clusters, one consisting 3 human isolates and the other comprising 19 isolates of human and animal origin from different geographical locations within Malaysia. The two groups of A. ceylanicum could be distinguished from one another through five fixed nucleotide differences at locations 891, 966, 1008, 1077 and 1083. The detection of genetically distinct groups and considerable level of genetic variation within the cox 1 sequence of A. ceylanicum might suggest potential haplotype-linked differences in zoonotic, epidemiological and pathobiological characteristics, a hypothesis that still needs further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. NADP+ binding to the regulatory subunit of methionine adenosyltransferase II increases intersubunit binding affinity in the hetero-trimer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz González

    Full Text Available Mammalian methionine adenosyltransferase II (MAT II is the only hetero-oligomer in this family of enzymes that synthesize S-adenosylmethionine using methionine and ATP as substrates. Binding of regulatory β subunits and catalytic α2 dimers is known to increase the affinity for methionine, although scarce additional information about this interaction is available. This work reports the use of recombinant α2 and β subunits to produce oligomers showing kinetic parameters comparable to MAT II purified from several tissues. According to isothermal titration calorimetry data and densitometric scanning of the stained hetero-oligomer bands on denatured gels, the composition of these oligomers is that of a hetero-trimer with α2 dimers associated to single β subunits. Additionally, the regulatory subunit is able to bind NADP(+ with a 1:1 stoichiometry, the cofactor enhancing β to α2-dimer binding affinity. Mutants lacking residues involved in NADP(+ binding and N-terminal truncations of the β subunit were able to oligomerize with α2-dimers, although the kinetic properties appeared altered. These data together suggest a role for both parts of the sequence in the regulatory role exerted by the β subunit on catalysis. Moreover, preparation of a structural model for the hetero-oligomer, using the available crystal data, allowed prediction of the regions involved in β to α2-dimer interaction. Finally, the implications that the presence of different N-terminals in the β subunit could have on MAT II behavior are discussed in light of the recent identification of several splicing forms of this subunit in hepatoma cells.

  17. Oxidative Ce"3"+ sequestration by fungal manganese oxides with an associated Mn(II) oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Haisu; Tani, Yukinori; Naitou, Hirotaka; Miyata, Naoyuki; Tojo, Fuyumi

    2016-01-01

    Sequestration of Ce"3"+ by biogenic manganese oxides (BMOs) formed by a Mn(II)-oxidizing fungus, Acremonium strictum strain KR21-2, was examined at pH 6.0. In anaerobic Ce"3"+ solution, newly formed BMOs exhibited stoichiometric Ce"3"+ oxidation, where the molar ratio of Ce"3"+ sequestered (Ce_s_e_q) relative to Mn"2"+ released (Mn_r_e_l) was maintained at approximately two throughout the reaction. A similar Ce"3"+ sequestration trend was observed in anaerobic treatment of BMOs in which the associated Mn(II) oxidase was completely inactivated by heating at 85 °C for 1 h or by adding 50 mM NaN_3. Aerobic Ce"3"+ treatment of newly formed BMO (enzymatically active) resulted in excessive Ce"3"+ sequestration over Mn"2"+ release, yielding Ce_s_e_q/Mn_r_e_l > 200, whereas heated or poisoned BMOs released a significant amount of Mn"2"+ with lower Ce"3"+ sequestration efficiency. Consequently, self-regeneration by the Mn(II) oxidase in newly formed BMO effectively suppressed Mn"2"+ release and enhanced oxidative Ce"3"+ sequestration under aerobic conditions. Repeated treatments of heated or poisoned BMOs under aerobic conditions confirmed that oxidative Ce"3"+ sequestration continued even after most Mn oxide was released from the solid phase, indicating auto-catalytic Ce"3"+ oxidation at the solid phase produced through primary Ce"3"+ oxidation by BMO. From X-ray diffraction analysis, the resultant solid phases formed through Ce"3"+ oxidation by BMO under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions consisted of cerianite with crystal sizes of 5.00–7.23 Å. Such nano-sized CeO_2 (CeO_2_,_B_M_O) showed faster auto-catalytic Ce"3"+ oxidation than that on well-crystalized cerianite under aerobic conditions, where the normalized pseudo-first order rate constants for auto-catalytic Ce"3"+ oxidation on CeO_2_,_B_M_O was two orders of magnitude higher. Consequently, we concluded that Ce"3"+ contact with BMOs sequesters Ce"3"+ through two oxidation paths: primary Ce"3

  18. Isolation and characterization of human cDNA clones encoding the α and the α' subunits of casein kinase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozeman, F.J.; Litchfield, D.W.; Piening, C.; Takio, Koji; Walsh, K.A.; Krebs, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    Casein kinase II is a widely distributed protein serine/threonine kinase. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer, containing two α or α' subunits (or one of each) and two β subunits. Complementary DNA clones encoding the subunits of casein kinase II were isolated from a human T-cell λgt 10 library using cDNA clones isolated from Drosophila melanogasten. One of the human cDNA clones (hT4.1) was 2.2 kb long, including a coding region of 1176 bp preceded by 156 bp (5' untranslated region) and followed by 871 bp (3' untranslated region). The hT4.1 close was nearly identical in size and sequence with a cDNA clone from HepG2 human hepatoma cultured cells. Another of the human T-cell cDNA clones (hT9.1) was 1.8 kb long, containing a coding region of 1053 bp preceded by 171 by (5' untranslated region) and followed by 550 bp (3' untranslated region). Amino acid sequences deduced from these two cDNA clones were about 85% identical. Most of the difference between the two encoded polypeptides was in the carboxy-terminal region, but heterogeneity was distributed throughout the molecules. Partial amino acid sequence was determined in a mixture of α and α' subunits from bovine lung casein kinase II. The bovine sequences aligned with the 2 human cDNA-encoded polypeptides with only 2 discrepancies out of 535 amino acid positions. This confirmed that the two human T-cell cDNA clones encoded the α and α' subunits of casein kinase II. These studies show that there are two distinct catalytic subunits for casein II (α and α') and that the sequence of these subunits is largely conserved between the bovine and the human

  19. The efficacy of a nested PCR in detecting cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene of Sarcoptes scabiei var. Hominis for diagnosing scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, J E; Kim, C W; Kim, S S

    2018-04-06

    A widespread scabies infestation, associated to long-term residence in nursing homes, is becoming a serious issue in developed countries. Mineral oil examination is regarded as the gold standard in diagnosing scabies, but the sensitivity of this method is generally low-approximately 50%. Molecular tests may contribute to enhance the sensitivity of current tests for laboratory diagnosis of human scabies. In this study, we developed new primers for a nested PCR for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis to increase the sensitivity of a previously developed conventional PCR. Clinically suspected scabies patients underwent dermoscopy-guided skin scraping with microscopic examination. The diagnosis was positive for scabies when mites or eggs were found under the microscope, and patients were then designated as 'microscopy-positive'. Patients in the 'microscopy-negative' group presented with negative microscopic results. Skin scrapings were collected from both groups for PCR. Of the total 63 samples, 28 were microscopy-positive and 35 were negative with no differences in sex and age between the two groups. All microscopically proven scabies cases were positive with the cox1 nested PCR. Among microscopy-negative ones, S. scabiei DNA was detected in 9 samples. If sensitivity of the cox1 nested PCR is considered 100% (95% CI, 90.51-100), then sensitivity of microscopy is 75.68% (95% CI, 58.80-88.23; P = 0.004). Nested PCR can be successfully used as an alternative method for diagnosing suspected scabies patient. Therefore, infection control measures and treatments can be initiated before significant transmission occurs, minimizing the risk of outbreaks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Forensically Important Calliphoridae and Sarcophagidae Species Collected in Korea Using SNaPshot Multiplex System Targeting the Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of postmortem interval (PMI is paramount in modern forensic investigation. After the disappearance of the early postmortem phenomena conventionally used to estimate PMI, entomologic evidence provides important indicators for PMI estimation. The age of the oldest fly larvae or pupae can be estimated to pinpoint the time of oviposition, which is considered the minimum PMI (PMImin. The development rate of insects is usually temperature dependent and species specific. Therefore, species identification is mandatory for PMImin estimation using entomological evidence. The classical morphological identification method cannot be applied when specimens are damaged or have not yet matured. To overcome this limitation, some investigators employ molecular identification using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI nucleotide sequences. The molecular identification method commonly uses Sanger’s nucleotide sequencing and molecular phylogeny, which are complex and time consuming and constitute another obstacle for forensic investigators. In this study, instead of using conventional Sanger’s nucleotide sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the COI gene region, which are unique between fly species, were selected and targeted for single-base extension (SBE technology. These SNPs were genotyped using a SNaPshot® kit. Eleven Calliphoridae and seven Sarcophagidae species were covered. To validate this genotyping, fly DNA samples (103 adults, 84 larvae, and 4 pupae previously confirmed by DNA barcoding were used. This method worked quickly with minimal DNA, providing a potential alternative to conventional DNA barcoding. Consisting of only a few simple electropherogram peaks, the results were more straightforward compared with those of the conventional DNA barcoding produced by Sanger’s nucleotide sequencing.

  1. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics.

  2. Analyzing proteasomal subunit expression reveals Rpt4 as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is the key to improving survival rates and as such a need exists to identify patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in oncogenesis and cancer cell survival, and proteasome inhibitors are in clinical use for a number of malignancies including multiple myeloma. In our study, we examined the protein expression of several key components of the UPS in colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry to determine expression levels of ubiquitinylated proteins and the proteasomal subunits, 20S core and Rpt4 in a cohort of 228 patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that neither the intensity of either ubiquitinylated proteins or the 20S core was predictive in either Stage II or III colon cancer for disease free survival or overall survival. In contrast, in Stage II patients increased Rpt4 staining was significantly associated with disease free survival (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.605; p = 0.0217). Our data suggest that Rpt4 is an independent prognostic variable for Stage II colorectal cancer and may aid in the decision of which patients undergo adjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Multichromophoric hybrid species made of perylene bisimide derivatives and Ru(ii) and Os(ii) polypyridine subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Francesco; La Ganga, Giuseppina; Campagna, Sebastiano; Syrgiannis, Zois; Rigodanza, Francesco; Vitale, Stefania; Licciardello, Antonino; Prato, Maurizio

    2017-05-31

    Herein, the synthesis and the photophysical and redox properties of a new perylene bisimide (PBI) species (L), bearing two 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) ligands at the two imide positions of the PBI, and its dinuclear Ru(ii) and Os(ii) complexes, [(bpy) 2 Ru(μ-L)Ru(bpy) 2 ](PF 6 ) 4 (Ru2; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [(Me 2 -bpy) 2 Os(μ-L)Os(Me 2 -bpy) 2 ](PF 6 ) 4 (Os2; Me 2 -bpy = (4,4'-dimethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine), are reported. The absorption spectra of the compounds are dominated by the structured bands of the PBI subunit due to the lowest-energy spin-allowed π-π* transition. The spin-allowed MLCT transitions in Ru2 and Os2 are inferred by the absorption at 350-470 nm, where the PBI absorption is negligible. The absorption band extends towards the red region for Os2 due to the spin-forbidden MLCT transitions, intensified by the heavy osmium center. The reduction processes of the compounds are dominated by two successive mono-electronic PBI-based processes, which in the metal complexes are slightly shifted compared to the free ligand. On oxidation, both metal complexes undergo an apparent bi-electronic process (at 1.31 V vs. SCE for Ru2 and 0.77 V for Os2), attributed to the simultaneous one-electron oxidation of the two weakly-interacting metal centers. In Ru2 and Os2, the intense fluorescence of L subunit (λ max , 535 nm; τ, 4.3 ns; Φ, 0.91) is fully quenched, mainly by photoinduced electron transfer from the metal centers, on the ps timescale (time constant, 11 ps in Ru2 and 3 ps in Os2). Such photoinduced electron transfer leads to the formation of a charge-separated state, which directly decays to the ground state in about 70 ps in Os2, but produces the triplet π-π* state of the PBI subunit in 35 ps in Ru2. The results provide information on the excited-state processes of the hybrid species combining two dominant classes of chromophore/luminophore species, the PBI and the metal polypyridine complexes, and can be used for future design on new hybrid

  4. The role of cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells: association with migration, invasion and prediction of distant metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Kuo, Kuang-Tai; Chou, Teh-Ying; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wang, Chih-Hao; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Liang-Shun

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide, but useful biomarkers of lung cancer are still insufficient. The aim of this study is to identify some membrane-bound protein(s) associated with migration and invasion in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We classified four NSCLC cell lines into high and low migration/invasion groups by Transwell and Matrigel assays. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we identified 10 membrane-associated proteins being significantly overexpressed in the high migration/invasion group. The expression of the target protein in the four NSCLC cell lines was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunostaining. RNA interference technique was applied to observe the influence of the target protein on migration and invasion. Gelatin zymography was also performed to evaluate the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Expression condition of the target protein on surgical specimens was further examined by immunohistochemical staining and the clinicopathologic data were analyzed. We identified a mitochondria-bound protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va (COX Va) because of its abundant presence found exclusively in tumorous areas. We also demonstrated that migration and invasion of NSCLC cells decreased substantially after knocking down COX Va by siRNA. Meanwhile, we found a positive correlation between COX Va expression, Bcl-2 expression and activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical staining of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas in 250 consecutive patients revealed that strong COX Va expression was found in 54.8% (137/250) of patients and correlated positively with the status of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.032). Furthermore, strong COX Va expression was associated with the presence of distant metastasis (P = 0

  5. Characterization of the regulatory subunit from brain cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Tryptic peptides derived from the regulatory subunits of brain and heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase II were mapped by reverse phase HPLC. At 280 nm, 15 unique peptides were found only in the heart RII digest, while 5 other peptides were obtained only from brain RII. At 210 nm, 13 brain-RII specific and 15 heart-RII specific tryptic peptides were identified and resolved. Two-dimensional mapping analyses revealed that several 37 P-labeled tryptic fragments derived from the autophosphorylation and the photoaffinity labeled cAMP-binding sites of brain RII were separate and distinct from the 32 P-peptides isolated from similarly treated heart RII. The tryptic phosphopeptide containing the autophosphorylation site in brain RII was purified. The sequence and phosphorylation site is: Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Val-Cys-Ala-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Asn-Pro-Asp-Glu-Glu-Glu-Asp-Asp-Ala-Glu. Astrocytes and neurons exhibit high levels of the brain RII enzyme, while oligodendrocytes contain the heart RII enzyme. Monoclonal antibodies to bovine cerebral cortex RII were made and characterized. The antibodies elucidated a subtle difference between membrane-associated and cytosolic RII from cerebral cortex

  6. Subunit Organization of a Synechocystis Hetero-Oligomeric Thylakoid FtsH Complex Involved in Photosystem II Repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boehm, M.; Yu, J.; Krynická, Vendula; Barker, M.; Tichý, Martin; Komenda, Josef; Nixon, P. J.; Nield, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2012), s. 3669-3683 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA ČR GBP501/12/G055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : photosystem II * FtsH metalloproteases * subunit Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.251, year: 2012

  7. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs. PMID:23818588

  8. Cloning and identification of the gene coding for the 140-kd subunit of Drosophila RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Daniela M.; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Falkenburg, Dieter; Gasch, Alexander; Bialojan, Siegfried; Young, Richard A.; Bautz, Ekkehard K. F.

    1986-01-01

    Genomic clones of Drosophila melanogaster were isolated from a λ library by cross-hybridization with the yeast gene coding for the 150-kd subunit of RNA polymerase II. Clones containing a region of ∼2.0 kb with strong homology to the yeast gene were shown to code for a 3.9-kb poly(A)+-RNA. Part of the coding region was cloned into an expression vector. A fusion protein was obtained which reacted with an antibody directed against RNA polymerase II of Drosophila. Peptide mapping of the fusion p...

  9. NADPH oxidase 1 deficiency alters caveolin phosphorylation and angiotensin II-receptor localization in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Olivier; Deffert, Christine; Foti, Michelangelo; Bedard, Karen; Jaquet, Vincent; Ogier-Denis, Eric; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2009-10-01

    The superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase NOX1 is thought to be involved in signaling by the angiotensin II-receptor AT1R. However, underlying signaling steps are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AngII on aortic smooth muscle from wild-type and NOX1-deficient mice. NOX1-deficient cells showed decreased basal ROS generation and did not produce ROS in response to AngII. Unexpectedly, AngII-dependent Ca(2+) signaling was markedly decreased in NOX1-deficient cells. Immunostaining demonstrated that AT1R was localized on the plasma membrane in wild-type, but intracellularly in NOX1-deficient cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting showed a decreased expression of AT1R in the aorta of NOX1-deficient mice. To investigate the basis of the abnormal AT1R targeting, we studied caveolin expression and phosphorylation. The amounts of total caveolin and of caveolae were not different in NOX1-deficient mice, but a marked decrease occurred in the phosphorylated form of caveolin. Exogenous H(2)O(2) or transfection of a NOX1 plasmid restored AngII responses in NOX1-deficient cells. Based on these findings, we propose that NOX1-derived reactive oxygen species regulate cell-surface expression of AT1R through mechanisms including caveolin phosphorylation. The lack cell-surface AT1R expression in smooth muscle could be involved in the decreased blood pressure in NOX1-deficient mice.

  10. Endothelial microparticle formation by angiotensin II is mediated via Ang II receptor type I/NADPH oxidase/ Rho kinase pathways targeted to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dylan; Montezano, Augusto C; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; He, Ying; Carter, Anthony; Touyz, Rhian M

    2011-08-01

    Circulating microparticles are increased in cardiovascular disease and may themselves promote oxidative stress and inflammation. Molecular mechanisms underlying their formation and signaling are unclear. We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Rho kinase, and lipid rafts in microparticle formation and examined their functional significance in endothelial cells (ECs). Microparticle formation from angiotensin II (Ang II)-stimulated ECs and apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice was assessed by annexin V or by CD144 staining and electron microscopy. Ang II promoted microparticle formation and increased EC O(2)(-) generation and Rho kinase activity. Ang II-stimulated effects were inhibited by irbesartan (Ang II receptor type I blocker) and fasudil (Rho kinase inhibitor). Methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin, which disrupt lipid rafts/caveolae, blocked microparticle release. Functional responses, assessed in microparticle-stimulated ECs, revealed increased O(2)(-) production, enhanced vascular cell adhesion molecule/platelet-EC adhesion molecule expression, and augmented macrophage adhesion. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor blocked the prooxidative and proinflammatory effects of microparticles. In vitro observations were confirmed in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice, which displayed vascular inflammation and high levels of circulating endothelial microparticles, effects that were reduced by apocynin. We demonstrated direct actions of Ang II on endothelial microparticle release, mediated through NADPH oxidase, ROS, and Rho kinase targeted to lipid rafts. Microparticles themselves stimulated endothelial ROS formation and inflammatory responses. Our findings suggest a feedforward system whereby Ang II promotes EC injury through its own endothelial-derived microparticles.

  11. Cholera toxin B subunit labeling in lamina II of spinal cord dorsal horn following chronic inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing Ping; Tian, Li

    2002-07-26

    We have investigated the effect of inflammation on the labeling pattern of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, an A-fiber marker, by an intra-sciatic nerve injection of the tracer. Following chronic inflammation in one hind paw in rats, there was substantial CTB labeling in lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn, which is normally absent. However, there was no change in the labeling pattern of wheat germ agglutinin or fluoride resistant acid phosphatase/thiamine monophosphatase, two C-fiber markers. The CTB labeling in lamina II after peripheral nerve injury has been interpreted as central sprouting of A-fibers or uptake of the tracer by injured C-fibers. Our results suggest that chronic inflammation and nerve injury may share some common mechanisms in generating allodynia and hyperalgesia.

  12. Safety and immunogenicity of three different formulations of an adjuvanted varicella-zoster virus subunit candidate vaccine in older adults: a phase II, randomized, controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chlibek, Roman; Smetana, Jan; Pauksens, Karlis; Rombo, Lars; van den Hoek, J. Anneke R.; Richardus, Jan H.; Plassmann, Georg; Schwarz, Tino F.; Ledent, Edouard; Heineman, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the safety and immunogenicity of different formulations and schedules of a candidate subunit herpes zoster vaccine containing varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E (gE) with or without the adjuvant system AS01B. In this phase II, single-blind, randomized, controlled study,

  13. CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE OF DEOXYGENATED LIMULUS-POLYPHEMUS SUBUNIT-II HEMOCYANIN AT 2.18-ANGSTROM RESOLUTION - CLUES FOR A MECHANISM FOR ALLOSTERIC REGULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAZES, B; MAGNUS, KA; BONAVENTURA, C; BONAVENTURA, J; DAUTER, Z; KALK, KH; HOL, WGJ

    The crystal structure of Limulus polyphemus subunit type II hemocyanin in the deoxygenated state has been determined to a resolution of 2.18 angstrom. Phase information for this first structure of a cheliceratan hemocyanin was obtained by molecular replacement using the crustacean hemocyanin

  14. The terminal oxidases of Paracoccus denitrificans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gier, J.-W.; Lübben, M; Reijnders, W N; Tipker, C A; Slotboom, D.J.; van Spanning, R J; Stouthamer, A.H.; van der Oost, J.

    Three distinct types of terminal oxidases participate in the aerobic respiratory pathways of Paracoccus denitrificans. Two alternative genes encoding subunit I of the aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase have been isolated before, namely ctaDI and ctaDII. Each of these genes can be expressed separately to

  15. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced.

  16. Molecular identification of sibling species of Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae that parasitize buprestid and cerambycid beetles by using partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and 28S ribosomal RNA gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiang

    Full Text Available The species belonging to Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae are currently the most important insect natural enemies of wood borer pests, mainly buprestid and cerambycid beetles, in China. However, some sibling species of this genus are very difficult to distinguish because of their similar morphological features. To address this issue, we conducted phylogenetic and genetic analyses of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI and 28S RNA gene sequences from eight species of Sclerodermus reared from different wood borer pests. The eight sibling species were as follows: S. guani Xiao et Wu, S. sichuanensis Xiao, S. pupariae Yang et Yao, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1-5. A 594-bp fragment of COI and 750-bp fragment of 28S were subsequently sequenced. For COI, the G-C content was found to be low in all the species, averaging to about 30.0%. Sequence divergences (Kimura-2-parameter distances between congeneric species averaged to 4.5%, and intraspecific divergences averaged to about 0.09%. Further, the maximum sequence divergences between congeneric species and Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5 averaged to about 16.5%. All 136 samples analyzed were included in six reciprocally monophyletic clades in the COI neighbor-joining (NJ tree. The NJ tree inferred from the 28S rRNA sequence yielded almost identical results, but the samples from S. guani, S. sichuanensis, S. pupariae, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1-4 clustered together and only Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5 clustered separately. Our findings indicate that the standard barcode region of COI can be efficiently used to distinguish morphologically similar Sclerodermus species. Further, we speculate that Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5 might be a new species of Sclerodermus.

  17. Chemical labeling studies on isolated and vesicular bovine heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venzke, K.S.; Reynolds, K.A.; Prochaska, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase dispersed in Triton X-100, Tween 80, or dodecyl maltoside was reacted with the water-soluble reagents [ 35 S]-diazonium benzene sulfonate (DABS) (10-100 μM) or [ 125 I]-iodo-DABS (34-55 nM) to map the surface topography of the enzyme in different protein aggregation states. Both reagents gave similar labeling profiles of the enzyme under all conditions. Subunits II, III, and VII were extensively labeled by DABS, while subunits I and VI were unreactive with DABS in each detergent. Subunit V exhibited an increase in DABS labeling when the enzyme was reacted in Tween 80 as compared to the enzyme in Triton X-100 or dodecyl maltoside. Also, components b and c showed an increase in DABS reactivity when the enzyme was modified in dodecyl maltoside. In general, the labeling profile of the enzyme in dodecyl maltoside resembled that of the enzyme in Triton X-100, emphasizing that the mechanism of dispersal of the enzyme by both detergents is similar. Cytochrome c oxidase incorporated into phosphatidylglycerol:phosphatidylcholine(1:20)(w:w) phospholipid vesicles (COV) by cholate dialysis was reacted with DABS and subunits II and III were significantly labeled. Approximately 65-70% of the enzyme in COV was oriented with the cytochrome c binding domain facing the extravesicular medium, as determined by comparison of the DABS labeling in subunit IV in detergent-lysed and intact COV

  18. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-06-03

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV).

  19. Design and synthesis of a tetradentate '3-amine-1-carboxylate' ligand to mimic the metal binding environment at the non-heme iron(II) oxidase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Victoria J; Ortin, Yannick; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Rutledge, Peter J

    2010-04-07

    Non-heme iron(II) oxidases (NHIOs) catalyse a diverse array of oxidative chemistry in Nature. As part of ongoing efforts to realize biomimetic, iron-mediated C-H activation, we report the synthesis of a new 'three-amine-one-carboxylate' ligand designed to complex with iron(II) and mimic the NHIO active site. The tetradentate ligand has been prepared as a single enantiomer in nine synthetic steps from N-Cbz-L-alanine, pyridine-2,6-dimethanol and diphenylamine, using Seebach oxazolidinone chemistry to control the stereochemistry. X-Ray crystal structures are reported for two important intermediates, along with variable temperature NMR experiments to probe the hindered interconversion of conformational isomers of several key intermediates, 2,6-disubstituted pyridine derivatives. The target ligand and an N-Cbz-protected precursor were each then complexed with iron(II) and tested for their ability to promote alkene dihydroxylation, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant.

  20. Interactions between the photosystem II subunit PsbS and xanthophylls studied in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonente, Giulia; Howes, Barry D; Caffarri, Stefano; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bassi, Roberto

    2008-03-28

    The photosystem II subunit PsbS is essential for excess energy dissipation (qE); however, both lutein and zeaxanthin are needed for its full activation. Based on previous work, two models can be proposed in which PsbS is either 1) the gene product where the quenching activity is located or 2) a proton-sensing trigger that activates the quencher molecules. The first hypothesis requires xanthophyll binding to two PsbS-binding sites, each activated by the protonation of a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding lumen-exposed glutamic acid residue. To assess the existence and properties of these xanthophyll-binding sites, PsbS point mutants on each of the two Glu residues PsbS E122Q and PsbS E226Q were crossed with the npq1/npq4 and lut2/npq4 mutants lacking zeaxanthin and lutein, respectively. Double mutants E122Q/npq1 and E226Q/npq1 had no qE, whereas E122Q/lut2 and E226Q/lut2 showed a strong qE reduction with respect to both lut2 and single glutamate mutants. These findings exclude a specific interaction between lutein or zeaxanthin and a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding site and suggest that the dependence of nonphotochemical quenching on xanthophyll composition is not due to pigment binding to PsbS. To verify, in vitro, the capacity of xanthophylls to bind PsbS, we have produced recombinant PsbS refolded with purified pigments and shown that Raman signals, previously attributed to PsbS-zeaxanthin interactions, are in fact due to xanthophyll aggregation. We conclude that the xanthophyll dependence of qE is not due to PsbS but to other pigment-binding proteins, probably of the Lhcb type.

  1. Interactions between the Photosystem II Subunit PsbS and Xanthophylls Studied in Vivo and in Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonente, Giulia; Howes, Barry D.; Caffarri, Stefano; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bassi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The photosystem II subunit PsbS is essential for excess energy dissipation (qE); however, both lutein and zeaxanthin are needed for its full activation. Based on previous work, two models can be proposed in which PsbS is either 1) the gene product where the quenching activity is located or 2) a proton-sensing trigger that activates the quencher molecules. The first hypothesis requires xanthophyll binding to two PsbS-binding sites, each activated by the protonation of a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding lumen-exposed glutamic acid residue. To assess the existence and properties of these xanthophyll-binding sites, PsbS point mutants on each of the two Glu residues PsbS E122Q and PsbS E226Q were crossed with the npq1/npq4 and lut2/npq4 mutants lacking zeaxanthin and lutein, respectively. Double mutants E122Q/npq1 and E226Q/npq1 had no qE, whereas E122Q/lut2 and E226Q/lut2 showed a strong qE reduction with respect to both lut2 and single glutamate mutants. These findings exclude a specific interaction between lutein or zeaxanthin and a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding site and suggest that the dependence of nonphotochemical quenching on xanthophyll composition is not due to pigment binding to PsbS. To verify, in vitro, the capacity of xanthophylls to bind PsbS, we have produced recombinant PsbS refolded with purified pigments and shown that Raman signals, previously attributed to PsbS-zeaxanthin interactions, are in fact due to xanthophyll aggregation. We conclude that the xanthophyll dependence of qE is not due to PsbS but to other pigment-binding proteins, probably of the Lhcb type. PMID:18070876

  2. Roles for common MLL/COMPASS subunits and the 19S proteasome in regulating CIITA pIV and MHC class II gene expression and promoter methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koues, Olivia I; Mehta, Ninad T; Truax, Agnieszka D; Dudley, R Kyle; Brooks, Jeanne K; Greer, Susanna F

    2010-02-04

    Studies indicate that the 19S proteasome contributes to chromatin reorganization, independent of the role the proteasome plays in protein degradation. We have previously shown that components of the 19S proteasome are crucial for regulating inducible histone activation events in mammalian cells. The 19S ATPase Sug1 binds to histone-remodeling enzymes, and in the absence of Sug1, a subset of activating epigenetic modifications including histone H3 acetylation, H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and H3 arginine 17 dimethylation are inhibited at cytokine-inducible major histocompatibilty complex (MHC)-II and class II transactivator (CIITA) promoters, implicating Sug1 in events required to initiate mammalian transcription. Our previous studies indicate that H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at cytokine-inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters is dependent on proteolytic-independent functions of 19S ATPases. In this report, we show that multiple common subunits of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)/complex of proteins associated with Set I (COMPASS) complexes bind to the inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters; that overexpressing a single common MLL/COMPASS subunit significantly enhances promoter activity and MHC-II HLA-DRA expression; and that these common subunits are important for H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at MHC-II and CIITA promoters. In addition, we show that H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, which is inversely correlated with H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, is significantly elevated in the presence of diminished 19S ATPase Sug1. Taken together, these experiments suggest that the 19S proteasome plays a crucial role in the initial reorganization of events enabling the relaxation of the repressive chromatin structure surrounding inducible promoters.

  3. Roles for common MLL/COMPASS subunits and the 19S proteasome in regulating CIITA pIV and MHC class II gene expression and promoter methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koues Olivia I

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that the 19S proteasome contributes to chromatin reorganization, independent of the role the proteasome plays in protein degradation. We have previously shown that components of the 19S proteasome are crucial for regulating inducible histone activation events in mammalian cells. The 19S ATPase Sug1 binds to histone-remodeling enzymes, and in the absence of Sug1, a subset of activating epigenetic modifications including histone H3 acetylation, H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and H3 arginine 17 dimethylation are inhibited at cytokine-inducible major histocompatibilty complex (MHC-II and class II transactivator (CIITA promoters, implicating Sug1 in events required to initiate mammalian transcription. Results Our previous studies indicate that H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at cytokine-inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters is dependent on proteolytic-independent functions of 19S ATPases. In this report, we show that multiple common subunits of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL/complex of proteins associated with Set I (COMPASS complexes bind to the inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters; that overexpressing a single common MLL/COMPASS subunit significantly enhances promoter activity and MHC-II HLA-DRA expression; and that these common subunits are important for H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at MHC-II and CIITA promoters. In addition, we show that H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, which is inversely correlated with H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, is significantly elevated in the presence of diminished 19S ATPase Sug1. Conclusion Taken together, these experiments suggest that the 19S proteasome plays a crucial role in the initial reorganization of events enabling the relaxation of the repressive chromatin structure surrounding inducible promoters.

  4. Spectroscopy of Cu(II)-PcoC and the multicopper oxidase function of PcoA, two essential components of Escherichia coli pco copper resistance operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, David L; Huyett, Jennifer; Outten, F Wayne; Doan, Peter E; Finney, Lydia A; Hoffman, Brian M; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2002-08-06

    The plasmid-encoded pco copper resistance operon in Escherichia coli consists of seven genes that are expressed from two pco promoters in response to elevated copper; however, little is known about how they mediate resistance to excess environmental copper. Two of the genes encode the soluble periplasmic proteins PcoA and PcoC. We show here that inactivation of PcoC, and PcoA to a lesser extent, causes cells to become more sensitive to copper than wild-type nonresistant strains, consistent with a tightly coupled detoxification pathway. Periplasmic extracts show copper-inducible oxidase activity, attributed to the multicopper oxidase function of PcoA. PcoC, a much smaller protein than PcoA, binds one Cu(II) and exhibits a weak electronic transition characteristic of a type II copper center. ENDOR and ESEEM spectroscopy of Cu(II)-PcoC and the (15)N- and Met-CD(3)-labeled samples are consistent with a tetragonal ligand environment of three nitrogens and one aqua ligand "in the plane". A weakly associated S-Met and aqua are likely axial ligands. At least one N is a histidine and is likely trans to the in-plane aqua ligand. The copper chemistry of PcoC and the oxidase function of PcoA are consistent with the emerging picture of the chromosomally encoded copper homeostasis apparatus in the E. coli cell envelope [Outten, F. W., Huffman, D. L., Hale, J. A., and O'Halloran, T. V. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 30670-30677]. We propose a model for the plasmid system in which Cu(I)-PcoC functions in this copper efflux pathway as a periplasmic copper binding protein that docks with the multiple repeats of Met-rich domains in PcoA to effect oxidation of Cu(I) to the less toxic Cu(II) form. The solvent accessibility of the Cu(II) in PcoC may allow for metal transfer to other plasmid and chromosomal factors and thus facilitate removal of Cu(II) from the cell envelope.

  5. Stimulation of casein kinase II by epidermal growth factor: Relationship between the physiological activity of the kinase and the phosphorylation state of its beta subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, P.; Osheroff, N.; Glover, C.V.C.

    1990-01-01

    To determine relationships between the hormonal activation of casein kinase II and its phosphorylation state, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated and EGF-naive human A-431 carcinoma cells were cultured in the presence of [ 32 P]orthophosphate. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that casein kinase II in the cytosol of EGF-treated cells contained approximately 3-fold more incorporated [ 32 P]phosphate than did its counterpart in untreated cells. Levels of kinase phosphorylation paralleled levels of kinase activity over a wide range of EGF concentrations as well as over a time course of hormone action. Approximately 97% of the incorporated [ 32 P]phosphate was found in the β subunit of casein kinase II. Both activated and hormone-naive kinase contained radioactive phosphoserine and phosphothreonine but no phosphotyronsine. On the basis of proteolytic mapping experiments, EGF treatment of A-431 cells led to an increase in the average [ 32 P]phosphate content (i.e., hyperphosphorylation) of casein kinase II β subunit peptides which were modified prior to hormone treatment. Finally, the effect of alkaline phosphatase on the reaction kinetics of activated casein kinase II indicated that hormonal stimulation of the kinase resulted from the increase in its phosphorylation state

  6. MspI and PvuII polymorphisms in the Na,K-ATPase. beta. subunit gene ATP1B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, M.M.; Pugh, D.G.; Lane, L.K.; Lingrel, J.B. (Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (USA))

    1990-02-25

    ATP1B HH1.2 is a 1.2 kb HindIII fragment from the 3{prime} portion of the human Na,K-ATPase {beta} subunit gene, ATP1B1. MspI identifies a two allele polymorphism (M1: 6.7 kb, M2: 5.3 kb). PvuII also detects a two-allele polymorphism (P1: 5.1 kb, P2: 4.7 kb). ATP1B1 has been assigned to chromosome 1q by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Codominant segregation of the MspI RFLP was observed in one two-generation family (5 individuals). Codominant segregation of the PvuII RFLP was observed in a two-generation (8 individuals) and a three-generation (12 individuals) family.

  7. Resolving the role of plant glutamate dehydrogenase: II. Physiological characterization of plants overexpressing the two enzyme subunits individually or simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Bedu, Magali; Dargel-Grafin, Céline; Dubois, Frédéric; Gibon, Yves; Restivo, Francesco M; Hirel, Bertrand

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is able to carry out the deamination of glutamate in higher plants. In order to obtain a better understanding of the physiological function of GDH in leaves, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants were constructed that overexpress two genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (GDHA and GDHB under the control of the Cauliflower mosiac virus 35S promoter), which encode the α- and β-subunits of GDH individually or simultaneously. In the transgenic plants, the GDH protein accumulated in the mitochondria of mesophyll cells and in the mitochondria of the phloem companion cells (CCs), where the native enzyme is normally expressed. Such a shift in the cellular location of the GDH enzyme induced major changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolite accumulation and a reduction in growth. These changes were mainly characterized by a decrease in the amount of sucrose, starch and glutamine in the leaves, which was accompanied by an increase in the amount of nitrate and Chl. In addition, there was an increase in the content of asparagine and a decrease in proline. Such changes may explain the lower plant biomass determined in the GDH-overexpressing lines. Overexpressing the two genes GDHA and GDHB individually or simultaneously induced a differential accumulation of glutamate and glutamine and a modification of the glutamate to glutamine ratio. The impact of the metabolic changes occurring in the different types of GDH-overexpressing plants is discussed in relation to the possible physiological function of each subunit when present in the form of homohexamers or heterohexamers.

  8. Alteration of structure and function of ATP synthase and cytochrome c oxidase by lack of F-o-a and Cox3 subunits caused by mitochondrial DNA 9205delTA mutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Kaplanová, Vilma; Nůsková, Hana; Kovářová, Nikola; Ješina, Pavel; Drahota, Zdeněk; Mráček, Tomáš; Seneca, S.; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 466, č. 3 (2015), s. 601-611 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0970; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1363 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP synthase * cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial diseases * mtDNA MT-ATP6 mutation * oxidative phosphorylation * threshold effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2015

  9. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 Regulate Mediator and RNA Polymerase II Recruitment to CBF-Responsive Cold-Regulated Genes[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Hurst, Charlotte H.; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R.; De Cothi, Elizabeth A.; Steele, John F.; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation–induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature–induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  10. The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from the Glaucocystophyta: functional constraint and short-branch exclusion in deep eukaryotic phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiller John W

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary analyses of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB1 have yielded important and at times provocative results. One particularly troublesome outcome is the consistent inference of independent origins of red algae and green plants, at odds with the more widely accepted view of a monophyletic Plantae comprising all eukaryotes with primary plastids. If the hypothesis of a broader kingdom Plantae is correct, then RPB1 trees likely reflect a persistent phylogenetic artifact. To gain a better understanding of RNAP II evolution, and the presumed artifact relating to green plants and red algae, we isolated and analyzed RPB1 from representatives of Glaucocystophyta, the third eukaryotic group with primary plastids. Results Phylogenetic analyses incorporating glaucocystophytes do not recover a monophyletic Plantae; rather they result in additional conflicts with the most widely held views on eukaryotic relationships. In particular, glaucocystophytes are recovered as sister to several amoebozoans with strong support. A detailed investigation shows that this clade can be explained by what we call "short-branch exclusion," a phylogenetic artifact integrally associated with "long-branch attraction." Other systematic discrepancies observed in RPB1 trees can be explained as phylogenetic artifacts; however, these apparent artifacts also appear in regions of the tree that support widely held views of eukaryotic evolution. In fact, most of the RPB1 tree is consistent with artifacts of rate variation among sequences and co-variation due to functional constraints related to C-terminal domain based RNAP II transcription. Conclusion Our results reveal how subtle and easily overlooked biases can dominate the overall results of molecular phylogenetic analyses of ancient eukaryotic relationships. Sources of potential phylogenetic artifact should be investigated routinely, not just when obvious "long-branch attraction" is encountered.

  11. Model studies of the Cu(B) site of cytochrome c oxidase utilizing a Zn(II) complex containing an imidazole-phenol cross-linked ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Russell P; Pratt, Derek A; Jeffers, Jerry; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2006-07-21

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the enzyme complex responsible for the four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O, contains an unusual histidine-tyrosine cross-link in its bimetallic heme a3-CuB active site. We have synthesised an unhindered, tripodal chelating ligand, BPAIP, containing the unusual ortho-imidazole-phenol linkage, which mimics the coordination environment of the CuB center. The ligand was used to investigate the physicochemical (pKa, oxidation potential) and coordination properties of the imidazole-phenol linkage when bound to a dication. Zn(II) coordination lowers the pKa of the phenol by 0.6 log units, and increases the potential of the phenolate/phenoxyl radical couple by approximately 50 mV. These results are consistent with inductive withdrawal of electron density from the phenolic ring. Spectroscopic data and theoretical calculations (DFT) were used to establish that the cationic complex [Zn(BPAIP)Br]+ has an axially distorted trigonal bipyramidal structure, with three coordinating nitrogen ligands (two pyridine and one imidazole) occupying the equatorial plane and the bromide and the tertiary amine nitrogen of the tripod in the axial positions. Interestingly, the Zn-Namine bonding interaction is weak or absent in [Zn(BPAIP)Br]+ and the complex gains stability in basic solutions, as indicated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. These observations are supported by theoretical calculations (DFT), which suggest that the electron-donating capacity of the equatorial imidazole ligand can be varied by modulation of the protonation and/or redox state of the cross-linked phenol. Deprotonation of the phenol makes the equatorial imidazole a stronger sigma-donor, resulting in an increased Zn-Nimd interaction and thereby leading to distortion of the axial ligand axis toward a more tetrahedral geometry.

  12. Isolated cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in G93A SOD1 mice overexpressing CCS protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Marjatta; Leary, Scot C; Romain, Nadine; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R; Haller, Ronald G; Elliott, Jeffrey L

    2008-05-02

    G93A SOD1 transgenic mice overexpressing CCS protein develop an accelerated disease course that is associated with enhanced mitochondrial pathology and increased mitochondrial localization of mutant SOD1. Because these results suggest an effect of mutant SOD1 on mitochondrial function, we assessed the enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in the spinal cords of CCS/G93A SOD1 and control mice. CCS/G93A SOD1 mouse spinal cord demonstrates a 55% loss of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) activity compared with spinal cord from age-matched non-transgenic or G93A SOD1 mice. In contrast, CCS/G93A SOD1 spinal cord shows no reduction in the activities of complex I, II, or III. Blue native gel analysis further demonstrates a marked reduction in the levels of complex IV but not of complex I, II, III, or V in spinal cords of CCS/G93A SOD1 mice compared with non-transgenic, G93A SOD1, or CCS/WT SOD1 controls. With SDS-PAGE analysis, spinal cords from CCS/G93A SOD1 mice showed significant decreases in the levels of two structural subunits of cytochrome c oxidase, COX1 and COX5b, relative to controls. In contrast, CCS/G93A SOD1 mouse spinal cord showed no reduction in levels of selected subunits from complexes I, II, III, or V. Heme A analyses of spinal cord further support the existence of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in CCS/G93A SOD1 mice. Collectively, these results establish that CCS/G93A SOD1 mice manifest an isolated complex IV deficiency which may underlie a substantial part of mutant SOD1-induced mitochondrial cytopathy.

  13. RNA Polymerase II Second Largest Subunit Molecular Identification of Boletus griseipurpureus Corner From Thailand and Antibacterial Activity of Basidiocarp Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung-Aud-Chariya, Amornrat; Bangrak, Phuwadol; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Phupong, Worrapong; Aggangan, Nelly Siababa; Kamlangdee, Niyom

    2015-03-01

    Boletus griseipurpureus Corner, an edible mushroom, is a putative ectomycorrhizal fungus. Currently, the taxonomic boundary of this mushroom is unclear and its bitter taste makes it interesting for evaluating its antibacterial properties. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic variation of this mushroom and also to evaluate any antibacterial activities. Basidiocarps were collected from 2 north-eastern provinces, Roi Et and Ubon Ratchathani, and from 2 southern provinces, Songkhla and Surat Thani, in Thailand. Genomic DNA was extracted and molecular structure was examined using the RNA polymerase II (RPB2) analysis. Antibacterial activities of basidiocarp extracts were conducted with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29523 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 189 using the agar-well diffusion method. All the samples collected for this study constituted a monophyletic clade, which was closely related with the Boletus group of polypore fungi. For the antibacterial study, it was found that the crude methanol extract of basidiomes inhibited the growth of all bacteria in vitro more than the crude ethyl acetate extract. Basidomes collected from four locations in Thailand had low genetic variation and their extracts inhibited the growth of all tested bacteria. The health benefits of this edible species should be evaluated further.

  14. MspI and PvuII polymorphisms in the Na,K-ATPase. alpha. subunit related gene ATP1AL1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, M.M.; Pugh, D.G.; Lingrel, J.B. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1990-01-11

    ATP1AL1 78-1-3 is a 0.56 kb genomic EcoRI-XbaI fragment from within the Na,K-ATPase {alpha} subunit related gene, previously referred to as {alpha}D on chromosome 13. The fragment was subcloned into pIBI31. MspI identifies a two-allele polymorphism (M1: 2.8 kb, M2: 2.5 kb). PvuII, which cuts within the probe sequence, detects two two-allele polymorphism (A1: 6.0 kb, A2: 5.7 kb, B1: 1.3 kb, B2: 1.1 kb). A1 and A2 appear to result from an insertion/deletion polymorphism that is also identified by MspI. ATP1AL1 78-1-3 has been assigned to chromosome 13q by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Codominant segregation of the RELPs was observed in 2 two-generation families.

  15. THE PRESENCE OF A B SUBUNIT INCREASES SENSITIVITY OF SODIUM CHANNEL NAV1.3, BUT NOT NAV1.2, TO TYPE II PYRETHROIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) are a primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. VSSCs are comprised of a pore-forming ¿ and auxillary ß subunits, and multiple isoforms of both subunit types exist. The sensitivity of different isoform combinations to pyrethroids has not...

  16. Characterization of the cytochrome c oxidase in isolated and purified plasma membranes from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschek, G.A.; Wastyn, M.; Trnka, M.; Molitor, V.; Fry, I.V.; Packer, L.

    1989-01-01

    Functionally intact plasma membranes were isolated from the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Anacystis nidulans through French pressure cell extrusion of lysozyme/EDTA-treated cells, separated from thylakoid membranes by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and purified by repeated recentrifugation. Origin and identity of the chlorophyll-free plasma membrane fraction were confirmed by labeling of intact cells with impermeant protein markers, [ 35 S]diazobenzenesulfonate and fluorescamine, prior to membrane isolation. Rates of oxidation of reduced horse heart cytochrome c by purified plasma and thylakoid membranes were 90 and 2 nmol min -1 (mg of protein) -1 , respectively. The cytochrome oxidase in isolated plasma membranes was identified as a copper-containing aa 3 -type enzyme from the properties of its redox-active and EDTA-resistant Cu 2+ ESR signal, the characteristic inhibition profile, reduced minus oxidized difference spectra, carbon monoxide difference spectra, photoaction and photodissociation spectra of the CO-inhibited enzyme, and immunological cross-reaction of two subunits of the enzyme with antibodies against subunits I and II, and the holoenzyme, of Paracoccus denitrificans aa 3 -type cytochrome oxidase. The data presented are the first comprehensive evidence for the occurrence of aa 3 -type cytochrome oxidase in the plasma membrane of a cyanobacterium similar to the corresponding mitochondrial enzyme

  17. Protein-protein interactions within photosystem II under photoprotection: the synergy between CP29 minor antenna, subunit S (PsbS) and zeaxanthin at all-atom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, Vangelis

    2018-05-07

    The assembly and disassembly of protein complexes within cells are crucial life-sustaining processes. In photosystem II (PSII) of higher plants, there is a delicate yet obscure balance between light harvesting and photo-protection under fluctuating light conditions, that involves protein-protein complexes. Recent breakthroughs in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are combined with new approaches herein to provide structural and energetic insight into such a complex between the CP29 minor antenna and the PSII subunit S (PsbS). The microscopic model involves extensive sampling of bound and dissociated states at atomic resolution in the presence of photo-protective zeaxanthin (Zea), and reveals well defined protein-protein cross-sections. The complex is placed within PSII, and macroscopic connections are emerging (PsbS-CP29-CP24-CP47) along the energy transfer pathways from the antenna to the PSII core. These connections explain macroscopic observations in the literature, while the previously obscured atomic scale details are now revealed. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the Non-Photochemical Quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, the down-regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, that enables the protection of PSII against excess excitation load. Zea is found at the PsbS-CP29 cross-section and a pH-dependent equilibrium between PsbS dimer/monomers and the PsbS-CP29 dissociation/association is identified as the target for engineering tolerant plants with increased crop and biomass yields. Finally, the new MD based approaches can be used to probe protein-protein interactions in general, and the PSII structure provided can initiate large scale molecular simulations of the photosynthetic apparatus, under NPQ conditions.

  18. Assessment of cytochrome C oxidase dysfunction in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Rice

    Full Text Available Perturbations in metabolism are a well-documented but complex facet of schizophrenia pathology. Optimal cellular performance requires the proper functioning of the electron transport chain, which is constituted by four enzymes located within the inner membrane of mitochondria. These enzymes create a proton gradient that is used to power the enzyme ATP synthase, producing ATP, which is crucial for the maintenance of cellular functioning. Anomalies in a single enzyme of the electron transport chain are sufficient to cause disruption of cellular metabolism. The last of these complexes is the cytochrome c oxidase (COX enzyme, which is composed of thirteen different subunits. COX is a major site for oxidative phosphorylation, and anomalies in this enzyme are one of the most frequent causes of mitochondrial pathology. The objective of the present report was to assess if metabolic anomalies linked to COX dysfunction may contribute to substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA pathology in schizophrenia. We tested COX activity in postmortem SN/VTA from schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls. We also tested the protein expression of key subunits for the assembly and activity of the enzyme, and the effect of antipsychotic medication on subunit expression. COX activity was not significantly different between schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls. However, we found significant decreases in the expression of subunits II and IV-I of COX in schizophrenia. Interestingly, these decreases were observed in samples containing the entire rostro-caudal extent of the SN/VTA, while no significant differences were observed for samples containing only mid-caudal regions of the SN/VTA. Finally, rats chronically treated with antipsychotic drugs did not show significant changes in COX subunit expression. These findings suggest that COX subunit expression may be compromised in specific sub-regions of the SN/VTA (i.e. rostral regions, which may lead to a faulty

  19. Discovery, characterization, and kinetic analysis of an alditol oxidase from streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; van Hellemond, Erik W.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2007-01-01

    A gene encoding an alditol oxidase was found in the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). This newly identified oxidase, AldO, was expressed at extremely high levels in Escherichia coli when fused to maltose-binding protein. AldO is a soluble monomeric flavoprotein with subunits of 45.1 kDa, each

  20. Qian Yang Yu Yin Granule-containing serum inhibits angiotensin II-induced proliferation, reactive oxygen species production, and inflammation in human mesangial cells via an NADPH oxidase 4-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kang; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Weimin; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Hongping; Fang, Zhuyuan

    2015-03-25

    Qian Yang Yu Yin Granule (QYYYG), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been indicated for renal damage in hypertension for decades in China, but little remains known regarding its underlying molecular mechanism. Therefore, we performed the current study in order to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of QYYYG in the treatment of hypertensive renal damage. We hypothesize that QYYYG relieves hypertensive renal injury through an angiotensin II (Ang II)-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAPDH)-oxidase (NOX)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathway. In this study, we investigated the effects of QYYYG-containing serum (QYGS) in human mesangial cells (HMCs) against Ang II-induced cell proliferation, ROS production, and inflammation through the seropharmacological method. We found that QYGS could inhibit cell proliferation in Ang II-treated HMCs. In addition, QYGS considerably suppressed production of ROS, decreased mRNA and protein expression of NAPDH-oxidase 4 (NOX4), p22 (phox) , and activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (GTP-Rac1); as well as counteracted the up-regulation of inflammatory markers including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, and interleukin 6 (IL-6). These effects were further confirmed in HMCs transfected with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NOX4. Taken together, these results suggest that a NOX4-dependent pathway plays an important role in regulating the inhibitory effect of QYGS. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of QYYYG and their role in the treatment of hypertensive nephropathy.

  1. Primary structure of the α-subunit of Na+, K+-ATPase. II. Isolation, reverse transcription, and cloning of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Broude, N.E.; Arsenyan, S.G.; Grishin, A.V.; Dzhandzhugazyan, K.N.; Modyanov, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The messenger RNA coding the α-subunit of Na + ,K + -ATPase has been isolated from the outer medullary layer of porcine kidneys. The mRNA gives a specific hybridization band in the 25S-26S region with three oligonucleotide probes synthesized on the basis of information on the structure of three peptides isolated from a tryptic hydrolyzate of the α-subunit of Na + ,K + -ATPase. The translation of the mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by immunochemical identification of the products of synthesis confirmed the presence of the mRNA of the α-subunit of Na + ,K + -ATPase in an enriched fraction of poly(A + )-RNA. This preparation has been used for the synthesis of cloning of double-stranded cDNA

  2. Primary structure of the. cap alpha. -subunit of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. II. Isolation, reverse transcription, and cloning of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Broude, N.E.; Arsenyan, S.G.; Grishin, A.V.; Dzhandzhugazyan, K.N.; Modyanov, N.N.

    1986-10-01

    The messenger RNA coding the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/,K/sup +/-ATPase has been isolated from the outer medullary layer of porcine kidneys. The mRNA gives a specific hybridization band in the 25S-26S region with three oligonucleotide probes synthesized on the basis of information on the structure of three peptides isolated from a tryptic hydrolyzate of the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/,K/sup +/-ATPase. The translation of the mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by immunochemical identification of the products of synthesis confirmed the presence of the mRNA of the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/,K/sup +/-ATPase in an enriched fraction of poly(A/sup +/)-RNA. This preparation has been used for the synthesis of cloning of double-stranded cDNA.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Acyclic and Cyclic Azabridged Ligands Incorporating 2,2'-Bipyridine Subunits and Their Complexes With Copper(II, Cobalt(II, and Nickel(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pappalardo

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a series of N,N'-disubstituted acyclic (AL and cyclic (CL aza-bridged ligands incorporating 2,2-pipryidine subunits is described. 1H-NMR and IR spectral data support the proposed ligand structures. Dynamic 1H-NMR studies on diurea and diamide derivatives point to the presence of slowly interconverting conformers on the 1H-NMR time-scale, owing to N−H···N hydrogen bonding and/or a restricted rotation around the amide bonds. The ligands synthesized form 1:1 complexes with divalent transition metal ions. Upon complexation, bis-ester derivatives AL5 and CL5 undergo a metal-induced hydrolysis of the ester groups to carboxyl functions, which act as additional binding sites for the metal ion, as well as hydrogen-bonding donor-acceptor binding site to produce dimeric complexes.

  4. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-medications/index.shtml. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Discontinuing antidepressant medications in adults. ...

  5. Halogenated benzimidazole inhibitors of phosphorylation, ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'', of the surface acidic proteins of the yeast ribosomal 60S subunit by endogenous protein kinases CK-II and PK60S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyszka, Ryszard; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Grankowski, Nikodem; Shugar, David

    1996-01-01

    Several halogeno benzimidazoles and 2-azabenzimidazoles, previously shown to be relatively selective inhibitors of protein kinases CK-I and/or CK-II from various sources, including CK-II from yeast [Szyszka et al. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 208, 418-424] inhibit also the yeast ribosomal protein kinase PK60S. The most effective inhibitor of CK-II and PK60S was tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TetraBr-2-azaBz), which was competitive with respect to ATP (and GTP in the case of CK-II) with K i values of 0.7 μM for CK-II, and 0.1 μM for PK60S. PK60S phosphorylates only three (YP1β, YB1β', YP2α) out of five polypeptides of pp13 kDa acidic proteins of 60S subunit phosphorylated by CK-II [Szyszka et al. (1995) Acta Biochim. Polon. 42, 357-362]. Accordingly, TetraBr-azaBz inhibits phosphorylation only of these polypeptides, catalysed by PK60S. Addition of TetraBr-2Bz to cultures of yeast cells, at concentrations which were without effect on cell growth, led to inhibition of intracellular phosphorylation of ribosomal acidic proteins, paralleling that observed ''in vitro''. TetraBr-2-azaBz is shown to be a useful tool for studies on the intracellular regulation of phosphorylation of the ribosomal 60S acidic proteins, which are involved in formation of active ribosomes. (author). 36 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  6. An active Mitochondrial Complex II Present in Mature Seeds Contains an Embryo-Specific Iron-Sulfur Subunit Regulated by ABA and bZIP53 and Is Involved in Germination and Seedling Establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restovic, Franko; Espinoza-Corral, Roberto; Gómez, Isabel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Jordana, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) is an essential mitochondrial enzyme involved in both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory chain. In Arabidopsis thaliana , its iron-sulfur subunit (SDH2) is encoded by three genes, one of them ( SDH2.3 ) being specifically expressed during seed maturation in the embryo. Here we show that seed SDH2.3 expression is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and we define the promoter region (-114 to +49) possessing all the cis -elements necessary and sufficient for high expression in seeds. This region includes between -114 and -32 three ABRE (ABA-responsive) elements and one RY-enhancer like element, and we demonstrate that these elements, although necessary, are not sufficient for seed expression, our results supporting a role for the region encoding the 5' untranslated region (+1 to +49). The SDH2.3 promoter is activated in leaf protoplasts by heterodimers between the basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP53 (group S1) and bZIP10 (group C) acting through the ABRE elements, and by the B3 domain transcription factor ABA insensitive 3 (ABI3). The in vivo role of bZIP53 is further supported by decreased SDH2.3 expression in a knockdown bzip53 mutant. By using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and sdh2 mutants we have been able to conclusively show that complex II is already present in mature embryos before imbibition, and contains mainly SDH2.3 as iron-sulfur subunit. This complex plays a role during seed germination sensu-stricto since we have previously shown that seeds lacking SDH2.3 show retarded germination and now we demonstrate that low concentrations of thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a complex II inhibitor, also delay germination. Furthermore, complex II inhibitors completely block hypocotyl elongation in the dark and seedling establishment in the light, highlighting an essential role of complex II in the acquisition of photosynthetic competence and the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy.

  7. Mutation of Gly195 of the ChlH subunit of Mg-chelatase reduces chlorophyll and further disrupts PS II assembly in a Ycf48-deficient strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Crawford

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenesis of the photosystems in oxygenic phototrophs requires co-translational insertion of chlorophyll a. The first committed step of chlorophyll a biosynthesis is the insertion of a Mg2+ ion into the tetrapyrrole intermediate protoporphyrin IX, catalyzed by Mg-chelatase. We have identified a Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain with a spontaneous mutation in chlH that results in a Gly195 to Glu substitution in a conserved region of the catalytic subunit of Mg-chelatase. Mutant strains containing the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation were generated using a two-step protocol that introduced the chlH gene into a putative neutral site in the chromosome prior to deletion of the native gene. The Gly195 to Glu mutation resulted in strains with decreased chlorophyll a. Deletion of the PS II assembly factor Ycf48 in a strain carrying the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation did not grow photoautotrophically. In addition, the ChlH-G195E:ΔYcf48 strain showed impaired PS II activity and decreased assembly of PS II centers in comparison to a ΔYcf48 strain. We suggest decreased chlorophyll in the ChlH-G195E mutant provides a background to screen for the role of assembly factors that are not essential under optimal growth conditions.

  8. Electrochemical analysis of coordination sphere of ruthenium(II) as an electron transport mediator in glucose oxidase catalysis in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurova, V.S.; Ryabov, A.D.; Ershov, A.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The redox-potentials of the cis-[Ru(LL) 2 XY] n+ complexes (LL=2,2' bipyridil, 1,10 phenanthrolin and 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridil; X, Y = Cl - , Br - , CO 3 2- , No 2 - , SCN - , H 2 O and methylsulfoxide) in water solutions are measured through the cyclic voltamperometry method. The linear dependence of the ruthenium complexes(II) measured redox-potentials on the ligand sphere is established. It is shown, that these complexes manifest the properties of the reversible or quasi-reversible redox-systems, the formal redox-potential values whereof are within the 0.2-0.5 V interval [ru

  9. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupar, C A; Gillett, J; Gordon, B A; Ramsay, D A; Johnson, J L; Garrett, R M; Rajagopalan, K V; Jung, J H; Bacheyie, G S; Sellers, A R

    1996-12-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of sulfur metabolism. In this report of a ninth patient the clinical history, laboratory results, neuropathological findings and a mutation in the sulfite oxidase gene are described. The data from this patient and previously published patients with isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency and molybdenum cofactor deficiency are summarized to characterize this rare disorder. The patient presented neonatally with intractable seizures and did not progress developmentally beyond the neonatal stage. Dislocated lenses were apparent at 2 months. There was increased urine excretion of sulfite and S-sulfocysteine and a decreased concentration of plasma cystine. A lactic acidemia was present for 6 months. Liver sulfite oxidase activity was not detectable but xanthine dehydrogenase activity was normal. The boy died of respiratory failure at 32 months. Neuropathological findings of cortical necrosis and extensive cavitating leukoencephalopathy were reminiscent of those seen in severe perinatal asphyxia suggesting an etiology of energy deficiency. A point mutation that resulted in a truncated protein missing the molybdenum-binding site has been identified.

  10. The exposed N-terminal tail of the D1 subunit is required for rapid D1 degradation during Photosystem II repair in Synechocystis sp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komenda, Josef; Tichý, Martin; Prášil, Ondřej; Knoppová, Jana; Kuviková, Stanislava; de Vries, R.; Nixon, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 19, - (2007), s. 2839-2854 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA203/04/0800; GA ČR GA206/06/0322 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : photosystem II * cyanobacterium * synechocystis sp. pcc 6803 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.653, year: 2007

  11. Resveratrol prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells through the transactivation of growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2017-08-01

    We previously showed that augmented levels of endogenous angiotensin II (AngII) contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic component of red wine, has also been shown to attenuate AngII-evoked VSMC hypertrophy; however, the molecular mechanism mediating this response is obscure. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine whether RV could prevent AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptor and associated signaling pathways. AngII treatment of VSMC enhanced the protein synthesis that was attenuated towards control levels by RV pretreatment as well as by the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, c-Src, and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, RV pretreatment also inhibited enhanced levels of superoxide anion, NADPH oxidase activity, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, and phosphorylation of c-Src, EGF-R, PDGE-R, ERK1/2, and AKT1/2. In conclusion, these results indicate that RV attenuates AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the inhibition of enhanced oxidative stress and activation of c-Src, growth factor receptors, and MAPK/AKT signaling. We suggest that RV could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of vascular complications associated with hypertension and hypertrophy.

  12. Intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase is enhanced in the presence of oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Wherland, S; Pecht, I

    1994-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer from the type 1 copper center to the type 3 copper(II) pair is induced in the multi-copper enzyme, ascorbate oxidase, following pulse radiolytic reduction of the type 1 Cu(II) ion. In the presence of a slight excess of dioxygen over ascorbate oxidase, interaction...... between the trinuclear copper center and O2 is observed even with singly reduced ascorbate oxidase molecules. Under these conditions, the rate constant for intramolecular electron transfer from type 1 Cu(I) to type 3 Cu(II) increases 5-fold to 1100 +/- 300 s-1 (20 degrees C, pH 5.8) as compared...

  13. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  14. Oxidase-based biocatalytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Woodley, John; Krühne, Ulrich

    interestingbiocatalystsbecause they use a mild oxidant (oxygen) as a substrateas opposed to their chemical counterparts which use strong oxidants such as permanganates. A class of oxidases calledmonoamine oxidases has been used as the central case study for the thesis. The rationale for choosing thissystemis that it has been...

  15. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein and Dendritic Local Translation of the Alpha Subunit of the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Messenger RNA Are Required for the Structural Plasticity Underlying Olfactory Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroles, Laura; Gribaudo, Simona; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Dubacq, Caroline; Mandairon, Nathalie; Greer, Charles August; Didier, Anne; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2016-07-15

    In the adult brain, structural plasticity allowing gain or loss of synapses remodels circuits to support learning. In fragile X syndrome, the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to defects in plasticity and learning deficits. FMRP is a master regulator of local translation but its implication in learning-induced structural plasticity is unknown. Using an olfactory learning task requiring adult-born olfactory bulb neurons and cell-specific ablation of FMRP, we investigated whether learning shapes adult-born neuron morphology during their synaptic integration and its dependence on FMRP. We used alpha subunit of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (αCaMKII) mutant mice with altered dendritic localization of αCaMKII messenger RNA, as well as a reporter of αCaMKII local translation to investigate the role of this FMRP messenger RNA target in learning-dependent structural plasticity. Learning induces profound changes in dendritic architecture and spine morphology of adult-born neurons that are prevented by ablation of FMRP in adult-born neurons and rescued by an metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist. Moreover, dendritically translated αCaMKII is necessary for learning and associated structural modifications and learning triggers an FMRP-dependent increase of αCaMKII dendritic translation in adult-born neurons. Our results strongly suggest that FMRP mediates structural plasticity of olfactory bulb adult-born neurons to support olfactory learning through αCaMKII local translation. This reveals a new role for FMRP-regulated dendritic local translation in learning-induced structural plasticity. This might be of clinical relevance for the understanding of critical periods disruption in autism spectrum disorder patients, among which fragile X syndrome is the primary monogenic cause. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Sohal, Rajindar S., E-mail: sohal@usc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  17. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. → Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. → Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H 2 O 2 generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  18. Oxidases as Breast Cancer Oncogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeldandi, Anjana

    2000-01-01

    ...) in a non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell line to ascertain whether oxidase overexpressing cells undergo transformation when exposed to substrate xanthine for XOX and uric acid for UOX...

  19. Glucose oxidase variants with improved properities

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Rainer; Ostafe, Raluca; Prodanovic, Radivoje

    2014-01-01

    Source: WO14173822A3 [EN] The technology provided herein relates to novel variants of microbial glucose oxidase with improved properties, more specifically to polypeptides having glucose oxidase activity as their major enzymatic activity; to nucleic acid molecules encoding said glucose oxidases; vectors and host cells containing the nucleic acids and methods for producing the glucose oxidase; compositions comprising said glucose oxidase; methods for the preparation and production of such enzy...

  20. NADPH Oxidases: Progress and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    San Martin, Alejandra; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2014-01-01

    From the initial discovery in 1999 that NADPH oxidases comprise a family of enzymes to our current focus on drug development to treat multiple pathologies related to this enzyme family, progress has been swift and impressive. We have expanded our understanding of the extent of the family, the basic enzymatic biochemistry, the multiple cellular functions controlled by NADPH oxidases, and their varied roles in physiology and diseases. We have developed numerous cell culture tools, animal models...

  1. Susceptibility of β1 Na+-K+ pump subunit to glutathionylation and oxidative inhibition depends on conformational state of pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Mahmmoud, Yasser A; Hamilton, Elisha J; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Fry, Natasha A S; Figtree, Gemma A; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2012-04-06

    Glutathionylation of cysteine 46 of the β1 subunit of the Na(+)-K(+) pump causes pump inhibition. However, the crystal structure, known in a state analogous to an E2·2K(+)·P(i) configuration, indicates that the side chain of cysteine 46 is exposed to the lipid bulk phase of the membrane and not expected to be accessible to the cytosolic glutathione. We have examined whether glutathionylation depends on the conformational changes in the Na(+)-K(+) pump cycle as described by the Albers-Post scheme. We measured β1 subunit glutathionylation and function of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in membrane fragments and in ventricular myocytes. Signals for glutathionylation in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-enriched membrane fragments suspended in solutions that preferentially induce E1ATP and E1Na(3) conformations were much larger than signals in solutions that induce the E2 conformation. Ouabain further reduced glutathionylation in E2 and eliminated an increase seen with exposure to the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity after exposure to ONOO(-) was greater when the enzyme had been in the E1Na(3) than the E2 conformation. We exposed myocytes to different extracellular K(+) concentrations to vary the membrane potential and hence voltage-dependent conformational poise. K(+) concentrations expected to shift the poise toward E2 species reduced glutathionylation, and ouabain eliminated a ONOO(-)-induced increase. Angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition was eliminated by conditions expected to shift the poise toward the E2 species. We conclude that susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na(+)-K(+) pump.

  2. Susceptibility of β1 Na+-K+ Pump Subunit to Glutathionylation and Oxidative Inhibition Depends on Conformational State of Pump*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Mahmmoud, Yasser A.; Hamilton, Elisha J.; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Fry, Natasha A. S.; Figtree, Gemma A.; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J.; Rasmussen, Helge H.

    2012-01-01

    Glutathionylation of cysteine 46 of the β1 subunit of the Na+-K+ pump causes pump inhibition. However, the crystal structure, known in a state analogous to an E2·2K+·Pi configuration, indicates that the side chain of cysteine 46 is exposed to the lipid bulk phase of the membrane and not expected to be accessible to the cytosolic glutathione. We have examined whether glutathionylation depends on the conformational changes in the Na+-K+ pump cycle as described by the Albers-Post scheme. We measured β1 subunit glutathionylation and function of Na+-K+-ATPase in membrane fragments and in ventricular myocytes. Signals for glutathionylation in Na+-K+-ATPase-enriched membrane fragments suspended in solutions that preferentially induce E1ATP and E1Na3 conformations were much larger than signals in solutions that induce the E2 conformation. Ouabain further reduced glutathionylation in E2 and eliminated an increase seen with exposure to the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase activity after exposure to ONOO− was greater when the enzyme had been in the E1Na3 than the E2 conformation. We exposed myocytes to different extracellular K+ concentrations to vary the membrane potential and hence voltage-dependent conformational poise. K+ concentrations expected to shift the poise toward E2 species reduced glutathionylation, and ouabain eliminated a ONOO−-induced increase. Angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent Na+-K+ pump inhibition was eliminated by conditions expected to shift the poise toward the E2 species. We conclude that susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na+-K+ pump. PMID:22354969

  3. [The X+ chronic granulomatous disease as a fabulous model to study the NADPH oxidase complex activation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasia, Marie-José

    2007-05-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disorder in which phagocytes lack NADPH oxidase activity. Patients with CGD suffer from recurrent bacterial and fungal infections because of the absence of superoxide anions (O2- degrees ) generatingsystem. The NADPH oxidase complex is composed of a membranous cytochrome b558, cytosolic proteins p67phox, p47phox, p40phox and two small GTPases Rac2 and Rap1A. Cytochrome b558 consists of two sub-units gp91phox and p22phox. The most common form of CGD is due to mutations in CYBB gene encoding gp91phox. In some rare cases, the mutated gp91phox is normally expressed but is devoided of oxidase activity. These variants called X+ CGD, have provided interesting informations about oxidase activation mechanisms. However modelization of such variants is necessary to obtain enough biological material for studies at the molecular level. A cellular model (knock-out PLB-985 cells) has been developed for expressing recombinant mutated gp91phox for functional analysis of the oxidase complex. Recent works demonstrated that this cell line genetically deficient in gp91phox is a powerful tool for functional analysis of the NADPH oxidase complex activation.

  4. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baertling, F.; Al-Murshedi, F.; Sanchez Caballero, L.M.; Al-Senaidi, K.; Joshi, N.P.; Venselaar, H.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2017-01-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia,

  5. NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species: A new mechanism for X-ray-induced HeLa cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qing; He Xiaoqing; Liu Yongsheng; Du Bingbing; Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Weisheng; Jia Pengfei; Dong Jingmei; Ma Jianxiu; Wang Xiaohu; Li Sha; Zhang Hong

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative damage is an important mechanism in X-ray-induced cell death. Radiolysis of water molecules is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to X-ray-induced cell death. In this study, we showed by ROS detection and a cell survival assay that NADPH oxidase has a very important role in X-ray-induced cell death. Under X-ray irradiation, the upregulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit gp91 phox was dose-dependent. Meanwhile, the cytoplasmic subunit p47 phox was translocated to the cell membrane and localized with p22 phox and gp91 phox to form reactive NADPH oxidase. Our data suggest, for the first time, that NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS is an important contributor to X-ray-induced cell death. This suggests a new target for combined gene transfer and radiotherapy.

  6. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    Industrially used carbohydrate oxidase was successfully crystallized in several forms, diffraction data suitable for structural analysis were collected. Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 Å and apparent space group P6 2 22. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 Å, β = 95.7°. Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress

  7. Adaptive evolution of cytochrome c oxidase: Infrastructure for a carnivorous plant radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Jobson, Richard W.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Laakkonen, Liisa; Wikström, Mårten; Albert, Victor A.

    2004-01-01

    Much recent attention in the study of adaptation of organismal form has centered on developmental regulation. As such, the highly conserved respiratory machinery of eukaryotic cells might seem an unlikely target for selection supporting novel morphologies. We demonstrate that a dramatic molecular evolutionary rate increase in subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from an active-trapping lineage of carnivorous plants is caused by positive Darwinian selection. Bladderworts (Utricularia) trap ...

  8. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  9. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  10. Lysyl oxidase in cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for cancer-associated deaths and therapies are desperately needed to target the progression of cancer. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, including metastasis, and is therefore is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review we...

  11. Resveratrol protects vascular endothelial cells from high glucose-induced apoptosis through inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation-driven oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Qian, Li-Hua; Deng, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Ying; Le, Ying-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress has been implicated in diabetic vascular complications in which NADPH oxidase is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol, which has vasoprotective effects in diabetic animal models and inhibits high glucose (HG)-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We aimed to examine whether HG-induced NADPH oxidase activation and ROS production contribute to glucotoxicity to endothelial cells and the effect of resveratrol on glucotoxicity. Using a murine brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3, we found that NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin) and resveratrol both inhibited HG-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. HG-induced elevation of NADPH oxidase activity and production of ROS were inhibited by apocynin, suggesting that HG induces endothelial cell apoptosis through NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production. Mechanistic studies revealed that HG upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit Nox1 but not Nox2, Nox4, and p22(phox) expression through NF-κB activation, which resulted in elevation of NADPH oxidase activity and consequent ROS production. Resveratrol prevented HG-induced endothelial cell apoptosis through inhibiting HG-induced NF-κB activation, NADPH oxidase activity elevation, and ROS production. HG induces endothelial cell apoptosis through NF-κB/NADPH oxidase/ROS pathway, which was inhibited by resveratrol. Our findings provide new potential therapeutic targets against brain vascular complications of diabetes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Changes in Activities of Respiratory Enzymes in Lungs of Guinea-pigs Exposed to Silica Dust: II. Comparison of the Effects of Quartz Dust and Lampblack on the Succinate Oxidase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Maria G.; Kilroe-Smith, T. A.; Prinsloo, H.

    1964-01-01

    Kilroe-Smith and Breyer (1963) reported that in the early stages of silicosis in guinea-pigs exposed to the inhalation of quartz dust, before the formation of collagen, there were increases in the specific activities of the complete succinate oxidase system and succinate dehydrogenase. The effects on these enzymes of quartz dust have now been compared with the effects of the fibrogenically `inert' lampblack. Lampblack causes a slight increase in the specific activities of these enzymes but the effects are small compared to those caused by quartz. Lampblack also causes a much smaller increase in lung weight than quartz, thus the enzyme increases are roughly parallel to the rise in lung weight. It appears that the effects observed on the enzymes are part of the general pattern associated with the early stages of the development of silicosis. PMID:14106132

  13. Laccases as palladium oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekmouche, Yasmina; Schneider, Ludovic; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Faure, Bruno; Simaan, A Jalila; Bochot, Constance; Réglier, Marius; Tron, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    The first example of a coupled catalytic system involving an enzyme and a palladium(ii) catalyst competent for the aerobic oxidation of alcohol in mild conditions is described. In the absence of dioxygen, the fungal laccase LAC3 is reduced by a palladium(0) species as evidenced by the UV/VIS and ESR spectra of the enzyme. During the oxidation of veratryl alcohol performed in water, at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, LAC3 regenerates the palladium catalyst, is reduced and catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen into water with no loss of enzyme activity. The association of a laccase with a water-soluble palladium complex results in a 7-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency of the complex. This is the first step in the design of a family of renewable palladium catalysts for aerobic oxidation.

  14. Targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the transgenic sickle cell mouse penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Sezen, Sena F; Burnett, Arthur L

    2012-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a state of chronic vasculopathy characterized by endothelial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, but the sources and mechanisms responsible for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are unknown. We evaluated whether SCD activates NADPH oxidase, induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, and decreases antioxidants in the SCD mouse penis. We further tested the hypothesis that targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the SCD mouse penis. SCD transgenic (sickle) mice were used as an animal model of SCD. Hemizygous (hemi) mice served as controls. Mice received an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Penes were excised at baseline for molecular studies. Markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase subunits p67(phox) , p47(phox) , and gp91(phox) ), and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD]1, SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase-1 [GPx1]) were measured by Western blot in penes. Sources of ROS, oxidative stress, and enzymatic antioxidants in the SCD penis. Relative to hemi mice, SCD increased (Ppenis. Apocynin treatment of sickle mice reversed (P0.05) prevented eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of hemi mice did not affect any of these parameters. NADPH oxidase and eNOS uncoupling are sources of oxidative stress in the SCD penis; decreased GPx1 further contributes to oxidative stress. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase upregulation decreases oxidative stress, implying a major role for NADPH oxidase as a ROS source and a potential target for improving vascular function in the SCD mouse penis. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Paraquat and maneb co-exposure induces noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurodegeneration through NADPH oxidase-mediated microglial activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Liyan; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Ke; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Hongwei; Che, Yuning; Sun, Fuqiang; Zhou, Xueying; Zhao, Xiulan; Wang, Qingshan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Microglial activation induced by paraquat and maneb precedes noradrenergic neurodegeneration in locus coeruleus. • NADPH oxidase activation contributes to microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and related noradrenergic neurodegeneration. • Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin protects noradrenergic neurons against paraquat and maneb-induced toxicity. - Abstract: Co-exposure to paraquat (PQ) and maneb (Mb) has been shown to increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dopaminergic (DA) neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) is observed in PQ and Mb-treated experimental animals. The loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC/NE) neurons in brainstem is a common feature shared by multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. However, whether PQ and Mb is able to damage LC/NE neurons remains undefined. In this study, mice treated with combined PQ and Mb displayed progressive LC/NE neurodegeneration. Time course studies revealed that the activation of microglia preceded LC/NE neurodegeneration. Mechanistically, the activation of NADPH oxidase contributed to microglial activation and subsequent LC/NE neurodegeneration. We found that PQ and Mb co-exposure induced activation of NADPH oxidase as shown by increased superoxide production and membrane translocation of p47 phox , a cytosolic subunit of NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin, a widely used NADPH oxidase inhibitor, suppressed microglial activation and gene expressions of proinflammatory factors. Furthermore, reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway was observed in apocynin-treated mice. More importantly, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin afforded LC/NE neuroprotection against PQ and Mb-induced neurotoxicity. Thus, our findings revealed the critical role NADPH oxidase-mediated microglial activation in driving LC/NE neurodegeneration induced by PQ and Mb, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of environmental

  16. Therapeutic potential of Mediator complex subunits in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amol; Ansari, Suraiya A

    2018-01-01

    The multisubunit Mediator is an evolutionary conserved transcriptional coregulatory complex in eukaryotes. It is needed for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression in general as well as in a gene specific manner. Mediator complex subunits interact with different transcription factors as well as components of RNA Pol II transcription initiation complex and in doing so act as a bridge between gene specific transcription factors and general Pol II transcription machinery. Specific interaction of various Mediator subunits with nuclear receptors (NRs) and other transcription factors involved in metabolism has been reported in different studies. Evidences indicate that ligand-activated NRs recruit Mediator complex for RNA Pol II-dependent gene transcription. These NRs have been explored as therapeutic targets in different metabolic diseases; however, they show side-effects as targets due to their overlapping involvement in different signaling pathways. Here we discuss the interaction of various Mediator subunits with transcription factors involved in metabolism and whether specific interaction of these transcription factors with Mediator subunits could be potentially utilized as therapeutic strategy in a variety of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  18. Cytochrome oxidase assembly does not require catalytically active cytochrome C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Antoni; Pierre, Danielle; Lee, Johnson; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2003-03-14

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, catalyzes the transfer of electrons from reduced cytochrome c to molecular oxygen. COX assembly requires the coming together of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits and the assistance of a large number of nuclear gene products acting at different stages of maturation of the enzyme. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of cytochrome c, encoded by CYC1 and CYC7, is required not only for electron transfer but also for COX assembly through a still unknown mechanism. We have attempted to distinguish between a functional and structural requirement of cytochrome c in COX assembly. A cyc1/cyc7 double null mutant strain was transformed with the cyc1-166 mutant gene (Schweingruber, M. E., Stewart, J. W., and Sherman, F. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 4132-4143) that expresses stable but catalytically inactive iso-1-cytochrome c. The COX content of the cyc1/cyc7 double mutant strain harboring non-functional iso-1-cytochrome c has been characterized spectrally, functionally, and immunochemically. The results of these studies demonstrate that cytochrome c plays a structural rather than functional role in assembly of cytochrome c oxidase. In addition to its requirement for COX assembly, cytochrome c also affects turnover of the enzyme. Mutants containing wild type apocytochrome c in mitochondria lack COX, suggesting that only the folded and mature protein is able to promote COX assembly.

  19. The light subunit of system bo,+ is fully functional in the absence of the heavy subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Reig, Núria; Chillarón, Josep; Bartoccioni, Paola; Fernández, Esperanza; Bendahan, Annie; Zorzano, Antonio; Kanner, Baruch; Palacín, Manuel; Bertran, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of a type II glycoprotein and a non-glycosylated polytopic membrane protein. System bo,+ exchanges dibasic for neutral amino acids. It is composed of rBAT and bo,+AT, the latter being the polytopic membrane subunit. Mutations in either of them cause malfunction of the system, leading to cystinuria. bo,+AT-reconstituted systems from HeLa or MDCK cells catalysed transport of arginine that was totally dependent on the presence of one of the bo...

  20. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    , such as influenza, tuberculosis, and Ebola, for which no good universal vaccines exist. At least two pharmaceutical improvements are expected to help filling this gap: i) The development of thermostable vaccine dosage forms, and ii) the full exploitation of the adjuvant technology for subunit vaccines to potentiate...... strong immune responses. This review highlights the status and recent advances in formulation and pulmonary delivery of thermostable human subunit vaccines. Such vaccines are very appealing from compliance, distribution and immunological point of view: Being non-invasive, inhalable vaccines are self...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  1. Ultrafine carbon particles promote rotenone-induced dopamine neuronal loss through activating microglial NADPH oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yinxi; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Huifeng; Wang, Yixin; Wei, Ling; Liu, Yutong; Liao, Jieying; Gao, Hui-Ming; Zhou, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) and pesticide rotenone were considered as potential environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether and how UFPs alone and in combination with rotenone affect the pathogenesis of PD remains largely unknown. Methods: Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, a surrogate of UFPs) and rotenone were used individually or in combination to determine their roles in chronic dopaminergic (DA) loss in neuron-glia, and neuron-enriched, mix-glia cultures. Immunochemistry using antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase was performed to detect DA neuronal loss. Measurement of extracellular superoxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed to examine activation of NADPH oxidase. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase and MAC-1 receptor in microglia were employed to examine their role in DA neuronal loss triggered by ufCB and rotenone. Results: In rodent midbrain neuron-glia cultures, ufCB and rotenone alone caused neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. In particularly, ufCB at doses of 50 and 100 μg/cm 2 induced significant loss of DA neurons. More importantly, nontoxic doses of ufCB (10 μg/cm 2 ) and rotenone (2 nM) induced synergistic toxicity to DA neurons. Microglial activation was essential in this process. Furthermore, superoxide production from microglial NADPH oxidase was critical in ufCB/rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. Studies in mix-glia cultures showed that ufCB treatment activated microglial NADPH oxidase to induce superoxide production. Firstly, ufCB enhanced the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91 phox , p47 phox and p40 phox ); secondly, ufCB was recognized by microglial surface MAC-1 receptor and consequently promoted rotenone-induced p47 phox and p67 phox translocation assembling active NADPH oxidase. Conclusion: ufCB and rotenone worked in synergy to activate NADPH oxidase in microglia, leading to oxidative damage to DA neurons. Our

  2. Ultrafine carbon particles promote rotenone-induced dopamine neuronal loss through activating microglial NADPH oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yinxi; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Huifeng; Wang, Yixin [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Peking University, 100191 (China); Wei, Ling [Beijing Center for Physical & Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China); Liu, Yutong [School of Life Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Liao, Jieying [Department of Translational Medicine, Xiamen Institute of Rare Earth Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361024 (China); Gao, Hui-Ming [Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, Nanjing 211800 (China); Zhou, Hui, E-mail: hardhui@gmail.com [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Peking University, 100191 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Background: Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) and pesticide rotenone were considered as potential environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether and how UFPs alone and in combination with rotenone affect the pathogenesis of PD remains largely unknown. Methods: Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, a surrogate of UFPs) and rotenone were used individually or in combination to determine their roles in chronic dopaminergic (DA) loss in neuron-glia, and neuron-enriched, mix-glia cultures. Immunochemistry using antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase was performed to detect DA neuronal loss. Measurement of extracellular superoxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed to examine activation of NADPH oxidase. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase and MAC-1 receptor in microglia were employed to examine their role in DA neuronal loss triggered by ufCB and rotenone. Results: In rodent midbrain neuron-glia cultures, ufCB and rotenone alone caused neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. In particularly, ufCB at doses of 50 and 100 μg/cm{sup 2} induced significant loss of DA neurons. More importantly, nontoxic doses of ufCB (10 μg/cm{sup 2}) and rotenone (2 nM) induced synergistic toxicity to DA neurons. Microglial activation was essential in this process. Furthermore, superoxide production from microglial NADPH oxidase was critical in ufCB/rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. Studies in mix-glia cultures showed that ufCB treatment activated microglial NADPH oxidase to induce superoxide production. Firstly, ufCB enhanced the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91{sup phox}, p47{sup phox} and p40{sup phox}); secondly, ufCB was recognized by microglial surface MAC-1 receptor and consequently promoted rotenone-induced p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox} translocation assembling active NADPH oxidase. Conclusion: ufCB and rotenone worked in synergy to activate NADPH oxidase in microglia, leading to

  3. Exploring flavin-containing carbohydrate oxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, Alessandro Renato

    2017-01-01

    Oxidases are enzymes capable of removing one or more electrons from their substrate and transfer them to molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide. Due to their high regio- and enantioselectivity, their use is preferred over traditional organic chemistry methods. Among the oxidases, flavoprotein

  4. Characterization of fimbrial subunits from Bordetella species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, F.R.; Heide, H.G.J. van der; Avest, A.R. ter; Welinder, K.G.; Livey, I.; Zeijst, B.A.M. van der; Gaastra, W.

    Using antisera raised against serotype 2 and 3 fimbrial subunits from Bordetella pertussis, serologically related polypeptides were detected in Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella avium strains. The two B. pertussis fimbrial subunits, and three of the serologically

  5. Crosstalk between HDAC6 and Nox2-based NADPH oxidase mediates HIV-1 Tat-induced pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Soo Youn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 likely is important in inflammatory diseases. However, how HDAC6 exerts its effect on inflammatory processes remains unclear. HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat activates NADPH oxidase resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to extensive neuro-inflammation in the central nervous system. We investigated the correlation of HDAC6 and NADPH oxidase in HIV-1 Tat-stimulated astrocytes. HDAC6 knockdown attenuated HIV-1 Tat-induced ROS generation and NADPH oxidase activation. HDAC6 knockdown suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, such as Nox2, p47phox, and p22phox. Specific inhibition of HDAC6 using tubastatin A suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced ROS generation and activation of NADPH oxidase. N-acetyl cysteine, diphenyl iodonium, and apocynin suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of HDAC6 and the pro-inflammatory chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10. Nox2 knockdown attenuated HIV-1 Tat-induced HDAC6 expression and subsequent expression of chemokines. The collective results point to the potential crosstalk between HDAC6 and NADPH oxidase, which could be a combined therapeutic target for relief of HIV-1 Tat-mediated neuro-inflammation. Keywords: HIV-1 Tat, HDAC6, NADPH oxidase, ROS, Inflammation, Astrocytes

  6. Exploring the entrance of proton pathways in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans: surface charge, buffer capacity and redox-dependent polarity changes at the internal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberg, Kristina; Michel, Hartmut; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal oxidase of cellular respiration, reduces molecular oxygen to water. The mechanism of proton pumping as well as the coupling of proton and electron transfer is still not understood in this redox-linked proton pump. Eleven residues at the aqueous-exposed surfaces of CcO from Paracoccus denitrificans have been exchanged to cysteines in a two-subunit base variant to yield single reactive cysteine variants. These variants are designed to provide unique labeling sites for probes to be used in spectroscopic experiments investigating the mechanism of proton pumping in CcO. To this end we have shown that all cysteine variants are enzymatically active. Cysteine positions at the negative (N-) side of the membrane are located close to the entrance of the D- and K-proton transfer pathways that connect the N-side with the catalytic oxygen reduction site. Labeling of the pH-indicator dye fluorescein to these sites allowed us to determine the surface potential at the cytoplasmic CcO surface, which corresponds to a surface charge density of -0.5 elementary charge/1000Å(2). In addition, acid-base titrations revealed values of CcO buffer capacity. Polarity measurements of the label environment at the N-side provided (i) site-specific values indicative of a hydrophilic and a more hydrophobic environment dependent on the label position, and (ii) information on a global change to a more apolar environment upon reduction of the enzyme. Thus, the redox state of the copper and heme centers inside the hydrophobic interior of CcO affect the properties at the cytoplasmic surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differences in activity of cytochrome C oxidase in brain between sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, Elena V; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zhang, Lin; Cater, Jacqueline R; Galante, Raymond J; Ward, Stephen E; Avadhani, Narayan G; Pack, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Increased mRNA level of subunit 1 cytochrome c oxidase (COXI) during wakefulness and after short-term sleep deprivation has been described in brain. We hypothesized that this might contribute to increased activity of cytochrome oxidase (COX) enzyme during wakefulness, as part of the mechanisms to provide sufficient amounts of adenosine triphosphate to meet increased neuronal energy demands. COX activity was measured in isolated mitochondria from different brain regions in groups of rats with 3 hours of spontaneous sleep, 3 hours of spontaneous wake, and 3 hours of sleep deprivation. The group with 3 hours of spontaneous wake was added to delineate the circadian component of changes in the enzyme activity. Northern blot analysis was performed to examine the mRNA levels of 2 subunits of the enzyme COXI and COXIV, encoded by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Laboratory of Biochemistry, Department of Animal Biology, and Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania. 2-month-old male Fischer rats (N = 21) implanted for polygraphic recording. For COX activity, there was a main effect by analysis of variance of experimental group (P sleep-deprived groups as compared to the sleep group. A main effect of brain region was also significant (P sleep. There is an increase in COX activity after both 3 hours of spontaneous wake and 3 hours of sleep deprivation as compared with 3 hours of spontaneous sleep in diverse brain regions, which could be, in part, explained by the increased levels of bigenomic transcripts of the enzyme. This likely contributes to increased adenosine triphosphate production during wakefulness. ADP, adenosine diphosphate; ATP, adenosine triphosphate; COXI, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mRNA; COX, cytochrome c oxidase (protein); CREB, cyclic AMP response element binding protein; DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid; EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; EEG, electroencephalography; EMG, electromyography; GABP, GA binding

  8. Natriuretic peptide receptor-C activation attenuates angiotensin II-induced enhanced oxidative stress and hyperproliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Padma; Hossain, Ekhtear; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2018-02-07

    We showed previously that natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) agonist, C-ANP 4-23 , attenuated the enhanced expression of Giα proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) through the inhibition of enhanced oxidative stress. Since the enhanced levels of endogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) contribute to the overexpression of Giα proteins and augmented oxidative stress in VSMC from SHR, the present study was undertaken to investigate if C-ANP 4-23 could also attenuate angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced oxidative stress and associated signaling. Ang II treatment of aortic VSMC augmented the levels of superoxide anion (O 2 - ), NADPH oxidase activity, and the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits and C-ANP 4-23 treatment attenuated all these to control levels. In addition, Ang II-induced enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and protein carbonyl content were also attenuated toward control levels by C-ANP 4-23 treatment. On the other hand, Ang II inhibited the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and augmented the levels of peroxynitrite (OONO - ) in VSMC which were restored to control levels by C-ANP 4-23 treatment. Furthermore, C-ANP 4-23 treatment attenuated Ang II-induced enhanced expression of Giα proteins, phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK 1,2 as well as hyperproliferation of VSMC as determined by DNA synthesis, and metabolic activity. These results indicate that C-ANP 4-23 , via the activation of NPR-C, attenuates Ang II-induced enhanced nitroxidative stress, overexpression of Giα proteins, increased activation of the p38/JNK/ERK 1,2 signaling pathways, and hyperproliferation of VSMC. It may be suggested that C-ANP 4-23 could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of vascular remodeling associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  9. Subunit architecture and functional modular rearrangements of the transcriptional mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Sato, Shigeo; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2014-06-05

    The multisubunit Mediator, comprising ∼30 distinct proteins, plays an essential role in gene expression regulation by acting as a bridge between DNA-binding transcription factors and the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription machinery. Efforts to uncover the Mediator mechanism have been hindered by a poor understanding of its structure, subunit organization, and conformational rearrangements. By overcoming biochemical and image analysis hurdles, we obtained accurate EM structures of yeast and human Mediators. Subunit localization experiments, docking of partial X-ray structures, and biochemical analyses resulted in comprehensive mapping of yeast Mediator subunits and a complete reinterpretation of our previous Mediator organization model. Large-scale Mediator rearrangements depend on changes at the interfaces between previously described Mediator modules, which appear to be facilitated by factors conducive to transcription initiation. Conservation across eukaryotes of Mediator structure, subunit organization, and RNA polymerase II interaction suggest conservation of fundamental aspects of the Mediator mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immobilization of oxidases and their analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasinzai, M.

    2007-01-01

    Immobilized enzymes are replacing their soluble counter-parts in nearly every field of application. These enzyme modifications have evolved from a research curiosity into an entire branch of Biotechnology. An immobilization method for flavin containing oxidases and their use in flow injection system is described. An electrochemical detector for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is assembled which is used effectively for the determination of glucose using more common glucose oxidase and the simultaneous determination of sugars. The combination of oxidases with hydrolases have been used for the determination of maltose and starch. (author)

  11. Acupuncture elicits neuroprotective effect by inhibiting NAPDH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xue-Rui; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Wen; Du, Si-Qi; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-10

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether NADPH oxidase, a major ROS-producing enzyme, was involved in the antioxidant effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment after cerebral ischaemia. The cognitive function, infract size, neuron cell loss, level of superoxide anion and expression of NADPH oxidase subunit in hippocampus of two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rats were determined after 2-week acupuncture. Furthermore, the cognitive function and production of O2(-) were determined in the presence and absence of NADPH oxidase agonist (TBCA) and antagonist (Apocynin). The effect of acupuncture on cognitive function after cerebral ischaemia in gp91phox-KO mice was evaluated by Morris water maze. Acupuncture reduced infarct size, attenuated overproduction of O2(-), and reversed consequential cognitive impairment and neuron cell loss in 2VO rats. The elevations of gp91phox and p47phox after 2VO were significantly decreased after acupuncture treatment. However, no differences of gp91phox mRNA were found among any experimental groups. Furthermore, these beneficial effects were reversed by TBCA, whereas apocynin mimicked the effect of acupuncture by improving cognitive function and decreasing O2(-) generation. Acupuncture failed to improve the memory impairment in gp91phox KO mice. Full function of the NADPH oxidase enzyme plays an important role in neuroprotective effects against cognitive impairment via inhibition of NAPDH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  12. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Vidoni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  13. NADPH oxidase and redox status in amygdala, hippocampus and cortex of male Wistar rats in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Romana; Puskas, Laslo; Jevtic Dozudic, Gordana; Stojkovic, Tihomir; Velimirovic, Milica; Nikolic, Tatjana; Zivkovic, Milica; Djorovic, Djordje J; Nenadovic, Milutin; Petronijevic, Natasa

    2018-05-26

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent and impairing disorder. Oxidative stress is implicated in its pathogenesis. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is an important source of free radicals. The aim of the study was to assess oxidative stress parameters, activities of respiratory chain enzymes, and the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91phox, p22phox, and p67phox) in the single prolonged stress (SPS) animal model of PTSD. Twenty-four (12 controls; 12 subjected to SPS), 9-week-old, male Wistar rats were used. SPS included physical restraint, forced swimming, and ether exposure. The rats were euthanized seven days later. Cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and thalamus were dissected. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), Complex I, and cytochrome C oxidase were measured using spectrophotometric methods, while the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits was determined by Western blot. Increased MDA and decreased GSH concentrations were found in the amygdala and hippocampus of the SPS rats. SOD activity was decreased in amygdala and GPx was decreased in hippocampus. Increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunits was seen in amygdala, while mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme expression was unchanged both in amygdala and hippocampus. In the cortex concentrations of MDA and GSH were unchanged despite increased Complex I and decreased GPx, while in the thalamus no change of any parameter was noticed. We conclude that oxidative stress is present in hippocampus and amygdala seven days after the SPS procedure. NADPH oxidase seems to be a main source of free radicals in the amygdala.

  14. Glycosylation site-targeted PEGylation of glucose oxidase retains native enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Dustin W; Roberts, Jason R; McShane, Michael J

    2013-04-10

    Targeted PEGylation of glucose oxidase at its glycosylation sites was investigated to determine the effect on enzymatic activity, as well as the bioconjugate's potential in an optical biosensing assay. Methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-hydrazide (4.5kDa) was covalently coupled to periodate-oxidized glycosylation sites of glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger. The bioconjugate was characterized using gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering. Gel electrophoresis data showed that the PEGylation protocol resulted in a drastic increase (ca. 100kDa) in the apparent molecular mass of the protein subunit, with complete conversion to the bioconjugate; liquid chromatography data corroborated this large increase in molecular size. Mass spectrometry data proved that the extent of PEGylation was six poly(ethylene glycol) chains per glucose oxidase dimer. Dynamic light scattering data indicated the absence of higher-order oligomers in the PEGylated GOx sample. To assess stability, enzymatic activity assays were performed in triplicate at multiple time points over the course of 29 days in the absence of glucose, as well as before and after exposure to 5% w/v glucose for 24h. At a confidence level of 95%, the bioconjugate's performance was statistically equivalent to native glucose oxidase in terms of activity retention over the 29 day time period, as well as following the 24h glucose exposure. Finally, the bioconjugate was entrapped within a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel containing an oxygen-sensitive phosphor, and the construct was shown to respond approximately linearly with a 220±73% signal change (n=4, 95% confidence interval) over the physiologically-relevant glucose range (i.e., 0-400mg/dL); to our knowledge, this represents the first demonstration of PEGylated glucose oxidase incorporated into an optical biosensing assay. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520, ..... on the inhibition of the catabolism of serotonin, .... Structure of human monoamine oxidase B, a drug target for.

  16. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase, a tasteful biocatalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Fraaije, M.W.; Mattevi, A.; Laane, C.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The covalent flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO) is a versatile biocatalyst. It converts a wide range of phenolic compounds by catalysing oxidation, deamination, demethylation, dehydrogenation and hydroxylation reactions. The production of natural vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, coniferyl

  17. Polyphenol Oxidase Enzyme and Inactivation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman Yılmaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase enzyme is found in vegetables and fruits, as well as in some animal organs and microorganisms. Polyphenol oxidase enzyme responsible for enzymatic browning is a group of copper proteins that catalyses the oxidation of phenolic compounds to quinones, which produce brown pigments, commonly found in fruits and vegetables. During the industrial preparation of fruits and vegetables, results of catalytic effect of polyphenol oxidase causes enzymatic browning. Enzymatic browning impairs the appearance of products containing phenolic compounds along with undesirable colour, odor and taste formation and significant loss of nutritional value of the products. This affects the acceptability of the products by the consumers and causes economic losses. In this review, some characteristics of polyphenol oxidase enzyme in different fruits and vegetables have been reviewed and information about chemical antibrowning agents, thermal applications, irradiation applications and alternative methods such as high pressure processing, pulse electric field, supercritical carbon dioxide and ultrasound applications to inactivate this enzyme has been presented.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Management Resources (1 link) GeneReview: Isolated Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and ...

  19. Xanthine oxidase activity and free radical generation in patients with sepsis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, H F; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Webster, N R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine xanthine oxidase activity, free radical concentrations, and lipid peroxidation in patients with sepsis syndrome compared with noninfected critically ill patients. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: A nine-bed intensive care unit in a university teaching......). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sepsis have xanthine oxidase activation, high free-radical concentrations, and evidence of free radical damage. The finding that xanthine oxidase activity was lower in those patients who died, coupled with increased lactate concentrations implies more severe ischemia with incomplete...... to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score or to the presence of organ dysfunction. The mean ascorbyl radical concentration (arbitrary units) determined by electron paramagnetic resonance following spin trapping was increased in patients compared with healthy subjects (p

  20. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Al-Senaidi, Khalfan; Joshi, Niranjan P; Venselaar, Hanka; van den Brand, Mariël Am; Nijtmans, Leo Gj; Rodenburg, Richard Jt

    2017-06-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, failure to thrive, and isolated complex IV deficiency are presented. We show that the variant lies within the evolutionarily conserved COX5A/COX4 interface domain, suggesting that it alters the interaction between these two subunits during complex IV biogenesis. In patient skin fibroblasts, the enzymatic activity and protein levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. Lentiviral complementation rescues complex IV deficiency. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates demonstrating a function of COX5A in complex IV biogenesis. A potential therapeutic lead is demonstrated by showing that copper supplementation leads to partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Oxoferryl-Porphyrin Radical Catalytic Intermediate in Cytochrome bd Oxidases Protects Cells from Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Angela; Rossius, Sebastiaan Gijsbertus Hendrik; Dijk, Madelon; de Vries, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The quinol-linked cytochrome bd oxidases are terminal oxidases in respiration. These oxidases harbor a low spin heme b558 that donates electrons to a binuclear heme b595/heme d center. The reaction with O2 and subsequent catalytic steps of the Escherichia coli cytochrome bd-I oxidase were investigated by means of ultra-fast freeze-quench trapping followed by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopy. After the initial binding of O2, the O–O bond is heterolytically cleaved to yield a kinetically competent heme d oxoferryl porphyrin π-cation radical intermediate (compound I) magnetically interacting with heme b595. Compound I accumulates to 0.75–0.85 per enzyme in agreement with its much higher rate of formation (∼20,000 s−1) compared with its rate of decay (∼1,900 s−1). Compound I is next converted to a short lived heme d oxoferryl intermediate (compound II) in a phase kinetically matched to the oxidation of heme b558 before completion of the reaction. The results indicate that cytochrome bd oxidases like the heme-copper oxidases break the O–O bond in a single four-electron transfer without a peroxide intermediate. However, in cytochrome bd oxidases, the fourth electron is donated by the porphyrin moiety rather than by a nearby amino acid. The production of reactive oxygen species by the cytochrome bd oxidase was below the detection level of 1 per 1000 turnovers. We propose that the two classes of terminal oxidases have mechanistically converged to enzymes in which the O–O bond is broken in a single four-electron transfer reaction to safeguard the cell from the formation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:22287551

  2. Activation of NADPH oxidase mediates increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao; Tian, Jing; Sun, Yi; Xu, Tao-Rui; Chi, Rui-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Hu, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Yue-An; Qin, Fu-Zhong; Zhang, Wei-Fang

    2015-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 3-phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are increased after myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, we proposed to test whether activation of the NADPH oxidase in the remote non-infarcted myocardium mediates ER stress and left ventricular (LV) remodeling after MI. Rabbits with MI or sham operation were randomly assigned to orally receive an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or placebo for 30 days. The agents were administered beginning at 1 week after surgery. MI rabbits exhibited decreases in LV fractional shortening, LV ejection fraction and the first derivative of the LV pressure rise, which were abolished by apocynin treatment. NADPH oxidase Nox2 protein and mRNA expressions were increased in the remote non-infarcted myocardium after MI. Immunolabeling further revealed that Nox2 was increased in cardiac myocytes in the remote myocardium. The apocynin treatment prevented increases in the Nox2 expression, NADPH oxidase activity, oxidative stress, myocyte apoptosis and GRP78, CHOP and cleaved caspase 12 protein expression in the remote myocardium. The apocynin treatment also attenuated increases in myocyte diameter and cardiac fibrosis. In cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes exposed to angiotensin II, an important stimulus for post-MI remodeling, Nox2 knockdown with siRNA significantly inhibited angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase activation, reactive oxygen species and GRP78 and CHOP protein expression. We conclude that NADPH oxidase inhibition attenuates increased ER stress in the remote non-infarcted myocardium and LV remodeling late after MI in rabbits. These findings suggest that the activation of NADPH oxidase in the remote non-infarcted myocardium mediates increased ER stress, contributing to myocyte apoptosis and LV remodeling after MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Subunit Stoichiometry of Human Muscle Chloride Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlke, Christoph; Knittle, Timothy; Gurnett, Christina A.; Campbell, Kevin P.; George, Alfred L.

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cl? channels belonging to the ClC family appear to function as homomultimers, but the number of subunits needed to form a functional channel is controversial. To determine subunit stoichiometry, we constructed dimeric human skeletal muscle Cl? channels in which one subunit was tagged by a mutation (D136G) that causes profound changes in voltage-dependent gating. Sucrose-density gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that both monomeric and dimeric hClC-1 channels in their ...

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_001146 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inal member of the mitochondrial inner membrane electron transport chain; predominantly express...ed during aerobic growth while its isoform Vb (Cox5Bp) is expressed during anaerobic growth; Cox5ap ... NC_001146 gi|6324276 >gi|6324276|ref|NP_014346.1| Subunit Va of cytochrome c oxidase, which is the term

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_001141 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inal member of the mitochondrial inner membrane electron transport chain; predominantly express...ed during anaerobic growth while its isoform Va (Cox5Ap) is expressed during aerobic growth; Cox5bp ... NC_001141 gi|6322080 >gi|6322080|ref|NP_012155.1| Subunit Vb of cytochrome c oxidase, which is the term

  6. Biogenic manganese oxide nanoparticle formation by a multimeric multicopper oxidase Mnx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Christine A; Zhou, Mowei; Song, Yang; Wysocki, Vicki H; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Kovarik, Libor; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Tebo, Bradley M

    2017-09-29

    Bacteria that produce Mn oxides are extraordinarily skilled engineers of nanomaterials that contribute significantly to global biogeochemical cycles. Their enzyme-based reaction mechanisms may be genetically tailored for environmental remediation applications or bioenergy production. However, significant challenges exist for structural characterization of the enzymes responsible for biomineralization. The active Mn oxidase in Bacillus sp. PL-12, Mnx, is a complex composed of a multicopper oxidase (MCO), MnxG, and two accessory proteins, MnxE and MnxF. MnxG shares sequence similarity with other, structurally characterized MCOs. MnxE and MnxF have no similarity to any characterized proteins. The ~200 kDa complex has been recalcitrant to crystallization, so its structure is unknown. Here, we show that native mass spectrometry defines the subunit topology and copper binding of Mnx, while high-resolution electron microscopy visualizes the protein and nascent Mn oxide minerals. These data provide critical structural information for understanding Mn biomineralization by such unexplored enzymes.Significant challenges exist for structural characterization of enzymes responsible for biomineralization. Here the authors show that native mass spectrometry and high resolution electron microscopy can define the subunit topology and copper binding of a manganese oxidizing complex, and describe early stage formation of its mineral products.

  7. Structure of choline oxidase in complex with the reaction product glycine betaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Francesca; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Weber, Irene T; Gadda, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Choline oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis, which is involved in the biosynthesis of glycine betaine from choline, has been extensively characterized in its mechanistic and structural properties. Despite the knowledge gained on the enzyme, the details of substrate access to the active site are not fully understood. The `loop-and-lid' mechanism described for the glucose-methanol-choline enzyme superfamily has not been confirmed for choline oxidase. Instead, a hydrophobic cluster on the solvent-accessible surface of the enzyme has been proposed by molecular dynamics to control substrate access to the active site. Here, the crystal structure of the enzyme was solved in complex with glycine betaine at pH 6.0 at 1.95 Å resolution, allowing a structural description of the ligand-enzyme interactions in the active site. This structure is the first of choline oxidase in complex with a physiologically relevant ligand. The protein structures with and without ligand are virtually identical, with the exception of a loop at the dimer interface, which assumes two distinct conformations. The different conformations of loop 250-255 define different accessibilities of the proposed active-site entrance delimited by the hydrophobic cluster on the other subunit of the dimer, suggesting a role in regulating substrate access to the active site.

  8. Production of recombinant cholesterol oxidase containing covalently bound FAD in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molla Gianluca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol oxidase is an alcohol dehydrogenase/oxidase flavoprotein that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of C(3-OH of cholesterol. It has two major biotechnological applications, i.e. in the determination of serum (and food cholesterol levels and as biocatalyst providing valuable intermediates for industrial steroid drug production. Cholesterol oxidases of type I are those containing the FAD cofactor tightly but not covalently bound to the protein moiety, whereas type II members contain covalently bound FAD. This is the first report on the over-expression in Escherichia coli of type II cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum (BCO. Results Design of the plasmid construct encoding the mature BCO, optimization of medium composition and identification of the best cultivation/induction conditions for growing and expressing the active protein in recombinant E. coli cells, concurred to achieve a valuable improvement: BCO volumetric productivity was increased from ~500 up to ~25000 U/L and its crude extract specific activity from 0.5 up to 7.0 U/mg protein. Interestingly, under optimal expression conditions, nearly 55% of the soluble recombinant BCO is produced as covalently FAD bound form, whereas the protein containing non-covalently bound FAD is preferentially accumulated in insoluble inclusion bodies. Conclusions Comparison of our results with those published on non-covalent (type I COs expressed in recombinant form (either in E. coli or Streptomyces spp., shows that the fully active type II BCO can be produced in E. coli at valuable expression levels. The improved over-production of the FAD-bound cholesterol oxidase will support its development as a novel biotool to be exploited in biotechnological applications.

  9. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  10. Identification of a conserved archaeal RNA polymerase subunit contacted by the basal transcription factor TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, C P; Jackson, S P; Bell, S D

    2001-12-14

    Archaea possess two general transcription factors that are required to recruit RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoters in vitro. These are TBP, the TATA-box-binding protein and TFB, the archaeal homologue of TFIIB. Thus, the archaeal and eucaryal transcription machineries are fundamentally related. In both RNAP II and archaeal transcription systems, direct contacts between TFB/TFIIB and the RNAP have been demonstrated to mediate recruitment of the polymerase to the promoter. However the subunit(s) directly contacted by these factors has not been identified. Using systematic yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analyses we have identified an interaction between the N-terminal domain of TFB and an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoK. Intriguingly, homologues of RpoK are found in all three nuclear RNA polymerases (Rpb6) and also in the bacterial RNA polymerase (omega-subunit).

  11. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All political...

  12. Extra virgin olive oil rich in polyphenols modulates VEGF-induced angiogenic responses by preventing NADPH oxidase activity and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; D'Amore, Simona; Gnoni, Antonio; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Storelli, Carlo; De Caterina, Raffaele; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown the antiinflammatory, antioxidant and antiangiogenic properties by pure olive oil polyphenols; however, the effects of olive oil phenolic fraction on the inflammatory angiogenesis are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of the phenolic fraction (olive oil polyphenolic extract, OOPE) from extra virgin olive oil and related circulating metabolites on the VEGF-induced angiogenic responses and NADPH oxidase activity and expression in human cultured endothelial cells. We found that OOPE (1-10 μg/ml), at concentrations achievable nutritionally, significantly reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the VEGF-induced cell migration, invasiveness and tube-like structure formation through the inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. OOPE significantly (Pextra virgin olive oil, with high polyphenol content, decreased VEGF-induced NADPH oxidase activity and Nox4 expression, as well as, MMP-9 expression, as compared with fasting control serum. Overall, native polyphenols and serum metabolites of extra virgin olive oil rich in polyphenols are able to lower the VEGF-induced angiogenic responses by preventing endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and decreasing the expression of selective NADPH oxidase subunits. Our results provide an alternative mechanism by which the consumption of olive oil rich in polyphenols may account for a reduction of oxidative stress inflammatory-related sequelae associated with chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment with salvianolic acid B restores endothelial function in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wei Chih; Liu, Jian; Lau, Chi Wai; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Huang, Yu

    2017-07-15

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is one of the most abundant phenolic acids derived from the root of Danshen with potent anti-oxidative properties. The present study examined the vasoprotective effect of Sal B in hypertensive mice induced by angiotensin II (Ang II). Sal B (25mg/kg/day) was administered via oral gavage for 11days to Ang II (1.2mg/kg/day)-infused C57BL/6J mice (8-10weeks old). The vascular reactivity (both endothelium-dependent relaxations and contractions) in mouse arteries was examined by wire myography. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein level and localization of angiotensin AT 1 receptors and the proteins involved in ROS formation were evaluated using dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. The changes of ROS generating proteins were also assessed in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to Ang II with and without co-treatment with Sal B (0.1-10nM). Oral administration of Sal B reversed the Ang II-induced elevation of arterial systolic blood pressure in mice, augmented the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations and attenuated the exaggerated endothelium-dependent contractions in both aortas and renal arteries of Ang II-infused mice. In addition, Sal B treatment normalized the elevated levels of AT 1 receptors, NADPH oxidase subunits (NOx-2 and NOx-4) and nitrotyrosine in arteries of Ang II-infused mice or in Ang II-treated HUVECs. In summary, the present study provided additional evidence demonstrating that Sal B treatment for 11days reverses the impaired endothelial function and with a marked inhibition of AT 1 receptor-dependent vascular oxidative stress. This vasoprotective and anti-oxidative action of Sal B most likely contributes to the anti-hypertensive action of the plant-derived compound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Complexity of Mitochondrial Complex IV: An Update of Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Natanael; Racca, Sofia; Gras, Diana E.; Gonzalez, Daniel H.

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is an energy producing process that involves the coordinated action of several protein complexes embedded in the inner membrane to finally produce ATP. Complex IV or Cytochrome c Oxidase (COX) is the last electron acceptor of the respiratory chain, involved in the reduction of O2 to H2O. COX is a multimeric complex formed by multiple structural subunits encoded in two different genomes, prosthetic groups (heme a and heme a3), and metallic centers (CuA and CuB). Tens of accessory proteins are required for mitochondrial RNA processing, synthesis and delivery of prosthetic groups and metallic centers, and for the final assembly of subunits to build a functional complex. In this review, we perform a comparative analysis of COX composition and biogenesis factors in yeast, mammals and plants. We also describe possible external and internal factors controlling the expression of structural proteins and assembly factors at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and the effect of deficiencies in different steps of COX biogenesis to infer the role of COX in different aspects of plant development. We conclude that COX assembly in plants has conserved and specific features, probably due to the incorporation of a different set of subunits during evolution. PMID:29495437

  15. Sildenafil promotes eNOS activation and inhibits NADPH oxidase in the transgenic sickle cell mouse penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, Biljana; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Champion, Hunter C; Burnett, Arthur L

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD)-associated vasculopathy in the penis is characterized by aberrant nitric oxide and phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 signaling, and by increased oxidative stress. Preliminary clinical trials show that continuous treatment with PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil unassociated with sexual activity decreases priapic activity in patients with SCD. However, the mechanism of its vasculoprotective effect in the penis remains unclear. We evaluated whether continuous administration of PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil promotes eNOS function at posttranslational levels and decreases superoxide-producing enzyme NADPH oxidase activity in the sickle cell mouse penis. SCD transgenic mice were used as an animal model of SCD. WT mice served as controls. Mice received treatment with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 weeks. eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177 (positive regulatory site), eNOS interactions with heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) (positive regulator), phosphorylated AKT (upstream mediator of eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177), an NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit gp91(phox), and a marker of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]) were measured by Western blot. Effect of continuous sildenafil treatment on eNOS posttranslational activation, NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit, and oxidative stress in the penis of the sickle cell mouse. Continuous treatment with sildenafil reversed (P penis. Sildenafil treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters. Our findings that sildenafil enhances eNOS activation and inhibits NADPH oxidase function in the sickle cell mouse penis offers a vasculoprotective molecular basis for the therapeutic effect of sildenafil in the penis in association with SCD. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  16. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Ostergaard, L. H.; Fuglsang, C. C.; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2009), s. 638-640 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbohydrate oxidase * crystallization * data processing Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2009

  17. Investigation of antihemolytic, xanthine oxidase inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abbreviations: SVEs: Salvia Verbenaca L. aerial part Extracts; CrE: Crud Extract; ChE: Chloroform Extract ; EAE: Ethyl Acetate Extract; AqE : Aqueous Extract ; ROS: Reactive Oxygen Spices; AAPH : 2,2, -Azobis (2-AmidinoPropane) Dihydrochloride ; DPPH: DiPhenyl- Picryl-Hydrazyl; XO: Xanthine Oxidase; Gen: Gentamicin ...

  18. Genetic defects of cytochrome c oxidase assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecina, Petr; Houšťková, H.; Hansíková, H.; Zeman, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. S213-S223 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/03/0749 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial disorders Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  19. The antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarchonanthus camphoratus (camphor bush) has been widely used for numerous medicinal purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase inhibition activities of the crude dichloromethane leaf extract of T. camphoratus. The antioxidant activities were ...

  20. [Three regions of Rpb10 mini-subunit of nuclear RNA polymerases are strictly conserved in all eukaryotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakovskiĭ, G V; Lebedenko, E N

    1996-12-01

    The rpb10+ cDNA from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was cloned using two independent approaches (PCR and genetic suppression). The cloned cDNA encoded the Rpb10 subunit common for all three RNA polymerases. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the Sz. pombe Rbp10 subunit (71 amino acid residues) with those of the homologous subunits of RNA polymerases I, II, and III from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Home sapiens revealed that heptapeptides RCFT/SCGK (residues 6-12), RYCCRRM (residues 43-49), and HVDLIEK (residues 53-59) were evolutionarily the most conserved structural motifs of these subunits. It is shown that the Rbp10 subunit from Sz. pombe can substitute its homolog (ABC10 beta) in the baker's yeast S. cerevisiae.

  1. Type II restriction modification system methylation subunit of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D.; Newby, Deborah T.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, David N.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Apel, William A.; Roberto, Francisco F.; Reed, David W.

    2018-02-13

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering recombination inside or outside of a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and/or nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  2. The TFIIH Subunit p89 (XPB Localizes to the Centrosome during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Weber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The general transcription factor II H (TFIIH, comprised of a core complex and an associated CAK-complex, functions in transcription, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Mutations of the two largest subunits, p89 (XPB and p80 (XPD, cause the hereditary cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum.

  3. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34.

  4. A novel mitochondrial protein of Neurospora crassa immunoprecipitates with known enzyme subunits but is not antigenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, E.

    1989-01-01

    14 C labeled 4'-phosphopantetheine (PAN) is detectable as 2 bands after SDS-PAGE of mitochondrial proteins. The bands comigrate with subunit 6 of cytochrome oxidase (COX) and a small ATPase subunit in tube gel slices of immunoprecipitates. However, other work demonstrated these bands to be due to modification of a novel protein, related to acyl carrier protein (ACP) of spinach and E. coli, that exists in two forms. To resolve this discrepancy, 1-dimensional (1D) slab and 2-dimensional (2D) SDS-PAGE was used for increased resolution over tube gels. Total mitochondrial protein gels from PAN labeled cells were western blotted, probed for COX, and autoradiographed. In 1D there is exact migration of PAN with COX6. In 2D PAN overlaps a protein distinct from and not antigenically related to COX subunits. These data suggest it is the ACP-like protein that in PAN-modified. Its possible association with COX during assembly will be discussed

  5. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  6. Role of pH in oxidase variability of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, L K; Overman, T L; Otero, R B

    1981-01-01

    Some strains of Aeromonas hydrophila may be oxidase negative or only weakly oxidase positive by the Kovacs method taken from the surface of a differential medium, such as MacConkey agar. Six strains of A. hydrophila, two oxidase variable, one oxidase constant, and three weakly oxidase positive on MacConkey agar, were studied to determine the cause of oxidase variability. The bacteriostatic dyes in MacConkey agar were considered possible inhibitors of the oxidase reaction. The concentration of...

  7. Eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunit RPB8 is a new relative of the OB family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, S; Kelly, G; Reischl, J; Weinzierl, R O; Matthews, S

    1998-02-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit RPB8 is an essential subunit that is highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution and is present in all three types of nuclear RNA polymerases. We report the first high resolution structural insight into eukaryotic RNA polymerase architecture with the solution structure of RPB8 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It consists of an eight stranded, antiparallel beta-barrel, four short helical regions and a large, unstructured omega-loop. The strands are connected in classic Greek-key fashion. The overall topology is unusual and contains a striking C2 rotational symmetry. Furthermore, it is most likely a novel associate of the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) binding protein class.

  8. Plasma diamine oxidase activity in asthmatic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoichiro Toyoshima

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine plays an important role in the development of asthmatic symptoms. Diamine oxidase (DAO histaminase, which inactivates histamine, is located in the intestine and kidney and is released into plasma. Plasma DAO activity in asthmatic children was measured by a recently developed high performance liquid chromatographic method using histamine as the DAO substrate. Diamine oxidase activity was higher in severely asthmatic children than in those with mild asthma. A time course study during the acute exacerbation phase revealed that DAO activity rose during acute asthmatic attacks and then decreased gradually over several days. Although the mechanisms of plasma DAO activity increase during acute asthmatic attacks could not be explained, data showed that plasma DAO activity is an important index of histamine metabolism in asthmatics and may relate to some mechanisms of acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Consequently, fluctuations in plasma DAO can be used as one of various indices of instability in management of asthma.

  9. Lysyl Oxidase and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Hong Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The lysyl oxidase (LOX family of oxidases contains a group of extracellular copper-dependent enzymes that catalyze the cross-linking of collagen and elastin by oxidation, thus maintaining the rigidity and structural stability of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Aberrant expression or activation of LOX alters the cellular microenvironment, leading to many diseases, including atherosclerosis, tissue fibrosis, and cancer. Recently, a number of studies have shown that LOX is overexpressed in most cancers and that it is involved in the regulation of tumor progression and metastasis. In contrast, a few reports have also indicated the tumor-suppressing role of LOX. In this short review, we discuss recent research on the correlations between LOX and cancer. Further, the role of LOX in tumor microenvironment remodeling, tumorigenesis, and metastasis and the underlying mechanisms have also been elucidated.

  10. Characterization of the cydAB-Encoded Cytochrome bd Oxidase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Bavesh D.; Weinstein, Edward A.; Avarbock, David; Dawes, Stephanie S.; Rubin, Harvey; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2001-01-01

    The cydAB genes from Mycobacterium smegmatis have been cloned and characterized. The cydA and cydB genes encode the two subunits of a cytochrome bd oxidase belonging to the widely distributed family of quinol oxidases found in prokaryotes. The cydD and cydC genes located immediately downstream of cydB encode a putative ATP-binding cassette-type transporter. At room temperature, reduced minus oxidized difference spectra of membranes purified from wild-type M. smegmatis displayed spectral features that are characteristic of the γ-proteobacterial type cytochrome bd oxidase. Inactivation of cydA or cydB by insertion of a kanamycin resistance marker resulted in loss of d-heme absorbance at 631 nm. The d-heme could be restored by transformation of the M. smegmatis cyd mutants with a replicating plasmid carrying the highly homologous cydABDC gene cluster from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Inactivation of cydA had no effect on the ability of M. smegmatis to exit from stationary phase at 37 or 42°C. The growth rate of the cydA mutant was tested under oxystatic conditions. Although no discernible growth defect was observed under moderately aerobic conditions (9.2 to 37.5 × 102 Pa of pO2 or 5 to 21% air saturation), the mutant displayed a significant growth disadvantage when cocultured with the wild type under extreme microaerophilia (0.8 to 1.7 × 102 Pa of pO2 or 0.5 to 1% air saturation). These observations were in accordance with the two- to threefold increase in cydAB gene expression observed upon reduction of the pO2 of the growth medium from 21 to 0.5% air saturation and with the concomitant increase in d-heme absorbance in spectra of membranes isolated from wild-type M. smegmatis cultured at 1% air saturation. Finally, the cydA mutant displayed a competitive growth disadvantage in the presence of the terminal oxidase inhibitor, cyanide, when cocultured with wild type at 21% air saturation in an oxystat. In conjunction with these findings, our results suggest that

  11. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors from Gentiana lutea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Kabbash, Amal; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2004-08-01

    Three monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were isolated from Gentiana lutea. Their structures were elucidated to be 3-3''linked-(2'-hydroxy-4-O-isoprenylchalcone)-(2'''-hydroxy-4''-O-isoprenyldihydrochalcone) (1), 2-methoxy-3-(1,1'-dimethylallyl)-6a,10a-dihydrobenzo(1,2-c)chroman-6-one and 5-hydroxyflavanone. These compounds, and the hydrolysis product of 1, displayed competitive inhibitory properties against MAO-B which was more effective than MAO-A.

  12. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  13. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets

  14. Identification of aldehyde oxidase 1 and aldehyde oxidase homologue 1 as dioxin-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Steven P.; Choi, Hyun Ho; Chapman, Brett; Whitekus, Michael J.; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Hankinson, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases are a family of highly related molybdo-flavoenzymes acting upon a variety of compounds of industrial and medical importance. We have identified aldehyde oxidase 1 (AOX1) as a 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) inducible gene in the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1. AOX1 mRNA levels were not increased by dioxin in mutant derivatives of the Hepa-1 cell line lacking either functional aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) or aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) proteins, thus demonstrating that transcriptional induction of AOX1 in response to dioxin occurs through the AHR pathway. Dioxin induction of AOX1 mRNA was also observed in mouse liver. In addition, levels of AOX1 protein as well as those of aldehyde oxidase homologue 1 (AOH1), a recently identified homolog of AOX1, were elevated in mouse liver in response to dioxin. Employing an aldehyde oxidase specific substrate, AOX1/AOH1 activity was shown to be induced by dioxin in mouse liver. This activity was inhibited by a known inhibitor of aldehyde oxidases, and eliminated by including tungstate in the mouse diet, which is known to lead to inactivation of molybdoflavoenzymes, thus confirming that the enzymatic activity was attributable to AOX1/AOH1. Our observations thus identify two additional xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes induced by dioxin

  15. Apocynin: Chemical and Biophysical Properties of a NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir F. Ximenes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apocynin is the most employed inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX, a multienzymatic complex capable of catalyzing the one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to the superoxide anion. Despite controversies about its selectivity, apocynin has been used as one of the most promising drugs in experimental models of inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we aimed to study the chemical and biophysical properties of apocynin. The oxidation potential was determined by cyclic voltammetry (Epa = 0.76V, the hydrophobicity index was calculated (logP = 0.83 and the molar absorption coefficient was determined (e275nm = 1.1 × 104 M−1 cm−1. Apocynin was a weak free radical scavenger (as measured using the DPPH, peroxyl radical and nitric oxide assays when compared to protocatechuic acid, used here as a reference antioxidant. On the other hand, apocynin was more effective than protocatechuic acid as scavenger of the non-radical species hypochlorous acid. Apocynin reacted promptly with the non-radical reactive species H2O2 only in the presence of peroxidase. This finding is relevant, since it represents a new pathway for depleting H2O2 in cellular experimental models, besides the direct inhibition of NADPH oxidase. This could be relevant for its application as an inhibitor of NOX4, since this isoform produces H2O2 and not superoxide anion. The binding parameters calculated by fluorescence quenching showed that apocynin binds to human serum albumin (HSA with a binding affinity of 2.19 × 104 M−1. The association did not alter the secondary and tertiary structure of HSA, as verified by synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism. The displacement of fluorescent probes suggested that apocynin binds to site I and site II of HSA. Considering the current biomedical applications of this phytochemical, the dissemination of these chemical and biophysical properties can be very helpful for scientists and physicians interested in the use of apocynin.

  16. Effect of microinjections of subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase on development, proliferation, and RNA synthesis in early embryos of the loach Misgurnus fossilis L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glukhov, A.I.; Benyumov, A.O.; Nesterova, M.V.; Severin, E.S.; Gazaryan, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II on development, proliferation, and RNA synthesis was studied in loach embryos. It was found that injection of the catalytic subunit in a physiological concentration leads to a disturbance in the course of development and inhibits proliferation and RNA synthesis in the embryos. An increase in the concentration of this protein above the physiological level leads to death of the embryos in the first hours of development. Injection of the regulatory subunit stimulated the incorporation of labeled uridine into the acid-insoluble fraction of the embryos, beginning with the gastrula stage. The cell nuclei of loach embryos injected with subunits of protein kinase type II were transplanted into activated loach egg cells: subunits of protein kinase type I had no effect on the ability of nuclei of undetermined loach embryo cells to provide de novo development and their effect was reversible

  17. The Subunit Principle in Scar Face Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahat, Ahmed; Lashin, Riham

    2017-06-01

    Facial scaring is considered one of the most difficult cosmetic problems for any plastic surgeon to solve. The condition is more difficult if the direction of the scar is not parallel to relaxed skin tension lines. Attempts to manage this difficult situation included revisions using geometric designs, Z plasties or W plasties to camouflage the straight line visible scaring. The use of long-lasting resorbable sutures was tried too. Recently, the use of botulinum toxin during revision improved the results. Fractional CO2 lasers, microfat grafts, and platelet-rich plasma were added to the armamentarium. The scar is least visible if placed in the junction between the facial subunits. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the subunit principle to improve the results of scar revision. Four patients were included in this study. Tissue expansion of the intact part of the subunit allowed shifting the scar to the junction between the affected subunit and the adjacent one. Tissue expansion, delivery of the expanders, and advancement of the flaps were successful in all patients. The fact that this is a 2-stage procedure and sacrifices some of the intact skin from the affected facial subunit, makes this technique reserved to patients with ugly facial scars who are ambitious to improve their appearance.

  18. Biogenic manganese oxide nanoparticle formation by a multimeric multicopper oxidase Mnx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Christine A.; Zhou, Mowei; Song, Yang; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Kovarik, Libor; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2017-09-29

    Bacteria that produce Mn oxides are extraordinarily skilled engineers of nanomaterials that contribute significantly to global biogeochemical cycles. Their enzyme-based reaction mechanisms may be genetically tailored for environmental remediation applications or bioenergy production. However, significant challenges exist for structural characterization of the enzymes responsible for biomineralization. The active Mn oxidase, Mnx, in Bacillus sp. PL-12 is a complex composed of a multicopper oxidase (MCO), MnxG, and two accessory proteins MnxE and MnxF. MnxG shares sequence similarity with other, structurally characterized MCOs. However, MnxE and MnxF have no similarity to any characterized proteins. The ~200 kDa complex has been recalcitrant to crystallization, so its structure is unknown. In this study, native mass spectrometry defines the subunit topology and copper binding of the Mnx complex, while high resolution electron microscopy visualizes the protein and nascent Mn oxide minerals. These data provide critical structural information for conceptualizing how Mnx produces nanoparticulate Mn oxides.

  19. Cox1 mutation abrogates need for Cox23 in cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dela Cruz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cox23 is a known conserved assembly factor for cytochrome c oxidase, although its role in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO biogenesis remains unresolved. To gain additional insights into its role, we isolated spontaneous suppressors of the respiratory growth defect in cox23∆ yeast cells. We recovered independent colonies that propagated on glycerol/lactate medium for cox23∆ cells at 37°C. We mapped these mutations to the mitochondrial genome and specifically to COX1 yielding an I101F substitution. The I101F Cox1 allele is a gain-of-function mutation enabling yeast to respire in the absence of Cox23. CcO subunit steady-state levels were restored with the I101F Cox1 suppressor mutation and oxygen consumption and CcO activity were likewise restored. Cells harboring the mitochondrial genome encoding I101F Cox1 were used to delete genes for other CcO assembly factors to test the specificity of the Cox1 mutation as a suppressor of cox23∆ cells. The Cox1 mutant allele fails to support respiratory growth in yeast lacking Cox17, Cox19, Coa1, Coa2, Cox14 or Shy1, demonstrating its specific suppressor activity for cox23∆ cells.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a flavoprotein NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus brevis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzu, Mutlu; Niefind, Karsten; Hummel, Werner; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    The water-forming flavoenzyme NADH oxidase was crystallized successfully for the first time. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 4.0 Å resolution. NADH oxidase (NOX) from Lactobacillus brevis is a homotetrameric flavoenzyme composed of 450 amino acids per subunit. The molecular weight of each monomer is 48.8 kDa. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of two equivalents of NADH and reduces one equivalent of oxygen to yield two equivalents of water, without releasing hydrogen peroxide after the reduction of the first equivalent of NADH. Crystals of this protein were grown in the presence of 34% polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether 2000, 0.1 M sodium acetate and 0.2 M ammonium sulfate at pH 5.4. They belong to the tetragonal space group P4 3 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.8, b = 95.7, c = 116.9 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 103.8°. The current diffraction limit is 4.0 Å. The self-rotation function of the native data set is consistent with a NOX tetramer in the asymmetric unit

  1. Identification and characterization of an antennae-specific aldehyde oxidase from the navel orangeworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Moo Choo

    Full Text Available Antennae-specific odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs are postulated to inactivate odorant molecules after they convey their signal. Different classes of insect ODEs are specific to esters, alcohols, and aldehydes--the major functional groups of female-produced, hydrophobic sex pheromones from moth species. Esterases that rapidly inactive acetate and other esters have been well-studied, but less is known about aldehyde oxidases (AOXs. Here we report cloning of an aldehyde oxidase, AtraAOX2, from the antennae of the navel orangeworm (NOW, Amyelois transitella, and the first activity characterization of a recombinant insect AOX. AtraAOX2 gene spans 3,813 bp and encodes a protein with 1,270 amino acid residues. AtraAOX2 cDNA was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect Sf21 cells as a ≈280 kDa homodimer with 140 kDa subunits. Recombinant AtraAOX2 degraded Z11Z13-16Ald and plant volatile aldehydes as substrates. However, as expected for aldehyde oxidases, recombinant AtraAOX2 did not show specificity for Z11Z13-16Ald, the main constituent of the sex pheromone, but showed high activity for plant volatile aldehydes. Our data suggest AtraAOX2 might be involved in degradation of a diversity of aldehydes including sex pheromones, plant-derived semiochemicals, and chemical cues for oviposition sites. Additionally, AtraAOX2 could protect the insect's olfactory system from xenobiotics, including pesticides that might reach the sensillar lymph surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons.

  2. Modulation of NADPH oxidase activity by known uraemic retention solutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna Marta; Terne, Cindy; Jankowski, Vera

    2014-01-01

    chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. The effect on enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase was quantified within an incubation time of 120 min. RESULTS: Thirty-nine of the 48 uraemic retention solutes tested had a significant decreasing effect on NADPH oxidase activity. Oxalate has been characterized......BACKGROUND: Uraemia and cardiovascular disease appear to be associated with an increased oxidative burden. One of the key players in the genesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Based on initial experiments demonstrating a decreased...... inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity in the presence of plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis compared with before dialysis, we investigated the effect of 48 known and commercially available uraemic retention solutes on the enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase. METHODS: Mononuclear leucocytes...

  3. Chemoenzymatic combination of glucose oxidase with titanium silicalite -1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennestrøm, Peter Nicolai Ravnborg; Taarning, Esben; Christensen, Claus H.

    2010-01-01

    Zeozymes: A proof-of-concept is presented for the chemoenzymatic combination of titanium silicalite-1 zeolite with glucose oxidase. In this combination, glucose is oxidized to gluconic acid and the H2O2 byproduct formed in situ is used for the simultaneous oxidation of chemical substrates. Both...... a soluble glucose oxidase and a truly integrated heterogeneous combination whereby the oxidase enzyme is anchored onto the zeolite surface are reported....

  4. Plasma diamine oxidase levels in pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, M; Duff, G B

    1981-02-01

    Plasma diamine oxidase levels were assayed in 66 patients who presented with pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion. Levels within the normal range were associated with continuing pregnancies, whereas levels below the normal range were associated with subsequent abortion. Among those patients in whom gestation was greater than eight weeks, 66.6% of diamine oxidase levels correctly predicted the pregnancy outcome. Assay of the diamine oxidase levels at eight weeks of gestation or less gave little useful information.

  5. Plasma diamine oxidase levels in pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion.

    OpenAIRE

    Legge, M; Duff, G B

    1981-01-01

    Plasma diamine oxidase levels were assayed in 66 patients who presented with pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion. Levels within the normal range were associated with continuing pregnancies, whereas levels below the normal range were associated with subsequent abortion. Among those patients in whom gestation was greater than eight weeks, 66.6% of diamine oxidase levels correctly predicted the pregnancy outcome. Assay of the diamine oxidase levels at eight weeks of gestation or less ga...

  6. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  7. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Deprivation on Redox Regulation in Rat Brain: Involvement of NADPH Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branka Marković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal deprivation (MD causes perinatal stress, with subsequent behavioral changes which resemble the symptoms of schizophrenia. The NADPH oxidase is one of the major generators of reactive oxygen species, known to play a role in stress response in different tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the long-term effects of MD on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91phox, p22phox, p67phox, p47phox, and p40phox. Activities of cytochrome C oxidase and respiratory chain Complex I, as well as the oxidative stress parameters using appropriate spectrophotometric techniques were analyzed. Nine-day-old Wistar rats were exposed to a 24 h maternal deprivation and sacrificed at young adult age. The structures affected by perinatal stress, cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and caudate nuclei were investigated. The most prominent findings were increased expressions of gp91phox in the cortex and hippocampus, increased expression of p22phox and p40phox, and decreased expression of gp91phox, p22phox, and p47phox in the caudate nuclei. Complex I activity was increased in all structures except cortex. Content of reduced glutathione was decreased in all sections while region-specific changes of other oxidative stress parameters were found. Our results indicate the presence of long-term redox alterations in MD rats.

  8. NADPH oxidase AtrbohD and AtrbohF genes function in ROS-dependent ABA signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, June M.; Mori, Izumi C.; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Torres, Miguel Angel; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Bloom, Rachel E.; Bodde, Sara; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed to function as second messengers in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in guard cells. However, the question whether ROS production is indeed required for ABA signal transduction in vivo has not yet been addressed, and the molecular mechanisms mediating ROS production during ABA signaling remain unknown. Here, we report identification of two partially redundant Arabidopsis guard cell-expressed NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit genes, AtrbohD and AtrbohF, in which gene disruption impairs ABA signaling. atrbohD/F double mutations impair ABA-induced stomatal closing, ABA promotion of ROS production, ABA-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increases and ABA- activation of plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channels in guard cells. Exogenous H2O2 rescues both Ca2+ channel activation and stomatal closing in atrbohD/F. ABA inhibition of seed germination and root elongation are impaired in atrbohD/F, suggesting more general roles for ROS and NADPH oxidases in ABA signaling. These data provide direct molecular genetic and cell biological evidence that ROS are rate-limiting second messengers in ABA signaling, and that the AtrbohD and AtrbohF NADPH oxidases function in guard cell ABA signal transduction. PMID:12773379

  9. Kinetic pathway of 40S ribosomal subunit recruitment to hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Gabriele; Petrov, Alexey N; Marceau, Caleb D; Popov, Lauren M; Chen, Jin; O'Leary, Seán E; Wang, Richard; Carette, Jan E; Sarnow, Peter; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-01-13

    Translation initiation can occur by multiple pathways. To delineate these pathways by single-molecule methods, fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunits are required. Here, we labeled human 40S ribosomal subunits with a fluorescent SNAP-tag at ribosomal protein eS25 (RPS25). The resulting ribosomal subunits could be specifically labeled in living cells and in vitro. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between RPS25 and domain II of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES), we measured the rates of 40S subunit arrival to the HCV IRES. Our data support a single-step model of HCV IRES recruitment to 40S subunits, irreversible on the initiation time scale. We furthermore demonstrated that after binding, the 40S:HCV IRES complex is conformationally dynamic, undergoing slow large-scale rearrangements. Addition of translation extracts suppresses these fluctuations, funneling the complex into a single conformation on the 80S assembly pathway. These findings show that 40S:HCV IRES complex formation is accompanied by dynamic conformational rearrangements that may be modulated by initiation factors.

  10. Distribution of protein and RNA in the 30S ribosomal subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.

    1986-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the small ribosomal subunit has a sedimentation coefficient of 30S, and consists of a 16S RNA molecule of 1541 nucleotides complexed with 21 proteins. Over the last few years, a controversy has emerged regarding the spatial distribution of RNA and protein in the 30S subunit. Contrast variation with neutron scattering was used to suggest that the RNA was located in a central core of the subunit and the proteins mainly in the periphery, with virtually no separation between the centers of mass of protein and RNA. However, these findings are incompatible with the results of efforts to locate individual ribosomal proteins by immune electron microscopy and triangulation with interprotein distance measurements. The conflict between these two views is resolved in this report of small-angle neutron scattering measurements on 30S subunits with and without protein S1, and on subunits reconstituted from deuterated 16S RNA and unlabeled proteins. The results show that (i) the proteins and RNA are intermingled, with neither component dominating at the core or the periphery, and (ii) the spatial distribution of protein and RNA is asymmetrical, with a separation between their centers of mass of about 25 angstroms

  11. Photoinduced reduction of the medial FeS center in the hydrogenase small subunit HupS from Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Hammarström, Leif; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The small subunit from the NiFe uptake hydrogenase, HupSL, in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133, has been isolated in the absence of the large subunit (P. Raleiras, P. Kellers, P. Lindblad, S. Styring, A. Magnuson, J. Biol. Chem. 288 (2013) 18,345-18,352). Here, we have used flash photolysis to reduce the iron-sulfur clusters in the isolated small subunit, HupS. We used ascorbate as electron donor to the photogenerated excited state of Ru(II)-trisbipyridine (Ru(bpy)3), to generate Ru(I)(bpy)3 as reducing agent. Our results show that the isolated small subunit can be reduced by the Ru(I)(bpy)3 generated through flash photolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunochemical aspects of crotoxim and its subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazone, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Crotamine and crotoxin with the subunits - phospholipase A and crotapotin - were obtained by purification from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom. Interaction studies of the subunits using crotalic antiserum, indicated that: crotoxin is formed of crotapotin and phospholipase A with the molar ratio of 1 to 1; using crotapotin 125 I the presence of a soluble complex was shown with the same antiserum. Immunological precipitation reactions demonstrated that crotapotin is antigenic: crotapotin and phospholipase A presented similar antigenic determinants; crotoxin antiserum reacted with each one of the submits; when the subunits are mixed to form synthetic crotoxin some antigenic determinants are masked in the process of interaction. Crotamine, interacted with crotapotin 1:1, without hidden antigenic determinants crotapotin antigenic site seems to be formed by, at least, one lysine. Enzimatical activity of phospholipase A apreared to be dependent on some reaction conditions when its arginine residues are blocked. Tyrosines of phospholipase A are more susceptible to labelling with 131 I than crotapotin. Gama irradiation of aqueous solutions of the subunits produced modifications in the ultraviolet spectra. A decrease of the enzymatic activity occured as a function of radiation dosis. Immunological activities of crotapotin and phospholipase A were not altered [pt

  13. NADPH oxidase: an enzyme for multicellularity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Multicellularity has evolved several times during the evolution of eukaryotes. One evolutionary pressure that permits multicellularity relates to the division of work, where one group of cells functions as nutrient providers and the other in specialized roles such as defence or reproduction. This requires signalling systems to ensure harmonious development of multicellular structures. Here, we show that NADPH oxidases are specifically present in organisms that differentiate multicellular structures during their life cycle and are absent from unicellular life forms. The biochemical properties of these enzymes make them ideal candidates for a role in intercellular signalling.

  14. Metformin and liraglutide ameliorate high glucose-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of PKC-NAD(P)H oxidase pathway in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Shuji; Inoue, Tomoaki; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    Metformin and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications and atherosclerosis. However, the direct effects on hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells are not fully understood. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the effects of metformin and a GLP-1 analog, liraglutide on high glucose-induced oxidative stress. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and NAD(P)H oxidase, and changes in signaling molecules in response to high glucose exposure were evaluated in human aortic endothelial cells with and without treatment of metformin and liraglutide, alone or in combination. PKC-NAD(P)H oxidase pathway was assessed by translocation of GFP-fused PKCβ2 isoform and GFP-fused p47phox, a regulatory subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase, in addition to endogenous PKC phosphorylation and NAD(P)H oxidase activity. High glucose-induced ROS overproduction was blunted by metformin or liraglutide treatment, with a further decrease by a combination of these drugs. Exposure to high glucose caused PKCβ2 translocation and a time-dependent phosphorylation of endogenous PKC but failed to induce its translocation and phosphorylation in the cells treated with metformin and liraglutide. Furthermore, both drugs inhibited p47phox translocation and NAD(P)H oxidase activation, and prevented the high glucose-induced changes in intracellulalr diacylglycerol (DAG) level and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A combination of these drugs further enhanced all of these effects. Metformin and liraglutide ameliorate high glucose-induced oxidative stress by inhibiting PKC-NAD(P)H oxidase pathway. A combination of these two drugs provides augmented protective effects, suggesting the clinical usefulness in prevention of diabetic vascular complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular evolution of the reactive oxygen-generating NADPH oxidase (Nox/Duox family of enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambeth J David

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NADPH-oxidases (Nox and the related Dual oxidases (Duox play varied biological and pathological roles via regulated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Members of the Nox/Duox family have been identified in a wide variety of organisms, including mammals, nematodes, fruit fly, green plants, fungi, and slime molds; however, little is known about the molecular evolutionary history of these enzymes. Results We assembled and analyzed the deduced amino acid sequences of 101 Nox/Duox orthologs from 25 species, including vertebrates, urochordates, echinoderms, insects, nematodes, fungi, slime mold amoeba, alga and plants. In contrast to ROS defense enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase that are present in prokaryotes, ROS-generating Nox/Duox orthologs only appeared later in evolution. Molecular taxonomy revealed seven distinct subfamilies of Noxes and Duoxes. The calcium-regulated orthologs representing 4 subfamilies diverged early and are the most widely distributed in biology. Subunit-regulated Noxes represent a second major subdivision, and appeared first in fungi and amoeba. Nox5 was lost in rodents, and Nox3, which functions in the inner ear in gravity perception, emerged the most recently, corresponding to full-time adaptation of vertebrates to land. The sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus possesses the earliest Nox2 co-ortholog of vertebrate Nox1, 2, and 3, while Nox4 first appeared somewhat later in urochordates. Comparison of evolutionary substitution rates demonstrates that Nox2, the regulatory subunits p47phox and p67phox, and Duox are more stringently conserved in vertebrates than other Noxes and Nox regulatory subunits. Amino acid sequence comparisons identified key catalytic or regulatory regions, as 68 residues were highly conserved among all Nox/Duox orthologs, and 14 of these were identical with those mutated in Nox2 in variants of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. In addition to

  16. NMDARs Mediate the Role of Monoamine Oxidase A in Pathological Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolato, Marco; Godar, Sean C.; Melis, Miriam; Soggiu, Alessio; Roncada, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Flore, Giovanna; Chen, Kevin; Frau, Roberto; Urbani, Andrea; Castelli, M. Paola; Devoto, Paola; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence shows that monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), the key enzyme catalyzing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) degradation, is a primary factor in the pathophysiology of antisocial and aggressive behavior. Accordingly, male MAO A-deficient humans and mice exhibit an extreme predisposition to aggressive outbursts in response to stress. As NMDARs regulate the emotional reactivity to social and environmental stimuli, we hypothesized their involvement in the modulation of aggression mediated by MAO A. In comparison with WT male mice, MAO A KO counterparts exhibited increases in 5-HT and NE levels across all brain regions, but no difference in glutamate concentrations and NMDAR binding. Notably, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of MAO A KO mice exhibited higher expression of NR2A and NR2B, as well as lower levels of glycosylated NR1 subunits. In line with these changes, the current amplitude and decay time of NMDARs in PFC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the currents of these receptors were hypersensitive to the action of the antagonists of the NMDAR complex (dizocilpine), as well as NR2A (PEAQX) and NR2B (Ro 25–6981) subunits. Notably, systemic administration of these agents selectively countered the enhanced aggression in MAO A KO mice, at doses that did not inherently affect motor activity. Our findings suggest that the role of MAO A in pathological aggression may be mediated by changes in NMDAR subunit composition in the PFC, and point to a critical function of this receptor in the molecular bases of antisocial personality. PMID:22723698

  17. Cytochemical Localization of Glucose Oxidase in Peroxisomes of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, Marten; Dijken, Johannes Pieter van

    1980-01-01

    The subcellular localization of glucose oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.4) in mycelia of Aspergillus niger has been investigated using cytochemical staining techniques. Mycelia from fermenter cultures, which produced gluconic acid from glucose, contained elevated levels of glucose oxidase and catalase. Both

  18. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    the increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle there were no detectable changes in the levels of muscle malondialdehyde or in plasma antioxidant capacity up to 4 days post-exercise. 5. It is concluded that eccentric exercise leads to an increased level of xanthine oxidase in human muscle and that the increase...

  19. Laboratory-evolved vanillyl-alcohol oxidase produces natural vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Rovida, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2004-01-01

    The flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase was subjected to random mutagenesis to generate mutants with enhanced reactivity to creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol). The vanillyl-alcohol oxidase-mediated conversion of creosol proceeds via a two-step process in which the initially formed vanillyl alcohol

  20. Optimization of glucose oxidase production by Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-28

    Feb 28, 2011 ... manganese, cobalt, thioglycolic acid, and gluconic acid according to (Liu et al., .... In this experiment duplicate media of glucose 10% were adjusted at different ... Glucose oxidase as a pharmaceutical anti oxidant Drug. Devt. ... Plush KS, Hellmuth K, Rinas U (1996). kinetics of glucose oxidase excretion by ...

  1. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420... screening test for gonorrhea. (a) Identification. An oxidase screening test for gonorrhea is an in vitro... of gonorrhea. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval) (transitional device). (c) Date PMA...

  2. Purification and characterization of an H2O-forming NADH oxidase from Clostridium aminovalericum: existence of an oxygen-detoxifying enzyme in an obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Ishikura, Jun; Chiba, Daisuke; Nishino, Tomoko; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium aminovalericum, an obligate anaerobe, is unable to form colonies on PYD agar plates in the presence of 1% O(2). When grown anaerobically in PYD liquid medium, the strain can continue normal growth after the shift from anoxic (sparged with O(2)-free N(2) carrier-gas) to microoxic (sparged with 3% O(2)/97% N(2) mixed carrier-gas) growth conditions in the mid exponential phase (OD(660)=1.0). When the strain grew under 3% O(2)/97% N(2), the medium remains anoxic. Thirty minutes after beginning aeration with 3% O(2), the activity of NADH oxidase in cell-free extracts increased more than five-fold from the level before aeration. We purified NADH oxidase to determine the characteristics of this enzyme in an obligate anaerobe. The purified NADH oxidase dominated the NADH oxidase activity detected in cell-free extracts. The enzyme is a homotetramer composed of a subunit with a molecular mass of 45 kDa. The enzyme shows a spectrum typical of a flavoprotein, and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) was identified as a cofactor. The final product of NADH oxidation was H(2)O, and the estimated K(m) for oxygen was 61.9 microM. These data demonstrate that an O(2)-response enzyme that is capable of detoxifying oxygen to water exists in C. aminovalericum.

  3. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  4. Human acid-labile subunit deficiency: clinical, endocrine and metabolic consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domené, Horacio M.; Hwa, Vivian; Argente, Jesús; Wit, Jan M.; Wit, Jaan M.; Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia; Jasper, Héctor G.; Pozo, Jesús; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A.; Yakar, Shoshana; Fofanova-Gambetti, Olga V.; Rosenfeld, Ron G.; Scaglia, Paula A.; Bengolea, Sonia V.; Lteif, Aida; Kirmani, Salman; Mahmud, Farid H.; Frystyk, Jan; Hermus, Ad; Twickler, T. B.; Kempers, Marlies J. E.; Barrios, Vicente; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel A.; David, Alessia; Rose, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The majority of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II circulate in the serum as a complex with the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 or IGFBP-5, and an acid-labile subunit (ALS). The function of ALS is to prolong the half-life of the IGF-I-IGFBP-3/IGFBP-5 binary complexes.

  5. Modulation of NADPH oxidase activity by known uraemic retention solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Anna Marta; Terne, Cindy; Jankowski, Vera; Cohen, Gerald; Schaefer, Mandy; Boehringer, Falko; Tepel, Martin; Kunkel, Desiree; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    Uraemia and cardiovascular disease appear to be associated with an increased oxidative burden. One of the key players in the genesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Based on initial experiments demonstrating a decreased inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity in the presence of plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis compared with before dialysis, we investigated the effect of 48 known and commercially available uraemic retention solutes on the enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase. Mononuclear leucocytes isolated from buffy coats of healthy volunteers were isolated, lysed and incubated with NADH in the presence of plasma from healthy controls and patients with CKD-5D. Furthermore, the leucocytes were lysed and incubated in the presence of uraemic retention solute of interest and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. The effect on enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase was quantified within an incubation time of 120 min. Thirty-nine of the 48 uraemic retention solutes tested had a significant decreasing effect on NADPH oxidase activity. Oxalate has been characterized as the strongest inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (90% of DPI inhibition). Surprisingly, none of the uraemic retention solutes we investigated was found to increase NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, plasma from patients with CKD-5D before dialysis caused significantly higher inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity compared with plasma from healthy subjects. However, this effect was significantly decreased in plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis. The results of this study show that uraemic retention solutes modulated the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The results of this study might be the basis for the development of inhibitors applicable as drug in the situation of increased oxidative stress. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Study on dioxygen reduction by mutational modifications of the hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Hirotoshi; Kurita, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Proton transport pathway in bilirubin oxidase was mutated. • Two intermediates in the dioxygen reduction steps were trapped and characterized. • A specific glutamate for dioxygen reduction by multicopper oxidases was identified. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase is constructed with Glu463 and water molecules to transport protons for the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. Substitutions of Glu463 with Gln or Ala were attributed to virtually complete loss or significant reduction in enzymatic activities due to an inhibition of the proton transfer steps to dioxygen. The single turnover reaction of the Glu463Gln mutant afforded the highly magnetically interacted intermediate II (native intermediate) with a broad g = 1.96 electron paramagnetic resonance signal detectable at cryogenic temperatures. Reactions of the double mutants, Cys457Ser/Glu463Gln and Cys457Ser/Glu463Ala afforded the intermediate I (peroxide intermediate) because the type I copper center to donate the fourth electron to dioxygen was vacant in addition to the interference of proton transport due to the mutation at Glu463. The intermediate I gave no electron paramagnetic resonance signal, but the type II copper signal became detectable with the decay of the intermediate I. Structural and functional similarities between multicopper oxidases are discussed based on the present mutation at Glu463 in bilirubin oxidase.

  7. Study on dioxygen reduction by mutational modifications of the hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Hirotoshi; Kurita, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Proton transport pathway in bilirubin oxidase was mutated. • Two intermediates in the dioxygen reduction steps were trapped and characterized. • A specific glutamate for dioxygen reduction by multicopper oxidases was identified. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase is constructed with Glu463 and water molecules to transport protons for the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. Substitutions of Glu463 with Gln or Ala were attributed to virtually complete loss or significant reduction in enzymatic activities due to an inhibition of the proton transfer steps to dioxygen. The single turnover reaction of the Glu463Gln mutant afforded the highly magnetically interacted intermediate II (native intermediate) with a broad g = 1.96 electron paramagnetic resonance signal detectable at cryogenic temperatures. Reactions of the double mutants, Cys457Ser/Glu463Gln and Cys457Ser/Glu463Ala afforded the intermediate I (peroxide intermediate) because the type I copper center to donate the fourth electron to dioxygen was vacant in addition to the interference of proton transport due to the mutation at Glu463. The intermediate I gave no electron paramagnetic resonance signal, but the type II copper signal became detectable with the decay of the intermediate I. Structural and functional similarities between multicopper oxidases are discussed based on the present mutation at Glu463 in bilirubin oxidase

  8. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New primers for amplification of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcode region designed for species of Decapoda (Crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando L. Mantelatto

    Full Text Available Abstract We designed 14 new primers for amplification of the COI barcode region of decapod crustacean species. We tested, with high level of success, the generation of ~ 640 ± 49 base-pair sequences in selected groups of decapods (hermit crabs, squat lobsters, marine and freshwater crabs and shrimps, encompassing representatives of 27 genera of 15 families, 11 of Pleocyemata (Anomura, Brachyura, and Caridea and 4 of Dendrobranchiata. Based on the results we expect the applicability of these primers for several studies with different taxa within Decapoda.

  10. Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Relationships of Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I in Cimex hemipterus (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seri Masran, Siti Nor Ain; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz

    2017-07-01

    The tropical bed bug is scientifically recognized as a significant public health problem. While there is an increased awareness about their resurgence by medical and life science committees, efficient bed bug management still remains unresolved. The solution may soon arise, as information about bed bugs' infestation dynamics and systematics are becoming more distinguishable. Recent developments in studies about bed bugs are based on molecular intervention by determining their genetic variation and phylogeography. The aim of this study is to assess the phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity among the populations of tropical bed bugs inhabiting Malaysia. A molecular genotyping study was conducted with 22 tropical bed bug populations composed of three individuals per population. The mitochondrial (COI) gene was used as a marker. The data obtained were analyzed using the T-Coffee, ClustalX, MEGA 6.0, and PAUP software. The results showed one main monophyletic clade that consisted of two groups: Ch01 and Ch02. Ch02 consists of samples from the Bandar Hilir population, differing from the other populations studied by one singleton base. However, as there were no changes in the amino acid, this singleton genetic variation was considered to have no effect on genetic differentiation. Ch01 shows similarity with some sequence of Cimex hemipterus (F.) from Thailand, suggesting an international diversity connection. The disparity index apparently suggests that all isolates are homogeneous populations and are supported by the low value of the mean pairwise distance between isolates. This study will increase the knowledge about phylogeographic diversity of tropical bed bug in Malaysia. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen.

  12. Voltammetry and single-molecule in situ scanning tunneling microscopy of laccases and bilirubin oxidase in electrocatalytic dioxygen reduction on Au(111) single-crystal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climent, Victor; Zhang, Jingdong; Friis, Esben Peter

    2012-01-01

    Laccases (E.C. 1.10.3.2) are multicopper oxidases catalytically active in the oxidation of diphenolics and related compounds by molecular dioxygen. The laccases contain a single-copper type I center and a trinuclear cluster of a single-copper type II and a dinuclear type III center. The oxidation...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to molluskan hemocyanin from Concholepas concholepas demonstrate common and specific epitopes among subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Harold; Moltedo, Bruno; De Ioannes, Pablo; Faunes, Fernando; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; Becker, María Inés

    2002-10-01

    We studied the reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the hemocyanin from the Chilean marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas (CCH). This protein has been successfully used as a carrier to produce antibodies to haptens and peptides. All MAbs (13) belonging to IgG subclass exhibit dissociation constants (K(d)) from 1 x 10(-7) M to 1 x 10(-9) M. MAbs were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using CCH treated with different procedures, including dissociation into CCH-A and CCH-B subunits, Western blot, enzymatic digestion, chemical deglycosylation, and thermal denaturation. MAbs were classified into three categories, according to subunit specificity by ELISA. The epitope distribution shows that CCH subunits display common epitopes (group I, 5 MAbs, 1H5, 2A8, 3A5, 3B3, and 3E3), as well as specific epitopes for CCH-A subunits (group II, 3 MAbs, 1B8, 4D8, and 8E5) and for CCH-B subunits (group III, 5 MAbs, 1A4, 1E4, 2H10, 3B7, and 7B4). The results can be summarized as follows: (1). six antibodies react with thermal denatured CCH, suggesting that they recognize linear epitopes, whereas seven recognize conformational epitopes; (2). oxidation of carbohydrate moieties does not affect the binding of the MAbs; (3). enzymatic digestion of CCH decreases the reactivity of all antibodies irrespective of the protease used (elastase or trypsin); (4). bringing together the above data, in addition to epitopic complementarity analysis, we identified 12 different epitopes on the CCH molecule recognized by these MAbs. The anti-CCH MAbs presented here can be useful tools to understand the subunit organization of the CCH and its complex structure, which can explain its immunogenic and immunostimulating properties in mammals.

  14. Muscular subunits transplantation for facial reanimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazan André Salo Buslik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present an alternative technique for reconstruction of musculocutaneous damages in the face transferring innervated subsegments(subunits of the latissimus dorsi flap for replacement of various facial mimetic muscles. METHODS: One clinical case of trauma with skin and mimetic muscles damage is described as an example of the technique. The treatment was performed with microsurgical transfer of latissimus dorsi muscle subunits. Each subunit present shape and dimensions of the respective mimetic muscles replaced. The origin, insertions and force vectors for the mimicmuscle lost were considered. Each subsegment has its own arterial and venous supply with a motor nerve component for the muscular unit. RESULTS: Pre and one year postoperative photos registration of static and dynamic mimic aspects, as well as digital electromyography digital data of the patients were compared. The transplanted muscular units presented myoeletric activity, fulfilling both the functional and cosmetic aspect. CONCLUSION: This technique seems to be a promising way to deal with the complex musculocutaneous losses of the face as well as facial palsy.

  15. Influvac, a trivalent inactivated subunit influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Fabiano, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Influenza represents a major sanitary and socio-economic burden and vaccination is universally considered the most effective strategy for preventing the disease and its complications. Traditional influenza vaccines have been on the market since the late 1940s, with million of doses administered annually worldwide, and demonstrated a substantial efficacy and safety. The trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine has been available for more than 25 years and has been studied in healthy children, adults and the elderly and in people affected by underlying chronic medical conditions. We describe vaccine technology focusing on subunit vaccine production procedures and mode of action and provide updated information on efficacy and safety available data. A review of efficacy and safety data in healthy subjects and in high risk populations from major sponsor- and investigator-driven studies. The vaccine showed a good immunogenicity and a favorable safety profile in all target groups. In the panorama of actually available influenza vaccines, trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine represents a well-established tool for preventing flu and the associated complications.

  16. In Situ Enzymatically Generated Photoswitchable Oxidase Mimetics and Their Application for Colorimetric Detection of Glucose Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gen-Xia; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Wang, Guang-Li

    2016-07-09

    In this study, a simple and amplified colorimetric assay is developed for the detection of the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on in situ formation of a photoswitchable oxidase mimetic of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). GOx catalyzes the oxidation of 1-thio-β-d-glucose to give 1-thio-β-d-gluconic acid which spontaneously hydrolyzes to β-d-gluconic acid and H₂S; the generated H₂S instantly reacts with Cd(2+) in the presence of Na₃PO₄ to give PO₄(3-)-stabilized CdS QDs in situ. Under visible-light (λ ≥ 400 nm) stimulation, the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs are a new style of oxidase mimic derived by producing some active species, such as h⁺, (•)OH, O₂(•-) and a little H₂O₂, which can oxidize the typical substrate (3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzydine (TMB)) with a color change. Based on the GOx-triggered growth of the oxidase mimetics of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs in situ, we developed a simple and amplified colorimetric assay to probe the enzymatic activity of GOx. The proposed method allowed the detection of the enzymatic activity of GOx over the range from 25 μg/L to 50 mg/L with a low detection limit of 6.6 μg/L. We believe the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs generated in situ with photo-stimulated enzyme-mimicking activity may find wide potential applications in biosensors.

  17. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  18. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shackleton, D.R.; Hulmes, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware

  19. Evaluation of oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase for industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassland, Pierre; Sjöde, Anders; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Increased recirculation of process water has given rise to problems with formation of calcium oxalate incrusts (scaling) in the pulp and paper industry and in forest biorefineries. The potential in using oxalate decarboxylase from Aspergillus niger for oxalic acid removal in industrial bleaching plant filtrates containing oxalic acid was examined and compared with barley oxalate oxidase. Ten different filtrates from chemical pulping were selected for the evaluation. Oxalate decarboxylase degraded oxalic acid faster than oxalate oxidase in eight of the filtrates, while oxalate oxidase performed better in one filtrate. One of the filtrates inhibited both enzymes. The potential inhibitory effect of selected compounds on the enzymatic activity was tested. Oxalate decarboxylase was more sensitive than oxalate oxidase to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate decarboxylase was not as sensitive to chlorate and chlorite as oxalate oxidase. Up to 4 mM chlorate ions, the highest concentration tested, had no inhibitory effect on oxalate decarboxylase. Analysis of the filtrates suggests that high concentrations of chlorate present in some of the filtrates were responsible for the higher sensitivity of oxalate oxidase in these filtrates. Oxalate decarboxylase was thus a better choice than oxalate oxidase for treatment of filtrates from chlorine dioxide bleaching.

  20. Quantitation of immunoadsorbed flavoprotein oxidases by luminol-mediated chemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkkanen, A; Maly, F E; Decker, K

    1983-04-01

    The detection of the flavoenzymes 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase and 6-hydroxy-D-nicotine oxidase at the sub-femtomol level was achieved by coupling the reaction of the immunoadsorbed proteins to the peroxidase-catalysed oxidation of luminol. The H2O2-producing oxidases retained their full activity when bound to the respective immobilized antibodies. This fact allowed the concentration of the enzymes from very dilute solutions and the quantitative assay of their activities in the microU range. Due to strict stereoselectivity and the absence of immunological cross-reactivity, the two flavoproteins could be determined in the same solution. This method was used to measure the 6-hydroxy-D-nicotine oxidase and 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase activities in Escherichia coli RR1 and different Arthrobacter strains cultured under non-inducing conditions. The same activity ratio of 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase/6-hydroxy-D-nicotine oxidase as in D L-nicotine-induced cells of A. oxidans was observed in non-induced wild type and in riboflavin-requiring (rf-) mutant cells of this aerob.

  1. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-09-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold.

  2. Soybean glycinin subunits: Characterization of physicochemical and adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaoqun; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Sun, Xiuzhi

    2006-10-04

    Soybean proteins have shown great potential for applications as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives. The objective of this work was to study physicochemical and adhesion properties of soy glycinin subunits. Soybean glycinin was extracted from soybean flour and then fractionated into acidic and basic subunits with an estimated purity of 90 and 85%, respectively. Amino acid composition of glycinin subunits was determined. The high hydrophobic amino acid content is a major contributor to the solubility behavior and water resistance of the basic subunits. Acidic subunits and glycinin had similar solubility profiles, showing more than 80% solubility at pH 2.0-4.0 or 6.5-12.0, whereas basic subunits had considerably lower solubility with the minimum at pH 4.5-8.0. Thermal analysis using a differential scanning calorimeter suggested that basic subunits form new oligomeric structures with higher thermal stability than glycinin but no highly ordered structures present in isolated acidic subunits. The wet strength of basic subunits was 160% more than that of acidic subunits prepared at their respective isoelectric points (pI) and cured at 130 degrees C. Both pH and the curing temperature significantly affected adhesive performance. High-adhesion water resistance was usually observed for adhesives from protein prepared at their pI values and cured at elevated temperatures. Basic subunits are responsible for the water resistance of glycinin and are a good starting material for the development of water-resistant adhesives.

  3. Platelet monoamine oxidase: specific activity and turnover number in headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, K.M.; Brown, G.K.; Craig, I.W.; Peatfield, R.; Rose, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase turnover numbers (molecules of substrate converted to product per minute per active site) have been calculated for the human platelet enzyme using [ 3 H]pargyline. Headache patients with high and low monoamine oxidase specific activities relative to controls were found to have turnover numbers very close to those for controls. This finding suggests that their specific activities vary because of differences in the concentration of active monoamine oxidase molecules, rather than differences in the ability of those enzyme molecules to catalyse the deamination reaction. (Auth.)

  4. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  5. A multisyringe flow injection system with immobilized glucose oxidase based on homogeneous chemiluminescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manera, Matias; Miro, Manuel; Estela, Jose Manuel; Cerda, Victor

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, enzyme containing reactors are for the first time implemented in the multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) technique interfaced with chemiluminescence detection for biochemical assays. The automated methodology is based on the on-line substrate conversion in an oxidase packed-bed reactor and the post-column chemiluminogenic catalysed-reaction of the generated oxidising species with an organic molecule (namely, 3-aminophthalhydrazide) in front of the photosensor module. Various catalysts in homogeneous phase are compared taking advantage of the benefits of the MSFIA concept. On one hand, mineral catalysts (namely, Co(II)) are assessed, on the other hand, minute and accurate volumes of soluble organic species (viz., horseradish peroxidase (HRP)) are readily handled without requiring further immobilization protocols. The potentials of the MSFIA-CL concept with immobilisation of the proper oxidase protein are demonstrated using glucose as a model of substrate. Despite the different pH and kinetic requirements for both the substrate conversion in the enzyme-reactor and the Co(II)/HRP-mediated luminol oxidation integrated in the flow system, the MSFIA approach warrants maximum yields owing to the independent optimisation of the physical and chemical parameters of the various reactions involved. Under the optimised configurations and experimental variables, dynamic working ranges from 2.5x10 -6 to 1.0x10 -3 mol l -1 glucose may be obtained for both detection schemes by proper photomultiplier gain selection. The detection and determination limits calculated at the 3σ and 10σ level were 8.6x10 -7 and 2.0x10 -6 mol l -1 glucose, respectively, for the Co(II)-luminol system, and 1.3x10 -6 and 2.3x10 -6 mol l -1 glucose, respectively, for the HRP-luminol procedure. The repeatability (n=10) at the 1.0x10 -5 mol l -1 level was slightly better for the Co(II)-catalysed reaction (2.5% versus 4.0%). The developed MSFIA-CL methodology was used for kinetic

  6. Effect of a heme oxygenase-1 inducer on NADPH oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of a heme oxygenase-1 inducer on NADPH oxidase expression in ... and immunohistochemistry of hepatic NOX1 and NOX4 were investigated in week 4. ... (HO-1 inhibitor) administration caused upregulation of NOX gene expression ...

  7. Effects of glucose oxidase on the growth performance, serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Martina

    2016-02-06

    Feb 6, 2016 ... The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of diets supplemented with ... Keywords: Glucose oxidase, intestinal health, performance, swine ..... This work was supported by the National High-Tech Research and ...

  8. Structure and activity of Aspergillus nidulans copper amine oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGrath, Aaron P; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Collyer, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans amine oxidase (ANAO) has the unusual ability among the family of copper and trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone-containing amine oxidases of being able to oxidize the amine side chains of lysine residues in large peptides and proteins. We show here that in common with the related...... enzyme from the yeast Pichia pastoris, ANAO can promote the cross-linking of tropoelastin and oxidize the lysine residues in α-casein proteins and tropoelastin. The crystal structure of ANAO, the first for a fungal enzyme in this family, has been determined to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The enzyme is a dimer...... with the archetypal fold of a copper-containing amine oxidase. The active site is the most open of any of those of the structurally characterized enzymes in the family and provides a ready explanation for its lysine oxidase-like activity....

  9. Gene cloning and characterization of NADH oxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... potent inhibitors of NADH oxidases, silver nitrate and potassium cyanide did not show any significant ... anaerobes, a class of organisms that have not been ... DNA and amino acid sequence analyses were performed using.

  10. Distribution of alpha3, alpha5 and alpha(v) integrin subunits in mature and immature human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, G; Mart, M; Santaló, J; Bolton, V N

    1998-10-01

    The distribution of three integrin subunits, alpha3, alpha5 and alpha(v), in immature and mature human oocytes has been examined using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that both alpha5 and alpha(v) are present at the germinal vesicle stage, while alpha3 was only detected in oocytes after germinal vesicle breakdown, in metaphase I and II stage oocytes. The cortical concentration of integrin subunits alpha3 and alpha5 is consistent with their localization in the oolemma. In contrast, the homogeneous distribution of alpha(v) throughout the oocyte suggests the existence of cytoplasmic reservoirs of this protein in the oocyte.

  11. Production of rabbit antibodies against purified Glucose oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Zia,Muhammad Anjum; Ain,Qurat-ul; Iftikhar,Tehreema; Abbas,Rao Zahid; Rahman,Khalil-ur

    2012-01-01

    Glucose oxidase is an active oxygen species generating enzyme produced from Aspergillus niger grown in submerged fermentation. Disintegration of the mycelium resulted in high glucose oxidase activity that was subjected to ammonium sulfate precipitation at 60-85% saturation rates that resulted to 6.14 U mg -1 specific activity. Purification of enzyme by anion exchange column (DEAE-Cellulose) resulted into 22.53 U mg-1 specific activity and 10.27 fold purification. This was applied to sephadex ...

  12. The structure of the TFIIH p34 subunit reveals a von Willebrand factor A like fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik R Schmitt

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase II dependent transcription and nucleotide excision repair are mediated by a multifaceted interplay of subunits within the general transcription factor II H (TFIIH. A better understanding of the molecular structure of TFIIH is the key to unravel the mechanism of action of this versatile protein complex within these vital cellular processes. The importance of this complex becomes further evident in the context of severe diseases like xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome and trichothiodystrophy, that arise from single point mutations in TFIIH subunits. Here we describe the structure of the p34 subunit of the TFIIH complex from the eukaryotic thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum. The structure revealed that p34 contains a von Willebrand Factor A (vWA like domain, a fold which is generally known to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Within TFIIH p34 strongly interacts with p44, a positive regulator of the helicase XPD. Putative protein-protein interfaces are analyzed and possible binding sites for the p34-p44 interaction suggested.

  13. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with [ 14 C]iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 (± 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked

  14. Molecular detection of field isolates of Turkey Eimeria by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinam, T; Gadde, U; Chapman, H D

    2015-07-01

    Oocysts of Eimeria spp. were isolated from litter samples obtained from 30 commercial turkey farms. Genomic DNA was extracted from clean oocysts, and polymerase chain amplification of the species-specific cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was performed for five species of turkey Eimeria. The species tested were Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria gallopavonis. All DNA samples were positive for E. meleagrimitis, nine were positive for E. adenoeides, two were positive for E. dispersa, and none for E. meleagridis and E. gallopavonis. E. meleagrimitis occurred as a single species in 21 (70 %) of the farms while 9 (30 %) farms had a mixed species with E. meleagrimitis and E. adenoeides and 2 (7 %) were triple positive with E. meleagrimitis, E. adenoeides, and E. dispersa. This is the first account of the field prevalence of turkey Eimeria species using molecular methods.

  15. Human aldolase B subunit-specific radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, M.; Alpert, E.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the direct quantification of aldolase B in human serum and tissues. The method is a double-antibody radioimmunoassay technique using radioiodinated aldolase B homopolymer as ligand, chicken antibodies to aldolase B and rabbit antibodies to chicken IgG. This radioimmunoassay was shown to be specific for the aldolase B subunit, with no cross-reactivity with either human aldolase A subunit or homopolymeric human aldolase C (C 4 ). The lowest measurable amount by this method was 2 ng/ml. Aldolase B is predominantly found in normal liver tissue, with relatively-high aldolase B levels also observed in kidney. Aldolase B levels in the serum obtained from 11 normal subjects ranged from 23 to 38 ng/ml, with a mean of 28.5 +- 9.2 (S.D.) ng/ml. Almost all of patients with hepatitis had serum aldolase B levels greater than 30 ng/ml. In cancer patients, serum aldolase B was slightly elevated in patients with metastatic liver cancer and primary lever cell carcinoma, whereas no elevation of serum aldolase B was shown in patients without liver metastasis. (Auth.)

  16. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  17. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  18. Subunit stoichiometry of the chloroplast photosystem I complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, B.D.; Malkin, R.

    1988-01-01

    A native photosystem I (PS I) complex and a PS I core complex depleted of antenna subunits has been isolated from the uniformly 14 C-labeled aquatic higher plant, Lemna. These complexes have been analyzed for their subunit stoichiometry by quantitative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results for both preparations indicate that one copy of each high molecular mass subunit is present per PS I complex and that a single copy of most low molecular mass subunits is also present. These results suggest that iron-sulfur center X, an early PS I electron acceptor proposed to bind to the high molecular mass subunits, contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster which is bound to a dimeric structure of high molecular mass subunits, each providing 2 cysteine residues to coordinate this cluster

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the small subunit of the heterodimeric laccase POXA3b from Pleurotus ostreatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraroni, Marta; Scozzafava, Andrea; Ullah, Sana; Tron, Thierry; Piscitelli, Alessandra; Sannia, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Laccases are multicopper oxidases of great biotechnological potential. While laccases are generally monomeric glycoproteins, the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus produces two closely related heterodimeric isoenzymes composed of a large subunit, homologous to the other fungal laccases, and a small subunit. The sequence of the small subunit does not show significant homology to any other protein or domain of known function and consequently its function is unknown. The highest similarity to proteins of known structure is to a putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase from Acinetobacter baumannii, which shows an identity of 27.8%. Diffraction-quality crystals of the small subunit of the heterodimeric laccase POXA3b (sPOXA3b) from P. ostreatus were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K from a solution consisting of 1.8 M sodium formate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.6, c = 53.9 Å. The asymmetric unit contains two molecules related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis. A complete data set extending to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å was collected at 100 K using a wavelength of 1.140 Å. PMID:24419623

  20. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis Is Regulated by the Redox State of a Heme-Binding Translational Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2016-02-20

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the respiratory chain, catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and therefore is essential for cell function and viability. COX is a multimeric complex, whose biogenesis is extensively regulated. One type of control targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), a key COX enzymatic core subunit translated on mitochondrial ribosomes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cox1 synthesis and COX assembly are coordinated through a negative feedback regulatory loop. This coordination is mediated by Mss51, a heme-sensing COX1 mRNA-specific processing factor and translational activator that is also a Cox1 chaperone. In this study, we investigated whether Mss51 hemylation and Mss51-mediated Cox1 synthesis are both modulated by the reduction-oxidation (redox) environment. We report that Cox1 synthesis is attenuated under oxidative stress conditions and have identified one of the underlying mechanisms. We show that in vitro and in vivo exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces the formation of a disulfide bond in Mss51 involving CPX motif heme-coordinating cysteines. Mss51 oxidation results in a heme ligand switch, thereby lowering heme-binding affinity and promoting its release. We demonstrate that in addition to affecting Mss51-dependent heme sensing, oxidative stress compromises Mss51 roles in COX1 mRNA processing and translation. H2O2-induced downregulation of mitochondrial translation has so far not been reported. We show that high H2O2 concentrations induce a global attenuation effect, but milder concentrations specifically affect COX1 mRNA processing and translation in an Mss51-dependent manner. The redox environment modulates Mss51 functions, which are essential for regulation of COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production.

  1. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  2. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqin eLi; Sigrid A Langhans

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during developme...

  3. Covalently bound phosphate residues in bovine milk xanthine oxidase and in glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger: A reevaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA)); London, R.E. (National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The reported presence of covalently bound phosphate residues in flavoproteins has significant implications with regard to the catalytic mechanisms and structural stability of the specific enzymes themselves and in terms of general cellular metabolic regulation. These considerations have led to a reevaluation of the presence of covalently bound phosphorus in the flavoproteins xanthine oxidase and glucose oxidase. Milk xanthine oxidase purified by a procedure that includes anion-exchange chromatography is shown to contain three phosphate residues. All three are noncovalently associated with the protein, two with the FAD cofactor, and one with the molybdenum cofactor. Results of chemical analysis and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy indicate that enzyme purified by this method contains no phosphoserine residues. Xanthine oxidase preparations purified by chromatography on calcium phosphate gel in place of DEAE-Sephadex yielded higher phosphate-to-protein ratios, which could be reduced to the expected values by additional purification on a folate affinity column. Highly active, highly purified preparations of glucose oxidase are shown to contain only the two phosphate residues of the FAD cofactor. The covalently bound bridging phosphate reported by others may arise in aged or degraded preparations of the enzyme but appears not to be a constituent of functional glucose oxidase. These results suggest that the presence of covalent phosphate residues in other flavoproteins should be rigorously reevaluated as well.

  4. Covalently bound phosphate residues in bovine milk xanthine oxidase and in glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger: A reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; London, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The reported presence of covalently bound phosphate residues in flavoproteins has significant implications with regard to the catalytic mechanisms and structural stability of the specific enzymes themselves and in terms of general cellular metabolic regulation. These considerations have led to a reevaluation of the presence of covalently bound phosphorus in the flavoproteins xanthine oxidase and glucose oxidase. Milk xanthine oxidase purified by a procedure that includes anion-exchange chromatography is shown to contain three phosphate residues. All three are noncovalently associated with the protein, two with the FAD cofactor, and one with the molybdenum cofactor. Results of chemical analysis and 31 P NMR spectroscopy indicate that enzyme purified by this method contains no phosphoserine residues. Xanthine oxidase preparations purified by chromatography on calcium phosphate gel in place of DEAE-Sephadex yielded higher phosphate-to-protein ratios, which could be reduced to the expected values by additional purification on a folate affinity column. Highly active, highly purified preparations of glucose oxidase are shown to contain only the two phosphate residues of the FAD cofactor. The covalently bound bridging phosphate reported by others may arise in aged or degraded preparations of the enzyme but appears not to be a constituent of functional glucose oxidase. These results suggest that the presence of covalent phosphate residues in other flavoproteins should be rigorously reevaluated as well

  5. Comparative study of the conformational lock, dissociative thermal inactivation and stability of euphorbia latex and lentil seedling amine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Floris, G; Longu, S; Mura, A; Moosavi-Nejad, S Z; Saboury, A A; Ahmad, F

    2005-04-01

    The thermal stability of copper/quinone containing amine oxidases from Euphorbia characias latex (ELAO) and lentil seedlings (LSAO) was measured in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) following changes in absorbance at 292 nm. ELAO was shown to be about 10 degrees C more stable than LSAO. The dissociative thermal inactivation of ELAO was studied using putrescine as substrate at different temperatures in the range 47-70 degrees C, and a "conformational lock" was developed using the theory pertaining to oligomeric enzyme. Moreover ELAO was shown to be more stable towards denaturants than LSAO, as confirmed by dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide denaturation curves. A comparison of the numbers of contact sites in inter-subunits of ELAO relative to LSAO led us to conclude that the higher stability of ELAO to temperature and towards denaturants was due to the presence of larger number of contact sites in the conformational lock of the enzyme. This study also gives a putative common mechanism for thermal inactivation of amine oxidases and explains the importance of C-terminal conserved amino acids residues in this class of enzymes.

  6. Ocular myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor ϵ subunit immunization in HLA DR3 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Saini, Shamsher S; Wang, Jun; Li, Jing; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Huda, Ruksana; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-12-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) are preferentially involved in myasthenia gravis (MG) and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive MG patients may occasionally present with isolated ocular symptoms. Although experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by whole AChR immunization closely mimics clinical and immunopathological aspects of MG, EOM are usually not affected. We have previously developed an EAMG model, which imitates EOM symptoms of MG by immunization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic mice with α or γ-subunits of human AChR (H-AChR). To investigate the significance of the ϵ-subunit in ocular MG, we immunized HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice with recombinant H-AChR ϵ-subunit expressed in Escherichia coli. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice showed significantly higher clinical ocular and generalized MG severity scores and lower grip strength values than HLA-DQ8 mice. H-AChR ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mice had higher serum anti-AChR antibody (IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgM) levels, neuromuscular junction IgG and complement deposit percentages than ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Control mice immunized with E. coli extract or complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) did not show clinical and immunopathological features of ocular and generalized EAMG. Lymph node cells of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 mice showed significantly higher proliferative responses than those of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 mice, crude E. coli extract-immunized and CFA-immunized transgenic mice. Our results indicate that the human AChR ϵ-subunit is capable of inducing myasthenic muscle weakness. Diversity of the autoimmune responses displayed by mice expressing different HLA class II molecules suggests that the interplay between HLA class II alleles and AChR subunits might have a profound impact on the clinical course of MG. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tea polyphenols alleviate high fat and high glucose-induced endothelial hyperpermeability by attenuating ROS production via NADPH oxidase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xuezhi; Tian, Chong; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Weiye; Meng, Yi; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Shibin; Ying, Chenjiang; Ye, Xiaolei

    2014-03-02

    Hyperglycemia-induced endothelial hyperpermeability is crucial to cardiovascular disorders and macro-vascular complications in diabetes mellitus. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) on endothelial hyperpermeability and the role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) pathway. Male Wistar rats fed on a high fat diet (HF) were treated with GTPs (0, 0.8, 1.6, 3.2 g/L in drinking water) for 26 weeks. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were treated with high glucose (HG, 33 mmol/L) and GTPs (0.0, 0.4, or 4 μg/mL) for 24 hours in vitro. The endothelial permeabilities in rat aorta and monolayer BAECs were measured by Evans blue injection method and efflux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran, respectively. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in rat aorta and monolayer BAECs were measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) and 2', 7'-dichloro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) fluorescent probe, respectively. Protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits were determined by Western-blot. HF diet-fed increased the endothelial permeability and ROS levels in rat aorta while HG treatments increased the endothelial permeability and ROS levels in cultured BAECs. Co-treatment with GTPs alleviated those changes both in vivo and in vitro. In in vitro studies, GTPs treatments protected against the HG-induced over-expressions of p22phox and p67phox. Diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, alleviated the hyperpermeability induced by HG. GTPs could alleviate endothelial hyperpermeabilities in HF diet-fed rat aorta and in HG treated BAECs. The decrease of ROS production resulting from down-regulation of NADPH oxidase contributed to the alleviation of endothelial hyperpermeability.

  8. New insights into the roles of NADPH oxidases in sexual development and ascospore germination in Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirschnabel, Daniela Elisabeth; Nowrousian, Minou; Cano-Domínguez, Nallely; Aguirre, Jesus; Teichert, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling determinants that induce different cellular processes. To characterize NOX function during fungal development, we utilized the genetically tractable ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Genome sequencing of a sterile mutant led us to identify the NADPH oxidase encoding nox1 as a gene required for fruiting body formation, regular hyphal growth, and hyphal fusion. These phenotypes are shared by nor1, lacking the NOX regulator NOR1. Further phenotypic analyses revealed a high correlation between increased ROS production and hyphal fusion deficiencies in nox1 and other sterile mutants. A genome-wide transcriptional profiling analysis of mycelia and isolated protoperithecia from wild type and nox1 revealed that nox1 inactivation affects the expression of genes related to cytoskeleton remodeling, hyphal fusion, metabolism, and mitochondrial respiration. Genetic analysis of nox2, lacking the NADPH oxidase 2 gene, nor1, and transcription factor deletion mutant ste12, revealed a strict melanin-dependent ascospore germination defect, indicating a common genetic pathway for these three genes. We report that gsa3, encoding a G-protein α-subunit, and sac1, encoding cAMP-generating adenylate cyclase, act in a separate pathway during the germination process. The finding that cAMP inhibits ascospore germination in a melanin-dependent manner supports a model in which cAMP inhibits NOX2 activity, thus suggesting a link between both pathways. Our results expand the current knowledge on the role of NOX enzymes in fungal development and provide a frame to define upstream and downstream components of the NOX signaling pathways in fungi.

  9. Cytochemical localization of catalase and several hydrogen peroxide-producing oxidases in the nucleoids and matrix of rat liver peroxisomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of catalase, amino acid oxidase, α-hydroxy acid oxidase, urate oxidase and alcohol oxidase was studied cytochemically in rat hepatocytes. The presence of catalase was demonstrated with the conventional diaminobenzidine technique. Oxidase activities were visualized with methods based

  10. Vaccine profile of herpes zoster (HZ/su) subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Heineman, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) causes an often severe and painful rash in older people and may be complicated by prolonged pain (postherpetic neuralgia; PHN) and by dissemination in immune-compromised patients. HZ results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, often associated with age-related or other causes of decreased T cell immunity. A live attenuated vaccine boosts this immunity and provides partial protection against HZ, but this decreases with age and declines over 8 years. Areas covered: A new HZ subunit (HZ/su) vaccine combines a key surface VZV glycoprotein (E) with a T cell-boosting adjuvant system (AS01 B ) and is administered by two intramuscular injections two months apart. Expert commentary: HZ/su showed excellent efficacy of ~90% in immunocompetent adults ≥50 and ≥70 years of age, respectively, in the ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 phase III controlled trials. Efficacy was unaffected by advancing age and persisted for >3 years. Approximately 9.5% of subjects had severe, but transient (1-2 days) injection site pain, swelling or redness. Compliance with both vaccine doses was high (95%). The vaccine will have a major impact on HZ management. Phase I-II trials showed safety and immunogenicity in severely immunocompromised patients. Phase III trial results are expected soon.

  11. Differential Roles of the Glycogen-Binding Domains of β Subunits in Regulation of the Snf1 Kinase Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R.; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits. In this study, the role of the β subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (α), Snf4 (γ), and one of three alternative β subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three β subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the β subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation. PMID:19897735

  12. Differential roles of the glycogen-binding domains of beta subunits in regulation of the Snf1 kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic alpha subunit and regulatory beta and gamma subunits. In this study, the role of the beta subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (alpha), Snf4 (gamma), and one of three alternative beta subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three beta subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the beta subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation.

  13. Serum diamine oxidase activity in patients with histamine intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzotti, G; Breda, D; Di Gioacchino, M; Burastero, S E

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance to various foods, excluding bona fide coeliac disease and lactose intolerance, represents a growing cause of patient visits to allergy clinics.Histamine intolerance is a long-known, multifaceted clinical condition triggered by histamine-rich foods and alcohol and/or by drugs that liberate histamine or block diamine oxidase (DAO), the main enzyme involved in the metabolism of ingested histamine. Histamine limitation diets impose complex, non-standardized restrictions that may severely impact the quality of life of patients. We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients who visited allergy outpatient facilities in northern Italy with a negative diagnosis for IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity, coeliac disease, conditions related to gastric hypersecretion, and systemic nickel hypersensitivity, and who previously underwent a histamine limitation diet with benefits for their main symptoms. Serum diamine oxidase levels and the clinical response to diamine oxidase supplementation were investigated. We found that 10 out of 14 patients had serum DAO activityintolerance. Moreover, 13 out of 14 patients subjectively reported a benefit in at least one of the disturbances related to food intolerances following diamine oxidase supplementation. The mean value (±SD) of diamine oxidase activity in the cohort of patients with histamine intolerance symptoms was 7.04±6.90 U/mL compared to 39.50±18.16 U/mL in 34 healthy controls (P=0.0031). In patients with symptoms triggered by histamine-rich food, measuring the serum diamine oxidase activity can help identify subjects who can benefit from a histamine limitation diet and/or diamine oxidase supplementation.Properly designed, controlled studies investigating histamine intolerance that include histamine provocation are indispensable for providing insights into the area of food intolerances, which are currently primarily managed with non-scientific approaches in Italy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsi, Livia; Vecsei, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence increasing with age. Oxidative stress and glutamate toxicity are involved in its pathomechanism. There are still many unmet needs of PD patients, including the alleviation of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, and the development of therapies with neuroprotective potential. To give an overview of the pharmacological properties, the efficacy and safety of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors in the treatment of PD, with special focus on the results of randomized clinical trials. A literature search was conducted in PubMed for 'PD treatment', 'MAO-B inhibitors', 'selegiline', 'rasagiline', 'safinamide' and 'clinical trials' with 'MAO-B inhibitors' in 'Parkinson' disease'. MAO-B inhibitors have a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, improve the dopamine deficient state and may have neuroprotective properties. Safinamide exhibits an anti-glutamatergic effect as well. When applied as monotherapy, MAO-B inhibitors provide a modest, but significant improvement of motor function and delay the need for levodopa. Rasagiline and safinamide were proven safe and effective when added to a dopamine agonist in early PD. As add-on to levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors significantly reduced off-time and were comparable in efficacy to COMT inhibitors. Improvements were achieved as regards certain non-motor symptoms as well. Due to the efficacy shown in clinical trials and their favorable side-effect profile, MAO-B inhibitors are valuable drugs in the treatment of PD. They are recommended as monotherapy in the early stages of the disease and as add-on therapy to levodopa in advanced PD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Forage Polyphenol Oxidase and Ruminant Livestock Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richard F. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase (PPO is associated with the detrimental effect of browning fruit and vegetables, however interest within PPO containing forage crops has grown since the brownng reaction was associated with reduced nitrogen (N losses in silo and the rumen. The reduction in protein breakdown in silo of red clover (high PPO forage increased the quality of protein, improving N-use efficiency (NUE when fed to ruminants. A further benefit of red clover silage feeding is a significant reduction in lipolysis in silo and an increase in the deposition of beneficial C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA in animal products, which has also been linked to PPO activity. PPOs protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in silo is related to the deactivation of plant proteases and lipases. This deactivation occurs through PPO catalysing the conversion of diphenols to quinones which bind with cellular nucleophiles such as protein reforming a protein-bound phenol (PBP. If the protein is an enzyme the complexing denatures the enzyme. However, PPO is inactive in the anaerobic rumen and therefore any subsequent protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen must be as a result of events that occurred to the forage pre-ingestion. Reduced activity of plant proteases and lipases would have little effect on NUE and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen due to the greater concentration of rumen microbial proteases and lipases. The mechanism for PPOs protection of plant protein in the rumen is a consequence of complexing plant protein, rather than protease deactivation per se. These complexed proteins reduce protein digestibility in the rumen and subsequently increase un-degraded dietary protein flow to the small intestine. The mechanism for protecting glycerol-based PUFA has yet to be fully elucidated but may be associated with entrapment within PBP reducing access to microbial lipases or differences in rumen digestion kinetics of red clover.

  16. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effect of Kaixinsan on monoamine oxidase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi; Dong, Xian-Zhe; Tan, Xiao; Wang, Yu-Ning; Liu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    To observe the effect of antidepressant medicine prescription, Kaixinsan (KXS) on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity, and explore the mechanism of KXS in elevating the levels of monoamine neurotransmitter from the perspective of metabolism, in vitro enzyme reaction system and C6 neuroglial cells, the effect of KXS at different concentrations on MAO-A and MAO-B activity was observed. In animal studies, the effect of KXS at different concentrations on MAO-A and MAO-B activities of brain mitochondrialin normal rats and solitary chronic unpredictable moderate stress (CMS) model rats after intragastric administration for 1, 2, 3 weeks. Results showed that 10 g•L⁻¹ KXS could significantly reduce the activity of MAO-A and MAO-B in enzyme reaction system; and in C6 cells, KXS within 0.625-10 g•L⁻¹ concentration range had no significant effect on the activity of MAO-A, but had obvious inhibitory effect on the activity of MAO-B in a dose dependent manner. KXS had no significant effect on the activity of MAO-A and MAO-B in brains of normal rats after action for 1, 2, 3 weeks. After 2 and 3 weeks treatment with 338 mg•kg⁻¹ dose KXS, MAO-A activity in the brain of CMS rats was decreased as compared with the model group (PMAO-B activity after 1, 2, 3 weeks of treatment. The results indicated that KXS had certain effect on in vitro MAO-A and MAO-B activity, had no effect on brain MAO-A and MAO-B activity in vivo in normal rats, and had certain inhibitory effect on MAO-A activity in brains of CMS rats. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  18. Lysyl oxidase and adipose tissue dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Emilie; Price, Emily; Sjöholm, Kajsa; McCulloch, Laura J; Rittig, Nikolaj; Liversedge, Neil; Knight, Bridget; Møller, Niels; Svensson, Per-Arne; Kos, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an enzyme crucial for collagen fibre crosslinking and thus for fibrosis development. Fibrosis is characterised by a surplus of collagen fibre accumulation and is amongst others also a feature of obesity-associated dysfunctional adipose tissue (AT) which has been linked with type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that in type 2 diabetes and obesity LOX expression and activity will be increased as a consequence of worsening AT dysfunction. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive characterisation of LOX in human AT. LOX mRNA expression was analysed in omental and abdominal subcutaneous AT obtained during elective surgery from subjects with a wide range of BMI, with and without diabetes. In addition, LOX expression was studied in subcutaneous AT before and 9.5months after bariatric surgery. To study the mechanism of LOX changes, its expression and activity were assessed after either hypoxia, recombinant human leptin or glucose treatment of AT explants. In addition, LOX response to acute inflammation was tested after stimulation by a single injection of lipopolysaccharide versus saline solution (control) in healthy men, in vivo. Quantity of mRNA was measured by RT-qPCR. LOX expression was higher in obesity and correlated with BMI whilst, in vitro, leptin at high concentrations, as a potential feedback mechanism, suppressed its expression. Neither diabetes status, nor hyperglycaemia affected LOX. Hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide-induced acute inflammation increased LOX AT expression, latter was independent of macrophage infiltration. Whilst LOX may not be affected by obesity-associated complications such as diabetes, our results confirm that LOX is increased by hypoxia and inflammation as underlying mechanism for its upregulation in adipose tissue with obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  20. Resveratrol prevents high glucose-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in renal tubular epithelial cells by inhibiting NADPH oxidase/ROS/ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting; Guan, Xu; Wang, Song; Xiao, Tangli; Yang, Ke; Xu, Xinli; Wang, Junping; Zhao, Jinghong

    2015-02-15

    Resveratrol (RSV) is reported to have renoprotective activity against diabetic nephropathy, while the mechanisms underlying its function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigate the effect and related mechanism of RSV against high glucose-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human tubular epithelial cells (HK-2). A typical EMT is induced by high glucose in HK-2 cells, accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). RSV exhibits a strong ability to inhibit high glucose-induced EMT by decreasing intracellular ROS levels via down-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunits NOX1 and NOX4. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) is found to be involved in high glucose-induced EMT in HK-2 cells. RSV, like NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, can block ERK1/2 activation induced by high glucose. Our results demonstrate that RSV is a potent agent against high glucose-induced EMT in renal tubular cells via inhibition of NADPH oxidase/ROS/ERK1/2 pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reconstitution of active human core Mediator complex reveals a pivotal role of the MED14 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher, Murat A.; Shi, Yi; Li, Dan; Chait, Brian T.; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is a critical coactivator for RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Here, we report the reconstitution of a functional 15-subunit human core Mediator complex and its characterization by functional assays and chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry (CX-MS). Whereas the reconstituted head and middle modules can stably associate, only with incorporation of MED14 into the bi-modular complex does it acquire basal and coactivator functions. This results from a dramatically enhanced ability of MED14-containing complexes to associate with Pol II. Altogether, our analyses identify MED14 as both an architectural and a functional backbone of the Mediator complex. We further establish a conditional requirement for metazoan-specific MED26 that becomes evident in the presence of heterologous nuclear factors. This general approach paves the way for systematically dissecting the multiple layers of functionalities associated with the Mediator complex. PMID:25383669

  2. Reconstitution of active human core Mediator complex reveals a critical role of the MED14 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher, Murat A; Shi, Yi; Li, Dan; Chait, Brian T; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is a critical coactivator for RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Here we report the reconstitution of a functional 15-subunit human core Mediator complex and its characterization by functional assays and chemical cross-linking coupled to MS (CX-MS). Whereas the reconstituted head and middle modules can stably associate, basal and coactivator functions are acquired only after incorporation of MED14 into the bimodular complex. This results from a dramatically enhanced ability of MED14-containing complexes to associate with Pol II. Altogether, our analyses identify MED14 as both an architectural and a functional backbone of the Mediator complex. We further establish a conditional requirement for metazoan-specific MED26 that becomes evident in the presence of heterologous nuclear factors. This general approach paves the way for systematic dissection of the multiple layers of functionality associated with the Mediator complex.

  3. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode......The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR expression profile of the target APCs. Here, we review state-of-the-art formulation approaches employed for the inclusion of immunostimulators and subunit...

  4. Estimation of Anadara tuberculosa genetic diversity in five mangroves from Tumaco, using Cytochrome oxidase I enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Chamorro L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the genetic diversity of the Anadara tuberculosa en five mangrove swams of Tumaco, Nariño, Colombia using as a mitocondrial molecular marker the cytochromo oxidase sub-unit I (COI. Materials and methods. A total of 50 individuals were collected from the San Jorge, La Tiburonera, El Pajal, La Playa y Bajito Vaquería mangrove swamps, randomly selecting 10 specimens of each zone. The tissue sample was worked with absolute alcohol at ambient temperature in microtubes. DNA was extracted, and the mitocondrial DNA was amplified using the PCR technique (polymerase chain reaction. The amplified and quantified products of PCR were sequenced on both sides (Macrogen. Each one of the obtained sequences was edited and aligned. Later, the parameters of genetic diversity (haplotypical and nucleotidical were measured, and the analysis of distribution between frequency pairs (Mistmach distribution was elaborated. Finally, the analysis of nucleotidic variation and population structure (AMOVA was completed. Results. The amplified product gene weighed 710 bp. The haplotypical diversity reported for all the populations was high (0.683±0.060 and the reported nucleotídical diversity was low for all the populations (0.040±0.020. The AMOVA results indicate that the variance amongst populations is low (4.20% and that the variance within populations is high (95.80%. Conclusions. The studied populations are not structured and although there is a decrease of natural banks, the genetic diversity is high.

  5. Genotypes and clinical phenotypes in children with cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin, N; Moslemi, A-R; Lebon, S; Rustin, P; Holme, E; Oldfors, A; Tulinius, M

    2003-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency has been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical features and may be caused by mutations in different genes of both the mitochondrial and the nuclear DNA. In an attempt to correlate the clinical phenotype with the genotype in 16 childhood cases, mtDNA was analysed for deletion, depletion, and mutations in the three genes encoding COX subunits and the 22 tRNA genes. Furthermore, nuclear DNA was analysed for mutations in the SURF1, SCO2, COX10, and COX17 genes and cases with mtDNA depletion were analysed for mutations in the TK2 gene. SURF1-mutations were identified in three out of four cases with Leigh syndrome while a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA (trp) gene was identified in the fourth. One case with mtDNA depletion had mutations in the TK2 gene. In two cases with leukoencephalopathy, one case with encephalopathy, five cases with fatal infantile myopathy and cardiomyopathy, two cases with benign infantile myopathy, and one case with mtDNA depletion, no mutations were identified. We conclude that COX deficiency in childhood should be suspected in a wide range of clinical settings and although an increasing number of genetic defects have been identified, the underlying mutations remain unclear in the majority of the cases.

  6. An assay of optimal cytochrome c oxidase activity in fish gills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yau-Chung; Chung, Meng-Han; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2018-07-15

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) catalyzes the terminal oxidation reaction in the electron transport chain (ETC) of aerobic respiratory systems. COX activity is an important indicator for the evaluation of energy production by aerobic respiration in various tissues. On the basis of the respiratory characteristics of muscle, we established an optimal method for the measurement of maximal COX activity. To validate the measurement of cytochrome c absorbance, different ionic buffer concentrations and tissue homogenate protein concentrations were used to investigate COX activity. The results showed that optimal COX activity is achieved when using 50-100 μg fish gill homogenate in conjunction with 75-100 mM potassium phosphate buffer. Furthermore, we compared branchial COX activities among three species of euryhaline teleost (Chanos chanos, Oreochromis mossambicus, and Oryzias dancena) to investigate differences in aerobic respiration of osmoregulatory organs. COX activities in the gills of these three euryhaline species were compared with COX subunit 4 (COX4) protein levels. COX4 protein abundance and COX activity patterns in the three species occurring in environments with various salinities increased when fish encountered salinity challenges. This COX activity assay therefore provides an effective and accurate means of assessing aerobic metabolism in fish. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Bryk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The main mechanisms which are involved are low-density lipoprotein oxidative modification, inactivation of nitric oxide and modulation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. ROS contribute to several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell dysfunction, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, stimulation of inflammation, and inducing smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation. NADPH oxidase is the main source of ROS in the vasculature. This enzyme consists of a membrane-bound heterodimer of gp91phox and p22phox, cytosolic regulatory subunits p47phox, p67phox and p40phox, and small GTP-binding proteins rac1 and rac 2. Seven distinct isoforms of this enzyme have been identified, of which four (NOX1, 2, 4 and 5 may have cardiovascular function. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning the role of oxidative stress and NOX enzymes in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, we analyze the experimental studies that explore the relationship between the NOX family and atherosclerosis.

  8. Purification and properties of fructosyl lysine oxidase from Fusarium oxysporum S-1F4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y; Yoshida, N; Isogai, A; Tani, Y; Kato, N

    1995-03-01

    Fructosyl lysine oxidase (FLOD) was examined for its use in the enzymatic measurement of the level of glycated albumin in blood serum. To isolate microorganisms having such an enzyme activity, we used N epsilon-fructosyl N alpha-Z-lysine (epsilon-FL) as a sole nitrogen source in the enrichment culture medium. The isolated fungus, strain S-1F4, showed a high FLOD activity in the cell-free extract and was identified as Fusarium oxysporum. FLOD was purified to an apparent homogeneity on SDS-PAGE. The molecular mass of the subunit was 50 kDa on SDS-PAGE and seemed to exist in a monomeric form. The enzyme had an absorption spectrum characteristic of a flavoprotein and the flavin was found to be covalently bound to the enzyme. The enzyme acted against N epsilon-fructosyl N alpha-Z-lysine and N alpha-fructosyl N epsilon-Z-lysine and showed specificity for fructosyl lysine residues.

  9. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  10. Production of rabbit antibodies against purified Glucose oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Anjum Zia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucose oxidase is an active oxygen species generating enzyme produced from Aspergillus niger grown in submerged fermentation. Disintegration of the mycelium resulted in high glucose oxidase activity that was subjected to ammonium sulfate precipitation at 60-85% saturation rates that resulted to 6.14 U mg -1 specific activity. Purification of enzyme by anion exchange column (DEAE-Cellulose resulted into 22.53 U mg-1 specific activity and 10.27 fold purification. This was applied to sephadex G-200 column for gel filtration chromatography. It was observed that enzyme achieved 59.37 U mg-1of specific activity with 27.08 fold purity and 64.36% recovery. Purified glucose oxidase was injected into rabbits through intravenous route, to raise the glucose oxidase antibodies. After 30 days incubation period, the rabbits were slaughtered and serum was separated from blood. The antibodies were isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and confirmed by agar gel precipitation test. This could be a convenient and low cost alternate assay for the estimation of glucose oxidase in biological fluids. Moreover, such antibodies against the said enzyme could be used in various therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K+ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K+ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  12. Immobilization of xanthine oxidase on a polyaniline silicone support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadruz, W; Marques, E T; Azevedo, W M; Lima-Filho, J L; Carvalho, L B

    1996-03-01

    A polyaniline silicone support to immobilize xanthine oxidase is proposed as a reactor coil to monitor the action of xanthine oxidase on hypoxanthine, xanthine and 6-mercaptopurine. A purified xanthine oxidase immobilized on this support lost 80% of the initial activity after 12 min of use. Co-immobilization of superoxide dismutase and catalase increased the stability of immobilized xanthine oxidase so that the derivative maintained 79% of its initial activity after 4.6 h of continuous use in which 1.5 mumol purine bases were converted by the immobilized enzyme system. There is no evidence of either polyaniline or protein leaching from the coil during 3 h of continuous use. When solutions (10 ml) of hypoxanthine, xanthine and 6-mercaptopurine were circulated individually through the xanthine oxidase-superoxide dismutase-catalase-polyaniline coil (1 mm internal diameter and 3 m in length, 3 ml internal volume) activities of 8.12, 11.17 and 1.09 nmol min-1 coil-1, respectively, were obtained. The advantages of the reactor configuration and the redox properties of the polymer, particularly with respect to immobilized oxidoreductases, make this methodology attractive for similar enzyme systems. This immobilized enzyme system using polyaniline-silicone as support converted 6-mercaptopurine to 6-thiouric acid with equal efficiency as resins based on polyacrylamide and polyamide 11.

  13. The effect of orexin-A on cardiac dysfunction mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide anion in ventrolateral medulla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    Full Text Available Hypocretin/orexin-producing neurons, located in the perifornical region of the lateral hypothalamus area (LHA and projecting to the brain sites of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, involve in the increase of sympathetic activity, thereby regulating cardiovascular function. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the central orexin-A (OXA could be involved in the cardiovascular dysfunction of acute myocardial infarction (AMI by releasing NAD(PH oxidase-derived superoxide anion (O2 (- generation in RVLM, AMI rat model established by ligating the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery to induce manifestation of cardiac dysfunction, monitored by the indicators as heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV, mean arterial pressure (MAP and left intraventricular pressure. The results showed that the expressions of OXA in LHA and orexin 1 receptor (OX1R increased in RVLM of AMI rats. The double immunofluorescent staining indicated that OX1R positive cells and NAD(PH oxidative subunit gp91phox or p47phox-immunoreactive (IR cells were co-localized in RVLM. Microinjection of OXA into the cerebral ventricle significantly increased O2 (- production and mRNA expression of NAD(PH oxidase subunits when compared with aCSF-treated ones. Exogenous OXA administration in RVLM produced pressor and tachycardiac effects. Furthermore, the antagonist of OX1R and OX2R (SB-408124 and TCS OX2 29, respectively or apocynin (APO, an inhibitor of NAD(PH oxidase, partly abolished those cardiovascular responses of OXA. HRV power spectral analysis showed that exogenous OXA led to decreased HF component of HRV and increased LF/HF ratio in comparison with aCSF, which suggested that OXA might be related to sympathovagal imbalance. As indicated by the results, OXA might participate in the central regulation of cardiovascular activities by disturbing the sympathovagal balance in AMI, which could be explained by the possibility that OXR and NAD(PH-derived O

  14. Radioimmunological properties of antisera from carp gonadotropin (c-GTH) and its subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burzawa-Gerard, Elisabeth; Kerdelhue, B.

    1978-01-01

    Anti-sera against carp gonadotropin (c-GTH) and its subunits SU I and SU II were produced in rabbits (IS-c-GTH, IS-SU I and IS-SU II). The radioimmunological titers were determined when antiserum binding dilution was 50 p. 100 of the 125 I-labelled glycoproteins. The titers of IS-c-GTH were 1/750 000, 1/300 000 and 1/500 000, respectively with c-GTH, SU I and SU II. With SU I, the titer of IS-SU I was 1/100 000 ; this antiserum in excess bound only 25 p. 100 of the c-GTH and no SU II. With c-GTH and SU II, the titer of IS-SU II was 1/270 000; it was 1/13 000 with SU I. With these antisera no binding was observed with rat hormones (LH, FSH, TSH, PRL) but IS-c-GTH and IS-SU II weakly bound rLH [fr

  15. Functional conservation of RNA polymerase II in fission and budding yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakovski, G V; Gadal, O; Labarre-Mariotte, S; Lebedenko, E N; Miklos, I; Sakurai, H; Proshkin, S A; Van Mullem, V; Ishihama, A; Thuriaux, P

    2000-02-04

    The complementary DNAs of the 12 subunits of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) RNA polymerase II were expressed from strong promoters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and tested for heterospecific complementation by monitoring their ability to replace in vivo the null mutants of the corresponding host genes. Rpb1 and Rpb2, the two largest subunits and Rpb8, a small subunit shared by all three polymerases, failed to support growth in S. cerevisiae. The remaining nine subunits were all proficient for heterospecific complementation and led in most cases to a wild-type level of growth. The two alpha-like subunits (Rpb3 and Rpb11), however, did not support growth at high (37 degrees C) or low (25 degrees C) temperatures. In the case of Rpb3, growth was restored by increasing the gene dosage of the host Rpb11 or Rpb10 subunits, confirming previous evidence of a close genetic interaction between these three subunits. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  17. Development of a Subunit Vaccine for Contagious Bovine ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Their work has set the stage for commercial development of a sub-unit vaccine. ... The sub-unit vaccine will be cost-effective, easy to produce, and safe. How it will make a ... IDRC invites applications for the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards.

  18. Mediator subunit18 controls flowering time and floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengui Zheng

    Full Text Available Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that plays an important role in regulating transcription by mediating interactions between transcriptional activator proteins and RNA polymerase II. Much evidence exists that Mediator plays a constitutive role in the transcription of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. However, evidence is mounting that specific Mediator subunits may control the developmental regulation of specific subsets of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Although the Mediator complex has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, only a few reports on Mediator function in flowering time control of plants, little is known about Mediator function in floral organ identity. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, MEDIATOR SUBUNIT 18 (MED18 affects flowering time and floral organ formation through FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and AGAMOUS (AG. A MED18 loss-of-function mutant showed a remarkable syndrome of later flowering and altered floral organ number. We show that FLC and AG mRNA levels and AG expression patterns are altered in the mutant. Our results support parallels between the regulation of FLC and AG and demonstrate a developmental role for Mediator in plants.

  19. Studies on the subunits of human glycoprotein hormones in relation to reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, C.

    1977-01-01

    In this review summarising present knowledge of the biological and immunological activity of the subunits of human glycoprotein hormones, the specificity of the α-subunit and β-subunit radioimmunoassays are discussed. The crossreaction studies performed with the α-subunit radioimmunoassays are aummarised in one table while those with the β-subunit radioimmunoassays are presented in a second table. (JIW)

  20. INTRINSIC REGULATION OF HEMOGLOBIN EXPRESSION BY VARIABLE SUBUNIT INTERFACE STRENGTHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, James M.; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Manning, Lois R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expression of the six types of human hemoglobin subunits over time is currently considered to be regulated mainly by transcription factors that bind to upstream control regions of the gene (the “extrinsic” component of regulation). Here we describe how subunit pairing and further assembly to tetramers in the liganded state is influenced by the affinity of subunits for one another (the “intrinsic” component of regulation). The adult hemoglobin dimers have the strongest subunit interfaces and the embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest with fetal hemoglobins of intermediate strength, corresponding to the temporal order of their expression. These variable subunit binding strengths and the attenuating effects of acetylation contribute to the differences with which these hemoglobin types form functional O2-binding tetramers consistent with gene switching. PMID:22129306

  1. Fluorescent Probes for Analysis and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dokyoung; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monoamine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of dietary amines and amine neurotransmitters, and assist in maintaining the homeostasis of the amine neurotransmitters in the brain. Dysfunctions of these enzymes can cause neurological and behavioral disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To understand their physiological roles, efficient assay methods for monoamine oxidases are essential. Reviewed in this Perspective are the recent progress in the development of fluorescent probes for monoamine oxidases and their applications to enzyme assays in cells and tissues. It is evident that still there is strong need for a fluorescent probe with desirable substrate selectivity and photophysical properties to challenge the much unsolved issues associated with the enzymes and the diseases.

  2. Characterization of wheat germin (oxalate oxidase) expressed by Pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Heng-Yen; Whittaker, Mei M.; Bouveret, Romaric; Berna, Anne; Bernier, Francois; Whittaker, James W.

    2007-01-01

    High-level secretory expression of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin/oxalate oxidase was achieved in Pichia pastoris fermentation cultures as an α-mating factor signal peptide fusion, based on the native wheat cDNA coding sequence. The oxalate oxidase activity of the recombinant enzyme is substantially increased (7-fold) by treatment with sodium periodate, followed by ascorbate reduction. Using these methods, approximately 1 g (4 x 10 4 U) of purified, activated enzyme was obtained following eight days of induction of a high density Pichia fermentation culture, demonstrating suitability for large-scale production of oxalate oxidase for biotechnological applications. Characterization of the recombinant protein shows that it is glycosylated, with N-linked glycan attached at Asn47. For potential biomedical applications, a nonglycosylated (S49A) variant was also prepared which retains essentially full enzyme activity, but exhibits altered protein-protein interactions

  3. The use of galactose oxidase in lipid labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radin, N.S.; Evangelatos, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    Galactose oxidase can be used to oxidize the terminal carbon atom of lipids containing galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine, and the resultant aldehyde group can be reduced back to the original carbinol with radioactive borohydride. The efficiency of the first reaction has been investigated systematically by using [6- 3 H]galactosyl ceramide as substrate and measuring the amount of radioactive water formed. This enabled us to establish that the addition of catalase and peroxidase greatly speeded the oxidation, that phosphate and PIPES buffers were the best among those tested, that the reaction continued for 24 hr without a second addition of galactose oxidase, and that the optimum concentration of organic solvent (tetrahydrofuran) was 50%. The suggestion if made that a similar set of variables be studied for each lipid or nonlipid by the same basic technique: labeling by the oxidase/borohydride method and use of the resultant compound as substrate

  4. Leonurine (SCM-198) attenuates myocardial fibrotic response via inhibition of NADPH oxidase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Pan, Li-Long; Deng, Hai-Yan; Xiong, Qing-Hui; Wu, Dan; Huang, Guo-Ying; Gong, Qi-Hai; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-01-01

    In our previous studies, we have reported that leonurine, a plant phenolic alkaloid in Herba leonuri, exerted cardioprotective properties in a number of preclinical experiments. Herein, we investigated the roles and the possible mechanisms of leonurine for reducing fibrotic responses in angiotensin II (Ang II)-stimulated primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts and post-myocardial infarction (MI) rats. In in vitro experiments performed in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, leonurine (10-20 μM) pretreatment attenuated Ang II-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin and types I and III collagen. A small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown strategy for NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) revealed that Nox4 was required for Ang II-induced activation of cardiac fibroblasts. In vivo studies using a post-MI model in rats indicated that administration of leonurine inhibited myocardial fibrosis while reducing cardiac Nox4 expression, ROS production, NF-κB activation, and plasma MMP-2 activity. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence that leonurine could prevent cardiac fibrosis and the activation of cardiac fibroblasts partly through modulation of a Nox4-ROS pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mediator Subunit Med28 Is Essential for Mouse Peri-Implantation Development and Pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit mammalian Mediator complex acts as an integrator of transcriptional regulation by RNA Polymerase II, and has emerged as a master coordinator of development and cell fate determination. We previously identified the Mediator subunit, MED28, as a cytosolic binding partner of merlin, the Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2 tumor suppressor, and thus MED28 is distinct in having a cytosolic role as an NF2 interacting protein as well as a nuclear role as a Mediator complex subunit. Although limited in vitro studies have been performed on MED28, its in vivo function remains unknown. Employing a knockout mouse model, we describe for the first time the requirement for Med28 in the developing mouse embryo. Med28-deficiency causes peri-implantation lethality resulting from the loss of pluripotency of the inner cell mass accompanied by reduced expression of key pluripotency transcription factors Oct4 and Nanog. Further, overexpression of Med28 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts enhances the efficiency of their reprogramming to pluripotency. Cre-mediated inactivation of Med28 in induced pluripotent stem cells shows that Med28 is required for their survival. Intriguingly, heterozygous loss of Med28 results in differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into extraembryonic trophectoderm and primitive endoderm lineages. Our findings document the essential role of Med28 in the developing embryo as well as in acquisition and maintenance of pluripotency during reprogramming.

  6. Increased xanthine oxidase during labour--implications for oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many, A; Roberts, J M

    1997-11-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase (XDH/XO) produces uric acid. When in the oxidase form, this production is coupled with the generation of free radicals. Hypoxia-reperfusion enhances conversion of XDH to XO. Since the placenta is exposed to short periods of hypoxia reperfusion during labour, 17 placentae of pregnancy terminated by elective caesarean section and five placentae of pregnancies terminated by caesarean section during labour were examined for XDH/XO activity. It was found that XO activity was higher in the placentae of labouring women (P = 0.003), which suggests that labour enhances conversion of XDH to XO, facilitating free radical production.

  7. Two X-linked chronic granulomatous disease patients with unusual NADPH oxidase properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Baruch; Broides, Arnon; Zeeli, Tal; Gavrieli, Ronit; de Boer, Martin; van Leeuwen, Karin; Levy, Jacov; Roos, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an immune deficiency syndrome caused by defects in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, the enzyme that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytizing leukocytes. This study evaluates the NADPH oxidase capacity in two

  8. Reactive oxygen species generation mediated by NADPH oxidase and PI3K/Akt pathways contribute to invasion of Streptococcus agalactiae in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jessica Silva Santos de; Santos, Gabriela da Silva; Moraes, João Alfredo; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Barja-Fidalgo, Thereza Christina; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza; Nagao, Prescilla Emy

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Streptococcus agalactiae can causes sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Although the virulence properties of S. agalactiae have been partially elucidated, the molecular mechanisms related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in infected human endothelial cells need further investigation. OBJECTIVES This study aimed to evaluate the influence of oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) during S. agalactiae infection. METHODS ROS production during S. agalactiae-HUVEC infection was detected using the probe CM-H2DCFDA. Microfilaments labelled with phalloidin-FITC and p47phox-Alexa 546 conjugated were analysed by immunofluorescence. mRNA levels of p47phox (NADPH oxidase subunit) were assessed using Real Time qRT-PCR. The adherence and intracellular viability of S. agalactiae in HUVECs with or without pre-treatment of DPI, apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitors), and LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) were evaluated by penicillin/gentamicin exclusion. Phosphorylation of p47phox and Akt activation by S. agalactiae were evaluated by immunoblotting analysis. FINDINGS Data showed increased ROS production 15 min after HUVEC infection. Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blotting performed in HUVEC infected with S. agalactiae detected alterations in mRNA levels and activation of p47phox. Pre-treatment of endothelial cells with NADPH oxidase (DPI and apocynin) and PI3K/Akt pathway (LY294002) inhibitors reduced ROS production, bacterial intracellular viability, and generation of actin stress fibres in HUVECs infected with S. agalactiae. CONCLUSIONS ROS generation via the NADPH oxidase pathway contributes to invasion of S. agalactiae in human endothelial cells accompanied by cytoskeletal reorganisation through the PI3K/Akt pathway, which provides novel evidence for the involvement of oxidative stress in S. agalactiae pathogenesis.

  9. Peroxisomal Polyamine Oxidase and NADPH-Oxidase cross-talk for ROS homeostasis which affects respiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios A. Andronis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the intracellular compartments is of critical importance as ROS have been linked with nearly all cellular processes and more importantly with diseases and aging. PAs are nitrogenous molecules with an evolutionary conserved role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic status of cells. Recent evidence also suggests that polyamines (PA are major regulators of ROS homeostasis. In Arabidopsis the backconversion of the PAs spermidine (Spd and spermine (Spm to putrescine (Put and Spd, respectively is catalyzed by two peroxisomal PA oxidases (AtPAO. However, the physiological role of this pathway remains largely elusive. Here we explore the role of peroxisomal PA backconversion and in particular that catalyzed by the highly expressed AtPAO3 in the regulation of ROS homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory burst. Exogenous PAs exert an NADPH-oxidase dependent stimulation of oxygen consumption, with Spd exerting the strongest effect. This increase is attenuated by treatment with the NADPH-oxidase blocker diphenyleneiodonium iodide (DPI. Loss-of-function of AtPAO3 gene results to increased NADPH-oxidase-dependent production of superoxide anions (O2.-, but not H2O2, which activate the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway (AOX. On the contrary, overexpression of AtPAO3 results to an increased but balanced production of both H2O2 and O2.-. These results suggest that the ratio of O2.-/H2O2 regulates respiratory chain in mitochondria, with PA-dependent production of O2.- by NADPH-oxidase tilting the balance of electron transfer chain in favor of the AOX pathway. In addition, AtPAO3 seems to be an important component in the regulating module of ROS homeostasis, while a conserved role for PA backconversion and ROS across kingdoms is discussed.

  10. The study of a fluorescent biosensor based on polyelectrolyte microcapsules with encapsulated glucose oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakova, L. I.; Sirota, N. P.; Sirota, T. V.; Shabarchina, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    A fluorescent biosensor is synthesized and described. The biosensor consists of polyelectrolyte microcapsules with glucose oxidase (GOx) entrapped in the cavities and an oxygen-sensitive fluorescent indicator Ru(dpp) immobilized in shells, where Ru(dpp) is tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride. The theoretical activity of the encapsulated GOx and the effect storage time and medium composition have on the stability of sensor microcapsules are determined from polarographic measurements. No change in the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and or its loss to the storage medium are detected over the test period. The dispersion medium (water or a phosphate buffer) are shown to have no effect on the activity of microcapsules with immobilized GOx. The described optical sensor could be used as an alternative to electrochemical sensors for in vitro determination of glucose in the clinically important range of concentrations (up to 10 mmol/L).

  11. The origin of the supernumerary subunits and assembly factors of complex I: A treasure trove of pathway evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elurbe, Dei M; Huynen, Martijn A

    2016-07-01

    We review and document the evolutionary origin of all complex I assembly factors and nine supernumerary subunits from protein families. Based on experimental data and the conservation of critical residues we identify a spectrum of protein function conservation between the complex I representatives and their non-complex I homologs. This spectrum ranges from proteins that have retained their molecular function but in which the substrate specificity may have changed or have become more specific, like NDUFAF5, to proteins that have lost their original molecular function and critical catalytic residues like NDUFAF6. In between are proteins that have retained their molecular function, which however appears unrelated to complex I, like ACAD9, or proteins in which amino acids of the active site are conserved but for which no enzymatic activity has been reported, like NDUFA10. We interpret complex I evolution against the background of molecular evolution theory. Complex I supernumerary subunits and assembly factors appear to have been recruited from proteins that are mitochondrial and/or that are expressed when complex I is active. Within the evolution of complex I and its assembly there are many cases of neofunctionalization after gene duplication, like ACAD9 and TMEM126B, one case of subfunctionalization: ACPM1 and ACPM2 in Yarrowia lipolytica, and one case in which a complex I protein itself appears to have been the source of a new protein from another complex: NDUFS6 gave rise to cytochrome c oxidase subunit COX4/COX5b. Complex I and its assembly can therewith be regarded as a treasure trove for pathway evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytochrome cbb3 of Thioalkalivibrio is a Na+-pumping cytochrome oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntyan, M.S.; Cherepanov, D.A.; Malinen, A.M.; Bloch, D.A.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Severina, I.I.; Ivashina, T.V.; Lahti, R.; Muyzer, G.; Skulachev, V.P.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (Coxs) are the basic energy transducers in the respiratory chain of the majority of aerobic organisms. Coxs studied to date are redox-driven proton-pumping enzymes belonging to one of three subfamilies: A-, B-, and C-type oxidases. The C-type oxidases (cbb3 cytochromes), which

  13. Unprecedented hetero-geometric discrete copper(II) complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper; X-ray structure; radical activity; catechol oxidase activity. 1. Introduction ... dylamine and thiocyanate ions but none of these groups .... Independent reflections. 7978 ... was added to it to achieve the ultimate concentration of .... as exchange couples so as to form a single species with ... cantly on central Cu(II) ion.

  14. Enhanced production of glucose oxidase from UVmutant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UV rays were used as mutagen in wild type strain of Aspergillus niger for enhanced production of glucose oxidase. After mutangenization and selection, mutant A. niger strains, resistant to 2-deoxy-Dglucose were obtained. The mutants showed 1.57 and 1.98 fold increase in activities of extra and intra cellular glucose ...

  15. Localization of Glucose Oxidase and Catalase Activities in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Cor F.B.; Veenhuis, Marten; Visser, Jaap

    The subcellular localization of glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) in Aspergillus niger N400 (CBS 120.49) was investigated by (immuno)cytochemical methods. By these methods, the bulk of the enzyme was found to be localized in the cell wall. In addition, four different catalases (EC 1.11.1.6) were

  16. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  17. Nanoporous gold assembly of glucose oxidase for electrochemical biosensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xinxin; Ulstrup, Jens; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) is composed of three-dimensional (3D) bicontinuous nanostructures with large surface area. Nano-channels inside NPG provide an ideal local environment for immobilization of enzyme molecules with expected stabilization of the protein molecules. In this work, glucose oxidase (...

  18. Gene cloning and characterization of NADH oxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genome search of Thermococcus kodakarensis revealed three open reading frames, Tk0304, Tk1299 and Tk1392 annotated as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidases. This study deals with cloning, and characterization of Tk0304. The gene, composed of 1320 nucleotides, encodes a protein of 439 ...

  19. Optimization of cholesterol oxidase production by Brevibacterium sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ultrasound-assisted emulsification as a pretreatment for cholesterol oxidase production by submerge fermentation using Brevibacterium sp. in a batch system was studied. Medium improvement for the production employing response surface methodology (RSM) was optimized in this paper. The concentration of ...

  20. in Escherichia coli with native cholesterol oxidase expressed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure and bio-activity of an endogenous cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sp. was compared to the same enzyme exogenously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with and without N- or C-terminal his-tags. The different proteins were purified with affinity and subtractive protocols. The specific activity of ...

  1. Cytokinin oxidase or dehydrogenase? Mechanism of cytokinin degradation in cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galuszka, P.; Frebort, I.; Sebela, M.

    2001-01-01

    An enzyme degrading cytokinins with isoprenoid side chain, previously named cytokinin oxidase, was purified to near homogeneity from wheat and barley grains. New techniques were developed for the enzyme activity assay and staining on native electrophoretic gels to identify the protein. The purifi...

  2. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of heat treatment (55°C/20 min) on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities and total phenolic compounds was investigated in Algerian dates (Deglet Nour variety) at Tamar (fully ripe) stage and in dates stored for 5 months at ambient temperature and in cold storage (10°C). Results obtained ...

  3. Lysyl oxidases regulate fibrillar collagen remodelling in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin, Gavin; White, Eric S; Faiz, Alen; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Mahar, Annabelle; Kable, Eleanor P W; Burgess, Janette K

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive scarring disease of the lung with feweffective therapeutic options. Structural remodelling of the extracellular matrix [i.e. collagen cross-linkingmediated by the lysyl oxidase (LO) family of enzymes (LOX, LOXL1-4)] might contribute to disease

  4. Novel thidiazuron-derived inhibitors of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nisler, Jaroslav; Kopečný, D.; Končitíková, R.; Zatloukal, Marek; Bazgier, Václav; Berka, K.; Zalabák, D.; Briozzo, P.; Strnad, Miroslav; Spíchal, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, 1-2 (2016), s. 235-248 ISSN 0167-4412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase * Crystal structure * Molecular docking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.356, year: 2016

  5. DNA damage and decrease of cellular oxidase activity in piglet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA damage and decrease of cellular oxidase activity in piglet sertoli cells exposed to gossypol. Ming Zhang, Hui Yuan, Zuping He, Liyun Yuan, Jine Yi, Sijun Deng, Li Zhu, Chengzhi Guo, Yin Lu, Jing Wu, Lixin Wen, Qiang Wei, Liqun Xue ...

  6. Ser2 is the autophosphorylation site in the beta subunit from bicistronically expressed human casein kinase-2 and from native rat liver casein kinase-2 beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; James, P; Staudenmann, W

    1993-01-01

    Human casein kinase-2 (CK-2) subunits alpha and beta were bicistronically expressed in bacteria. The recombinant holoenzyme shared all investigated properties with the native CK-2 from mammalian sources (rat liver, Krebs II mouse ascites tumour cells). Contrary to recombinant human CK-2 produced...

  7. Amino acid substitutions in subunit 9 of the mitochondrial ATPase complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence analysis of a series of revertants of an oli1 mit- mutant carrying an amino acid substitution in the hydrophilic loop of subunit 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, T A; Nagley, P

    1987-09-01

    This work concerns a biochemical genetic study of subunit 9 of the mitochondrial ATPase complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Subunit 9, encoded by the mitochondrial oli1 gene, contains a hydrophilic loop connecting two transmembrane stems. In one particular oli1 mit- mutant 2422, the substitution of a positively charged amino acid in this loop (Arg39----Met) renders the ATPase complex non-functional. A series of 20 revertants, selected for their ability to grow on nonfermentable substrates, has been isolated from mutant 2422. The results of DNA sequence analysis of the oli1 gene in each revertant have led to the recognition of three groups of revertants. Class I revertants have undergone a same-site reversion event: the mutant Met39 is replaced either by arginine (as in wild-type) or lysine. Class II revertants maintain the mutant Met39 residue, but have undergone a second-site reversion event (Asn35----Lys). Two revertants showing an oligomycin-resistant phenotype carry this same second-site reversion in the loop region together with a further amino acid substitution in either of the two membrane-spanning segments of subunit 9 (either Gly23----Ser or Leu53----Phe). Class III revertants contain subunit 9 with the original mutant 2422 sequence, and additionally carry a recessive nuclear suppressor, demonstrated to represent a single gene. The results on the revertants in classes I and II indicate that there is a strict requirement for a positively charged residue in the hydrophilic loop close to the boundary of the lipid bilayer. The precise location of this positive charge is less stringent; in functional ATPase complexes it can be found at either residue 39 or 35. This charged residue is possibly required to interact with some other component of the mitochondrial ATPase complex. These findings, together with hydropathy plots of subunit 9 polypeptides from normal, mutant and revertant strains, led to the conclusion that the hydrophilic loop in normal subunit 9

  8. Inactivation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase involves oxidative modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J N; Zhang, Z; John, P; Baldwin, J E; Schofield, C J

    1997-03-25

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of the plant signaling molecule ethylene. It is a member of the ferrous iron dependent family of oxidases and dioxygenases and is unusual in that it displays a very short half-life under catalytic conditions, typically less than 20 min, and a requirement for CO2 as an activator. The rates of inactivation of purified, recombinant ACC oxidase from tomato under various combinations of substrates and cofactors were measured. Inactivation was relatively slow in the presence of buffer alone (t1/2 > 1 h), but fast in the presence of ferrous iron and ascorbate (t1/2 approximately 10 min). The rate of iron/ascorbate-mediated inactivation was increased by the addition of ACC, unaffected by the addition of CO2 at saturation (supplied as bicarbonate) but decreased by the addition of catalase or ACC + CO2 at saturation (supplied as bicarbonate). Iron/ascorbate-mediated inactivation was accompanied by partial proteolysis as observed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The fragmentation pattern was altered when ACC was also included, suggesting that ACC can bind to ACC oxidase in the absence of bicarbonate. N-terminal sequencing of fragments resulted in identification of an internal cleavage site which we propose is proximate to active-site bound iron. Thus, ACC oxidase inactivates via relatively slow partial unfolding of the catalytically active conformation, oxidative damage mediated via hydrogen peroxide which is catalase protectable and oxidative damage to the active site which results in partial proteolysis and is not catalase protectable.

  9. Expression Studies of Gibberellin Oxidases in Developing Pumpkin Seeds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisse, Andrea; Pimenta, Maria João; Lange, Theo

    2003-01-01

    Two cDNA clones, 3-ox and 2-ox, have been isolated from developing pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) embryos that show significant amino acid homology to gibberellin (GA) 3-oxidases and 2-oxidases, respectively. Recombinant fusion protein of clone 3-ox converted GA12-aldehyde, GA12, GA15, GA24, GA25, and GA9 to GA14-aldehyde, GA14, GA37, GA36, GA13, and GA4, respectively. Recombinant 2-ox protein oxidized GA9, GA4, and GA1 to GA51, GA34, and GA8, respectively. Previously cloned GA 7-oxidase revealed additional 3β-hydroxylation activity of GA12. Transcripts of this gene were identified in endosperm and embryo of the developing seed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and localized in protoderm, root apical meristem, and quiescent center by in situ hybridization. mRNA of the previously cloned GA 20-oxidase from pumpkin seeds was localized in endosperm and in tissues of protoderm, ground meristem, and cotyledons of the embryo. However, transcripts of the recently cloned GA 20-oxidase from pumpkin seedlings were found all over the embryo, and in tissues of the inner seed coat at the micropylar end. Previously cloned GA 2β,3β-hydroxylase mRNA molecules were specifically identified in endosperm tissue. Finally, mRNA molecules of the 3-ox and 2-ox genes were found in the embryo only. 3-ox transcripts were localized in tissues of cotyledons, protoderm, and inner cell layers of the root apical meristem, and 2-ox transcripts were found in all tissues of the embryo except the root tips. These results indicate tissue-specific GA-biosynthetic pathways operating within the developing seed. PMID:12644672

  10. Characterization and Thermodynamic Relationship of Three Polymorphs of a Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor, Febuxostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jinish; Jagia, Moksh; Bansal, Arvind Kumar; Patel, Sarsvatkumar

    2015-11-01

    Febuxostat (FXT), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is an interesting and unique molecule, which exhibits extensive polymorphism, with over 15 polymorphic forms reported to date. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the three polymorphic forms with respect to their thermodynamic quantities and establish thermodynamic relationship between them. The polymorphs were characterized by thermal and powder X-ray diffraction methods. Three different methods were used to calculate the transition temperatures (Ttr) and thereby their thermodynamic relationships. Although the first and second method used calorimetric data (melting point and heat of fusion), the third method employed the use of configurational free energy phase diagram. The onset melting points of three polymorphic forms were found to be 482.89 ± 0.37 K for form I, 476.30 ± 1.21 K for form II, and 474.19 ± 0.11 K for form III. Moreover, the powder X-ray diffraction patterns for each form were also unique. The polymorphic pair of form I and II and of form I and III was found to be enantiotropic, whereas pair of form II and III was monotropic. Besides the relative thermodynamic aspects (free energy differences, enthalpy, entropy contributions) using different methods, the pharmaceutical implications and phase transformation aspects have also been covered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  12. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, K Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  13. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kevin Pfister

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  14. Silencing SlMED18, tomato Mediator subunit 18 gene, restricts internode elongation and leaf expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshu; Hu, Zongli; Zhang, Jianling; Yu, XiaoHui; Guo, Jun-E; Liang, Honglian; Liao, Changguang; Chen, Guoping

    2018-02-19

    Mediator complex, a conserved multi-protein, is necessary for controlling RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription in eukaryotes. Given little is known about them in tomato, a tomato Mediator subunit 18 gene was isolated and named SlMED18. To further explore the function of SlMED18, the transgenic tomato plants targeting SlMED18 by RNAi-mediated gene silencing were generated. The SlMED18-RNAi lines exhibited multiple developmental defects, including smaller size and slower growth rate of plant and significantly smaller compound leaves. The contents of endogenous bioactive GA 3 in SlMED18 silenced lines were slightly less than that in wild type. Furthermore, qRT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of gibberellins biosynthesis genes such as SlGACPS and SlGA20x2, auxin transport genes (PIN1, PIN4, LAX1 and LAX2) and several key regulators, KNOX1, KNOX2, PHAN and LANCEOLATE(LA), which involved in the leaf morphogenesis were significantly down-regulated in SlMED18-RNAi lines. These results illustrated that SlMED18 plays an essential role in regulating plant internode elongation and leaf expansion in tomato plants and it acts as a key positive regulator of gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction as well as auxin proper transport signalling. These findings are the basis for understanding the function of the individual Mediator subunits in tomato.

  15. Cyanobacterial lactate oxidases serve as essential partners in N2-fixation and evolved into photorespiratory glycolate oxidases in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackenberg, C.; Kern, R.; Hüge, J; Stal, L.J.; Tsuji, Y.; Kopka, J.; Shiraiwa, Y.; Bauwe, H.; Hagemann, M.

    2011-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is an essential enzyme involved in photorespiratory metabolism in plants. In cyanobacteria and green algae, the corresponding reaction is catalyzed by glycolate dehydrogenases (GlcD). The genomes of N2-fixing cyanobacteria, such as Nostoc PCC 7120 and green algae, appear to

  16. Cyanobacterial lactate oxidases serve as essential partners of N2-fixation and evolved to photorespiratory glycolate oxidases in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackenberg, C.; Kern, R.; Hüge, J.; Stal, L.J.; Tsuji, Y.; Kopka, J.; Shiraiwa, Y.; Bauwe, H.; Hagemann, M.

    2011-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is an essential enzyme involved in photorespiratory metabolism in plants. In cyanobacteria and green algae, the corresponding reaction is catalyzed by glycolate dehydrogenases (GlcD). The genomes of N2-fixing cyanobacteria, such as Nostoc PCC 7120 and green algae, appear to

  17. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  18. Substrate specificity and copper loading of the manganese-oxidizing multicopper oxidase Mnx from Bacillus sp. PL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tebo, Bradley M

    2017-02-22

    Manganese(ii) oxidation in the environment is thought to be driven by bacteria because enzymatic catalysis is many orders of magnitude faster than the abiotic processes. The heterologously purified Mn oxidase (Mnx) from marine Bacillus sp. PL-12 is made up of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) MnxG and two small Cu and heme-binding proteins of unknown function, MnxE and MnxF. Mnx binds Cu and oxidizes both Mn(ii) and Mn(iii), generating Mn(iv) oxide minerals that resemble those found on the Bacillus spore surface. Spectroscopic techniques have illuminated details about the metallo-cofactors of Mnx, but very little is known about their requirement for catalytic activity, and even less is known about the substrate specificity of Mnx. Here we quantify the canonical MCO Cu and persistent peripheral Cu bound to Mnx, and test Mnx oxidizing ability toward different substrates at varying pH. Mn(ii) appears to be the best substrate in terms of k cat , but its oxidation does not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, instead showing a sigmoidal cooperative behavior. Mnx also oxidizes Fe(ii) substrate, but in a Michaelis-Menten manner and with a decreased activity, as well as organic substrates. The reduced metals are more rapidly consumed than the larger organic substrates, suggesting the hypothesis that the Mnx substrate site is small and tuned for metal oxidation. Of biological relevance is the result that Mnx has the highest catalytic efficiency for Mn(ii) at the pH of sea water, especially when the protein is loaded with greater than the requisite four MCO copper atoms, suggesting that the protein has evolved specifically for Mn oxidation.

  19. Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase β and δ regulate neutrophil oxidase activation in response to Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Keith B; Gyori, David; Sindrilaru, Anca; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Taylor, Philip R; Mócsai, Attila; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2011-03-01

    An effective immune response to the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is dependent upon production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase. This is evidenced by the acute sensitivity of oxidase-deficient humans and mice to invasive aspergillosis. Neutrophils are recruited to the lungs shortly postinfection and respond by phagocytosing conidia and mediating extracellular killing of germinated hyphae in a ROS-dependent manner. However, the signaling mechanisms regulating the generation of ROS in response to hyphae are poorly understood. PI3Ks are important regulators of numerous cellular processes, with much recent work describing unique roles for the different class I PI3K isoforms. We showed by live-cell imaging that the lipid products of class I PI3Ks accumulated at the hyphal-bound neutrophil plasma membrane. Further, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to demonstrate essential, but overlapping, roles for PI3Kβ and PI3Kδ in the ROS and spreading responses of murine neutrophils to Aspergillus hyphae. Hyphal-induced ROS responses were substantially inhibited by deletion of the common β2-integrin subunit CD18, with only a minor, redundant role for Dectin-1. However, addition of soluble algal glucans plus the genetic deletion of CD18 were required to significantly inhibit activation of the PI3K-effector protein kinase B. Hyphal ROS responses were also totally dependent on the presence of Syk, but not its ITAM-containing adaptor proteins FcRγ or DAP12, and the Vav family of Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factors. These results start to define the signaling network controlling neutrophil ROS responses to A. fumigatus hyphae.

  20. Pituitary glycoprotein hormone a-subunit secretion by cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of the a-subunit of pituitary glycoprotein hormones usually follows the secretion of intact gonadotropins and is increased in gonadal failure and decreased in isolated gonadotropin deficiency. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of the a-subunit in the serum of patients with cirrhosis of the liver and to compare the results obtained for eugonadal cirrhotic patients with those obtained for cirrhotic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Forty-seven of 63 patients with cirrhosis (74.6% presented hypogonadism (which was central in 45 cases and primary in 2, 7 were eugonadal, and 9 women were in normal menopause. The serum a-subunit was measured by the fluorimetric method using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity with LH, TSH, FSH and hCG was 6.5, 1.2, 4.3 and 1.1%, respectively, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of less than 5% and an interassay CV of 5%, and sensitivity limit of 4 ng/l. The serum a-subunit concentration ranged from 36 to 6253 ng/l, with a median of 273 ng/l. The median was 251 ng/l for patients with central hypogonadism and 198 ng/l for eugonadal patients. The correlation between the a-subunit and basal LH levels was significant both in the total sample (r = 0.48, P<0.01 and in the cirrhotic patients with central hypogonadism (r = 0.33, P = 0.02. Among men with central hypogonadism there was a negative correlation between a-subunit levels and total testosterone levels (r = 0.54, P<0.01 as well as free testosterone levels (r = -0.53, P<0.01. In conclusion, although the a-subunit levels are correlated with LH levels, at present they cannot be used as markers for hypogonadism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  1. Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Sedentary, Obese Humans is mediated by NADPH Oxidase; Influence of Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Favor, Justin D.; Dubis, Gabriel S.; Yan, Huimin; White, Joseph D.; Nelson, Margaret A.M.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Hickner, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of in vivo reactive oxygen species (ROS) on microvascular endothelial function in obese human subjects and to determine the efficacy of an aerobic exercise intervention on alleviating obesity-associated dysfunctionality. Approach and Results Young, sedentary men and women were divided into lean (BMI 18–25; n=14), intermediate (BMI 28–32.5; n=13), and obese (BMI 33–40; n=15) groups. A novel microdialysis technique was utilized to detect elevated interstitial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide levels in the vastus lateralis of obese compared to both lean and intermediate subjects. Nutritive blood flow was monitored in the vastus lateralis via the microdialysis-ethanol technique. A decrement in acetylcholine-stimulated blood flow revealed impaired microvascular endothelial function in the obese subjects. Perfusion of apocynin, an NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor, lowered (normalized) H2O2 and superoxide levels and reversed microvascular endothelial dysfunction in obese subjects. Following 8-weeks of exercise, H2O2 levels were decreased in the obese subjects and microvascular endothelial function in these subjects was restored to levels similar to lean subjects. Skeletal muscle protein expression of the Nox subunits p22phox, p47phox, and p67phox were increased in obese relative to lean subjects, where p22phox and p67phox expression was attenuated by exercise training in obese subjects. Conclusions This study implicates Nox as a source of excessive ROS production in skeletal muscle of obese individuals, and links excessive Nox derived ROS to microvascular endothelial dysfunction in obesity. Furthermore, aerobic exercise training proved to be an effective strategy for alleviating these maladies. PMID:27765769

  2. Lactate Biosensor Based on Cellulose Acetate Membrane Bound Lactate Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactate biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing lactate oxidase in cellulose acetate membrane and by mounting over the sensing part of Pt electrode (working and connected to Ag/AgCl electrode (reference along with auxillary electrode through potentiostat. The enzyme electrode was anodically polarized at +400 mV to generate electrons from H2O2, which was formed from oxidation of serum lactate by immobilized lactate oxidase. The minimum detection limit of the electrode was 0.1mmoles/L and sensitivity of the sensor was 0.008 mA/mM/L lactate. Assay coefficients of variation were < 2% .A good correlation (r=0.99 was found between lactate values obtained by colorimetric method and lactate biosensor. The self-life of the biosensor was 18 days at 4ºC and enzyme electrode can be re-used 150 times without any significant loss in enzyme activity.

  3. Dual inhibitors of cholinesterases and monoamine oxidases for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Damijan; Sova, Matej; Košak, Urban; Gobec, Stanislav

    2017-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a solid relationship between several enzymes and Alzheimer's disease. Cholinesterases and monoamine oxidases are closely associated with the disease symptomatology and progression and have been tackled simultaneously using several multifunctional ligands. This design strategy offers great chances to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease, in addition to alleviation of the symptoms. More than 15 years of research has led to the identification of various dual cholinesterase/monoamine oxidase inhibitors, while some showing positive outcomes in clinical trials, thus giving rise to additional research efforts in the field. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the novel dual inhibitors identified recently and to shed light on their therapeutic potential.

  4. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Ge

    Full Text Available Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation.

  5. Variations in epidermal cytochrome oxidase activity after local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoiz, M.E.; Rey, B.M. de; Cabrini, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase activity was evaluated histochemically as an index of mitochondrial damage after local irradiation with X-rays. It was determined by microphotometry on the tail skin of newly born Wistar rats four days after irradiation with doses ranging from 2 to 16krad. The enzyme activity of the whole epidermis increased after irradiation, the increases being related to the increase in thickness of the epithelium which was observed as a response to irradiation injury. Within the dose range tested, the enzyme concentration (expressed per unit volume of tissue) decreased in relation to the dose applied. At the electron microscopy level, the cytochemical demonstration of cytochrome oxidase revealed an irregular reaction over the cristae, intramitochondrial vacuolization and partial homogenization of the matrix. Positive membrane fragments were seen around lipid droplets. This reaction confirms the mitochondrial origin of these previously observed radiation-induced vacuoles. (author)

  6. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  7. Glucose Oxidase Catalyzed Self-Assembly of Bioelectroactive Gold Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    polymer matrix), however, electrons generated at the FAD/FADH2 active site of glucose oxidase (GOx) must tunnel ca. 15 through the protein shell...described as a surface bound thiolate [33]. Recently, the presence of free thiol groups has been proposed as a mechanism for gold reduction in pure enzymes...simultaneously [38]. The oxidative polymerization of the amines proceeds simulta- neously with the formation of gold nanoparticles such that the polymerized amine

  8. Graphene-glucose oxidase bioanodes for enzymatic biofuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jing; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen; Engelbrekt, Christian

    2017-01-01

    as supporting material, polyethyleneimine (PEI) as linker and glucose oxidase (GOD) as the chosen enzyme. GOD can catalyze oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone, but needs a mediator to assist electron transfer between the enzyme and electrodes. The redox molecule ferrocene carboxylic acid (Fc...... and systematically investigated. The assembled EBFCs show good reproducibility. EBFCs provide maximum output power density 2.47 μW cm-2 at 35 ℃, indicating the optimized activity of EBFCs fed with glucose....

  9. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppée Jean-Yves

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III to As(V as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III. To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54 of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III in this microorganism.

  10. Biochemical Conservation and Evolution of Germacrene A Oxidase in Asteraceae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Don Trinh; Göpfert, Jens Christian; Ikezawa, Nobuhiro; MacNevin, Gillian; Kathiresan, Meena; Conrad, Jürgen; Spring, Otmar; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones are characteristic natural products in Asteraceae, which constitutes ∼8% of all plant species. Despite their physiological and pharmaceutical importance, the biochemistry and evolution of sesquiterpene lactones remain unexplored. Here we show that germacrene A oxidase (GAO), evolutionarily conserved in all major subfamilies of Asteraceae, catalyzes three consecutive oxidations of germacrene A to yield germacrene A acid. Furthermore, it is also capable of oxidizing non-natural substrate amorphadiene. Co-expression of lettuce GAO with germacrene synthase in engineered yeast synthesized aberrant products, costic acids and ilicic acid, in an acidic condition. However, cultivation in a neutral condition allowed the de novo synthesis of a single novel compound that was identified as germacrene A acid by gas and liquid chromatography and NMR analyses. To trace the evolutionary lineage of GAO in Asteraceae, homologous genes were further isolated from the representative species of three major subfamilies of Asteraceae (sunflower, chicory, and costus from Asteroideae, Cichorioideae, and Carduoideae, respectively) and also from the phylogenetically basal species, Barnadesia spinosa, from Barnadesioideae. The recombinant GAOs from these genes clearly showed germacrene A oxidase activities, suggesting that GAO activity is widely conserved in Asteraceae including the basal lineage. All GAOs could catalyze the three-step oxidation of non-natural substrate amorphadiene to artemisinic acid, whereas amorphadiene oxidase diverged from GAO displayed negligible activity for germacrene A oxidation. The observed amorphadiene oxidase activity in GAOs suggests that the catalytic plasticity is embedded in ancestral GAO enzymes that may contribute to the chemical and catalytic diversity in nature. PMID:20351109

  11. Multi-Copper Oxidases and Human Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashchenko, Ganna; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are a small group of enzymes that oxidize their substrate with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. Generally, multi-copper oxidases are promiscuous with regards to their reducing substrates and are capable of performing various functions in different species. To date, three multi-copper oxidases have been detected in humans—ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Each of these enzymes has a high specificity towards iron with the resulting ferroxidase activity being associated with ferroportin, the only known iron exporter protein in humans. Ferroportin exports iron as Fe2+, but transferrin, the major iron transporter protein of blood, can bind only Fe3+ effectively. Iron oxidation in enterocytes is mediated mainly by hephaestin thus allowing dietary iron to enter the bloodstream. Zyklopen is involved in iron efflux from placental trophoblasts during iron transfer from mother to fetus. Release of iron from the liver relies on ferroportin and the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin which is found in blood in a soluble form. Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen show distinctive expression patterns and have unique mechanisms for regulating their expression. These features of human multi-copper ferroxidases can serve as a basis for the precise control of iron efflux in different tissues. In this manuscript, we review the biochemical and biological properties of the three human MCOs and discuss their potential roles in human iron homeostasis. PMID:23807651

  12. Biocompatibility selenium nanoparticles with an intrinsic oxidase-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Leilei; Huang, Kaixun; Liu, Hongmei

    2016-03-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) are considered to be the new selenium supplement forms with high biological activity and low toxicity; however, the molecular mechanism by which SeNPs exert the biological function is unclear. Here, we reported that biocompatibility SeNPs possessed intrinsic oxidase-like activity. Using Na2SeO3 as a precursor and glutathione as a reductant, biocompatibility SeNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical reduction method in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results of structure characterization revealed that synthesized SeNPs were amorphous red elementary selenium with spherical morphology, and ranged in size from 25 to 70 nm size with a narrow distribution (41.4 ± 6.7 nm). The oxidase-like activity of the as-synthesized SeNPs was tested with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a substrate. The results indicated that SeNPs could catalyze the oxidization of TMB by dissolved oxygen. These SeNPs showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 4 and 30 °C, and the oxidase-like activity was higher as the concentration of SeNPs increased and the size of SeNPs decreased. The Michaelis constant ( K m) values and maximal reaction velocity ( V max) of the SeNPs for TMB oxidation were 0.0083 mol/L and 3.042 μmol/L min, respectively.

  13. Probing the functional subunits of the tonoplast H+-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, S.K.; Lai, S.; Sze, H.

    1986-01-01

    The tonoplast ATPase of oat roots is composed of at least three polypeptides of 72, 60, and 16 kDa. The 16 kDA polypeptide covalently binds N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and is postulated to be a component of the proton channel. Initial studies to identify other subunits indicate that both the 72 and 60 kDa subunits covalently bind 14 C]-7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole and [ 14 C]N-ethylamleimide, inhibitors of the tonoplast ATPase. ATP prevents binding of these inhibitors suggesting that both the 72 and 60 kDa subunits are involved in substrate binding. Polyclonal antibody has been made to the 72 kDa subunit. Western blot analysis of tonoplast vesicles reveals single reactive polypeptide (72 kDa). The antibody shows no cross-reactivity towards either the mitochondrial F 1 -ATPase or the plasma membrane ATPase. This antibody specifically inhibits ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent H + pumping in native tonoplast vesicles. The authors conclude that the 72 kDa subunit is intimately associated with the catalytic (or ATP-binding) site

  14. Allelic variations in the CYBA gene of NADPH oxidase and risk of kidney complications in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patente, Thiago A; Mohammedi, Kamel; Bellili-Muñoz, Naïma; Driss, Fathi; Sanchez, Manuel; Fumeron, Frédéric; Roussel, Ronan; Hadjadj, Samy; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Marre, Michel; Velho, Gilberto

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy, and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase system is an important source of reactive oxygen species in hyperglycemic conditions in the kidney. Plasma concentration of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), a marker of oxidative stress, is increased in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We investigated associations of variants in the CYBA gene, encoding the regulatory subunit p22(phox) of NADPH oxidase, with diabetic nephropathy and plasma AOPP and myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentrations in type 1 diabetic patients. Seven SNPs in the CYBA region were analyzed in 1357 Caucasian subjects with type 1 diabetes from the SURGENE (n=340), GENEDIAB (n=444), and GENESIS (n=573) cohorts. Duration of follow-up was 10, 9, and 6 years, respectively. Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression analyses were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) or odds ratios (OR) for incidence and prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. The major G-allele of rs9932581 was associated with the incidence of renal events defined as new cases of microalbuminuria or the progression to a more severe stage of nephropathy during follow-up (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17-2.18, P=0.003) in SURGENE. The same allele was associated with established/advanced nephropathy (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.22-1.92, P=0.0001) and with the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.30-3.24, P=0.001) in GENEDIAB/GENESIS pooled studies. The risk allele was also associated with higher plasma AOPP concentration in subsets of SURGENE and GENEDIAB, with higher plasma MPO concentration in a subset of GENEDIAB, and with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in the three cohorts. In conclusion, a functional variant in the promoter of the CYBA gene was associated with lower eGFR and with prevalence and incidence of diabetic nephropathy and ESRD in type 1 diabetic patients. These results are consistent with

  15. D-Amino acid oxidase bio-functionalized platforms: Toward an enhanced enzymatic bio-activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Elisa; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the adsorption process and surface bio-activity of His-tagged D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) from Rhodotorula gracilis (His6-RgDAAO) as the first step for the development of an electrochemical bio-functionalized platform. With such a purpose this work comprises: (a) the His6-RgDAAO bio-activity in solution determined by amperometry, (b) the adsorption mechanism of His6-RgDAAO on bare gold and carboxylated modified substrates in the absence (substrate/COO-) and presence of Ni(II) (substrate/COO- + Ni(II)) determined by reflectometry, and (c) the bio-activity of the His6-RgDAAO bio-functionalized platforms determined by amperometry. Comparing the adsorption behavior and bio-activity of His6-RgDAAO on these different solid substrates allows understanding the contribution of the diverse interactions responsible for the platform performance. His6-RgDAAO enzymatic performance in solution is highly improved when compared to the previously used pig kidney (pk) DAAO. His6-RgDAAO exhibits an amperometrically detectable bio-activity at concentrations as low as those expected on a bio-functional platform; hence, it is a viable bio-recognition element of D-amino acids to be coupled to electrochemical platforms. Moreover, His6-RgDAAO bio-functionalized platforms exhibit a higher surface activity than pkDAAO physically adsorbed on gold. The platform built on Ni(II) modified substrates present enhanced bio-activity because the surface complexes histidine-Ni(II) provide with site-oriented, native-like enzymes. The adsorption mechanism responsible of the excellent performance of the bio-functionalized platform takes place in two steps involving electrostatic and bio-affinity interactions whose prevalence depends on the degree of surface coverage.

  16. Angiotensin II induced catabolic effect and muscle atrophy are redox dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Yoshida, Tadashi; Rezk, Bashir M.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Vaughn, Charlotte; Tabony, A. Michael; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) causes skeletal muscle wasting via an increase in muscle catabolism. To determine whether the wasting effects of Ang II were related to its ability to increase NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) we infused wild-type C57BL/6J or p47phox−/− mice with vehicle or Ang II for 7 days. Superoxide production was increased 2.4 fold in the skeletal muscle of Ang II infused mice, and this increase was prevented in p47phox−/− mice. Apocynin treatment prevented Ang II-induced superoxide production in skeletal muscle, consistent with Ang II increasing NADPH oxidase derived ROS. Ang II induced loss of body and skeletal muscle weight in C57BL/6J mice, whereas the reduction was significantly attenuated in p47phox−/− animals. The reduction of skeletal muscle weight caused by Ang II was associated with an increase of proteasome activity, and this increase was completely prevented in the skeletal muscle of p47phox−/− mice. In conclusion, Ang II-induced skeletal muscle wasting is in part dependent on NADPH oxidase derived ROS. PMID:21570954

  17. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopic characterization and spectroscopic/electrochemical evidence of formation of phenoxy free radical in active center analogs of galactose oxidase - [Cu(Salgly)H₂O] and [Cu(Salphenylalanine)H₂O].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biva; Medhi, Okhil K

    2013-03-01

    The formation of phenolate free radical is the factor of high turnover for catalytic activity of galactose oxidase (GO) compared to that by inorganic complexes. A new active center analog of GO, [Cu(II)(Salphenylalanine)H(2)O] have been synthesized and its single crystal X-ray analysis was done. In aqueous surfactant micellar solution chemical oxidation as well as electrochemical oxidation of structural models of galactose oxidase - [Cu(II)Salgly·H(2)O] and [Cu(II)(Salphenylalanine)·H(2)O], have been found to generate free radical originating at the phenolate group. Formation of the free radical have been proved by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Amide group anchored glucose oxidase based anodic catalysts for high performance enzymatic biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yongjin; Ahn, Yeonjoo; Kim, Do-Heyoung; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-01-01

    A new enzyme catalyst is formed by fabricating gold nano particle (GNP)-glucose oxidase (GOx) clusters that are then attached to polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) with cross-linkable terephthalaldehyde (TPA) (TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP]). Especially, amide bonds belonging to TPA play an anchor role for incorporating rigid bonding among GNP, GOx and CNT/PEI, while middle size GNP is well bonded with thiol group of GOx to form strong GNP-GOx cluster. Those bonds are identified by chemical and electrochemical characterizations like XPS and cyclic voltammogram. The anchording effect of amide bonds induces fast electron transfer and strong chemical bonding, resulting in enhancements in (i) catalytic activity, (ii) amount of immobilized GOx and (ii) performance of enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) including the catalyst. Regarding the catalytic activity, the TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP] produces high electron transfer rate constant (6 s-1), high glucose sensitivity (68 μA mM-1 cm-2), high maximum current density (113 μA cm-2), low charge transfer resistance (17.0 Ω cm2) and long-lasting durability while its chemical structure is characterized by XPS confirming large portion of amide bond. In EBC measurement, it has high maximum power density (0.94 mW cm-2) compatible with catalytic acitivity measurements.

  19. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 regulates the expression of the same NMDA receptor subunit genes as NRF-1: both factors act by a concurrent and parallel mechanism to couple energy metabolism and synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled processes. Previously, we found that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) transcriptionally co-regulates energy metabolism and neuronal activity by regulating all 13 subunits of the critical energy generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), as well as N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits 1 and 2B, GluN1 (Grin1) and GluN2B (Grin2b). We also found that another transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2 or GA-binding protein) regulates all subunits of COX as well. The goal of the present study was to test our hypothesis that NRF-2 also regulates specific subunits of NMDA receptors, and that it functions with NRF-1 via one of three mechanisms: complementary, concurrent and parallel, or a combination of complementary and concurrent/parallel. By means of multiple approaches, including in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and rat visual cortical tissue, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, NRF-2 was found to functionally regulate Grin1 and Grin2b genes, but not any other NMDA subunit genes. Grin1 and Grin2b transcripts were up-regulated by depolarizing KCl, but silencing of NRF-2 prevented this up-regulation. On the other hand, over-expression of NRF-2 rescued the down-regulation of these subunits by the impulse blocker TTX. NRF-2 binding sites on Grin1 and Grin2b are conserved among species. Our data indicate that NRF-2 and NRF-1 operate in a concurrent and parallel manner in mediating the tight coupling between energy metabolism and neuronal activity at the molecular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of a variant in the regulatory region of NADPH oxidase 4 gene and metabolic syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Erika Rabelo Forte de; Pereira, Luciano Beltrao; Stefano, Jose Tadeu; Patente, Thiago; Cavaleiro, Ana Mercedes; Silva Vasconcelos, Luydson Richardson; Carmo, Rodrigo Feliciano; Moreira Beltrao Pereira, Leila Maria; Carrilho, Flair Jose; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lucia; Oliveira, Claudia P

    2015-03-28

    Given the important contribution of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase system to the generation of reactive oxygen species induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV), we investigated two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the putative regulatory region of the genes encoding NADPH oxidase 4 catalytic subunit (NOX4) and its regulatory subunit p22phox (CYBA) and their relation with metabolic and histological variables in patients with HCV. One hundred seventy eight naïve HCV patients (49.3% male; 65% HCV genotype 1) with positive HCV RNA were genotyped using specific primers and fluorescent-labeled probes for SNPs rs3017887 in NOX4 and -675 T → A in CYBA. No association was found between the genotype frequencies of NOX4 and CYBA SNPs and inflammation scores or fibrosis stages in the overall population. The presence of the CA + AA genotypes of the NOX4 SNP was nominally associated with a lower alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentration in the male population (CA + AA = 72.23 ± 6.34 U/L versus CC = 100.22 ± 9.85; mean ± SEM; P = 0.05). The TT genotype of the CYBA SNP was also nominally associated with a lower ALT concentration in the male population (TT = 84.01 ± 6.77 U/L versus TA + AA = 109.67 ± 18.37 U/L; mean ± SEM; P = 0.047). The minor A-allele of the NOX4 SNP was inversely associated with the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) in the male population (odds ratio (OR): 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.79; P = 0.025). The results suggest that the evaluated NOX4 and CYBA SNPs are not direct genetic determinants of fibrosis in HCV patients, but nevertheless NOX4 rs3017887 SNP could indirectly influence fibrosis susceptibility due to its inverse association with MS in male patients.

  1. Surface Induced Dissociation Coupled with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Unveils Heterogeneity of a 211 kDa Multicopper Oxidase Protein Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Romano, Christine A.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2018-01-01

    Manganese oxidation is an important biogeochemical process that is largely regulated by bacteria through enzymatic reactions. However, the detailed mechanism is poorly understood due to challenges in isolating and characterizing these unknown enzymes. A manganese oxidase, Mnx, from Bacillus sp. PL-12 has been successfully overexpressed in active form as a protein complex with a molecular mass of 211 kDa. We have recently used surface induced dissociation (SID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to release and detect folded subcomplexes for determining subunit connectivity and quaternary structure. The data from the native mass spectrometry experiments led to a plausible structural model of this multicopper oxidase, which has been difficult to study by conventional structural biology methods. It was also revealed that each Mnx subunit binds a variable number of copper ions. Becasue of the heterogeneity of the protein and limited mass resolution, ambiguities in assigning some of the observed peaks remained as a barrier to fully understanding the role of metals and potential unknown ligands in Mnx. In this study, we performed SID in a modified Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. The high mass accuracy and resolution offered by FTICR unveiled unexpected artificial modifications on the protein that had been previously thought to be iron bound species based on lower resolution spectra. Additionally, isotopically resolved spectra of the released subcomplexes revealed the metal binding stoichiometry at different structural levels. This method holds great potential for in-depth characterization of metalloproteins and protein-ligand complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Role of regulatory subunits and protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) in determining nuclear localization and activity of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J C; Wailes, L A; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1999-03-05

    Regulation of protein kinase A by subcellular localization may be critical to target catalytic subunits to specific substrates. We employed epitope-tagged catalytic subunit to correlate subcellular localization and gene-inducing activity in the presence of regulatory subunit or protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). Transiently expressed catalytic subunit distributed throughout the cell and induced gene expression. Co-expression of regulatory subunit or PKI blocked gene induction and prevented nuclear accumulation. A mutant PKI lacking the nuclear export signal blocked gene induction but not nuclear accumulation, demonstrating that nuclear export is not essential to inhibit gene induction. When the catalytic subunit was targeted to the nucleus with a nuclear localization signal, it was not sequestered in the cytoplasm by regulatory subunit, although its activity was completely inhibited. PKI redistributed the nuclear catalytic subunit to the cytoplasm and blocked gene induction, demonstrating that the nuclear export signal of PKI can override a strong nuclear localization signal. With increasing PKI, the export process appeared to saturate, resulting in the return of catalytic subunit to the nucleus. These results demonstrate that both the regulatory subunit and PKI are able to completely inhibit the gene-inducing activity of the catalytic subunit even when the catalytic subunit is forced to concentrate in the nuclear compartment.

  3. In vitro antioxidant, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of fractions from Cienfuegosia digitata Cav., Sida alba L. and Sida acuta Burn f. (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, K; Souza, A; Coulibaly, A Y; Meda, N T R; Kiendrebeogo, M; Lamien-Meda, A; Millogo-Rasolodimby, J; Lamidi, M; Nacoulma, O G

    2010-11-15

    In this study polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, lipoxygenase (LOX) and Xanthine Oxidase (XO) inhibitory effects of n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of aqueous acetone extracts from S. alba L., S. acuta Burn f and Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. were investigated. The total phenolics, flavonoids, flavonols and total tannins were determined by spectrophotometric methods using Folin-ciocalteu, AlCl3 reagents and tannic acid, respectively. The antioxidant potential was evaluated using three methods: inhibition of free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydramzyl (DPPH), ABTS radical cation decolorization assay and Iron (III) to iron (II) reduction activity (FRAP). For enzymatic activity, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities were used. This study shows a relationship between polyphenol contents, antioxidant and enzymatic activities. Present results showed that ethyl acetate and dichloromethane fractions elicit the highest polyphenol content, antioxidant and enzymatic activities.

  4. The V-ATPase a2-subunit as a putative endosomal pH-sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshansky, V

    2007-11-01

    V-ATPase (vesicular H(+)-ATPase)-driven intravesicular acidification is crucial for vesicular trafficking. Defects in vesicular acidification and trafficking have recently been recognized as essential determinants of various human diseases. An important role of endosomal acidification in receptor-ligand dissociation and in activation of lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes is well established. However, the molecular mechanisms by which luminal pH information is transmitted to the cytosolic small GTPases that control trafficking events such as budding, coat formation and fusion are unknown. Here, we discuss our recent discovery that endosomal V-ATPase is a pH-sensor regulating the degradative pathway. According to our model, V-ATPase is responsible for: (i) the generation of a pH gradient between vesicular membranes; (ii) sensing of intravesicular pH; and (iii) transmitting this information to the cytosolic side of the membrane. We also propose the hypothetical molecular mechanism involved in function of the V-ATPase a2-subunit as a putative pH-sensor. Based on extensive experimental evidence on the crucial role of histidine residues in the function of PSPs (pH-sensing proteins) in eukaryotic cells, we hypothesize that pH-sensitive histidine residues within the intra-endosomal loops and/or C-terminal luminal tail of the a2-subunit could also be involved in the pH-sensing function of V-ATPase. However, in order to identify putative pH-sensitive histidine residues and to test this hypothesis, it is absolutely essential that we increase our understanding of the folding and transmembrane topology of the a-subunit isoforms of V-ATPase. Thus the crucial role of intra-endosomal histidine residues in pH-dependent conformational changes of the V-ATPase a2-isoform, its interaction with cytosolic small GTPases and ultimately in its acidification-dependent regulation of the endosomal/lysosomal protein degradative pathway remain to be determined.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana GYRB3 does not encode a DNA gyrase subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M Evans-Roberts

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in all cells. DNA gyrase is unique among the topoisomerases in that it is the only enzyme that can actively supercoil DNA using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Until recently gyrase was thought to be unique to bacteria, but has now been discovered in plants. The genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, is predicted to encode four gyrase subunits: AtGyrA, AtGyrB1, AtGyrB2 and AtGyrB3.We found, contrary to previous data, that AtGyrB3 is not essential to the survival of A. thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis suggests AtGyrB3 is considerably shorter than other gyrase B subunits, lacking part of the ATPase domain and other key motifs found in all type II topoisomerases; but it does contain a putative DNA-binding domain. Partially purified AtGyrB3 cannot bind E. coli GyrA or support supercoiling. AtGyrB3 cannot complement an E. coli gyrB temperature-sensitive strain, whereas AtGyrB2 can. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that AtGyrB3 cannot bind to AtGyrA or form a dimer.These data strongly suggest that AtGyrB3 is not a gyrase subunit but has another unknown function. One possibility is that it is a nuclear protein with a role in meiosis in pollen.

  6. On the Possibility of Uphill Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Multicopper Oxidases: Electrochemical and Quantum Chemical Study of Bilirubin Oxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shleev, S.; Andoralov, V.; Falk, M.; Reimann, C. T.; Ruzgas, T.; Srnec, Martin; Ryde, U.; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 7 (2012), s. 1524-1540 ISSN 1040-0397 Grant - others:7th Framework Program(XE) NMP4-SL-2009-229255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bilirubin oxidase * intramolecular electron transfer * rate-limiting catalytic step * reorganization energy * QM/MM calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.817, year: 2012

  7. Novel subunit structure observed for noncooperative hemoglobin from Urechis caupo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolatkar, P R; Meador, W E; Stanfield, R L; Hackert, M L

    1988-03-05

    Tetrameric hemoglobin from the "fat innkeeper" worm Urechis caupo possesses a novel subunit arrangement having an "inside out" quaternary structure in that the G/H helices are located on the outer surface of the tetramer. A 5-A resolution crystal structure reveals that although the individual subunits are beta-like, having a distinct D helix and the general myoglobin fold, the subunit contacts are very different from those previously observed for hemoglobins. Furthermore, the hemoglobin from U. caupo is also quite different from the unusual hemoglobin tetramer from clam which also has its G/H helices on the outer surface but with the hemes in close proximity through E-F helical contacts (Royer, W. E., Jr., Love, W. E., and Fenderson, F. F. (1985) Nature 316, 277-280).

  8. Dynamic properties of motor proteins with two subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; III, Hubert Phillips

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of motor protein molecules consisting of two subunits is investigated using simple discrete stochastic models. Exact steady-state analytical expressions are obtained for velocities and dispersions for any number of intermediate states and conformations between the corresponding binding states of proteins. These models enable us to provide a detailed description and comparison of two different mechanisms of the motion of motor proteins along the linear tracks: the hand-over-hand mechanism, when the motion of subunits alternate; and the inchworm mechanism, when one subunit is always trailing another one. It is shown that the proteins in the hand-over-hand mechanism move faster and fluctuate more than the molecules in the inchworm mechanism. The effect of external forces on dynamic properties of motor proteins is also discussed. Finally, a quantitative method, based on experimental observations for single motor proteins, is proposed for distinguishing between two mechanisms of motion

  9. CSNAP Is a Stoichiometric Subunit of the COP9 Signalosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Rozen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly conserved COP9 signalosome (CSN complex is a key regulator of all cullin-RING-ubiquitin ligases (CRLs, the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Until now, it was accepted that the CSN is composed of eight canonical components. Here, we report the discovery of an additional integral and stoichiometric subunit that had thus far evaded detection, and we named it CSNAP (CSN acidic protein. We show that CSNAP binds CSN3, CSN5, and CSN6, and its incorporation into the CSN complex is mediated through the C-terminal region involving conserved aromatic residues. Moreover, depletion of this small protein leads to reduced proliferation and a flattened and enlarged morphology. Finally, on the basis of sequence and structural properties shared by both CSNAP and DSS1, a component of the related 19S lid proteasome complex, we propose that CSNAP, the ninth CSN subunit, is the missing paralogous subunit of DSS1.

  10. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan J. Baldauf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT, which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA and the B subunit (CTB. CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction.

  11. Direct comparison of gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase variants and glucose oxidase: substrate range and H2O2 stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Thu V; Foumani, Maryam; MacCormick, Benjamin; Kwan, Rachel; Master, Emma R

    2016-11-21

    Glucose oxidase (GO) activity is generally restricted to glucose and is susceptible to inactivation by H 2 O 2 . By comparison, the Y300A variant of gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase (GOOX) from Sarocladium strictum showed broader substrate range and higher H 2 O 2 stability. Specifically, Y300A exhibited up to 40 times higher activity on all tested sugars except glucose, compared to GO. Moreover, fusion of the Y300A variant to a family 22 carbohydrate binding module from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM22A) nearly doubled its catalytic efficiency on glucose, while retaining significant activity on oligosaccharides. In the presence of 200 mM of H 2 O 2 , the recombinant CtCBM22A_Y300A retained 80% of activity on glucose and 100% of activity on cellobiose, the preferred substrate for this enzyme. By contrast, a commercial glucose oxidase reported to contain ≤0.1 units catalase/ mg protein, retained 60% activity on glucose under the same conditions. GOOX variants appear to undergo a different mechanism of inactivation, as a loss of histidine instead of methionine was observed after H 2 O 2 incubation. The addition of CtCBM22A also promoted functional binding of the fusion enzyme to xylan, facilitating its simultaneous purification and immobilization using edible oat spelt xylan, which might benefit the usage of this enzyme preparation in food and baking applications.

  12. Spatio-temporal detection of the Thiomonas population and the Thiomonas arsenite oxidase involved in natural arsenite attenuation processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès eHovasse

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acid mine drainage (AMD impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based on pyrosequencing and FISH, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ.

  13. Protein structural development of threadfin bream ( Nemipterus spp.) surimi gels induced by glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fan, Daming; Fu, Lulu; Jiao, Xidong; Huang, Jianlian; Zhao, Jianxin; Yan, Bowen; Zhou, Wenguo; Zhang, Wenhai; Ye, Weijian; Zhang, Hao

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of glucose oxidase on the gel properties of threadfin bream surimi. The gel strength of surimi increased with the addition of 0.5‰ glucose oxidase after two-step heating. Based on the results of the chemical interactions, the hydrophobic interaction and disulfide bond of glucose oxidase-treated surimi samples increased compared with the control samples at the gelation temperature and gel modori temperature. The surface hydrophobicity of samples with glucose oxidase and glucose increased significantly ( p glucose oxidase induced more α-helixes to turn into a more elongated random and flocculent structure. Glucose oxidase changes the secondary structure of the surimi protein, making more proteins depolarize and stretch and causing actomyosin to accumulate to each other, resulting in the formation of surimi gel.

  14. Multiple isoforms for the catalytic subunit of PKA in the basal fungal lineage Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Núñez, Lucas; Ocampo, Josefina; Gottlieb, Alexandra M; Rossi, Silvia; Moreno, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) activity is involved in dimorphism of the basal fungal lineage Mucor. From the recently sequenced genome of Mucor circinelloides we could predict ten catalytic subunits of PKA. From sequence alignment and structural prediction we conclude that the catalytic core of the isoforms is conserved, and the difference between them resides in their amino termini. This high number of isoforms is maintained in the subdivision Mucoromycotina. Each paralogue, when compared to the ones form other fungi is more homologous to one of its orthologs than to its paralogs. All of these fungal isoforms cannot be included in the class I or II in which fungal protein kinases have been classified. mRNA levels for each isoform were measured during aerobic and anaerobic growth. The expression of each isoform is differential and associated to a particular growth stage. We reanalyzed the sequence of PKAC (GI 20218944), the only cloned sequence available until now for a catalytic subunit of M. circinelloides. PKAC cannot be classified as a PKA because of its difference in the conserved C-tail; it shares with PKB a conserved C2 domain in the N-terminus. No catalytic activity could be measured for this protein nor predicted bioinformatically. It can thus be classified as a pseudokinase. Its importance can not be underestimated since it is expressed at the mRNA level in different stages of growth, and its deletion is lethal. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Amine oxidases as important agents of pathological processes of rhabdomyolysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkova, O O; Latyshko, N V; Shandrenko, S G

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have tested an idea on the important role of amine oxidases (semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase) as an additional source of oxidative/carbonyl stress under glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis, since the enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and reactive carbonyl species in a variety of tissues is linked to various diseases. In our experiments we used the sensitive fluorescent method devised for estimation of amine oxidases activity in the rat kidney and thymus as targeted organs under rhabdomyolysis. We have found in vivo the multiple rises in activity of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase (2-4.5 times) in the corresponding cell fractions, whole cells or their lysates at the 3-6th day after glycerol injection. Aberrant antioxidant activities depended on rhabdomyolysis stage and had organ specificity. Additional treatment of animals with metal chelator ‘Unithiol’ adjusted only the activity of antioxidant enzymes but not amine oxidases in both organs. Furthermore the in vitro experiment showed that Fenton reaction (hydrogen peroxide in the presence of iron) products alone had no effect on semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity in rat liver cell fraction whereas supplementation with methylglyoxal resulted in its significant 2.5-fold enhancement. Combined action of the both agents had additive effect on semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity. We can assume that biogenic amine and polyamine catabolism by amine oxidases is upregulated by oxidative and carbonyl stress factors directly under rhabdomyolysis progression, and the increase in catabolic products concentration contributes to tissue damage in glycerol-induced acute renal failure and apoptosis stimulation in thymus.

  16. Up-Streaming Process for Glucose Oxidase by Thermophilic Penicillium sp. in Shake Flask

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Mohsin JAVED; Aroosh SHABIR; Sana ZAHOOR; Ikram UL-HAQ

    2012-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the production of glucose oxidase (GOD) from thermophilic Penicillium sp. in 250 mL shake flask. Fourteen different strains of thermophilic Penicillium sp. were isolated from the soil and were screened for glucose oxidase production. IIBP-13 strain gave maximum extra-cellular glucose oxidase production as compared to other isolates. Effect of submerged fermentation in shaking and static conditions, different carbon sources and incubation period on the produ...

  17. Safety and immunogenicity of H1/IC31®, an adjuvanted TB subunit vaccine, in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts greater than 350 cells/mm3: a phase II, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reither

    Full Text Available Novel tuberculosis vaccines should be safe, immunogenic, and effective in various population groups, including HIV-infected individuals. In this phase II multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, the safety and immunogenicity of the novel H1/IC31 vaccine, a fusion protein of Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1 formulated with the adjuvant IC31, was evaluated in HIV-infected adults.HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T cell counts >350/mm3 and without evidence of active tuberculosis were enrolled and followed until day 182. H1/IC31 vaccine or placebo was randomly allocated in a 5:1 ratio. The vaccine was administered intramuscularly at day 0 and 56. Safety assessment was based on medical history, clinical examinations, and blood and urine testing. Immunogenicity was determined by a short-term whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assay.47 of the 48 randomised participants completed both vaccinations. In total, 459 mild or moderate and 2 severe adverse events were reported. There were three serious adverse events in two vaccinees classified as not related to the investigational product. Local injection site reactions were more common in H1/IC31 versus placebo recipients (65.0% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.015. Solicited systemic and unsolicited adverse events were similar by study arm. The baseline CD4+ T cell count and HIV viral load were similar by study arm and remained constant over time. The H1/IC31 vaccine induced a persistent Th1-immune response with predominately TNF-α and IL-2 co-expressing CD4+ T cells, as well as polyfunctional IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 expressing CD4+ T cells.H1/IC31 was well tolerated and safe in HIV-infected adults with a CD4+ Lymphocyte count greater than 350 cells/mm3. The vaccine did not have an effect on CD4+ T cell count or HIV-1 viral load. H1/IC31 induced a specific and durable Th1 immune response.Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (PACTR PACTR201105000289276.

  18. Low-Dose Dextromethorphan, a NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor, Reduces Blood Pressure and Enhances Vascular Protection in Experimental Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao-Cheng; Chao, Chih-Yu; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular oxidative stress may be increased with age and aggravate endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effects of dextromethorphan (DM), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, either alone or in combination treatment, on blood pressure (BP) and vascular protection in aged spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methodology/Principal Findings Eighteen-week-old WKY rats and SHRs were housed for 2 weeks. SHRs were randomly assigned to one of the 12 groups: untreated; DM monotherapy with 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day; amlodipine (AM, a calcium channel blocker) monotherapy with 1 or 5 mg/kg/day; and combination therapy of DM 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day with AM 1 or 5 mg/kg/day individually for 4 weeks. The in vitro effects of DM were also examined. In SHRs, AM monotherapy dose-dependently reduced arterial systolic BP. DM in various doses significantly and similarly reduced arterial systolic BP. Combination of DM with AM gave additive effects on BP reduction. DM, either alone or in combination with AM, improved aortic endothelial function indicated by ex vivo acetylcholine-induced relaxation. The combination of low-dose DM with AM gave most significant inhibition on aortic wall thickness in SHRs. Plasma total antioxidant status was significantly increased by all the therapies except for the combination of high-dose DM with high-dose AM. Serum nitrite and nitrate level was significantly reduced by AM but not by DM or the combination of DM with AM. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with DM reduced angiotensin II-induced reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activation in human aortic endothelial cells. Conclusions/Significance Treatment of DM reduced BP and enhanced vascular protection probably by inhibiting vascular NADPH oxidase in aged hypertensive animals with or without AM treatment. It provides the potential rationale to a novel combination treatment with low-dose DM and AM in clinical hypertension. PMID:23049937

  19. Low-dose dextromethorphan, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reduces blood pressure and enhances vascular protection in experimental hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Cheng Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular oxidative stress may be increased with age and aggravate endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effects of dextromethorphan (DM, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, either alone or in combination treatment, on blood pressure (BP and vascular protection in aged spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighteen-week-old WKY rats and SHRs were housed for 2 weeks. SHRs were randomly assigned to one of the 12 groups: untreated; DM monotherapy with 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day; amlodipine (AM, a calcium channel blocker monotherapy with 1 or 5 mg/kg/day; and combination therapy of DM 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/day with AM 1 or 5 mg/kg/day individually for 4 weeks. The in vitro effects of DM were also examined. In SHRs, AM monotherapy dose-dependently reduced arterial systolic BP. DM in various doses significantly and similarly reduced arterial systolic BP. Combination of DM with AM gave additive effects on BP reduction. DM, either alone or in combination with AM, improved aortic endothelial function indicated by ex vivo acetylcholine-induced relaxation. The combination of low-dose DM with AM gave most significant inhibition on aortic wall thickness in SHRs. Plasma total antioxidant status was significantly increased by all the therapies except for the combination of high-dose DM with high-dose AM. Serum nitrite and nitrate level was significantly reduced by AM but not by DM or the combination of DM with AM. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with DM reduced angiotensin II-induced reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activation in human aortic endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment of DM reduced BP and enhanced vascular protection probably by inhibiting vascular NADPH oxidase in aged hypertensive animals with or without AM treatment. It provides the potential rationale to a novel combination treatment with low-dose DM and AM in clinical hypertension.

  20. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polekhina, Galina, E-mail: gpolekhina@svi.edu.au; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha [St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); O’Donnell, Paul [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W. [St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  1. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polekhina, Galina; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein

  2. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  3. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Anna; Teichert, Ines; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-06-21

    The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. The striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex is highly conserved from yeasts to humans and is an important regulator of numerous eukaryotic developmental processes, such as cellular signaling and cell development. Although functional insights into the STRIPAK complex are accumulating, the detailed molecular mechanisms of single subunits are only partially understood

  4. CMS-G from Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is maintained in natural populations despite containing an atypical cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Etienne H; Lehmann, Caroline; Boivin, Stéphane; Brings, Lea; De Cauwer, Isabelle; Bock, Ralph; Kühn, Kristina; Touzet, Pascal

    2018-02-23

    While mitochondrial mutants of the respiratory machinery are rare and often lethal, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), a mitochondrially inherited trait that results in pollen abortion, is frequently encountered in wild populations. It generates a breeding system called gynodioecy. In Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima , a gynodioecious species, we found CMS-G to be widespread across the distribution range of the species. Despite the sequencing of the mitochondrial genome of CMS-G, the mitochondrial sterilizing factor causing CMS-G is still unknown. By characterizing biochemically CMS-G, we found that the expression of several mitochondrial proteins is altered in CMS-G plants. In particular, Cox1, a core subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), is larger but can still assemble into complex IV. However, the CMS-G-specific complex IV was only detected as a stabilized dimer. We did not observe any alteration of the affinity of complex IV for cytochrome c ; however, in CMS-G, complex IV capacity is reduced. Our results show that CMS-G is maintained in many natural populations despite being associated with an atypical complex IV. We suggest that the modified complex IV could incur the associated cost predicted by theoretical models to maintain gynodioecy in wild populations. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Molecular evolution of the polyamine oxidase gene family in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polticelli Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyamine oxidase enzymes catalyze the oxidation of polyamines and acetylpolyamines. Since polyamines are basic regulators of cell growth and proliferation, their homeostasis is crucial for cell life. Members of the polyamine oxidase gene family have been identified in a wide variety of animals, including vertebrates, arthropodes, nematodes, placozoa, as well as in plants and fungi. Polyamine oxidases (PAOs from yeast can oxidize spermine, N1-acetylspermine, and N1-acetylspermidine, however, in vertebrates two different enzymes, namely spermine oxidase (SMO and acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO, specifically catalyze the oxidation of spermine, and N1-acetylspermine/N1-acetylspermidine, respectively. Little is known about the molecular evolutionary history of these enzymes. However, since the yeast PAO is able to catalyze the oxidation of both acetylated and non acetylated polyamines, and in vertebrates these functions are addressed by two specialized polyamine oxidase subfamilies (APAO and SMO, it can be hypothesized an ancestral reference for the former enzyme from which the latter would have been derived. Results We analysed 36 SMO, 26 APAO, and 14 PAO homologue protein sequences from 54 taxa including various vertebrates and invertebrates. The analysis of the full-length sequences and the principal domains of vertebrate and invertebrate PAOs yielded consensus primary protein sequences for vertebrate SMOs and APAOs, and invertebrate PAOs. This analysis, coupled to molecular modeling techniques, also unveiled sequence regions that confer specific structural and functional properties, including substrate specificity, by the different PAO subfamilies. Molecular phylogenetic trees revealed a basal position of all the invertebrates PAO enzymes relative to vertebrate SMOs and APAOs. PAOs from insects constitute a monophyletic clade. Two PAO variants sampled in the amphioxus are basal to the dichotomy between two well supported

  6. Determination of catechin in green tea using a catechol oxidase biomimetic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Suellen C.; Osorio, Renata El-Hage M. de Barros; Anjos, Ademir dos; Neves, Ademir; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu; Vieira, Iolanda C.

    2008-01-01

    A catechol oxidase biomimetic sensor, based on a novel copper(II) complex, was developed for the determination of catechin in green tea and the results were compared with those obtained by capillary electrophoresis. The dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu 2 (HL)(μ-CH 3 COO)](ClO 4 ), containing the ligand N,N-[bis-(2-pyridylmethyl)]-N',N'-[(2-hydroxybenzyl)(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert - butylbenzyl)]-1,3-propanediamine-2-ol (H 3 L), was synthesized and characterized by IR, 1 H NMR and elemental analysis. The best conditions for the optimization of the biomimetic sensor were established by square wave voltammetry. The best performance for this sensor was obtained in 75:15:10% (m/m/m) of the graphite powder:nujol:copper(II) complex, 0.05 mol L -1 phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.5) and frequency, pulse amplitude, scan increment at 30 Hz, 80 mV, 3.3 mV, respectively. The analytical curve was linear in the concentration range 4.95 x 10 -6 to 3.27 x 10 -5 mol L -1 (r = 0.9993) with a detection limit of 2.8 x 10 -7 mol L -1 . This biomimetic sensor demonstrated long-term stability (9 months; 800 determinations) and reproducibility with a relative standard deviation of 3.5%. The recovery of catechin from green tea samples ranged from 93.8 to 106.9% and the determination, compared with that obtained using capillary electrophoresis, was found to be acceptable at the 95% confidence level. (author)

  7. Evaluation of subunit vaccines against feline immunodeficiency virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Verschoor, E.J.; Willemse, M.J.; Stam, J.G.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Pouwels, H.; Chalmers, S.K.; Sondermeijer, P.J.; Hesselink, W.; Ronde, A. de

    1996-01-01

    Subunit vaccines prepared against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection were evaluated in two trials. First, cats were immunized with bacterial expression products of an envelope fragment that contained the V3 neutralization domain of the FIV surface protein fused to either galactokinase

  8. Partial agonists and subunit selectivity at NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Rune; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2010-01-01

    Subunit-selective ligands for glutamate receptors remains an area of interest as glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and involved in a number of diseased states in the central nervous system (CNS). Few subtype-selective ligands are known, especially among the N...

  9. α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphisms exhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Nicotine is the major addictive substance in cigarettes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are thought to play an important role in nicotine addiction of smokers. One of the genes, α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...

  10. Structural interaction of novel dendrimer and subunits with water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    interaction study with solvents are essential [4-6] and several subunits are used for .... slowed down the viscous flow with higher excess limiting viscosities of the 2,4,6- ..... Practical Organic Chemistry, 5th ed.; Wiley: New York; 1989; p 300. 14.

  11. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  12. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of hemoglobin and its isolated subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, G.R.; Cook, D.C.; Berger, R.L.; Friedman, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of 90% enriched 57Fe hemoglobin and its isolated subunits have been prepared. Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements have been made on three such samples. Sample one contained contributions of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and carbonmonoxyhemoglobin. This sample was studied from a temperature of 90 K down to 230 mK. Measurements were also made at 4.2 K using a small applied magnetic field of 1.0 T. In general, the measured quadrupole splittings and isomer shifts for each component agreed with previous measurements on single component samples in the literature, and thus demonstrated that chemically enriched hemoglobin has not been altered. The second and third samples were isolated alpha and beta subunits, respectively. We have found measurable Moessbauer spectral differences between the HbO 2 sites in the alpha subunit sample and the beta subunit sample. The measured Moessbauer spectral areas indicate that the iron ion has the largest mean-square displacement at the deoxy Hb sites as compared to that at the oxy- and carbonmonoxy Hb sites. The mean-square displacement at the HbO 2 sites is the smallest

  13. Regulation of the NADPH Oxidase RBOHD During Plant Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Shirasu, Ken; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    Pathogen recognition induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases in both plants and animals. ROS have direct antimicrobial properties, but also serve as signaling molecules to activate further immune outputs. However, ROS production has to be tightly controlled to avoid detrimental effects on host cells, but yet must be produced in the right amount, at the right place and at the right time upon pathogen perception. Plant NADPH oxidases belong to the respiratory burst oxidase homolog (RBOH) family, which contains 10 members in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) leads to a rapid, specific and strong production of ROS, which is dependent on RBOHD. RBOHD is mainly controlled by Ca(2+) via direct binding to EF-hand motifs and phosphorylation by Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. Recent studies have, however, revealed a critical role for a Ca(2+)-independent regulation of RBOHD. The plasma membrane-associated cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 (BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1), which is a direct substrate of the PRR complex, directly interacts with and phosphorylates RBOHD upon PAMP perception. Impairment of these phosphorylation events completely abolishes the function of RBOHD in immunity. These results suggest that RBOHD activity is tightly controlled by multilayered regulations. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling RBOHD activation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Biocompatibility selenium nanoparticles with an intrinsic oxidase-like activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Leilei; Huang, Kaixun; Liu, Hongmei, E-mail: hmliu2004@126.com [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2016-03-15

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) are considered to be the new selenium supplement forms with high biological activity and low toxicity; however, the molecular mechanism by which SeNPs exert the biological function is unclear. Here, we reported that biocompatibility SeNPs possessed intrinsic oxidase-like activity. Using Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} as a precursor and glutathione as a reductant, biocompatibility SeNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical reduction method in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results of structure characterization revealed that synthesized SeNPs were amorphous red elementary selenium with spherical morphology, and ranged in size from 25 to 70 nm size with a narrow distribution (41.4 ± 6.7 nm). The oxidase-like activity of the as-synthesized SeNPs was tested with 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a substrate. The results indicated that SeNPs could catalyze the oxidization of TMB by dissolved oxygen. These SeNPs showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 4 and 30 °C, and the oxidase-like activity was higher as the concentration of SeNPs increased and the size of SeNPs decreased. The Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) values and maximal reaction velocity (V{sub max}) of the SeNPs for TMB oxidation were 0.0083 mol/L and 3.042 μmol/L min, respectively.

  15. Biocompatibility selenium nanoparticles with an intrinsic oxidase-like activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Leilei; Huang, Kaixun; Liu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) are considered to be the new selenium supplement forms with high biological activity and low toxicity; however, the molecular mechanism by which SeNPs exert the biological function is unclear. Here, we reported that biocompatibility SeNPs possessed intrinsic oxidase-like activity. Using Na 2 SeO 3 as a precursor and glutathione as a reductant, biocompatibility SeNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical reduction method in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results of structure characterization revealed that synthesized SeNPs were amorphous red elementary selenium with spherical morphology, and ranged in size from 25 to 70 nm size with a narrow distribution (41.4 ± 6.7 nm). The oxidase-like activity of the as-synthesized SeNPs was tested with 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a substrate. The results indicated that SeNPs could catalyze the oxidization of TMB by dissolved oxygen. These SeNPs showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 4 and 30 °C, and the oxidase-like activity was higher as the concentration of SeNPs increased and the size of SeNPs decreased. The Michaelis constant (K m ) values and maximal reaction velocity (V max ) of the SeNPs for TMB oxidation were 0.0083 mol/L and 3.042 μmol/L min, respectively.

  16. Crystallization of the Nonameric Small Terminase Subunit of Bacteriophage P22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Roy; A Bhardwaj; G Cingolani

    2011-12-31

    The packaging of viral genomes into preformed empty procapsids is powered by an ATP-dependent genome-translocating motor. This molecular machine is formed by a heterodimer consisting of large terminase (L-terminase) and small terminase (S-terminase) subunits, which is assembled into a complex of unknown stoichiometry, and a dodecameric portal protein. There is considerable confusion in the literature regarding the biologically relevant oligomeric state of terminases, which, like portal proteins, form ring-like structures. The number of subunits in a hollow oligomeric protein defines the internal diameter of the central channel and the ability to fit DNA inside. Thus, knowledge of the exact stoichiometry of terminases is critical to decipher the mechanisms of terminase-dependent DNA translocation. Here, the gene encoding bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in Escherichia coli has been overexpressed and the protein purified under native conditions. In the absence of detergents and/or denaturants that may cause disassembly of the native oligomer and formation of aberrant rings, it was found that P22 S-terminase assembles into a concentration-independent nonamer of {approx}168 kDa. Nonameric S-terminase was crystallized in two different crystal forms at neutral pH. Crystal form I belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 144.2, c = 145.3 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. Crystal form II belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.48, b = 100.9, c = 89.95 {angstrom}, {beta} = 93.73{sup o}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of crystal form II confirms that the S-terminase crystals contain a nonamer in the asymmetric unit and are suitable for high-resolution structure determination.

  17. Crystallization of the Nonameric Small Terminase Subunit of bacteriophage P22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Roy; A Bhardwaj; G Cingoloni

    2011-12-31

    The packaging of viral genomes into preformed empty procapsids is powered by an ATP-dependent genome-translocating motor. This molecular machine is formed by a heterodimer consisting of large terminase (L-terminase) and small terminase (S-terminase) subunits, which is assembled into a complex of unknown stoichiometry, and a dodecameric portal protein. There is considerable confusion in the literature regarding the biologically relevant oligomeric state of terminases, which, like portal proteins, form ring-like structures. The number of subunits in a hollow oligomeric protein defines the internal diameter of the central channel and the ability to fit DNA inside. Thus, knowledge of the exact stoichiometry of terminases is critical to decipher the mechanisms of terminase-dependent DNA translocation. Here, the gene encoding bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in Escherichia coli has been overexpressed and the protein purified under native conditions. In the absence of detergents and/or denaturants that may cause disassembly of the native oligomer and formation of aberrant rings, it was found that P22 S-terminase assembles into a concentration-independent nonamer of {approx}168 kDa. Nonameric S-terminase was crystallized in two different crystal forms at neutral pH. Crystal form I belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 144.2, c = 145.3 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. Crystal form II belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.48, b = 100.9, c = 89.95 {angstrom}, {beta} = 93.73{sup o}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of crystal form II confirms that the S-terminase crystals contain a nonamer in the asymmetric unit and are suitable for high-resolution structure determination.

  18. The Mediator subunit MDT-15 confers metabolic adaptation to ingested material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Taubert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II (Pol(II dependent gene expression requires accessory factors termed transcriptional coregulators. One coregulator that universally contributes to Pol(II-dependent transcription is the Mediator, a multisubunit complex that is targeted by many transcriptional regulatory factors. For example, the Caenorhabditis elegans Mediator subunit MDT-15 confers the regulatory actions of the sterol response element binding protein SBP-1 and the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 on fatty acid metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that MDT-15 displays a broader spectrum of activities, and that it integrates metabolic responses to materials ingested by C. elegans. Depletion of MDT-15 protein or mutation of the mdt-15 gene abrogated induction of specific detoxification genes in response to certain xenobiotics or heavy metals, rendering these animals hypersensitive to toxin exposure. Intriguingly, MDT-15 appeared to selectively affect stress responses related to ingestion, as MDT-15 functional defects did not abrogate other stress responses, e.g., thermotolerance. Together with our previous finding that MDT-15:NHR-49 regulatory complexes coordinate a sector of the fasting response, we propose a model whereby MDT-15 integrates several transcriptional regulatory pathways to monitor both the availability and quality of ingested materials, including nutrients and xenobiotic compounds.

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J; Habl, Samar S; Barnes, Roxann D; Rasmussen, Keith G

    2004-12-01

    Concerns have been expressed regarding the use of general anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). We review the published literature and present 4 new cases and conclude that there is no evidence of a dangerous interaction between ECT and MAOI use. In general, a cautious approach would be to discontinue MAOIs before ECT if the medication has not been helpful; however, there is no need for a washout interval before starting ECT. Furthermore, if there is otherwise a reason for continuing the MAOI, it can be continued during index ECT or initiated during maintenance ECT.

  20. Lysyl Oxidase, a Targetable Secreted Molecule Involved in Cancer Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas Robert; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    to improve the tools available in our arsenal against this disease, both in terms of treatment, but also prevention. Recently, we showed that hypoxic induction of the extracellular matrix modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic dissemination to the bone in estrogen receptor negative...... of this enzyme as a therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer. Our work is the latest in an emerging body of work supporting the targeting of LOX and calls for greater efforts in developing therapeutics against this extracellular secreted factor in the prevention of cancer progression across multiple solid...

  1. QSYQ Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis Induced Heart Remodeling Rats through Different Subtypes of NADPH-Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We aim to investigate the therapeutic effects of QSYQ, a drug of heart failure (HF in clinical practice in China, on a rat heart failure (HF model. 3 groups were divided: HF model group (LAD ligation, QSYQ group (LAD ligation and treated with QSYQ, and sham-operated group. After 4 weeks, rats were sacrificed for cardiac injury measurements. Rats with HF showed obvious histological changes including necrosis and inflammation foci, elevated ventricular remodeling markers levels(matrix metalloproteinases-2, MMP-2, deregulated ejection fraction (EF value, increased formation of oxidative stress (Malondialdehyde, MDA, and up-regulated levels of apoptotic cells (caspase-3, p53 and tunnel in myocardial tissue. Treatment of QSYQ improved cardiac remodeling through counter-acting those events. The improvement of QSYQ was accompanied with a restoration of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4 and NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2 pathways in different patterns. Administration of QSYQ could attenuate LAD-induced HF, and AngII-NOX2-ROS-MMPs pathway seemed to be the critical potential targets for QSYQ to reduce the remodeling. Moreover, NOX4 was another key targets to inhibit the p53 and Caspase3, thus to reduce the hypertrophy and apoptosis, and eventually provide a synergetic cardiac protective effect.

  2. NADPH Oxidase 1 Modulates WNT and NOTCH1 Signaling To Control the Fate of Proliferative Progenitor Cells in the Colon▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coant, Nicolas; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Pedruzzi, Eric; Guichard, Cécile; Tréton, Xavier; Ducroc, Robert; Freund, Jean-Noel; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Bouhnik, Yoram; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Skurnik, David; Grodet, Alain; Fay, Michèle; Biard, Denis; Lesuffleur, Thécla; Deffert, Christine; Moreau, Richard; Groyer, André; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Daniel, Fanny; Ogier-Denis, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The homeostatic self-renewal of the colonic epithelium requires coordinated regulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways to control proliferation and lineage commitment of multipotent stem cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the Wnt/β-catenin and Notch1 pathways interplay in controlling cell proliferation and fate in the colon are poorly understood. Here we show that NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing oxidase that is highly expressed in colonic epithelial cells, is a pivotal determinant of cell proliferation and fate that integrates Wnt/β-catenin and Notch1 signals. NOX1-deficient mice reveal a massive conversion of progenitor cells into postmitotic goblet cells at the cost of colonocytes due to the concerted repression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/Wnt/β-catenin and Notch1 signaling. This conversion correlates with the following: (i) the redox-dependent activation of the dual phosphatase PTEN, causing the inactivation of the Wnt pathway effector β-catenin, and (ii) the downregulation of Notch1 signaling that provokes derepression of mouse atonal homolog 1 (Math1) expression. We conclude that NOX1 controls the balance between goblet and absorptive cell types in the colon by coordinately modulating PI3K/AKT/Wnt/β-catenin and Notch1 signaling. This finding provides the molecular basis for the role of NOX1 in cell proliferation and postmitotic differentiation. PMID:20351171

  3. Pulse Radiolysis Studies of Temperature Dependent Electron Transfers among Redox Centers in ba(3)-Cytochrome c Oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Wherland, Scot; Antholine, William E

    2010-01-01

    The functioning of cytochrome c oxidases involves orchestration of long-range electron transfer (ET) events among the four redox active metal centers. We report the temperature dependence of electron transfer from the Cu(A)(r) site to the low-spin heme-(a)b(o) site, i.e., Cu(A)(r) + heme-a(b)(o) ......The functioning of cytochrome c oxidases involves orchestration of long-range electron transfer (ET) events among the four redox active metal centers. We report the temperature dependence of electron transfer from the Cu(A)(r) site to the low-spin heme-(a)b(o) site, i.e., Cu(A)(r) + heme...... in cytochrome ba(3) had no effect on the rate of this reaction whereas the II-Met160Leu Cu(A)-mutation was slower by an amount corresponding to a decreased driving force of ∼0.06 eV. The structures support the presence of a common, electron-conducting "wire" between Cu(A) and heme-a(b). The transfer...

  4. Putting together a plasma membrane NADH oxidase: a tale of three laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Hans; Crane, Frederick L; Morré, D James

    2012-11-01

    The observation that high cellular concentrations of NADH were associated with low adenylate cyclase activity led to a search for the mechanism of the effect. Since cyclase is in the plasma membrane, we considered the membrane might have a site for NADH action, and that NADH might be oxidized at that site. A test for NADH oxidase showed very low activity, which could be increased by adding growth factors. The plasma membrane oxidase was not inhibited by inhibitors of mitochondrial NADH oxidase such as cyanide, rotenone or antimycin. Stimulation of the plasma membrane oxidase by iso-proterenol or triiodothyronine was different from lack of stimulation in endoplasmic reticulum. After 25 years of research, three components of a trans membrane NADH oxidase have been discovered. Flavoprotein NADH coenzyme Q reductases (NADH cytochrome b reductase) on the inside, coenzyme Q in the middle, and a coenzyme Q oxidase on the outside as a terminal oxidase. The external oxidase segment is a copper protein with unique properties in timekeeping, protein disulfide isomerase and endogenous NADH oxidase activity, which affords a mechanism for control of cell growth by the overall NADH oxidase and the remarkable inhibition of oxidase activity and growth of cancer cells by a wide range of anti-tumor drugs. A second trans plasma membrane electron transport system has been found in voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC), which has NADH ferricyanide reductase activity. This activity must be considered in relation to ferricyanide stimulation of growth and increased VDAC antibodies in patients with autism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and subunits of gliadin on physicochemical parameters of different wheat genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of functional properties of wheat flour by specific tests allows genotypes with appropriate characteristics to be selected for specific industrial uses. The objective of wheat breeding programs is to improve the quality of germplasm bank in order to be able to develop wheat with suitable gluten strength and extensibility for bread making. The aim of this study was to evaluate 16 wheat genotypes by correlating both glutenin subunits of high and low molecular weight and gliadin subunits with the physicochemical characteristics of the grain. Protein content, sedimentation volume, sedimentation index, and falling number values were analyzed after the grains were milled. Hectoliter weight and mass of 1000 seeds were also determined. The glutenin and gliadin subunits were separated using polyacrylamide gel in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The data were evaluated using variance analysis, Pearson's correlation, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis. The IPR 85, IPR Catuara TM, T 091015, and T 091069 genotypes stood out from the others, which indicate their possibly superior grain quality with higher sedimentation volume, higher sedimentation index, and higher mass of 1000 seeds; these genotypes possessed the subunits 1 (Glu-A1, 5 + 10 (Glu-D1, c (Glu-A3, and b (Glu-B3, with exception of T 091069 genotype that possessed the g allele instead of b in the Glu-B3.

  6. Redox regulation of the MED28 and MED32 mediator subunits is important for development and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhali, Jehad; Davoine, Céline; Björklund, Stefan; Wingsle, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that acts as a bridge between promoter-bound transcriptional regulators and RNA polymerase II. While redox signaling is important in adjusting plant metabolism and development, the involvement of Mediator in redox homeostasis and regulation only recently started to emerge. Our previous results show that the MED10a, MED28, and MED32 Mediator subunits form various types of covalent oligomers linked by intermolecular disulfide bonds in vitro. To link that with biological significance we have characterized Arabidopsis med32 and med28 mutants and found that they are affected in root development and senescence, phenotypes possibly associated to redox changes.

  7. Reduction of NADPH-oxidase activity ameliorates the cardiovascular phenotype in a mouse model of Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Campuzano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a generalized arteriopathy due to elastin deficiency, presenting as stenoses of medium and large arteries and leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular complications. Deletion of a functional NCF1 gene copy has been shown to protect a proportion of WBS patients against hypertension, likely through reduced NADPH-oxidase (NOX-mediated oxidative stress. DD mice, carrying a 0.67 Mb heterozygous deletion including the Eln gene, presented with a generalized arteriopathy, hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy, associated with elevated angiotensin II (angII, oxidative stress parameters, and Ncf1 expression. Genetic (by crossing with Ncf1 mutant and/or pharmacological (with ang II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or NOX inhibitor apocynin reduction of NOX activity controlled hormonal and biochemical parameters in DD mice, resulting in normalized blood pressure and improved cardiovascular histology. We provide strong evidence for implication of the redox system in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular disease in a mouse model of WBS. The phenotype of these mice can be ameliorated by either genetic or pharmacological intervention reducing NOX activity, likely through reduced angII-mediated oxidative stress. Therefore, anti-NOX therapy merits evaluation to prevent the potentially serious cardiovascular complications of WBS, as well as in other cardiovascular disorders mediated by similar pathogenic mechanism.

  8. Plasma amine oxidase activities in Norrie disease patients with an X-chromosomal deletion affecting monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D L; Sims, K B; Karoum, F; Garrick, N A; de la Chapelle, A; Sankila, E M; Norio, R; Breakefield, X O

    1991-01-01

    Two individuals with an X-chromosomal deletion were recently found to lack the genes encoding monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) and MAO-B. This abnormality was associated with almost total (90%) reductions in the oxidatively deaminated urinary metabolites of the MAO-A substrate, norepinephrine, and with marked (100-fold) increases in an MAO-B substrate, phenylethylamine, confirming systemic functional consequences of the genetic enzyme deficiency. However, urinary concentrations of the deaminated metabolites of dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) were essentially normal. To investigate other deaminating systems besides MAO-A and MAO-B that might produce these metabolites of dopamine and 5-HT, we examined plasma amine oxidase (AO) activity in these two patients and two additional patients with the same X-chromosomal deletion. Normal plasma AO activity was found in all four Norrie disease-deletion patients, in four patients with classic Norrie disease without a chromosomal deletion, and in family members of patients from both groups. Marked plasma amine metabolite abnormalities and essentially absent platelet MAO-B activity were found in all four Norrie disease-deletion patients, but in none of the other subjects in the two comparison groups. These results indicate that plasma AO is encoded by gene(s) independent of those for MAO-A and MAO-B, and raise the possibility that plasma AO, and perhaps the closely related tissue AO, benzylamine oxidase, as well as other atypical AOs or MAOs encoded independently from MAO-A and MAO-B may contribute to the oxidative deamination of dopamine and 5-HT in humans.

  9. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Beier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general.

  10. Hofmeister effects on the glucose oxidase hydrogel-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Aimi; Tsujimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    We describe the consistent effect of salts in the electrolyte solution on glucose oxidation current production in the redox hydrogel-modified electrode containing glucose oxidase as an electrocatalyst and Os complex mediator. The ions affect not only on the electron transfer between the enzyme and the Os complex, but also on the hydrogel structure. This study found that the degree of the effect can be characterized by Hofmeister series. The relative decrease in oxidization current is the lowest in the middle of the Hofmeister series, and increases monotonically on either side. An increase of ionic strength inhibits the electron transfer from the active site of glucose oxidase to Os complex. In addition to this, the kosmotropic anions, which are strongly hydrated, caused hydrogel deswelling (shrinking). The more chaotropic an ion is, the more it adsorbs to uncharged parts of polymer/enzyme with dispersion force, and the swelling of the hydrogel decreases the catalytic current. This study impacts the design of hydrogel electrode and selection of electrolyte ions for bioelectronic applications.

  11. A broad distribution of the alternative oxidase in microsporidian parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony A P Williams

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are a group of obligate intracellular parasitic eukaryotes that were considered to be amitochondriate until the recent discovery of highly reduced mitochondrial organelles called mitosomes. Analysis of the complete genome of Encephalitozoon cuniculi revealed a highly reduced set of proteins in the organelle, mostly related to the assembly of iron-sulphur clusters. Oxidative phosphorylation and the Krebs cycle proteins were absent, in keeping with the notion that the microsporidia and their mitosomes are anaerobic, as is the case for other mitosome bearing eukaryotes, such as Giardia. Here we provide evidence opening the possibility that mitosomes in a number of microsporidian lineages are not completely anaerobic. Specifically, we have identified and characterized a gene encoding the alternative oxidase (AOX, a typically mitochondrial terminal oxidase in eukaryotes, in the genomes of several distantly related microsporidian species, even though this gene is absent from the complete genome of E. cuniculi. In order to confirm that these genes encode functional proteins, AOX genes from both A. locustae and T. hominis were over-expressed in E. coli and AOX activity measured spectrophotometrically using ubiquinol-1 (UQ-1 as substrate. Both A. locustae and T. hominis AOX proteins reduced UQ-1 in a cyanide and antimycin-resistant manner that was sensitive to ascofuranone, a potent inhibitor of the trypanosomal AOX. The physiological role of AOX microsporidia may be to reoxidise reducing equivalents produced by glycolysis, in a manner comparable to that observed in trypanosomes.

  12. Oxidase catalysis via aerobically generated hypervalent iodine intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Asim; Hyun, Sung-Min; Powers, David C.

    2018-02-01

    The development of sustainable oxidation chemistry demands strategies to harness O2 as a terminal oxidant. Oxidase catalysis, in which O2 serves as a chemical oxidant without necessitating incorporation of oxygen into reaction products, would allow diverse substrate functionalization chemistry to be coupled to O2 reduction. Direct O2 utilization suffers from intrinsic challenges imposed by the triplet ground state of O2 and the disparate electron inventories of four-electron O2 reduction and two-electron substrate oxidation. Here, we generate hypervalent iodine reagents—a broadly useful class of selective two-electron oxidants—from O2. This is achieved by intercepting reactive intermediates of aldehyde autoxidation to aerobically generate hypervalent iodine reagents for a broad array of substrate oxidation reactions. The use of aryl iodides as mediators of aerobic oxidation underpins an oxidase catalysis platform that couples substrate oxidation directly to O2 reduction. We anticipate that aerobically generated hypervalent iodine reagents will expand the scope of aerobic oxidation chemistry in chemical synthesis.

  13. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legoabe LJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lesetja J Legoabe,1 Anél Petzer,1 Jacobus P Petzer1,21Centre of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South AfricaAbstract: Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15 and related compounds (two were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.Keywords: monoamine oxidase, MAO, inhibition, 2-acetylphenol, structure–activity relationship

  14. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds with oxidases from sorghum and non-defined mixed bacterium media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obame, C. E. L.; Savadogo, P. W.; Mamoudou, D. H.; Dembele, R. H.; Traore, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    The biodegradation of the phenolic compounds is performed using oxidative enzymes, e. g. polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and peroxidases (POXs). These oxidases displaying a wide spectrum for the oxidation of phenolic compounds were isolated either from sorghum or mixed bacteria. Spectrophotometric methods were used to assess the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of PPOs as well as the hydrogen-dependant oxidation of POXs. (Author)

  15. Study on the preparation of immobilized glucose oxidase membrane and its application in clinic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ye; Cao Jin; Su Zongxian; Chen Zixiong

    1990-01-01

    The paper deals with the preparation of immobilized glucose oxidase membrane by using two steps irradiation (irradiation gratfting, irradiation entrapping). Some properties of membrane were discussed. The immobilized glucose oxidase membrane with oxygen electrode and oxygen analyser can be satisfied with the clinic analysis for the determination of serum glucose

  16. Switching an O2 sensitive glucose oxidase bioelectrode into an almost insensitive one by cofactor redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremey, Emilie; Suraniti, Emmanuel; Courjean, Olivier; Gounel, Sébastien; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Louerat, Frédéric; Mano, Nicolas

    2014-06-04

    In the 5-8 mM glucose concentration range, of particular interest for diabetes management, glucose oxidase bioelectrodes are O2 dependent, which decrease their efficiencies. By replacing the natural cofactor of glucose oxidase, we succeeded in turning an O2 sensitive bioelectrode into an almost insensitive one.

  17. Hydroxychavicol: a potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor obtained from the leaves of betel, Piper betle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuya; Nakao, Kikuyo; Hirata, Noriko; Namba, Kensuke; Nomi, Takao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Moriyama, Kenzo; Shintani, Takahiro; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    The screening of Piperaceous plants for xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity revealed that the extract of the leaves of Piper betle possesses potent activity. Activity-guided purification led us to obtain hydroxychavicol as an active principle. Hydroxychavicol is a more potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor than allopurinol, which is clinically used for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  18. Analysis of cellulase and polyphenol oxidase production by southern pine beetle associated fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduvali Valiev; Zumrut B. Ogel; Dier D. Klepzig

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the production of extracellular enzymes by fungi associated with southern pine beetle was investigated for the first time. Cellulase and polyphenol oxidase production were analyzed for three beetle associated fungi. Only the mutualistic symbiont Entomocorticium sp. A was found to produce cellulases and polyphenol oxidase....

  19. Biocatalytic potential of laccase-like multicopper oxidases from Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamayo Ramos, J.A.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laccase-like multicopper oxidases have been reported in several Aspergillus species but they remain uncharacterized. The biocatalytic potential of the Aspergillus niger fungal pigment multicopper oxidases McoA and McoB and ascomycete laccase McoG was investigated. RESULTS: The

  20. Purification, characterization and decolorization of bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190 is a nonligninolytic fungus that produces bilirubin oxidase. Both Myrothecium verrucaria and the extracellular bilirubin oxidase were tested for their ability to decolorize indigo carmine. The biosorption and biodegradation of the dye were detected during the process of...

  1. Hot or not? Discovery and characterization of a thermostable alditol oxidase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, Remko T.; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Rijpkema, Egon M. A.; van Bloois, Edwin; Wijma, Hein J.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    We describe the discovery, isolation and characterization of a highly thermostable alditol oxidase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B. This protein was identified by searching the genomes of known thermophiles for enzymes homologous to Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) alditol oxidase (AldO). A gene

  2. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds with oxidases from sorghum and non-defined mixed bacterium media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obame, C. E. L.; Savadogo, P. W.; Mamoudou, D. H.; Dembele, R. H.; Traore, A. S.

    2009-07-01

    The biodegradation of the phenolic compounds is performed using oxidative enzymes, e. g. polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and peroxidases (POXs). These oxidases displaying a wide spectrum for the oxidation of phenolic compounds were isolated either from sorghum or mixed bacteria. Spectrophotometric methods were used to assess the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of PPOs as well as the hydrogen-dependant oxidation of POXs. (Author)

  3. Downregulation of blood-brain barrier phenotype by proinflammatory cytokines involves NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation: consequences for interendothelial adherens and tight junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D Rochfort

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction is an integral feature of neurological disorders and involves the action of multiple proinflammatory cytokines on the microvascular endothelial cells lining cerebral capillaries. There is still however, considerable ambiguity throughout the scientific literature regarding the mechanistic role(s of cytokines in this context, thereby warranting a comprehensive in vitro investigation into how different cytokines may cause dysregulation of adherens and tight junctions leading to BBB permeabilization.The present study employs human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMvECs to compare/contrast the effects of TNF-α and IL-6 on BBB characteristics ranging from the expression of interendothelial junction proteins (VE-cadherin, occludin and claudin-5 to endothelial monolayer permeability. The contribution of cytokine-induced NADPH oxidase activation to altered barrier phenotype was also investigated.In response to treatment with either TNF-α or IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml, 0-24 hrs, our studies consistently demonstrated significant dose- and time-dependent decreases in the expression of all interendothelial junction proteins examined, in parallel with dose- and time-dependent increases in ROS generation and HBMvEC permeability. Increased expression and co-association of gp91 and p47, pivotal NADPH oxidase subunits, was also observed in response to either cytokine. Finally, cytokine-dependent effects on junctional protein expression, ROS generation and endothelial permeability could all be attenuated to a comparable extent using a range of antioxidant strategies, which included ROS depleting agents (superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, apocynin and targeted NADPH oxidase blockade (gp91 and p47 siRNA, NSC23766.A timely and wide-ranging investigation comparing the permeabilizing actions of TNF-α and IL-6 in HBMvECs is presented, in which we demonstrate how either cytokine can similarly downregulate the

  4. Nitro-oleic acid ameliorates oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation triggered oxidative stress in renal tubular cells via activation of Nrf2 and suppression of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Huibin; Xue, Xia; Liu, Gang; Guan, Guangju; Liu, Haiying; Sun, Lina; Zhao, Long; Wang, Xueling; Chen, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Nitroalkene derivative of oleic acid (OA-NO 2 ), due to its ability to mediate revisable Michael addition, has been demonstrated to have various biological properties and become a therapeutic agent in various diseases. Though its antioxidant properties have been reported in different models of acute kidney injury (AKI), the mechanism by which OA-NO 2 attenuates intracellular oxidative stress is not well investigated. Here, we elucidated the anti-oxidative mechanism of OA-NO 2 in an in vitro model of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Human tubular epithelial cells were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R) injury. Pretreatment with OA-NO 2 (1.25 μM, 45 min) attenuated OGD/R triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential disruption. This action was mediated via up-regulating endogenous antioxidant defense components including superoxide dismutase (SOD1), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase modulatory subunits (GCLM). Moreover, subcellular fractionation analyses demonstrated that OA-NO 2 promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2- related factor-2 (Nrf2) and Nrf2 siRNA partially abrogated these protective effects. In addition, OA-NO 2 inhibited NADPH oxidase activation and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and p22 phox up-regulation after OGD/R injury, which was not relevant to Nrf2. These results contribute to clarify that the mechanism of OA-NO 2 reno-protection involves both inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity and induction of SOD1, Nrf2-dependent HO-1, and GCLM.

  5. Analysis of the role of COP9 Signalosome (CSN subunits in K562; the first link between CSN and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunce Christopher M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The COP9/signalosome (CSN is a highly conserved eight subunit complex that, by deneddylating cullins in cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligases, regulates protein degradation. Although studied in model human cell lines such as HeLa, very little is known about the role of the CSN in haemopoietic cells. Results Greater than 95% knockdown of the non-catalytic subunit CSN2 and the deneddylating subunit CSN5 of the CSN was achieved in the human myeloid progenitor cell line K562. CSN2 knockdown led to a reduction of both CSN5 protein and mRNA whilst CSN5 knockdown had little effect on CSN2. Both knockdowns inhibited CSN deneddylase function as demonstrated by accumulation of neddylated Cul1. Furthermore, both knockdowns resulted in the sequential loss of Skp2, Cdc4 and β-TrCP F-box proteins. These proteins were rescued by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, indicating the autocatalytic degradation of F-box proteins upon loss of CSN2 or CSN5. Interestingly, altered F-box protein gene expression was also observed in CSN2 and CSN5 knockdowns, suggesting a potential role of the CSN in regulating F-box protein transcription. Loss of either CSN subunit dramatically reduced cell growth but resulted in distinct patterns of cell death. CSN5 knockdown caused mitotic defects, G2/M arrest and apoptotic cell death. CSN2 knockdown resulted in non-apoptotic cell death associated with accumulation of both the autophagy marker LC3-II and autophagic vacuoles. Treatment of vector control K562 cells with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1 recapitulated the growth kinetics, vacuolar morphology and LC3-II accumulation of CSN2 knockdown cells indicating that the cellular phenotype of CSN2 cells arises from autophagy inhibition. Finally, loss of CSN2 was associated with the formation of a CSN5 containing subcomplex. Conclusion We conclude that CSN2 is required for CSN integrity and the stability of individual CSN subunits, and postulate

  6. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  7. Amine oxidase from lentil seedlings: energetic domains and effect of temperature on activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Nejad, S Z; Rezaei-Tavirani, M; Padiglia, A; Floris, G; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    2001-07-01

    Copper/TPQ amine oxidases from mammalian and plant sources have shown many differences in substrate specificity and molecular properties. In this work the activity of lentil seedling amine oxidase was followed at various temperatures in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7, using benzylamine as substrate. The discontinuous Arrhenius plot of lentil amine oxidase showed two distinct phases with a jump between them. Thermal denaturation of the enzyme, using differential scanning calorimetry under the same experimental conditions, showed a transition at the same temperature ranges in the absence of substrate, indicating the occurrence of conformational changes, with an enthalpy change of about 175.9 kJ/mole. The temperature-induced changes of the activity of lentil amine oxidase are compared with those of bovine serum amine oxidase (taken from the literature).

  8. Functional expression of amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger (AO-I) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaríková, Katerina; Galuszka, Petr; Sedlárová, Iva; Sebela, Marek; Frébort, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare recombinant amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger after overexpressing in yeast. The yeast expression vector pDR197 that includes a constitutive PMA1 promoter was used for the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recombinant amine oxidase was extracted from the growth medium of the yeast, purified to homogeneity and identified by activity assay and MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting. Similarity search in the newly published A. niger genome identified six genes coding for copper amine oxidase, two of them corresponding to the previously described enzymes AO-I a methylamine oxidase and three other genes coding for FAD amine oxidases. Thus, A. niger possesses an enormous metabolic gear to grow on amine compounds and thus support its saprophytic lifestyle.

  9. [Experimental rationale for the parameters of a rapid method for oxidase activity determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butorina, N N

    2010-01-01

    Experimental rationale is provided for the parameters of a rapid (1-2-min) test to concurrently determine the oxidase activity of all bacteria grown on the membrane filter after water filtration. Oxidase reagents that are the aqueous solutions of tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride and demethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride have been first ascertained to exert no effect on the viability and enzymatic activity of bacteria after one-hour contact. An algorithm has been improved for the rapid oxidase activity test: the allowable time for bacteria to contact oxidase reagents and procedures for minimizing the effect on bacterial biochemical activity following the contact. An accelerated method based on lactose medium with tergitol 7 and Endo agar has been devised to determine coliform bacteria, by applying the rapid oxidase test: the time of a final response is 18-24 hours. The method has been included into GOST 52426-2005.

  10. Ethylene biosynthesis by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Arianna; Borowski, Tomasz; Schofield, Christopher J; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2006-11-24

    The reaction catalyzed by the plant enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACCO) was investigated by using hybrid density functional theory. ACCO belongs to the non-heme iron(II) enzyme superfamily and carries out the bicarbonate-dependent two-electron oxidation of its substrate ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) concomitant with the reduction of dioxygen and oxidation of a reducing agent probably ascorbate. The reaction gives ethylene, CO(2), cyanide and two water molecules. A model including the mononuclear iron complex with ACC in the first coordination sphere was used to study the details of O-O bond cleavage and cyclopropane ring opening. Calculations imply that this unusual and complex reaction is triggered by a hydrogen atom abstraction step generating a radical on the amino nitrogen of ACC. Subsequently, cyclopropane ring opening followed by O-O bond heterolysis leads to a very reactive iron(IV)-oxo intermediate, which decomposes to ethylene and cyanoformate with very low energy barriers. The reaction is assisted by bicarbonate located in the second coordination sphere of the metal.

  11. A structural and functional model for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmann, Madleen; Oldenburg, Fabio; Braun, Beatrice; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Limberg, Christian

    2015-10-12

    The hitherto most realistic low-molecular-weight analogue for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACCO) is reported. The ACCOs 2-His-1-carboxylate iron(II) active site was mimicked by a TpFe moiety, to which the natural substrate ACC could be bound. The resulting complex [Tp(Me,Ph) FeACC] (1), according to X-ray diffraction analysis performed for the nickel analogue, represents an excellent structural model, featuring ACC coordinated in a bidentate fashion-as proposed for the enzymatic substrate complex-as well as a vacant coordination site that forms the basis for the first successful replication also of the ACCO function: 1 is the first known ACC complex that reacts with O2 to produce ethylene. As a FeOOH species had been suggested as intermediate in the catalytic cycle, H2 O2 was tested as the oxidant, too, and indeed evolution of ethylene proceeded even more rapidly to give 65 % yield. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. [Role of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in photoprotection in Rumex K-1 leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang-Long; Zhang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Taking Rumex K-1 leaves as test materials, this paper studied the role of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in photoprotection under different light intensities. Under low light intensity (200 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)), and after treated with salicylhydroxamic acid to inhibit the AOX pathway, the leaf actual photochemical efficiency of PS II, linear electron transport rate of photosynthesis, and photosynthetic O2 evolution rate all decreased significantly while the non-Q(B) reducing reaction center had a significant increase, indicating that under low light, the photoinhibition was aggravated while the scavenging enzymes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased, which avoided the over-accumulation of ROS and partially alleviated the photoinhibition of Rumex K-1 leaves. Under high light intensity (800 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)), the inhibition of AOX pathway caused more severe photoinhibition, and the increased activities of ROS scavenging enzymes were insufficient to prevent the over-accumulation of ROS. This study demonstrated that AOX pathway played an important role in the photoprotection in Rumex K-1 leaves under both high and low light intensities, and the role of AOX pathway in photoprotection under high light could be irreplaceable by the other photoprotection pathways in chloroplast.

  13. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  14. Electrophysiology and Beyond: Multiple roles of Na+ channel β subunits in development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Gustavo A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) β subunits are not “auxiliary.” These multifunctional molecules not only modulate Na+ current (INa), but also function as cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) – playing roles in aggregation, migration, invasion, neurite outgrowth, and axonal fasciculation. β subunits are integral members of VGSC signaling complexes at nodes of Ranvier, axon initial segments, and cardiac intercalated disks, regulating action potential propagation through critical intermolecular and cell-cell communication events. At least in vitro, many β subunit cell adhesive functions occur both in the presence and absence of pore-forming VGSC α subunits, and in vivo β subunits are expressed in excitable as well as non-excitable cells, thus β subunits may play important functional roles on their own, in the absence of α subunits. VGSC β1 subunits are essential for life and appear to be especially important during brain development. Mutations in β subunit genes result in a variety of human neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, some cancer cells exhibit alterations in β subunit expression during metastasis. In short, these proteins, originally thought of as merely accessory to α subunits, are critical players in their own right in human health and disease. Here we discuss the role of VGSC β subunits in the nervous system. PMID:20600605

  15. Absence of population genetic structure in Heterakis gallinarum of chicken from Sichuan, inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaobin; Zhu, Jun-Yang; Jian, Ke-Ling; Wang, Bao-Jian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You; Wang, Tao; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Peng, Ke-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Population genetics information provides a foundation for understanding the transmission and epidemiology of parasite and, therefore, may be used to assist in the control of parasitosis. However, limited available sequence information in Heterakis gallinarum has greatly impeded the study in this area. In this study, we first investigated the genetic variability and genetic structure of H. gallinarum. The 1325 bp fragments of the mitochondrial COX1 gene were amplified in 56 isolates of H. gallinarum from seven different geographical regions in Sichuan province, China. The 56 sequences were classified into 22 haplotypes (H1-H22). The values of haplotype diversity (0.712) and nucleotide diversity (0.00158) in Sichuan population indicate a rapid expansion occurred from a relatively small, short-term effective population in the past. The haplotype network formed a distribution around H1 in a star-like topology, and the haplotypes did not cluster according to their geographical location. Similar conclusions could be made from MP phylogenetic tree. The Fst value (FstNeutrality tests (Tajima's D and Fu's Fs) and mismatch analysis indicated that H. gallinarum experienced a population expansion in the past. Our results indicated that H. gallinarum experienced a rapid population expansion in the past, and there was a low genetic diversity and an absence of population structure across the population.

  16. Architecture of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Leitner, Alexander; Bieri, Philipp; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Erzberger, Jan P; Leibundgut, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-01-23

    Mitochondrial ribosomes synthesize a number of highly hydrophobic proteins encoded on the genome of mitochondria, the organelles in eukaryotic cells that are responsible for energy conversion by oxidative phosphorylation. The ribosomes in mammalian mitochondria have undergone massive structural changes throughout their evolution, including ribosomal RNA shortening and acquisition of mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of the 39S large subunit of the porcine mitochondrial ribosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 4.9 Å resolution. The structure, combined with data from chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry experiments, reveals the unique features of the 39S subunit at near-atomic resolution and provides detailed insight into the architecture of the polypeptide exit site. This region of the mitochondrial ribosome has been considerably remodelled compared to its bacterial counterpart, providing a specialized platform for the synthesis and membrane insertion of the highly hydrophobic protein components of the respiratory chain.

  17. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Denaro, Luca; Redaelli, Marco; D'Avella, Domenico; Caretta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  18. Testing experimental subunit furunculosis vaccines for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika H.; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) is the etiological agent of typical furunculosis in salmonid fish. The disease causes bacterial septicemia and is a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide, inducing high morbidity and mortality. In this study we vaccinated rainbow...... trout with subunit vaccines containing protein antigens that were selected based on an in silico antigen discovery approach. Thus, the proteome of AS strain A449 was analyzed by an antigen discovery platform and its proteins consequently ranked by their predicted ability to evoke protective immune...... response against AS. Fourteen proteins were prepared in 3 different experimental subunit vaccine combinations and used to vaccinate rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. We tested the proteins for their ability to elicit antibody production and protection. Thus, fish were exposed to virulent...

  19. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  20. A Biocatalytic One-Pot Approach for the Preparation of Lignin Oligomers Using an Oxidase/Peroxidase Cascade Enzyme System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, Mohamed H. M.; Deuss, Peter J.; Loncar, Nikola; Trajkovic, Milos; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic lignin was prepared biocatalytically in a one-pot, two-step reaction using an oxidase/peroxidase cascade enzyme system. Using eugenol in combination with eugenol oxidase and a peroxidase, lignin-like material was produced. The cascade reaction takes advantage of the ability of the oxidase

  1. Lysyl Oxidase Induces Vascular Oxidative Stress and Contributes to Arterial Stiffness and Abnormal Elastin Structure in Hypertension: Role of p38MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; García-Redondo, Ana B; Avendaño, María S; Varona, Saray; Palao, Teresa; Orriols, Mar; Roque, Fernanda R; Fortuño, Ana; Touyz, Rhian M; Martínez-González, Jose; Salaices, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Cristina; Briones, Ana M

    2017-09-01

    Vascular stiffness, structural elastin abnormalities, and increased oxidative stress are hallmarks of hypertension. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an elastin crosslinking enzyme that produces H 2 O 2 as a by-product. We addressed the interplay between LOX, oxidative stress, vessel stiffness, and elastin. Angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused hypertensive mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showed increased vascular LOX expression and stiffness and an abnormal elastin structure. Mice over-expressing LOX in vascular smooth muscle cells (TgLOX) exhibited similar mechanical and elastin alterations to those of hypertensive models. LOX inhibition with β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) attenuated mechanical and elastin alterations in TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and SHR. Arteries from TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and/or SHR exhibited increased vascular H 2 O 2 and O 2 .- levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. BAPN prevented the higher oxidative stress in hypertensive models. Treatment of TgLOX and Ang II-infused mice and SHR with the mitochondrial-targeted superoxide dismutase mimetic mito-TEMPO, the antioxidant apocynin, or the H 2 O 2 scavenger polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase) reduced oxidative stress, vascular stiffness, and elastin alterations. Vascular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) activation was increased in Ang II-infused and TgLOX mice and this effect was prevented by BAPN, mito-TEMPO, or PEG-catalase. SB203580, the p38MAPK inhibitor, normalized vessel stiffness and elastin structure in TgLOX mice. We identify LOX as a novel source of vascular reactive oxygen species and a new pathway involved in vascular stiffness and elastin remodeling in hypertension. LOX up-regulation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress that promotes p38MAPK activation, elastin structural alterations, and vascular stiffness. This pathway contributes to vascular abnormalities in hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27

  2. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis [Molecular Structure and Function, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Fadda, Elisa, E-mail: pomes@sickkids.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Galway (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  3. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis; Fadda, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  4. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rowan M.; Caplan, David; Fadda, Elisa; Pomès, Régis

    2011-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  5. Functional analysis of fructosyl-amino acid oxidases of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Shin-Ichi; Karino, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Nobuyuki; Katsuragi, Tohoru; Tani, Yoshiki

    2004-10-01

    Three active fractions of fructosyl-amino acid oxidase (FAOD-Ao1, -Ao2a, and -Ao2b) were isolated from Aspergillus oryzae strain RIB40. N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of FAOD-Ao2a corresponded to those of FAOD-Ao2b, suggesting that these two isozymes were derived from the same protein. FAOD-Ao1 and -Ao2 were different in substrate specificity and subunit assembly; FAOD-Ao2 was active toward N(epsilon)-fructosyl N(alpha)-Z-lysine and fructosyl valine (Fru-Val), whereas FAOD-Ao1 was not active toward Fru-Val. The genes encoding the FAOD isozymes (i.e., FAOAo1 and FAOAo2) were cloned by PCR with an FAOD-specific primer set. The deduced amino acid sequences revealed that FAOD-Ao1 was 50% identical to FAOD-Ao2, and each isozyme had a peroxisome-targeting signal-1, indicating their localization in peroxisomes. The genes was expressed in Escherichia coli and rFaoAo2 showed the same characteristics as FAOD-Ao2, whereas rFaoAo1 was not active. FAOAo2 disruptant was obtained by using ptrA as a selective marker. Wild-type strain grew on the medium containing Fru-Val as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, but strain Delta faoAo2 did not grow. Addition of glucose or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the Fru-Val medium did not affect the assimilation of Fru-Val by wild-type, indicating glucose and ammonium repressions did not occur in the expression of the FAOAo2 gene. Furthermore, conidia of the wild-type strain did not germinate on the medium containing Fru-Val and NaNO(2) as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, suggesting that Fru-Val may also repress gene expression of nitrite reductase. These results indicated that FAOD is needed for utilization of fructosyl-amino acids as nitrogen sources in A. oryzae.

  6. ASIC subunit ratio and differential surface trafficking in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jiangping; Hu, Youjia; Zha, Xiang-ming

    2016-01-08

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are key mediators of acidosis-induced responses in neurons. However, little is known about the relative abundance of different ASIC subunits in the brain. Such data are fundamental for interpreting the relative contribution of ASIC1a homomers and 1a/2 heteromers to acid signaling, and essential for designing therapeutic interventions to target these channels. We used a simple biochemical approach and semi-quantitatively determined the molar ratio of ASIC1a and 2 subunits in mouse brain. Further, we investigated differential surface trafficking of ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC2b. ASIC1a subunits outnumber the sum of ASIC2a and ASIC2b. There is a region-specific variation in ASIC2a and 2b expression, with cerebellum and striatum expressing predominantly 2b and 2a, respectively. Further, we performed surface biotinylation and found that surface ASIC1a and ASIC2a ratio correlates with their total expression. In contrast, ASIC2b exhibits little surface presence in the brain. This result is consistent with increased co-localization of ASIC2b with an ER marker in 3T3 cells. Our data are the first semi-quantitative determination of relative subunit ratio of various ASICs in the brain. The differential surface trafficking of ASICs suggests that the main functional ASICs in the brain are ASIC1a homomers and 1a/2a heteromers. This finding provides important insights into the relative contribution of various ASIC complexes to acid signaling in neurons.

  7. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  8. Nitrate binding to Limulus polyphemus subunit type II hemocyanin and its functional implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazes, B; Magnus, KA; Kalk, KH; Bonaventura, C; Hol, WGJ

    1996-01-01

    The horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, employs hemocyanin as an oxygen carrier in its hemolymph. This hemocyanin displays cooperative oxygen binding and heterotropic allosteric regulation by protons, chloride ions and divalent cations. Here, we report the crystal structure of Limulus polyphemus

  9. Accessibility controls selective degradation of photosystem II subunits by FtsH protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krynická, Vendula; Shao, S.; Nixon, P.J.; Komenda, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 12 (2015), UNSP 15168 ISSN 2055-026X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA ČR GBP501/12/G055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : SYNECHOCYSTIS SP PCC-6803 * DRIVEN SYNTHESIS * COMPLEX Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  10. Global Proteome Analysis Identifies Active Immunoproteasome Subunits in Human Platelets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M.; Brown, Lyda M.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. PMID:25146974

  11. Global proteome analysis identifies active immunoproteasome subunits in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M; Brown, Lyda M; Hoffman, Michael D; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Radioimmunoassay of TSH subunits in thyroid diseases and endocrine opthalmopahty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, W.

    1982-01-01

    Highly sensitive radioimmunoassays of hTSH sub-units were developed. The hormone preparations were labelled with 125-iodine according to a modified chloramine -T method, and purified by chromatography using biogel P6 and P60. Rabbit antisera were used as antibodies. Separation of the antibody-bound and of the free antigens was carried out via the double antibody method. The antiserum required for this purpose was obtained from a goat. The sensitivity of the assay was influenced by changing the protein content of the buffer, the incubation volume, the tracer amounts, the incubation time and the incubation temperature. For hTSH-α, the lowest detectable limit was found to be 50 pg/ml, for hTSH-#betta# 20 pg/ml. Thus, the sub-units could be determined for 98% of the patients under review. The #betta#-TSH radioimmunoassay is largely specific, TSH cross-reacts to a degree of 5%. The computerized evoluation was carried out by means of Spline approximation using the Siemens 4004 computer. Precision and accurateness are in compliance with generally accpted criteria. The serum levels of α and #betta# sub-units showed no discordancy with regard to TSH. In all groups of patients examined, the levels of the hormone-specific #betta#-chain were found to be exclusively dependent upon the actual thyroid activity. (orig.) [de

  13. Functional and structural analysis of photosystem II core complexes from spinach with high oxygen evolution capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Elisabeth; Irrgang, Klaus-D.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Renger, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving photo system II core complexes were prepared from spinach by solubilizing photosystem II membrane fragments with dodecyl-β-D-maltoside. The core complexes consist of the intrinsic 47-kDa, 43-kDa, D1 and D2 polypeptides, the two subunits of cytochrome b559 and the extrinsic 33-kDa

  14. N-3 PUFAs protect against aortic inflammation and oxidative stress in angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Wales

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with infiltration of inflammatory cells into the aortic wall. The inflammatory response is also evident in animal models, such as apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/- mice that have been infused with angiotensin II, prior to development of aortic aneurysm. Since omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs and their metabolites have anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving activity, we hypothesised that dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs would protect against inflammatory processes in this mouse model. Twenty C57 and 20 ApoE-/- 3-4 week old male mice were supplemented with a low (0.14%, n = 10/group or high (0.70%, n = 10/group n-3 PUFA diet for 8 weeks before 2-day infusion with 0.9% saline or angiotensin II (1000 ng/kg/min. Four ApoE-/- mice on the low n-3 PUFA diet and none of the ApoE-/- mice on the high n-3 PUFA diet showed morphological evidence of abdominal aortic dissection. The plasma concentration of the n-3 PUFA metabolite, resolvin D1 was higher in angiotensin II-infused ApoE-/- mice fed the high, compared to the low n-3 PUFA diet. The number of neutrophils and macrophages infiltrating the abdominal aorta was elevated in ApoE-/- mice on the low n-3 PUFA diet, and this was significantly attenuated in mice that were fed the high n-3 PUFA diet. Most neutrophils and macrophages were associated with dissected aortas. Immunoreactivity of the catalytic subunit of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase, Nox2, and superoxide were elevated in ApoE-/- mice that were fed the low n-3 PUFA diet, and this was also significantly attenuated in mice that were fed the high n-3 PUFA diet. Together, the findings indicate that supplementation of ApoE-/- mice with a diet high in n-3 PUFA content protected the mice against pro-inflammatory and oxidative stress responses following short-term infusion with angiotensin II.

  15. Facile direct electron transfer in glucose oxidase modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dan; Chen Liwei

    2009-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is widely used in the glucose biosensor industry. However, mediatorless direct electron transfer (DET) from GOx to electrode surfaces is very slow. Recently, mediatorless DET has been reported via the incorporation of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles in the modification of electrodes. Here we report GOx electrodes showing DET without the need for any nanomaterials. The enzyme after immobilization with poly-L-lysine (PLL) and Nafion retains the biocatalytic activities and oxidizes glucose efficiently. The amperometric response of Nafion-PLL-GOx modified electrode is linearly proportional to the concentration of glucose up to 10 mM with a sensitivity of 0.75 μA/mM at a low detection potential (-0.460 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The methodology developed in this study will have impact on glucose biosensors and biofuel cells and may potentially simplify enzyme immobilization in other biosensing systems.

  16. Low platelet monoamine oxidase activity in pathological gambling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, J.L.; Saiz-Ruiz, J.; Hollander, E.; Cesar, J.; Lopez-Ibor, J.J. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity has been reported in association with sensation-seeking personality type and in some mental disorders associated with a lack of impulse control. Pathological gambling itself has been related with both sensation-seeking and reduced impulse control. Platelet MAO activity was investigated in 15 DSM-III-R pathological gamblers from our outpatient clinic. Gamblers had a significantly lower platelet MAO activity than a group of 25 healthy controls. The range of MAO levels in gamblers was also significantly shorter than in controls. In controls, platelet MAO levels showed the previously described negative correlations with sensation-seeking scores but not in gamblers. The findings are consistent with previous studies showing an association of low platelet MAO activity with impulse control disorders and raise some interesting therapeutic alternatives for pathological gambling. (au) (40 refs.)

  17. Dual oxidase in mucosal immunity and host-microbe homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Soo; Choi, Myoung Kwon; Lee, Won-Jae

    2010-07-01

    Mucosal epithelia are in direct contact with microbes, which range from beneficial symbionts to pathogens. Accordingly, hosts must have a conflicting strategy to combat pathogens efficiently while tolerating symbionts. Recent progress has revealed that dual oxidase (DUOX) plays a key role in mucosal immunity in organisms that range from flies to humans. Information from the genetic model of Drosophila has advanced our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of DUOX and its role in mucosal immunity. Further investigations of DUOX regulation in response to symbiotic or non-symbiotic bacteria and the in vivo consequences in host physiology will give a novel insight into the microbe-controlling system of the mucosa. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyphenol Oxidases in Crops: Biochemical, Physiological and Genetic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Taranto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic browning is a colour reaction occurring in plants, including cereals, fruit and horticultural crops, due to oxidation during postharvest processing and storage. This has a negative impact on the colour, flavour, nutritional properties and shelf life of food products. Browning is usually caused by polyphenol oxidases (PPOs, following cell damage caused by senescence, wounding and the attack of pests and pathogens. Several studies indicated that PPOs play a role in plant immunity, and emerging evidence suggested that PPOs might also be involved in other physiological processes. Genomic investigations ultimately led to the isolation of PPO homologs in several crops, which will be possibly characterized at the functional level in the near future. Here, focusing on the botanic families of Poaceae and Solanaceae, we provide an overview on available scientific literature on PPOs, resulting in useful information on biochemical, physiological and genetic aspects.

  19. The Membrane Modulates Internal Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öjemyr, Linda Nasvik; Ballmoos, Christoph von; Faxén, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    The functionality of membrane proteins is often modulated by the surrounding membrane. Here, we investigated the effect of membrane reconstitution of purified cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) on the kinetics and thermodynamics of internal electron and proton-transfer reactions during O-2 reduction...... DOPC lipids. In conclusion, the data show that the membrane significantly modulates internal charge-transfer reactions and thereby the function of the membrane-bound enzyme.......-glycerol) (DOPG). In addition, a small Change in the internal Cu-A-heme a electron equilibrium constant was observed. This effect was lipid-dependent and explained in terms of a lower electrostatic potential within the membrane-spanning part of the protein with the anionic DOPG lipids than with the zwitterionic...

  20. Purification and characterization of amine oxidase from soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, F; Di Paolo, M L; Stevanato, R; Gasparini, R; Rigo, A

    1993-11-15

    A simple and rapid procedure for purification of soybean seedling amine oxidase is reported. The crude enzyme, obtained by ammonium sulfate fractionation was purified by ion-exchange chromatography on a cellulose phosphate column and batch affinity chromatography on 6-aminohexyl-Sepharose. Cyclohexylamine, a competitive inhibitor, was utilized to elute the enzyme. A homogeneous enzyme was obtained with a yield higher than 25%, the content of minor components being lauryl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme is a dimer and contains two Cu2+ ion per molecule. Its EPR spectrum is typical of Cu2+ in a tetragonal symmetry. The enzyme oxidizes cadaverine at high rate, the specific activity being 4.3 mukat/mg. Molecular, spectroscopic, and kinetic properties of this enzyme are reported.

  1. Low platelet monoamine oxidase activity in pathological gambling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, J.L. [Department of Psychiatry, Centro de Salud Mental, Parla Madrid (Spain); Saiz-Ruiz, J. [Department of Psychiatry and Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Hollander, E. [Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Queens Hospital Center, New York (United States); Cesar, J. [Department of Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Ibor, J.J. Jr. [Department of Psychiatry, Hospital San Carlos, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain)

    1994-12-01

    Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity has been reported in association with sensation-seeking personality type and in some mental disorders associated with a lack of impulse control. Pathological gambling itself has been related with both sensation-seeking and reduced impulse control. Platelet MAO activity was investigated in 15 DSM-III-R pathological gamblers from our outpatient clinic. Gamblers had a significantly lower platelet MAO activity than a group of 25 healthy controls. The range of MAO levels in gamblers was also significantly shorter than in controls. In controls, platelet MAO levels showed the previously described negative correlations with sensation-seeking scores but not in gamblers. The findings are consistent with previous studies showing an association of low platelet MAO activity with impulse control disorders and raise some interesting therapeutic alternatives for pathological gambling. (au) (40 refs.).

  2. Optical characterization of porous silicon microcavities for glucose oxidase biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palestino, G.; Agarwal, V.; Garcia, D. B.; Legros, R.; Pérez, E.; Gergely, C.

    2008-04-01

    PSi microcavity (PSiMc) is characterized by a narrow resonance peak in the optical spectrum that is very sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. We report that the resonant optical cavities of PSi structures can be used to enhance the detection of labeled fluorescent biomolecules. Various PSi configurations were tested in order to compare the optical response of the PSi devices to the capture of organic molecules. Morphological and topographical analyses were performed on PSiMc using Atomic Force (AFM) and Scanning Electron (SEM) microscopies. The heterogeneity in pores lengths resulting from etching process assures a better penetration of larger molecules into the pores and sensor sensitivity depends on the pore size. Molecular detection is monitored by the successive red shifts in the reflectance spectra after the stabilization of PSiMc with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The glucose oxidase was cross linked into the PSiMc structures following a silane-glutaraldehyde (GTA) chemistry.

  3. Magnetic field effects on brain monoamine oxidase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borets, V.M.; Ostrovskiy, V.Yu.; Bankovskiy, A.A.; Dudinskaya, T.F.

    1985-03-01

    In view of the increasing use of magnetotherapy, studies were conducted on the effects of 35 mTesla magnetic fields on monoamine oxidase activity in the rat brain. Under in vitro conditions a constant magnetic field in the continuous mode was most effective in inhibiting deamination of dopamine following 1 min exposure, while in vivo studies with 8 min or 10 day exposures showed that inhibition was obtained only with a variable field in the continuous mode. However, inhibition of dopamine deamination was only evident within the first 24 h after exposure was terminated. In addition, in none of the cases was norepinephrine deamination inhibited. The effects of the magnetic fields were, therefore, transient and selective with the CNS as the target system. 9 references.

  4. Suicide attempts, platelet monoamine oxidase and the average evoked response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Haier, R.J.; Murphy, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between suicides and suicide attempts and two biological measures, platelet monoamine oxidase levels (MAO) and average evoked response (AER) augmenting was examined in 79 off-medication psychiatric patients and in 68 college student volunteers chosen from the upper and lower deciles of MAO activity levels. In the patient sample, male individuals with low MAO and AER augmenting, a pattern previously associated with bipolar affective disorders, showed a significantly increased incidence of suicide attempts in comparison with either non-augmenting low MAO or high MAO patients. Within the normal volunteer group, all male low MAO probands with a family history of suicide or suicide attempts were AER augmenters themselves. Four completed suicides were found among relatives of low MAO probands whereas no high MAO proband had a relative who committed suicide. These findings suggest that the combination of low platelet MAO activity and AER augmenting may be associated with a possible genetic vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. (author)

  5. Safflor yellow B suppresses angiotensin II-mediated human umbilical vein cell injury via regulation of Bcl-2/p22phox expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chaoyun; He, Yanhao; Yang, Ming; Sun, Hongliu; Zhang, Shuping; Wang, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are derived from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Angiotensin II (Ang II) can cause endothelial dysfunction by promoting intracellular ROS generation. Safflor yellow B (SYB) effectively inhibits ROS generation by upregulating Bcl-2 expression. In this study, we examined the effects of SYB on Ang II-induced injury to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and elucidated the roles of NADPH oxidase and Bcl-2. We treated cultured HUVECs with Ang II, SYB, and Bcl-2 siRNA, and determined NADPH oxidase activity and ROS levels. Furthermore, cellular and mitochondrial physiological states were evaluated, and the expression levels of target proteins were analyzed. Ang II significantly enhanced intracellular ROS levels, caused mitochondrial membrane dysfunction, and decreased cell viability, leading to apoptosis. This was associated with increased expression of AT1R and p22 phox , increased NADPH oxidase activity, and an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, leading to decreases in antioxidant enzyme activities, which were further strengthened after blocking Bcl-2. Compared to Ang II treatment alone, co-treatment with SYB significantly reversed HUVEC injury. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SYB could significantly protect endothelial cells from Ang II-induced cell damage, and that it does so by upregulating Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting ROS generation. - Highlights: • Angiotensin II depresses mitochondria physiological function. • Angiotensin II activates NADPH oxidase via up-regulating expresion of p22 phox . • Bcl-2 plays a pivotal role in improving mitochondria function and regulates ROS level. • Inhibitor of Bcl-2 promotes angiotensin II mediated HUVEC injury. • SYB attenuates angiotensin II mediated HUVEC injury via up regulating Bcl-2 expression

  6. Reengineered glucose oxidase for amperometric glucose determination in diabetes analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango Gutierrez, Erik; Mundhada, Hemanshu; Meier, Thomas; Duefel, Hartmut; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-12-15

    Glucose oxidase is an oxidoreductase exhibiting a high β-D-glucose specificity and high stability which renders glucose oxidase well-suited for applications in diabetes care. Nevertheless, GOx activity is highly oxygen dependent which can lead to inaccuracies in amperometric β-D-glucose determinations. Therefore a directed evolution campaign with two rounds of random mutagenesis (SeSaM followed by epPCR), site saturation mutagenesis studies on individual positions, and one simultaneous site saturation library (OmniChange; 4 positions) was performed. A diabetes care well suited mediator (quinone diimine) was selected and the GOx variant (T30V I94V) served as starting point. For directed GOx evolution a microtiter plate detection system based on the quinone diimine mediator was developed and the well-known ABTS-assay was applied in microtiter plate format to validate oxygen independency of improved GOx variants. Two iterative rounds of random diversity generation and screening yielded to two subsets of amino acid positions which mainly improved activity (A173, A332) and oxygen independency (F414, V560). Simultaneous site saturation of all four positions with a reduced subset of amino acids using the OmniChange method yielded finally variant V7 with a 37-fold decreased oxygen dependency (mediator activity: 7.4 U/mg WT, 47.5 U/mg V7; oxygen activity: 172.3 U/mg WT, 30.1 U/mg V7). V7 is still highly β-D-glucose specific, highly active with the quinone diimine mediator and thermal resistance is retained (prerequisite for GOx coating of diabetes test stripes). The latter properties and V7's oxygen insensitivity make V7 a very promising candidate to replace standard GOx in diabetes care applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Dynamic Studies of the Complex Polyethylenimine and Glucose Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Beata; Diudea, Mircea V; Putz, Mihai V; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P

    2016-10-27

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an enzyme produced by Aspergillus, Penicillium and other fungi species. It catalyzes the oxidation of β-d-glucose (by the molecular oxygen or other molecules, like quinones, in a higher oxidation state) to form d-glucono-1,5-lactone, which hydrolyses spontaneously to produce gluconic acid. A coproduct of this enzymatic reaction is hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). GOx has found several commercial applications in chemical and pharmaceutical industries including novel biosensors that use the immobilized enzyme on different nanomaterials and/or polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI). The problem of GOx immobilization on PEI is retaining the enzyme native activity despite its immobilization onto the polymer surface. Therefore, the molecular dynamic (MD) study of the PEI ligand (C14N8_07_B22) and the GOx enzyme (3QVR) was performed to examine the final complex PEI-GOx stabilization and the affinity of the PEI ligand to the docking sites of the GOx enzyme. The docking procedure showed two places/regions of major interaction of the protein with the polymer PEI: (LIG1) of -5.8 kcal/mol and (LIG2) of -4.5 kcal/mol located inside the enzyme and on its surface, respectively. The values of enthalpy for the PEI-enzyme complex, located inside of the protein (LIG1) and on its surface (LIG2) were computed. Docking also discovered domains of the GOx protein that exhibit no interactions with the ligand or have even repulsive characteristics. The structural data clearly indicate some differences in the ligand PEI behavior bound at the two places/regions of glucose oxidase.

  8. Molecular Dynamic Studies of the Complex Polyethylenimine and Glucose Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szefler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose oxidase (GOx is an enzyme produced by Aspergillus, Penicillium and other fungi species. It catalyzes the oxidation of β-d-glucose (by the molecular oxygen or other molecules, like quinones, in a higher oxidation state to form d-glucono-1,5-lactone, which hydrolyses spontaneously to produce gluconic acid. A coproduct of this enzymatic reaction is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. GOx has found several commercial applications in chemical and pharmaceutical industries including novel biosensors that use the immobilized enzyme on different nanomaterials and/or polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI. The problem of GOx immobilization on PEI is retaining the enzyme native activity despite its immobilization onto the polymer surface. Therefore, the molecular dynamic (MD study of the PEI ligand (C14N8_07_B22 and the GOx enzyme (3QVR was performed to examine the final complex PEI-GOx stabilization and the affinity of the PEI ligand to the docking sites of the GOx enzyme. The docking procedure showed two places/regions of major interaction of the protein with the polymer PEI: (LIG1 of −5.8 kcal/mol and (LIG2 of −4.5 kcal/mol located inside the enzyme and on its surface, respectively. The values of enthalpy for the PEI-enzyme complex, located inside of the protein (LIG1 and on its surface (LIG2 were computed. Docking also discovered domains of the GOx protein that exhibit no interactions with the ligand or have even repulsive characteristics. The structural data clearly indicate some differences in the ligand PEI behavior bound at the two places/regions of glucose oxidase.

  9. Proteomic and immunoproteomic characterization of a DIVA subunit vaccine against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protection of pigs by vaccination against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, is hampered by the presence of 15 different serotypes. A DIVA subunit vaccine comprised of detergent-released proteins from A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2 and 5 has been developed and shown to protect pigs from clinical symptoms upon homologous and heterologous challenge. This vaccine has not been characterized in-depth so far. Thus we performed i mass spectrometry in order to identify the exact protein content of the vaccine and ii cross-serotype 2-D immunoblotting in order to discover cross-reactive antigens. By these approaches we expected to gain results enabling us to argue about the reasons for the efficacy of the analyzed vaccine. Results We identified 75 different proteins in the vaccine. Using the PSORTb algorithm these proteins were classified according to their cellular localization. Highly enriched proteins are outer membrane-associated lipoproteins like OmlA and TbpB, integral outer membrane proteins like FrpB, TbpA, OmpA1, OmpA2, HgbA and OmpP2, and secreted Apx toxins. The subunit vaccine also contained large amounts of the ApxIVA toxin so far thought to be expressed only during infection. Applying two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE we showed different isoforms and variations in expression levels of several proteins among the strains used for vaccine production. For detection of cross-reactive antigens we used detergent released proteins of serotype 7. Sera of pigs vaccinated with the detergent-released proteins of serotypes 1, 2, and 5 detected seven different proteins of serotype 7, and convalescent sera of pigs surviving experimental infection with serotype 7 reacted with 13 different proteins of the detergent-released proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2, and 5. Conclusions A detergent extraction-based subunit vaccine of A. pleuropneumoniae was

  10. The increasing role of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors in Parkinson's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Lawrence W; Bertoni, John M

    2008-11-01

    The role of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease has expanded with the new monoamine oxidase B inhibitor rasagiline and a new formulation, selegiline oral disintegrating tablets. As primary therapy in early disease monoamine oxidase B inhibitors reduce motor disability and delay the need for levodopa. In more advanced disease requiring levodopa, adjunctive monoamine oxidase B inhibitors reduce 'off' time and may improve gait and freezing. Rasagiline and selegiline oral disintegrating tablets may reduce the safety risks associated with the amfetamine and methamfetamine metabolites of conventional oral selegiline while retaining or improving therapeutic efficacy. Articles were identified by searches of PubMed and searches on the Internet and reviewed. All articles and other referenced materials were retrieved using the keywords 'Parkinson's disease', 'treatment' and 'monoamine oxidase B inhibitor' and were published between 1960 and 2007, with older references selected for historical significance. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Accumulating data support the use of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors as monotherapy for early and mild Parkinson's disease and as adjunctive therapy for more advanced Parkinson's disease with levodopa-associated motor fluctuations. The recently released monoamine oxidase B inhibitor rasagiline and a new formulation, selegiline oral disintegrating tablets, have potential advantages over conventional oral selegiline.

  11. Molecular Basis for Converting (2S-Methylsuccinyl-CoA Dehydrogenase into an Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Burgener

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although flavoenzymes have been studied in detail, the molecular basis of their dioxygen reactivity is only partially understood. The members of the flavin adenosine dinucleotide (FAD-dependent acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA oxidase families catalyze similar reactions and share common structural features. However, both enzyme families feature opposing reaction specificities in respect to dioxygen. Dehydrogenases react with electron transfer flavoproteins as terminal electron acceptors and do not show a considerable reactivity with dioxygen, whereas dioxygen serves as a bona fide substrate for oxidases. We recently engineered (2S-methylsuccinyl-CoA dehydrogenase towards oxidase activity by rational mutagenesis. Here we characterized the (2S-methylsuccinyl-CoA dehydrogenase wild-type, as well as the engineered (2S-methylsuccinyl-CoA oxidase, in detail. Using stopped-flow UV-spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS based assays, we explain the molecular base for dioxygen reactivity in the engineered oxidase and show that the increased oxidase function of the engineered enzyme comes at a decreased dehydrogenase activity. Our findings add to the common notion that an increased activity for a specific substrate is achieved at the expense of reaction promiscuity and provide guidelines for rational engineering efforts of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and oxidases.

  12. Khz-cp (crude polysaccharide extract obtained from the fusion of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) induces apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium levels and activating P38 and NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in SNU-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Ju Sung; Kim, Zoo Haye; Huang, Ren Bin; Chae, Young Lye; Wang, Ren Sheng

    2014-07-10

    Khz-cp is a crude polysaccharide extract that is obtained after nuclear fusion in Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia (Khz). It inhibits the growth of cancer cells. Khz-cp was extracted by solvent extraction. The anti-proliferative activity of Khz-cp was confirmed by using Annexin-V/PI-flow cytometry analysis. Intracellular calcium increase and measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed by using flow cytometry and inverted microscope. SNU-1 cells were treated with p38, Bcl-2 and Nox family siRNA. siRNA transfected cells was employed to investigate the expression of apoptotic, growth and survival genes in SNU-1 cells. Western blot analysis was performed to confirm the expression of the genes. In the present study, Khz-cp induced apoptosis preferentially in transformed cells and had only minimal effects on non-transformed cells. Furthermore, Khz-cp was found to induce apoptosis by increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and activating P38 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria. Khz-cp-induced apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred via a mitochondrial pathway. ROS generation by NADPH oxidase was critical for Khz-cp-induced apoptosis, and although mitochondrial ROS production was also required, it appeared to occur secondary to ROS generation by NADPH oxidase. Activation of NADPH oxidase was shown by the translocation of the regulatory subunits p47phox and p67phox to the cell membrane and was necessary for ROS generation by Khz-cp. Khz-cp triggered a rapid and sustained increase in [Ca2+]i that activated P38. P38 was considered to play a key role in the activation of NADPH oxidase because inhibition of its expression or activity abrogated membrane translocation of the p47phox and p67phox subunits and ROS generation. In summary, these data indicate that Khz-cp preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells and that the signaling mechanisms involve an

  13. The Cytochrome bd Oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis Contributes to Oxidative Stress Resistance and Dioxygen Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Leclerc

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is an etiologic agent of periodontal disease in humans. The disease is associated with the formation of a mixed oral biofilm which is exposed to oxygen and environmental stress, such as oxidative stress. To investigate possible roles for cytochrome bd oxidase in the growth and persistence of this anaerobic bacterium inside the oral biofilm, mutant strains deficient in cytochrome bd oxidase activity were characterized. This study demonstrated that the cytochrome bd oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis, encoded by cydAB, was able to catalyse O2 consumption and was involved in peroxide and superoxide resistance, and dioxygen tolerance.

  14. Structural relationships among the multiple forms of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II from cultured parsley cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, G.; Bogorad, L.; Kidd, G.H.; Richter, G.

    1978-01-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (or B) was purified from cultured parsley cells, and its molecular structure was examined in detail. Upon centrifugation through glycerol gradients, RNA polymerase II sediments as a single band with an apparent sedimentation constant of 15S. No contamination with RNA polymerases I or III could be detected when the activity of purified RNA polymerase II was assayed in the presence of high concentrations of α-amanitin. Analysis of purified RNA polymerase II be nondenaturing and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that this enzyme exists in multiple forms. They were designated II(O), II(A), and II(B). It is suggested that each form has a subunit of Mr = 140000 as well as smaller polypeptides in common. They differ, however, in the molecular weights of their largest subunits which is 220000 in form II(O), 200000 in form II(A), and 180000 in form II(B). These large subunits were labelled with 125 I, digested with trypsin, and tryptic digests were compared by two-dimensional analysis on thin-layer plates (Elder et al. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 6510-6515). Fingerprints of tryptic digests from the polypeptides with Mr = 220000, Mr = 200000, and Mr = 180000 were similar. It is, therefore, suggested that these subunits are stucturally related. A tryptic digest was also produced from the subunit with Mr = 140000. Its fingerprint was found to yield a considerably different distribution of peptides as compared to those from the three large subunits. (orig.) [de

  15. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, R.M.B. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia]|[Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal). Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of {sup 35}S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author).

  16. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.M.B.; Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35 S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author)

  17. Flexible Connectors between Capsomer Subunits that Regulate Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasek, Mary L; Maurer, Joshua B; Hendrix, Roger W; Duda, Robert L

    2017-08-04

    Viruses build icosahedral capsids of specific size and shape by regulating the spatial arrangement of the hexameric and pentameric protein capsomers in the growing shell during assembly. In the T=7 capsids of Escherichia coli bacteriophage HK97 and other phages, 60 capsomers are hexons, while the rest are pentons that are correctly positioned during assembly. Assembly of the HK97 capsid to the correct size and shape has been shown to depend on specific ionic contacts between capsomers. We now describe additional ionic interactions within capsomers that also regulate assembly. Each is between the long hairpin, the "E-loop," that extends from one subunit to the adjacent subunit within the same capsomer. Glutamate E153 on the E-loop and arginine R210 on the adjacent subunit's backbone alpha-helix form salt bridges in hexamers and pentamers. Mutations that disrupt these salt bridges were lethal for virus production, because the mutant proteins assembled into tubes or sheets instead of capsids. X-ray structures show that the E153-R210 links are flexible and maintained during maturation despite radical changes in capsomer shape. The E153-R210 links appear to form early in assembly to enable capsomers to make programmed changes in their shape during assembly. The links also prevent flattening of capsomers and premature maturation. Mutant phenotypes and modeling support an assembly model in which flexible E153-R210 links mediate capsomer shape changes that control where pentons are placed to create normal-sized capsids. The E-loop may be conserved in other systems in order to play similar roles in regulating assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role for the MED21-MED7 Hinge in Assembly of the Mediator-RNA Polymerase II Holoenzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shigeo; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yu, Xiaodi; Sardiu, Mihaela; Saraf, Anita; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Asturias, Francisco J.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator plays an integral role in activation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. A key step in activation is binding of Mediator to Pol II to form the Mediator-Pol II holoenzyme. Here, we exploit a combination of biochemistry and macromolecular EM to investigate holoenzyme assembly. We identify a subset of human Mediator head module subunits that bind Pol II independent of other subunits and thus probably contribute to a major Pol II binding site. In addition, we show that binding of human Mediator to Pol II depends on the integrity of a conserved “hinge” in the middle module MED21-MED7 heterodimer. Point mutations in the hinge region leave core Mediator intact but lead to increased disorder of the middle module and markedly reduced affinity for Pol II. These findings highlight the importance of Mediator conformation for holoenzyme assembly. PMID:27821593

  19. Sex Hormone Receptor Expression in the Human Vocal Fold Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirgezen, Tolga; Sunter, Ahmet Volkan; Yigit, Ozgur; Huq, Gulben Erdem

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the existence of sex hormone receptors in the subunits of vocal fold. This is a cadaver study. The androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors were examined in the epithelium (EP), superficial layer of the lamina propria (SLP), vocal ligament (VL), and macula flava (MF) of the vocal folds from 42 human cadavers (21 male, 21 female) by immunohistochemical methods. Their staining ratios were scored and statistically compared. The androgen receptor score was significantly higher for the MF than for the EP and SLP (P vocal fold, mostly in the MF and VLs. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rho-kinase inhibitor and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor prevent impairment of endothelium-dependent cerebral vasodilation by acute cigarette smoking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroki; Iida, Mami; Takenaka, Motoyasu; Fukuoka, Naokazu; Dohi, Shuji

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported that acute cigarette smoking can cause a dysfunction of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in cerebral vessels, and that blocking the angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor with valsartan prevented this impairment. Our aim was to investigate the effects of a Rho-kinase inhibitor (fasudil) and a Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide PHosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor (apocynin) on smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arterioles. In Sprague-Dawley rats, we used a closed cranial window preparation to measure changes in pial vessel diameters following topical acetylcholine (ACh) before smoking. After one-minute smoking, we again examined the arteriolar responses to ACh. Finally, after intravenous fasudil or apocynin pre-treatment we re-examined the vasodilator responses to topical ACh (before and after cigarette smoking). Under control conditions, cerebral arterioles were dose-dependently dilated by topical ACh (10(-6) M and 10(-5) M). One hour after a one-minute smoking (1 mg-nicotine cigarette), 10(-5) M ACh constricted cerebral arterioles. However, one hour after a one-minute smoking, 10(-5) M ACh dilated cerebral pial arteries both in the fasudil pre-treatment and the apocynin pre-treatment groups, responses that were significantly different from those obtained without fasudil or apocynin pre-treatment. Thus, inhibition of Rho-kinase and NADPH oxidase activities may prevent the above smoking-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  1. N-linked glycans are required on epithelial Na+ channel subunits for maturation and surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlan, Ossama B; Kinlough, Carol L; Myerburg, Michael M; Shi, Shujie; Chen, Jingxin; Blobner, Brandon M; Buck, Teresa M; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Hughey, Rebecca P; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) subunits undergo N-linked glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum where they assemble into an αβγ complex. Six, 13, and 5 consensus sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) for N-glycosylation reside in the extracellular domains of the mouse α-, β-, and γ-subunits, respectively. Because the importance of ENaC N-linked glycans has not been fully addressed, we examined the effect of preventing N-glycosylation of specific subunits on channel function, expression, maturation, and folding. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes or Fischer rat thyroid cells with αβγ-ENaC lacking N-linked glycans on a single subunit reduced ENaC activity as well as the inhibitory response to extracellular Na + . The lack of N-linked glycans on the β-subunit also precluded channel activation by trypsin. However, channel activation by shear stress was N-linked glycan independent, regardless of which subunit was modified. We also discovered that the lack of N-linked glycans on any one subunit reduced the total and surface levels of cognate subunits. The lack of N-linked glycans on the β-subunit had the largest effect on total levels, with the lack of N-linked glycans on the γ- and α-subunits having intermediate and modest effects, respectively. Finally, channels with wild-type β-subunits were more sensitive to limited trypsin proteolysis than channels lacking N-linked glycans on the β-subunit. Our results indicate that N-linked glycans on each subunit are required for proper folding, maturation, surface expression, and function of the channel.

  2. Steady-state kinetics of substrate binding and iron release in tomato ACC oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrower, J S; Blalock, R; Klinman, J P

    2001-08-14

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACC oxidase) catalyzes the last step in the biosynthetic pathway of the plant hormone, ethylene. This unusual reaction results in the oxidative ring cleavage of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylate (ACC) into ethylene, cyanide, and CO2 and requires ferrous ion, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen for catalysis. A new purification procedure and assay method have been developed for tomato ACC oxidase that result in greatly increased enzymatic activity. This method allowed us to determine the rate of iron release from the enzyme and the effect of the activator, CO2, on this rate. Initial velocity studies support an ordered kinetic mechanism where ACC binds first followed by O2; ascorbate can bind after O2 or possibly before ACC. This kinetic mechanism differs from one recently proposed for the ACC oxidase from avocado.

  3. In vivo oxalate degradation by liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in rat model of hyperoxaluria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: EMA-oxalate oxidase encapsulated liposome caused oxalate degradation in experimental hyperoxaluria indicating that the enzyme could be used as a therapeutic agent in hyperoxaluria leading to urinary stones.

  4. Action of DCCD on the H+/O stoichiometry of mitoplast cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Costa, L

    1985-01-01

    The mechanistic H+/O ejection stoichiometry of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction in rat liver mitoplasts is close to 4 at level flow when the reduced oxidase is pulsed with O2. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) up to 30 nmol/mg protein fails to influence the rate of electron flow through the mitoplast oxidase, but inhibits H+ ejection. The inhibition of H+ ejection appears to be biphasic; ejection of 2-3 H+ per O is completely inhibited by very low DCCD, whereas inhibition of the remaining H+ ejection requires very much higher concentrations of DCCD. This effect suggests the occurrence of two types of H+ pumps in the native cytochrome oxidase of mitoplasts.

  5. Production of a new D-amino acid oxidase from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, M; Fischer, L

    1999-08-01

    The fungus Fusarium oxysporum produced a D-amino acid oxidase (EC 1. 4.3.3) in a medium containing glucose as the carbon and energy source and ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source. The specific D-amino acid oxidase activity was increased up to 12.5-fold with various D-amino acids or their corresponding derivatives as inducers. The best inducers were D-alanine (2.7 microkat/g of dry biomass) and D-3-aminobutyric acid (2.6 microkat/g of dry biomass). The addition of zinc ions was necessary to permit the induction of peroxisomal D-amino acid oxidase. Bioreactor cultivations were performed on a 50-liter scale, yielding a volumetric D-amino acid oxidase activity of 17 microkat liter(-1) with D-alanine as an inducer. Under oxygen limitation, the volumetric activity was increased threefold to 54 microkat liter(-1) (3,240 U liter(-1)).

  6. Interferon gamma/NADPH oxidase defence system in immunity and cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodný, Zdeněk; Reiniš, Milan; Hubáčková, Soňa; Vašicová, Pavla; Bartek, Jiří

    -, 01 Sep (2015) ISSN 2162-4011 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : IFNγ * NADPH oxidase * immunity * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.266, year: 2014

  7. NADPH oxidase 4 mediates insulin-stimulated HIF-1α and VEGF expression, and angiogenesis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Meng

    Full Text Available Acute intensive insulin therapy causes a transient worsening of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients and is related to VEGF expression. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to be involved in HIF-1α and VEGF expression induced by insulin, but the role of specific ROS sources has not been fully elucidated. In this study we examined the role of NADPH oxidase subunit 4 (Nox4 in insulin-stimulated HIF-1α and VEGF expression, and angiogenic responses in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs. Here we demonstrate that knockdown of Nox4 by siRNA reduced insulin-stimulated ROS generation, the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR-β and IRS-1, but did not change the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1. Nox4 gene silencing had a much greater inhibitory effect on insulin-induced AKT activation than ERK1/2 activation, whereas it had little effect on the expression of the phosphatases such as MKP-1 and SHIP. Inhibition of Nox4 expression inhibited the transcriptional activity of VEGF through HIF-1. Overexpression of wild-type Nox4 was sufficient to increase VEGF transcriptional activity, and further enhanced insulin-stimulated the activation of VEGF. Downregulation of Nox4 expression decreased insulin-stimulated mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α, but did not change the rate of HIF-1α degradation. Inhibition of Nox4 impaired insulin-stimulated VEGF expression, cell migration, cell proliferation, and tube formation in HMVECs. Our data indicate that Nox4-derived ROS are essential for HIF-1α-dependent VEGF expression, and angiogenesis in vitro induced by insulin. Nox4 may be an attractive therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy caused by intensive insulin treatment.

  8. Sinomenine, a natural dextrorotatory morphinan analog, is anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective through inhibition of microglial NADPH oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Belinda

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms involved in the induction and regulation of inflammation resulting in dopaminergic (DA neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease (PD are complex and incompletely understood. Microglia-mediated inflammation has recently been implicated as a critical mechanism responsible for progressive neurodegeneration. Methods Mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures and reconstituted cultures were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms of sinomenine (SN-mediated anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in both the lipopolysaccharide (LPS- and the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+-mediated models of PD. Results SN showed equivalent efficacy in protecting against DA neuron death in rat midbrain neuron-glial cultures at both micro- and sub-picomolar concentrations, but no protection was seen at nanomolar concentrations. The neuroprotective effect of SN was attributed to inhibition of microglial activation, since SN significantly decreased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS production by microglia. In addition, from the therapeutic point of view, we focused on sub-picomolar concentration of SN for further mechanistic studies. We found that 10-14 M of SN failed to protect DA neurons against MPP+-induced toxicity in the absence of microglia. More importantly, SN failed to show a protective effect in neuron-glia cultures from mice lacking functional NADPH oxidase (PHOX, a key enzyme for extracellular superoxide production in immune cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SN reduced LPS-induced extracellular ROS production through the inhibition of the PHOX cytosolic subunit p47phoxtranslocation to the cell membrane. Conclusion Our findings strongly suggest that the protective effects of SN are most likely mediated through the inhibition of microglial PHOX activity. These findings suggest a novel therapy to treat inflammation-mediated neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Diversity and abundance of the arsenite oxidase gene aioA in geothermal areas of Tengchong, Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Wu, Geng; Dong, Hailiang; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Bing; Wang, Yanxin; Guo, Qinghai

    2014-01-01

    A total of 12 samples were collected from the Tengchong geothermal areas of Yunnan, China, with the goal to assess the arsenite (AsIII) oxidation potential of the extant microbial communities as inferred by the abundance and diversity of the AsIII oxidase large subunit gene aioA relative to geochemical context. Arsenic concentrations were higher (on average 251.68 μg/L) in neutral or alkaline springs than in acidic springs (on average 30.88 μg/L). aioA abundance ranged from 1.63 × 10(1) to 7.08 × 10(3) per ng of DNA and positively correlated with sulfide and the ratios of arsenate (AsV):total dissolved arsenic (AsTot). Based on qPCR estimates of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundance, aioA-harboring organisms comprised as much as ~15% of the total community. Phylogenetically, the major aioA sequences (270 total) in the acidic hot springs (pH 3.3-4.4) were affiliated with Aquificales and Rhizobiales, while those in neutral or alkaline springs (pH 6.6-9.1) were inferred to be primarily bacteria related to Thermales and Burkholderiales. Interestingly, aioA abundance at one site greatly exceeded bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance, suggesting these aioA genes were archaeal even though phylogenetically these aioA sequences were most similar to the Aquificales. In summary, this study described novel aioA sequences in geothermal features geographically far removed from those in the heavily studied Yellowstone geothermal complex.

  10. Kaempferol suppresses collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and protecting SHP-2 from oxidative inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su Bin; Jang, Ji Yong; Chae, Yun Hee; Min, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Park, Yunjeong; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated upon collagen stimulation act as second messengers to propagate various platelet-activating events. Among the ROS-generating enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) plays a prominent role in platelet activation. Thus, NOX has been suggested as a novel target for anti-platelet drug development. Although kaempferol has been identified as a NOX inhibitor, the influence of kaempferol on the activation of platelets and the underlying mechanism have never been investigated. Here, we studied the effects of kaempferol on NOX activation, ROS-dependent signaling pathways, and functional responses in collagen-stimulated platelets. Superoxide anion generation stimulated by collagen was significantly inhibited by kaempferol in a concentration-dependent manner. More importantly, kaempferol directly bound p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX, and significantly inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) and NOX activation. In accordance with the inhibition of NOX, ROS-dependent inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) was potently protected by kaempferol. Subsequently, the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (Syk, Vav1, Btk, and PLCγ2) of collagen receptor signaling pathways was suppressed by kaempferol. Kaempferol also attenuated downstream responses, including cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Ultimately, kaempferol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen in vitro and prolonged in vivo thrombotic response in carotid arteries of mice. This study shows that kaempferol impairs collagen-induced platelet activation through inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2. This effect suggests that kaempferol has therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metavanadate causes cellular accumulation of copper and decreased lysyl oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Changtai T.; Uriu-Adams, Janet Y.; Tchaparian, Eskouhie H.; Keen, Carl L.; Rucker, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    Selected indices of copper metabolism in weanling rats and fibroblast cultures were progressively altered in response to increased levels of sodium metavanadate. In diets, vanadium was added in amounts ranging from 0 to 80 μg V/g of diet, that is, 0-1.6 μmol V/g of diet. In fibroblast cultures, vanadium ranged from 0 to 400 nmol V/ml. The inhibition of P-ATPase-7A activity by metavanadate, important to copper egress from cells, was a primary focus. In skin, and tendon, the copper concentration was increased in response to increased dietary levels of metavanadate, whereas lysyl oxidase activity, a secreted cuproprotein, was reduced. The reduction in lysyl oxidase activity was also accompanied by reduced redox cycling potential of isolated fractions of lysyl oxidase, presumably due to reduced lysyltyrosyl quinone (LTQ) formation at the active site of lysyl oxidase. In contrast, liver copper concentrations and plasma ceruloplasmin activity were not affected by metavanadate exposure. However, semicarbazide-sensitive benzylamine oxidase (SCBO) activity, which was taken as an indirect measure of vascular adhesive protein-1 (VAP-1), was increased. In cultured fibroblasts, cellular copper was also increased and lysyl oxidase decreased in response to metavanadate. Moreover, the steady-state levels of atp7a and lysyl oxidase mRNAs were not affected by addition of metavanadate to culture medium up to 200 nmol/ml. Taken together, these data suggest that pathways involving copper egress and lysyl oxidase activation are particularly sensitive to metavanadate exposure through processes that are predominately posttranslational

  12. Herbivore-plant interactions: mixed-function oxidases and secondary plant substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F; Eisner, T

    1977-06-17

    The mixed-function oxidases of a polyphagous insect larva (the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania) were found to be induced by a diversity of secondary plant substances. The induction proceeds rapidly and in response to a small quantity of secondary substance. Following induction, the larva is less susceptible to dietary poisoning. It is argued that mixed-function oxidases play a major role in protecting herbivores against chemical stress from secondary plant substances.

  13. Process technology for the application of d-amino acid oxidases in pharmaceutical intermediate manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tindal, Stuart; Carr, Reuben; Archer, Ian V. J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in biocatalysis have seen increased interest in the use of D-amino acid oxidase to synthesize optically pure amino acids. However, the creation of a genuine oxidase based platform technology will require suitable process technology as well as an understanding of the challenges...... and opportunities of a wider portfolio of synthetic targets. In this article we address some of the recent progress in process technology to enable the future development of a generic platform technology....

  14. A charged residue at the subunit interface of PCNA promotes trimer formation by destabilizing alternate subunit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential accessory factor in DNA replication and repair, is a ring-shaped homotrimer. A novel nontrimeric structure of E113G-mutant PCNA protein is reported, which shows that this protein forms alternate subunit interactions. It is concluded that the charged side chain of Glu113 promotes normal trimer formation by destabilizing these alternate subunit interactions. Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential replication accessory factor that interacts with a variety of proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. Each monomer of PCNA has an N-terminal domain A and a C-terminal domain B. In the structure of the wild-type PCNA protein, domain A of one monomer interacts with domain B of a neighboring monomer to form a ring-shaped trimer. Glu113 is a conserved residue at the subunit interface in domain A. Two distinct X-ray crystal structures have been determined of a mutant form of PCNA with a substitution at this position (E113G) that has previously been studied because of its effect on translesion synthesis. The first structure was the expected ring-shaped trimer. The second structure was an unanticipated nontrimeric form of the protein. In this nontrimeric form, domain A of one PCNA monomer interacts with domain A of a neighboring monomer, while domain B of this monomer interacts with domain B of a different neighboring monomer. The B–B interface is stabilized by an antiparallel β-sheet and appears to be structurally similar to the A–B interface observed in the trimeric form of PCNA. The A–A interface, in contrast, is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Because the E113G substitution is located on this hydrophobic surface, the A–A interface should be less favorable in the case of the wild-type protein. This suggests that the side chain of Glu113 promotes trimer formation by destabilizing these possible alternate subunit interactions

  15. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta ...

  16. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits are located on rat liver endosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyke Rebecca W

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat liver endosomes contain activated insulin receptors and downstream signal transduction molecules. We undertook these studies to determine whether endosomes also contain heterotrimeric G proteins that may be involved in signal transduction from G protein-coupled receptors. Results By Western blotting Gsα, Giα1,2, Giα3 and Gβ were enriched in both canalicular (CM and basolateral (BLM membranes but also readily detectable on three types of purified rat liver endosomes in the order recycling receptor compartment (RRC > compartment for uncoupling of receptor and ligand (CURL > multivesicular bodies (MVB >> purified secondary lysosomes. Western blotting with antibodies to Na, K-ATPase and to other proteins associated with plasma membranes and intracellular organelles indicated this was not due to contamination of endosome preparations by CM or BLM. Adenylate cyclase (AC was also identified on purified CM, BLM, RRC, CURL and MVB. Percoll gradient fractionation of liver postnuclear supernatants demonstrated co-occurrence of endosomes and heterotrimeric G protein subunits in fractions with little plasma membrane markers. By confocal microscopy, punctate staining for Gsα, Giα3 and Gβ corresponded to punctate areas of endocytosed Texas red-dextran in hepatocytes from control and cholera toxin-treated livers. Conclusion We conclude that heterotrimeric G protein subunits as well as AC likely traffic into hepatocytes on endosome membranes, possibly generating downstream signals spatially separate from signalling generated at the plasma membrane, analogous to the role(s of internalized insulin receptors.

  17. Fungal mediator tail subunits contain classical transcriptional activation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2015-04-01

    Classical activation domains within DNA-bound eukaryotic transcription factors make weak interactions with coactivator complexes, such as Mediator, to stimulate transcription. How these interactions stimulate transcription, however, is unknown. The activation of reporter genes by artificial fusion of Mediator subunits to DNA binding domains that bind to their promoters has been cited as evidence that the primary role of activators is simply to recruit Mediator. We have identified potent classical transcriptional activation domains in the C termini of several tail module subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis Mediator, while their N-terminal domains are necessary and sufficient for their incorporation into Mediator but do not possess the ability to activate transcription when fused to a DNA binding domain. This suggests that Mediator fusion proteins actually are functioning in a manner similar to that of a classical DNA-bound activator rather than just recruiting Mediator. Our finding that deletion of the activation domains of S. cerevisiae Med2 and Med3, as well as C. dubliniensis Tlo1 (a Med2 ortholog), impairs the induction of certain genes shows these domains function at native promoters. Activation domains within coactivators are likely an important feature of these complexes and one that may have been uniquely leveraged by a common fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site

  20. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.