WorldWideScience

Sample records for oxford university 22-25

  1. The 'gender gap' in final examination results at Oxford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellanby, J; Martin, M; O'Doherty, J

    2000-08-01

    A lower proportion of women than men obtain first class degrees at British universities (the so-called gender gap). At Oxford University, this difference is not seen in all degree subjects but is found both in some Arts and in some Science subjects. We have used a questionnaire administered under supervision to undergraduates 2 to 3 months before their final examination to assess factors which might be expected to affect examination performance. These included measures of verbal and non-verbal reasoning (Alice Heim AH6 test), self-esteem, motivation, responses to stresses of examinations and of personal relationships, happiness, risk-taking and working patterns. We have also obtained a detailed breakdown of the marks the students were given in the examination. Women scored higher on negative emotions while men scored higher on self-esteem, their perception of their own academic efficacy and on risk-taking strategies, but none of these factors predicted outcome. Verbal reasoning ability did predict outcome but there was no gender difference. Hence, it is concluded that the gender gap is not due to any of these individual differences and is more likely to be related to the nature of the academic assessment system.

  2. Annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae (Hymenoptera) in the Oxford University Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; O'Toole, C.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated catalogue of the types of Braconidae in the Hope Entomological Collections, University Museum, Oxford, is given. The following new combinations are proposed: Aleiodes rothneyi (Shenefelt, 1975); Aniphiaulax agraensis (Cameron, 1897); Balcemena ruficollis (Cameron, 1899); Bicarinibracon

  3. Book review: Dexter Hoyos, Mastering the West. Rome and Carthage at War, Oxford-New York, Oxford University Press, 2015, pp. XXI, 337; ISBN 9780199860104

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    Gabriele Demurtas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a critical review of the volume by Dexter Hoyos «Mastering the West. Rome and Carthage at War», published in 2015 in Oxford-New York by the Oxford University Press, focused on the conflicts that involved Rome and Carthage between 264 and 146 BC for the supremacy in the western Mediterranean.

  4. Towards a Unified University Infrastructure: The Data Management Roll-Out at the University of Oxford

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    James A. J. Wilson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since presenting a paper at the International Digital Curation Conference 2010 conference entitled ‘An Institutional Approach to Developing Research Data Management Infrastructure’, the University of Oxford has come a long way in developing research data management (RDM policy, tools and training to address the various phases of the research data lifecycle. Work has now begun on integrating these various elements into a unified infrastructure for the whole university, under the aegis of the Data Management Roll-out at Oxford (Damaro Project.This paper will explain the process and motivation behind the project, and describes our vision for the future. It will also introduce the new tools and processes created by the university to tie the individual RDM components together. Chief among these is the ‘DataFinder’ – a hierarchically-structured metadata cataloguing system which will enable researchers to search for and locate research datasets hosted in a variety of different datastores from institutional repositories, through Web 2 services, to filing cabinets standing in department offices. DataFinder will be able to pull and associate research metadata from research information databases and data management plans, and is intended to be CERIF compatible. DataFinder is being designed so that it can be deployed at different levels within different contexts, with higher-level instances harvesting information from lower-level instances enabling, for example, an academic department to deploy one instance of DataFinder, which can then be harvested by another at an institutional level, which can then in turn be harvested by another at a national level.The paper will also consider the requirements of embedding tools and training within an institution and address the difficulties of ensuring the sustainability of an RDM infrastructure at a time when funding for such endeavours is limited. Our research shows that researchers (and indeed departments

  5. Developing a Structured Teaching Plan for Psychiatry Tutors at Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Taiar, Hasanen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis was to examine the teaching ways I undertook in teaching medical students and to examine the use of a structured teaching plan for the academic and clinical tutors in psychiatry. The teaching plan was developed for use, initially by Oxford University Academic tutors at the Department of Psychiatry. In addition,…

  6. The Why, What, and Impact of GPA at Oxford Brookes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the introduction at Oxford Brookes University of a Grade Point Average (GPA) scheme alongside the traditional honours degree classification. It considers the reasons for the introduction of GPA, the way in which the scheme was implemented, and offers an insight into the impact of GPA at Brookes. Finally, the paper considers…

  7. “To Live in Hearts We Leave Behind is Not to Die.” Remembrance Sunday at Pusey House, Oxford University, A Review of Worship at Oxford University

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    Peter L. Kraus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, religious participation by students of all faiths at Universities in the United Kingdom has seen a steady increase in attendance. This brief essay is a case study of worship by members of the University Community at Pusey House at the University of Oxford, which reflects the trend. On a crisp fall, November day, the twenty-third Sunday after Trinity (8th of November 2015 I had the opportunity to attend services at Pusey House, Oxford on Remembrance Sunday while on sabbatical at The University of Oxford (St. Stephen’s House.

  8. Theology amongst the sciences: A personal view from the University of Oxford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Gillingham

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on two individuals who have each made a seminal contribution to the debates between theology and the sciences in Oxford - Charles Darwin (in the mid�19th century, and Richard Dawkins (from the 1990s to the present day. It introduces Darwin by way of a more personal and visual view from Worcester College Chapel. The restoration of the chapel took place at about the same time as the debates between Huxley and Wilberforce in the Oxford University Museum over Charles Darwin�s On the Origin of the Species. The first part of the paper then traces these debates back: first to an earlier period of disputation represented by Galileo Galilei (c. 1564�1642, and then to a period of greater accommodation represented by Isaac Newton (1643�1727. Darwin represents a third, more controversial, stage. The paper then looks at a fourth period, from the mid�20th century onwards, which is marked by more eirenical attempts to demarcate science and theology by seeing the former again as asking the �how� questions and the latter, the �why� questions. It then focuses on a fifth, more disputatious stage, which was initiated by Richard Dawkins, professor in the Public Understanding of Science until 2008. Professor Dawkins challenges the idea that theology cannot be studied, because its focus is a non-existent object, �God�.The second part of the paper looks at various Oxford projects and Oxford theologians who have risen to this contemporary challenge. They include the work of the Ian Ramsey Centre; Justin Barret�s and John Trigg�s joint � 2 million project, supported by the John Templeton foundation, which examines scientific ideas about religion and the mind; Richard Harries, Bishop of Oxford from 1987 to 2006, who has conducted a number of media interviews with Richard Dawkins; Keith Ward, who has written several books engaging not only with Dawkins but is also the Cambridge Professor of Mathematics, Stephen Hawking; and

  9. How to Find Optimal National Model of Pension System: the Projection on Russia (Book Review: Barr, N. Pension reform: A short guide [Text] / N. Barr, P. Diamond. – Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. – 261 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Avakovich Tumanyants

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Find Optimal National Model of Pension System: the Projection on Russia (Book Review: Barr, N. Pension reform: A short guide [Text] / N. Barr, P. Diamond. – Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. – 261 p.

  10. Book Review: MACBETH, Danielle. Realizing Reason: A Narrative of Truth and Knowing. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, 494 pp., $99.00 (hbk, ISBN 9780198704751

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Valente

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We review Danielle Macbeth's book Realizing Reason, published by Oxford University Press in 2014. This extensive book is composed by nine chapters in which Macbeth critically presents the development of mathematical practices in the Western world - from its founding in Ancient Greece's diagrammatic practices to the apogee of mathematical logic in the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries - while offering a revaluation of its present stage by means of a reconsideration of Gottlob Frege's philosophical contributions. In this review, we present a summary of each chapter's contents and make general considerations about them.

  11. Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  12. 16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

    CERN Document Server

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

  13. Professor Daniel M Segal and studies of collision and `half-collision' complexes at Imperial College London and Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Keith

    2018-03-01

    We discuss Danny Segal's key roles in the development of the spectroscopy of collision complexes at Imperial College and Oxford. We explain how his work lead to a number of new insights into collision dynamics in external fields.

  14. 19th Biennial International Nineteenth-Century Music Conference, Faculty of Music, University of Oxford, 11.-13. 7. 2016

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Myslivcová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 53, 2-3 (2016), s. 300-301 ISSN 0018-7003. [19th Biennial International Nineteenth-Century Music Conference. Oxford, 11.07.2016-13.07.2016] Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : music ological conference * nineteenth-century music * Antonin Dvorak * opera Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  15. The new philosophy of psychiatry: its (recent) past, present and future: a review of the Oxford University Press series International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Natalie F; Thornton, Tim

    2007-01-01

    There has been a recent growth in philosophy of psychiatry that draws heavily (although not exclusively) on analytic philosophy with the aim of a better understanding of psychiatry through an analysis of some of its fundamental concepts. This 'new philosophy of psychiatry' is an addition to both analytic philosophy and to the broader interpretation of mental health care. Nevertheless, it is already a flourishing philosophical field. One indication of this is the new Oxford University Press series International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry seven volumes of which (by Bolton and Hill; Bracken and Thomas; Fulford, Morris, Sadler, and Stanghellini; Hughes, Louw, and Sabat; Pickering; Sadler; and Stanghellini) are examined in this critical review.

  16. Oxford dictionary of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Alan

    The dictionary is derived from the Concise Science Dictionary, first published by Oxford University Press in 1984 (third edition, 1996). It consists of all the entries relating to physics in that dictionary, together with some of those entries relating to astronomy that are required for an understanding of astrophysics and many entries that relate to physical chemistry. It also contains a selection of the words used in mathematics that are relevant to physics, as well as the key words in metal science, computing, and electronics. For this third edition a number of words from quantum field physics and statistical mechanics have been added. Cosmology and particle physics have been updated and a number of general entries have been expanded.

  17. 1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  18. THE ANALYSIS OF SONG-TEXT COLLECTION BELONGS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY: Bodleian Library of Oxford University With The Number of 127 and 128

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri Parmaksiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The song-text collections have great significance in consequence of their tasks in Turkish Music. The music performers have received support from song-text collections in remembering the modes, rhythms, the composers and especially the lyrics consisting short or long poems related to the each of the songs which they intend to keep in their minds.Today, those collections demonstrate the researchers employing modes, composers, forms and rhythms the musical works recorded in their contents and the transformation which Turkish Music has experienced throughout centuries.In this study, a song-text collection of the 16th century recorded in the Bodleian Library of Oxford University with the number of 127 and 128 was analyzed. The finding which obtain from song-text collection which analyzed with systematic musicology and historical methodology is expected to contribute importantly. Keywords: XVI. century, Turkish Music, song-text collection, Bodleian Library

  19. New Oxford style manual

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The New Oxford Style Manual brings together two essential reference works in a single volume: New Hart's Rules and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors. New Hart's Rules, Oxford's definitive guide to style, consists of 20 chapters that provide authoritative and expert advice on how to prepare copy for publication. Topics covered include how to use italic, roman, and other type treatments, numbers and dates, law and legal references, illustrations, notes and references, and bibliographies. The guidelines are complemented by the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors, which features 25,000 alphabetically arranged entries giving authoritative advice on those words and names which raise questions time and time again because of spelling, capitalization, hyphenation, or cultural and historical context. Entries give full coverage of recommended spellings, variant forms, confusable words, hyphenation, capitalization, foreign and specialist terms, proper names, and abbreviations. The dictionary a...

  20. Book Review: Die Oxford Kortspelgids | Ponelis | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Die Oxford Kortspelgids. Book Author: A.S. Coetser. 1ste uitgawe 1993, ix + 379 pp. ISBN 0-19-570802-4. Kaapstad: Oxford University Press. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  1. The Making of the "Oxford English Dictionary."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes remarks made to open the Gallaudet University conference on Dictionaries and the Standardization of languages. It concerns the making of what is arguably the world's greatest dictionary, "The Oxford English Dictionary." (VWL)

  2. The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology

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    Jasmina Talam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In July 2015, Oxford University Press published a substantial volume titled The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology, co-edited by two eminent ethnomusicologists, Svanibor Pettan and Jeff Todd Titon. The book is an impressive collection of different approaches in applied ethnomusicology, developed through a combination of ethnographic research (personal experiences and fieldwork in different parts of the world and contemporary scholarship.

  3. The Oxford History of English Lexicography. Volume I: General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.P. Cowie (Editor). The Oxford History of English Lexicography. Volume I: General-purpose Dictionaries. Volume II: Specialized Dictionaries. 2009. Volume I: xviii + 467 pp., Volume II: xix + 551 pp. ISBN Volume I–II: 978-0-19-928562-4. Volume I: 978-0-19-928560-0. Volume II: 978-0-19-928561-7. Oxford: Oxford University ...

  4. Women Leaders in Oxford House

    OpenAIRE

    Timpo, Phyllis; Price, Temple; Salina, Doreen; Witek, Caroline; Pommer, Nicole; Jason, Leonard A.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined women assuming leadership roles in Oxford Houses, which are communal, democratically run recovery settings for substance use disorder. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women Oxford House leaders who shared their thoughts and experiences on leadership. Several themes emerged from qualitative data analysis, most notably that stepping up and accepting a leadership role in Oxford House had a positive effect on self-esteem, which is vital to women w...

  5. Women Leaders in Oxford House.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpo, Phyllis; Price, Temple; Salina, Doreen; Witek, Caroline; Pommer, Nicole; Jason, Leonard A

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined women assuming leadership roles in Oxford Houses, which are communal, democratically run recovery settings for substance use disorder. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women Oxford House leaders who shared their thoughts and experiences on leadership. Several themes emerged from qualitative data analysis, most notably that stepping up and accepting a leadership role in Oxford House had a positive effect on self-esteem, which is vital to women with a history of substance abuse. Barriers to leadership were also identified such as negative interpersonal relationships with other women. A number of methods mentioned to increase the number of women leaders included: developing workshops, providing positive encouragement, and accessing existing female role models. The implications of this study are discussed.

  6. Oxford engineering students to study new solutions for vacuum chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Department of Engineering Science - University of Oxford

    2012-01-01

    In April, eleven engineering science students in their third year at Oxford University were invited here to present their design ideas for new vacuum chamber materials to be used in accelerators. We publish below an abstract of the article that the University of Oxford featured on its website.   The 11 Oxford students who worked at CERN on alternatives to beryllium in vacuum chambers. (Photo courtesy of the Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford.) Engineering Science students invited to design for CERN’s Large Hadron Collider In April, eleven Engineering Science students in their third year were invited to the CERN laboratory in Geneva to present their ideas for new vacuum chamber designs for the experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their design objectives were to propose alternatives to beryllium – the material used for some of the existing experimental vacuum chambers. Beryllium (chemical element with the symbol Be and atomic number 4) is to...

  7. Review: G.-M. de Schryver et al. (Eds.). Oxford Bilingual School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. G.-M. de Schryver et al. (Eds.). Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: IsiXhosa and English. 2014, 562 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-576682-0. Cape Town: Oxford University Press Southern Africa. Price R129.95.

  8. Review of the Oxford Cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Oxford Cryocooler incorporates a linear drive compressor operating close to resonance. All dynamic seals are noncontacting clearance seals maintained by mounting the piston and displacer on mechanical suspension systems with infinite fatigue life. The displacer is pneumatically driven but controlled by a miniature linear motor. The cooler is therefore nonwearing and performance can be maintained even in adverse environments by servo control of piston and displacer strokes and relative phase. Split and integral, single- and two-stage coolers have been produced with operating temperatures between 30 K and 200 K, refrigeration powers between 50 mW and several watts and capable of operating in ambient temperatures from -40 C to 70 C. A current project aims to extend the refrigeration power to 500 watts at 80 K. Experimental optimisation techniques have been devised for rapid development of high efficiency coolers

  9. Changing Traditions: Automation and the Oxford College Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of automation in the Oxford College Libraries (England) begins with background on the university library system, which consists of numerous independent libraries. Centralized and decentralized automation activities are described, and hardware and software for the microcomputer-based system at the University College Library are…

  10. Usage Notes in the Oxford American Dictionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, R. Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Compares the "Oxford American Dictionary" with the "American Heritage Dictionary." Examines the dictionaries' differences in philosophies of language, introductory essays, and usage notes. Concludes that the "Oxford American Dictionary" is too conservative, paternalistic, and dogmatic for the 1980s. (DMM)

  11. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Scott Durow, Software Engineer, Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Conducted by Paul

    1998-05-01

    Scott Durow was educated at Bootham School, York. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry to A-level and went on to Nottingham University to read Medical Physics. After graduating from Nottingham he embarked on his present career as a Software Engineer based in Oxford. He is a musician in his spare time, as a member of a band and playing the French horn.

  12. The Oxford Handbook of the History of Linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Laborda, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    La reseña presenta el libro que K. Allan ha editado, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Linguistics (2013), en la colección de la Oxford University Press sobre Lingüística. En la obra participan más de treinta especialistas, que tratan de la historia en Occidente y, en menor medida, en Oriente. Los ámbitos de estudio respetan un orden tradicional: el sonido, la sintaxis y el significado y, como relativa novedad, la lingüística aplicada. Un interés complementario de la obr...

  13. Leadership Styles of Oxford House Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komer, Anne C; Jason, Leonard A; Harvey, Ronald; Olson, Brad

    Oxford House recovery homes are unusual compared to most recovery homes in that they function entirely without the use of staff; instead members are elected to officer positions. The aim of this study was to perform preliminary analysis of the types of leadership styles utilized by members of oxford house. Twentynine house residents of five Oxford Houses were asked to rate their own leadership styles using the leader behavior description questionnaire and the multifactor leader questionnaire. Results showed that participants were more likely to use person-oriented behaviors above task-oriented actions. Transformational leadership was associated with higher outcomes than Transactional leadership. Implications for future research are discussed.

  14. Christopher Hasty, Meter as Rhythm [Metro come Ritmo], Oxford University Press, New York & Oxford, 1997.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cascelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quando, nell’undicesimo libro delle Confessioni, S. Agostino si interroga circa la natura del tempo, individua un problema linguistico in senso forte, dove il linguaggio non costituisce una semplice etichetta da attaccare agli eventi ma un modo di entrare in relazione con essi e conoscerli. Quando qualcuno gli domanda cosa sia il tempo, egli non lo sa, cioè non sa come spiegarlo e gli mancano le parole per esprimere qualcosa che, quando nessuno glielo chiede, egli conosce. Come possiamo esprimere il fluire del tempo? Come possiamo dire il tempo e dar voce a una profonda esperienza cognitiva del divenire e della relazione che noi stabiliamo con esso? Queste domande costituiscono le basi del libro di Christopher Hasty. Il suo punto di partenza è la considerazione che, sopprimendo la creatività e la novità dell'effettiva esperienza musicale, l’astrazione dell’analisi tradisce la natura temporale della musica. Al contrario, Hasty vuole prendere in considerazione questa natura temporale e "cercare dei modi di parlare dell’aspetto evanescente della musica, sviluppando concetti che catturino tanto la determinatezza quanto l’indeterminatezza degli eventi al loro passaggio" (p. vii.

  15. The Oxford English Dictionary: A Brief History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Ronald H.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the development of English dictionaries in general and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in particular. The discussion covers the decision by the Philological Society to create the dictionary, the principles that guided its development, the involvement of James Augustus Henry Murray, the magnitude and progress of the project, and the…

  16. The Oxford handbook of economic inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salverda, W.; Nolan, B.; Smeeding, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    The essential guide for students and researchers interested in economic inequality Contains 27 original research contributions from the top names in economic inequality. The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality presents a new and challenging analysis of economic inequality, focusing primarily on

  17. The Oxford Picture Dictionary. Beginning Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Marjorie

    The beginning workbook of the Oxford Picture Dictionary is in full color and offers vocabulary reinforcement activities that correspond page for page with the dictionary. Clear and simple instructions with examples make it suitable for independent use in the classroom or at home. The workbook has up-to-date art and graphics, explaining over 3700…

  18. The "New Oxford English Dictionary" Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Heather

    1993-01-01

    Describes the conversion of the 22,000-page Oxford English Dictionary to an electronic version incorporating a modified Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) syntax. Explains that the database designers chose structured markup because it supports users' data searching needs, allows textual components to be extracted or modified, and allows…

  19. Nonlinear absorption properties of some 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octaalkylphthalocyanines and their metallated derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    BLAU, WERNER

    2003-01-01

    PUBLISHED The third-order nonlinear optical properties of a series of 15 unmetallated and metallated 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octaalkylphthalocyanines have been investigated. The palladium-metallated compound is the strongest nonlinear absorber of the series, but, due to its comparatively high linear absorption coefficient, it exhibits a relatively low ratio of excited- to ground-state absorption cross-sections (?) when compared to the other compounds. The highest values for ? were found for d...

  20. Oxford House Recovery Homes: Characteristics and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest examples of a community-based, mutual-help residential community for high risk substance abuse individuals is Oxford House. In the U.S., over 9,800 people live in these self-run dwellings where they obtain jobs, pay utility bills, and learn to be responsible citizens. Beginning with one single rented residence in the mid 1970s, Oxford Houses now number over 1,300. These rented homes are helping to deal with drug addiction and community re-entry by providing stable housing without any limits on length of stay, a network of job opportunities, and support for abstinence. An exploration of the research on these unique settings highlights the strengths of such a community-based approach to addressing addiction. New roles for psychologists in working with these types of support systems are identified. PMID:20577571

  1. Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    DESCRIPTION The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine provides reliable definitions of sports science and medicine terms. It provides an invaluable reference book for anyone interested in the captivating subject of sport. PURPOSE This dictionary aims to include almost every sports science, anatomy, physiology, biomechanical, injuries description, and psychological term as related to sports medicine and science and support the explanations by illustrations wherever necessary. AUDIEN...

  2. Johann Graaff. What is Sociology? Cape Town. Oxford University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Sociological Review / Revue Africaine de Sociologie. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Development of thermoluminescence dating techniques at Oxford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The two-decade long history of thermoluminescene as a pottery dating method is surveyed with particular reference to the various problems that have been encountered in the Oxford Laboratory's research programme. Effects, such as supralinearity and radon emanation, are explained in terms of how they are measured and how their existence influences thermoluminescence (TL) dating accuracy (currently close to plus minus 7% per analysis). Illustrations of Thermoluminescence (TL) applications include a Nok culture terracotta from Nigeria and a Cambodia bronze Buddha figure of the Khmer period, dated ising the ceramic-like casting-core retained within it. (author)

  4. Recent results from the Oxford EBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, David N [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ezekiel, Toleme Z [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Green, Felicia M [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Smith, Claire J [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Silver, Joshua D [Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Here we summarise the present status of the experimental programme of the Oxford electron beam ion trap. Most notably this research has recently culminated in the successful measurement of the 2s{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} transition in hydrogenlike nitrogen by a laser resonance method. We also introduce preliminary results from some computational investigations of both electron beam transport and the trapped ion ensemble. In particular, we show that the contribution of the magnetic field to ion confinement has a potentially measurable effect on the ion phase space distribution.

  5. Oxford CyberSEM: remote microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M; Kirkland, A; Cockayne, D; Meyer, R

    2008-01-01

    The Internet has enabled researchers to communicate over vast geographical distances, sharing ideas and documents. e-Science, underpinned by Grid and Web Services, has enabled electronic communications to the next level where, in addition to document sharing, researchers can increasingly control high precision scientific instruments over the network. The Oxford CyberSEM project developed a simple Java applet via which samples placed in a JEOL 5510LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) can be manipulated and examined collaboratively over the Internet. Designed with schoolchildren in mind, CyberSEM does not require any additional hardware or software other than a generic Java-enabled web browser. This paper reflects on both the technical and social challenges in designing real-time systems for controlling scientific equipments in collaborative environments. Furthermore, it proposes potential deployment beyond the classroom setting.

  6. OXFORD DICTIONARY OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine provides reliable definitions of sports science and medicine terms. It provides an invaluable reference book for anyone interested in the captivating subject of sport. PURPOSE This dictionary aims to include almost every sports science, anatomy, physiology, biomechanical, injuries description, and psychological term as related to sports medicine and science and support the explanations by illustrations wherever necessary. AUDIENCE As a comprehensive dictionary of sports science and medicine, it will be of particular help to medical specialists and general practitioners, as well as students of PE, coaches, and athletes who need to understand the anatomical structures and physiological processes which affect athletic performance. Any member of public interested in health and fitness; exercise and sport or wants to understand what the obscure terms mean, like jogger's nipple, social loafing, and Zatopek phenomenon will also benefit from this book. FEATURES The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine features terms in A to Z fashion at all the major areas of sports science and medicine including: anatomy, physiology/exercise physiology, biomechanics, training principles and techniques, nutrition, sports psychology and sociology, sports injuries and rehabilitation. A team of prominent contributors and advisers put together this dictionary in the first edition. The third edition includes around 8000 cross-referenced terms which have been updated or added since the first edition. There are plenty of illustrations wherever appropriate to make the terms easily understandable. ASSESSMENT A must-have dictionary for all medics practising in sports and exercise medicine, as well as students of medicine, physical education, nursing and physiotherapy. Even coaches, trainers, biomechanical experts; in fact anyone who has a special interest in this area will find this dictionary useful.

  7. 22 - 25 Bashir

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    Likewise, phytochemical screening tests were conducted to determine some of the phytochemicals ... effectiveness and quality of finished herbal medicinal products depend ... and animals as it is responsible for many serious community and ...

  8. Factors Affecting Applications to Oxford and Cambridge--Repeat Survey. Executive Summary with Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Kate; White, Kerensa; Styles, Ben; Morrison, Jo

    2005-01-01

    This research follows up a study conducted in 1998 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to investigate teachers' and students' views on the factors affecting students' choices of whether or not to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. It identifies what has changed since 1998 and areas in which the universities could…

  9. The new Oxford dictionary of English

    CERN Document Server

    Hanks, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    This dictionary focuses on English as it is really used in the late 20th century, informed by available evidence and thinking. Its defining style makes it possible to give the most complete picture of English as it is used today, providing authoritative and comprehensive coverage of the language. Compiled after in-depth analysis of computerized databases of current English, this dictionary is the first to base its coverage on the evidence of real English. Accessibility is one of the dictionary's key aims; a rapid-reference page design separates out parts of speech, word histories, phrases, and derivatives to make information easy to find, and the most modern meaning of each word, as used by the majority of people, is placed first within each entry. Contemporary rules are given on question of usage, providing relevant advice on problems old and new. Word history notes not only explain the linguistic roots of words, but also tell the story of how a word's meaning and form have changed over time. Oxford's worldw...

  10. The Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Davies, Roger L.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design of the Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph, a dedicated I and z band instrument (0.65μm micron - 1.0μm micron at R~4000), designed to be used in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system (PALAO, and its planned upgrade PALM-3000). It builds on two recent developments (i) the improved ability of second generation adaptive optics systems to correct for atmospheric turbulence at wavelengths less than or equal to 1μm micron, and (ii) the availability of CCD array detectors with high quantum efficiency at very red wavelengths (close to the silicon band edge). Combining these with a state-of-the-art integral field unit design using an all-glass image slicer, SWIFT's design provides very high throughput and low scattered light. SWIFT simultaneously provides spectra of ~4000 spatial elements, arranged in a rectangular field-of-view of 44 × 89 pixels. It has three on-the-fly selectable pixel scales of 0.24", 0.16" and 0.08'. First light is expected in spring 2008.

  11. The Oxford book of modern science writing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawkins, Richard

    2008-01-01

    ..." to "the terror and vastness of the universe." Edited by renowned scientist Richard Dawkins, this collection brings together pieces by a who's who of scientists and science writers, including Stephen Pinker, Stephen Jay Gould, Martin Gardner...

  12. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin JenkinsonNuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKBackground: With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ. The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs.Methods: Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to

  13. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin Jenkinson Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ, which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Methods: Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and EQ-5D-5L. Results: Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81–0.96, as was test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83–0.92. Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ-5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Conclusion: Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in

  14. The Dictionary Unit for South African English. South African Concise Oxford Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    Rajend Mesthrie

    2011-01-01

    The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary (henceforth SACOD) is a South Af-rican version of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the first time that this particular hybrid has been prepared. It is testimony to the enduring success of the work of the Dictionary Unit for South African English at Rhodes University, headed by teams that included Jean and William Branford in the 1970s, Penny Silva in the 1990s and now, Kathryn Kavanagh. The lexicographical work from the unit saw the publication of fou...

  15. Book review: T. J. Stohlgren: Measuring plant diversity: lessons from the field; Oxford University Press, Oxford, 390 pp.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřík, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2007), s. 438-439 ISSN 1211-9520 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biodiversity * methodology * ecology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.133, year: 2007

  16. News from the Library: You need never be lost for words again - Oxford Reference Online and Oxford Dictionaries Pro

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Whether you are looking for an English word definition or want to check the correct usage of a word, we can offer you a solution: Oxford Reference Online.   It includes a wide range of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, but also subject-specific reference books on physics, astronomy or mathematics. All these works are fully indexed and cross-searchable. Two highlights from this vast collection of reference works are the Concise Oxford English Dictionary and the Oxford Dictionary of English, which is the online counterpart of the compact, single-volume dictionary of current English language. As the name says, Oxford Dictionaries Pro focuses on language dictionaries. Particularly noteworthy are the dictionaries for writers and editors. On a dedicated web page you will find access to: - The "New Hart's Rules", providing information on all aspects of writing and preparing copy for publication, whether in print or electronically - The New Oxford Dictionary for Wri...

  17. Women leadership in Oxford House: examining their strengths and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Margaret I; Dziekan, Marta M; Horin, Elizabeth V; Jason, Leonard A; Ferrari, Joseph R; Olson, Bradley D

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives and definition of leadership by women and mothers with children (n = 40) affiliated with Oxford Houses, a communal mutual-help recovery setting. Participants were asked questions relating to their experiences living in an Oxford House including the strengths and challenges encountered and how leadership impacted the stability in their house. Results illustrated the value of female leadership and highlighted the characteristics deemed important for women leaders in Oxford House, as well as some differences between these women's perception of leadership and the standard definition of leadership. The implications of the findings and how they may be useful to women's and mothers' with children houses are discussed.

  18. The Dictionary Unit for South African English. South African Concise Oxford Dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajend Mesthrie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary (henceforth SACOD is a South Af-rican version of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the first time that this particular hybrid has been prepared. It is testimony to the enduring success of the work of the Dictionary Unit for South African English at Rhodes University, headed by teams that included Jean and William Branford in the 1970s, Penny Silva in the 1990s and now, Kathryn Kavanagh. The lexicographical work from the unit saw the publication of four editions of the Dictionary of Southern African English (1978, 1980, 1987, 1991, a South African Pocket Oxford Dictionary (SAPOD and the Dictionary of South African English on Historical Principles (DOSAEHP (1995. SACOD differs from the rest in several ways. It is larger in scope than SAPOD, smaller than DOSAEHP, and unlike DOSAE and DOSAEHP, does not deal with South African words alone. Based on the 10th edition of the Concise Oxford Dictionary SACOD has excised some words from the parent, whilst adding many new words of general English as well as of South Africa.

  19. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Dalsgaard, Jesper; Bjerggaard, Karin

    2012-01-01

    trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery...... together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional...... performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy...

  20. Validation of the Danish version of Oxford Shoulder Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Noergaard, Peter Moensted; Brorson, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS).......The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS)....

  1. The Courtrai chest from New College, Oxford, re-examined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the age estimation of the Courtrai chest from New College Oxford, using the accelerator mass spectrometer method. Radiocarbon dating of the wood in the chest revealed a date around 1280, which is in agreement with dates determined using the dendrochronological technique. (UK)

  2. Classic Classroom Activities: The Oxford Picture Dictionary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Renee; Adelson-Goldstein, Jayme; Shapiro, Norma

    This teacher resource book offers over 100 reproducible communicative practice activities and 768 picture cards based on the vocabulary of the Oxford Picture Dictionary. Teacher's notes and instructions, including adaptations for multilevel classes, are provided. The activities book has up-to-date art and graphics, explaining over 3700 words. The…

  3. Validation of the Danish version of the Oxford Elbow Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaschke, Hans Christian; Jørgensen, Andreas Møller; Thillemann, Theis Muncholm

    2013-01-01

    The Oxford Elbow Score (OES) is a patient-related outcome measure quantifying quality of life in relation to elbow disorders. This 12-item patient-administered English questionnaire comprises three domains: function, social-psychological status and pain. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  4. An Analysis of the Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Northern Sotho and English (De Schryver 2007) is a welcome addition to dictionaries that have been compiled for school use in particular. Its novelty and appeal lie in the fact that the lemmas and Northern Sotho mini-grammar are based on a corpus of general language usage and ...

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version of Oxford hip score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuğay, Baki Umut; Tuğay, Nazan; Güney, Hande; Hazar, Zeynep; Yüksel, İnci; Atilla, Bülent

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Oxford hip score (OHS) into Turkish and to evaluate the psychometric properties by testing the internal consistency, reproducibility, construct validity, and responsiveness in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). Oxford hip score was translated and culturally adapted according to the guidelines in the literature. Seventy patients (mean age 61.45 ± 9.29 years) with hip osteoarthritis participated in the study. Patients completed the Turkish Oxford hip score (OHS-TR), the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC). Internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's α coefficient. Patients completed OHS-TR questionnaire twice in 7 days for determining the reproducibility. Correlation between the total results of both tests was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Validity was assessed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient between the OHS-TR and WOMAC and SF-36 scores. Floor and ceiling effects were analyzed. The internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α 0.93). The construct validity showed a significant correlation between the OHS-TR and WOMAC and related SF-36 domains (p < 0.001). The ICC's ranged between 0.80 and 0.99. There was no floor or ceiling effect in total OHS-TR score. The OHS-TR questionnaire is valid, reliable, and responsive for the Turkish-speaking patients with hip OA.

  6. The Japanese Words Adopted into The Pocket Oxford Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    今里, 智晃

    1993-01-01

    This paper aims to give a comparative analysis of the six POD editions on the basis of the Japanese words adopted into them. There have been many words borrowed from Japanese into English. For example, bonze and sake2 were naturalized in English a long time ago.The new 1992 edition of The Pocket Oxford Dictionary contains 39 Japanese words, some of which are futon, ikebana and sumo. But, needless to say, karaoke must be one of the latest examples we can see in English dictionaries that are of...

  7. How to Run a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. R.

    2006-01-01

    The Lambert Review of Business-University Collaboration proposed a business model for universities in 2003. Pressure to change university governance to make it match the business model remains strong, and it is being most actively applied to Oxford and Cambridge. The Oxford and Cambridge governance debates (which began in the 1990s) open up the…

  8. Internal consistency, reliability, and temporal stability of the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire short-form: Test-retest data over two weeks

    OpenAIRE

    MCGUCKIN, CONOR

    2006-01-01

    PUBLISHED The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire short-form is a recently developed eight-item measure of happiness. This study evaluated the internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability of the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire short-form among 55 Northern Irish undergraduate university students who completed the measure on two occasions separated by two weeks. Internal consistency of the measure on both occasions was satisfactory at both Time 1 (alpha = .62) and Time 2 (alpha = ....

  9. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laura Kelly, Crispin Jenkinson, Sarah Dummett, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, David Morley Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods: Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13 were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results: ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion: Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of 22/25-gauge core needle in endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kang, Hyun; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Geun Joo; Choi, Jung Sik

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle aspiration with that of standard fine-needle aspiration by systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies using 22/25-gauge core needles, irrespective of comparison with standard fine needles, were comprehensively reviewed. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristic curves for the diagnosis of malignancy were used to estimate the overall diagnostic efficiency. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the core needle for the diagnosis of malignancy were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 0.90), 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1), and 167.37 (95% CI, 65.77 to 425.91), respectively. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the standard needle were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.88), 1 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1), and 130.14 (95% CI, 34.00 to 495.35), respectively. The area under the curve of core and standard needle in the diagnosis of malignancy was 0.974 and 0.955, respectively. The core and standard needle were comparable in terms of pancreatic malignancy diagnosis. There was no significant difference in procurement of optimal histologic cores between core and standard needles (risk ratio [RR], 0.545; 95% CI, 0.187 to 1.589). The number of needle passes for diagnosis was significantly lower with the core needle (standardized mean difference, -0.72; 95% CI, -1.02 to -0.41). There were no significant differences in overall complications (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.34 to 4.62) and technical failure (RR, 5.07; 95% CI, 0.68 to 37.64). Core and standard needles were comparable in terms of diagnostic accuracy, technical performance, and safety profile.

  11. Parroquia católica en Oxford, Gran Bretaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahrends, Peter

    1974-03-01

    Full Text Available This strange new building was commissioned Í0 accommodate the expanding activities of the Newman Community which acts as a religious and social center for the Catholics of the University of Oxford. The following have been constructed: a chapel, a multiple-use room, entrance hall, bar, library, meeting room, eight bedrooms, small lounges and kitchen, etc. Part of the already existing building was used for the installation of another kitchen and several bathrooms. The best possible advantage has been taken of the lot which is narrow and irregularly shaped. Construction consists basically of brick walls, with columns, reinforced concrete stairs and castings.Este curioso y nuevo edificio se ha edificado para subsanar la creciente expansión de actividades de la Comunidad Newman, que actúa como centro religioso y social para los católicos de la Universidad de Oxford. Han sido construidos: una capilla, una sala de usos múltiples, entrada, bar, biblioteca, sala de reuniones, ocho dormitorios, pequeñas salitas y cocina, etc., aprovechando parte del edificio existente para ubicar otra cocina y varios cuartos de baño. El solar, que era estrecho y de forma irregular, se ha aprovechado al máximo. La construcción se ha llevado a cabo, fundamentalmente, a base de muros de fábrica de ladrillo, con pilares, forjados y escaleras de hormigón armado.

  12. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyun Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio, is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that promises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT. MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the genomics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assembly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in genome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  13. Teaching Geomorphology at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, David; Hamilton, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Geomorphology courses in British universities emphasize the main landform/process systems rather than more abstract concepts. Recommends a more theoretical focus on fundamental geomorphic processes and methodological problems. Available from: Faculty of Modern Studies, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford OX3 OBP, England. (Author/AV)

  14. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  15. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ), which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and EQ-5D-5L. Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81-0.96), as was test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83-0.92). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ- 5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in a range of further conditions, and additional properties, such as responsiveness, will also be assessed in the next phase of the instrument's development.

  16. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2013-01-01

    With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ). The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs. Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to identify appropriate dimensions and redundant items. Reliability will be assessed by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlations. A second, large-scale postal survey will follow, with the Ox-PAQ being

  17. Review of: Ancient Scandinavia: An Archaeological History from the First Humans to the Vikings (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2016) T. Douglas Price

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2017-01-01

    , barrows and megaliths that still mark the present-day landscape and bear witness to an intriguing prehistory. One of the important factors involved in the discovery of these archaeological remains is the nature of Scandinavian landscapes, riddled as they are with wet marshes, bogs, rivers and flooded......), providing better opportunities for strategic sampling and systematic data storage than in many other regions of Europe. This book draws together the main historical lines in this rich body of archaeological remains from Scandinavian prehistory from the arrival of the first reindeer hunters after the last...

  18. Hamilton Alaistar, The Copts and the West, 1439-1822, The European Discovery of the Egyptian Church, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2006, 338 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Girard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dès le titre, le livre annonce son point de vue : il ne s’agit pas d’une histoire des Coptes mais d’une histoire de la découverte par les Européens de l’Église égyptienne. L’auteur, Alaistar Hamilton, a déjà consacré d’importants travaux à l’histoire de l’orientalisme à l’époque moderne. Son étude commence en 1439 lorsque la décision est prise au concile de Florence (1438-1445 d’inviter la première délégation officielle copte en Europe. À cette occasion, des manuscrits coptes et coptes-arabe...

  19. Proceedings of the International Conference on Algebraic Methodology and Software Technology (2nd) Held in Iowa City, Iowa on May 22-25, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-25

    d’Etat, University of Paris-Sud. [Boudol 84] G. Boudol, An asynchronous calculus MEIJE, in NATO summer school, La - Colle - sur - Loup , France (1984). [Da...on the propositional p-calculus. Theoretical Comput. Sci., 27:333-354, 1983. [12] M. Nivat. Sur la synchronisation des processus. Revue Technique...Meulen, E.A. Deriving In- Traynor, 0., de la Cruz, P., Uniform (Meta- ) De- cremental Implementations from Algebraic Specifica- velopment in the PROSPECTRA

  20. Learning lessons from the past: A historical exploration of a century of business education at Oxford and Cambridge (1900s-2000s)

    OpenAIRE

    Arena , Lise; Dang , Rani Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to identify a set of generative mechanisms which are shared by business schools' process of development in their search for strategic comparative advantage. We use a processual approach (Pettigrew, 1997) based on two detailed historical studies supported by unexplored archival data and interviews: the case of the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford and the case of the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge (1990s - 2000s). Preliminary results indi...

  1. Internal consistency reliability and validity of the Hebrew translation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L J; Katz, Y J

    2000-08-01

    The Hebrew translation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory and the short form Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire were completed by 298 undergraduate women in Israel. The findings confirm the internal reliability of the Hebrew translation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory and support the construct validity according to which "happiness is a thing called stable extraversion."

  2. G.-M. de Schryver (Editor. Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Zulu and English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Prinsloo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Bilingual School Dictionary: Zulu and English (henceforth OZSD is the latest addition to the bidirectional English–isiZulu bilingual dictionary market and is based on the same successful and prize-winning formula used for the Oxford Northern Sotho School Dictionary (ONSD published in 2007.

  3. Presentation of the Book “The Golden Horde in World History” (Oxford, Great Britain, April 7–8, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Giniyatullina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available April 8, 2017 the multi-authored monograph “The Golden Horde in World History” (Kazan, Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences Publ., 2017. 968 p. + 28 p. with colour insert was presented at the conference “Tatars in World History” (April 7–8, 2017, Oxford, Great Britain. The conference was organized by the University of Oxford and Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences. The idea was also supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, the World Congress of Tatars, the Alliance of Tatars of Europe and the Association of Tatars of Great Britain. The conference was opened with welcoming speeches by the deputy mayor of Oxford, Ray Hamberstone; Head of Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Rafael Khakimov; famous British historian, specialist in early medieval Russia, the Caucasus and Byzantium, Professor Jonathan Shepard. Also the adviser on information, press and culture, Konstantin Shlykov, welcomed the guests and participants of the conference on behalf of the Embassy of the Russian Federation in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In his welcoming address, Head of Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Rafael Khakimov, noted that the monograph “The Golden Horde in World History” is the fruit of the joint work of the researchers of Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences and the University of Oxford. Now these works are also available in English at the Bodleian Library of Oxford University. The chief editor of “The Golden Horde in World History”, a researcher at the University of Oxford, Marie Favereau, thanked colleagues from the Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences and from the Institute of Russian History of the Russian Academy of Sciences for fruitful academic cooperation and stressed the importance of conducting further research on

  4. Translation, cross-culturally adaptation and validation of the Danish version of Oxford Hip Score (OHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    there was no properly translated, adapted and validated Danish language version available, a translation to Danish, cross-culturally adaptation and validation of the Danish Oxford Hip Score was warranted. Material and Methods: We translated and cross-culturally adapted the Oxford Hip Score into Danish, in accordance......Objective: The Oxford Hip Score is a patient reported outcome questionnaire designed to assess pain and function in patients undergoing total hip arthroplaty (THA). The Oxford Hip Score is valid, reliable and consistent, and different language versions have been developed. Since.......9 % ceiling effect on this cohort of postoperative patients. Only in 1.2 % of the patients no sum score could be calculated, due to missing items. In relation to construct validity 80 % of predefined hypothesis were confirmed. The different items had an intraclass correlation in the range of 0...

  5. Phillip Louw: Oxford Afrikaans-Engels / English-Afrikaans Skoolwoordeboek / School Dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton F. Prinsloo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Die Oxford Afrikaans–Engels/English–Afrikaans Skoolwoordeboek is as skoolwoor-deboek 'n puik hulpbron vir leerders. Dit is egter meer as net 'n woordeboek, soos wat 'n oorsig dadelik toon.

  6. Long term effects on potential repository sites: the alteration of the Lower Oxford Clay during weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milowdowski, A.E.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Wilmot, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The report is one of a short series describing work carried out to investigate the long-term effects of various geological processes on the performance of both shallow and deep repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the alteration as a result of weathering of the Lower Oxford Clay, a potential host rock for shallow disposal of wastes. A description of the Lower Oxford Clay is given, along with the weathering of argillaceous rocks. Investigations of the weathering at the Elstow Storage Depot are described, as well as the implications for radioactive waste disposal. (U.K.)

  7. This is my neighborhood: comparing United States and Australian Oxford House Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R; Jason, Leonard A; Blake, Ron; Davis, Margaret I; Olson, Bradley D

    2006-01-01

    The number of Oxford Houses, communal-living, mutual help settings for persons in recovery of alcohol and substance abuse, has spread across the United States and recently in and around Melbourne, Australia. In this study 55 US and 6 AU Houses were compared descriptively for their neighborhood characteristics. Across settings, there were greater similarities than significant differences in the locations. Results imply that Australian Oxford Houses are "safe and sober" settings for persons in recovery consistent with the original United States model in physical dwelling settings.

  8. Rasch analysis of the Dutch version of the Oxford elbow score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Jeroen de Haan1, Niels Schep2, Wim Tuinebreijer2, Peter Patka2, Dennis den Hartog21Department of Surgery and Traumatology, Westfriesgasthuis, Hoorn, the Netherlands; 2Department of Surgery and Traumatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsBackground: The Oxford elbow score (OES is a patient-rated, 12-item questionnaire that measures quality of life in relation to elbow disorders. This English questionnaire has been proven to be a reliable and valid instrument. Recently, the OES has been translated into Dutch and examined for its reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a group of Dutch patients with elbow pathology. The aim of this study was to analyze the Dutch version of the OES (OES-DV in combination with Rasch analysis or the one-parameter item response theory to examine the structure of the questionnaire.Methods: The OES-DV was administered to 103 patients (68 female, 35 male. The mean age of the patients was 44.3 ± 14.7 (range 15–75 years. Rasch analysis was performed using the Winsteps® Rasch Measurement Version 3.70.1.1 and a rating scale parameterization.Results: The person separation index, which is a measure of person reliability, was excellent (2.30. All the items of the OES had a reasonable mean square infit or outfit value between 0.6 and 1.7. The threshold of items were ordered, so the categories can function as intended. Principal component analysis of the residuals partly confirmed the multidimensionality of the English version of the OES. The OES distinguished 3.4 strata, which indicates that about three ranges can be differentiated.Conclusion: Rasch analysis of the OES-DV showed that the data fit to the stringent Rasch model. The multidimensionality of the English version of the OES was partly confirmed, and the four items of the function and three items of the pain domain were recognized as separate domains. The category rating scale of the OES-DV works well. The OES can

  9. Grammar Coding in the "Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekker, Herman

    1992-01-01

    Focuses on the revised system of grammar coding for verbs in the fourth edition of the "Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" (OALD4), comparing it with two other similar dictionaries. It is shown that the OALD4 is found to be more favorable on many criteria than the other comparable dictionaries. (16 references) (VWL)

  10. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model for Kinematic Gait Analysis of the Foot and Ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeve, S.; Vos, J.; Weijers, P.; Verbruggen, J.; Willems, P.; Poeze, M.; Meijer, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kinematic gait analysis via the multi-segmental Oxford foot model (OFM) may be a valuable addition to the biomechanical examination of the foot and ankle. The aim of this study is to assess the repeatability of the OFM in healthy subjects. METHODS: Nine healthy subjects, without a

  11. Software for relativistic atomic structure theory: The grasp project at oxford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.A.; Grant, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    GRASP is an acronym for General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The objective of the GRASP project at Oxford is to produce user-friendly state-of-the-art multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) software packages for rleativistic atomic structure theory

  12. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model in children with foot deformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCahill, Jennifer; Stebbins, Julie; Koning, Bart; Harlaar, Jaap; Theologis, Tim

    Introduction The Oxford Foot Model (OFM) is a multi-segment, kinematic model developed to assess foot motion. It has previously been assessed for repeatability in healthy populations. To determine the OFM's reliability for detecting foot deformity, it is important to know repeatability in

  13. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) into Persian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate and test the validity and reliablity of the Persian version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire in foot and ankle patients. We translated the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire to Persian language according to the accepted guidelines, then assessed the psychometric properties including the validity and reliability on 308 patients with long-standing foot and ankle problems. To test the reliability, we calculated the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for test-retest reliability and measured Cronbach's alpha to test the internal consistency. To test the construct validity of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire we also administered the Short-Form 36 to patients. Construct validity was supported by significant correlation with SF36 subscales except for pain subscale of the persian MOXFQ with mental health of the SF36 (r=0.207). Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.79 for the total MOXFQ and ranged from 0.83 to 0.89 for the three subscales. Cronbach's alpha for pain, walking/standing, and social interaction was 0.86, 0.88, and 0.89, respectively, and was 0.79 for the total MOXFQ showing good internal consistency in each domain. The Persian Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire health scoring system is a valid and reliable patient-reported instrument for foot and ankle problems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Oxford Knee Score: cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuğay, Baki Umut; Tuğay, Nazan; Güney, Hande; Kınıklı, Gizem İrem; Yüksel, İnci; Atilla, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    The Oxford Knee Score (OKS) is a valid, short, self-administered, and site- specific outcome measure specifically developed for patients with knee arthroplasty. This study aimed to cross-culturally adapt and validate the OKS to be used in Turkish-speaking patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. The OKS was translated and culturally adapted according to the guidelines in the literature. Ninety-one patients (mean age: 55.89±7.85 years) with knee osteoarthritis participated in the study. Patients completed the Turkish version of the Oxford Knee Score (OKS-TR), Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC) questionnaires. Internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's α coefficient. Patients completed the OKS-TR questionnaire twice in 7 days to determine the reproducibility. Correlation between the total results of both tests was determined by Spearman's correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Validity was assessed by calculating Spearman's correlation coefficient between the OKS, WOMAC, and SF-36 scores. Floor and ceiling effects were analyzed. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α: 0.90). The reproducibility tested by 2 different methods showed no significant difference (p>0.05). The construct validity analyses showed a significant correlation between the OKS and the other scores (p<0.05). There was no floor or ceiling effect in total OKS score. The OKS-TR is a reliable and valid measure for the self-assessment of pain and function in Turkish-speaking patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  15. Aerosol trace metals, particle morphology and total gaseous mercury in the atmosphere of Oxford, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M. L. I.; Meheran, N.; Mather, T. A.; de Hoog, J. C. M.; Pyle, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    An investigation of atmospheric trace metals was conducted in Oxford, UK, a small city ˜60 miles northwest of London, in 2007 and 2008. Concentrations of Sr, Mo, Cd, Pb, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn in aerosol were measured in bulk and size segregated samples. In addition, total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were monitored semi-continuously by cold vapour-atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Metal concentrations in Oxford were intermediate between previously reported levels of UK rural and urban areas for most metals studied and levels of Cd, Ni and Pb were within European guidelines. Metal concentrations appeared to be influenced by higher traffic volume on a timescale of hours. The influence of traffic on the aerosols was also suggested by the observation of carbonaceous particles via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Air mass back trajectories suggest air masses arriving in Oxford from London and mainland Europe contained the highest metal concentrations. Aerosol samples collected over Bonfire Weekend, a period of intense firework use and lighting of bonfires in the UK, showed metal concentrations 6-46 times higher than at other times. Strontium, a tracer of firework release, was present at higher concentrations and showed a change in its size distribution from the coarse to fine mode over Bonfire Weekend. The presence of an abundance of spherical Sr particles was also confirmed in SEM images. The average TGM concentration in Oxford was 3.17 ng m -3 (st. dev. 1.59) with values recorded between 1.32 and 23.2 ng m -3. This is a higher average value than reported from nearby rural locations, although during periods when air was arriving from the west, similar concentrations to these rural areas were seen in Oxford. Comparison to meteorological data suggests that TGM in Oxford's air is highest when wind is arriving from the east/southeast. This may be due to emissions from London/mainland Europe with a possible contribution from emissions from a local

  16. Radiocarbon facility at the Research Laboratory for Archaeology in Oxford - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, N.R.; Hedges, R.E.M.; Wand, J.O.; Hall, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    The Oxford accelerator mass spectrometry facility is primarily intended for radiocarbon work. It has been designed and built within the department, except for the 3 MV tandem, which is being purchased from General Ionex and is still awaited. This system has been described many times before, so this paper will not give a comprehensive description of the facility, but only cover in detail areas of recent progress, or areas where our approach differs from other labs

  17. Rubidium-strontium ages from the Oxford Lake-Knee Lake greenstone belt, northern Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.S.; Cheung, S.-P.

    1980-01-01

    Rb-Sr whole-rock ages have been determined for rocks from the Oxford Lake-Knee Lake-Gods Lake geenstone belt in the Superior Province of northeastern Manitoba. The age of the Magill Lake Pluton is 2455 +- 35 Ma(lambda 87 Rb = 1.42 x 10 -11 yr -1 ), with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7078 +- 0.0043. This granite stock intrudes the Oxford Lake Group, so it is post-tectonic and probably related to the second, weaker stage of metamorphism. The age of the Bayly Lake Pluton is 2424 +- 74 Ma, with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7029 +- 0.0001. This granodioritic batholith complex does not intrude the Oxford Lake Group. It is syn-tectonic and metamorphosed. The age of volcanic rocks of the Hayes River Group, from Goose Lake (30 km south of Gods Lake Narrows), is 2680 +- 125 Ma, with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7014 +- 0.0009. The age for the Magill Lake and Bayly Lake Plutons can be interpreted as the minimum ages of granite intrusion in the area. The age for the Hayes River Group volcanic rocks is consistent with Rb-Sr ages of volcanic rocks from other Archean greenstone belts within the northwestern Superior Province. (auth)

  18. Book review: ALMOG, J. Referential Mechanics: Direct Reference and the Foundations of Semantics (Oxford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Martone

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this review I discuss Joseph Almog's book "Referential Mechanics". The book discusses direct reference as conceived by three of its founding fathers, Kripke, Kaplan and Donnellan, and introduces Almog's ambitious project of providing a referential semantics to all subject-phrases. I offer a brief overview of its four chapters and point out some of their virtues and shortcomings.

  19. Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race: Performance, Pacing and Tactics Between 1890 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M; Guy, Joshua H; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-10-01

    Currently no studies have examined the historical performances of Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race crews in the context of performance, pacing and tactics which is surprising as the event has routinely taken place annually for over 150 years on the same course. The purpose of this study was twofold, to firstly examine the historical development of performances and physical characteristics of crews over 124 years of the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race between 1890 and 2014 and secondly to investigate the pacing and tactics employed by crews over that period. Linear regression modelling was applied to investigate the development of performance and body size for crews of eight male individuals over time from Boat Race archive data. Performance change over time was further assessed in 10-year clusters while four intra-race checkpoints were used to examine pacing and tactics. Significant correlations were observed between performance and time (1890-2014) for both Oxford (r = -0.67; p tactical advantage from commencing on either the Surrey or Middlesex station beyond chance alone; however, all crews (n = 228) adopted a fast-start strategy, with 81 % of victories achieved by the crew leading the race at the first intra-race checkpoint (24 % of total distance). Crews leading the race at the final checkpoint (83 % of total distance; 1143 m) achieved victory on 94 % of occasions. Performances and physical characteristics of the crews have changed markedly since 1890, with faster heavier crews now common. Tactically, gaining the early lead position with a fast-start strategy seems particularly meaningful to success in the Boat Race throughout the years, and has been of greater importance to race outcome than factors such as the starting station.

  20. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish version of the Oxford hip score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, A; Odgaard, Anders; Overgaard, S

    2012-01-01

    missing to calculate a sum score. Construct validity was adequate and 80% of our predefined hypotheses regarding the correlation between scores on the Danish OHS and the other questionnaires were confirmed. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of the different items ranged from 0.80 to 0.95 and the average......Objectives The Oxford hip score (OHS) is a 12-item questionnaire designed and developed to assess function and pain from the perspective of patients who are undergoing total hip replacement (THR). The OHS has been shown to be consistent, reliable, valid and sensitive to clinical change following...

  1. The Oxford SWIFT Spectrograph: first commissioning and on-sky results

    OpenAIRE

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Mathias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Fogarty, Lisa; Houghton, Ryan; Salter, Graeme; Scott, Nicholas; Davies, Roger L.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Oxford SWIFT spectrograph, an I & z band (6500-10500 A) integral field spectrograph, is designed to operate as a facility instrument at the 200 inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain, in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system PALAO (and its upgrade to PALM3000). SWIFT provides spectra at R(≡λ/▵λ)~4000 of a contiguous two-dimensional field, 44 x 89 spatial pixels (spaxels) in size, at spatial scales of 0.235";, 0.16", and 0.08" per spaxel. It employs two 250μ...

  2. Deep Mapping and Screen Tourism: The Oxford of Harry Potter and Inspector Morse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cateridge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the experiences of screen tourists in Oxford help to create a theoretical “deep map” of the city which explores place through narrative. Building on the travel writing of William Least Heat-Moon and other recent work in the spatial humanities, two case studies of major screen tourism drivers are considered and analyzed. The British television drama Inspector Morse (1987–2000 explores the ambiguity of Oxford intellectualism through its central character. Morse’s love of high culture, especially music, provides suggestive additional layers for multimedia mapping, which are realized online through user-adapted Google Maps and geolocated images posted on the Flickr service. Harry Potter fans may not be “pure” or independent screen tourists, but they provide a wealth of data on their interactions with filming locations via social media such as Instagram. This data provides emotional as well as factual evidence, and is accumulating into an ever richer and deeper digital map of human experience.

  3. Accurate Typing of Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Genes by Oxford Nanopore Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xiao, Fangzhou; Hoisington-Lopez, Jessica; Lang, Kathrin; Quenzel, Philipp; Duffy, Brian; Mitra, Robi David

    2018-04-03

    Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION has expanded the current DNA sequencing toolkit by delivering long read lengths and extreme portability. The MinION has the potential to enable expedited point-of-care human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, an assay routinely used to assess the immunologic compatibility between organ donors and recipients, but the platform's high error rate makes it challenging to type alleles with accuracy. We developed and validated accurate typing of HLA by Oxford nanopore (Athlon), a bioinformatic pipeline that i) maps nanopore reads to a database of known HLA alleles, ii) identifies candidate alleles with the highest read coverage at different resolution levels that are represented as branching nodes and leaves of a tree structure, iii) generates consensus sequences by remapping the reads to the candidate alleles, and iv) calls the final diploid genotype by blasting consensus sequences against the reference database. Using two independent data sets generated on the R9.4 flow cell chemistry, Athlon achieved a 100% accuracy in class I HLA typing at the two-field resolution. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cemented versus Uncemented Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Is There a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Akan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The use of uncemented unicompartmental knee prostheses has recently increased. However, few studies on the outcomes of uncemented unicompartmental knee prostheses have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of cemented and uncemented Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. This retrospective observational study evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of 263 medial Oxford unicompartmental prostheses (141 cemented, 122 uncemented implanted in 235 patients. The mean follow-up was 42 months in the cemented group and 30 months in the uncemented group. Results. At the last follow-up, there were no significant differences in the clinical results or survival rates between the two groups. However, the operation time in the uncemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty group was shorter than that in the cemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty group. In addition, the cost of uncemented arthroplasty was greater. Conclusion. Despite the successful midterm results in the uncemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty group, a longer follow-up period is required to determine the best fixation mode.

  5. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  6. Assessment of practical and experimental work in physics through OCEA (Oxford Certificate of Educational Achievement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephy, Richard

    1986-07-01

    For some years there has been a growing recognition of the need for changes in assessment patterns in school science. These changes include a move towards criterion-based assessment linking to objectives and an increased emphasis on the assessment of practical and experimental skills. These changes are, to a significant extent, embodied in the new GCSE assessment schemes and will thus affect all students and teachers of physics from September (1986). At least 20% of the total assessment in GCSE physics examinations must be of practical and experimental skills, and at least half of this must be carried out in the laboratory environment. One development which addresses the needs and problems outlined above is the science component of OCEA, the Oxford Certificate of Educational Achievement. Because this covers a much wider field than assessment of practical and experimental skills in physics, a brief description of the whole project is given.

  7. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  8. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, B F; Povey, T

    2017-01-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design. (paper)

  9. Violation of a local form of the Lieb-Oxford bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Räsänen, E.; Lehtovaara, L.; Marques, M. A. L.

    2012-05-01

    In the framework of density-functional theory, several popular density functionals for exchange and correlation have been constructed to satisfy a local form of the Lieb-Oxford bound. In its original global expression, the bound represents a rigorous lower limit for the indirect Coulomb interaction energy. Here we employ exact-exchange calculations for the G2 test set to show that the local form of the bound is violated in an extensive range of both the dimensionless gradient and the average electron density. Hence, the results demonstrate the severity in the usage of the local form of the bound in functional development. On the other hand, our results suggest alternative ways to construct accurate density functionals for the exchange energy.

  10. Photographic monitoring of soiling and decay of roadside walls in central Oxford, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornbush, Mary J.; Viles, Heather A.

    2008-12-01

    As part of the Environmental Monitoring of Integrated Transport Strategies (EMITS) project, which examined the impact of the Oxford Transport Strategy (OTS) on the soiling and decay of buildings and structures in central Oxford, England, a simple photographic survey of a sample of roadside walls was carried out in 1997, with re-surveys in 1999 and 2003. Thirty photographs were taken each time, covering an area of stonework approximately 30 × 30 cm in dimensions at 1-1.3 m above pavement level. The resulting images have been used to investigate, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the progression of soiling and decay. Comparison of images by eye reveals a number of minor changes in soiling and decay patterns, but generally indicates stability except at one site where dramatic, superficial damage occurred over 2 years. Quantitative analysis of decay features (concavities resulting from surface blistering, flaking, and scaling), using simple techniques in Adobe Photoshop, shows variable pixel-based size proportions of concavities across 6 years of survey. Colour images (in Lab Color) generally have a reduced proportion of pixels, representing decay features in comparison to black and white (Grayscale) images. The study conveys that colour images provide more information both for general observations of soiling and decay patterns and for segmentation of decay-produced concavities. The study indicates that simple repeat photography can reveal useful information about changing patterns of both soiling and decay, although unavoidable variation in external lighting conditions between re-surveys is a factor limiting the accuracy of change detection.

  11. Polyethylene wear in Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement: a retrieval study of 47 bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, B J L; Longino, D; Pandit, H; Svard, U; Gill, H S; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W; Price, A J

    2010-03-01

    The Oxford Unicompartmental Knee replacement (UKR) was introduced as a design to reduce polyethylene wear. There has been one previous retrieval study involving this implant, which reported very low rates of wear in some specimens but abnormal patterns of wear in others. There has been no further investigation of these abnormal patterns. The bearings were retrieved from 47 patients who had received a medial Oxford UKR for anteromedial osteoarthritis of the knee. None had been studied previously. The mean time to revision was 8.4 years (sd 4.1), with 20 having been implanted for over ten years. The macroscopic pattern of polyethylene wear and the linear penetration were recorded for each bearing. The mean rate of linear penetration was 0.07 mm/year. The patterns of wear fell into three categories, each with a different rate of linear penetration; 1) no abnormal macroscopic wear and a normal articular surface, n = 16 (linear penetration rate = 0.01 mm/year); 2) abnormal macroscopic wear and normal articular surfaces with extra-articular impingement, n = 16 (linear penetration rate = 0.05 mm/year); 3) abnormal macroscopic wear and abnormal articular surfaces with intra-articular impingement +/- signs of non-congruous articulation, n = 15 (linear penetration rate = 0.12 mm/year). The differences in linear penetration rate were statistically significant (p < 0.001). These results show that very low rates of polyethylene wear are possible if the device functions normally. However, if the bearing displays suboptimal function (extra-articular, intra-articular impingement or incongruous articulation) the rates of wear increase significantly.

  12. Comparison of neonatal intensive care: Trento area versus Vermont Oxford Network

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    Pederzini Fabio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. Chiara hospital is the only neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in the Province of Trento (Italy. It serves a population of about 460000 people with about 5000 infants per year, admitting the totality of the inborn and outborn VLBWI of the province. The aim of this work is to compare mortality, morbidity and neonatal treatment of the very low birth weight infants (VLBWI of Trento area with those recorded in the Vermont Oxford Network (VON during 2004. Methods In this retrospective analysis, the rates of complications and related treatments reported in VLBWI admitted in the S. Chiara NICU during the period 2000–2005 were compared with those recorded in the VON in 2004. The analysis included both the total populations and different weight groups. Results The frequency of inborn infants was significantly higher in Trento than in VON: 91% vs 84% (MH 8.56; p-value 0.003. The administration of prenatal steroids (82% vs 74%; MH 7.47 and p-value 0.006 and caesarean section were significantly more frequent in the Trento area than in VON. In Trento significantly more VLBWI with BW ≤ 1000 grams were given surfactant prophylaxis compared with VON and significantly fewer VLBWI in every Trento weight group developed RDS (MH 18.55; p-value 0.00001. Overall rates of complications (CLD, PDA, NEC, IVH were significantly lower than in the Vermont Oxford Network. In CLD and PDA the differences were marked also in infants weighting less than 1000 grams. Overall rates of PNX, PVL, severe grade of ROP and mortality were similar in the two populations. In Trento, significantly more infants were discharged on human milk than in VON, in both the overall population and in BW sub-groups. Conclusion On the basis of this analysis, a less aggressive therapeutic strategy based on perinatal prevention in global management, such as that employed in Trento area, may be associated with an improvement in clinical outcomes in very low birth weight infants.

  13. Prima la musica: insegnare il melodramma a Oxford negli Anni 2000

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    Emanuele Senici

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available La tavola rotonda ‘L’opera monta in cattedra: didattica del melodramma’, coordinata da Lorenzo Bianconi e Annamaria Cecconi nel novembre 2007 in occasione dell’XI Colloquio di Musicologia del «Saggiatore musicale», includeva un mio breve intervento sull’esperienza didattica maturata in moduli d’argomento operistico nell’Università di Oxford, dove ho insegnato dal 1998 al 2008. L’intento era di fornire dati utili a un esercizio comparativo, il quale permettesse d’osservare le esperienze di docenti sia d’università sia di conservatorii italiani dalla prospettiva d’un sistema universitario molto diverso da ambo le istituzioni e che però, come vedremo, per le sue caratteristiche pare collocarsi a cavallo tra le due. Le pagine che seguono costituiscono un ripensamento sistematico di quelle riflessioni, nella speranza che esse possano tuttora risultare di qualche interesse a chi riflette sulla didattica del melodramma in Italia. Dopo aver delineato in breve il contesto istituzionale, presenterò un questionario proposto a due gruppi di studenti; sui risultati esporrò poi qualche riflessione conclusiva, tenendo presenti i temi proposti dal testo-base della tavola rotonda e la discussione che ebbe luogo a Bologna. Avverto infine che, benché io scriva quasi sempre al presente, ciò che dico si riferisce al periodo del mio insegnamento oxoniense: dal 2008 alcune cose possono essere cambiate.

  14. Mantel--Haenszel analysis of Oxford data. II. Independent effects of fetal irradiation subfactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Stewart, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    A Mantel-Haenszel analysis of fetal irradiation subfactors indicated that most of the extra x-rayed cases in the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers were radiation induced. First trimester exposures were rare but probably ten times more dangerous than later exposures. Ratios of observed: expected numbers of cancer deaths were lower for children with abnormal x-rays than for other x-rayed children, and lower for recent than remote exposures. The first of these differences was probably due to several antenatal conditions having positive associations with obstetric radiography and several causes of early (noncancer) deaths; the second one was probably due to a progressive lowering of film doses between 1940 and the present time. A rare cause of fetal irradiation (hydramnios), whose associations with congenital defects are well documented, led to the discovery that two faults in the International Classification of Diseases and Causes of Death have contributed to mistaken ideas about the etiology of childhood cancers: Neoplasms were not listed among the official causes of stillbirths, and cystic tumors of the kidneys and lungs of infants were not listed as neoplasms

  15. An Analysis of The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography (Atkins and Rundell 2008

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    Gilles-Maurice de Schryver

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Since at least a decade ago, the lexicographic community at large has been demandingthat a modern textbook be designed — one that would place corpora at the centre of the lexicographicenterprise. Written by two of the most respected practising lexicographers, this book hasfinally arrived, and delivers on very many levels. This review article presents a critical analysis ofits features.

    Keywords: LEXICOGRAPHY, LEARNERS' DICTIONARY, MONOLINGUAL, BILINGUAL,CORPUS, FRAME SEMANTICS, ENGLISH, FRENCH, TEXTBOOK

    Samenvatting: Een analyse van The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography(Atkins en Rundell 2008. Al minstens tien jaar lang eist de volledige lexicografischegemeenschap dat een modern tekstboek zou worden ontworpen — één dat corpora in het centrumvan de lexicografische belangstelling zou plaatsen. Geschreven door twee van de meest gerespecteerdepraktiserende lexicografen, is dit boek er nu eindelijk, en het ontgoochelt niet. Dit recensieartikelanalyseert de kenmerken ervan kritisch.

    Sleutelwoorden: LEXICOGRAFIE, LEERWOORDENBOEK, VERKLAREND (MONOLINGUAAL,VERTALEND (BILINGUAAL, CORPUS, FRAME SEMANTICS, ENGELS, FRANS,TEKSTBOEK

  16. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui Soles; Caldeira, Carolina Quintal; Rodrigues, Mónica Vieira; Felícia, Sabine Cardoso; Cavalheiro, Luís Manuel; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2018-03-08

    To translate and culturally adapt the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) to the European Portuguese language, and to test its reliability (internal consistency, reproducibility and measurement error) and validity (construct validity). The OSS Portuguese version was obtained through translations, back-translations, consensus panels, clinical review and cognitive pre-test. Portuguese OSS, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires, and the visual analogue scales of pain at rest [VAS rest] and during movement [VAS movement] were applied to 111 subjects with shoulder pain (degenerative or inflammatory disorders) and recommended for physical therapy. A clinical and sociodemographic questionnaire was also applied. The reliability was good, with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.90, an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.92, a standard error of measurement (SEM) of 2.59 points and a smallest detectable change (SDC) of 7.18 points. Construct validity was supported by the confirmation of three initial hypotheses involving expected significant correlation between OSS and other measures (DASH, VAS rest and VAS movement) and between OSS and the number of days of work absenteeism. The Portuguese OSS version presented suitable psychometric properties, in terms of reliability (internal consistency, reproducibility and measurement error) and validity (construct validity).

  17. The Oxford SWIFT Spectrograph: first commissioning and on-sky results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Mathias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Fogarty, Lisa; Houghton, Ryan; Salter, Graeme; Scott, Nicholas; Davies, Roger L.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The Oxford SWIFT spectrograph, an I & z band (6500-10500 A) integral field spectrograph, is designed to operate as a facility instrument at the 200 inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain, in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system PALAO (and its upgrade to PALM3000). SWIFT provides spectra at R(≡λ/▵λ)~4000 of a contiguous two-dimensional field, 44 x 89 spatial pixels (spaxels) in size, at spatial scales of 0.235", 0.16", and 0.08" per spaxel. It employs two 250μm thick, fully depleted, extremely red sensitive 4k X 2k CCD detector arrays (manufactured by LBNL) that provide excellent quantum efficiency out to 1000 nm. We describe the commissioning observations and present the measured values of a number of instrument parameters. We also present some first science results that give a taste of the range of science programs where SWIFT can have a substantial impact.

  18. Determination of baroreflex sensitivity during the modified Oxford maneuver by trigonometric regressive spectral analysis.

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    Julia Gasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in spontaneous and drug-induced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS have been attributed to its different operating ranges. The current study attempted to compare BRS estimates during cardiovascular steady-state and pharmacologically stimulation using an innovative algorithm for dynamic determination of baroreflex gain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-five volunteers underwent the modified Oxford maneuver in supine and 60° tilted position with blood pressure and heart rate being continuously recorded. Drug-induced BRS-estimates were calculated from data obtained by bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Spontaneous indices were derived from data obtained during rest (stationary and under pharmacological stimulation (non-stationary using the algorithm of trigonometric regressive spectral analysis (TRS. Spontaneous and drug-induced BRS values were significantly correlated and display directionally similar changes under different situations. Using the Bland-Altman method, systematic differences between spontaneous and drug-induced estimates were found and revealed that the discrepancy can be as large as the gain itself. Fixed bias was not evident with ordinary least products regression. The correlation and agreement between the estimates increased significantly when BRS was calculated by TRS in non-stationary mode during the drug injection period. TRS-BRS significantly increased during phenylephrine and decreased under nitroprusside. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The TRS analysis provides a reliable, non-invasive assessment of human BRS not only under static steady state conditions, but also during pharmacological perturbation of the cardiovascular system.

  19. Validity and cross-cultural adaptation of the persian version of the oxford elbow score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Vahedi, Ehsan; Moradi, Ali; Mashayekhi, Zeinab; Hallaj-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Azami, Mehran; Birjandinejad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Oxford Elbow Score (OES) is a patient-reported questionnaire used to assess outcomes after elbow surgery. The aim of this study was to validate and adapt the OES into Persian language. After forward-backward translation of the OES into Persian, a total number of 92 patients after elbow surgeries completed the Persian OES along with the Persian DASH and SF-36. To assess test-retest reliability, 31 randomly selected patients (34%) completed the Persian OES again after three days while abstaining from all forms of therapeutic regimens. Reliability of the Persian OES was assessed by measuring intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for test-retest reliability and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to test the construct validity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.92 showing excellent reliability. Cronbach's alpha for function, pain, and social-psychological subscales was 0.95, 0.86, and 0.85, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.85 for the overall questionnaire and 0.90, 0.76, and 0.75 for function, pain, and social-psychological subscales, respectively. Construct validity was confirmed as the Spearman correlation between OES and DASH was 0.80. Persian OES is a valid and reliable patient-reported outcome measure to assess postsurgical elbow status in Persian speaking population.

  20. Gut Microbiota Confers Resistance of Albino Oxford Rats to the Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisavljević, Suzana; Dinić, Miroslav; Jevtić, Bojan; Đedović, Neda; Momčilović, Miljana; Đokić, Jelena; Golić, Nataša; Mostarica Stojković, Marija; Miljković, Đorđe

    2018-01-01

    Albino Oxford (AO) rats are extremely resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), with established autoimmune pathogenesis. The autoimmune response against the antigens of the CNS is initiated in the peripheral lymphoid tissues after immunization of AO rats with CNS antigens. Subsequently, limited infiltration of the CNS occurs, yet without clinical sequels. It has recently become increasingly appreciated that gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and gut microbiota play an important role in regulation and propagation of encephalitogenic immune response. Therefore, modulation of AO gut microbiota by antibiotics was performed in this study. The treatment altered composition of gut microbiota in AO rats and led to a reduction in the proportion of regulatory T cells in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes, and in lymph nodes draining the site of immunization. Upregulation of interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 production was observed in the draining lymph nodes. The treatment led to clinically manifested EAE in AO rats with more numerous infiltrates and higher production of IL-17 observed in the CNS. Importantly, transfer of AO gut microbiota into EAE-prone Dark Agouti rats ameliorated the disease. These results clearly imply that gut microbiota is an important factor in AO rat resistance to EAE and that gut microbiota transfer is an efficacious way to treat CNS autoimmunity. These findings also support the idea that gut microbiota modulation has a potential as a future treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  1. Validation of the Italian version of the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Nicolò; Romeo, Giovanni; Bonifacini, Carlo; Viganò, Marco; Bianchi, Alberto; Malerba, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire (OAFQ) into Italian, to perform a cross-cultural adaptation and to evaluate its psychometric properties. The Italian OAFQ was developed according to the recommended forward/backward translation protocol and evaluated in pediatric patients treated for symptomatic flatfoot deformity. Feasibility, reliability, internal consistency, construct validity [comparing OAFQ domains with Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) domains] and responsiveness to surgical treatment were assessed. A total of 61 children and their parents were enrolled in the study. Results showed satisfactory levels of internal consistency for both children and parent forms. The test-retest reliability was confirmed by high ICC values for both child and parents subscales. Good construct validity was showed by patterns of relationships consistent with theoretically related domains of the CHQ. After surgery, the mean OAFQ scores improved in all the domains after treatment with the subtalar arthroereisis, for both children and parent scales (p valid instrument in order to evaluate interventions used to treat children's foot or ankle problem, but needs further study on different clinical settings.

  2. Quality of life after TIA and stroke: ten-year results of the Oxford Vascular Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Gray, Alastair M; Bull, Linda; Welch, Sarah; Cuthbertson, Fiona; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-10-29

    To evaluate the 5-year impact of stroke and TIA on utility and quality-adjusted survival. TIA and stroke patients from a UK population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study) were recruited from 2002 to 2007, and followed up until 2012. Quality of life was assessed over 5 years using the EQ-5D (EuroQol-5 Dimensions), with responses converted into utilities ranging from -0.59 (worse than death) to 1 (perfect health), using UK population valuations. Utilities for stroke and TIA patients were compared with those in matched controls obtained from the 2006 Health Survey for England. Five-year quality-adjusted life years were estimated by combining utility and survival information. Four hundred forty TIA and 748 stroke patients were ascertained and included. Utility remained constant at approximately 0.78 over the 5 years after TIA. Utility improved from 0.64 one month after stroke to 0.70 at 6 months (p = 0.006), remaining at approximately 0.70 thereafter. Matched controls had considerably higher utility levels than stroke/TIA patients (0.85, p TIA and 2.21 (2.15-2.37) after stroke, varying considerably by severity (minor: 2.94; moderate: 1.65; and severe: 0.70). Quality-adjusted survival is low over the 5 years after stroke and TIA, with severity and recurrent stroke being major predictors. There remains considerable scope for improvements in acute treatment and secondary prevention to improve the quality of life after TIA and stroke.

  3. Clinical Outcomes and Risks of Single-stage Bilateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty via Oxford Phase III

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    Tong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis often affects the joint bilaterally, and the single-stage (SS unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA is advantageous in terms of a single anesthesia administration, a short hospital stay, lower medical costs, and enhanced patient convenience. However, the complication risk of SS UKA continues to be debated. The aim of this article was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and functional recovery of SS and two-stage (TS UKA. Methods: From January 2008 to December 2013, we compared a series of 36 SS UKA with 45 TS UKA for osteoarthritis. The mean age was 65.4 years (range: 55-75 years. The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m 2 (range: 22-29 kg/m 2 . The pre- and post-operative Oxford Knee Scores (OKSs, complications, operative times, tourniquet times, the amount of drainage, and hemoglobin (Hb were evaluated. The Chi-square test, Fisher′s exact test, and paired and grouped t-tests were used in this study. Results: The mean follow-up was 50 months. No complications of death, fat embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and prosthetic infection were reported. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a shorter cumulative anesthesia time (113.5 vs. 133.0 min, P 0.05. At the final follow-up, the mean OKS improved from 39.48 ± 5.69 to 18.83 ± 3.82 (P 0.05. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a faster recovery. Conclusions: The single-staged UKA offers the benefits of a single anesthesia administration, reduced total anesthetic time, decreased overall rehabilitation time, and absence of an increase in perioperative mortality or complications compared with the TS bilateral UKA.

  4. Postremediation dose assessment for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-04-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates were calculated for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio, which was involved in machining of uranium metal in the 1950s for the U.S. atomic energy program. The site is not currently being used. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was sued in this evaluation. Three potential land use scenarios were considered for the former Alba Craft site; the scenarios vary with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food consumed. Scenario A (a possible land use scenario) assumed industrial use of the site; Scenario B (a likely future land use scenario) assumed residential use of the site; and Scenario C (a possible but unlikely land use scenario) assumed the presence of a resident farmer. For scenario A, it was assumed that any water used for domestic or industrial activities would be from uncontaminated off-site municipal sources. The water used for drinking, household purposes, and irrigation was assumed to be from uncontaminated municipal sources in Scenario B; groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the contaminated zone would be the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock in Scenario C. The results of the evaluation indicated that the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, and C are 0.64, 2.0, and 11 mrem/yr, respectively

  5. The Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for children: responsiveness and longitudinal validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Doll, Helen; Davies, Neville; Wainwright, Andrew; Theologis, Tim; Willett, Keith; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate how scores from the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire change over time and with treatment using both distribution-based and anchor-based approaches. Eighty children aged 5-16 and their parent or career completed questionnaires at orthopaedic or trauma outpatient clinics. They were asked to complete and return a second set of questionnaires again within 2 weeks (retest), and then mailed a third set of questionnaires to complete again after 2 months (follow-up). The follow-up questionnaires included a global rating of change 'transition' item. Child- and parent-reported mean domain scores (Physical, School & Play, and Emotional) were all stable at retest, whereas positive mean changes were observed at follow-up. As we hypothesised, trauma patients had poorer scores than elective patients at baseline, and showed greater improvement at follow-up. For trauma patients, mean changes in per cent scores were large (scores improved between 40 and 56 for the Physical and School & Play domains, and 17 and 21 for Emotional); all effect sizes (ES) were large (>0.8). For elective patients, the mean improvement in per cent scores were more moderate (Physical: child 10, ES = 0.4, parent 11, ES = 0.5; School & Play child 0, ES = 0, parent 9 ES = 0.4; Emotional: child 6, ES = 0.2; parents 8, ES > 0.3). Minimal detectable change (MDC(90)), an indication of measurement error, ranged from 6 to 8. Half the standard deviation of baseline scores ranged from 11 to 18. Minimal important difference could only be calculated for elective patients (9 child and 13 parent ratings), these ranged from 7 to 17. The findings support the responsiveness and longitudinal validity of the scales. Changes in domain scores of, or exceeding, the MDC(90) (6-8) are likely to be beyond measurement error; further work is required to refine the estimate of change that can be considered important.

  6. Anatomical masking of pressure footprints based on the Oxford Foot Model: validation and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, Claudia; Stebbins, Julie A

    2017-03-01

    Plantar pressure analysis is widely used in the assessment of foot function. In order to assess regional loading, a mask is applied to the footprint to sub-divide it into regions of interest (ROIs). The most common masking method is based on geometric features of the footprint (GM). Footprint masking based on anatomical landmarks of the foot has been implemented more recently, and involves the integration of a 3D motion capture system, plantar pressure measurement device, and a multi-segment foot model. However, thorough validation of anatomical masking (AM) using pathological footprints has not yet been presented. In the present study, an AM method based on the Oxford Foot Model (OFM) was compared to an equivalent GM. Pressure footprints from 20 young healthy subjects (HG) and 20 patients with clubfoot (CF) were anatomically divided into 5 ROIs using a subset of the OFM markers. The same foot regions were also identified by using a standard GM method. Comparisons of intra-subject coefficient of variation (CV) showed that the OFM-based AM was at least as reliable as the GM for all investigated pressure parameters in all foot regions. Clinical relevance of AM was investigated by comparing footprints from HG and CF groups. Contact time, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area proved to be sensitive parameters that were able to distinguish HG and CF groups, using both AM and GM methods However, the AM method revealed statistically significant differences between groups in 75% of measured variables, compared to 62% using a standard GM method, indicating that the AM method is more sensitive for revealing differences between groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model in children with foot deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCahill, Jennifer; Stebbins, Julie; Koning, Bart; Harlaar, Jaap; Theologis, Tim

    2018-03-01

    The Oxford Foot Model (OFM) is a multi-segment, kinematic model developed to assess foot motion. It has previously been assessed for repeatability in healthy populations. To determine the OFM's reliability for detecting foot deformity, it is important to know repeatability in pathological conditions. The aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of the OFM in children with foot deformity. Intra-tester repeatability was assessed for 45 children (15 typically developing, 15 hemiplegic, 15 clubfoot). Inter-tester repeatability was assessed in the clubfoot population. The mean absolute differences between testers (clubfoot) and sessions (clubfoot and hemiplegic) were calculated for each of 15 clinically relevant, kinematic variables and compared to typically developing children. Children with clubfoot showed a mean difference between visits of 2.9° and a mean difference between raters of 3.6° Mean absolute differences were within one degree for the intra and inter-rater reliability in 12/15 variables. Hindfoot rotation, forefoot/tibia abduction and forefoot supination were the most variable between testers. Overall the clubfoot data were less variable than the typically developing population. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated slightly higher differences between sessions (mean 4.1°), with the most reliable data in the sagittal plane, and largest differences in the transverse plane. The OFM was designed to measure different types of foot deformity. The results of this study show that it provides repeatable results in children with foot deformity. To be distinguished from measurement artifact, changes in foot kinematics as a result of intervention or natural progression over time must be greater than the repeatability reported here. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensitivity of the Oxford Foot Model to marker misplacement: A systematic single-case investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Christopher P; Walsh, Henry P J; Gillett, Jarred G

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically assess the effect of Oxford Foot Model (OFM) marker misplacement on hindfoot relative to tibia, and forefoot relative to hindfoot kinematic calculations during the stance phase of gait. Marker trajectories were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system (Vicon Motion Systems Ltd., UK) and ground reaction forces were recorded from three force platforms (AMTI, USA). A custom built marker cluster consisting of 4 markers in a square arrangement (diagonal distance 2 cm) was used to assess the effect of marker misplacement in the superior, inferior, anterior and posterior direction for the sustentaculum tali (STL), the proximal 1st metatarsal (P1M), distal 5th metatarsal (D5M), proximal 5th metatarsal (P5M) and lateral calcaneus (LCA) markers. In addition manual movement of the heel complex 1 cm superiorly, inferiorly, medially and laterally, and also an alignment error of 10° inversion and 10° eversion was assessed. Clinically meaningful effects of marker misplacement were determined using a threshold indicating the minimal clinically important difference. Misplacement of the heel-wand complex had the most pronounced effect on mean kinematic profiles during the stance phase across all degrees-of-freedom with respect to hindfoot-tibia and forefoot-hindfoot angles. Vertical marker misplacement of the D5M and P5M markers affected the sagittal plane, and to a lesser extent frontal plane, forefoot-hindfoot kinematics. In conclusion, the OFM is highly sensitive to misplacement of the heel-wand complex in all directions and the P5M marker in the vertical direction. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of foot kinematics wearing high heels using the Oxford foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizi; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien Steven

    2018-04-29

    Wearing high heels is thought to lead to various foot disorders and injuries such as metatarsal pain, Achilles tendon tension, plantar fasciitis and Haglund malformation. However, there is little available information explaining the specific mechanisms and reasons why wearing high heels causes foot deformity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the foot kinematics of high heel wearers and compare any differences with barefoot individuals using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Fifteen healthy women aged 20-25 years were measured while walking barefoot and when wearing high heels. The peak value of angular motion for the hallux with respect to the forefoot, the forefoot with respect to the hind foot, and the hind foot with respect to the tibia were all analyzed. Compared to the barefoot, participants wearing high heels demonstrated larger hallux dorsiflexion (22.55∘± 1.62∘ VS 26.6∘± 2.33∘ for the barefoot; P= 0.001), and less hallux plantarflexion during the initial stance phase (-4.86∘± 2.32∘ VS -8.68∘± 1.13∘; Pfoot demonstrated a larger dorsiflexion in the horizontal plane (16.59∘± 1.69∘ VS 12.08∘± 0.9∘; Pfoot extension rotation (-5.49∘± 0.69∘ VS -10.73∘± 0.42∘; P= 0.001). These findings complement existing kinematic evidence that wearing high heels can lead to foot deformities and injuries.

  10. The Vermont oxford neonatal encephalopathy registry: rationale, methods, and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2006, the Vermont Oxford Network (VON) established the Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry (NER) to characterize infants born with neonatal encephalopathy, describe evaluations and medical treatments, monitor hypothermic therapy (HT) dissemination, define clinical research questions, and identify opportunities for improved care. Methods Eligible infants were ≥ 36 weeks with seizures, altered consciousness (stupor, coma) during the first 72 hours of life, a 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 3, or receiving HT. Infants with central nervous system birth defects were excluded. Results From 2006–2010, 95 centers registered 4232 infants. Of those, 59% suffered a seizure, 50% had a 5 minute Apgar score of ≤ 3, 38% received HT, and 18% had stupor/coma documented on neurologic exam. Some infants experienced more than one eligibility criterion. Only 53% had a cord gas obtained and only 63% had a blood gas obtained within 24 hours of birth, important components for determining HT eligibility. Sixty-four percent received ventilator support, 65% received anticonvulsants, 66% had a head MRI, 23% had a cranial CT, 67% had a full channel encephalogram (EEG) and 33% amplitude integrated EEG. Of all infants, 87% survived. Conclusions The VON NER describes the heterogeneous population of infants with NE, the subset that received HT, their patterns of care, and outcomes. The optimal routine care of infants with neonatal encephalopathy is unknown. The registry method is well suited to identify opportunities for improvement in the care of infants affected by NE and study interventions such as HT as they are implemented in clinical practice. PMID:22726296

  11. Simple shoulder test and Oxford Shoulder Score: Persian translation and cross-cultural validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Soofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Rustaie, Nilufar; Akbari, Mohammad; Ebadi, Safoora; Senobari, Maryam; Hasson, Scott

    2015-12-01

    To translate, culturally adapt, and validate the simple shoulder test (SST) and Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) into Persian language using a cross-sectional and prospective cohort design. A standard forward and backward translation was followed to culturally adapt the SST and the OSS into Persian language. Psychometric properties of floor and ceiling effects, construct convergent validity, discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, standard error of the measurement (SEM), smallest detectable change (SDC), and factor structure were determined. One hundred patients with shoulder disorders and 50 healthy subjects participated in the study. The PSST and the POSS showed no missing responses. No floor or ceiling effects were observed. Both the PSST and POSS detected differences between patients and healthy subjects supporting their discriminant validity. Construct convergent validity was confirmed by a very good correlation between the PSST and POSS (r = 0.68). There was high internal consistency for both the PSST (α = 0.73) and the POSS (α = 0.91 and 0.92). Test-retest reliability with 1-week interval was excellent (ICCagreement = 0.94 for PSST and 0.90 for POSS). Factor analyses demonstrated a three-factor solution for the PSST (49.7 % of variance) and a two-factor solution for the POSS (61.6 % of variance). The SEM/SDC was satisfactory for PSST (5.5/15.3) and POSS (6.8/18.8). The PSST and POSS are valid and reliable outcome measures for assessing functional limitations in Persian-speaking patients with shoulder disorders.

  12. The Words First Attested in Shakespeare and Their Later Obsolescence : A Study Based on the Oxford English Dictionary

    OpenAIRE

    鉄村, 明美

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to classify the words that first attested in Shakespeare’s works and to investigate the characteristics of ‘obsolete’ words in the texts with reference to the Oxford English Dictionary. The words first attested in Shakespeare’s works were selected using the Oxford English Dictionary Online. Next, these words were divided into two groups: ‘obsolete lexical items’ and ‘current lexical items’. The results for each of Shakespeare’s works and for sources of neologisms(der...

  13. Oxford Guide to British and American Culture for Learners of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Jonathan, Ed.; Kavanagh, Kathryn, Ed.

    The guide to American and British culture, for upper secondary- and university-level students, is intended for use by learners of English as a second language. It is designed to explain specific aspects of British and American life and traditions not generally included in English language dictionaries. The guide has a dictionary format, with terms…

  14. The reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Dutch version of the Oxford elbow score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patka Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Oxford elbow score (OES is an English questionnaire that measures the patients' subjective experience of elbow surgery. The OES comprises three domains: elbow function, pain, and social-psychological effects. This questionnaire can be completed by the patient and used as an outcome measure after elbow surgery. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the Dutch version of the translated OES for reliability, validity and responsiveness with respect to patients after elbow trauma and surgery. Methods The 12 items of the English-language OES were translated into Dutch and then back-translated; the back-translated questionnaire was then compared to the original English version. The OES Dutch version was completed by 69 patients (group A, 60 of whom had an elbow luxation, four an elbow fracture and five an epicondylitis. QuickDASH, the visual analogue pain scale (VAS and the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI were also completed to examine the convergent validity of the OES in group A. To calculate the test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the OES, this questionnaire was completed three times by 43 different patients (group B. An average of 52 days elapsed between therapy and the administration of the third OES (SD = 24.1. Results The Cronbach's α coefficients for the function, pain and social-psychological domains were 0.90, 0.87 and 0.90, respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for the domains were 0.87 for function, 0.89 for pain and 0.87 for social-psychological. The standardised response means for the domains were 0.69, 0.46 and 0.60, respectively, and the minimal detectable changes were 27.6, 21.7 and 24.0, respectively. The convergent validity for the function, pain and social-psychological domains, which were measured as the Spearman's correlation of the OES domains with the MEPI, were 0.68, 0.77 and 0.77, respectively. The Spearman's correlations of the OES domains with QuickDASH were

  15. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél. 022 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 October 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Long-lived particle searches at colliders Dr. Philippe Mermod / Oxford University The discovery of exotic long-lived particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics such as the origin and composition of dark matter and the unification of the fundamental forces. This talk will focus on searches for long-lived charged massive particles, where "charged" refers to the magnetic, electric or colour charge. Previous searches at the LEP and Tevatron Colliders allowed to put mass and cross section limits on various kinds of long-lived particles, such as Magnetic Monopoles and metastable leptons and up-type quarks. The new energy regime made available at the LHC will probe physics regions well beyond these limits. F...

  16. The Psychometric Analysis of the Persian Version of the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning of Rebecca L. Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Seyed Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims to analyze the psychometric qualities of the Persian adapted version of Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) developed by Rebecca L. Oxford (1990). Three instruments were used: Persian adapted version of SILL, a Background Questionnaire, and Test of English as a Foreign Language. Two hundred and thirteen Iranian…

  17. Translation and validation of the Dutch version of the Oxford 12-item knee questionnaire for knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniël; Breugem, Stefan J. M.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Blankevoort, Leendert; van Dijk, C. Nick

    2005-01-01

    Background In 1998, the Oxford 12-item knee questionnaire was developed by Dawson et al. as a self-administered disease- and site-specific questionnaire, specifically developed for knee arthroplasty patients. Since then, it has proven to be an effective outcome questionnaire, and is widely used.

  18. Comparison between the Harris- and Oxford Hip Score to evaluate outcomes one-year after total hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, Hanneke; Lindeboom, Robert; Kuipers, Sander E.; Vervest, Ton M. J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Harris Hip Score (HHS) is a surgeon administered measurement for assessing hip function before and after total hip arthroplasties (THA). Patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs) such as the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) are increasingly used. HHS was compaired to the OHS assessing whether the HHS can

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric analysis of the Arabic version of the oxford knee score in adult male with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Al-Eisa, Einas S; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2017-05-15

    There are varieties of self-assessment questionnaire used for the evaluation of pain, functional disability, and health related quality of life in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The present study intended to adapt and translate the oxford knee score into the Arabic and investigated its psychometric properties in adult male with knee OA. Ninety-seven adult male (mean age 57.55 ± 11.49 years) with knee OA participated. Patients were requested to complete the adapted Arabic version of the Oxford knee score (OKS-Ar), reduced "Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC)", and the Visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients were requested to complete 2 nd form of OKS-Ar at least 1 week apart to assess the reproducibility of the score. The OKS was adapted and translated into Arabic by two independent Arabic native speakers (one rehabilitation professional having experience of knee OA patients and another one a trained translator) according to the international guidelines. All the participants completed the 2 nd form of OKS-Ar (Response rate 100%). Reliability and internal consistency was high with an ICC of 0.97, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.987, respectively. A significant relationship between the OKS-Ar and the WOMAC and VAS scores confirmed the construct validity (p < 0.001). The standard error of measurement (SEM) and the minimum detectable change (MDC) were 2.2 and 6.2, respectively. The adapted Arabic version of the OKS demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties, including reliability, internal consistency, and the validity. The present study indicates that the OKS-Ar is a suitable questionnaire to measure pain and physical function in the Arabic speaking adult male patients with knee OA.

  20. Handover practice amongst core surgical trainees at the Oxford School of Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazim Sadideen

    2014-02-01

    Results: There were responses from 40 CSTs (80.0 %. The most striking findings revolved around perceived educational value, formal training, and auditing practice with regards to handover, which were all remarkably lower than expected. CST handover was thus targeted in the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University Hospital, with the suggestion and implementation of targeted changes to improve practice. Conclusion: In the EWTD era with many missed educational opportunities, daily handover represents an underused educational tool for CSTs, especially in light of competency-based and time-limited training. We recommend modifications based on our results and the literature and hope schools of surgery follow suit nationally by assessing and addressing handover practice.

  1. The variability in Oxford hip and knee scores in the preoperative period: is there an ideal time to score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, C; Holmes, D; Khan, T; Cockshott, S; Lewis, J; Stephen, A

    2018-01-01

    Background All NHS-funded providers are required to collect and report patient-reported outcome measures for hip and knee arthroplasty. Although there are established guidelines for timing such measures following arthroplasty, there are no specific time-points for collection in the preoperative period. The primary aim of this study was to identify whether there was a significant amount of variability in the Oxford hip and knee scores prior to surgical intervention when completed in the outpatient clinic at the time of listing for arthroplasty or when completed at the preoperative assessment clinic. Methods A prospective cohort study of patients listed for primary hip or knee arthroplasty was conducted. Patients were asked to fill in a preoperative Oxford score in the outpatient clinic at the time of listing. They were then invited to fill in the official outcome measures questionnaire at the preoperative assessment clinic. The postoperative Oxford score was then completed when the patient was seen again at their postoperative follow up in clinic. Results Of the total of 109 patients included in this study period, there were 18 (17%) who had a worse score of 4 or more points difference and 43 (39.4%) who had an improvement of 4 or more points difference when the scores were compared between time of listing at the outpatient and at the preoperative assessment clinic. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.0054) in the mean Oxford scores. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that there should be standardisation of timing for completing the preoperative patient-reported outcome measures.

  2. Happiness as stable extraversion : internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire among undergraduate students\\ud \\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Mandy; Francis, Leslie J.; Edwards, Bethan

    2010-01-01

    The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ) was developed by Hills and Argyle (2002) to provide a more accessible equivalent measure of the Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI). The aim of the present study was to examine the internal consistency reliability, and construct validity of this new instrument alongside the Eysenckian dimensional model of personality. The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire was completed by a sample of 131 undergraduate students together with the abbreviated form of the Revise...

  3. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  4. Considering (Auto)biography in Teaching and Learning about Race and Racism in a Diverse University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Demelza

    2017-01-01

    The "sociological imagination"--the recognition of the relationship between "private troubles" and "public issues" (Mills [1959] 2000. "The Sociological Imagination". Oxford: Oxford University Press: 8)--is central to the discipline of sociology. This article reports findings of a 2014 study which…

  5. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-01-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for ver...

  6. New reductions of the Astrographic Catalogue. Plate adjustments of the Algiers, Oxford I and II, and Vatican Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, S. E.; Martin, J. C.; Jackson, E. S.; Corbin, T. E.

    1996-07-01

    The U. S. Naval Observatory is in the process of making new reductions of the Astrographic Catalogue using a modern reference catalog, the ACRS, and new data analysis and reduction software. Currently ten AC zones have been reduced. This papers discusses the reduction models and results from the Algiers, Oxford I and II, and Vatican zones (those of the Cape zone are discussed elsewhere). The resulting star positions will be combined with those of the U.S. Naval Observatory's Twin Astrograph Catalog to produce a catalog of positions and proper motions in support of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  7. The Oxford survey of childhood cancers. A description of the largest and longest continuing national study of childhood cancers in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, E.A.; Kneale, G.W.; Knox, E.G.; Stewart, A.M.

    1989-06-01

    The OSCC was initiated by Alice Stewart and David Hewitt of the University of Oxford to investigate the annual peak of leukaemia mortality in the 3rd and 4th years of life which had been noted by the latter (Hewitt, 1955). Of particular interest was the possibility that this was the result of an antenatal event related to medical innovations of the time, e.g. radiology and antibiotics. Since its inception the OSCC has produced over 200 publications relating to aetiology of childhood cancer. Some of the more important findings include the identification of factors which exert an independent effect on childhood cancer risk. First born children are at greatest risk of childhood cancer, particularly leukaemia, than children of higher birth rank. Children whose parents are in social class I have the highest risk of childhood cancers of all social classes (Kneale and Steward, 1976). Children with Down's Syndrome have a risk of developing leukaemia which is about 20 times that of normal children (Stewart et al, 1958). A major finding of the OSCC was that children who have been irradiated in utero by abdominal x-ray examination of their mother during pregnancy have a significantly increased risk of developing cancer

  8. The assessment of schizotypy by the O-LIFE (Oxford-Liverpool Inventory for Feelings and Experiences) in patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembińska-Krajewska, Daria; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2016-12-23

    The aim of the study was to assess schizotypy by using the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE), in the groups of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder (BD) and unipolar (recurrent) depression (UD). An important element of the study was to compare - in terms of similarity - the results obtained in schizophrenia and BD, and - in terms of differences - the results obtained in BD and UD. The study involved 58 patients with schizophrenia (35 men, 23 women, mean age = 34.0, SD = 9.8), 52 patients with BD (22 men, 30 women, mean age = 40.3, SD = 13.6) and 57 UD patients (24 men, 33 women, mean age = 50.2, SD = 11.9), treated in the Department of Adult Psychiatry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences. For the assessment of schizotypy, the full version of the O-LIFE questionnaire (104 questions) was used, including such dimensions as: unusual experiences, cognitive disorganization, introvertive anhedonia and impulsive nonconformity. The biggest differences between diagnostic groups were found in the dimensions of unusual experiences and impulsive nonconformity. Similarities between schizophrenia and BD were found for unusual experiences, cognitive disorganization and introvertive anhedonia. Differences between BD and UD were obtained for unusual experiences and impulsive nonconformity. The assessment of schizotypy in three diagnostic groups (it was the first study in patients with UD), allowed to address contemporary pathogenic and clinical concepts pertaining to similarities between schizophrenia and BD as well as to differences between two types of affective disorders.

  9. Oxford Shoulder Score: A Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation Study of the Persian Version in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Razi, Shiva; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Reza Kachooei, Amir

    2015-09-01

    Oxford shoulder score is a specific 12-item patient-reported tool for evaluation of patients with inflammatory and degenerative disorders of the shoulder. Since its introduction, it has been translated and culturally adapted in some Western and Eastern countries. The aim of this study was to translate the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) in Persian and to test its validity and reliability in Persian speaking population in Iran. One hundred patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder problem participated in the survey in 2012. All patients completed the Persian version of OSS, Persian DASH and the SF-36 for testing validity. Randomly, 37 patients filled out the Persian OSS again three days after the initial visit to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.93. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93. In terms of validity, there was a significant correlation between the Persian OSS and DASH and SF-36 scores (P Persian version of the OSS proved to be a valid, reliable, and reproducible tool as demonstrated by high Cronbach's alpha and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The Persian transcript of OSS is administrable to Persian speaking patients with shoulder condition and it is understandable by them.

  10. Introducing Collabra, OA Journal from University of California Press

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An introductory presentation of Collabra, the open access mega journal from University of California Press, highlighting its unique business model which shares and spreads revenue back to the research community. (Presented at the FORCE 2015 conference at the University of Oxford, January 13, 2015.)

  11. Ecology and ranging behaviour of Red foxes in the city of Oxford / Ecologia e comportamento della volpe (Vulpes vulpes nella città di Oxford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Patrick Doncaster

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes living in the city of Oxford, like those in its neighbouring suburbs, are organized into social groups which each defend a territory. While territories in the suburbs are spatially stable, those in the city continually drift in location. They move in synchrony with their neighbours and the prevailing pattern is a honeycomb of group ranges of relatively small but constant size. The city environment is characterized by a high level of disturbance, which may favour range mobility, and by a patchy and highly divided mosaic of habitats. A quantification of patch density leads us to propose an explanation for the small size of territories and the existence of more adults than a single pair, in terms of the dispersion of habitat patches and competition for food resources contained therein. Riassunto Le popolazioni di Volpe (Vulpes vulpes insediate nella città di Oxford e nelle aree suburbane limitrofe sono organizzate in gruppi sociali che difendono un proprio territorio. Mentre i territori nelle aree suburbane sono spazialmente stabili, quelli presenti in città cambiano continuamente posizione. Questi ultimi si muovono sincronicamente con quelli limitrofi e la disposizione prevalente è simile al favo delle api con territori relativamente piccoli, ma di dimensioni costanti. L'ambiente cittadino è caratterizzato da elevato disturbo, che può favorire la mobilita dei territori, e da un mosaico molto vario di ambienti. La presenza di territori di ridotte dimensioni occupati da più adulti e non da una singola coppia di volpi sembra dipendere dall'alternanza e variabilità degli ambienti e dalla competizione per le risorse alimentari.

  12. Up to 10-year follow-up of the Oxford medial partial knee arthroplasty - 695 cases from a single institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner Kristensen, Per; Holm, Henriette A; Varnum, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Partial knee arthroplasty (PKA) has shown obvious advantages compared to total knee arthroplasty, but survival of PKA from different institutions and registries has differed. In our institution, 695 consecutive Oxford medial PKAs were performed from 2002 to 2011 with mean follow-up of 4.6 years....... The overall 10.7-year survival rate was 85.3% (95% CI: 78.7%-90.0%), and no difference in survival for gender and age younger or older than 60 years was found. One year after PKA, 94.3% were very satisfied or satisfied, as were 93.6% six years postoperatively. The revision rate was 7.3% (n=51), and the most...

  13. Dynamic RSA for the evaluation of inducible micromotion of Oxford UKA during step-up and step-down motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Kristian; Kaptein, Bart L; Rømer, Lone; Jørgensen, Peter B; Stilling, Maiken

    2017-06-01

    Background and purpose - Implant inducible micromotions have been suggested to reflect the quality of the fixation interface. We investigated the usability of dynamic RSA for evaluation of inducible micromotions of the Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) tibial component, and evaluated factors that have been suggested to compromise the fixation, such as fixation method, component alignment, and radiolucent lines (RLLs). Patients and methods - 15 patients (12 men) with a mean age of 69 (55-86) years, with an Oxford UKA (7 cemented), were studied after a mean time in situ of 4.4 (3.6-5.1) years. 4 had tibial RLLs. Each patient was recorded with dynamic RSA (10 frames/second) during a step-up/step-down motion. Inducible micromotions were calculated for the tibial component with respect to the tibia bone. Postoperative component alignment was measured with model-based RSA and RLLs were measured on screened radiographs. Results - All tibial components showed inducible micromotions as a function of the step-cycle motion with a mean subsidence of up to -0.06 mm (95% CI: -0.10 to -0.03). Tibial component inducible micromotions were similar for cemented fixation and cementless fixation. Patients with tibial RLLs had 0.5° (95% CI: 0.18-0.81) greater inducible medio-lateral tilt of the tibial component. There was a correlation between postoperative posterior slope of the tibial plateau and inducible anterior-posterior tilt. Interpretation - All patients had inducible micromotions of the tibial component during step-cycle motion. RLLs and a high posterior slope increased the magnitude of inducible micromotions. This suggests that dynamic RSA is a valuable clinical tool for the evaluation of functional implant fixation.

  14. Ranking current and prospective NO2 pollution mitigation strategies: An environmental and economic modelling investigation in Oxford Street, London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanjean, A P R; Gallagher, J; Monks, P S; Leigh, R J

    2017-06-01

    Air pollution continues to be a problem in the urban environment. A range of different pollutant mitigation strategies that promote dispersion and deposition exist, but there is little evidence with respect to their comparative performance from both an environmental and economic perspective. This paper focuses on examining different NO 2 mitigation strategies such as trees, buildings facades coated with photocatalytic paint and solid barriers in Oxford Street in London. The case study findings will support ranking the environmental and economic impacts of these different strategies to improve personal exposure conditions on the footpath and on the road in a real urban street canyon. CFD simulations of airflow and NO 2 dispersion in Oxford Street in London were undertaken using the OpenFOAM software platform with the k-ε model, taking into account local prevailing wind conditions. Trees are shown to be the most cost-effective strategy, with a small reduction in NO 2 concentrations of up to 0.7% on the road. However, solid barriers with and without the application of photocatalytic paint and an innovative material (20 times more expensive than trees) can improve air quality on the footpaths more substantially, up to 7.4%, yet this has a significant detrimental impact on NO 2 concentrations (≤23.8%) on the road. Photocatalytic paint on building surfaces presented a minimal environmental reductions (1.2%) and economic (>100 times more expensive than trees) mitigation strategy. The findings recognised the differences between footpath and road concentrations occurred and that a focused examination of three pollution hotspots can provide more cost effective pollution mitigation. This study considers how a number of pollutant mitigation measures can be applied in a single street canyon and demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of these strategies from economic and environmental perspectives. Further research is required to extrapolate the findings presented here to

  15. SOFTWARE REVIEW: Oxford Personal Revision Guides: A-level Physics 1999/2000 Syllabus GCSE Physics 1999/2000 Syllabus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kerry

    2000-09-01

    Is it any better than a textbook and a pad of A4 paper? That's the question we have to ask if we consider investing in a `Revision' CD-ROM. Of course, nothing, in our lifetimes, will quite replace the students' own notes, some paper and a pencil. But, so far as private study is concerned, the computer offers a number of potential advantages: sound, animation, hyperlinks, interactivity, a calculator and a clock. For those with a modem, we can add Internet connections too. A few years ago the only revision materials available for computers were simply electronic versions of textbooks: a few animations and voice commentaries, with maybe a few multiple choice tests was the best you could expect. I was universally disappointed with all such CD-ROMs; they were a waste of money. At last things are changing and theseOxford Personal Revision Guides are definitely software of the new generation: there is commentary, there are animated diagrams (ripple tanks, Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, falling stones...), there are plenty of hyperlinks to other sections of the CD, and to exam board websites on the Internet, so that students can check their own syllabus.... This CD is not a rip-off! The software uses Microscoft Internet Explorer to produce a screen that looks as if you are connected to the Internet. Few students will have any problems in navigating the system. It is a massive piece of programming requiring a fairly modern PC (Pentium 166, 32 MB RAM, quad-speed CD-ROM drive and a good monitor and sound card really are the minimum; I loaded the programme on an older machine and it struggled!). Installation took a good while because the software insists on installing/updating Internet Explorer to 5.0 and checking for, and loading if necessary, Real Player 7, Microsoft Java Virtual Machine and Macromedia Shockwave 7.0.2 Player. Once all this was loaded it worked extremely well, and at first I kept imagining that I was in fact connected to a fantastic educational site on the web

  16. Roy Ellen, Stephen J. Lycett, Sarah E. Johns, eds., 2013, Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Viecelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available recensione: Roy Ellen, Stephen J. Lycett, Sarah E. Johns, eds., 2013, Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books di Clelia Viecelli

  17. (Reprinted in Heuristics: The foundations of adaptive behavior, pp. 477-501, by G. Gigerenzer, R. Hertwig, & T. Pachur, Eds., 2011, New York: Oxford University Press)

    OpenAIRE

    Pachur, T.; Hertwig, R.

    2006-01-01

    The recognition heuristic is a prime example of a boundedly rational mind tool that rests on an evolved capacity, recognition, and exploits environmental structures. When originally proposed, it was conjectured that no other probabilistic cue reverses the recognition-based inference (D. G. Goldstein & G. Gigerenzer, 2002). More recent studies challenged this view and gave rise to the argument that recognition enters inferences just like any other probabilistic cue. By linking research on the ...

  18. Taken Hostage. The Iran Hostage Crisis and America’s First Encounter with Radical Islam. Princeton et Oxford, Princeton University Press, 2005, 212 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Kian-Thiébaut, Azadeh

    2007-01-01

    Spécialiste de l’histoire des États-Unis, l’A. a décidé d’écrire cet ouvrage sur la crise des otages à Téhéran après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001. Ces deux évènements sont certes très différents mais pour l’A. la crise des otages est le premier acte d’anti-américanisme d’envergure. A travers son ouvrage, D. Farber espère donc mettre en perspective les rapports tordus entre les États-Unis et les forces de l’islam politique. L’A. a entrepris des recherches dans les archives et analyse la ...

  19. "Book Review: FRANKFURT, Harry G. On Inequality. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2015, 102 pp., $14.95 (hbk, ISBN 9780691167145."

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luisa Bucchile Faggion

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT On Inequality is a short book that skillfully handles a challenging topic. As its title suggests, its focus is a major theme in contemporary theories of justice: equality. Contrary to what one might expect, however, Frankfurt's critique of equality is not grounded in libertarian arguments or an ideal of the minimal state. Rather, it aims to clarify a cluster of alleged conceptual confusions about equality as a constitutive moral value.

  20. Brian Steensland, The Failed Welfare Revolution. America's Struggle over Guaranteed Income Policy, Princeton and Oxford, Princeton University Press, 2008, XII, 304 pp. [Ressenya de llibre

    OpenAIRE

    Espuelas Barroso, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    A diferencia de lo que es habitual, el libro de Steensland se centra en la historia de un fracaso. El ascenso y declive de una propuesta para crear, primero durante el gobierno Nixon y después durante la era Carter, una Renta Mínima Garantizada en los Estados Unidos. ...

  1. ‘This is education as the practice of freedom': Twenty Years of Women’s Studies at the University of Oxford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleri Watson

    2015-10-01

    [1] bell hooks’s writings cover gender, race, teaching, education and media, emphasising the connections with systems of oppression. hooks is the author of pioneering works such as Ain’t I a Woman?: Black Women and Feminism (1981, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Centre (1984 and Writing Beyond Race: Living Theory and Practice (2013, and remains a leading public intellectual in feminist and educational studies.

  2. Tradurre nel contesto pluriglosso dell'arabo con l'aiuto di un nuovo dizionario bilingue. Riflessioni sull'Oxford Arabic Dictionary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maria Tresso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Translating in the Arabic Plurilingual Context with the Help of a New Bilingual Dictionary. Some remarks on the Oxford Arabic Dictionary. A bilingual dictionary from English, the International language for communication, to Arabic nowadays represents one of the major challenges in the fields of translation studies and teaching. The Oxford Arabic Dictionary, with is corpus-based word list represents a good point of departure for future lexicographical works and for the development of teaching of Modern Standard Arabic.

  3. [Book review] Cowbirds and Other Brood Parasites by Catherine Ortega. Tucson, Arizona: University of Arizona Press (1998). The Avian Brood Parasites: Deception at the Nest by Paul A. Johnsgard. New York: Oxford University Press (1997) Parasitic Birds and their Hosts: Studies in Coevolution edited by S.I. Rothstein & S.K. Robinson. New York: Oxford University Press (1998)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    We are in a golden age for the study of brood parasitism, judging from both the quantity and quality of recent scientific publications on cuckoos, cowbirds and parasitic finches by investigators working in Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia. As Johnsgard (1997) remarks in his preface, the evolutionary, ecological, and behavioural questions posed by obligate brood parasites are among the most intriguing contemporary ornithological topics. Rothstein & Robinson (1998) explain that brood parasites make ideal subjects for testing the generality of models for the evolution of social and mating behaviour, foraging behaviour, spatial distribution, and vocal development, because the strategy of providing no parental care removes constraints imposed on other birds. Since Aristotle, people have been fascinated by brood parasites, but only in the past two decades has the number of investigators working on this topic reached a critical mass and created momentum that promises many breakthroughs. New studies are being completed so rapidly that a general book is inevitably out of date on some topics by the time it is published. A complete library on brood parasitism should add two recent volumes (Morrison et al. 1999; Smith et al., in press).to the three reviewed here.

  4. Trends in hospital admission rates for anorexia nervosa in Oxford (1968-2011) and England (1990-2011): database studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Josephine; Hall, Nick; Yeates, David G R; Goldacre, Michael

    2016-02-01

    To report on long-term trends in hospital admission rates for anorexia nervosa using two English datasets. We used data on hospital day-case and inpatient care across five decades in the Oxford Record Linkage Study (ORLS), and similar data for all England from 1990. We analysed rates of admission for anorexia nervosa in people aged 10-44 years, using hospital episodes (counting every admission) and first-recorded admissions (counting only the first record for each person). Former Oxford NHS Region; and England. None; anonymous statistical records were used. In the longstanding ORLS, the age-standardised first-recorded admission rate for women was 2.7 (95% confidence interval 1.6-3.8) per 100,000 female population aged 10-44 years in 1968-1971; 2.7 (2.1-3.3) in 1992-1996; and 6.3 (5.5-7.2) in 2007-2011. Male rates were zero in the 1960s; 0.07 (0.0-0.1) per 100,000 men in 1992-1996; and 0.4 (0.2-0.6) in 2007-2011. In England, female rates increased from 4.2 (4.0-4.4) in 1998-2001 to 6.9 (6.7-7.1) in 2007-2011; and the corresponding male rates were 0.2 (0.1-0.3) and 0.5 (0.4-0.6). Episode-based admission rates rose more than person-based rates. The highest rates by far were in girls and women aged 15-19 years. In recent years, anorexia nervosa has become a greater burden on secondary care: not only have admission rates increased but so too have multiple admissions per person with anorexia nervosa. The increase in admission rates might reflect an increase in prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa in the general population, but other explanations, including lower clinical thresholds for admission, are possible and are discussed. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  5. A review of initiatives to reduce energy-related CO2 emissions from the city of Oxford: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Rajat

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews three key initiatives undertaken in the historical city of Oxford to bring about reductions in energy-related CO 2 emissions on a city-wide scale. The author has been part of all the three initiatives. In 2002, a collaborative partnership between academia, industry and city council started the Oxford Solar Initiative (OSI) which uses a community-based approach to help households and organisations in Oxford, financially and technically, to install solar energy systems and energy efficiency measures in buildings. So far OSI has facilitated the installation of 80 active solar systems, over 450 energy efficiency measures and 3,000 low energy bulbs. The scientific basis of OSI is a GIS-based DECoRuM model which estimates and maps baseline energy use and CO 2 emissions on a house-by house level, identifies 'pollution' hotspots, predicts the potential for reductions in CO 2 emissions and monitors reductions achieved as a result of deploying energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. The application of DECoRuM model to a case study in Oxford shows that CO 2 emission reductions above 60 % are possible, at a cost of between GBP 6 to GBP 77 per tonne of CO 2 emissions saved, depending upon the package of measures used, and the scenario of capital costs (low or high) employed. The OSI and DECoRuM projects have led to the development of an action-oriented Oxford Climate Change Action Plan (OCCAP) which constructs an accurate CO 2 emissions inventory for Oxford city for a baseline year, establishes CO 2 reduction targets and proposes action for each of the energy-related sectors to meet those targets. The OCCAP will be implemented by Oxford City Council and provides a useful example for other cities in their endeavour for emission reductions

  6. A review of initiatives to reduce energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions from the city of Oxford: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Rajat [Dept. of Architecture, School of the Built Environment, Oxford Brookes Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    This paper reviews three key initiatives undertaken in the historical city of Oxford to bring about reductions in energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions on a city-wide scale. The author has been part of all the three initiatives. In 2002, a collaborative partnership between academia, industry and city council started the Oxford Solar Initiative (OSI) which uses a community-based approach to help households and organisations in Oxford, financially and technically, to install solar energy systems and energy efficiency measures in buildings. So far OSI has facilitated the installation of 80 active solar systems, over 450 energy efficiency measures and 3,000 low energy bulbs. The scientific basis of OSI is a GIS-based DECoRuM model which estimates and maps baseline energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions on a house-by house level, identifies 'pollution' hotspots, predicts the potential for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions and monitors reductions achieved as a result of deploying energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. The application of DECoRuM model to a case study in Oxford shows that CO{sub 2} emission reductions above 60 % are possible, at a cost of between GBP 6 to GBP 77 per tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions saved, depending upon the package of measures used, and the scenario of capital costs (low or high) employed. The OSI and DECoRuM projects have led to the development of an action-oriented Oxford Climate Change Action Plan (OCCAP) which constructs an accurate CO{sub 2} emissions inventory for Oxford city for a baseline year, establishes CO{sub 2} reduction targets and proposes action for each of the energy-related sectors to meet those targets. The OCCAP will be implemented by Oxford City Council and provides a useful example for other cities in their endeavour for emission reductions.

  7. Oxford Partial Knee Replacement as a Gateway to Outpatient Arthroplasty “Lessons Learned along the Journey”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Berend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Partial Knee Replacement was approved for implantation in the US in 2004 after the surgeon completed an educational training requirement.  Since then my knee practiced has expanded to over 50% partial knee.  This experience coupled with refinement of surgical techniques, anesthesia protocols, and patient selection has facilitated the transformation to same day discharge for partial knee cases and has quickly transitioned to total hip, total knee, and selected revision surgeries.  Patient selection has also expanded for outpatient joints and is now based on medical screening criteria and insurance access.  Over a two-year period we have performed over 1,000 outpatient arthroplasty procedures with no readmissions for pain control.   Overall readmission rate for all reasons was 2%.  Patient satisfaction scores were 98% Great-Good for 2014-15.  The combination of a partial knee replacement practice and an outpatient joint program brings the best VALUE to the patients, surgeons, and the arthroplasty system and represents the future of arthroplasty care.

  8. Remaking the medico-legal scene: a social history of the late-Victorian coroner in Oxford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Elizabeth T

    2010-04-01

    There have been wide-ranging debates about medicine and the law encapsulated in the figure of the coroner in Victorian England. Recently the historical literature on coroners has been enriched by macro-studies. Despite this important research, the social lives of coroners and their daily interactions remain relatively neglected in standard historical accounts. This article redresses that issue by examining the working life of the coroner for Oxford during the late-Victorian era. Edward Law Hussey kept very detailed records of his time in office as coroner. New research material makes it feasible to trace his professional background, from doctor of the sick poor, to hospital house surgeon and then busy coroner. His career trajectory, personal interactions, and professional disputes, provide an important historical prism illuminating contemporary debates that occupied coroners in their working lives. Hussey tried to improve his medico-legal reach and the public image of his coroner's office by reducing infanticide rates, converting a public mortuary, and acquiring a proper coroner's court. His campaigns had limited success because the social scene in which he worked was complicated by the dominance of health and welfare agencies that resented his role as an expanding arm of the Victorian information state.

  9. Minimally important change was estimated for the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire after foot/ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jill; Boller, Irene; Doll, Helen; Lavis, Grahame; Sharp, Robert; Cooke, Paul; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2014-06-01

    To ascertain the smallest amounts of change for the three Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) domains that are likely to be clinically meaningful and beyond measurement error for conditions affecting the foot/ankle. Estimates were compared with those from the Short-Form 36 (SF-36). A prospective observational study of 671 consecutive patients undergoing foot or ankle surgery at an orthopedic hospital. Before and 9 months after surgery, patients completed the MOXFQ and SF-36; transition items (anchor) asked about perceived changes in foot/ankle pain or problems since the surgery. Four hundred ninety-one patients completed pre- and postoperative questionnaires. Anchor-based minimal clinically important change (MCIC) values were ~13 points for each of the MOXFQ Walking/standing (W/S), Pain, and Social Interaction (S-I) domains [and greater than the standard error of measurement (SEM)]. MCIC values for all SF-36 domains fell within the SEM. Between-group MCIDs for the MOXFQ were W/S, 16.2; Pain, 9.9; S-I, 9.3. Distribution-based minimal detectable change (MDC90) values for the MOXFQ were ~11, ~12, and ~16 score points for the W/S, Pain, and S-I scales, respectively. This article provides information for aiding the interpretability of MOXFQ outcomes data and for planning future studies. The SF-36 is not recommended as a primary outcome for foot/ankle surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D. Hargreaves

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0–2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5′ and 3′ UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29. We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species.

  11. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Mulley, John F

    2015-01-01

    Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0-2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5' and 3' UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete) and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29). We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species.

  12. The petrography of the Jurassic core from the Harwell research site. Part 1: Kimmeridge Clay, Corallian Beds and Oxford Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.

    1983-06-01

    Detailed examination by mineralogical and petrological techniques has enabled a detailed characterisation of the lithologies of the Oxford Clay, Corallian Beds and the Kimmeridge Clay beneath the Harwell Research Site. Information obtained has revealed the nature of the bulk mineralogy, pore-types, pore-surface mineralogy and post-depositional alteration of the rocks. Diagenesis has played an important part in determining the mineralogy, porosity and fabric of the rocks and has had the greatest variation of effects in the Corallian Beds, determining the phases now in contact with groundwater. It is these authigenic phases that are of key interest in assessing the behaviour of radionuclides which may be released into the local groundwater systems. The importance of the different pore-types characterised during this investigation and of the mineral phases lining these potential pathways for groundwater movement are discussed in detail at the end of this report. Diagenesis has reduced primary porosity in many of the Corallian rocks by calcite precipitation. In such rocks where a cohesive cement is present, groundwater flow must occur along large-scale fractures and more slowly along intercrystalline grain-boundary cracks. (author)

  13. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Persian Version of the Oxford Knee Score in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Oxford Knee Score (OKS is a short patient-reported outcome instrument that measures pain and physical activity related to knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, construct validity and consistent reliability of the Persian version of the OKS. Methods: The case series consisted of 80 patients who were clinically diagnosed with having knee osteoarthritis. All patients were requested to fill-in the Persian OKS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Correlation analysis between the Persian versions of these two instruments was then carried out. The scores of the Persian SF-36 were used to evaluate convergent and divergent validity of the 12-item Persian OKS. Results: From a total of 80 patients, 63 were female (79% and the remaining 17 were male (21% with a mean age of 52.2 years. In the present study, high Cronbach’s alpha of 0.95 confirms excellent internal consistency of the Persian OKS scale similar to previous investigations. The results confirm that the Persian version of this instrument is valid and reliable, similar to its English index and its subsequent translations in different languages. Conclusion: The Persian OKS is a reliable instrument to evaluate knee function in patients with knee osteoarthritis and is a useful tool for outcome measurement in clinical research.

  14. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-09-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for very bright guide star AO with substantial increase of enclosed energy. Over the last two years PALAO was upgraded to PALM-3000: an extreme, high-order adaptive optics system with two deformable mirrors with more than 3000 actuators, promising diffraction limited performance in SWIFT's wavelength range. In order to take advantage of this increased spatial resolution we upgraded SWIFT with new pre-optics allowing us to spatially Nyquist sample the diffraction limited PALM-3000 point spread function with 16 mas resolution, reducing the spaxel scale by another factor of 5×. We designed, manufactured, integrated and tested the new pre-optics in the first half of 2011 and commissioned it in December 2011. Here we present the opto-mechanical design and assembly of the new scale changing optics, as well as laboratory and on-sky commissioning results. In optimal observing conditions we achieve substantial Strehl ratios, delivering the near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the I and z bands.

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the persian version of the oxford knee score in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Birjandinejad, Ali; Soltani-Moghaddas, Seyed Hosein

    2014-11-01

    The Oxford Knee Score (OKS) is a short patient-reported outcome instrument that measures pain and physical activity related to knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, construct validity and consistent reliability of the Persian version of the OKS. The case series consisted of 80 patients who were clinically diagnosed with having knee osteoarthritis. All patients were requested to fill-in the Persian OKS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Correlation analysis between the Persian versions of these two instruments was then carried out. The scores of the Persian SF-36 were used to evaluate convergent and divergent validity of the 12-item Persian OKS. From a total of 80 patients, 63 were female (79%) and the remaining 17 were male (21%) with a mean age of 52.2 years. In the present study, high Cronbach's alpha of 0.95 confirms excellent internal consistency of the Persian OKS scale similar to previous investigations. The results confirm that the Persian version of this instrument is valid and reliable, similar to its English index and its subsequent translations in different languages. The Persian OKS is a reliable instrument to evaluate knee function in patients with knee osteoarthritis and is a useful tool for outcome measurement in clinical research.

  16. Validation of the translated Oxford ankle foot questionnaire in 82 Danish children aged between five and 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkevich, P; Møller-Madsen, B; Gottliebsen, M; Kjeldgaard Pedersen, L; Rahbek, O

    2015-03-01

    We present the validation of a translation into Danish of the Oxford ankle foot questionnaire (OxAFQ). We followed the Isis Pros guidelines for translation and pilot-tested the questionnaire on ten children and their parents. Following modifications we tested the validity of the final questionnaire on 82 children (36 boys and 45 girls) with a mean age of 11.7 years (5.5 to 16.0) and their parents. We tested the reliability (repeatability (test-retest), child-parent agreement, internal consistency), feasibility (response rate, time to completion, floor and ceiling effects) and construct validity. The generic child health questionnaire was used for comparison. We found good internal consistency for the physical and the school and play domains, but lower internal consistency for the emotional domain. Overall, good repeatability was found within children and parents as well as agreement between children and parents. The OxAFQ was fast and easy to complete, but we observed a tendency towards ceiling effects in the school and play and emotional domains. To our knowledge this is the first independent validation of the OxAFQ in any language. We found it valid and feasible for use in the clinic to assess the impact on children's lives of foot and/or ankle disorders. It is a valuable research tool. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. Validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire for hallux valgus deformity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talu, Burcu; Bayramlar, Kezban; Bek, Nilgün; Yakut, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients affected by hallux valgus in order to assess the accuracy of this cross-cultural adaption. Thirty female volunteers aged between 18 and 55 years were included in the study. Subjects with hallux valgus were asked to complete the MOXFQ and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). After receiving permission from the author, the MOXFQ was translated into Turkish twice and then back translated to English, after which its compatibility was evaluated. The Turkish version of the MOXFO was applied twice, 1-3 days apart, to the study subjects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed using Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Construct validity was assessed with the use of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, using a priori hypothesized correlations with SF-36 domains. Subjects achieved similar scores at the first and second administration of the questionnaire (validity was supported by the presence of all the hypothesized correlations, with SF-36 within its physical parameters. The Turkish version of the MOXFQ is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating foot pain and functional status in patients affected by hallux valgus.

  18. Reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Spanish Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients with foot or ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Juan B Gerstner; Winson, Ian; Goldhahn, Sabine; Castro, Michael D; Swords, Michael P; Grujic, Leslie; Rammelt, Stefan; Sands, Andrew K

    2016-03-01

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) has been validated in Spanish for use in patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery. 120 patients completed the MOXFQ and the SF-36 before surgery and 6 and 12 months postoperative. Surgeons completed the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Clinical Rating System. Psychometric properties were assessed for all three MOXFQ dimensions, and for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish MOXFQ demonstrated consistency with Cronbach's alpha values between 0.65 and 0.90, and reliability ([ICCs] >0.95). It shows a moderate to strong correlation between the Walking/standing dimension and the related domains of the SF-36 (|r|>0.6), the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (|r|>0.47) and Hallux-MTP-IP Scale (|r|>0.64). Responsiveness was excellent, (effect sizes >2.1). The respective minimal detectable change (MDC90) was 14.18 for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish version of the MOXFQ showed good psychometric properties in patients with foot and ankle disorders. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Results of the radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site properties, Oxford, Ohio (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September of 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, primarily 238 U, from uranium machining operations conducted for National Lead of Ohio, a prime Atomic Energy Commission contractor. The survey included scan measurement of direct radiation levels inside and outside the former laboratory, outdoors on eight properties adjoining the former laboratory, and the city right-of-way adjacent to the surveyed properties. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples taken from each property and the exterior of the laboratory. Fixed surface residual radioactivity was measured inside the laboratory and outside the building. Air samples were collected, direct exposure was measured, and samples were collected to measure transferable radioactivity inside the building. Results of the survey indicate areas where surface and soil contamination level s are above the DOE guidelines for uncontrolled areas

  20. Benchmarking of the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing for quantitative and qualitative assessment of cDNA populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomopoulos, Spyros; Wang, Yu Chang; Djambazian, Haig; Badescu, Dunarel; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2016-08-24

    To assess the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencing platform, cDNAs from the External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC) RNA Spike-In mix were sequenced. This mix mimics mammalian mRNA species and consists of 92 polyadenylated transcripts with known concentration. cDNA libraries were generated using a template switching protocol to facilitate the direct comparison between different sequencing platforms. The MinION performance was assessed for its ability to sequence the cDNAs directly with good accuracy in terms of abundance and full length. The abundance of the ERCC cDNA molecules sequenced by MinION agreed with their expected concentration. No length or GC content bias was observed. The majority of cDNAs were sequenced as full length. Additionally, a complex cDNA population derived from a human HEK-293 cell line was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500, PacBio RS II and ONT MinION platforms. We observed that there was a good agreement in the measured cDNA abundance between PacBio RS II and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.82, isoforms with length more than 700bp) and between Illumina HiSeq 2500 and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.75). This indicates that the ONT MinION can sequence quantitatively both long and short full length cDNA molecules.

  1. The universe - present, past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longair, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is the text of the Halley Lecture 1985 which was delivered on 21 May 1985 in Oxford. It addresses the major problems of contemporary cosmology. The Universe as understood to astronomers in 1985 is discussed, and this is compared with the observations of what happened in earlier epochs. Questions about the origin of galaxies and the Universe itself are raised. Although some guesses are made about the future of the Universe the main look at the future is about what astronomers want to do about the major problems facing them today. (UK)

  2. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  3. The Japanese Histologic Classification and T-score in the Oxford Classification system could predict renal outcome in Japanese IgA nephropathy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihan, Ahmad Baseer; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Katsuno, Takayuki; Kato, Sawako; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Ozeki, Takaya; Hishida, Manabu; Nagata, Takanobu; Ando, Masahiko; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2017-12-01

    The Oxford Classification is utilized globally, but has not been fully validated. In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis between the Oxford Classification and Japanese Histologic Classification (JHC) to predict renal outcome in Japanese patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). A retrospective cohort study including 86 adult IgAN patients was conducted. The Oxford Classification and the JHC were evaluated by 7 independent specialists. The JHC, MEST score in the Oxford Classification, and crescents were analyzed in association with renal outcome, defined as a 50% increase in serum creatinine. In multivariate analysis without the JHC, only the T score was significantly associated with renal outcome. While, a significant association was revealed only in the JHC on multivariate analysis with JHC. The JHC and T score in the Oxford Classification were associated with renal outcome among Japanese patients with IgAN. Superiority of the JHC as a predictive index should be validated with larger study population and cohort studies in different ethnicities.

  4. New insights into Mesozoic cycad evolution: an exploration of anatomically preserved Cycadaceae seeds from the Jurassic Oxford Clay biota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R.T. Spencer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most knowledge concerning Mesozoic Era floras has come from compression fossils. This has been augmented in the last 20 years by rarer permineralized material showing cellular preservation. Here, we describe a new genus of anatomically preserved gymnosperm seed from the Callovian–Oxfordian (Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation (UK, using a combination of traditional sectioning and synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-tomography (SRXMT. Oxfordiana motturii gen. et sp. nov. is large and bilaterally symmetrical. It has prominent external ribs, and has a three-layered integument comprising: a narrow outer layer of thick walled cells; a thick middle parenchymatous layer; and innermost a thin fleshy layer. The integument has a longitudinal interior groove and micropyle, enveloping a nucellus with a small pollen chamber. The large size, bilateral symmetry and integumentary groove demonstrate an affinity for the new species within the cycads. Moreover, the internal groove in extant taxa is an autapomorphy of the genus Cycas, where it facilitates seed germination. Based upon the unique seed germination mechanism shared with living species of the Cycadaceae, we conclude that O. motturii is a member of the stem-group lineage leading to Cycas after the Jurassic divergence of the Cycadaceae from other extant cycads. SRXMT—for the first time successfully applied to fossils already prepared as slides—reveals the distribution of different mineral phases within the fossil, and allows us to evaluate the taphonomy of Oxfordiana. An early pyrite phase replicates the external surfaces of individual cells, a later carbonate component infilling void spaces. The resulting taphonomic model suggests that the relatively small size of the fossils was key to their exceptional preservation, concentrating sulfate-reducing bacteria in a locally closed microenvironment and thus facilitating soft-tissue permineralization.

  5. Metabolic profiles of male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the EPIC-Oxford cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julie A; Rinaldi, Sabina; Ferrari, Pietro; Carayol, Marion; Achaintre, David; Scalbert, Augustin; Cross, Amanda J; Gunter, Marc J; Fensom, Georgina K; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2015-12-01

    Human metabolism is influenced by dietary factors and lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors; thus, men who exclude some or all animal products from their diet might have different metabolic profiles than meat eaters. We aimed to investigate differences in concentrations of 118 circulating metabolites, including acylcarnitines, amino acids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, hexose, and sphingolipids related to lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism between male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. In this cross-sectional study, concentrations of metabolites were measured by mass spectrometry in plasma from 379 men categorized according to their diet group. Differences in mean metabolite concentrations across diet groups were tested by using ANOVA, and a false discovery rate-controlling procedure was used to account for multiple testing. Principal component analysis was used to investigate patterns in metabolic profiles. Concentrations of 79% of metabolites differed significantly by diet group. In the vast majority of these cases, vegans had the lowest concentration, whereas meat eaters most often had the highest concentrations of the acylcarnitines, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, and fish eaters or vegetarians most often had the highest concentrations of the amino acids and a biogenic amine. A clear separation between patterns in the metabolic profiles of the 4 diet groups was seen, with vegans being noticeably different from the other groups because of lower concentrations of some glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. Metabolic profiles in plasma could effectively differentiate between men from different habitual diet groups, especially vegan men compared with men who consume animal products. The difference in metabolic profiles was mainly explained by the lower concentrations of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in vegans.

  6. Metabolic profiles of male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the EPIC-Oxford cohort12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julie A; Rinaldi, Sabina; Ferrari, Pietro; Carayol, Marion; Achaintre, David; Scalbert, Augustin; Cross, Amanda J; Gunter, Marc J; Fensom, Georgina K; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human metabolism is influenced by dietary factors and lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors; thus, men who exclude some or all animal products from their diet might have different metabolic profiles than meat eaters. Objective: We aimed to investigate differences in concentrations of 118 circulating metabolites, including acylcarnitines, amino acids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, hexose, and sphingolipids related to lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism between male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Design: In this cross-sectional study, concentrations of metabolites were measured by mass spectrometry in plasma from 379 men categorized according to their diet group. Differences in mean metabolite concentrations across diet groups were tested by using ANOVA, and a false discovery rate–controlling procedure was used to account for multiple testing. Principal component analysis was used to investigate patterns in metabolic profiles. Results: Concentrations of 79% of metabolites differed significantly by diet group. In the vast majority of these cases, vegans had the lowest concentration, whereas meat eaters most often had the highest concentrations of the acylcarnitines, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, and fish eaters or vegetarians most often had the highest concentrations of the amino acids and a biogenic amine. A clear separation between patterns in the metabolic profiles of the 4 diet groups was seen, with vegans being noticeably different from the other groups because of lower concentrations of some glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. Conclusions: Metabolic profiles in plasma could effectively differentiate between men from different habitual diet groups, especially vegan men compared with men who consume animal products. The difference in metabolic profiles was mainly explained by the lower concentrations of

  7. A comparison of foot kinematics in people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Barton, Christian J; Cotchett, Matthew P; McSweeney, Simone R; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-10-01

    Foot posture is thought to influence predisposition to overuse injuries of the lower limb. Although the mechanisms underlying this proposed relationship are unclear, it is thought that altered foot kinematics may play a role. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate differences in foot motion between people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Foot posture in 19 participants was documented as normal-arched (n=10) or flat-arched (n=9) using a foot screening protocol incorporating measurements from weightbearing antero-posterior and lateral foot radiographs. Differences between the groups in triplanar motion of the tibia, rearfoot and forefoot during walking were evaluated using a three-dimensional motion analysis system incorporating a multi-segment foot model (OFM). Participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated greater peak forefoot plantar-flexion (-13.7° ± 5.6° vs -6.5° ± 3.7°; p=0.004), forefoot abduction (-12.9° ± 6.9° vs -1.8° ± 6.3°; p=0.002), and rearfoot internal rotation (10.6° ± 7.5° vs -0.2°± 9.9°; p=0.018) compared to those with normal-arched feet. Additionally, participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated decreased peak forefoot adduction (-7.0° ± 9.2° vs 5.6° ± 7.3°; p=0.004) and a trend towards increased rearfoot eversion (-5.8° ± 4.4° vs -2.5° ± 2.6°; p=0.06). These findings support the notion that flat-arched feet have altered motion associated with greater pronation during gait; factors that may increase the risk of overuse injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diet and risk of kidney stones in the Oxford cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Benjamin W; Appleby, Paul N; Reynard, John M; Noble, Jeremy G; Key, Timothy J; Allen, Naomi E

    2014-05-01

    The lifetime prevalence of kidney stones is around 10 % and incidence rates are increasing. Diet may be an important determinant of kidney stone development. Our objective was to investigate the association between diet and kidney stone risk in a population with a wide range of diets. This association was examined among 51,336 participants in the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition using data from Hospital Episode Statistics in England and Scottish Morbidity Records. In the cohort, 303 participants attended hospital with a new kidney stone episode. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). Compared to those with high intake of meat (>100 g/day), the HR estimates for moderate meat-eaters (50-99 g/day), low meat-eaters (<50 g/day), fish-eaters and vegetarians were 0.80 (95 % CI 0.57-1.11), 0.52 (95 % CI 0.35-0.8), 0.73 (95 % CI 0.48-1.11) and 0.69 (95 % CI 0.48-0.98), respectively. High intakes of fresh fruit, fibre from wholegrain cereals and magnesium were also associated with a lower risk of kidney stone formation. A high intake of zinc was associated with a higher risk. In conclusion, vegetarians have a lower risk of developing kidney stones compared with those who eat a high meat diet. This information may be important to advise the public about prevention of kidney stone formation.

  9. Validation of the Korean Version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire in Patients With Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man-Jun; Ko, Young-Chul; Huh, Jung-Wook; Park, Sook-Hyun; Park, Tae-Hong; Park, Joon-Hyung

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) is a practical, reliable, and valid questionnaire for hallux valgus surgery and has been translated into several languages. However, the MOXFQ has not been translated into Korean. In the present study, we aimed to translate and evaluate the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the MOXFQ for patients affected by hallux valgus. In accordance with the guidelines of cross-cultural adaptation, we translated the English version of MOXFQ into Korean and then backward translated it into English. We sent out letters that included the Korean version of the MOXFQ, a visual analog scale measure of pain, and a validated Korean version of the short-form 36-item Health Survey to 135 patients with hallux valgus. A retest was administered after 2 weeks. Of the 135 patients, 104 responded to the first questionnaire, and 82 of the first-time responders returned their second questionnaires. We evaluated the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, concurrent validity, and construct validity of the Korean version of the MOXFQ. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.82 for the total MOXFQ and ranged from 0.81 to 0.82 for the 3 subscales. Cronbach's alpha for the total MOXFQ was 0.85 and ranged from 0.8 to 0.92 for the 3 subscales. Concurrent and construct validity was supported by significant correlation with the visual analog scale and short-form 36-item Health Survey subscale scores. The Korean version of the MOXFQ was tested, and it was found to be a valid and reliable instrument for patients with hallux valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An analysis of Euroqol EQ-5D and Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire scores six months following podiatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Anthony J; Kilmartin, Timothy E

    2012-07-09

    In the United Kingdom patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) have been adopted as a key measure of foot surgery outcomes. The intention of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of a regional outcome measure; the Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) and a generic measure; the EuroQol EQ-5D, in the context of day care Podiatric Surgery. A prospective audit of 375 consecutive day care surgical admissions was undertaken. All patients attending for surgery, who agreed to participate, were included. Pre operation patients completed the MOXFQ and the EQ-5D. Both questionnaires were completed again at 6 months post operation. Additional data was collected on patient demographics, surgical procedures and complications. Few complications were encountered and most patients (84%) returned for a final review 6 months post operation. Mean MOXFQ scores improved for each domain: pain; 51.7 pre-operation, reduced to 16.5 post-operation, walking; 50.2 reduced to 14.1 and social interaction; 45.7 reduced to 10.6. The minimal clinically important differences (MCID) estimates for the pain domain were exceeded by 82.6% of patients, while 74.8% exceeded the MCID for walking and 68.5% exceeded the MCID for social interaction. A small number of patients (2.9%) deteriorated across all three MOXFQ domains.The EQ-5D Index, summary of health related quality of life, improved from 0.66 pre-operation to 0.86 post operation. The EQ-5D index MCID was exceeded by 79.2% of patients. Index scores deteriorated for 1.8% of patients following surgery. Effect sizes measured following surgery were largest for the MOXFQ domains: Walking; 1.39, Pain; 1.52 and Social Interaction: 1.39. The EQ-5D index effect size was 0.83. The EQ-5D visual analogue scale (VAS) was not influenced by surgery. Both the MOXFQ and EQ-5D index (but not the VAS) appear sensitive to changes in health status at 6 months following elective foot surgery. Both instruments were particularly responsive to changes

  11. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  12. AMS radiocarbon dating at Oxford and its contribution to issues of the extinction of Neanderthals and the spread of Homo sapiens sapiens across Eurasia

    CERN Document Server

    Pettitt, P B; Hedges, R E M; Hodgins, G W L

    2000-01-01

    The Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit has participated in a number of projects central to the question of the evolutionary fate of the Neanderthals and the spread of our own species across Eurasia. This paper outlines some of the key issues in this field and reports on some dating projects which have refined our knowledge of these momentous events in human history.

  13. AMS radiocarbon dating at Oxford and its contribution to issues of the extinction of Neanderthals and the spread of Homo sapiens sapiens across Eurasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettitt, P.B.; Bronk Ramsey, C.; Hedges, R.E.M.; Hodgins, G.W.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit has participated in a number of projects central to the question of the evolutionary fate of the Neanderthals and the spread of our own species across Eurasia. This paper outlines some of the key issues in this field and reports on some dating projects which have refined our knowledge of these momentous events in human history

  14. Evidence from the Oxford Classification cohort supports the clinical value of subclassification of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in IgA nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellur, Shubha S.; Lepeytre, Fanny; Vorobyeva, Olga; Troyanov, Stéphan; Cook, H. Terence; Roberts, Ian S. D.; Alpers, Charles E.; Amore, Alessandro; Barratt, Jonathan; Berthoux, Francois; Bonsib, Stephen; Bruijn, Jan A.; Cattran, Daniel C.; Coppo, Rosanna; D'Agati, Vivette; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Emancipator, Steven; Emma, Francesco; Feehally, John; Ferrario, Franco; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Fogo, Agnes; Geddes, Colin C.; Groene, Hermann-Josef; Haas, Mark; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Hill, Prue A.; Hogg, Ronald J.; Hsu, Stephen I.; Jennette, J. Charles; Joh, Kensuke; Julian, Bruce A.; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Lai, Fernand M.; Li, Lei-Shi; Li, Philip K. T.; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Mackinnon, Bruce; Mezzano, Sergio; Schena, F. Paolo; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Walker, Patrick D.; Wang, Haiyan; Weening, Jan J.; Yoshikawa, Nori; Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a common finding in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Here we assessed FSGS lesions in the Oxford Classification patient cohort and correlated histology with clinical presentation and outcome to determine whether subclassification of the S score in IgAN is

  15. 'Where of is mad al mankynde' : an edition of and introduction to the twenty-four poems in Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Digby 102

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Louis Johan Philip

    2009-01-01

    'Where of is Mad al Mankynde' represents a new critical edition of the collection of twenty-four late-medieval anonymous poems contained, among other pieces, in Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Digby 102. Each poem is introduced with a brief summary and closes with line-for-line explanatory comments.

  16. The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011) The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, G.

    2012-11-01

    The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers, held in Lady Margaret Hall College in Oxford in October 2011 continues the tradition of bi-annual international meetings dedicated to the study of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. The first meeting of this series took place in S Diego (CA, US) in 1987, and since then scientists in the fusion community studying the formation and effects of transport barriers in plasmas have been meeting at this small workshop to discuss progress, new experimental evidence and related theoretical studies. The first workshops were strongly focussed on the characterization and understanding of the H-mode plasma, discovered in ASDEX in 1982. Tokamaks throughout the entire world were able to reproduce the H-mode transition in the following few years and since then the H-mode has been recognised as a pervasive physics feature of toroidally confined plasmas. Increased physics understanding of the H-mode transition and of the properties of H-mode plasmas, together with extensive development of diagnostic capabilities for the plasma edge, led to the development of edge transport barrier studies and theory. The H-mode Workshop reflected this extension in interest, with more and more contributions discussing the phenomenology of edge transport barriers and instabilities (ELMs), L-H transition and edge transport barrier formation theory. In the last 15 years, in response to the development of fusion plasma studies, the scientific scope of the workshop has been broadened to include experimental and theoretical studies of both edge and internal transport barriers, including formation and sustainment of transport barriers for different transport channels (energy, particle and momentum). The 13th H-mode Workshop was organized around six leading topics, and, as customary for this workshop, a lead speaker was selected for each topic to present to the audience the state-of-the-art, new understanding and open issues, as well

  17. The Effect of Quality of School Life on Sense of Happiness: A Study on University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökler, Riza; Gürgan, Ugur; Tastan, Nuray

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between quality of school life and happiness among university students. For this purpose, 326 students from five different faculties in Çankiri Karatekin University participated in the study. Participants filled in the "scale for quality of school life" and "scale for Oxford happiness-Compact…

  18. Universe symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  19. Validation of a prediction model that allows direct comparison of the Oxford Knee Score and American Knee Society clinical rating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maempel, J F; Clement, N D; Brenkel, I J; Walmsley, P J

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates a significant correlation between the American Knee Society (AKS) Clinical Rating System and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and provides a validated prediction tool to estimate score conversion. A total of 1022 patients were prospectively clinically assessed five years after TKR and completed AKS assessments and an OKS questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between OKS and the AKS knee and function scores but a stronger correlation (r = 0.68, p Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Sensing Emotion in Voices: Negativity Bias and Gender Differences in a Validation Study of the Oxford Vocal (?OxVoc?) Sounds Database

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Katherine S.; Parsons, Christine E.; LeBeau, Richard T.; Tabak, Benjamin A.; Sewart, Amy R.; Stein, Alan; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2016-01-01

    Emotional expressions are an essential element of human interactions. Recent work has increasingly recognized that emotional vocalizations can color and shape interactions between individuals. Here we present data on the psychometric properties of a recently developed database of authentic nonlinguistic emotional vocalizations from human adults and infants (the Oxford Vocal 'OxVoc' Sounds Database; Parsons, Young, Craske, Stein, & Kringelbach, 2014). In a large sample (n = 562), we demonstrat...

  1. Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  2. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  3. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  4. Runaway universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  5. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  6. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  7. Selected Abstracts of the 3rd Edition of Transport of High Risk Infants; Oxford (UK); August 31st-September 2nd, 2017

    OpenAIRE

    --- Various Authors

    2017-01-01

    Selected Abstracts of the 3rd Edition of Transport of High Risk Infants; Oxford (UK); August 31st-September 2nd, 2017ABS 1. MORTALITY RATE IN 23-30 WEEKS PRE­MATURE BORN IN LEVEL 2 HOSPITAL IN COMPARISON TO THOSE BORN IN TERTIARY-CARE HOSPITAL • J.P. Doray, J.L. DorayABS 2. THE QUEBEC AEROMEDICAL EXPERIENCE: EVACUATION OF NEONATES FROM AREAS IN EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS – IN­NOVATIONS IN SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY • É. Notebaert, J. Provencher, R. Bernier, S. Côté, S. KindABS 3. NASAL HIGH FLOW S...

  8. Ten- to 15-year results of the Oxford Phase III mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a prospective study from a non-designer group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowski, L A; Meijer, L I; Bekerom, M P J van den; Pilot, P; Lisowski, A E

    2016-10-01

    The interest in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial osteoarthritis has increased rapidly but the long-term follow-up of the Oxford UKAs has yet to be analysed in non-designer centres. We have examined our ten- to 15-year clinical and radiological follow-up data for the Oxford Phase III UKAs. Between January 1999 and January 2005 a total of 138 consecutive Oxford Phase III arthroplasties were performed by a single surgeon in 129 patients for medial compartment osteoarthritis (71 right and 67 left knees, mean age 72.0 years (47 to 91), mean body mass index 28.2 (20.7 to 52.2)). Both clinical data and radiographs were prospectively recorded and obtained at intervals. Of the 129 patients, 32 patients (32 knees) died, ten patients (12 knees) were not able to take part in the final clinical and radiological assessment due to physical and mental conditions, but via telephone interview it was confirmed that none of these ten patients (12 knees) had a revision of the knee arthroplasty. One patient (two knees) was lost to follow-up. The mean follow-up was 11.7 years (10 to 15). A total of 11 knees (8%) were revised. The survival at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.2 to 96.0) and revision related to the prosthesis was 99.3% (95% CI 97.9 to 100). The mean total Knee Society Score was 47 (0 to 80) pre-operatively and 81 (30 to 100) at latest follow-up. The mean Oxford Knee Score was 19 (12 to 40) pre-operatively and 42 (28 to 55) at final follow-up. Radiolucency beneath the tibial component occurred in 22 of 81 prostheses (27.2%) without evidence of loosening. This study supports the use of UKA in medial compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term functional and radiological outcomes with an excellent 15-year survival rate. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):41-7. ©2016 Lisowski et al.

  9. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  10. Use of a novel medium, the Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium, for isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from raw or non-pasteurized foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gonzáles, N E; Martínez-Chávez, L; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Martínez-Cárdenas, C; Gutiérrez-González, P; Castillo, A

    2016-05-01

    Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium (PCOM), a novel selective and differential plating medium for Listeria monocytogenes was compared with Modified Oxford Agar (MOX) for efficacy to isolate L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. naturally present in non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese (n = 50), non-pasteurized fresh squeezed orange juice (n = 50), raw beef chunks (n = 36), and fresh cabbage (n = 125). Samples were collected from retail markets and farms in Mexico and tested following the US Department of Agriculture enrichment technique. Listeria spp. were isolated from 23.4% of analyzed samples, and from those, 75.0% corresponded to raw beef chunks, 38.0% to non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese, and 30.0% to fresh squeezed orange juice. No Listeria spp. were isolated from fresh cabbage samples. L. monocytogenes was recovered from 15.3% of food samples analyzed. Non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese showed the highest proportion of L. monocytogenes positive samples (36.0%), followed by orange juice (26.0%) and raw beef (25.0%). The frequency of isolation of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes was not different (P > 0.05) between PCOM and MOX. The advantages of using PCOM when comparing to MOX, include the easier way to identify Listeria species, the lower cost per plate and the availability of its ingredients for Latin-American countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Baby universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  12. Stiegler's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  13. The Oxford solid state basics

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Steven H

    2013-01-01

    The study of solids is one of the richest, most exciting, and most successful branches of physics. While the subject of solid state physics is often viewed as dry and tedious this new book presents the topic instead as an exciting exposition of fundamental principles and great intellectual breakthroughs. Beginning with a discussion of how the study of heat capacity of solids ushered in the quantum revolution, the author presents the key ideas of the field while emphasizing the deepunderlying concepts. The book begins with a discussion of the Einstein/Debye model of specific heat, and the Drude

  14. Religion and Happiness: A Study Among University Students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J; Ok, Üzeyir; Robbins, Mandy

    2017-08-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that higher levels of positive religious affect are associated with higher levels of personal happiness among a sample of 348 students studying at a state university in Turkey who completed the Ok Religious Attitude Scale (Islam), the Oxford Happiness Inventory, and the short-form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised. The data reported a small but statistically significant association between religiosity and happiness after taking sex and individual differences in personality into account.

  15. Evidence Support and Guidelines for Using Heated, Humidified, High-Flow Nasal Cannulae in Neonatology: Oxford Nasal High-Flow Therapy Meeting, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehr, Charles C; Yoder, Bradley A; Davis, Peter G; Ives, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    Nasal high-flow therapy (nHFT) has become a popular form of noninvasive respiratory support in neonatal intensive care units. A meeting held in Oxford, UK, in June 2015 examined the evidence base and proposed a consensus statement. In summary, nHFT is effective for support of preterm infants following extubation. There is growing evidence evaluating its use in the primary treatment of respiratory distress. Further study is needed to assess which clinical conditions are most amenable to nHFT support, the most effective flow rates, and escalation and weaning strategies. Its suitability as first-line treatment needs to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intra-rater repeatability of the Oxford foot model in healthy children in different stages of the foot roll over process during gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, D J; Bencke, J; Stebbins, J A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The repeatability of the Oxford foot model has been reported, but possible variations in the repeatability during the foot roll over process have not been examined. The aim of this study was to determine the relative and absolute repeatability of the model for each stage of the foot...... roll over process during gait and to compare foot kinematic data from this study with that from another centre as a preliminary examination of the model's inter-centre repeatability and validity. METHOD: Eight healthy children were tested twice at the gait laboratory. Foot kinematics from this study...... were plotted against those from an earlier repeatability study and repeatability statistics calculated for the three rockers of stance phase and swing phase. RESULTS: Foot kinematics from this study and an earlier repeatability study produced similar kinematic patterns and joint angle ranges...

  17. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  18. Universe unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  19. Oxford-Style Debates in a Microbiology Course for Majors: A Method for Delivering Content and Engaging Critical Thinking Skills †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucaud, Dwayne W.; Nabel, Michael; Eggers, Christian H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing scientific expertise in the classroom involves promoting higher-order cognitive skills as well as content mastery. Effective use of constructivism can facilitate these outcomes. However this is often difficult to accomplish when delivery of content is paramount. Utilizing many of the tenets of constructivist pedagogy, we have designed an Oxford-style debate assignment to be used in an introductory microbiology course. Two teams of students were assigned a debatable topic within microbiology. Over a five-week period students completed an informative web page consisting of three parts: background on the topic, data-based positions for each side of the argument, and a data-based persuasive argument to support their assigned position. This was followed by an in-class presentation and debate. Analysis of student performance on knowledge-based questions shows that students retain debate-derived content acquired primarily outside of lectures significantly better than content delivered during a normal lecture. Importantly, students who performed poorly on the lecture-derived questions did as well on debate-derived questions as other students. Students also performed well on questions requiring higher-order cognitive skills and in synthesizing data-driven arguments in support of a position during the debate. Student perceptions of their knowledge-base in areas covered by the debate and their skills in using scientific databases and analyzing primary literature showed a significant increase in pre- and postassignment comparisons. Our data demonstrate that an Oxford-style debate can be used effectively to deliver relevant content, increase higher-order cognitive skills, and increase self-efficacy in science-specific skills, all contributing to developing expertise in the field. PMID:23858349

  20. University physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi

  1. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  2. Oxford Astronomer John Knight Fotheringham (1874-1936) as Unwitting Godfather of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Fictional Luni-solar Holiday “Durin’s Day”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that famed fantasy author J.R.R. Tolkien incorporated a great deal of general astronomical knowledge into his Middle-Earth novels and other works, including references to the phases and motion of the moon, the seasonal cycle of the constellations, and the historical use of meteoritic iron. Various authors have also demonstrated his use of various scientific hypotheses of his time, such as Wegener’s continental drift and the conflicting pre-Apollo models of lunar formation, as well as specific astronomical events, such as the spectacular auroral displays in 1926, a December 8, 1927 lunar eclipse, and several spectacular comets visible in 1927. An astronomical mystery remains concerning one of Tolkien’s most famous works, The Hobbit (written between the summer of 1930 and January 1933, and finally published in 1937). One of the important plot points is a message hidden in an heirloom map that explains that the secret entrance to a treasure-loaded mountain kingdom can only been found with the last ray of sunlight on a holiday that is notoriously difficult to calculate, known as Durin’s Day. Tolkien scholars have pondered why the author transformed the date, initially the last ray of sunlight on the first day of the first lunar cycle of Autumn, into a complex affair that was difficult to predict. This presentation summarizes evidence that the answer involves Tolkien’s probable knowledge of highly publicized work by his Oxford colleague, J.K. Fotheringham, on not only the visibility of the young waxing crescent moon, but the importance of lunar phases in dating historical events, including the crucifixion (research that would have keenly resonated with the devout Tolkien). In addition, Tolkien was involved in university politics at the same time that Fotheringham was (unsuccessfully) maneuvering to become the Savilian Professor of Astronomy, namely 1930-1, the years of the early work on The Hobbit.

  3. The Research Potential of the Electronic OED Database at the University of Waterloo: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Donna Lee

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the history and structure of the online database of the second edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and the software tools developed at the University of Waterloo to manipulate the unusually complex database. Four sample searches that indicate some types of problems that might be encountered are appended. (DB)

  4. Strategies Employed by Iranian EFL Freshman University Students in Extensive Listening: A Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Farinaz Shirani; Yamat, Hamidah

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study on the strategies employed by Iranian freshmen in extensive listening. A group of 12 freshman university students were purposefully selected based on their scores in the Oxford Placement Test administered. Four learners were identified as advanced, four as intermediate, and four as lower…

  5. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    Declarations on Sustainability in Higher Education (SHE) can be viewed as a piece of international regulation. Over the past 30 years research at universities has produced convincing data to warn about deterioration of the environment, resource scarcity and the need for sustainability. This in turn....... Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...

  6. Open University

    CERN Multimedia

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  7. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 9 March 2009 COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Are We Descended From Heavy Neutrinos? Prof. Boris Kayser / Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Center, Geneva, Illinois, USA) Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe. The discovery that they have nonzero masses has raised a number of very interesting questions about them, and about their connections to other areas of physics and to cosmology. After briefly reviewing what has been learned about the neutrinos so far, we will identify the major open questions, explain why they are interesting, and discuss ideas and plans for answering them through future experiments. We will highlight a particularly intriguing question: Are neutrinos the key to understanding why the universe contains matter but almost no antimatter, making it s...

  8. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  9. Associations between preoperative Oxford hip and knee scores and costs and quality of life of patients undergoing primary total joint replacement in the NHS England: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibich, Peter; Dakin, Helen A; Price, Andrew James; Beard, David; Arden, Nigel K; Gray, Alastair M

    2018-04-10

    To assess how costs and quality of life (measured by EuroQoL-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D)) before and after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) vary with age, gender and preoperative Oxford hip score (OHS) and Oxford knee score (OKS). Regression analyses using prospectively collected data from clinical trials, cohort studies and administrative data bases. UK secondary care. Men and women undergoing primary THR or TKR. The Hospital Episode Statistics data linked to patient-reported outcome measures included 602 176 patients undergoing hip or knee replacement who were followed up for up to 6 years. The Knee Arthroplasty Trial included 2217 patients undergoing TKR who were followed up for 12 years. The Clinical Outcomes in Arthroplasty Study cohort included 806 patients undergoing THR and 484 patients undergoing TKR who were observed for 1 year. EQ-5D-3L quality of life before and after surgery, costs of primary arthroplasty, costs of revision arthroplasty and the costs of hospital readmissions and ambulatory costs in the year before and up to 12 years after joint replacement. Average postoperative utility for patients at the 5th percentile of the OHS/OKS distribution was 0.61/0.5 for THR/TKR and 0.89/0.85 for patients at the 95th percentile. The difference between postoperative and preoperative EQ-5D utility was highest for patients with preoperative OHS/OKS lower than 10. However, postoperative EQ-5D utility was higher than preoperative utility for all patients with OHS≤46 and those with OKS≤44. In contrast, costs were generally higher for patients with low preoperative OHS/OKS than those with high OHS/OKS. For example, costs of hospital readmissions within 12 months after primary THR/TKR were £740/£888 for patients at the 5th percentile compared with £314/£404 at the 95th percentile of the OHS/OKS distribution. Our findings suggest that costs and quality of life associated with total joint replacement vary systematically with

  10. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  11. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  12. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 28 April 2008 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Gravity : an Emergent Perspective by Prof. Thanu Padmanabhan, Pune University Dean, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India I will motivate and describe a novel perspective in which gravity arises as an emergent phenomenon, somewhat like elasticity. This perspective throws light on several issues which are somewhat of a mystery in the conventional approach. Moreover it provides new insights on the dark energy problem. In fact, I will show that it is necessary to have such an alternative perspective in order to solve the cosmological constant problem.Information: http://theory.physics.unige.ch/~fiteo/seminars/COL/collist.html

  13. The Prevalence of Substance Use among Bandar Abas Azad Islamic University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mardani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Substance abuse is one of the most important problem and disease in current century that produced wide worry in the entire world. The solving of addiction among young and educated population is more important issue. The current research was aimed the study of the prevalence rate of the substance use (included: opium, alcohol, cigarette, Hubble bubble among Bandar Abas azad Islamic university students. Method: In this cross sectional study 310 university students were selected by stratified random sampling. For gathering data the prevalence substance use questionnaire was used. Results: The findings showed the start age was 22-25 years old. Also, prevalence rate of cigarette, Hubble bubble, opium, and alcohol were higher in boy students in comparison of girl students. The rate of difference was significant by run of chi square analysis. Conclusion: Sex, the history of substance use in family member, and friends were risk factors of substance use.

  14. Universal Alienation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harvey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a debate between David Harvey, Michael Hardt and Toni Negri. It takes Marx’s bicentenary as occasion for an update of his concept of alienation. The paper asks: how are we to interpret universal alienation and from whence does it come? Marx radically reformulated the concept of alienation in the Grundrisse. The humanism of the early Marx can be re-rooted and reconceptualised in the scientific mode proposed in the Grundrisse. In the Grundrisse, the universality of alienation is specific to capitalism’s historical evolution. Today, alienation exists almost everywhere. It exists at work in production, at home in consumption, and it dominates much of politics and daily life. Such trends intensify through the application of information technologies and artificial intelligence. Widespread alienation has resulted in Occupy movements as well as right-wing populism and bigoted nationalist and racist movements. Donald Trump is the President of alienation. The circulation of capital as totality consists of the three key moments of production, circulation and distribution. A lot of contemporary economic struggles are now occurring at the point of realisation rather than at the point of production. Protests are therefore today often expressions of broad-based discontent. Our future is dictated by the need to redeem our debts. Under such conditions democracy becomes a sham. The big question is what forms of social movement can help us get out of the state-finance nexus. The theory of objective alienation along with an understanding of its subjective consequences is one vital key to unlock the door of a progressive politics for the future.

  15. The Oxford Questionnaire on the Emotional Side-effects of Antidepressants (OQuESA): development, validity, reliability and sensitivity to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jonathan; Cole, Victoria; Doll, Helen; Goodwin, Guy M

    2012-09-01

    Some patients with major depression report a restricted range of emotions that may appear to arise as a side-effect of treatment with antidepressants. It is uncertain whether this phenomenon, sometimes called emotional blunting, represents residual symptoms of depression or side-effects of antidepressant treatment. There is currently no adequate instrument to measure this phenomenon. A draft questionnaire was developed from patient-derived qualitative data, refined using cognitive interviewing, and administered on three occasions to patients taking antidepressants. Statistical methods including factor analysis were used to reduce the size of the draft questionnaire, and to assess the performance of the resulting Oxford Questionnaire on the Emotional Side-effects of Antidepressants (OQuESA). 207 patients completed the OQuESA on at least one occasion. Their BDI-II scores and self-reported emotional blunting were spread across the possible range. The factor analysis resulted in four dimensions: 'not caring', 'emotional detachment', 'reduction in positive emotions', and 'general reduction in emotions'. The OQuESA appears to be acceptable, valid, and reliable, with sensitivity to change. The OQuESA offers promise as an effective self-report measure of the symptoms of emotional blunting in patients with depression. It can be used as a clinical tool, to facilitate the identification of patients with the syndrome of emotional blunting. It should also be used in research studies, to advance our understanding of the nature, causes and treatment of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. A team from ORNL conducted a radiological verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property between December 1994 and February 1995. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE and included directly measured radiation levels, the collection and analysis of soil samples to determine concentrations of uranium and certain other radionuclides, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. This document reports the findings of this survey. The results of the independent verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property demonstrate that all contaminated areas have been remediated to radionuclide concentrations and activity levels below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  17. Introducing the Oxford Vocal (OxVoc Sounds Database: A validated set of non-acted affective sounds from human infants, adults and domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eParsons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sound moves us. Nowhere is this more apparent than in our responses to genuine emotional vocalisations, be they heartfelt distress cries or raucous laughter. Here, we present perceptual ratings and a description of a freely available, large database of natural affective vocal sounds from human infants, adults and domestic animals, the Oxford Vocal (OxVoc Sounds database. This database consists of 173 non-verbal sounds expressing a range of happy, sad and neutral emotional states. Ratings are presented for the sounds on a range of dimensions from a number of independent participant samples. Perceptions related to valence, including distress, vocaliser mood, and listener mood are presented in Study 1. Perceptions of the arousal of the sound, listener motivation to respond and valence (positive, negative are presented in Study 2. Perceptions of the emotional content of the stimuli in both Study 1 and Study 2 were consistent with the predefined categories (e.g., laugh stimuli perceived as positive. While the adult vocalisations received more extreme valence ratings, rated motivation to respond to the sounds was highest for the infant sounds. The major advantages of this database are the inclusion of vocalisations from naturalistic situations, which represent genuine expressions of emotion, and the inclusion of vocalisations from animals and infants, providing comparison stimuli for use in cross-species and developmental studies. The associated website provides a detailed description of the physical properties of the each sound stimulus along with cross-category descriptions.

  18. The Dutch version of the Oxford Ankle and Foot Questionnaire for Children: Useful for evaluation of pediatric foot problems in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Elise; Selles, Ruud; van Nieuwkasteele, Shelly; Bessems, Gert; Pollet, Virginie; Hovius, Steven; van Nieuwenhoven, Christianne

    2017-11-04

    The purpose of this study is to develop a Dutch version of the Oxford Ankle and Foot Questionnaire for Children (OxAFQ-c) to allow evaluation of pediatric foot care. The OxAFQ-c was translated into Dutch, according to the ISPOR-guidelines. Children with different foot and ankle complaints completed the OxAFQ-c at baseline, after two weeks, and after 4-6 months. Measurement properties were assessed in terms of reliability, responsiveness, and construct validity. Test-retest reliability showed moderate intraclass correlation coefficients. Bland-Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement. After 4-6 months, the group that experienced improvement also showed improved questionnaire outcomes, indicating responsiveness. Moderate correlation between the OxAFQ-c and the Kidscreen and foot-specific VAS-scores were observed, indicating moderate construct validity. The Dutch OxAFQ-c showed moderate to good measurement properties. However, because we observed limited sensitivity to changes and wide limits of agreement in individual patients, we think the questionnaire should only be used in groups. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Hong Kong version of the Oxford Cognitive Screen (HK-OCS): validation study for Cantonese-speaking chronic stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin; Lam, Pinky Hiu-Ping; Ho, Diana Wai-Lam; Lau, Johnny King; Humphreys, Glyn W; Riddoch, Jane; Weekes, Brendan

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the validation of the Hong Kong version of Oxford Cognitive Screen (HK-OCS). Seventy Cantonese-speaking healthy individuals participated to establish normative data and 46 chronic stroke survivors were assessed using the HK-OCS, Albert's Test of Visual Neglect, short test of gestural production, and Hong Kong version of the following assessments: Western Aphasia Battery, MMSE, MoCA, Modified Barthel Index, and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale. The validity of the HK-OCS was appraised by the difference between the two participant groups. Neurologically unimpaired individuals performed significantly better than stroke survivors on the HK-OCS. Positive and significant correlations found between cognitive subtests in the HK-OCS and related assessments indicated good concurrent validity. Excellent intra-rater and inter-rater reliabilities, fair test-retest reliability, and acceptable internal consistency suggested that the HK-OCS had good reliability. Specific HK-OCS subtests including semantics, episodic memory, number writing, and orientation were the best predictors of functional outcomes.

  20. Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at 525 S. Main Street, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Rice, D.E.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Above-guideline radiation levels were also found both indoors and outdoors at 525 S. Main Street, a private residential property in the immediate vicinity of the Alba Craft site. This document reports the findings at this private residence. Although the amount of uranium found on the properties posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. A team from ORNL conducted a radiological verification survey of the property at 525 S. Main Street, between November 1993 and December 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE and included directly measured radiation levels, the collection and analysis of soil samples to determine concentrations of uranium and certain other radionuclides, and comparison of these data to the guidelines

  1. On the Relationship among Critical Thinking, Language Learning Strategy Use and University Achievement of Iranian English as a Foreign Language Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Hassan Soodmand; Movassagh, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship among critical thinking, strategy use and university achievement. To this end, 76 English major students sat the California Critical Thinking Skills Test and filled out Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning. Participants' Grade Point Averages were regarded as their university achievement. The…

  2. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 25 March 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Hunting for the Higgs with D0 at the Tevatron Prof. Gustaaf Brooijmans / Columbia University The search for the Higgs boson is one of the most important endeavors in current experimental particle physics. At the eve of the LHC start, the Tevatron is delivering record luminosity allowing both CDF and D0 to explore a new region of possible Higgs masses. In this seminar, the techniques used to search for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron will be explained, limiting factors will be examined, and the sensitivity in the various channels will be reviewed. The newly excluded values of the standard model Higgs mass will be presented. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : J.-S. Graulich

  3. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 6 avril 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR àt 17:00 – Auditoire Stückelberg Hospital superbugs, nanomechanics and statistical physics Prof. Dr G. Aeppli / University College London The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbug, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report silicon cantilever based studies of self-assembled monolayers of mucopeptides which model drug-sensitive and resistant bacterial walls. The underlying concepts needed to understand the measurements will simplify the design of cantilevers and coatings for biosensing and could even impact our understanding of drug action on bacteria themselves. (Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.) Organizer : Prof. Markus Büttiker ...

  4. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 October 2008 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements of low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions with the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab by Dr Michel Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and University of Valencia) «Do all modern accelerator-based neutrino experiments need to make use of kiloton-scale detectors and decade-long exposure times? In order to study the full pattern of neutrino mixing via neutrino oscillation experiments, the answer is probably yes, together with powerful proton sources. Still, to push the sensitivity of future neutrino oscillation searches into unchartered territory, those are necessary, but not sufficient, ingredients. In addition, accurate knowledge of neutrino interactions and neutrino production is mandatory. This knowledge can be acquired via small-scale and short-term dedicated n...

  5. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Dark Matter and the XENON Experiment By Dr. Marc Schumann, Physik Institut, Universität Zürich There is convincing astrophysical and cosmological evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is dark: It is invisible in every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are promising Dark Matter candidates that arise naturally in many theories beyond the Standard Model. Several experiments aim to directly detect WIMPs by measuring nuclear recoils from WIMPs scattered on target nuclei. In this talk, I will give an overview on Dark Matter and direct Dark Matter detection. Then I will focus on the XENON100 experiment, a 2-phase liquid/gas time projection chamber (TPC) that ...

  6. Universal algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Grätzer, George

    1979-01-01

    Universal Algebra, heralded as ". . . the standard reference in a field notorious for the lack of standardization . . .," has become the most authoritative, consistently relied on text in a field with applications in other branches of algebra and other fields such as combinatorics, geometry, and computer science. Each chapter is followed by an extensive list of exercises and problems. The "state of the art" account also includes new appendices (with contributions from B. Jónsson, R. Quackenbush, W. Taylor, and G. Wenzel) and a well-selected additional bibliography of over 1250 papers and books which makes this a fine work for students, instructors, and researchers in the field. "This book will certainly be, in the years to come, the basic reference to the subject." --- The American Mathematical Monthly (First Edition) "In this reviewer's opinion [the author] has more than succeeded in his aim. The problems at the end of each chapter are well-chosen; there are more than 650 of them. The book is especially sui...

  7. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 April 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Search for spin-1 excited bosons at the LHC Mihail V. Chizhov (Physics Department, Sofia University, Bulgaria) I will discuss the resonance production of new type spin-1 excited bosons, Z*, at hadron colliders. They can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the invariant dilepton mass distribution in the same way as the well-known hypothetical gauge bosons, Z�. This makes them very interesting objects for early searches with the LHC first data. Moreover, they have unique signatures in transverse momentum and angular distributions, which allow to distinguish them from other resonances. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  8. Prosthetic alignment after total knee replacement is not associated with dissatisfaction or change in Oxford Knee Score: A multivariable regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbregts, Henricus J T A M; Khan, Riaz J K; Fick, Daniel P; Jarrett, Olivia M; Haebich, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 18% of the patients are dissatisfied with the result of total knee replacement. However, the relation between dissatisfaction and prosthetic alignment has not been investigated before. We retrospectively analysed prospectively gathered data of all patients who had a primary TKR, preoperative and one-year postoperative Oxford Knee Scores (OKS) and postoperative computed tomography (CT). The CT protocol measures hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle, and coronal, sagittal and axial component alignment. Satisfaction was defined using a five-item Likert scale. We dichotomised dissatisfaction by combining '(very) dissatisfied' and 'neutral/not sure'. Associations with dissatisfaction and change in OKS were calculated using multivariable logistic and linear regression models. 230 TKRs were implanted in 105 men and 106 women. At one year, 12% were (very) dissatisfied and 10% neutral. Coronal alignment of the femoral component was 0.5 degrees more accurate in patients who were satisfied at one year. The other alignment measurements were not different between satisfied and dissatisfied patients. All radiographic measurements had a P-value>0.10 on univariate analyses. At one year, dissatisfaction was associated with the three-months OKS. Change in OKS was associated with three-months OKS, preoperative physical SF-12, preoperative pain and cruciate retaining design. Neither mechanical axis, nor component alignment, is associated with dissatisfaction at one year following TKR. Patients get the best outcome when pain reduction and function improvement are optimal during the first three months and when the indication to embark on surgery is based on physical limitations rather than on a high pain score. 2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Can pain and function be distinguished in the Oxford Hip Score in a meaningful way? : an exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, K K; Price, A J; Beard, D J; Fitzpatrick, R; Jenkinson, C; Dawson, J

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensionality of the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and examine whether self-reported pain and functioning can be distinguished in the form of subscales. This was a secondary data analysis of the UK NHS hospital episode statistics/patient-reported outcome measures dataset containing pre-operative OHS scores on 97 487 patients who were undergoing hip replacement surgery. The proposed number of factors to extract depended on the method of extraction employed. Velicer's Minimum Average Partial test and the Parallel Analysis suggested one factor, the Cattell's scree test and Kaiser-over-1 rule suggested two factors. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that the two-factor OHS had most of the items saliently loading either of the two factors. These factors were named 'Pain' and 'Function' and their respective subscales were created. There was some cross-loading of items: 8 (pain on standing up from a chair) and 11 (pain during work). These items were assigned to the 'Pain' subscale. The final 'Pain' subscale consisted of items 1, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12. The 'Function' subscale consisted of items 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7, with the recommended scoring of the subscales being from 0 (worst) to 100 (best). Cronbach's alpha was 0.855 for the 'Pain' subscale and 0.861 for the 'Function' subscale. A confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the two-factor model of the OHS had a better fit. However, none of the one-factor or two-factor models was rejected. Factor analyses demonstrated that, in addition to current usage as a single summary scale, separate information on pain and self-reported function can be extracted from the OHS in a meaningful way in the form of subscales. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:305-9. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Cross-sectional analyses of participation in cancer screening and use of hormone replacement therapy and medications in meat eaters and vegetarians: the EPIC-Oxford study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Paul N; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Key, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine differences in health-related behaviours such as screening or testing for cancer, use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and use of other medications in different diet groups. Design We studied 31 260 participants across four diet groups (18 155 meat eaters, 5012 fish eaters, 7179 vegetarians, 914 vegans) in the UK EPIC-Oxford cohort. Information was collected in 5-year (around 2000–2003) or 10-year (around 2007) follow-up questionnaires regarding participation in breast screening, cervical screening, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, use of HRT and use of medications for the past 4 weeks. Using Poisson regression, we estimated the prevalence ratios (PR) for each behaviour across people of different diet groups, using meat eaters as the reference group. Results Compared with meat eaters, vegetarian (PR: 0.94, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98) and vegan (PR: 0.82, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.95) women reported lower participation in breast screening, and vegetarian men were less likely to report PSA testing (PR: 0.82, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.96). No differences were observed among women for cervical screening. In women, all non-meat-eating groups reported lower use of HRT compared with meat eaters (P heterogeneity diet groups for the reported use of specific medication for high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, asthma, diabetes and thyroid disease. Conclusions Differences in self-reported breast screening, PSA testing, HRT use and overall medication use were observed across the diet groups. Whether such differences contribute to differential long-term disease risks requires further study. PMID:29284719

  11. Serum uric acid concentrations in meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Schmidt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Circulating concentrations of uric acid may be affected by dietary components such as meat, fish and dairy products, but only a few studies have compared uric acid concentrations among individuals who exclude some or all of these foods from their diet. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in serum uric acid concentrations between meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A sample of 670 men and 1,023 women (424 meat eaters, 425 fish eaters, 422 vegetarians and 422 vegans, matched on age and sex from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and serum concentrations of uric acid were measured. Mean concentrations of uric acid by diet group were calculated after adjusting for age, body mass index, calcium and alcohol intake. RESULTS: In both men and women, serum uric acid concentrations differed significantly by diet group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.01, respectively. The differences between diet groups were most pronounced in men; vegans had the highest concentration (340, 95% confidence interval 329-351 µmol/l, followed by meat eaters (315, 306-324 µmol/l, fish eaters (309, 300-318 µmol/l and vegetarians (303, 294-312 µmol/l. In women, serum uric acid concentrations were slightly higher in vegans (241, 234-247 µmol/l than in meat eaters (237, 231-242 µmol/l and lower in vegetarians (230, 224-236 µmol/l and fish eaters (227, 221-233 µmol/l. CONCLUSION: Individuals consuming a vegan diet had the highest serum concentrations of uric acid compared to meat eaters, fish eaters and vegetarians, especially in men. Vegetarians and individuals who eat fish but not meat had the lowest concentrations of serum uric acid.

  12. Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans: results from the EPIC-Oxford study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Francesca L; Steur, Marinka; Allen, Naomi E; Appleby, Paul N; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J

    2011-02-01

    Vegetarians and vegans exclude certain food sources of vitamin D from their diet, but it is not clear to what extent this affects plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). The objective was to investigate differences in vitamin D intake and plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D among meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans. A cross-sectional analysis. United Kingdom. Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were measured in 2107 white men and women (1388 meat eaters, 210 fish eaters, 420 vegetarians and eighty-nine vegans) aged 20-76 years from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Oxford cohort. Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations reflected the degree of animal product exclusion and, hence, dietary intake of vitamin D; meat eaters had the highest mean intake of vitamin D (3·1 (95 % CI 3·0, 3·2) μg/d) and mean plasma 25(OH)D concentrations (77·0 (95 % CI 75·4, 78·8) nmol/l) and vegans the lowest (0·7 (95 % CI 0·6, 0·8) μg/d and 55·8 (95 % CI 51·0, 61·0) nmol/l, respectively). The magnitude of difference in 25(OH)D concentrations between meat eaters and vegans was smaller (20 %) among those participants who had a blood sample collected during the summer months (July-September) compared with the winter months (38 %; January-March). The prevalence of low plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D (vegans than in meat and fish eaters; diet is an important determinant of plasma 25(OH)D in this British population.

  13. Serum uric acid concentrations in meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julie A; Crowe, Francesca L; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    Circulating concentrations of uric acid may be affected by dietary components such as meat, fish and dairy products, but only a few studies have compared uric acid concentrations among individuals who exclude some or all of these foods from their diet. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in serum uric acid concentrations between meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans. A sample of 670 men and 1,023 women (424 meat eaters, 425 fish eaters, 422 vegetarians and 422 vegans, matched on age and sex) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and serum concentrations of uric acid were measured. Mean concentrations of uric acid by diet group were calculated after adjusting for age, body mass index, calcium and alcohol intake. In both men and women, serum uric acid concentrations differed significantly by diet group (pvegans had the highest concentration (340, 95% confidence interval 329-351 µmol/l), followed by meat eaters (315, 306-324 µmol/l), fish eaters (309, 300-318 µmol/l) and vegetarians (303, 294-312 µmol/l). In women, serum uric acid concentrations were slightly higher in vegans (241, 234-247 µmol/l) than in meat eaters (237, 231-242 µmol/l) and lower in vegetarians (230, 224-236 µmol/l) and fish eaters (227, 221-233 µmol/l). Individuals consuming a vegan diet had the highest serum concentrations of uric acid compared to meat eaters, fish eaters and vegetarians, especially in men. Vegetarians and individuals who eat fish but not meat had the lowest concentrations of serum uric acid.

  14. Using the Oxford Cognitive Screen to Detect Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Comparison with the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Mauro; Demeyere, Nele; Abbruzzese, Laura; Damora, Alessio; Varalta, Valentina; Pirrotta, Fabio; Antonucci, Gabriella; Matano, Alessandro; Caputo, Marina; Caruso, Maria Giovanna; Pontiggia, Giovanna Teresa; Coccia, Michela; Ciancarelli, Irene; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi

    2018-01-01

    The Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS) was recently developed with the aim of describing the cognitive deficits after stroke. The scale consists of 10 tasks encompassing five cognitive domains: attention and executive function, language, memory, number processing, and praxis. OCS was devised to be inclusive and un-confounded by aphasia and neglect. As such, it may have a greater potential to be informative on stroke cognitive deficits of widely used instruments, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) or the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, which were originally devised for demented patients. The present study compared the OCS with the MMSE with regards to their ability to detect cognitive impairments post-stroke. We further aimed to examine performance on the OCS as a function of subtypes of cerebral infarction and clinical severity. 325 first stroke patients were consecutively enrolled in the study over a 9-month period. The OCS and MMSE, as well as the Bamford classification and NIHSS, were given according to standard procedures. About a third of patients (35.3%) had a performance lower than the cutoff (cognitive domains of the OCS. Using the MMSE as a standard of clinical practice, the comparative sensitivity of OCS was 100%. Out of the 208 patients with normal MMSE performance 180 showed impaired performance in at least one domain of the OCS. The discrepancy between OCS and MMSE was particularly strong for patients with milder strokes. As for subtypes of cerebral infarction, fewer patients demonstrated widespread impairments in the OCS in the Posterior Circulation Infarcts category than in the other categories. Overall, the results showed a much higher incidence of cognitive impairment with the OCS than with the MMSE and demonstrated no false negatives for OCS vs MMSE. It is concluded that OCS is a sensitive screen tool for cognitive deficits after stroke. In particular, the OCS detects high incidences of stroke-specific cognitive impairments, not detected

  15. Clasificación Oxford para la validación de un protocolo de antibioticoterapia subcutánea paliativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Antonio Sánchez-Cárdenas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: los casos de pacientes con procesos infecciosos al final de la vida muestran la necesidad de contar con alternativas que garanticen el cuidado y el manejo terapéutico instaurado. Las vías clásicas intravenosa, intramuscular y oral se ven limitadas, mientras que la vía subcutánea demuestra ser una alternativa prometedora; sin embargo, la escasa evidencia científica reflejada en el bajo número de investigaciones, devela la necesidad de explorar y generar productos científicos que respalden esta práctica. Metodología: estudio documental, con base en un proceso de revisión sistemática, en el cual se realiza la búsqueda de 10 acciones descritas en un protocolo. Fueron seleccionados 34 artículos en idioma inglés y español, excluyendo 17.Los artículosfueron clasificados a partir de la escala del Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford, consultando las bases: Nursing Skills, Clinicalkey, Pubmed, Springerlink, Science Direct, ProQuest y Cochrane. Se utilizaron como descriptores: antibacterianos, cuidados paliativos, protocolos, catéter, subcutáneo, signos, tiempo, antibiótico, enfermería, registros, consentimiento informado, valoración. Resultados: el 60% de las acciones propuestas en el protocolo no tuvo artículos que respaldaran su práctica, solamente el 40% fue clasificado. Conclusión: el protocolo no se recomienda, puesto que más del 50% de las actividades no cuentan con evidencia científica que las respalde.

  16. The influence of age and gender on motor and non-motor features of early Parkinson's disease: initial findings from the Oxford Parkinson Disease Center (OPDC) discovery cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk-Krolikowski, Konrad; Tomlinson, Paul; Nithi, Kannan; Wade-Martins, Richard; Talbot, Kevin; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hu, Michele T M

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors influencing phenotypic heterogeneity in Parkinson's Disease is crucial for understanding variability in disease severity and progression. Age and gender are two most basic epidemiological characteristics, yet their effect on expression of PD symptoms is not fully defined. We aimed to delineate effects of age and gender on the phenotype in an incident cohort of PD patients and healthy controls from the Oxford Parkinson Disease Centre (OPDC). Clinical features, including demographic and medical characteristics and non-motor and motor symptoms, were analyzed in a group of PD patients within 3 years of diagnosis and a group of healthy controls from the OPDC cohort. Disease features were stratified according to age and compared between genders, controlling for effects of common covariates. 490 PD patients and 176 healthy controls were analyzed. Stratification by age showed increased disease severity with age on motor scales. Some non-motor features showed similar trend, including cognition and autonomic features. Comparison across genders highlighted a pattern of increased severity and greater symptom symmetricality in the face, neck and arms in men with women having more postural problems. Amongst the non-motor symptoms, men had more cognitive impairment, greater rate of REM behavior disorder (RBD), more orthostatic hypotension and sexual dysfunction. Age in PD is a strong factor contributing to disease severity even after controlling for the effect of disease duration. Gender-related motor phenotype can be defined by a vertical split into more symmetrical upper-body disease in men and disease dominated by postural symptoms in women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Americans value happiness but block required policies. Book review of ‘‘The Politics of Happiness; what governments can learn from the new research on well-being’’ by Derek Bok, Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford, 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Ott (Jan Cornelis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAbstract In his book ‘‘The Politics of Happiness’’ Derek Bok argues that happiness should be a goal in public policy. He presents an inventory of social problems in the US with negative effects on happiness, like inadequate education, chronic pain, sleep disorders, depressions, divorce,

  18. Steve Clarke, Julian Savulescu, C. A. J. Coady, Alberto Giubilini, and Sagar Sanyal (eds.), The Ethics of Human Enhancement: Understanding the Debate, Oxford University Press, 2016, 269pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198754855.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyholm, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    The Ethics of Human Enhancement: Understanding the Debate has two chief aims. These aims are to help readers understand the existing debate and to move the debate forward. The book consists of an introductory chapter by Alberto Giubilini and Sagar Sanyal (which lays out some prominent

  19. “The Big Three”: Historical Experience of Personal Contacts (Book Review: Costigliola, F. Roosevelt’s Lost Alliances. How Personal Politics Provoked the Cold War [Text] / F. Costigliola. – Princeton and Oxford : Princeton University Press, 2012. – 533 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Bystrova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The book of Frank Costigliola is devoted to the role of personal factor in the evolution of relations between the USA, the USSR and Great Britain during World War II. The author used different sources from the archives of the USA, the USSR and Great Britain, first of all, the sources of personal origin, diaries and interviews as well as unpublished memoirs of comrades-in-arms of the leaders of the “Big Three”. The main hero of the book is President of the United States F.D. Roosevelt. The author claimed a rather controversial thesis that it was only Roosevelt who managed to establish very specific relations with Stalin, while opposing Roosevelt’s art of constructing bridges to the behavior of W. Churchill and H. Truman. We are now diminishing really great merits of the US President, but it seems hardly possible to establish some equality between Churchill and Truman. W. Churchill was a kind of liaison unit – a “cement” of the Big Three countries in real practice, for he actively moved from one front to another. Therefore he was the person who established personal contact with I.V. Stalin earlier, than Roosevelt. Special attention is devoted to the activities of a famous American diplomat G. Kennan and his colleagues – American representatives in Moscow during the more prolonged period from 1933 to 1946, i.e. more long-term tendencies in Soviet-American relations, including the informal ones, have been studied. As for the position of foreign ambassadors in the USSR, the author clarifies and studies thoroughly a very bad tendency, on his view, of their “isolation” from the Soviet people. This isolation aggravated the negative image of the Soviet state abroad. The main stages, problems and difficulties of creation of the “Big Three” alliance have been studied in the book. From the point of view of F. Costigliola, unprecedented unity of the leaders of the “Big Three” – F.D. Roosevelt, I.V. Stalin and W. Churchill had been achieved during the war, however, Roosevelt’s death in April 1945 led to the sharp change of course of the new American leadership towards the Cold war.

  20. Using the Oxford Cognitive Screen to Detect Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Comparison with the Mini-Mental State Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mancuso

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS was recently developed with the aim of describing the cognitive deficits after stroke. The scale consists of 10 tasks encompassing five cognitive domains: attention and executive function, language, memory, number processing, and praxis. OCS was devised to be inclusive and un-confounded by aphasia and neglect. As such, it may have a greater potential to be informative on stroke cognitive deficits of widely used instruments, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE or the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, which were originally devised for demented patients.ObjectiveThe present study compared the OCS with the MMSE with regards to their ability to detect cognitive impairments post-stroke. We further aimed to examine performance on the OCS as a function of subtypes of cerebral infarction and clinical severity.Methods325 first stroke patients were consecutively enrolled in the study over a 9-month period. The OCS and MMSE, as well as the Bamford classification and NIHSS, were given according to standard procedures.ResultsAbout a third of patients (35.3% had a performance lower than the cutoff (<22 on the MMSE, whereas 91.6% were impaired in at least one OCS domain, indicating higher incidences of impairment for the OCS. More than 80% of patients showed an impairment in two or more cognitive domains of the OCS. Using the MMSE as a standard of clinical practice, the comparative sensitivity of OCS was 100%. Out of the 208 patients with normal MMSE performance 180 showed impaired performance in at least one domain of the OCS. The discrepancy between OCS and MMSE was particularly strong for patients with milder strokes. As for subtypes of cerebral infarction, fewer patients demonstrated widespread impairments in the OCS in the Posterior Circulation Infarcts category than in the other categories.ConclusionOverall, the results showed a much higher incidence of cognitive impairment with the OCS than with the

  1. Road traffic noise, air pollution and incident cardiovascular disease: A joint analysis of the HUNT, EPIC-Oxford and UK Biobank cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yutong; Hodgson, Susan; Blangiardo, Marta; Gulliver, John; Morley, David; Fecht, Daniela; Vienneau, Danielle; de Hoogh, Kees; Key, Tim; Hveem, Kristian; Elliott, Paul; Hansell, Anna L

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to road traffic noise and air pollution on incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in three large cohorts: HUNT, EPIC-Oxford and UK Biobank. In pooled complete-case sample of the three cohorts from Norway and the United Kingdom (N = 355,732), 21,081 incident all CVD cases including 5259 ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 2871 cerebrovascular cases were ascertained between baseline (1993-2010) and end of follow-up (2008-2013) through medical record linkage. Annual mean 24-hour weighted road traffic noise (Lden) and air pollution (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm [PM10], ≤2.5 μm [PM2.5] and nitrogen dioxide [NO2]) exposure at baseline address was modelled using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU) and European-wide Land Use Regression models. Individual-level covariate data were harmonised and physically pooled across the three cohorts. Analysis was via Cox proportional hazard model with mutual adjustments for both noise and air pollution and potential confounders. No significant associations were found between annual mean Lden and incident CVD, IHD or cerebrovascular disease in the overall population except that the association with incident IHD was significant among current-smokers. In the fully adjusted models including adjustment for Lden, an interquartile range (IQR) higher PM10 (4.1 μg/m3) or PM2.5 (1.4 μg/m3) was associated with a 5.8% (95%CI: 2.5%-9.3%) and 3.7% (95%CI: 0.2%-7.4%) higher risk for all incident CVD respectively. No significant associations were found between NO2 and any of the CVD outcomes. We found suggestive evidence of a possible association between road traffic noise and incident IHD, consistent with current literature. Long-term particulate air pollution exposure, even at concentrations below current European air quality standards, was significantly associated with incident CVD. Copyright

  2. "I Was My War; My War Was I": Vera Brittain, Autobiography and University Fiction during the Great War

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Ann K.

    2016-01-01

    Applying the critical lenses of feminism, autographical theory and literary analysis, this essay performs a triple reading of Vera Brittain's multi-genre writings about gender, war,and university education. Focusing specifically on "The Dark Tide" (1923), "Testament of Youth" (1933) and "The Women of Oxford" (1960),…

  3. The Relationship between Listening Strategies Used by Iranian EFL Freshman University Students and Their Listening Proficiency Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Farinaz Shirani; Yamat, Hamidah

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify Iranian EFL freshman university students' listening proficiency levels and the listening strategies they employed to investigate the relationship between these two variables. A total of 92 freshmen were involved in this study. The Oxford Placement Test was employed to identify the learners'…

  4. The Learning University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Glenys

    1999-01-01

    As universities make cross-sectoral alliances, various models for integrating postsecondary education into universities arise: contract, brokerage, collaborative, validation, joint program, dual-sector institution, tertiary university, metaphoric, and federal. The integrated, comprehensive university is the learning university of the 21st century.…

  5. Anglo-French Collaboration in the Nuclear Sector: The Human, Social and Ethical Dimensions. Graduate seminar, Maison Francaise d'Oxford, Monday 15 May 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denoun, Martin; Tsuchiya, Miyuki; Degremont-Dorville, Marie; Bouillet, Jeremy; Deront, Eva; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kobylka, Krzysztof; Nithesh, Antony; Defard, Camille; Giachetti, Charles; Nivole, Audrey; Takahashi, Makoto; Pini, Paul-Etienne; Lloyd, Clara

    2017-05-01

    A graduate workshop was held on Monday 15 May, at the Maison francaise d'Oxford, involving a little group of graduate students, from the UK and France. They were invited to present their research and to engage in discussions over the place of nuclear energy in the context of the social sciences and humanities. Wider issues of relevance and interest regarding nuclear energy - such as its human, cultural and philosophical dimensions - have not received sufficient attention in either France or Britain. A number of specific areas were identified to be significant in this respect: - The need for clearer, 'unbiased' information, explanations and better understanding of the wider human dimensions associated with nuclear energy. - A better understanding of the influences upon, and differences in social attitudes towards nuclear in France and Britain. - The factors influencing varying attitudes within Britain and France amongst different sections of society. Particular references were made to the younger age groups and gender differences. - And understanding of 'changes' of attitude and support found in Britain and France, in more recent times. - The importance of the community, social, cultural, ethical and human dimensions given the unique nature of the nuclear sector, and in particular the long term nature and scale of economic and social investments associated with nuclear energy. - The impact of perceptions about the nuclear risk factors that may, or may not, be very different to reality over time. - The global nature of the impact of the sector on Anglo-French interests and the opportunities for positive collaboration, and learning in the wider human, social, ethical, cultural and philosophical aspects. - The multitude of social media channels available for disseminating information and opinions that influence social attitudes about nuclear energy. - A lack of trust in policy or operational statements emanating from the government, company or

  6. Atmospheric Surface Layer Characterization: Preliminary Desert Lapse Rate Study 22-25 August 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Doyle

    2003-01-01

    Results of the August 2000 Desert Lapse Rate (DLR) Experiment are presented. The DLR Experiment was performed to document the night-to-day transition effects on the desert Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL...

  7. BKR 27(1) pp. 22-25 (Ufelle et al)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Femi J. Olorunniji

    2015-03-31

    Mar 31, 2015 ... Groups A to D were administered orally with graded-doses of crude methanolic extract ... macrophylla (Ugba in Igbo language) is consumed by an estimated 15 ... herbal remedy may lead to either bone marrow stimulation for.

  8. 50 CFR 22.25 - What are the requirements concerning permits to take golden eagle nests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nests are inactive, if the taking is compatible with the preservation of the area nesting population of... Director—Attention: Migratory Bird Permit Office. You can find addresses for the appropriate Regional... applicant must calculate the area nesting population of golden eagles and identify on an appropriately...

  9. Summary of the International Conference on Arabidopsis Research 2011, June 22-25, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Blake C

    2012-07-15

    This project provided participant support for the gathering of plant biologists at the International Conferences on Arabidopsis Research (ICAR) in 2011. Arabidopsis thaliana, the reference flowering plant, has been intensely studied over the last 20 years and has proven to be an ideal model for studying nearly all aspects of plant biology. The success of this research field has been greatly facilitated by the openness and collegiality of the community fostered through multiple international forums including the ICAR. Advances in basic and applied plant biology are featured at the meeting, which is the primary gathering point for this strongly integrated international community. The ICAR convenes plant researchers, allows discussion and dissemination of the latest research in plant biology, and facilitates dialog among those that may be separated by geography, career stage, and culture. This project focused on facilitating access by early career scientists that have reduced access to attend major meetings.

  10. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS OF FEMALE STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE SPORT OLYMPIAD OF IRANIAN UNIVERSITIES: A CORRELATIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Hassan Bahrololoum

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at studying the relationship between happiness and emotional intelligence among female students participating in the 10th Sport Olympiad of Iranian universities held in Semnan province. To do this survey, 302 female students were randomly selected from the total population of female students participating in the 10th sport Olympiad of Iranian Universities. To collect data, the study used three standardized questionnaires: Oxford's Happiness Questionnaire; Brodberry's Emotional...

  11. University and Transitions to Democracy in Mediterranean Europe and Latin America (1970-1980. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara González Gómez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities and periods of transition to democracy form the tandem analyzed in the monograph the journal Espacio, Tiempo y Educación presented in this issue. A total of eight studies –from Spain, Greece, Portugal, Brazil and Chile– makes up a volume approaching different question (student mobilization, models of university, claims of teachers, regulatory framework... and exploring changes, evolution or inertia experienced in some European and Latin American universities during what Huntington (1990 called the «third wave» of transition to democracy. This outline of studies aims at expanding the information available on the binomial formed by University and democratic transition, a topic rather limited investigated at present, and, above all, encouraging to develop new lines of research focused on a suggestive and critical issue to understand the history of our universities. How to reference this article González Gómez, S. (2015. Universidad y Transiciones a la Democracia en la Europa mediterránea e Iberoamérica (1970-1980. Presentación. Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, 2(2, 25-32. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/ete.2015.002.002.002

  12. Development of the Oxford Hills Healthy Moms Project using a social marketing process: a community-based physical activity and nutrition intervention for low-socioeconomic-status mothers in a rural area in Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharod, Jigna M; Drewette-Card, Rebecca; Crawford, David

    2011-03-01

    A physical activity and nutrition community intervention called the Oxford Hills Healthy Moms (OHHM) Project was developed using a multifaceted social marketing process, including review of state surveillance results, key informant interviews, and a survey and focus group discussions with low-socioeconomic-status (low-SES) mothers. This formative work was used to make key decisions on the selection of the intervention region, segmentation of the audience, and design of intervention strategies addressing multiple levels of the socioecological model. The OHHM Project aims to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity levels among low-SES mothers in the Oxford Hills region of Maine. The OHHM Project includes five components: (a) physical activity buddy program, (b) cooking club with education, (c) fruit and vegetable discount buying club with education, (d) increased access to produce vendors, and (e) increased access to places for physical activity.

  13. The Global University Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  14. Enlistment Propensities of University Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moskos, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Enlistment propensities of undergraduates were assessed through surveys conducted at Northwestern University, University of Arizona, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of Illinois-Chicago...

  15. Selected Abstracts of the 3rd Edition of Transport of High Risk Infants; Oxford (UK; August 31st-September 2nd, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 3rd Edition of Transport of High Risk Infants; Oxford (UK; August 31st-September 2nd, 2017ABS 1. MORTALITY RATE IN 23-30 WEEKS PRE­MATURE BORN IN LEVEL 2 HOSPITAL IN COMPARISON TO THOSE BORN IN TERTIARY-CARE HOSPITAL • J.P. Doray, J.L. DorayABS 2. THE QUEBEC AEROMEDICAL EXPERIENCE: EVACUATION OF NEONATES FROM AREAS IN EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS – IN­NOVATIONS IN SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY • É. Notebaert, J. Provencher, R. Bernier, S. Côté, S. KindABS 3. NASAL HIGH FLOW SUPPORT DURING NEONATAL RETRIEVAL IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA • V. Abraham, C. Roberts, B. Manley, L. Owen, M. Stewart, P. DavisABS 4. NEONATAL TRANSPORT TO AND FROM A REGIONAL LEVEL 2 CENTRE • C. Moore, M. Cassidy, M. Byrne, A. Bowden, J. Franta, I. Farombi, J. FitzsimonsABS 5. PASSIVE THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA DURING AMBULANCE AND HELICOPTER SECONDARY NEONATAL TRANSPORT IN NEONATES WITH HYPOXIC BRAIN INJURY: 10-YEARS RETROSPECTIVE SURVEY • M. Leben, M. Nolimal, I. Vidmar, S. GrosekABS 6. STABILIZATION OF CRITICALLY ILL NEW­BORNS: PREVENTION OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY • A. Babintseva, Y. Hodovanets, L. AgafonovaABS 7. TRANSPORT OF THE SURGICAL NEONATES • R. Pejaver, A. Poveidein, D. Winterbank-Scott, C. Keys, N. GuptaABS 8. AUDIT OF VENTILATED NEONATAL TRANS­FERS IN NORTHERN IRELAND FROM 1ST JANUARY 2017 UNTIL 1ST MAY 2017 • R. Moore, S. KnoxABS 9. “HUB AND SPOKE” ECMO IN NEONATES WITH MECONIUM ASPIRATION SYNDROME: A PRELIMINARY REPORT • N. Doglioni, D. Fichera, F. Zanella, M. Padalino, V. Vida, G. Stellin, P. Lago, D. TrevisanutoABS 10. INTRA-HOSPITAL TRANSPORTATION OF EX­TREMELY PRETERM INFANTS AND INCI­DENCE OF INTRAVENTRICULAR HAEMOR­RHAGES • N. Wadström, M. Breindahl, B. Hallberg, B. SkiöldABS 11. RISK OF POSTNATAL TRANSPORT AND OUT­COME OF LATE PRETERM INFANTS BORN AT NON-TERTIARY CENTRES: A RETRO­SPEC­TIVE COHORT STUDY • N. Doglioni, L. Salmaso, P. Facchin, D. TrevisanutoABS 12. COMPARING THREE METHODS OF THERA

  16. John Howard Marsden (1803–1891 First Disney Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge 1851–1865

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Leach

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there were ten chairs of archaeology at universities in Germany, and one in France, by the mid-nineteenth century, in Great Britain it was the amateur societies and museums (the British Museum in particular that encouraged the study of this subject. In 1851 John Disney established the first university chair in Great Britain at Cambridge University. His proposal was initially received with considerable caution by the governing body of the university, and was only accepted by the narrowest margin of eight votes to seven. His agreement with the University of Cambridge stipulated that six lectures a year should be given on the subject of ‘Classical, Medieval, and other Antiquities, the Fine Arts and all matters and things connected therewith’ (Clark 1904, 222–225. However university archaeology was slow to establish its academic credibility nationally, and it was more than thirty years before Oxford University established its chair of classical archaeology. The Cambridge Board of Anthropological Studies, which included instruction in prehistoric archaeology, was not created until 1915, and as late as 1945 there were still only a few university lecturers in archaeology in Great Britain. It was not until 1946 that Oxford University appointed a Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology (Wilson 2002, 153; Daniel 1976, 6–12; Smith 2004, 4–5, 53–54.

  17. Cleaning, Disinfection, and Sterilization Protocols Employed for Customized Implant Abutments: An International Survey of 100 Universities Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canullo, Luigi; Tallarico, Marco; Chu, Stephen; Peñarrocha, David; Özcan, Mutlu; Pesce, Paolo

    American and European standards recommend sterilization of customized abutments before connecting them to implants, as customized abutments are considered semi-critical medical devices. Since standardized procedures could not be identified in the literature on implantology, this survey evaluated the protocols employed at different universities worldwide to clean, disinfect, and/or sterilize customized abutments before their connection to bone-level implants. The survey took place between October 2015 and January 2016. A single question acquiring information on how customized abutments were treated prior to connection to the implants was sent by email to researchers affiliated at 100 universities worldwide. To avoid any bias, the survey was kept rigorously anonymous. A total of 100 universities from Europe (56), USA and Canada (25), Latin America (9), South Africa (1), Asia (6), and Australia and New Zealand (3) were invited to participate in the survey. Altogether, 85 universities responded to the survey question, and 22 (25.9%) declared that no cleaning protocols were adopted. More than half of the respondents (n = 49, 57.6%) performed only one of the three procedures required by the standards (cleaning, disinfection, or sterilization). Twelve respondents (14.1%) adopted two procedures, and only two universities performed all three required procedures (2.4%). This survey indicated substantial heterogeneity in treating customized abutments before connecting them to implants. This study demonstrated that the majority of the universities applied either cleaning, disinfection, or sterilization which may not meet the prevailing standards.

  18. Increasing Active Student Responding in a University Applied Behavior Analysis Course: The Effect of Daily Assessment and Response Cards on End of Week Quiz Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Paul R.; Sweeney, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The study compared the effects of daily assessment and response cards on average weekly quiz scores in an introduction to applied behavior analysis course. An alternating treatments design (Kazdin 1982, "Single-case research designs." New York: Oxford University Press; Cooper et al. 2007, "Applied behavior analysis." Upper Saddle River:…

  19. Whither the African University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam

    reform. 1. Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, Addis Ababa University ..... reduce African universities to virtually vocational schools. The World ..... theories, established institutions, and widely held beliefs according to the cannons ...

  20. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cal models of the universe are based on the idea, which is supported by ... Only the continuous distribution was clearly ... displaced from their natural locations, their observed wave- .... universe? Mathematical Models: Basic Assumptions.

  1. The Alien University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    - they are alien. The conditions of universities today is not one of crisis and upheaval, as with the postmodern universities, it is one of night travel and exile. The alien university leaves behind the epistemological skirmishes of the postmodern university with all its rhetoric and knowledge activism. Thinking...... in the alien university is a move into a whirlpool of nothingness, a “nocturnal space”, where “[d]arkness fills it like a content; it is full, but full of the nothingness of everything.” (Levinas, 2001, p.53). In the alien university thinking is not situated, and instead of rhizomes, and assemblages of thought......, there is merely an imposing and nightly “swarming of points.” (ibid.). There is no place for the alien university, and exactly this exile of thought makes possible the move beyond postmodernism and the mentality of political crisis. The alien university is not in the future as such, but it is not entirely...

  2. Gambling with the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  3. Inflation in the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, J.D.; California Univ., Berkeley; Turner, M.S.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1981-01-01

    The problems of explaining the observed isotropy, homogeneity, flatness and specific entropy of the Universe are discussed in the context of an inflationary Universe which has recently been suggested. It is shown that the isotropy cannot be ignored as a Universe with a large amount of anisotropy will not undergo the inflationary phase. A Universe with only moderate anistropy will undergo inflation and will be rapidly isotropized. (U.K.)

  4. Entrepreneurship in Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Piia; Paasio, Kaisu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of universities in fostering and promoting entrepreneurship in Finland. In particular it seeks to examine the university-entrepreneurship relationship: its nature and how universities are addressing the entrepreneurship agenda. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a large…

  5. Our Particle Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and “why is the universe the way it is?” Not long before ... to each other. The interactions of particles in the universe ... theory by Jean Perrin in 1908 convinced people that atoms and ..... ing the origin and evolution of our universe13. This is an ...

  6. Hybrid Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Molly; Wan, Chang Da; Sirat, Morshidi

    2017-01-01

    Are Asian universities different from those in Western countries? Premised on the hypothesis that Asian universities are different because of hybridization between Western academic models and local traditional cultures, this paper investigates the hybrid characteristics in Malaysian universities resulting from interaction between contemporary…

  7. Establishing a University Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemish, Donald L.

    A handbook on how to establish a university foundation is presented. It presupposes that a foundation will be used as the umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, for the benefit of a public college or university; and hence it chiefly addresses readers from public colleges and universities. Information is…

  8. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  9. Motivating University Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Alves de Sousa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said

  10. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  11. The early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the physics of the early universe: the production and survival of relics from the big bang. The author comments on relic WIMPs as the dark matter in the universe. The remainder of this discussion is devoted to a review of the status of the only predictions from the early evolution of the universe that are accessible to astronomical observation: primordial nucleosynthesis

  12. Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Søgaard; Kornbeck, Kasper Pihl; Kristensen, Rune

    Dropout from university studies comprises a number of complex phenomena with serious complex consequences and profound political attention. Further analysis of the field is, therefore, warranted. Such an analysis is offered here as a systematic review which gives answers based on the best possible...... such dropout phenomena occur at universities? What can be done by the universities to prevent or reduce such dropout phenomena?...

  13. Antimatter in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigman, G.

    1973-01-01

    The means of detecting the presence of antimatter in the universe are discussed. Both direct, annihilation processes, and indirect, cosmic ray particles, were analyzed. All results were negative and it was concluded that no antimatter exists, if the universe is in fact symmetric. If the universe is not symmetric then matter and antimatter are well separated from each other.

  14. Universities as Development Hubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Aage; Lindegaard, Klaus; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Capacity-building in environment and development has been implemented and tested over the last decade through university and university consortia networking. Universities from Africa (Botswana and South Africa), Asia (Malaysia and Thailand), Central America (Costa Rica, El Salvador and Nicaragua...

  15. Grimstone v Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust: (It's Not) Hip To Be Square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Louise V

    2017-11-24

    In Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board [2015] UKSC 11 the Supreme Court redefined the standard of disclosure in informed consent to medical treatment, rejecting the application of the doctor-focused Bolam standard in favour of one focused on what was significant to patients. In Grimstone v Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust [2015] EWHC 3756 (QB), despite acknowledging a new standard now applied, McGowan J nevertheless used the Bolam test to determine liability for non-disclosure. This illustrates ongoing judicial deference to the medical profession and this case commentary explores that decision and its implications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. The inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guth, A.; Steinhardt, P.

    1993-01-01

    According to the inflationary model, the universe had a brief period of extraordinary rapid expansion, or inflation, during which its diameter increased by a factor at least 10 25 times larger (and perhaps much larger still) than had been previously thought. All the matter and energy in the universe could have been created from virtually nothing. Features of this article are: comparison of standard and inflationary modes, the horizon problem, the geometry of the universe, spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism (energy density of the Higgs fields), the flatness problem, the new inflationary universe (new Higgs fields and false vacuum), conserved quantities in the universe. 12 figs., 11 refs

  17. The inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the inflationary universe scenario the universe in the very early stages of its evolution was exponentially expanding in the unstable vacuum-like state. At the end of the exponential expansion the energy of the unstable vacuum transforms into the energy of hot dense matter. Recently it was realised that the exponential expansion of the universe naturally occurs in a wide class of realistic theories of elementary particles. The inflationary universe scenario makes it possible to obtain a simple solution to many longstanding cosmological problems and leads to a crucial modification of the standard point of view of the large-scale structure of the universe. (author)

  18. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  19. The universe a biography

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2008-01-01

    The Universe: A Biography makes cosmology accessible to everyone. John Gribbin navigates the latest frontiers of scientific discovery to tell us what we really know about the history of the universe. Along the way, he describes how the universe began; what the early universe looked like; how its structure developed; and what emerged to hold it all together. He describes where the elements came from; how stars and galaxies formed; and the story of how life emerged. He even looks to the future: is the history of the universe going to end with a Big Crunch or a Big Rip.

  20. H. Beale et al., Cases, Materials and Texts on Contract Law, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2010; and T. K. Graziano, Comparative Contract Law: Cases, Materials and Exercises (Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael L. Johnstone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available view essay of the following books on comparative law: Hugh Beale, Bénédicte Fauvarque-Cosson, Jacobien Rutgers, Denis Tallon and Stefan Vogenauer, Cases, Materials and Text on Contract Law, 2nd ed. (Ius Commune Casebooks for the Common Law of Europe No. 6 (Oxford, United Kingdom: Hart Publishing, 2010 lxxxiv + 1358 pp. paper. 38.95 GBP; and Thomas Kadner Graziano, Comparative Contract Law: Cases, Materials and Exercises (Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrage MacMillan, 2009 xi + 510 pp. paper. 34.99 GBP

  1. The relationship between English language learning strategies and proficiency of pre-university students: A study case of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-07-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between language learning strategies and proficiency in English. Fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were judged based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) Results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  2. A lightweight universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Fan, Xiaohui

    1998-01-01

    How much matter is there in the universe? Does the universe have the critical density needed to stop its expansion, or is the universe underweight and destined to expand forever? We show that several independent measures, especially those utilizing the largest bound systems known—clusters of galaxies—all indicate that the mass-density of the universe is insufficient to halt the expansion. A promising new method, the evolution of the number density of clusters with time, provides the most powerful indication so far that the universe has a subcritical density. We show that different techniques reveal a consistent picture of a lightweight universe with only ∼20–30% of the critical density. Thus, the universe may expand forever. PMID:9600898

  3. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  4. Universities scale like cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony F J van Raan

    Full Text Available Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

  5. Universities scale like cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raan, Anthony F J

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

  6. University of Maryland MRSEC - Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    . University of Maryland Materials Research Science and Engineering Center Home About Us Leadership , National Nanotechnology Lab, Neocera, NIST, Rowan University, Rutgers University, Seagate, Tokyo Tech

  7. Rectors of European universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Several rectors of European universities visited CERN recently while in Geneva for a conference on coordination between their institutions. The visit began with a welcome by Roger Cashmore, CERN Director of Collider Programmes,and continued with tours of CMS, ALICE and the LHC magnet assembly hall. Photos 01, 02: The visitors in the ALICE assembly hall: (left to right) Dr. Raymond Werlen, Deputy Secretary-General of the Conference of Rectors of Swiss Universities; visit guide Prof. Alain Blondel, Department of Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics, University of Geneva; Prof. Adriano Pimpão, Rector of the University of Algarve, President of the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities; Prof. Jean-Pierre Finance, Conference of University Presidents, France; Prof. Jean-Paul Lehners, Vice-President of the Centre Universitaire, Luxemburg.

  8. Universities as Research Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Bronwyn; Link, Albert; Scott, John

    2010-01-01

    Universities are a key institution in the U.S. innovation system, and an important aspect of their involvement is the role they play in public-private partnerships. This note offers insights into the performance of industry-university research partnerships, using a survey of precommercial research projects funded by the Advanced Technology Program. Although results must be interpreted cautiously because of the small size of the sample, the study finds that projects with university involvement...

  9. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  10. University Advertising and Universality in Messaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diel, Stan R.; Katsinas, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    University and college institutional advertisements, which typically are broadcast as public service announcements during the halftime of football games, were the subject of a quantitative analysis focused on commonality in messaging and employment of the semiotic theory of brand advertising. Findings indicate advertisements focus on students'…

  11. From Universal Access to Universal Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Anne C.

    2003-01-01

    Panel of five education experts--Elliot Eisner, John Goodlad, Patricia Graham, Phillip Schlechty, and Warren Simons--answer questions related to recent school reform efforts, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, aimed at achieving universal educational proficiency. (PKP)

  12. Imagining the Future University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Barnett, Ronald

    'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett.......'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett....

  13. Mathematics at University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics is studied in universities by a large number of students. At the same time it is a field of research for a (smaller) number of university teachers. What relations, if any, exist between university research and teaching of mathematics? Can research “support” teaching? What research...... and what teaching? In this presentation we propose a theoretical framework to study these questions more precisely, based on the anthropological theory of didactics. As a main application, the links between the practices of mathematical research and university mathematics teaching are examined...

  14. University of Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  15. University Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Cox

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the experiences and general observations of the author at Heriot-Watt University and concerns the transfer of university technology for the purposes of commercialisation. Full commercial exploitation of a university invention generally requires transferring that technology into the industrial arena, usually either by formation of a new company or licensing into an existing company. Commercialisation activities need to be carried out in unison with the prime activities of the university of research and teaching. Responsibility for commercialising university inventions generally rests with a specific group within the university, typically referred to as the technology transfer group. Each technology transfer should be considered individually and appropriate arrangements made for that particular invention. In general, this transfer process involves four stages: identification, evaluation, protection and exploitation. Considerations under these general headings are outlined from a university viewpoint. A phased approach is generally preferred where possible for the evaluation, protection and exploitation of an invention to balance risk with potential reward. Evaluation of the potential opportunity for a university invention involves essentially the same considerations as for an industrial invention. However, there are a range of commercial exploitation routes and potential deals so that only general guidelines can be given. Naturally, the final deal achieved is that which can be negotiated. The potential rewards for the university and inventor are both financial (via licensing income and equity realisation and non-financial.

  16. A new external microbeam system in Fudan University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Shen, H.; Li, Y.Q.; Li, X.Y.; Yang, M.J.; Mi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A cost-effective and removable external beam system is set up based on the Oxford Microbeam system in Fudan University. In our external beam system, 7.5-μm-thick Kapton film is used as exit window with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The spatial resolution is about 18 μm full width at half maximum (FWHM) on a copper grid. As an example, calcium distribution in otolith is present by the external micro-PIXE. In addition, little change can be done to the external system mentioned above for radiobiology experiments. The exit window can be changed from the focal plane to the observation window of vacuum chamber. By calculation, the beam spot size can reach less than 30 μm. Since the Oxford type octagonal target chamber is popular among the nuclear microprobe facilities, this method can be provided to easily replace the in-vacuum system with the external system, extending the in-vacuum analysis to external beam analysis

  17. A new external microbeam system in Fudan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.; Shen, H., E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn; Li, Y.Q.; Li, X.Y.; Yang, M.J.; Mi, Y.

    2013-07-01

    A cost-effective and removable external beam system is set up based on the Oxford Microbeam system in Fudan University. In our external beam system, 7.5-μm-thick Kapton film is used as exit window with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The spatial resolution is about 18 μm full width at half maximum (FWHM) on a copper grid. As an example, calcium distribution in otolith is present by the external micro-PIXE. In addition, little change can be done to the external system mentioned above for radiobiology experiments. The exit window can be changed from the focal plane to the observation window of vacuum chamber. By calculation, the beam spot size can reach less than 30 μm. Since the Oxford type octagonal target chamber is popular among the nuclear microprobe facilities, this method can be provided to easily replace the in-vacuum system with the external system, extending the in-vacuum analysis to external beam analysis.

  18. A new external microbeam system in Fudan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, H., E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, Y.Q.; Li, X.Y.; Yang, M.J.; Mi, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2013-02-01

    A cost-effective and removable external beam system is set up based on the Oxford Microbeam system in Fudan University. In our external beam system, 7.5-μm-thick Kapton film is used as exit window with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The spatial resolution is about 18 μm full width at half maximum (FWHM) on a copper grid. As an example, calcium distribution in otolith is present by the external micro-PIXE. In addition, little change can be done to the external system mentioned above for radiobiology experiments. The exit window can be changed from the focal plane to the observation window of vacuum chamber. By calculation, the beam spot size can reach less than 30 μm. Since the Oxford type octagonal target chamber is popular among the nuclear microprobe facilities, this method can be provided to easily replace the in-vacuum system with the external system, extending the in-vacuum analysis to external beam analysis.

  19. Oxford textbook of women and mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohen, Dora

    2010-01-01

    .... Exploring issues covering psychological, social, and cultural aspects of mental health problems, it looks at epidemiological data that shows increased frequency in different clinical aspects of many...

  20. The Oxford handbook of organization theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsoukas, Haridimos; Knudsen, Christian Sebell

    This text provides a forum for scholars in organization theory to engage in meta-theoretical reflection on the historical development, present state, and future prospects of organization theory as a scientific discipline. The central question explored is the epistemological status of organization...

  1. Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Review Oxford Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    well as those on spousal abuse and related issues, reflect their national ... photographs, reproductions of paintings or line drawings). One must, of course, consider ... although much of it involves work on kindling in the amygdala and the effect of .... The Food and Drug Administration has advised that it has taken regulatory ...

  2. OXFORD HANDBOOK OF SPORT AND EXERCISE MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domhnall MacAuley

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This flexicover handbook presents a user-friendly overview into the evolving discipline of sports medicine. The growing scientific and research base is summarised and essential views on treatment, preventive strategies, and optimal exercise recommendation are discussed briefly in the relevant chapters. This book has been designed for everyday use for the practitioners working in this medical field. It also has blank pages for the readers' own updates. PURPOSE This guide book aims to display the common problems and diagnoses in sports and exercise medicine and to concentrate on the up-to-date approaches, management plans, and evidence-based procedures of treatment at the same time. AUDIENCE As a comprehensive basic text this guide book could be useful for lecturers, teachers, practitioners and students of exercise and sports medicine as well as GPs, nurses and others who are especially interested in this field. FEATURES This handbook is partitioned into 24 chapters focusing on the needs of the patient and offering an immediate guide to all aspects of diagnosis and treatment, epidemiology, exercise benefits and physiological issues. The chapters are: 1. Immediate care, 2. Sports injury, 3. Benefits of exercise, 4. Physiothrepy and rehabilitation, 5. Hip and pelvis, 6. Knee, 7. Ankle and lower leg, 8. Foot, 9. Shoulder, 10. Elbow and forearm, 11. Wrist and hand, 12. Head and face, 13. Spine, 14. Cardiorespiratory, 15. Abdomen, 16. Infectious disease, 17. Arthritis, 18. Dermatology, 19. Disability, 20. Physiology, 21. Metabolic, 22. Women, 23. Aids to performance, 24. The team physician. ASSESSMENT This is a must-have handbook for all medics practising in sports and exercise medicine, as well as anyone who has a special interest in this area, especially GPs, nurses, physiotherapists; even coaches, trainers, biomechanical experts. I believe they will enjoy making use of this guide book as it is right to the point, easy to read and understand during hectic daily practise.

  3. Oxford handbook of nutrition and dietetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webster-Gandy, Joan; Madden, Angela; Holdsworth, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    ... of disease and the maintenance of good health. This handbook will be an invaluable companion for all dieticians, nutritionists, and nurses, as well as doctors and students in a variety of specialities...

  4. Technology evaluation: TroVax, Oxford Biomedica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2004), s. 436-442 ISSN 1464-8431 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticancer * vaccine * viral vector-based gene therapy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.117, year: 2004

  5. Future perspectives - proposal for Oxford Physiome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    The Physiome Project is an effort to understand living creatures using "analysis by synthesis" strategy, i.e., by reproducing their behaviors. In order to achieve its goal, sharing developed models between different computer languages and application programs to incorporate into integrated models is critical. To date, several XML-based markup languages has been developed for this purpose. However, source codes written with XML-based languages are very difficult to read and edit using text editors. An alternative way is to use an object-oriented meta-language, which can be translated to different computer languages and transplanted to different application programs. Object-oriented languages are suitable for describing structural organization by hierarchical classes and taking advantage of statistical properties to reduce the number of parameter while keeping the complexity of behaviors. Using object-oriented languages to describe each element and posting it to a public domain should be the next step to build up integrated models of the respiratory control system.

  6. Oxford textbook of women and mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohen, Dora

    2010-01-01

    ... psychiatric disorders, the biological and endocrinological concomitants of mental health, and eating disorders, perinatal psychiatric disorders, and the long term effects of abuse - helping readers...

  7. W. J. Johnson, Oxford Dictionary of Hinduism

    OpenAIRE

    Clémentin-Ojha, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Avec l'élévation du niveau de nos connaissances sur l'hindouisme et le développement spectaculaire des études en tout genre le concernant, nous assistons actuellement à la multiplication d'ouvrages de référence, de manuels, d'encyclopédies et de collections d'essais, qui tous sont destinés à faire le point du savoir sur les différents aspects de ce vaste phénomène. La plupart de ces ouvrages sont toutefois volumineux. Restait donc à mettre l'hindouisme dans un petit dictionnaire. Tel a été le...

  8. Universality in heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Pedersen, Thomas Bligaard; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2002-01-01

    Based on an extensive set of density functional theory calculations it is shown that for a class of catalytic reactions there is a universal, reactant independent relation between the reaction activation energy and the stability of reaction intermediates. This leads directly to a universal relati...

  9. Regionalism in Scottish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Dougal

    1976-01-01

    It is well-known that Scottish universities are highly local institutions and that over two-fifth of Scottish university students live at home. Attempts to ascertain if this regionalism has relaxed over the past twenty years with student grant regulations, improvement in communications and the increasing affluence of today's society. (Author/RK)

  10. Reeducation at Heidelberg University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Geoffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizes German archival records to illuminate crucial post-war events at Heidelberg University. The university became the focal point of attempts to define the theoretical and practical meaning of "geistige Umerziehung" (spiritual reeducation). Discusses the conflict between U.S. authorities and such esteemed German scholars as Karl…

  11. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market"…

  12. Universe of constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  13. Knowledge and the University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnett, Ronald; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    for the university and the university’s place in the world. However, that presupposition has taken a battering recently from many directions. With the incorporation of the university more fully into the world, knowledge is no longer seen as valuable in-itself but now is viewed only instrumentally, and has to have...

  14. The deep universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sandage, AR; Longair, MS

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the concept of the deep universe from two conflicting theoretical viewpoints: firstly as a theory embracing the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present; and secondly through observations gleaned over the years on stars, galaxies and clusters.

  15. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  16. Talent Management for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  17. General Topology of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Aalok

    2002-01-01

    General topology of the universe is descibed. It is concluded that topology of the present universe is greater or stronger than the topology of the universe in the past and topology of the future universe will be stronger or greater than the present topology of the universe. Consequently, the universe remains unbounded.

  18. The university with conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Ripalda Crespo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The model of the national university is being substituted by that of the global university. At the same time, new dogmas that appear with economic labels are being imposed. All this is accompanied by important cultural changes. The Spanish university was one of the instances that was taken care of by the post-Francoist regime. Now, this regime feels strong against it, and on the other hand this university – as the whole of the productive structure – requires a reform. It is not expected that this reform will go in the direction of the university having more social presence, but rather more presence of companies. It is neither expected that it will imply more internal democracy, but more discipline. All resistance or alternative has to take into account the new situation and join the still dispersed forces that still have, however, a constitutive capacity.

  19. The holographic universe

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot, Michael

    1991-01-01

    'There is evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it - from snowflakes to maple trees to falling stars and spinning electrons - are only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality literally beyond both space and time.' This is the astonishing idea behind the holographic theory of the universe, pioneered by two eminent thinkers: physicist David Bohm, a former protege of Albert Einstein, and quantum physicist Karl Pribram. The holographic theory of the universe encompasses consciousness and reality as we know them, but can also explain such hitherto unexplained phenomena as telepathy, out-of-body experiences and even miraculous healing. In this remarkable book, Michael Talbot reveals the extraordinary depth and power of the holographic theory of the universe, illustrating how it makes sense of the entire range of experiences within our universe - and in other universes beyond our own.

  20. The rotating universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, G.; Treder, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    For a long time the question whether the universe rotates or not is discussed. Aspects of Huygens, Newton, Mach and other important historical scientists in this field are reported. The investigations of the mathematician Kurt Groedel in order to prove the rotation of the universe are illustrated. Kurt Groedel has shown that Einstein's gravitational equations of general relativity theory and the cosmological postulate of global homogeneity of cosmic matter (that is the Copernical principle) are not contradictionary to a rotating universe. Abberation measurements, position determination by means of radiointerferometry and methods for the determination of the rotation of the universe from the isotropy of the background radiation are presented. From these experiments it can be concluded that the universe seems not to rotate as already Einstein expected

  1. Dimensional assessment of schizotypal, psychotic, and other psychiatric traits in children and their parents: development and validation of the Childhood Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences on a representative US sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David W; Lusk, Laina G; Slane, Mylissa M; Michael, Andrew M; Myers, Scott M; Uljarević, Mirko; Mason, Oliver; Claridge, Gordon; Frazier, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Healthy functioning relies on a variety of perceptual, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral abilities that are distributed throughout the normal population. Variation in these traits define the wide range of neurodevelopmental (NDD) and neuropsychiatric (NPD) disorders. Here, we introduce a new measure for assessing these traits in typically developing children and children at risk for NDD and NPD from age 2 to 18 years. The Childhood Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (CO-LIFE) was created as a dimensional, parent-report measure of schizotypal and psychotic traits in the general population. Parents of 2,786 children also self-reported on an adapted version of the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE-US). The CO-LIFE resulted in continuous distributions for the total score and for each of three factor analytically-derived subscales. Item response theory (IRT) analyses indicated strong reliability across the score range for the O-LIFE-US and the CO-LIFE. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were high across all scales. Parent-child intraclass correlations were consistent with high heritability. The scales discriminated participants who reported a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis from those who reported no diagnosis. The O-LIFE-US and CO-LIFE scores correlated positively with the Social Responsiveness Scale 2 (SRS-2) indicating good convergent validity. Like the original O-LIFE, the O-LIFE-US and the CO-LIFE are valid and reliable tools that reflect the spectrum of psychiatric and schizotypal traits in the general population. Such scales are necessary for conducting family studies that aim to examine a range of psychological and behavioral traits in both children and adults and are well-suited for the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative of the NIMH. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  2. University Performance Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    For the last two decades the Danish Universities have felt the impact of the international trend towards implementation of New Public Management. The results are seen in the implementation of new hierarchical governance structures and contractual governance system including market based quantitat......For the last two decades the Danish Universities have felt the impact of the international trend towards implementation of New Public Management. The results are seen in the implementation of new hierarchical governance structures and contractual governance system including market based...... quantitative measurement systems for resource allocation and performance evaluation. Compared to other countries the changes in performance measurements and governance of the Danish universities are radical and the Minister of Science heralded them as "the greatest change in university management since...... the founding of Copenhagen University in 1479". The changes took place with surprisingly little resistance from university scholars. The articles in this anthology investigate the origins and rationales for the silent managerial revolution at Danish Universities and the radical implications for the identity...

  3. Age of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, B.

    1981-01-01

    The age of the universe is the time that has elapsed since the Big Bang. To calculate the age, the expansion rate of the universe and distance to the galaxies must be determined. Unfortunately, it appears that the expansion rate is not constant but is decelerating. In the 1920's and 30's, Edwin Hubble set out to estimate the age of universe based on the expansion rate and distance to the galaxies. His method is described along with its flaw. Since that time several others have estimated the age of the universe. Their methods as well as results vary. These are discussed in the article. The ages determined from the various methods range from 10 to 20 billion years. There are two independent ways to determine the age of the universe. What they actually do is determine the age of our galaxy which would give a lower limit to the age of the universe. The first method calculates age of globular clusters which yields as age range from 8 to 18 billion years. The second method involves observing the speed at which radioactive substances decay. This also yields and age greater than 10 billion years. It is clear that there is still a lot of work to do before the true age of the universe can be determied

  4. On universal partial words

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Herman Z. Q.; Kitaev, Sergey; Mütze, Torsten; Sun, Brian Y.

    2016-01-01

    A universal word for a finite alphabet $A$ and some integer $n\\geq 1$ is a word over $A$ such that every word in $A^n$ appears exactly once as a subword (cyclically or linearly). It is well-known and easy to prove that universal words exist for any $A$ and $n$. In this work we initiate the systematic study of universal partial words. These are words that in addition to the letters from $A$ may contain an arbitrary number of occurrences of a special `joker' symbol $\\Diamond\

  5. Consciousness in the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Chamcham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available So far we can identify at least three concepts within modern cosmology that bring into debate the question of consciousness in the universe: 1 Fine Tuning; 2 The Anthropic Principle and 3 The Multiverse. This does not exclude the question of the role of observer (i.e. consciousness in cosmology as developed within Quantum Physics: we observe the universe through quanta and any breakthrough in understanding the origin and nature of the universe will come only through a quantum theory of gravity […

  6. Possible physical universes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon McCabe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various types of physical universe which could exist according to modern mathematical physics. The paper begins with an introduction that approaches the question from the viewpoint of ontic structural realism. Section 2 takes the case of the 'multiverse' of spatially homogeneous universes, and analyses the famous Collins-Hawking argument, which purports to show that our own universe is a very special member of this collection. Section 3 considers the multiverse of all solutions to the Einstein field equations, and continues the discussion of whether the notions of special and typical can be defined within such a collection.

  7. Universal (Global Evolutionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Ursul

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article investigate a general scientific concept of a global (universal evolution, in which selforganization of the material systems acts as a common ground and a permanent process of progressive development in the visible Universe. The main problem of research of this type of evolution is seen as a superhighway trajectory of evolutionary processes in the Universe, in which there is a continuous selforganization of the material systems, ranging from the Big Bang and to the social level of evolution, which may have an indefinite continuation of society and nature

  8. Interaction university and school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  9. The intelligent Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, F.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the 'primordial soup'); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe. (U.K.)

  10. An experience in World Nuclear University-Summer Institute 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzilawati Mohd Sarowi

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: World Nuclear University-Summer Institute (WNU-SI) has been held annually since 2005 in Cristchurh College, Oxford, London. This six weeks course is attended by 80-90 young professionals, or fellow from 20-25 countries across the world. The WNU-SI is designed not only to discuss the full spectrum of issues surrounding nuclear energy, but also emphasis on team building, cultural awareness and the development of leadership potential in multinational environment. Interestingly, the mentors play their role base on their experience in leading the nuclear industry throughout the globe. At the end of the course, the participant could understand the most important issues address in the industry with global perspective, experience and learn from practical teamwork internationally. Finally, this course is believed to be a step in developing a worldwide network among the fellows to support each other in their careers. This paper will discuss the experience gained in WNU-SI 2012. (author)

  11. ULTRA: Universal Grammar as a Universal Parser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, David P

    2018-01-01

    A central concern of generative grammar is the relationship between hierarchy and word order, traditionally understood as two dimensions of a single syntactic representation. A related concern is directionality in the grammar. Traditional approaches posit process-neutral grammars, embodying knowledge of language, put to use with infinite facility both for production and comprehension. This has crystallized in the view of Merge as the central property of syntax, perhaps its only novel feature. A growing number of approaches explore grammars with different directionalities, often with more direct connections to performance mechanisms. This paper describes a novel model of universal grammar as a one-directional, universal parser. Mismatch between word order and interpretation order is pervasive in comprehension; in the present model, word order is language-particular and interpretation order (i.e., hierarchy) is universal. These orders are not two dimensions of a unified abstract object (e.g., precedence and dominance in a single tree); rather, both are temporal sequences, and UG is an invariant real-time procedure (based on Knuth's stack-sorting algorithm) transforming word order into hierarchical order. This shift in perspective has several desirable consequences. It collapses linearization, displacement, and composition into a single performance process. The architecture provides a novel source of brackets (labeled unambiguously and without search), which are understood not as part-whole constituency relations, but as storage and retrieval routines in parsing. It also explains why neutral word order within single syntactic cycles avoids 213-like permutations. The model identifies cycles as extended projections of lexical heads, grounding the notion of phase. This is achieved with a universal processor, dispensing with parameters. The empirical focus is word order in noun phrases. This domain provides some of the clearest evidence for 213-avoidance as a cross

  12. Risk management at university

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, H.; Abramovich, S.

    2013-01-01

    This article observes the basic recommendations for the risk management system in higher education as an example Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno. Consider the risk-management standard that based in a process approach

  13. The hidden universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomer Disney has followed a somewhat different tack than that of most popular books on cosmology by concentrating on the notion of hidden (as in not directly observable by its own radiation) matter in the universe

  14. Is our Universe typical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurzadyan, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of typicalness of the Universe - as a dynamical system possessing both regular and chaotic regions of positive measure of phase space, is raised and discussed. Two dynamical systems are considered: 1) The observed Universe as a hierarchy of systems of N graviting bodies; 2) (3+1)-manifold with matter evolving to Wheeler-DeWitt equation in superspace with Hawking boundary condition of compact metrics. It is shown that the observed Universe is typical. There is no unambiguous answer for the second system yet. If it is typical too then the same present state of the Universe could have been originated from an infinite number of different initial conditions the restoration of which is practically impossible at present. 35 refs.; 2 refs

  15. The Universe and Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Kazantsev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses some of the unsolved problems of modern cosmology, which lead to the need to consider the role of living matter in the evolution of the universe. The author proposes the hy- pothesis of the emergence, in the process of evolution of the universe, “biological vacuum” (physical antipode, which has a purpose of improving physical matter until the appearance of living matter. Substantiates the idea that the “biological vacuum” in the “live” dark matter with the participation of a living organism as an intermediary. The model of a stationary universe, as the local group of galaxies, placed in a halo of “live” dark matter. At the end of the article the author predicts the final evolution of the physical universe (after the collapse of the physical fields and particles as the begin- ning of a new stage of evolution of the “live” dark matter.

  16. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    light nuclei and the microwave background. ... tested by more sophisticated observations. This is what we ... of the universe so long as the observational tests do not disprove it. ... Naturally, in the six and a half decades since Hubble's observa-.

  17. University Presidents: Academic Chameleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Thomas H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Sampling the opinions of at least one college or university president in each state and at schools of all sizes, the authors measure the degree of job satisfaction experienced by presidents. (Editor/LBH)

  18. The accidental universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P.C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Is our universe an accident of nature. The mysterious coincidences underlying the structure and properties of the universe that we inhabit are examined. This is the first book for the non-specialist reader to present in depth the provocative hypothesis that the structure of the physical world is exceedingly contrived in its appearance. A survey is presented of the range of apparently miraculous accidents of nature that have enabled the universe to evolve its familiar structures: atoms, stars, galaxies, and life itself. This book concludes with an investigation of the so-called 'anthropic principle' which postulates that 'miraculous coincidences' are inevitable in any universe containing conscious observers. This thesis of a cosmic biological selection effect will both reassure and enrage readers, the very existence of whom may be related to fine tuning in the laws of physics. (author)

  19. The isotropic Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raine, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This introduction to contemporary ideas in cosmology differs from other books on the 'expanding Universe' in its emphasis on physical cosmology and on the physical basis of the general theory of relativity. It is considered that the remarkable degree of isotropy, rather than the expansion, can be regarded as the central observational feature of the Universe. The various theories and ideas in 'big-bang' cosmology are discussed, providing an insight into current problems. Chapter headings are: quality of matter; expanding Universe; quality of radiation; quantity of matter; general theory of relativity; cosmological models; cosmological tests; matter and radiation; limits of isotropy; why is the Universe isotropic; singularities; evolution of structure. (U.K.)

  20. University of Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  1. The universe strikes back

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.

    1983-01-01

    The approach to particle physics via cosmology may meet with an obstacle in a series of cosmological puzzles studied in this paper: the flatness-longevity puzzle, the horizon-homogenity puzzle, and the cosmological constant puzzle. An analysis of the geometry and dynamics of the universe leads to an understanding (but not solution) of the flatness-longevity puzzle: possible universes are distinguished by the value of the dimensionless quantity N, the coordinate density of ER particles, such that the longevity of the universe is fixed by N. Universes where nonrelativistic particles dominate are then studied. An inflationary scenario proposed as a solution to these puzzles is studied, but found to have some difficulties

  2. Perelman's Universal Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the concept of the universal audience as the basic factor of Chaim Perelman's rhetorical theory and concludes that it is subject to the same criticism as Rousseau's general will and Kant's categorical imperative. (JMF)

  3. Performance Measurement at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes empirical approaches to testing the reliability, validity, and organizational effectiveness of student evaluations of teaching (SET) as a performance measurement instrument in knowledge management at the institutional level of universities. Departing from Weber’s concept...

  4. University related studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Over the years, opportunities for terrestrial ecology studies have attracted student researchers associated with Pacific Northwest colleges and universities. During the past year, four students have been involved with undergraduate or graduate thesis projects. Brief descriptions of these studies are included in this section. It is expected that university participation will be enhanced by designating parts of the Hanford Reservation as a National Environmental Research Park (NERP)

  5. Mapping the early Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    From its unique vantage point 900 kilometres above the earth's surface, NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has a privileged view of cosmic background radiation - the remnants of the early (radiation-dominated) Universe which followed the Big Bang some ten Gigayears ago, and possibly some subsequent history. In this way astroparticle physicists get a first peek at the quantum cosmology which moulded the infant Universe

  6. The Bright Universe Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdin, M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that viewed from the 'outside', our universe is a black hole. Hence the 'inside' cosmology considered is termed as the Bright Universe Cosmology. The model proposed avoids the singularities of cosmologies of the Big Bang variety, it gives a good account of the redshifts, the cosmic background radiation, the number counts; it also gives a satisfactory explanation of the 'large numbers coincidence' and of the variation in time of fundamental constants. (Auth.)

  7. The universal access handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the field of Universal Access has made significant progress in consolidating theoretical approaches, scientific methods and technologies, as well as in exploring new application domains. Increasingly, professionals in this rapidly maturing area require a comprehensive and multidisciplinary resource that addresses current principles, methods, and tools. Written by leading international authorities from academic, research, and industrial organizations and nonmarket institutions, The Universal Access Handbook covers the unfolding scientific, methodological, technological, and pol

  8. Rotating universe models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozini, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review is made of some properties of the rotating Universe models. Godel's model is identified as a generalized filted model. Some properties of new solutions of the Einstein's equations, which are rotating non-stationary Universe models, are presented and analyzed. These models have the Godel's model as a particular case. Non-stationary cosmological models are found which are a generalization of the Godel's metrics in an analogous way in which Friedmann is to the Einstein's model. (L.C.) [pt

  9. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  10. Mapping the early Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-06-15

    From its unique vantage point 900 kilometres above the earth's surface, NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has a privileged view of cosmic background radiation - the remnants of the early (radiation-dominated) Universe which followed the Big Bang some ten Gigayears ago, and possibly some subsequent history. In this way astroparticle physicists get a first peek at the quantum cosmology which moulded the infant Universe.

  11. Cultural universals: So what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elaine Botha

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the elusive "cultural universal s” in a variety of academic disciplines has been motivated b y the spectre of relativism in its diverse guises. The problem of relativism has been thrust upon us inter alia by the inability of our epistemological models to account for social and cultural, moral and cognitive diversity and to provide us with criteria by means of which to judge aberrations like ideologies. Contrary to the general trend I would like to argue that it is not the spectre of relativism in its various guises which necessitates the search for cultural universals, nor is this the only motivation for a Christian to argue in favour of the recognition of cultural universals. Various authors have suggested that such universal structures do exist; that they condition human and societal behaviour and that it would in principle be possible to construct a theory of these structural universals or a "biogrammar" or "geography ” of the universal cultural acquisition device of humankind (cf. Harre,1976, 32; Johnson, 1987: xxxvii ; Tige r and Fox, 1974:17,30. Cross -cu ltural research in both psychology and anthropology has pointed to the existence of such traits, and in recent philosophical discussions Apel and others have pointed to the necessity of recognizing the existence of some sort of " transcendentalia" . These arguments emphasize elements that are common to diverse approaches to the problem of cultural universals. Christian scholars could accept most of these arguments as valid and yet argue in favour of a very specifically modified version of the notion of cultural universals. This essay attempts to develop such a position.

  12. University contracts summary book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  13. Universal Majorana thermoelectric noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2018-04-01

    Thermoelectric phenomena resulting from an interplay between particle flows induced by electric fields and temperature inhomogeneities are extremely insightful as a tool providing substantial knowledge about the microscopic structure of a given system. By tuning, e.g., parameters of a nanoscopic system coupled via tunneling mechanisms to two contacts, one may achieve various situations where the electric current induced by an external bias voltage competes with the electric current excited by the temperature difference of the two contacts. Even more exciting physics emerges when the system's electronic degrees freedom split to form Majorana fermions which make the thermoelectric dynamics universal. Here, we propose revealing these unique universal signatures of Majorana fermions in strongly nonequilibrium quantum dots via noise of the thermoelectric transport beyond linear response. It is demonstrated that whereas mean thermoelectric quantities are only universal at large-bias voltages, the noise of the electric current excited by an external bias voltage and the temperature difference of the contacts is universal at any bias voltage. We provide truly universal, i.e., independent of the system's parameters, thermoelectric ratios between nonlinear response coefficients of the noise and mean current at large-bias voltages where experiments may easily be performed to uniquely detect these truly universal Majorana thermoelectric signatures.

  14. University students' mental health: Aksaray University example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Gündoğdu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether mental health scores of the university students differ based on gender, whether they study in their ideal majors, whether they are contended with their majors, economic condition perceived and perceptions on employment opportunity after graduation. The sample group of the study constituted 3492 students comprising 2037 female students and 1455 male students attending Faculty of Education (634, Engineering Faculty (1582, Economic and Administrative Sciences Faculty (1097, Faculty of Science and Letters (762, Medical Vocational College (540, Physical Training and Sports College (443 and Aksaray Vocational College (1452 of Aksaray University in 2010-2011 Academic Year. Symptom Checklist (SCL 90-R developed by Deragotis, (1983; eg Öner, 1997 has been used to collect data on mental health level of the students involved in the study. Statistical analysis of the data collected has been carried out using t Test, One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences have been found in students in terms of independent variants according to the general symptom average score and numerous sub-scale scores.

  15. Gender differences in self-esteem and happiness among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik, S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research examines gender differences in the self esteem and happiness of university students. A sample of 120 students (60 males and 60 females was drawn from the various departments of university of Sargodha within the age range of 18-26 years. Convenience sampling technique was used. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1985 and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (Hills and Argyle, 2001 were individually administered to the participants. The results suggested that the male students reported significantly higher level of self esteem as compared to the female university students (t = 3.78, df = 117, ***p .05. Furthermore, significant positive relationship was found between happiness and self esteem of students (r = .22*. These findings have implications for helping teachers and parents.

  16. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented

  17. Recipes for the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of conferences for the uninitiated. Each of the conferences will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create "cosmic music". The third conference in the series, "How to build a universe?", will take place on Tuesday 15 March 2005 and the speaker will be the CERN theoretical physicist, John Ellis. A tiny number of elementary particles are responsible for the very diverse universe that surrounds us. These basic building blocks of matter interact by exchanging photons and other similar particles. After summing up what we know about these fundamental building blocks, their role in the history of the universe will be discussed. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that ...

  18. Quantum and Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uiler, Dzh.

    1982-01-01

    General approach to the structure of the Universe is discussed. Two properties of physical laws: symmetry and changeability are considered from this view point. Each physical law permits simpler formulation in the notion of symmetry. But the simplicity of this description conceals interval mechanisms which make up the base of the physical law. The problem of physical law stability is analyzed. It is concluded that unrestricted changeability is the main property of physics. Primary attention is paid to the problem of ''quantum and Universe''. The effect of measuring process on the experimental results is the most difficult problem of quantum mechanisms. The quantum principle rejected an attempt to conceptually present the reality as it is pictured independently from its observation and it made the description of the Universe structure still more complicated and confused

  19. Armored glass university ceilings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guil Bozal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The barriers that women face to occupy the highest professional positions are well studied, yet they persist. The employment situation of women has improved, but the positions of power are still predominantly in male hands, as if men continually seek new mechanisms to keep, like viruses that change every year to survive the way vaccines. Barriers persist, although in recent decades women have managed to overcome in quantity and quality to men among university students. Women are still unable to access the best academic positions. Among university faculty only reach 40% and full professor position remain masculinized, having managed to reach the women -after many efforts and some policies- measures only 20%, which is seen clearly insufficient given their greater training. Against this background, the future is difficult, unless the university decided to endorse the cause of equality, going to assume its role of reference for the new generations and to other organizations and society in general.

  20. Baby universe theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Ninomiya, Masao

    1989-12-01

    We give an elementary review of the so called 'the theory of baby universes' which is a series of ideas or speculations about some effects in quantum gravity, viz. the effect of a certain type of wormholes, representing the exchange of small 3-space universes called baby universes. We consider this 'theory' as being physically and scientifically a very promising candidate for a theory of everything. It is, however, mathematically lacking any strong foundation at all. It solves several fine-tuning problems: First of all the cosmological constant problem, and also the strong CP-problem and the hierarchy problem. We also speculate that it might predict the possibility of influencing the probability distributions of the outcome of quantum mechanical measurements at one time by acts at a later time. (orig.)

  1. Phonology without universal grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  2. Electromagnetic Gowdy universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, C.

    1979-01-01

    Following Gowdy and Berger we construct an inhomogeneous closed electromagnetic universe with three-torus topology. This model is obtained as a result of the homogeneity breaking in the electromagnetic Bianchi type-I universe and contains interacting gravitational and electromagnetic waves. This cosmological solution provides an exactly solvable model for the study of the nonlinear fully relativistic regime of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational fields in the early universe. The asymptotic behavior is considered (i) in the vicinity of the initial singularity and (ii) in the high-frequency limit. It is shown that the effects of coupling between electromagnetic and gravitational waves cause an evolution which is significantly different from that of the vacuum model. The influence of the primordial homogeneous electromagnetic field on the dynamics of the model is also discussed

  3. The anamorphic universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  4. The anamorphic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce ''anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase

  5. The anamorphic universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J., E-mail: aijjas@princeton.edu, E-mail: steinh@princeton.edu [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ''anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  6. Southern Universities Nuclear Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Southern Universities Nuclear Institute was created in 1961 to provide postgraduate research and teaching facilities for the universities of Cape Town and Stellenbosch. The main research tool is the 6,0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator installed in 1964. Developments and improvements over the years have maintained the Institute's research effectiveness. The work of local research groups has led to a large number of M Sc and doctorate degrees and numerous publications in international journals. Research at the Institute includes front-line studies of basic nuclear and atomic physics, the development and application of nuclear analytical techniques and the application of radioisotope tracers to problems in science, industry and medicine. The Institute receives financial support from the two southern universities, the Department of National Education, the CSIR and the Atomic Energy Board

  7. An eternal universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.; Heintzmann, H.

    1983-01-01

    A new generalized solution of Maxwell-Einstein equations (which are non-minimally coupled) which leads to some fascinating aspects of the Universe is presented. The Cosmos has no singularity due to the coupling of longitudinal electromagnetism with space-time. It contains the Milne-Schucking cosmos as a limiting case. This model contains a free parameter (the longitudinal electromagnetic field) which allows one to fix the density of highest compression of the Cosmos. Alternativelly the parameter allows one to adjust our cosmos to the presently observed Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter. The model seems to be a viable candidate for our real cosmos as it allows one to extend the time scale of the Universe to arbitrarily large values i.e., it is able to provide the necessary time scale for the origin of life. It is speculated that the entropy is finite but intelligence in the Universe may be infinite. (Author) [pt

  8. The Worldhood university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Nørgård, Rikke Toft

    Universities and higher education today are sites for entanglement of multiple forms of agency and lifeworlds. Enhanced focus is given to higher education strategies and frameworks that integrate more traditional forms of higher education curriculum with moral and political awareness, social agency...... the mode 2 university, where the university is ‘for sale’ (Shumar, 1997) and where higher education curricula are being defined and shaped by the needs and current drivers of the job market and the shifting neoliberalist company strategies. As Ronald Barnett underlines “the contemporary vocabulary...... politically, socially, ethically, and philosophically. It requires, among other things, new conceptions of academic citizenship, belonging in higher education, and what we have called ‘placeful universities’ where “academic citizenship emerges through dialogical integration and ‘Mitsein’ in the critically...

  9. Supercomplexity and the university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    Ronald Barnett’s modern classic Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity (published December 1999), has had a crucial impact internationally on the field of Higher Education research and develop- ment since the book was published now nearly 20 years ago. Bridging an academic oeuvre...... across almost 30 years with close to 30 published volumes, Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity plays an important role in the development and transformation of Barnett’s social theory of Higher Education into a social philosophy of Higher Education. In the book Barnett performs...... and vision that fully embraces the future of Higher Education. This way, Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity has not only paved the way for Barnett’s own devel- opment of a social philosophy of Higher Education, but also contributed invaluably to the rise and maturing of philosophy...

  10. A unified universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2018-01-01

    We present a unified evolution of the universe from very early times until the present epoch by including both the leading local correction R2 and the leading non-local term R1□2R to the classical gravitational action. We find that the inflationary phase driven by R2 term gracefully exits...... in a transitory regime characterized by coherent oscillations of the Hubble parameter. The universe then naturally enters into a radiation dominated epoch followed by a matter dominated era. At sufficiently late times after radiation–matter equality, the non-local term starts to dominate inducing an accelerated...... expansion of the universe at the present epoch. We further exhibit the fact that both the leading local and non-local terms can be obtained within the covariant effective field theory of gravity. This scenario thus provides a unified picture of inflation and dark energy in a single framework by means...

  11. Radioprotection in Brazilian universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, K.C.; Borges, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a broad knowledge of the circumstances under which activities involving ionizing radiations are held at brazilian academic institutions. Around 90 institutions (universities and isolated schools of both public and private sectors) were invited, by mail, to answer an inquiry with questions from technical to legal aspects of their activities with radiations. Information received from 2/3 of institutions contacted, permitted conclusions as: there is a wide ignorance about radioprotection procedures and legislation, although few universities maintain some efficient radioprotection staff; there is a need for the establishment of a standard radioprotection text dedicated to those specific activities of the sector. (author)

  12. Universal Lyndon Words

    OpenAIRE

    Carpi, Arturo; Fici, Gabriele; Holub, Stepan; Oprsal, Jakub; Sciortino, Marinella

    2014-01-01

    A word $w$ over an alphabet $\\Sigma$ is a Lyndon word if there exists an order defined on $\\Sigma$ for which $w$ is lexicographically smaller than all of its conjugates (other than itself). We introduce and study \\emph{universal Lyndon words}, which are words over an $n$-letter alphabet that have length $n!$ and such that all the conjugates are Lyndon words. We show that universal Lyndon words exist for every $n$ and exhibit combinatorial and structural properties of these words. We then defi...

  13. Building the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Christine

    1985-01-01

    The book 'In Building the Universe' contains a collection of articles from the magazine 'New Scientist', compiled and edited to provide an overview of the field of particle physics. A picture of the basic constituents of matter (quarks and leptons) is given, together with the four fundamental forces that hold them together. The operation of these forces in the first instance of the hot young Universe is described. Also, the development of the accelerators and detectors used in elementary particle physics, is discussed. (UK)

  14. The 4-percent universe

    CERN Document Server

    Panek, Richard

    2012-01-01

    It is one of the most disturbing aspects of our universe: only four per cent of it consists of the matter that makes up every star, planet, and every book. The rest is completely unknown. Acclaimed science writer Richard Panek tells the story of the handful of scientists who have spent the past few decades on a quest to unlock the secrets of “dark matter" and the even stranger substance called “dark energy". These are perhaps the greatest mysteries in science,and solving them will reshape our understanding of the universe and our place in it. The stakes could not be higher. Panek's fast-paced

  15. The missing universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springel, V.; Taillet, R.; Deffayet, C.

    2014-01-01

    According to the Big Bang model, ordinary matter would play a second role in the universe compared to 2 mysterious components: dark matter and dark energy. Although the nature of both components is unknown, observational hints for their existence pile up but the direct detection of both has been unsuccessful so far. New ways have been explored to do without the concepts of dark matter and dark energy. This document that is divided into 3 parts presents the observational data that back the idea of dark matter and dark energy, the experimental effort made worldwide to detect dark matter particles, and the other ways to explain universe expansion

  16. Models of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Most models of the universe are dependent on the assumption of a uniform distribution of matter, and thus are rather crude, due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's field equations. Here, a model is proposed which avoids this smoothing-out process. A metric is obtained which is consistent with the assumption that the matter of the universe is concentrated mainly in stars, moving with the velocity of recession implied by Hubble's law. The solution obtained gives results comparable to those obtainable by Schwarzchild metric, suitably adjusted to agree with the Einstein-DeSitter model at large distances

  17. Exponential Cardassian universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Daojun; Sun Changbo; Li Xinzhou

    2006-01-01

    The expectation of explaining cosmological observations without requiring new energy sources is forsooth worthy of investigation. In this Letter, a new kind of Cardassian models, called exponential Cardassian models, for the late-time universe are investigated in the context of the spatially flat FRW universe scenario. We fit the exponential Cardassian models to current type Ia supernovae data and find they are consistent with the observations. Furthermore, we point out that the equation-of-state parameter for the effective dark fluid component in exponential Cardassian models can naturally cross the cosmological constant divide w=-1 that observations favor mildly without introducing exotic material that destroy the weak energy condition

  18. Fundamentals of university mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    McGregor, C M; Stothers, W W

    2010-01-01

    The third edition of this popular and effective textbook provides in one volume a unified treatment of topics essential for first year university students studying for degrees in mathematics. Students of computer science, physics and statistics will also find this book a helpful guide to all the basic mathematics they require. It clearly and comprehensively covers much of the material that other textbooks tend to assume, assisting students in the transition to university-level mathematics.Expertly revised and updated, the chapters cover topics such as number systems, set and functions, differe

  19. Bootstrap, universality and horizons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chi-Ming [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics,University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704 (United States); Lin, Ying-Hsuan [Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-10-13

    We present a closed form expression for the semiclassical OPE coefficients that are universal for all 2D CFTs with a “weak” light spectrum, by taking the semiclassical limit of the fusion kernel. We match this with a properly regularized and normalized bulk action evaluated on a geometry with three conical defects, analytically continued in the deficit angles beyond the range for which a metric with positive signature exists. The analytically continued geometry has a codimension-one coordinate singularity surrounding the heaviest conical defect. This singularity becomes a horizon after Wick rotating to Lorentzian signature, suggesting a connection between universality and the existence of a horizon.

  20. The plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faelthammar, C.G.

    1989-12-01

    The term 'Plasma Universe', coined by Hannes Alfven, emphasices the fact that plasma phenomena discovered in the laboratory and in accessible regions of space. must be important also in the rest of the universe, which consists almost entirely of matter in the plasma state. Relevant aspect of this concept will be discussed. They include the response of the plasma to electric currents, the support of magnetic-field aligned electric fields, violation of the frozen-field condition, rapid release of magnetically stored energy, acceleration of charged particles, chemical separation, and filamentary and cellular structures. (authors)

  1. Onze mille pages. Les Œuvres complètes de Montesquieu à Oxford : projet, réalisations, perspectives (février 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Volpilhac-Auger

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available La nouvelle édition des œuvres complètes de Montesquieu en vingt et un volumes (huit sont parus depuis 1998, rattachée à l’École normale supérieure Lettre et Sciences humaines (Lyon depuis 2000 et publiée par la Voltaire Foundation (Oxford, se fonde sur une approche nouvelle du corpus manuscrit comme de la conception même de l’œuvre, saisie dans son devenir ; l’établissement du texte comme l’annotation cherchent à en restituer la force initiale, telle qu’elle a pu apparaître aux contemporains de Montesquieu. Cette entreprise se double d’une réflexion constante sur sa propre pratique, par rapport à l’histoire de l’édition et à la réception (et donc l’interprétation des œuvres de Montesquieu.

  2. Serum concentrations of vitamin B12 and folate in British male omnivores, vegetarians and vegans: results from a cross-sectional analysis of the EPIC-Oxford cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsing, A M J; Crowe, F L; Lloyd-Wright, Z; Sanders, T A B; Appleby, P N; Allen, N E; Key, T J

    2010-09-01

    Vegans, and to a lesser extent vegetarians, have low average circulating concentrations of vitamin B12; however, the relation between factors such as age or time on these diets and vitamin B12 concentrations is not clear. The objectives of this study were to investigate differences in serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations between omnivores, vegetarians and vegans and to ascertain whether vitamin B12 concentrations differed by age and time on the diet. A cross-sectional analysis involving 689 men (226 omnivores, 231 vegetarians and 232 vegans) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort. Mean serum vitamin B12 was highest among omnivores (281, 95% CI: 270-292 pmol/l), intermediate among vegetarians (182, 95% CI: 175-189 pmol/l) and lowest among vegans (122, 95% CI: 117-127 pmol/l). In all, 52% of vegans, 7% of vegetarians and one omnivore were classified as vitamin B12 deficient (defined as serum vitamin B12 vegan diet and serum vitamin B12. In contrast, folate concentrations were highest among vegans, intermediate among vegetarians and lowest among omnivores, but only two men (both omnivores) were categorized as folate deficient (defined as serum folate Vegans have lower vitamin B12 concentrations, but higher folate concentrations, than vegetarians and omnivores. Half of the vegans were categorized as vitamin B12 deficient and would be expected to have a higher risk of developing clinical symptoms related to vitamin B12 deficiency.

  3. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  4. Study of university students' attitudes toward office space at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Eteadifard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Office space is the space where students first experience the university. In this paper, the attitude of students toward office space in the public sphere of university is discussed. This article is the result of the research conducted for the “Institute for Social and Cultural Studies” by the author. The main issues in this paper are: university students' attitudes towards quality office space at the universities and mental basis of common issues among students at the universities. Data were collected through individual and group interviews. More than eighty interviews with activists and students of University of Tehran, Shahid Beheshti University, Allameh Tabataba’i University, Sharif University of Technology and Kharazmi University were done. The main indicators of office space in this study include: students’ satisfaction of office space, students’ welfare affairs and students’ feedback about this space. Problems and obstacles relating to the office space and their solutions were also studied in this paper.

  5. Universal Precautions: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    and hazards could cause devastating effects on. 2 health and ... (splash of blood or other body fluids into the eyes, nose or ... nurses, laboratory staff and aides who work in .... electric hand dryers are available which is ideal. ... self, patient and co-workers from infection. All ... with universal precautions include the absence of ...

  6. Ranganathan : A Universal Librarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abulfazale M. Fazle Kabir

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In formulating Five Laws of Library Science Ranganathan has made a lasting and fundamental contribution to the philosophy of library patron service. His Colon Classification has provided a scheme for hierarchical design of faceted subject classification. For such valuable contribution to the profession he has been acclaimed as a universal librarian.

  7. Universal and Relative Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Goldberg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I illustrate how a basic kind of universal rationality can be profitably combined with undeniable instances of relativism. I do so by engaging Michael Friedman’s recent response to a challenge from Thomas Kuhn.

  8. Entrepreneurship and University Licensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Outside invention has gained in importance as universities are actively seeking commercialization of their inventions since the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act. The paper analyzes the incentives to invent for outside and inside inventors. It is shown that outside inventors have greater incentives to

  9. Explore Your Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This warm-up lab is intended to get students familiar with the large numbers encountered in astronomy (e.g. distances, times, numbers of stars and galaxies in the universe). Students will measure the dimensions of the classroom and/or the distance between objects in the classroom, and report their findings in units of millimeters, micrometers and nanometers.

  10. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Origin (?) of the Universe The Big Bang. Jayant V Narlikar. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 6-12. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/03/0006-0012 ...

  11. Discrete bipolar universal integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greco, S.; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 1 (2014), s. 55-65 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/11/0378 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : bipolar integral * universal integral * Choquet integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.986, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/mesiar-0432224.pdf

  12. Universal decoherence in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M

    2004-03-26

    Symmetry implications for the decoherence of quantum oscillations of a two-state system in a solid are studied. When the oscillation frequency is small compared to the Debye frequency, the universal lower bound on the decoherence due to the atomic environment is derived in terms of the macroscopic parameters of the solid, with no unknown interaction constants.

  13. Origin(?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weaknesses of the big bang cosmology, conceptual as well as observational. ... They argue that this event marks the origin of the ... a change of the lowest energy state of matter, normally designated as ... Rapid expansion of this kind produces some lasting effects in the universe. .... This attitude coupled with attempted ...

  14. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  15. Telecommunications and Universal Service

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The book is intended to provide valuable input to the Universal Service Agency .... Figure 1 is not, of course, drawn to scale for South Africa. .... Such uneconomic customers and areas are mainly found in rural, peripheral, and less favoured regions. ... The United Kingdom is a good example of the enduring nature of this task.

  16. Universities in Transition

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The use in this publication of trade names, trademarks, service marks, and similar .... 13 Germany: The Role of Universities in the Learning Economy ... and that there exist good opportunities for learning from each other's experiences. ...... to sell on credit, and/or provide access to markets, introducing the firms to customers.

  17. The Classification of Universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J

    2004-01-01

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific

  18. Earth and Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosygin, Yu A

    1986-12-01

    Rocks, the age of which according to certain data exceeds considerably the recognized age of the Earth and approximates the age of the Universe, have been detected on the Earth. There is a necessity to coordinate the geological data with cosmological structures.

  19. Organizing University Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    During a period of projected declining enrollments some years ago, colleges and universities began looking to business and industry for models and methods to achieve stability and exhibit accountability. Zero-based budgeting, computerized record keeping, and planned-programmed-budgeting systems found their way to college campuses. A trend to…

  20. Romanians decipher the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    Balan, Sorin

    2007-01-01

    We are at the European Nuclear Research Center, the greatest partcile accelerator in the world. Approximately 50 people work here. Thanks to them, Romania can be proud of taking part in the greatest experiment in the world that tries to find an explanation for the ofrmation of the Universe. (1,5 page)

  1. Towards Universal Semantic Tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abzianidze, Lasha; Bos, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes the task of universal semantic tagging---tagging word tokens with language-neutral, semantically informative tags. We argue that the task, with its independent nature, contributes to better semantic analysis for wide-coverage multilingual text. We present the initial version of

  2. Parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too. We may not be able -- as least not yet -- to prove they exist, many serious scientists say, but there are plenty of reasons to think that parallel dimensions are more than figments of eggheaded imagination.

  3. Universities and National Laboratories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    knowledge, etc. in the curriculum of the Institute of Technology at Kharagpur. The. University of ... Nothing can be farther from reality. If the powers that can ... have moved and mixed and have had my being in the student community. I claim that.

  4. The Classification of Universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J

    2004-04-09

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific.

  5. PBL at Aalborg university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From the preface: "All the articles in this book have been presented at the International Conference PBL 2006 ABP, that was held in Lima, Peru, July 19th-21th 2006. This conference is part of a series of Pan-American conferences. It is the first time that Aalborg University has participated...

  6. Universal Cable Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanvalkenburgh, C.

    1985-01-01

    Concept allows routing easily changed. No custom hardware required in concept. Instead, standard brackets cut to length and installed at selected locations along cable route. If cable route is changed, brackets simply moved to new locations. Concept for "universal" cable brackets make it easy to route electrical cable around and through virtually any structure.

  7. A Universe of Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldovich, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    Reprinted from the original Russian manuscript of Yakov Zeldovich, this article chronicles his studies of the universe and his attempts to construct a theory of its evolution. He provides the high school student with compelling cosmological discussions about uniformity, galactic clusters, radiation, evolution, the big bang, and gravitational…

  8. Universe opacity and EBL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 2 (2017), s. 1532-1542 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : cosmic background radiation * dust, extinction * early Universe * galaxies: high redshift * galaxies: ISM * intergalactic medium Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  9. University of Maryland MRSEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    operation. This site remains as a history of the center, but will not be actively maintained. University of . Crystals are made up of layers, or "planes" of atoms, perfectly stacked in an ordered pattern . Because this surface has been cut at a slight angle to the crystal planes, it appears "stepped"

  10. Empirically sampling Universal Dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schluter, Natalie; Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Universal Dependencies incur a high cost in computation for unbiased system development. We propose a 100% empirically chosen small subset of UD languages for efficient parsing system development. The technique used is based on measurements of model capacity globally. We show that the diversity o...

  11. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  12. Chaotic universe model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2018-01-15

    In this study, we consider nonlinear interactions between components such as dark energy, dark matter, matter and radiation in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker space-time and propose a simple interaction model based on the time evolution of the densities of these components. By using this model we show that these interactions can be given by Lotka-Volterra type equations. We numerically solve these coupling equations and show that interaction dynamics between dark energy-dark matter-matter or dark energy-dark matter-matter-radiation has a strange attractor for 0 > w de  >-1, w dm  ≥ 0, w m  ≥ 0 and w r  ≥ 0 values. These strange attractors with the positive Lyapunov exponent clearly show that chaotic dynamics appears in the time evolution of the densities. These results provide that the time evolution of the universe is chaotic. The present model may have potential to solve some of the cosmological problems such as the singularity, cosmic coincidence, big crunch, big rip, horizon, oscillation, the emergence of the galaxies, matter distribution and large-scale organization of the universe. The model also connects between dynamics of the competing species in biological systems and dynamics of the time evolution of the universe and offers a new perspective and a new different scenario for the universe evolution.

  13. 9. Universality and Incomputability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Algorithms - Universality and Incomputability. R K Shyamasundar. Series Article ... Author Affiliations. R K Shyamasundar1. Computer Science Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  14. Type II universal spacetimes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hervik, S.; Málek, Tomáš; Pravda, Vojtěch; Pravdová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 24 (2015), s. 245012 ISSN 0264-9381 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10042S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : einstein spacetimes * generalized gravities * universal spacetimes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.837, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0264-9381/32/24/245012

  15. The Universe's First Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster VersionFigure 1Figure 2 This is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. Figure 1 is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first groups of objects -- either huge stars or voracious black holes. Darker shades in the image on the left correspond to dimmer parts of the background glow, while yellow and white show the brightest light. Brief History of the Universe In figure 2, the artist's timeline chronicles the history of the universe, from its explosive beginning to its mature, present-day state. Our universe began in a tremendous explosion known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago (left side of strip). Observations by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer and Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe revealed microwave light from this very early epoch, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang, providing strong evidence that our universe did blast into existence. Results from the Cosmic Background Explorer were honored with the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics. A period of darkness ensued, until about a few hundred million years later, when the first objects flooded the universe with light. This first light is believed to have been captured in data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The light detected by Spitzer would have originated as visible and ultraviolet light, then stretched, or redshifted, to lower-energy infrared wavelengths during its long voyage to reach us across expanding space. The light detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer and the

  16. Exploring the relationship between university internationalization and university autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gullieva, Valeria

    This paper explores a research gap at the intersection of university internationalization and university autonomy. A process model of university internationalization is put forward whereby the process of university internationalization is mediated by university internationalization capacity...... and moderated by target country institutional autonomy and globalization; and entry modes, timing and pace, as well as product mix of internationalization define university’s internationalization pattern. A systematic review is conducted to identify empirical studies at this intersection. One of the questions...

  17. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  18. Universe or Multiverse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Part I. Overviews: 1. Introduction and overview Bernard Carr; 2. Living in the multiverse Steven Weinberg; 3. Enlightenment, knowledge, ignorance, temptation Frank Wilczek; Part II. Cosmology and Astrophysics: 4. Cosmology and the multiverse Martin J. Rees; 5. The anthropic principle revisited Bernard Carr; 6. Cosmology from the top down Stephen Hawking; 7. The multiverse hierarchy Max Tegmark; 8. The inflationary universe Andrei Linde; 9. A model of anthropic reasoning: the dark to ordinary matter ratio Frank Wilczek; 10. Anthropic predictions: the case of the cosmological constant Alexander Vilenkin; 11. The definition and classification of universes James D. Bjorken; 12. M/string theory and anthropic reasoning Renata Kallosh; 13. The anthropic principle, dark energy and the LHC Savas Dimopoulos and Scott Thomas; Part III. Particle Physics and Quantum Theory: 14. Quarks, electrons and atoms in closely related universes Craig J. Hogan; 15. The fine-tuning problems of particle physics and anthropic mechanisms John F. Donoghue; 16. The anthropic landscape of string theory Leonard Susskind; 17. Cosmology and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics Viatcheslav Mukhanov; 18. Anthropic reasoning and quantum cosmology James B. Hartle; 19. Micro-anthropic principle for quantum theory Brandon Carter; Part IV. More General Philosophical Issues: 20. Scientific alternatives to the anthropic principle Lee Smolin; 21. Making predictions in a multiverse: conundrums, dangers, coincidences Anthony Aguirre; 22. Multiverses: description, uniqueness and testing George Ellis; 23. Predictions and tests of multiverse theories Don N. Page; 24. Observation selection theory and cosmological fine-tuning Nick Bostrom; 25. Are anthropic arguments, involving multiverses and beyond, legitimate? William R. Stoeger; 26. The multiverse hypothesis: a theistic perspective Robin Collins; 27. Living in a simulated universe John D. Barrow; 28. Universes galore: where will it all end? Paul

  19. Life at a Teaching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marineau, Josiah F.

    2018-01-01

    Many new political science faculty at teaching universities are recent PhD recipients, and are coming to these institutions from research-oriented universities. There are considerable differences between the training for graduate students received at research universities and the expectations for faculty at teaching universities. This essay…

  20. Universities Venture into Venture Capitalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desruisseaux, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Reports that some universities are starting their own venture-capital funds to develop campus companies, or are investing endowment funds with established venture-capital firms inclined to finance potential spinoffs from campus research. Examples cited are from the University of Alabama, Vanderbilt University (Tennessee), University of…

  1. The relationship between English language learning strategies and gender among pre-university students: An overview of UMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to analyze the effects psychological gender differences on the relationship between language learning strategies and their proficiency in English language for pre-university students. Previous researchers found that the more employment of language learning strategies, the more successful the learners are and those with higher level of strategy use are female rather than male. In this study, fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  2. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario-Josefa Marrero

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning constructs in a convenience sample. Participants analysed were 48 university students (mean age 22.25, 25 assigned nonrandomized to intervention condition and 23 to no-treatment waiting-list control condition. All participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention to test the treatment program effectiveness. Repeated-measures ANCOVAs, controlling baseline differences between the two groups, indicated that the intervention group reported greater social support after the intervention period than the waiting-list control group. Within-group differences were found for happiness, selfacceptance, positive relations with others, optimism, and self-esteem in the intervention group; these differences did not appear in the waiting-list control group. These findings suggest the limited capacity of this intervention program for improving well-being through positive activities combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy. Future research should analyse what kind of activities could be more effective in promoting well-being depending on the characteristics of participants.

  3. The future of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, AJ

    2007-01-01

    Many books have described how the universe became the way it is today. But what about the future of the universe? How long might the universe as we recognize it survive? The Future of the Universe takes the reader on a journey through space and time, beginning with a long look at the Earth and solar system, voyaging to the outermost galaxies, and finishing with speculations about the life and fate of the entire universe.

  4. Serum concentrations of vitamin B12 and folate in British male omnivores, vegetarians, and vegans: results from a cross-sectional analysis of the EPIC-Oxford cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsing, Anne MJ; Crowe, Francesca L; Lloyd-Wright, Zouë; Sanders, Thomas AB; Appleby, Paul N; Allen, Naomi E; Key, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives Vegans and to a lesser extent vegetarians have low average circulating concentrations of vitamin B12; however, the relation between factors such as age or time on these diets and vitamin B12 concentrations is not clear. The objectives were to investigate differences in serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations between omnivores, vegetarians and vegans and to ascertain whether vitamin B12 concentrations differed by age and time on the diet. Subjects/Methods A cross-sectional analysis involving 689 men (226 omnivores, 231 vegetarians and 232 vegans) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort. Results Mean serum vitamin B12 was highest among omnivores (281, 95% CI: 270-292 pmol/l), intermediate in vegetarians (182, 95% CI: 175-189 pmol/l), and lowest in vegans (122, 95% CI: 117-127 pmol/l). Fifty-two percent of vegans, 7% of vegetarians and one omnivore were classified as vitamin B12 deficient (defined as serum vitamin B12 vegan diet and serum vitamin B12. In contrast, folate concentrations were highest among vegans, intermediate in vegetarians, and lowest in omnivores, but only two men (both omnivores) were categorised as folate deficient (defined as serum folate Vegans have lower vitamin B12 concentrations, but higher folate concentrations, than vegetarians and omnivores. Half of the vegans were categorised as vitamin B12 deficient and would be expected to have a higher risk of developing clinical symptoms related to vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:20648045

  5. High compliance with dietary recommendations in a cohort of meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Oxford study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiecki, Jakub G; Appleby, Paul N; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Key, Timothy J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in dietary intakes between 30251 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Oxford study, comprising 18 244 meat eaters, 4 531 fish eaters, 6 673 vegetarians, and 803 vegans aged 30 to 90 years who completed semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. We hypothesized that these groups characterized by varying degrees of animal product exclusion have significantly different intakes of many nutrients, with possible implications for dietary adequacy and compliance with population dietary goals. Nutrient intakes were estimated including fortification in foods, but excluding dietary supplements. Dietary supplementation practices were also evaluated. Highly significant differences were found in estimated nutrient intakes between meat eaters and vegans, with fish eaters and vegetarians usually having intermediate values. Meat eaters had the highest energy intakes, followed by fish eaters and vegetarians, whereas vegans had the lowest intakes. Vegans had the highest intakes of polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, vitamins C and E, folate, magnesium, iron, and copper. Meat eaters had the highest intake of saturated fatty acids, protein, vitamin B2, vitamin B12, vitamin D, zinc, and iodine. Fish eaters had the highest intakes of calcium and selenium. There were no statistically significant differences in sodium and potassium intakes between dietary groups. With the exception of sodium intake, compliance with population dietary goals was high across diet groups. The results suggested a high prevalence of inadequacy for dietary vitamin B12 and iodine in vegans. The diet groups under study showed striking differences in dietary intakes, with possible implications for compliance with dietary recommendations, as well as cardiometabolic diseases risk. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High compliance with dietary recommendations in a cohort of meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition–Oxford study☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiecki, Jakub G.; Appleby, Paul N.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Key, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in dietary intakes between 30 251 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition–Oxford study, comprising 18 244 meat eaters, 4 531 fish eaters, 6 673 vegetarians, and 803 vegans aged 30 to 90 years who completed semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. We hypothesized that these groups characterized by varying degrees of animal product exclusion have significantly different intakes of many nutrients, with possible implications for dietary adequacy and compliance with population dietary goals. Nutrient intakes were estimated including fortification in foods, but excluding dietary supplements. Dietary supplementation practices were also evaluated. Highly significant differences were found in estimated nutrient intakes between meat eaters and vegans, with fish eaters and vegetarians usually having intermediate values. Meat eaters had the highest energy intakes, followed by fish eaters and vegetarians, whereas vegans had the lowest intakes. Vegans had the highest intakes of polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, vitamins C and E, folate, magnesium, iron, and copper. Meat eaters had the highest intake of saturated fatty acids, protein, vitamin B2, vitamin B12, vitamin D, zinc, and iodine. Fish eaters had the highest intakes of calcium and selenium. There were no statistically significant differences in sodium and potassium intakes between dietary groups. With the exception of sodium intake, compliance with population dietary goals was high across diet groups. The results suggested a high prevalence of inadequacy for dietary vitamin B12 and iodine in vegans. The diet groups under study showed striking differences in dietary intakes, with possible implications for compliance with dietary recommendations, as well as cardiometabolic diseases risk. PMID:27101764

  7. Plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids in male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J A; Rinaldi, S; Scalbert, A; Ferrari, P; Achaintre, D; Gunter, M J; Appleby, P N; Key, T J; Travis, R C

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the differences in plasma concentrations and in intakes of amino acids between male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. This cross-sectional analysis included 392 men, aged 30-49 years. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured with a targeted metabolomic approach using mass spectrometry, and dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Differences between diet groups in mean plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids were examined using analysis of variance, controlling for potential confounding factors and multiple testing. In plasma, concentrations of 6 out of 21 amino acids varied significantly by diet group, with differences of -13% to +16% between meat-eaters and vegans. Concentrations of methionine, tryptophan and tyrosine were highest in fish-eaters and vegetarians, followed by meat-eaters, and lowest in vegans. A broadly similar pattern was seen for lysine, whereas alanine concentration was highest in fish-eaters and lowest in meat-eaters. For glycine, vegans had the highest concentration and meat-eaters the lowest. Intakes of all 18 dietary amino acids differed by diet group; for the majority of these, intake was highest in meat-eaters followed by fish-eaters, then vegetarians and lowest in vegans (up to 47% lower than in meat-eaters). Men belonging to different habitual diet groups have significantly different plasma concentrations of lysine, methionine, tryptophan, alanine, glycine and tyrosine. However, the differences in plasma concentrations were less marked than and did not necessarily mirror those seen for amino acid intakes.

  8. The universal Higgs fit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giardino, P. P.; Kannike, K.; Masina, I.

    2014-01-01

    We perform a state-of-the-art global fit to all Higgs data. We synthesise them into a 'universal' form, which allows to easily test any desired model. We apply the proposed methodology to extract from data the Higgs branching ratios, production cross sections, couplings and to analyse composite...... Higgs models, models with extra Higgs doublets, supersymmetry, extra particles in the loops, anomalous top couplings, and invisible Higgs decays into Dark Matter. Best fit regions lie around the Standard Model predictions and are well approximated by our 'universal' fit. Latest data exclude the dilaton...... as an alternative to the Higgs, and disfavour fits with negative Yukawa couplings. We derive for the first time the SM Higgs boson mass from the measured rates, rather than from the peak positions, obtaining M-h = 124.4 +/- 1.6 GeV....

  9. Universality of accelerating change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2018-03-01

    On large time scales the progress of human technology follows an exponential growth trend that is termed accelerating change. The exponential growth trend is commonly considered to be the amalgamated effect of consecutive technology revolutions - where the progress carried in by each technology revolution follows an S-curve, and where the aging of each technology revolution drives humanity to push for the next technology revolution. Thus, as a collective, mankind is the 'intelligent designer' of accelerating change. In this paper we establish that the exponential growth trend - and only this trend - emerges universally, on large time scales, from systems that combine together two elements: randomness and amalgamation. Hence, the universal generation of accelerating change can be attained by systems with no 'intelligent designer'.

  10. Pythagorean Philolaus’ Pyrocentric Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniatis, Yiorgo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, first, I reexamine the pyrocentric universe of the Pythagorean, Philolaus, who emphatically propounded that the center of the cosmos is neither the earth nor the sun, but a central fiery hearth that stands in the middle of the spherical universe. Second, I attempt to demonstrate the value and significance of this pyrocentric cosmic model by elaborating its novel revolutionary elements and its contribution to astronomy. Third, by underlining the diachroneity and timeliness of this cosmic model, I try to establish as to how the model served as a precursor to not only the ancient and modern heliocentric models, as widely believed, but also as much to the contemporary cosmic models and theories of astrophysics.

  11. Universality for quintessence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicciarella, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Pieroni, M., E-mail: f.cicciarella1@gmail.com, E-mail: mauro.pieroni@apc.in2p3.fr [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2017-08-01

    Several recent works suggested the possibility of describing inflation by means of a renormalization group equation. In this paper we discuss the application of these methods to models of quintessence. In this framework a period of exponential expansion corresponds to the slow evolution of the scalar field in the neighborhood of a fixed point. A minimal set of universality classes for models of quintessence is defined and the transition from a matter dominated to quintessence dominated universe is studied. Models in which quintessence is non-minimally coupled with gravity are also discussed. We show that the formalism proves to be extremely convenient to describe quintessence and moreover we find that in most of the models discussed in this work quintessence naturally takes over ordinary matter.

  12. Improving University Research Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley O’Reilly

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the current data management practices of university researchers at an Intermountain West land-grant research university in the United States. Key findings suggest that researchers are primarily focused on the collection and housing of research data. However, additional research value exists within the other life cycle stages for research data—specifically in the stages of delivery and maintenance. These stages are where most new demands and requirements exist for data management plans and policies that are conditional for external grant funding; therefore, these findings expose a “gap” in current research practice. These findings should be of interest to academics and practitioners alike as findings highlight key management gaps in the life cycle of research data. This study also suggests a course of action for academic institutions to coalesce campus-wide assets to assist researchers in improving research value.

  13. Atoms against the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senovilla, J.; Raul Vera, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Woody Allen's masterpiece Annie Hall the main character is worried about the expansion of the universe. Indeed, during a childhood visit to his psychiatrist, his mother admonishes him: ''You're here in Brooklyn! Brooklyn is not expanding!''. But is that really true? Relativists have attacked this naive question many times and have arrived at different answers. New light has now been thrown on the subject by William Bonnor from Queen Mary and Westfield College in London by considering the influence of the expanding universe on the size of the hydrogen atom (Class. Quantum Grav. 1999 16 1313). According to Bonner's calculations we can conclude that the cosmic expansion does not affect human-scale objects like laboratories and our bodies. In this article the authors explain the reasoning behind this research and its thought provoking consequences. (UK)

  14. Universal quantum interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Landahl, Andrew J.; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    2004-01-01

    To observe or control a quantum system, one must interact with it via an interface. This article exhibits simple universal quantum interfaces--quantum input/output ports consisting of a single two-state system or quantum bit that interacts with the system to be observed or controlled. It is shown that under very general conditions the ability to observe and control the quantum bit on its own implies the ability to observe and control the system itself. The interface can also be used as a quantum communication channel, and multiple quantum systems can be connected by interfaces to become an efficient universal quantum computer. Experimental realizations are proposed, and implications for controllability, observability, and quantum information processing are explored

  15. Universal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  16. Mapping the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, M J; Huchra, J P

    1989-11-17

    Maps of the galaxy distribution in the nearby universe reveal large coherent structures. The extent of the largest features is limited only by the size of the survey. Voids with a density typically 20 percent of the mean and with diameters of 5000 km s(-1) are present in every survey large enough to contain them. Many galaxies lie in thin sheet-like structures. The largest sheet detected so far is the "Great Wall" with a minimum extent of 60 h(-1) Mpc x 170 h(-1) Mpc, where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The frequent occurrence of these structures is one of several serious challenges to our current understanding of the origin and evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe.

  17. Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  18. University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center

  19. Geneva University - Cancelled

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2010-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 19 April 2010 17h00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Into the darkness: Simulating the distribution of dark matter in our Universe Prof. Volker Springel - Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies   THE COLLOQUIUM IS CANCELLED. Prof. Markus Büttiker

  20. Building baby universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The thought of a scientist trying to design a laboratory experiment in which to create a whole new universe probably sounds like it belongs in the plot of a science-fiction B-movie. But as author Zeeya Merali explains in her new book A Big Bang in a Little Room, there are more than a few eminent physicists who think that this is theoretically possible.

  1. Dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  2. The Modern University, Ltd.

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Today, the university in the United Kingdom (UK) appears to be being led far from its educational, egalitarian roots. It appears to be a corporate beast, increasingly marketised, commodified and commercialised. In recent years, many words have been written on this matter. In this article, I wish to consider how these perceived changes could affect a cherished notion for academics – academic freedom. I connect the marketisation of UK higher education to the (comparatively) recent economic chan...

  3. State of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, G [ed.

    1980-01-01

    A survey is presented of the history of the universe, its origin, the structure and evolution of galaxies, the origin of the chemical elements, determination of the fundamental properties of stars, the properties of black holes, x-ray observations of galactic and extragalactic x-ray sources, exploration of the planets by planetary fly-bys and probes, and a survey of the whole electromagnetic spectrum which emphasizes the importance of each spectral region. (GHT)

  4. For information: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 TéL: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 5 décembre COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium ARCHEOLOGY OF THE UNIVERSE WITH THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND by Prof. Paolo de Bernardis / Université de Rome 'La Sapienza'

  5. Life In The Universe!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 30 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists and astronomers have worked tirelessly to answer these questions. Yet just this past week at CERN students from all over Europe came to present their ideas on the subject and listen to the latest on extraterrestrial life from some of the world's most prestigious researchers.

  6. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  7. Universe opacity and CMB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2018-04-01

    A cosmological model, in which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a thermal radiation of intergalactic dust instead of a relic radiation of the Big Bang, is revived and revisited. The model suggests that a virtually transparent local Universe becomes considerably opaque at redshifts z > 2 - 3. Such opacity is hardly to be detected in the Type Ia supernova data, but confirmed using quasar data. The opacity steeply increases with redshift because of a high proper density of intergalactic dust in the previous epochs. The temperature of intergalactic dust increases as (1 + z) and exactly compensates the change of wavelengths due to redshift, so that the dust radiation looks apparently like the radiation of the blackbody with a single temperature. The predicted dust temperature is TD = 2.776 K, which differs from the CMB temperature by 1.9% only, and the predicted ratio between the total CMB and EBL intensities is 13.4 which is close to 12.5 obtained from observations. The CMB temperature fluctuations are caused by EBL fluctuations produced by galaxy clusters and voids in the Universe. The polarization anomalies of the CMB correlated with temperature anisotropies are caused by the polarized thermal emission of needle-shaped conducting dust grains aligned by large-scale magnetic fields around clusters and voids. A strong decline of the luminosity density for z > 4 is interpreted as the result of high opacity of the Universe rather than of a decline of the global stellar mass density at high redshifts.

  8. The Flying University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  9. The inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guth, A.; Steinhardt, P.

    1989-01-01

    The new inflationary cosmological model discussed here in terms of grand unified theories (GUTs) seems to offer solutions to all the problems associated with the big bang model, such as the existence of magnetic monopoles. Before the first 10 -30 s of the existence of the universe, a brief period of extraordinarily rapid expansion occurred according to the ''inflation'' model. Successes of the big bang model include the three standard testable predictions, but relate to time a second or two after the big bang, namely red-shifts of distant, receding galaxies, measured in the 1920s, the existence of a microwave background radiation, confirmed in 1964, and the abundance of light atomic nuclei such as Helium, Hydrogen and Lithium. Two problems posed by the big bang theory are the horizon problem which seeks an answer to the large-scale uniformity of the universe and the question of energy density which leads to questions about whether the universe is closed, open, or flat. In this new inflationary model the phase transition is driven by random fluctuations of the Higgs fields, thus overcoming the flaw in the original model. (U.K.)

  10. [Universal electrogustometer EG-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wałkanis, Andrzej; Czesak, Michał; Pleskacz, Witold A

    2011-01-01

    Electrogustometry is a method for taste diagnosis and measurement. The EG-2 project is being developed in cooperation between Warsaw University of Technology and Military institute of Medicine in Warsaw. The device is an evolution of the recent universal electrogustometer EG-1 prototype. Due to considerations and experiences acquired during prototype usage, many enhancements have been incorporated into device. The aim was to create an easy-to-use, portable, battery powered device, enabled for fast measurements. Developed electrogustometer is using innovative, low-power microprocessor system, which control whole device. User interface is based on 5.7" graphical LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) and touchscreen. It can be directly operated by finger or with optional stylus. Dedicated GUI (Graphical User Interface) offers simple, predefined measurements and advance settings of signal parameters. It is also possible to store measurements results and patients data in an internal memory. User interface is multilanguage. Signals for patients examinations, supplied with bipolar electrode, are generated by an on-board circuit using DDS (Direct-Digital Synthesis) and DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter). Electrogustometer is able to generate DC, sinus, triangle or rectangle signals with current amplitude from 0 to 500 pA and frequency form 0 to 500 Hz. Device is designed for manual and automeasurement modes. By using USB (Universal Serial Bus) port it is possible to retrieve data stored in internal memory and charging of built-in Li-lon battery as a source of power.

  11. Universal elements of fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovsky, V. V.; Tur, A. V.; Kuklina, O. V.

    2010-01-01

    A fragmentation theory is proposed that explains the universal asymptotic behavior of the fragment-size distribution in the large-size range, based on simple physical principles. The basic principles of the theory are the total mass conservation in a fragmentation process and a balance condition for the energy expended in increasing the surface of fragments during their breakup. A flux-based approach is used that makes it possible to supplement the basic principles and develop a minimal theory of fragmentation. Such a supplementary principle is that of decreasing fragment-volume flux with increasing energy expended in fragmentation. It is shown that the behavior of the decreasing flux is directly related to the form of a power-law fragment-size distribution. The minimal theory is used to find universal asymptotic fragment-size distributions and to develop a natural physical classification of fragmentation models. A more general, nonlinear theory of strong fragmentation is also developed. It is demonstrated that solutions to a nonlinear kinetic equation consistent with both basic principles approach a universal asymptotic size distribution. Agreement between the predicted asymptotic fragment-size distributions and experimental observations is discussed.

  12. Antimatter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papini, P.; Spillantini, P.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the present knowledge on the study of antimatter in the universe is summarized. From the theoretical point of view, both baryon symmetric and asymmetric cosmologies are possible in the framework of big-bang theories. With the three 'Sakharov's conditions', it is possible to imagine an evolution from the big bang toward a universe with 'all matter' inside or toward a symmetric universe with matter and antimatter separated in domains. Measurement of the γ ray cosmic background implies only a local asymmetry and does not rule out the possibility of a symmetry on a large scale. Observations of the antiproton spectrum and antinuclei in cosmic rays are useful tools for studying the possible existence of an antigalaxy. The number and quality of the present data are poor, and no data are available at high energy, where the presence of an antigalaxy must be revealable owing to a large amount of antiprotons and antinuclei. In this paper, the future experimental projects to measure the antiproton flux at high energies and to search for antinuclei in cosmic rays are briefly presented

  13. Army Science Conference Proceedings Held in Orlando, Florida on June 22 - 25, 1992. Volume 1, Principal Authors A Through G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-25

    from Atlantic Christian College and a degree from the National War College. Mr. Hardison has served on several government advisory panels and is...Southern California, Los Angeles , CA 90089-0482 1. INTRODUCTION Simple atom-molecule reactions such as are studied here H(2.4 eV) + CO 2 - CO + OH (I) H...Dutta, L. Fotiadis, P.G. Newman, R.P. Moerkirk, W.H. Chang, and R.N. Sacks, Appl. Phys. Lett. 57, 2118 (1990). 7. E.E. Mendez, F. Agullo- Rueda , and

  14. International Conference on Optical Computing Held in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 22-25, 1994. Technical Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-24

    by CICYT(Comision Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnologia ). Project: TAP 93-0667-C03-01. References [1 J.L. Horner and P.D. Gianino, Appi. Opt., 23...Comisidn Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnologfa). Project TAP93-0667-C03-01 and ROB91-0554 Bibliography M1] E. Carcoi4, J. Campos, S. Bosch...Filtering and Adaptive Neural Networks Based on Fractional Fourier Transforms, S.- Y . Lee, Dept. of Elec. Eng., KAIST, Taejon, Korea. Based on fractional

  15. Advances and trends in structures and dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Washington, DC, October 22-25, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K. (Editor); Hayduk, R. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are developments in structural engineering hardware and software, computation for fracture mechanics, trends in numerical analysis and parallel algorithms, mechanics of materials, advances in finite element methods, composite materials and structures, determinations of random motion and dynamic response, optimization theory, automotive tire modeling methods and contact problems, the damping and control of aircraft structures, and advanced structural applications. Specific topics covered include structural design expert systems, the evaluation of finite element system architectures, systolic arrays for finite element analyses, nonlinear finite element computations, hierarchical boundary elements, adaptive substructuring techniques in elastoplastic finite element analyses, automatic tracking of crack propagation, a theory of rate-dependent plasticity, the torsional stability of nonlinear eccentric structures, a computation method for fluid-structure interaction, the seismic analysis of three-dimensional soil-structure interaction, a stress analysis for a composite sandwich panel, toughness criterion identification for unidirectional composite laminates, the modeling of submerged cable dynamics, and damping synthesis for flexible spacecraft structures.

  16. Army Science Conference Proceedings Held in Orlando, Florida on June 22 - 25, 1992. Volume 2, Principal Authors H Through M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-25

    A. See Cooke, P. W. I 291 Evans, Timothy D. See Hansen, John V.E. II 1 Ezzell , John W. See Friedlander, Arthur I 445 Fazi, C. Observation of rf...Network (ALVINN) has demonstrated ARF at speeds up to 104KPH and distances over 20 miles per segment. ALVINN follows defined road edges using a neural...just north of the Kwajalein Atoll, over 5000 miles away. The target launch was monitored and tracked by radars at Vandenburg much in the same way as

  17. Army Science Conference Proceedings Held in Orlando, Florida on June 22 - 25, 1992. Volume 3, Principal Authors N Through Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-25

    Cooke, P. W. I 291 Evans, Timothy D. See Hansen, John V.E. II 1 Ezzell , John W. See Friedlander, Arthur I 445 Fazi, C. Observation of rf-Induced I 421...resolution cf the NO’ ion sigr--! c,, mile -- 30. A total selectivity value of 5 x 105 is obtained when using values of 500 nm and 0.001 nm for RREMPI

  18. National Information Systems Security Conference (19th) held in Baltimore, Maryland on October 22-25, 1996. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-25

    realism and internal consistency of the security policies the TCB enforces; (3) make an initial assessment of the adequacy of the TOE’s policy...the exclusive right to reproduce his work, as well as to translate, arrange, transform, dramatize, cinematize , or otherwise adapt his work. In

  19. Selected Abstracts of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology; Cagliari (Italy; October 22-25, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology • THE LAST TEN YEARS, THE NEXT TEN YEARS IN NEONATOLOGY • Cagliari (Italy • October 22nd-25th 2014The Workshop has been organized on behalf of Union of European Neonatal and Perinatal Societies, Union of Mediterranean Neonatal Societies, Italian Society of Neonatology, UNICEF, and under the High Patronage of the President of the Italian Republic. ABS 1. Utilizing maternal factors to predict acute kidney injury in very low birth weight infants • A.R. Denotti, C.H. Springsteen, M.R. Conaway, M.W. Harer, J.R. Charlton; Charlottesville (VI, USA and Cagliari (Italy ABS 2. Effects of Cesarean section and infant feeding on later obesity risk • E. Verduci, B. Mariani, C. Lassandro, A. Re Dionigi, G. Banderali; Milan (Italy ABS 3. A proposal for multicenter study on family-centered care in NICU, parents’ satisfaction and experience • I. Dall’Oglio, A. Portanova, M. Fiori, A. Dotta, O. Gawronski, R. Fida , C. Offidani, G. Rocco, E. Tiozzo, J.M. Latour; Rome (Italy and Plymouth (UK ABS 4. Dorsal penile glans epidermoid cyst: a case report in a child • P. Atzori, A. Pane, S. Avanzini, F. Caddeo, G. Chabert, A. De Lisa, L. Mascia; Cagliari (Italy ABS 5. A numerical prediction of the italian scholastic population in 2020 • I. Farnetani, F. Farnetani; Milan, Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy ABS 6. Respiratory tract infections (RTI in pediatric population • L. Marseglia, G. D’Angelo, S. Manti, C. Salpietro, T. Arrigo, I Barberi; Messina (Italy ABS 7. Fetal-neonatal H1NMR nutrimetabolomics in the first week of life • C. Pravettoni, A. Dessì, F. Cesare Marincola, M.G. Pattumelli, R. Carboni, S. Corbu, C. Ossicini, S. Ciccarelli, V. Fanos, R. Agostino; Cagliari and Rome (Italy ABS 8. Variability in langerhans islets number at birth: marker of susceptibility to develop diabetes later in life? • G. Locci, A. Pinna, S. Nemolato, A. Dessì, V. Fanos, R. Ambu; Cagliari (Italy ABS 9. Traffiking of thymosin beta-4 in the cellular compartments of HepG2 cells at different conditions • M. Piras, M. Piludu, G. Pichiri, P. Coni, T. Cabras, R. Ambu, M. Castagnola; Cagliari and Rome (Italy ABS 10. Thyroid carcinoma in sardinian children and adolescents is often associated with autoimmune thyroiditis • P. Coni, E. Tamponi, A. Lampis, G. Pinna, A.M. Nurchi, S. Farci, M.L. Lai; Cagliari (Italy ABS 11. Prolonging nephrogenesis in preterm infants: a new approach for the prevention of renal disease in adulthood? • A. Sanna, C. Gerosa, D. Fanni, P. Van Eyken, M. Castagnola, R. Ambu; Cagliari, Rome (Italy and Leuven (Belgium ABS 12. Human adrenal gland development: morphogenesis and molecular mechanisms • E. Obinu, V. Fanos, A. Dessì, R. Ambu; Cagliari (Italy ABS 13. Biometrics application for newborns safe identification in Neonatal Intensive Care Units • A. Casanova, S. Barra, M. De Marsico, D. Riccio, L. Barberini, M. Puddu, V. Fanos; Cagliari, Rome and Naples (Italy ABS 14. Metabolomics in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE: a proposal for a european multicenter study • P. Gancia, G. Pomero, A. Delogu, C. Dalmazzo, G. Palmas, V. Fanos; Cuneo and Cagliari (Italy ABS 15. Longitudinal evaluation of myocardial function in infants with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE: preliminary data • F. Vitali, S. Galletti, A. Aceti, L. Ridolfi, G. Aquilano, M. Fabi, G. Faldella; Bologna (Italy ABS 16. Changes in podocyte number during intrauterine development • M. Desogus, A. Crobe, A. Sanna, C. Gerosa, C. Fanni, C. Loddo, M. Puddu, G. Ottonello, D. Fanni; Cagliari (Italy ABS 17. Efficacy of recombinant human erythropoietin in anemic pregnant women with heterozygous beta-thalassemia • S. Angioni, V. Mais, G.B. Melis; Cagliari (Italy ABS 18. WT1 expression in ontogenesis of human fetus • R. Ambu, L. Vinci, C. Gerosa, D. Fanni, E. Obinu, A. Faa, V. Fanos; Cagliari (Italy ABS 19. Brain hypothermia in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS • A. Djouf, G. Pomero, C. Dalmazzo, C. Alpicrovi, G. Borgarello, N. Castellino, C. De Maio, A. Simonitti, P. Gancia; Cuneo (Italy ABS 20. Favorable outcome after severe hemostatic complications in neonates receiving therapeutic hypothermia (TH for perinatal asphyxia • S. Luciani, A. Pietravalle, G. Di Marzo, C.S. Barbàra, R. Grossi, A. Ruggeri, P. Papoff, C. Moretti; Rome (Italy ABS 21. Variations in cardiomyocyte density in different zones of the left ventricular wall characterize the developing human heart • E. Podda, A. Crobe, M. Desogus, A. Faa; Cagliari (Italy ABS 22. Renal shear waves velocity correlates with estimated glomerular filtration rate in children with chronic kidney disease • M. Zaffanello, C. Bruno, G. Piacentini, R. Micciolo, M. Brugnara, M. Cecchetto, M. Zuffante, A. Bucci; Verona (Italy ABS 23. A possible new approach for information to parents on the use of off-label drugs in neonatology and pediatrics • A. Dessì, V. Fanos, M. Zonza, E. D’Aloja, R. Massa, M. Ciuffi, R. Agostiniani, F. Cardinale, A. Correra, P. D’Agostino, L. Greco, P. Tagliabue; Cagliari, Pistoia, Bari, Naples, Turin, Bergamo, Monza (Italy ABS 24. Neonatal hypoglycemia • Carlo Dionisi-Vici; Rome (Italy ABS 25. Metabolomics approach for the functional evaluation of a population of kids born very preterm: preliminary results with GC-MS • M. Zaffanello, E. Del Zotti, D. Grapov, L. Barberini, C. Fattuoni, A. Noto, M. Brugnara, V. Fanos; Verona, Cagliari (Italy and Davis (CA, USA ABS 26. Lipoma of the corpus callosus: a clinic case • V. Masile, R. Irmesi, E. Coni, M.A. Marcialis, M.C. Pintus; Cagliari (Italy ABS 27. Cerebral oxygenation, superior vena cava flow, severe IVH and mortality in 60 very low birth weight infants • M. Pozzi, R.M. Cerbo, G. Masa, E. De Sando, M. Stronati; Pavia (Italy ABS 28. A Sardinian hospice by the sea, founded in Cagliari 135 years ago • I. Farnetani, F. Farnetani; Milan, Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy ABS 29. Changes in podocyte number and glomerular volume in Down syndrome • A. Crobe, M. Desogus, S. Soddu, G. Parodo; Cagliari (Italy ABS 30. Giorgio Maggioni, master of Pediatrics • M.G. Gregorio, F.S. Biagiarelli, L. Cataldi; Cagliari and Rome (Italy ABS 31. Regulation of the hospice by the sea of Viareggio under the Borboun-Parma Dinasty • I. Farnetani, F. Farnetani; Milan, Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy ABS 32. Milk’s colours and Latch Score: a transcultural experience in Nurse Led Clinic • C. Ennas, A. Dessì, E. Vannelli, V. Fanos; Cagliari (Italy ABS 33. Epicardial fat thickness, an emerging cardiometabolic risk factor, is increased in young adults born preterm • P.P. Bassareo, M. Puddu, S. Marras, G. Mercuro; Cagliari (Italy ABS 34. A metabolomics analysis of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: survivors vs non survivors. Preliminary results • I. Capolupo, L. Barberini, A. Di Pede, C. Fattuoni, D. Grapov, A. Noto, A. Dotta, D. Tibboel, P. Bagolan, V. Fanos; Rome and Cagliari (Italy, Davis (CA, USA and Rotterdam (The Netherlands ABS 35. Bernardino Ramazzini and occupational exposure in Neonatology in the seventeenth century • I. Farnetani, F. Farnetani; Milan, Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy ABS 36. Marked interindividual variability in surfactant A and B protein expression in the fetal and newborn human lung • F. Cau F, E. Pisu, F. Uda, D. Fanni, C. Gerosa, E. Di Felice, C. Botta, F. Ronchi, R. Antonucci, V. Marinelli, Y. Gibo; Cagliari, San Gavino-Monreale (Italy and Matsumoto (Japan ABS 37. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury In Neonates • E. Tzimou, A.E. Papathanasiou, I. Chatziioannidis, I. Spiridakis, G. Mitsiakos; Thessaloniki (Greece ABS 38. Seizures-like were the alarming symptoms in an African child with life-threatening condition from severe upper respiratory tract obstruction • M. Zaffanello, E. Gasperi, P. Biban, L. Lubrano, E. Fiorini, G. Piacentini; Verona (Italy ABS 39. Diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex in the neonatal period: a case report • C. Loddo, P. Neroni, S. Floris, M.A. Marcialis, R. Carta, C. Fanni, D. Pruna, G. Ottonello; Cagliari (Italy ABS 40. Save breast-milk from pollution • L. Marseglia, S. Manti, G. D’Angelo, C. Mamì, C. Salpietro, I. Barberi; Messina (Italy ABS 41. The role of epigenetic factors on diabetes mellitus development • A.P. Pinna, G. Locci, C. Ripoli, A.M. Nurchi; Cagliari (Italy ABS 42. WT1 expression in the human mesonephros • L. Vinci, E. Obinu, G. Locci, C. Gerosa, D. Fanni, V. Fanos, R. Ambu; Cagliari (Italy ABS 43. Sinusoidal cell apoptosis: a new marker of perinatal sepsis? • E. Obinu, L. Vinci, G. Locci, C. Gerosa, D. Fanni, F. Birocchi, F. Cioglia, R. Ambu; Cagliari (Italy ABS 44. WNT1 expression in the human embryo liver at 7 week of gestation: similarities with hepatocellular carcinoma • E. Obinu, L. Vinci, D. Fanni, R. Ambu; Cagliari (Italy ABS 45. Epidermolysis bullosa • S. Vendemmia, D. Nappa, M. Vendemmia; Aversa and Naples (Italy ABS 46. Platelets alloimmune antibodies: different outcome in twin premature infants • I. Sibona, M. Gaffuri, S. Spaggiari, P. Biban; Verona (Italy ABS 47. An unexpected enemy • R. Carta, C. Fanni, C. Loddo, F. Sau, C. Soddu, A.M. Nurchi; Cagliari (Italy ABS 48. May the HIF-1α polymorphisms be helpful in understanding the neonatal hypoxic-ischemic events? • E. d’Aloja, M. Caddeo, M. Melis, R. Piras, G.P. Maietta, M.F. Rosa; Cagliari (Italy ABS 49. Immune Thrombocytopenia due to rifampicin: descrition of a pediatric case • V. Relli, S. Piras, G. Melis, O. Forresu, U. Pelosi; Iglesias (Italy ABS 50. The effects of neonatal resuscitation training on the Apgar scores of babies born at The National Hospital Abuja (NHA, Nigeria • M. Mukhtar-Yola, L.I. Audu, Y. Olaniyan, H.T. Akinbi, A. Dawodu, E.F. Donovan; Abuja (Nigeria and Cincinnati (OH, USA 

  20. Universal Health Coverage for Schizophrenia: A Global Mental Health Priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram

    2016-07-01

    The growing momentum towards a global consensus on universal health coverage, alongside an acknowledgment of the urgency and importance of a comprehensive mental health action plan, offers a unique opportunity for a substantial scale-up of evidence-based interventions and packages of care for a range of mental disorders in all countries. There is a robust evidence base testifying to the effectiveness of drug and psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia and to the feasibility, acceptability and cost-effectiveness of the delivery of these interventions through a collaborative care model in low resource settings. While there are a number of barriers to scaling up this evidence, for eg, the finances needed to train and deploy community based workers and the lack of agency for people with schizophrenia, the experiences of some upper middle income countries show that sustained political commitment, allocation of transitional financial resources to develop community services, a commitment to an integrated approach with a strong role for community based institutions and providers, and a progressive realization of coverage are the key ingredients for scale up of services for schizophrenia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  1. How much we know about university internationalization and university autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gullieva, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    in their mission statements and strategic plans. Conventional wisdom suggests that universities should adapt their strategies, resources, and structures and organizations to international environments. However, recent examples of university internationalization failures and withdrawals from international markets...

  2. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields....

  3. Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    goals. The first goal was to integrate upper level undergraduate students from Hampton University into the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer...upper level undergraduate Biology and Biochemistry Majors from Hampton University to work throughout the summer participating in prostate cancer...Dominican Republic summer 2017 Marissa Willis HU-GU Fellow Summer 2016 (Notario lab) Biology Major Hampton University, class of 2018, Math and

  4. University IPRs and knowledge transfer : is university ownership more efficient?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespi, G.A.; Geuna, A.; Nomaler, Z.O.; Verspagen, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue that has been largely ignored so far in the empirical literature on the role of patents in university-industry knowledge transfer: does it matter who owns the patents on university research? We observe that especially in Europe, many patents in which university

  5. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    In issue 1-2003, Anette Kolmos and Lone Krogh reported on the two-semester study course " University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (DK)". Now, in part 2, they are adressing guidelines for supervison and advising of assistant professors in the university teacher education...

  6. Private Universities in Zimbabwe: The Case of Africa University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whilst many of these challenges are shared with other private universities in Zimbabwe, a few are peculiar to Africa University. This paper discusses Africa University's experience with regard to establishment, nature, institutional marketing and student recruitment, programmes, governance, finding and other external factors ...

  7. The Necessary University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ibarra Mendívil

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of the complex scenarios brought about by globalization, the necessary university will require flexible models oriented toward problem solving and collaborative work, which will also allow students to enter and leave the institution at different times during their training. Among its main features, there will be collegial work, in the sense of collective teaching experimentation; active follow up of students’ progress; trust in the students’ potential; a close relationship of headmasters, teachers and students; and rules that provide certainty to institutional life.

  8. The relational universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnon, A.

    1998-01-01

    A relational approach to be observable universe is proposed, which precludes the concept of absolute background. Space-time events emerge as dynamical entities which owe their existence to a memorization process, itself inter wind with the availability of cosmological horizons (screening from totality) sourcing long-range correlations. The resulting (and relational) mode of description sheds light on various paradoxes (EPR, Foucault pendolum, light beam effect, etc.), on the problem of instantaneous and global influences (quark deconfinement) as related to the interconnectedness of our cosmos. This scenario leads to comment on living systems vs. robots, and on non-recursive and global aspects of the mathematical intuition

  9. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  10. Status Report Jilin University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yang; Huo Junde, E-mail: huojd@jlu.edu.cn

    2013-08-15

    Status of mass chain evaluation: Jilin University (JLU) group is responsible for nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of mass chains: A=52, 53, 54, 55, 56, and 63. (1) Status of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS): 52 - NDS, 106, 773 (2007); 53 - NDS, 110, 2689 (2009); 54 - NDS, 107, 1393 (2006); 55 - NDS, 109, 787 (2008); 56 - NDS, 112, 1513 (2011); 63 - NDS, 92, 147 (2001); ENSDF (2009) (2) Evaluation since last meeting (2011). A=54 in review (since 26-Dec-2012) A=52 evaluating A=63 evaluating. Other activities are briefly presented.

  11. Physics of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sachs, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to the subject of cosmology. It fully exploits Einstein's theory of general relativity. It is found that the most general formal expression of the theory replaces the (10-component) tensor formalism with a (16-component) quaternion formalism. This leads to a unified field theory, where one field incorporates gravitation and electromagnetism. The theory predicts an oscillating universe cosmology with a spiral configuration. Dark matter is explained in terms of a sea of particle-antiparticle pairs, each in a particular (derived) ground state. This leads to an ex

  12. Attractors, universality, and inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Sean; Dutta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Kuver

    2012-11-01

    Studies of the initial conditions for inflation have conflicting predictions from exponential suppression to inevitability. At the level of phase space, this conflict arises from the competing intuitions of CPT invariance and thermodynamics. After reviewing this conflict, we enlarge the ensemble beyond phase space to include scalar potential data. We show how this leads to an important contribution from inflection point inflation, enhancing the likelihood of inflation to a power law, 1/Ne3. In the process, we emphasize the attractor dynamics of the gravity-scalar system and the existence of universality classes from inflection point inflation. Finally, we comment on the predictivity of inflation in light of these results.

  13. Cyclotron to Oslo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstad, J.

    1978-01-01

    The new cyclotron was delivered to Oslo University on September 21st 1978, and was mannfactured by A/B Scandtronix of Uppsala, Sweden. The contract price was 6,8 million Norwegian kroner and installation will cost a further 4 million. The main specifications are given. The energy will be 36 MeV for protons and alpha particles, 18 MeV deuterons and 48 MeV for helium 3. The principle of a cyclotron is briefly described. While the primary purpose of the machine is nuclear research it is also planned to produce short-lived radioisotopes, primarily iodine 123. (JIW)

  14. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  15. Messengers of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.K.; Spurio, M.

    2011-01-01

    The observation of the solar neutrinos and of a neutrino burst from the supernova explosion 1987A opened a new observation field which in the next years could be complemented with the detection of astrophysical highenergy neutrinos. Neutrino astronomy is a young discipline derived from the fundamental necessity of extending conventional astronomy beyond the usual electro-magnetic messengers. This is a summary of recent results on those new 'messengers of the universe', based on the presentations in Branch IV of the Neutrino Oscillation Workshop 2010 (NOW2010).

  16. Understanding Our Only Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Marra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In an imaginary dialogue between a professor and a layman about the future of cosmology, the said professor relates the paradoxical story of scientist Zee Prime, a bold thinker of a future civilization, stuck in a lonely galaxy, forever unaware of the larger universe. Zee Prime comes to acknowledge his position and shows how important it is to question standard models and status quo, as only the most imaginative ideas give us the chance to understand what he calls “our only universe” — the special place and time in which we live.

  17. Conformally connected universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, M.; Piran, T.

    1983-01-01

    A well-known difficulty associated with the conformal method for the solution of the general relativistic Hamiltonian constraint is the appearance of an aphysical ''bag of gold'' singularity at the nodal surface of the conformal factor. This happens whenever the background Ricci scalar is too large. Using a simple model, it is demonstrated that some of these singular solutions do have a physical meaning, and that these can be considered as initial data for Universe containing black holes, which are connected, in a conformally nonsingular way with each other. The relation between the ADM mass and the horizon area in this solution supports the cosmic censorship conjecture. (author)

  18. On universal procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a general stochastic model for procrastination with respect to a deadline. The model establishes a universal procrastination pattern that follows an inverse power-law: if the time remaining to the deadline is r then the response is 1/rε , where ɛ is a positive exponent. The model further establishes that the exponent value ε =1 , which yields the harmonic response 1/r , stands out as special and distinguishable. The theoretical results of the model are shown to be in perfect accord with recent empirical findings.

  19. Achieving Minimum Clinically Important Difference in Oxford Knee Score and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary Is Less Likely with Single-Radius Compared with Multiradius Total Knee Arthroplasty in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wu Chean; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Allen, John Carson; Chong, Hwei Chi; Tan, Hwee Chye Andrew

    2018-04-10

    Single-radius (SR) and multiradius (MR) total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) have produced similar outcomes, albeit most studies originate from Western nations. There are known knee kinematic differences between Western and Asian patients after TKA. The aim of this study is to compare the short-term patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) of SR-TKA versus MR-TKA in Asians. Registry data of 133 SR-TKA versus 363 MR-TKA by a single surgeon were analyzed. Preoperative and 2-year postoperative range of motion (ROM) and PROMs were compared with Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression model was used to evaluate the odds of SR-TKA or MR-TKA achieving the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) of studied outcomes. Patients in both groups had similar age (65.7 ± 7.6 vs. 65.8 ± 8.2 years; p  = 0.317), gender proportion (71% females vs. 79% females; p  = 0.119), and ethnic distribution (80% Chinese vs. 84% Chinese; p  = 0.258). Preoperatively, there were no statistically significant differences between both groups for ROM, Knee Society Score (KSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Short Form (SF)-36 scores. At 2 years, all outcomes were statistically similar or failed to achieve a difference of MCID. Controlling for all preoperative variables, SR-TKA has significantly lower odds of achieving MCID for OKS (odds ratio [OR]: 0.275, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.114-0.663; p  = 0.004) and SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) (OR: 0.547; 95% CI: 0.316-0.946; p  = 0.031) compared with MR-TKA. In conclusion, there are no significant differences in the absolute PROMs between SR-TKA and MR-TKA at 2 years following TKA in Asians. However, SR-TKA has significantly lower odds of achieving the MCID for OKS and SF-36 PCS. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Using the Oxford Foot Model to determine the association between objective measures of foot function and results of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale and the Foot Function Index: a prospective gait analysis study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostuj, Tanja; Stief, Felix; Hartmann, Kirsten Anna; Schaper, Katharina; Arabmotlagh, Mohammad; Baums, Mike H; Meurer, Andrea; Krummenauer, Frank; Lieske, Sebastian

    2018-04-05

    After cross-cultural adaption for the German translation of the Ankle-Hindfoot Scale of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS-AHS) and agreement analysis with the Foot Function Index (FFI-D), the following gait analysis study using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM) was carried out to show which of the two scores better correlates with objective gait dysfunction. Results of the AOFAS-AHS and FFI-D, as well as data from three-dimensional gait analysis were collected from 20 patients with mild to severe ankle and hindfoot pathologies.Kinematic and kinetic gait data were correlated with the results of the total AOFAS scale and FFI-D as well as the results of those items representing hindfoot function in the AOFAS-AHS assessment. With respect to the foot disorders in our patients (osteoarthritis and prearthritic conditions), we correlated the total range of motion (ROM) in the ankle and subtalar joints as identified by the OFM with values identified during clinical examination 'translated' into score values. Furthermore, reduced walking speed, reduced step length and reduced maximum ankle power generation during push-off were taken into account and correlated to gait abnormalities described in the scores. An analysis of correlations with CIs between the FFI-D and the AOFAS-AHS items and the gait parameters was performed by means of the Jonckheere-Terpstra test; furthermore, exploratory factor analysis was applied to identify common information structures and thereby redundancy in the FFI-D and the AOFAS-AHS items. Objective findings for hindfoot disorders, namely a reduced ROM, in the ankle and subtalar joints, respectively, as well as reduced ankle power generation during push-off, showed a better correlation with the AOFAS-AHS total score-as well as AOFAS-AHS items representing ROM in the ankle, subtalar joints and gait function-compared with the FFI-D score.Factor analysis, however, could not identify FFI-D items consistently related to these three