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Sample records for overexpression alters immune-mediated

  1. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  2. Immune mediated liver failure.

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    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capacity. Direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury are two major factors involved in this process. Increasing evidence has suggested the essential role of immune-mediated liver injury in the pathogenesis of liver failure. Here, we review the evolved concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure from human and animal studies. Both innate and adaptive immunity, especially the interaction of various immune cells and molecules as well as death receptor signaling system are discussed. In addition, we highlight the concept of "immune coagulation", which has been shown to be related to the disease progression and liver injury exacerbation in HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  3. Immune-mediated diseases and microbial exposure in early life

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    Bisgaard, H; Bønnelykke, K; Stokholm, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The non-communicable disease pandemic includes immune-mediated diseases such as asthma and allergy, which are likely originating in early life where the immature immune system is prone to alterations caused by the exposome. The timing of exposure seems critical for the developing immune system...

  4. Helminthic therapy: using worms to treat immune-mediated disease.

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    Elliott, David E; Weinstock, Joel V

    2009-01-01

    There is an epidemic of immune-mediated disease in highly-developed industrialized countries. Such diseases, like inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis and asthma increase in prevalence as populations adopt modern hygienic practices. These practices prevent exposure to parasitic worms (helminths). Epidemiologic studies suggest that people who carry helminths have less immune-mediated disease. Mice colonized with helminths are protected from disease in models of colitis, encephalitis, Type 1 diabetes and asthma. Clinical trials show that exposure to helminths reduce disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. This chapter reviews some of the work showing that colonization with helminths alters immune responses, against dysregulated inflammation. These helminth-host immune interactions have potentially important implications for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases.

  5. Helminths as governors of immune-mediated inflammation.

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    Elliott, David E; Summers, Robert W; Weinstock, Joel V

    2007-04-01

    Immune-mediated diseases (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multiple sclerosis and autoimmune diabetes) are increasing in prevalence and emerge as populations adopt meticulously hygienic lifestyles. This change in lifestyles precludes exposure to helminths (parasitic worms). Loss of natural helminth exposure removes a previously universal Th2 and regulatory immune biasing imparted by these organisms. Helminths protect animals from developing immune-mediated diseases (colitis, reactive airway disease, encephalitis and diabetes). Clinical trials show that exposure to helminths can reduce disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. This paper summarises work by multiple groups demonstrating that colonization with helminths alters immune reactivity and protects against disease from dysregulated inflammation.

  6. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Peripheral Immune Mediators

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    Thorsen, Steffen; Pipper, Christian; Skogstrand, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to examine if 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was related to the peripheral immunological and inflammatory signature both at birth, and in newly diagnosed patients with childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their healthy controls; (2) Methods: The birth cohort consisted of 470...... patients and 500 healthy controls. Dried blood samples were collected from the neonates in the period 1981–1999. The newly diagnosed cohort consisted of 460 patients and 453 siblings. Serum samples were collected in the period 1997–2005. A variety of peripheral immune mediators were measured and compared...... to total 25(OH)D levels (25(OH)D2 + 25(OH)D3). For each immune mediator, the relative change (RC) in the mean level was modeled by robust log-normal regression and correction for multiple testing was performed; (3) Results: Two associations were identified; there was a negative association between 25(OH...

  7. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

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    Michelle Barbi de Moura

    Full Text Available SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  8. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymes in diaphragm muscle does not alter contraction-induced fatigue or recovery

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    McClung, Joseph M.; DeRuisseau, Keith C.; Whidden, Melissa A.; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Song, Wook; Vrabas, Ioannis S.; Powers, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    contractile dysfunction. Finally, the transgenic overexpression of independent endogenous antioxidants alters diaphragm skeletal muscle morphology, and these changes may also contribute to the diminished specific force production observed in these animals. PMID:19783618

  9. Overexpression of AtLOV1 in Switchgrass alters plant architecture, lignin content, and flowering time.

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    Bin Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. is a prime candidate crop for biofuel feedstock production in the United States. As it is a self-incompatible polyploid perennial species, breeding elite and stable switchgrass cultivars with traditional breeding methods is very challenging. Translational genomics may contribute significantly to the genetic improvement of switchgrass, especially for the incorporation of elite traits that are absent in natural switchgrass populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we constitutively expressed an Arabidopsis NAC transcriptional factor gene, LONG VEGETATIVE PHASE ONE (AtLOV1, in switchgrass. Overexpression of AtLOV1 in switchgrass caused the plants to have a smaller leaf angle by changing the morphology and organization of epidermal cells in the leaf collar region. Also, overexpression of AtLOV1 altered the lignin content and the monolignol composition of cell walls, and caused delayed flowering time. Global gene-expression analysis of the transgenic plants revealed an array of responding genes with predicted functions in plant development, cell wall biosynthesis, and flowering. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a single ectopically expressed transcription factor altering the leaf angle, cell wall composition, and flowering time of switchgrass, therefore demonstrating the potential advantage of translational genomics for the genetic improvement of this crop.

  10. Prognosis in canine idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

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    Piek, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Canine idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (iIMHA) is one of the most frequently occurring immune-mediated diseases in dogs. A gel-based Coombs' test was shown to perform equally well as a classical Coombs' test. Since the gel-based Coombs' test can be commercially produced and is easy and

  11. Prognostic and predictive values of EGFR overexpression and EGFR copy number alteration in HER2-positive breast cancer.

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    Lee, H J; Seo, A N; Kim, E J; Jang, M H; Kim, Y J; Kim, J H; Kim, S-W; Ryu, H S; Park, I A; Im, S-A; Gong, G; Jung, K H; Kim, H J; Park, S Y

    2015-01-06

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a subset of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers, and coexpression of HER2 and EGFR has been reported to be associated with poor clinical outcome. Moreover, interaction between HER2 and EGFR has been suggested to be a possible basis for trastuzumab resistance. We analysed the clinical significance of EGFR overexpression and EGFR gene copy number alterations in 242 HER2-positive primary breast cancers. In addition, we examined the correlations between EGFR overexpression, trastuzumab response and clinical outcome in 447 primary, and 112 metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer patients treated by trastuzumab. Of the 242 primary cases, the level of EGFR overexpression was 2+ in 12.7% and 3+ in 11.8%. High EGFR gene copy number was detected in 10.3%. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression was associated with hormone receptor negativity and high Ki-67 proliferation index. In survival analyses, EGFR overexpression, but not high EGFR copy number, was associated with poor disease-free survival in all patients, and in the subgroup not receiving adjuvant trastuzumab. In 447 HER2-positive primary breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab, EGFR overexpression was also an independent poor prognostic factor. However, EGFR overexpression was not associated with trastuzumab response, progression-free survival or overall survival in the metastatic setting. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression, but not high EGFR copy number, is a poor prognostic factor in HER2-positive primary breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression is a predictive factor for trastuzumab response in HER2-positive primary breast cancer, but not in metastatic breast cancer.

  12. Principles and approaches to the treatment of immune-mediated movement disorders.

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    Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Dale, Russell C

    2018-03-01

    Immune mediated movement disorders include movement disorders in the context of autoimmune encephalitis such as anti-NMDAR encephalitis, post-infectious autoimmune movement disorders such as Sydenham chorea, paraneoplastic autoimmune movement disorders such as opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome, and infection triggered conditions such as paediatric acute neuropsychiatric syndrome. This review focuses on the approach to treatment of immune mediated movement disorders, which requires an understanding of the immunopathogenesis, whether the disease is destructive or 'altering', and the natural history of disease. Factors that can influence outcome include the severity of disease, the delay before starting therapy, use of multimodal therapy and whether the course is monophasic or relapsing. Although the four main conditions listed above have different pathophysiological processes, there are general themes that broadly apply including: early diagnosis and treatment is better, minimise the severity of disease, escalate treatment if the patient is not responding to initial treatments, and minimise relapse. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Anti-thymocyte serum as part of an immunosuppressive regimen in treating haematological immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

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    Cuq, B; Blois, S L; Mathews, K A

    2017-06-01

    To report the outcomes associated with the use of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum in dogs with haematological immune-mediated diseases. Medical records from 2000 to 2016 of patients diagnosed with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia and myelofibrosis were reviewed. All dogs had a severe or refractory disease and received rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum. Lymphocyte counts were used to monitor the immediate anti-thymocyte effect of therapy; long-term patient outcome was recorded. A total of 10 dogs were included. All dogs except one had a notable decrease in their lymphocyte count after rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum; four of nine had a decrease to less than 10% of the initial lymphocyte count and one dog reached 10·8%. All dogs were discharged from the hospital following their treatment. The dog with no alteration of lymphocyte count following therapy with rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum had refractory immune mediated haemolytic anemia and was euthanised within two weeks. All other cases achieved clinical remission with immunosuppressive therapy eventually being tapered (3 of 10) or discontinued (6 of 10). Rabbit anti-dog thymocyte serum therapy might be of interest as an adjunctive therapy in refractory immune-mediated diseases and suppressed lymphocyte counts in most dogs. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. ATG5 overexpression is neuroprotective and attenuates cytoskeletal and vesicle-trafficking alterations in axotomized motoneurons.

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    Leiva-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Romeo-Guitart, David; Marmolejo-Martínez-Artesero, Sara; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Bosch, Assumpció; Forés, Joaquim; Casas, Caty

    2018-05-24

    Injured neurons should engage endogenous mechanisms of self-protection to limit neurodegeneration. Enhancing efficacy of these mechanisms or correcting dysfunctional pathways may be a successful strategy for inducing neuroprotection. Spinal motoneurons retrogradely degenerate after proximal axotomy due to mechanical detachment (avulsion) of the nerve roots, and this limits recovery of nervous system function in patients after this type of trauma. In a previously reported proteomic analysis, we demonstrated that autophagy is a key endogenous mechanism that may allow motoneuron survival and regeneration after distal axotomy and suture of the nerve. Herein, we show that autophagy flux is dysfunctional or blocked in degenerated motoneurons after root avulsion. We also found that there were abnormalities in anterograde/retrograde motor proteins, key secretory pathway factors, and lysosome function. Further, LAMP1 protein was missorted and underglycosylated as well as the proton pump v-ATPase. In vitro modeling revealed how sequential disruptions in these systems likely lead to neurodegeneration. In vivo, we observed that cytoskeletal alterations, induced by a single injection of nocodazole, were sufficient to promote neurodegeneration of avulsed motoneurons. Besides, only pre-treatment with rapamycin, but not post-treatment, neuroprotected after nerve root avulsion. In agreement, overexpressing ATG5 in injured motoneurons led to neuroprotection and attenuation of cytoskeletal and trafficking-related abnormalities. These discoveries serve as proof of concept for autophagy-target therapy to halting the progression of neurodegenerative processes.

  15. Bone turnover is altered in transgenic rats overexpressing the P2Y2 purinergic receptor

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    Ellegaard, Maria; Agca, Cansu; Petersen, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    overexpression on bone status and bone cell function using a transgenic rat. Three-month-old female transgenic Sprague Dawley rats overexpressing P2Y2R (P2Y2R-Tg) showed higher bone strength of the femoral neck. Histomorphometry showed increase in resorptive surfaces and reduction in mineralizing surfaces. Both...

  16. Overexpression of plastidial thioredoxins f and m differentially alters photosynthetic activity and response to oxidative stress in tobacco plants

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    Pascal eREY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants display a remarkable diversity of thioredoxins (Trxs, reductases controlling the thiol redox status of proteins. The physiological function of many of them remains elusive, particularly for plastidial Trxs f and m, which are presumed based on biochemical data to regulate photosynthetic reactions and carbon metabolism. Recent reports revealed that Trxs f and m participate in vivo in the control of starch metabolism and cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer around photosystem I, respectively. To further delineate their in planta function, we compared the photosynthetic characteristics, the level and/or activity of various Trx targets and the responses to oxidative stress in transplastomic tobacco plants overexpressing either Trx f or Trx m. We found that plants overexpressing Trx m specifically exhibit altered growth, reduced chlorophyll content, impaired photosynthetic linear electron transfer and decreased pools of glutathione and ascorbate. In both transplastomic lines, activities of two enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, NADP-malate dehydrogenase and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are markedly and similarly altered. In contrast, plants overexpressing Trx m specifically display increased capacity for methionine sulfoxide reductases, enzymes repairing damaged proteins by regenerating methionine from oxidized methionine. Finally, we also observed that transplastomic plants exhibit distinct responses when exposed to oxidative stress conditions generated by methyl viologen or exposure to high light combined with low temperature, the plants overexpressing Trx m being notably more tolerant than Wt and those overexpressing Trx f. Altogether, these data indicate that Trxs f and m fulfill distinct physiological functions. They prompt us to propose that the m type is involved in key processes linking photosynthetic activity, redox homeostasis and antioxidant mechanisms in the chloroplast.

  17. Immune-mediated neuropathies our experience over 3 years

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    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy is the term applied to a spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders where immune dysregulation plays a role. Therefore, they are treatable. We analyzed the cases seen in the past 3 years by us and evaluated the clinical, laboratory, and outcome parameters in these patients. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients seen by the authors and diagnosed as immune-mediated neuropathy were analyzed for etiology, pathology, and outcome assessed. Results: A total of sixty patients, 31 acute and 29 chronic neuropathies, were identified. Their subtypes treatment and outcome assessed. Males were significantly more in both acute and chronic cases. Miller Fisher 4, AMAN 1, paraplegic type 1, motor dominant type 19, Sensory-motor 1, MADSAM 3, Bifacial 2. Nonsystemic vasculitis was seen in 16 out of 29 chronic neuropathy and HIV, POEMS, and diabetes mellitus one each. Discussion: There is a spectrum of immune-mediated neuropathy which varies in clinical course, response to treatment, etc., Small percentage of uncommon cases are seen. In this group, mortality was nil and morbidity was minimal. Conclusion: Immune-mediated neuropathies are treatable and hence should be diagnosed early for good quality outcome.

  18. Overexpression of cypin alters dendrite morphology, single neuron activity, and network properties via distinct mechanisms

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    Rodríguez, Ana R.; O'Neill, Kate M.; Swiatkowski, Przemyslaw; Patel, Mihir V.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the effect that overexpression of cytosolic PSD-95 interactor (cypin), a regulator of synaptic PSD-95 protein localization and a core regulator of dendrite branching, exerts on the electrical activity of rat hippocampal neurons and networks. Approach. We cultured rat hippocampal neurons and used lipid-mediated transfection and lentiviral gene transfer to achieve high levels of cypin or cypin mutant (cypinΔPDZ PSD-95 non-binding) expression cellularly and network-wide, respectively. Main results. Our analysis revealed that although overexpression of cypin and cypinΔPDZ increase dendrite numbers and decrease spine density, cypin and cypinΔPDZ distinctly regulate neuronal activity. At the single cell level, cypin promotes decreases in bursting activity while cypinΔPDZ reduces sEPSC frequency and further decreases bursting compared to cypin. At the network level, by using the Fano factor as a measure of spike count variability, cypin overexpression results in an increase in variability of spike count, and this effect is abolished when cypin cannot bind PSD-95. This variability is also dependent on baseline activity levels and on mean spike rate over time. Finally, our spike sorting data show that overexpression of cypin results in a more complex distribution of spike waveforms and that binding to PSD-95 is essential for this complexity. Significance. Our data suggest that dendrite morphology does not play a major role in cypin action on electrical activity.

  19. Overexpression of a Panax ginseng tonoplast aquaporin alters salt tolerance, drought tolerance and cold acclimation ability in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

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    Peng, Yanhui; Lin, Wuling; Cai, Weiming; Arora, Rajeev

    2007-08-01

    Water movement across cellular membranes is regulated largely by a family of water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs). Since several abiotic stresses such as, drought, salinity and freezing, manifest themselves via altering water status of plant cells and are linked by the fact that they all result in cellular dehydration, we overexpressed an AQP (tonoplast intrinsic protein) from Panax ginseng, PgTIP1, in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test its role in plant's response to drought, salinity and cold acclimation (induced freezing tolerance). Under favorable conditions, PgTIP1 overexpression significantly increased plant growth as determined by the biomass production, and leaf and root morphology. PgTIP1 overexpression had beneficial effect on salt-stress tolerance as indicated by superior growth status and seed germination of transgenic plants under salt stress; shoots of salt-stressed transgenic plants also accumulated greater amounts of Na(+) compared to wild-type plants. Whereas PgTIP1 overexpression diminished the water-deficit tolerance of plants grown in shallow (10 cm deep) pots, the transgenic plants were significantly more tolerant to water stress when grown in 45 cm deep pots. The rationale for this contrasting response, apparently, comes from the differences in the root morphology and leaf water channel activity (speed of dehydration/rehydration) between the transgenic and wild-type plants. Plants overexpressed with PgTIP1 exhibited lower (relative to wild-type control) cold acclimation ability; however, this response was independent of cold-regulated gene expression. Our results demonstrate a significant function of PgTIP1 in growth and development of plant cells, and suggest that the water movement across tonoplast (via AQP) represents a rate-limiting factor for plant vigor under favorable growth conditions and also significantly affect responses of plant to drought, salt and cold stresses.

  20. Alterations in Adiposity and Glucose Homeostasis in Adult Gasp-1 Overexpressing Mice

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    Luce Périè

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Myostatin is known as a powerful negative regulator of muscle growth playing a key role in skeletal muscle homeostasis. Recent studies revealed that myostatin-deficient mice lead to an increase of insulin sensitivity, a decrease of adiposity and a resistance to obesity, showing that myostatin can also impact on metabolism. Thus, myostatin appeared as a potential therapeutic target to treat insulin resistance. Methods: We generated transgenic mice overexpressing Gasp-1, a myostatin inhibitor. Results: Surprisingly, we found that these mice gained weight with age due to an increase in fat mass associated with ectopic fat accumulation. In addition, these mice developed an adipocyte hypertrophy, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, muscle and hepatic insulin resistance. Understanding the molecular networks controlling this insulin resistance responsiveness in overexpressing Gasp-1 mice is essential. Molecular analyses revealed a deregulation of adipokines and muscle cytokines expression, but also an increase in plasma myostatin levels. The increase in myostatin bioactivity by a positive feedback mechanism in the Tg(Gasp-1 transgenic mice could lead to this combination of phenotypes. Conclusion: Altogether, these data suggested that overexpressing Gasp-1 mice develop most of the symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome and could be a relevant model for the study of obesity or type 2 diabetes.

  1. Alterations in the 5 'untranslated region of the EPSPS gene influence EPSPS overexpression in glyphosate-resistant Eleusine indica.

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    Zhang, Chun; Feng, Li; Tian, Xing-Shan

    2018-04-26

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Overexpression of the EPSPS gene is one of the molecular mechanisms conferring glyphosate resistance in weeds, but the transcriptional regulation of this gene is poorly understood. The EPSPS gene was found to be significantly up-regulated following glyphosate treatment in a glyphosate- resistant Eleusine indica population from South China. To further investigate the regulation of EPSPS overexpression, the promoter of the EPSPS gene from this E. indica population was cloned and analyzed. Two upstream regulatory sequences, Epro-S (862 bp) and Epro-R (877 bp) of EPSPS were obtained from glyphosate-susceptible (S) and -resistant (R) E. indica plants respectively by HiTAIL-PCR. The Epro-S and Epro-R sequences were 99% homologous, except for the two insertions (3 bp and12 bp) in the R sequence. The 12-base insertion of the Epro-R sequence was located in the 5'-UTR-Py-rich stretch element. The promoter activity tests showed that the 12-base insertion resulted in significant enhancement of the Epro-R promoter activity, whereas the 3-base insertion had little effect on Epro-R promoter activity. Alterations in the 5'-UTR-Py-rich stretch element of EPSPS are responsible for glyphosate induced EPSPS overexpression. Therefore, EPSPS transcriptional regulation confers glyphosate resistance in this E. indica population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 in the arcuate nucleus of juvenile Phodopus sungorus alters seasonal body weight changes.

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    Ganjam, Goutham K; Benzler, Jonas; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Boucsein, Alisa; Stöhr, Sigrid; Steger, Juliane; Culmsee, Carsten; Barrett, Perry; Tups, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    The profound seasonal cycle in body weight exhibited by the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) is associated with the development of hypothalamic leptin resistance during long day photoperiod (LD, 16:8 h light dark cycle), when body weight is elevated relative to short day photoperiod (SD, 8:16 h light dark cycle). We previously have shown that this seasonal change in physiology is associated with higher levels of mRNA for the potent inhibitor of leptin signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of LD hamsters relative to hamsters in SD. The alteration in SOCS3 gene expression preceded the body weight change suggesting that SOCS3 might be the molecular switch of seasonal body weight changes. To functionally characterize the role of SOCS3 in seasonal body weight regulation, we injected SOCS3 expressing recombinant adeno-associated virus type-2 (rAAV2-SOCS3) constructs into the ARC of leptin sensitive SD hamsters immediately after weaning. Hamsters that received rAAV2 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rAAV2-EGFP) served as controls. ARC-directed SOCS3 overexpression led to a significant increase in body weight over a period of 12 weeks without fully restoring the LD phenotype. This increase was partially due to elevated brown and white adipose tissue mass. Gene expression of pro-opiomelanocortin was increased while thyroid hormone converting enzyme DIO3 mRNA levels were reduced in SD hamsters with SOCS3 overexpression. In conclusion, our data suggest that ARC-directed SOCS3 overexpression partially overcomes the profound seasonal body weight cycle exhibited by the hamster which is associated with altered pro-opiomelanocortin and DIO3 gene expression.

  3. Niemann-pick type C1 (NPC1) overexpression alters cellular cholesterol homeostasis.

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    Millard, E E; Srivastava, K; Traub, L M; Schaffer, J E; Ory, D S

    2000-12-08

    The Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) protein is a key participant in intracellular trafficking of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, but its role in regulation of sterol homeostasis is not well understood. To characterize further the function of NPC1, we generated stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines overexpressing the human NPC1 protein (CHO/NPC1). NPC1 overexpression increases the rate of trafficking of low density lipoprotein cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum and the rate of delivery of endosomal cholesterol to the plasma membrane (PM). CHO/NPC1 cells exhibit a 1.5-fold increase in total cellular cholesterol and up to a 2.9-fold increase in PM cholesterol. This increase in PM cholesterol is closely paralleled by a 3-fold increase in de novo cholesterol synthesis. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis results in marked redistribution of PM cholesterol to intracellular sites, suggesting an unsuspected role for NPC1 in internalization of PM cholesterol. Despite elevated total cellular cholesterol, CHO/NPC1 cells exhibit increased cholesterol synthesis, which may be attributable to both resistance to oxysterol suppression of sterol-regulated gene expression and to reduced endoplasmic reticulum cholesterol levels under basal conditions. Taken together, these studies provide important new insights into the role of NPC1 in the determination of the levels and distribution of cellular cholesterol.

  4. Overexpression of a SNARE protein AtBS14b alters BR response in Arabidopsis.

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    Zhu, Zhong Xin; Ye, Hong Bo; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Yao, Da Nian

    2014-12-01

    N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor (SNAREs) domain-containing proteins were known as key players in vesicle-associated membrane fusion. Genetic screening has revealed the function of SNAREs in different aspects of plant biology, but the role of many SNAREs are still unknown. In this study, we have characterized the role of Arabidopsis Qc-SNARE protein AtBS14b in brassinosteroids (BRs) signaling pathway. AtBS14b overexpression (AtBS14b ox) plants exhibited short hypocotyl and petioles lengths as well as insensitivity to exogenously supplied BR, while AtBS14b mutants did not show any visible BR-dependent morphological differences. BR biosynthesis enzyme BR6OX2 expression was slightly lower in AtBS14b ox than in wild type plants. Further BR-mediated repression of BR6OX2, CPD and DWF4 was inhibited in AtBS14b ox plants. AtBS14b-mCherry fusion protein localized in vesicular compartments surrounding plasma membrane in N. benthamiana leaves. In addition, isolation of AtBS14b-interacting BR signaling protein, which localized in plasma membrane, showed that AtBS14b directly interacted with membrane steroid binding protein 1 (MSBP1), but did not interact with BAK1 or BRI1. These data suggested that Qc-SNARE protein AtBS14b is the first SNARE protein identified that interacts with MSBP1, and the overexpression of AtBS14b modulates BR response in Arabidopsis.

  5. Altered Fruit and Seed Development of Transgenic Rapeseed (Brassica napus Over-Expressing MicroRNA394.

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    Jian Bo Song

    Full Text Available Fruit and seed development in plants is a complex biological process mainly involved in input and biosynthesis of many storage compounds such as proteins and oils. Although the basic biochemical pathways for production of the storage metabolites in plants are well characterized, their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we functionally identified rapeseed (Brassica napus miR394 with its target gene Brassica napus leaf curling responsiveness (BnLCR to dissect a role of miR394 during the fruit and seed development. Transgenic rapeseed plants over-expressing miR394 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were generated. miR394 over-expression plants exhibited a delayed flowering time and enlarged size of plants, leaf blade, pods and seed body, but developed seeds with higher contents of protein and glucosinolates (GLS and lower levels of oil accumulation as compared to wild-type. Over-expression of miR394 altered the fatty acid (FA composition by increasing several FA species such as C16:0 and C18:0 and unsaturated species of C20:1 and C22:1 but lowering C18:3. This change was accompanied by induction of genes coding for transcription factors of FA synthesis including leafy cotyledon1 (BnLEC1, BnLEC2, and FUSCA3 (FUS3. Because the phytohormone auxin plays a crucial role in fruit development and seed patterning, the DR5-GUS reporter was used for monitoring the auxin response in Arabidopsis siliques and demonstrated that the DR5 gene was strongly expressed. These results suggest that BnmiR394 is involved in rapeseed fruit and seed development.

  6. Immune-mediated rippling muscle disease and myasthenia gravis.

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    Bettini, Mariela; Gonorazky, Hernan; Chaves, Marcelo; Fulgenzi, Ernesto; Figueredo, Alejandra; Christiansen, Silvia; Cristiano, Edgardo; Bertini, Enrico S; Rugiero, Marcelo

    2016-10-15

    Cases of acquired rippling muscle disease in association with myasthenia gravis have been reported. We present three patients with iRMD (immune-mediated rippling muscle disease) and AChR-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. None of them had thymus pathology. They presented exercise-induced muscle rippling combined with generalized myasthenia gravis. One of them had muscle biopsy showing a myopathic pattern and a patchy immunostaining with caveolin antibodies. They were successfully treated steroids and azathioprine. The immune nature of this association is supported by the response to immunotherapies and the positivity of AChR-antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transgenic overexpression of adenosine kinase in brain leads to multiple learning impairments and altered sensitivity to psychomimetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Benjamin K; Singer, Philipp; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Feldon, Joram; Boison, Detlev

    2007-12-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine fulfills a unique role in the brain affecting glutamatergic neurotransmission and dopaminergic signaling via activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, respectively. The adenosine system is thus ideally positioned to integrate glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, which in turn could affect behavior and cognition. In the adult brain, adenosine levels are largely regulated by its key metabolic enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK), which may assume the role of an 'upstream regulator' of these two neurotransmitter pathways. To test this hypothesis, transgenic mice with an overexpression of ADK in brain (Adk-tg), and therefore reduced brain adenosine levels, were evaluated in a panel of behavioral and psychopharmacological assays to assess possible glutamatergic and dopaminergic dysfunction. In comparison to non-transgenic control mice, Adk-tg mice are characterized by severe learning deficits in the Morris water maze task and in Pavlovian conditioning. The Adk-tg mice also exhibited reduced locomotor reaction to systemic amphetamine, whereas their reaction to the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 was enhanced. Our results confirmed that ADK overexpression could lead to functional concomitant alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic functions, which is in keeping with the hypothesized role of ADK in the balance and integration between glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. The present findings are of relevance to current pathophysiological hypotheses of schizophrenia and its pharmacotherapy.

  8. Calmodulin overexpression does not alter Cav1.2 function or oligomerization state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Tolia, Alexandra; Arant, Ryan; Kim, Eun Young; Isacoff, Ehud; Minor, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between calmodulin (CaM) and voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)s) are crucial for Ca(v) activity-dependent feedback modulation. We recently reported an X-ray structure that shows two Ca(2+)/CaM molecules bound to the Ca(v)1.2 C terminal tail, one at the PreIQ region and one at the IQ domain. Surprisingly, the asymmetric unit of the crystal showed a dimer in which Ca(2+)/CaM bridged two PreIQ helixes to form a 4:2 Ca(2+)/CaM:Ca(v) C-terminal tail assembly. Contrary to previous proposals based on a similar crystallographic dimer, extensive biochemical analysis together with subunit counting experiments of full-length channels in live cell membranes failed to find evidence for multimers that would be compatible with the 4:2 crossbridged complex. Here, we examine this possibility further. We find that CaM over-expression has no functional effect on Ca(v)1.2 inactivation or on the stoichiometry of full-length Ca(v)1.2. These data provide further support for the monomeric Ca(v)1.2 stoichiometry. Analysis of the electrostatic surfaces of the 2:1 Ca(2+)/CaM:Ca(V) C-terminal tail assembly reveals notable patches of electronegativity. These could influence various forms of channel modulation by interacting with positively charged elements from other intracellular channel domains.

  9. Azathioprine reduces the risk of audiometric relapse in immune-mediated hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Castro, Nieves; Gavilanes-Plasencia, Javier; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael; García-Fernández, Alfredo; García-Berrocal, José Ramón

    2018-03-01

    Current schemes for treatment of immune-mediated hearing loss with sporadic short-course, low-dose corticosteroids, are insufficient. To determine the role of azathioprine in the control of auditory impairment, a longitudinal, observational, descriptive study was performed with 20 patients treated with azathioprine (1.5-2.5mg/kg/day into two doses) for 1year. The loss of 10dB on two consecutive frequencies or 15dB on an isolated frequency was considered as relapse. The mean age of the patients was 52.50years (95%CI: 46.91-58.17), half were women. Bilateral affectation was 65%. 75% had organ specific disease and 25% had systemic autoimmune disease. The difference between baseline PTA (46.49dB; DS18.90) and PTA at 12months (45.47dB; DS18.88) did not reach statistical significance (P=.799). There was a moderate positive correlation between female sex and the presence of systemic disease (R=.577). By applying Student's t for paired data, a significant difference (P=.042) was obtained between the PTA in frequencies up to 1000 Hz (PTA125-1000Hz). The relative incidence rate of relapse per year was .52 relapses/year (95%CI: .19-1.14]). The median time to audiometric relapse-free was 9.70months (DS1.03). Azathioprine maintains the hearing threshold, decreases the risk of relapse, and slows down the rate at which patients relapse, altering the course of immune-mediated inner ear disease. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Overexpression of BMP3 in the developing skeleton alters endochondral bone formation resulting in spontaneous rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Cox, Karen; Carlo, Joelle M; Rosen, Vicki

    2009-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-3 (BMP) has been identified as a negative regulator in the skeleton as mice lacking BMP3 have increased bone mass. To further understand how BMP3 mediates bone formation, we created transgenic mice overexpressing BMP3 using the type I collagen promoter. BMP3 transgenic mice displayed spontaneous rib fractures that were first detected at E17.0. The fractures were due to defects in differentiation of the periosteum and late hypertrophic chondrocytes resulting in thinner cortical bone with decreased mineralization. As BMP3 modulates BMP and activin signaling through ActRIIB, we examined the ribs of ActRIIB receptor knockout mice and found they had defects in late chondrogenesis and mineralization similar to BMP3 transgenic mice. These data suggest that BMP3 exerts its effects in the skeleton by altering signaling through ActRIIB in chondrocytes and the periosteum, and this results in defects in bone collar formation and late hypertrophic chondrocyte maturation leading to decreased mineralization and less bone. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Overexpression of Laccaria bicolor aquaporin JQ585595 alters root water transport properties in ectomycorrhizal white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Kemppainen, Minna; El Kayal, Walid; Lee, Seong Hee; Pardo, Alejandro G; Cooke, Janice E K; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of hyphae to water transport in ectomycorrhizal (ECM) white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings was examined by altering expression of a major water-transporting aquaporin in Laccaria bicolor. Picea glauca was inoculated with wild-type (WT), mock transgenic or L. bicolor aquaporin JQ585595-overexpressing (OE) strains and exposed to root temperatures ranging from 5 to 20°C to examine the root water transport properties, physiological responses and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) expression in colonized plants. Mycorrhization increased shoot water potential, transpiration, net photosynthetic rates, root hydraulic conductivity and root cortical cell hydraulic conductivity in seedlings. At 20°C, OE plants had higher root hydraulic conductivity compared with WT plants and the increases were accompanied by higher expression of P. glauca PIP GQ03401_M18.1 in roots. In contrast to WT L. bicolor, the effects of OE fungi on root and root cortical cell hydraulic conductivities were abolished at 10 and 5°C in the absence of major changes in the examined transcript levels of P. glauca root PIPs. The results provide evidence for the importance of fungal aquaporins in root water transport of mycorrhizal plants. They also demonstrate links between hyphal water transport, root aquaporin expression and root water transport in ECM plants. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P. O. Box 80, M. G. Marg, Lucknow-226 001, U. P. (India); Parmar, Devendra [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P. O. Box 80, M. G. Marg, Lucknow-226 001, U. P. (India)

    2007-12-15

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD{sub 50}) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring.

  13. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2007-01-01

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD 50 ) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring

  14. Immune-Mediated Inner Ear Disease: Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penêda, José Ferreira; Lima, Nuno Barros; Monteiro, Francisco; Silva, Joana Vilela; Gama, Rita; Condé, Artur

    2018-03-07

    Immune Mediated Inner Ear Disease (IMIED) is a rare form of sensorineural bilateral hearing loss, usually progressing in weeks to months and responsive to immunosuppressive treatment. Despite recent advances, there is no consensus on diagnosis and optimal treatment. A review of articles on IMIED from the last 10 years was conducted using PubMed ® database. IMIED is a rare disease, mostly affecting middle aged women. It may be a primary ear disease or secondary to autoimmune systemic disease. A dual immune response (both cellular and humoral) seems to be involved. Cochlin may be the inner ear protein targeted in this disease. Distinction from other (core common) forms of neurosensory hearing loss is a challenge. Physical examination is mandatory for exclusion of other causes of hearing loss; audiometry identifies characteristic hearing curves. Laboratory and imaging studies are controversial since no diagnostic marker is available. Despite recent research, IMIED diagnosis remains exclusive. Steroids are the mainstay treatment; other therapies need further investigation. For refractory cases, cochlear implantation is an option and with good relative outcome. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune-mediated animal models of Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    An autoimmune diathesis has been proposed in Tourette syndrome (TS) and related neuropsychiatric disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism and anorexia nervosa. Environmental triggers including infection and xenobiotics are hypothesized to lead to the production of brain-directed autoantibodies in a subset of genetically susceptible individuals. Although much work has focused on Group A Streptococcus (GAS), the role of this common childhood infection remains controversial. Animal model studies based on immune and autoantibody findings in TS have demonstrated immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits and stereotypic movements and related behavioral disturbances reminiscent of TS following exposure to GAS and other activators of host anti-microbial responses, soluble immune mediators and anti-GAS or anti-neuronal antibodies. Demonstration of the ability to recreate these abnormalities through passive transfer of serum IgG from GAS-immunized mice into naïve mice and abrogation of this activity through depletion of IgG has provided compelling evidence in support of the autoimmune hypothesis. Immunologically-based animal models of TS are a potent tool for dissecting the pathogenesis of this serious neuropsychiatric syndrome. PMID:23313649

  16. Aggravating Impact of Nanoparticles on Immune-Mediated Pulmonary Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichiro Inoue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the adverse health effects of nanoparticles have been proposed and are being clarified, their aggravating effects on pre-existing pathological conditions have not been fully investigated. In this review, we provide insights into the immunotoxicity of both airborne and engineered nanoparticles as an exacerbating factor on hypersusceptible subjects, especially those with immune-mediated pulmonary inflammation, using our in vivo experimental model. First, we exhibit the effects of nanoparticles on pulmonary inflammation induced by bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide: LPS as a disease model in innate immunity, and demonstrate that nanoparticles instilled through both an intratracheal tube and an inhalation system can exacerbate the lung inflammation. Second, we introduce the effects of nanoparticles on allergic pulmonary inflammation as a disease model in adaptive immunity, and show that repetitive pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles has aggravating effects on allergic inflammation, including adjuvant effects on Th2-milieu. Third, we show that very small nanoparticle exposure exacerbates emphysematous pulmonary inflammation, which is concomitant with enhanced lung expression of proinflammatory molecules (including those that are innate immunity related. Taken together, nanoparticle exposure may synergistically facilitate pathological pulmonary inflammation via both innate and adaptive immunological impairment.

  17. The Role of Histone Demethylase Jmjd3 in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0055 TITLE: The Role of Histone Demethylase Jmjd3 in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yi...Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0055 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yi Zhang 5d... anemia (AA) is a condition of bone marrow failure (BMF) characterized by blood pancytopenia and BM hypoplasia. In most cases, AA is an immune-mediated

  18. PEP3 overexpression shortens lag phase but does not alter growth rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Bradford, C. Samuel; Cooley, Ben; Yoshinaga, Allen S.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Abeliovich, Hagai; Penner, Michael H.; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2017-01-01

    In fungi, two recognized mechanisms contribute to pH homeostasis: the plasma membrane proton-pumping ATPase that exports excess protons and the vacuolar proton-pumping ATPase (V-ATPase) that mediates vacuolar proton uptake. Here, we report that overexpression of PEP3 which encodes a component of the HOPS and CORVET complexes involved in vacuolar biogenesis, shortened lag phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress. By confocal microscopy, PEP3-overexpressing cells stained with the vacuolar membrane-specific dye, FM4-64 had more fragmented vacuoles than the wild-type control. The stained overexpression mutant was also found to exhibit about 3.6-fold more FM4-64 fluorescence than the wild-type control as determined by flow cytometry. While the vacuolar pH of the wild-type strain grown in the presence of 80 mM acetic acid was significantly higher than in the absence of added acid, no significant difference was observed in vacuolar pH of the overexpression strain grown either in the presence or absence of 80 mM acetic acid. Based on an indirect growth assay, the PEP3-overexpression strain exhibited higher V-ATPase activity. We hypothesize that PEP3 overexpression provides protection from acid stress by increasing vacuolar surface area and V-ATPase activity and, hence, proton-sequestering capacity. PMID:26051671

  19. Overexpression of GRß in colonic mucosal cell line partly reflects altered gene expression in colonic mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zsolt; Acs, Bence; Butz, Henriett; Feldman, Karolina; Marta, Alexa; Szabo, Peter M; Baghy, Kornelia; Pazmany, Tamas; Racz, Karoly; Liko, Istvan; Patocs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) plays a crucial role in inflammatory responses. GR has several isoforms, of which the most deeply studied are the GRα and GRß. Recently it has been suggested that in addition to its negative dominant effect on GRα, the GRß may have a GRα-independent transcriptional activity. The GRß isoform was found to be frequently overexpressed in various autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study, we wished to test whether the gene expression profile found in a GRß overexpressing intestinal cell line (Caco-2GRß) might mimic the gene expression alterations found in patients with IBD. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed in both normal and GRß overexpressing Caco-2 cell lines with and without dexamethasone treatment. IBD-related genes were identified from a meta-analysis of 245 microarrays available in online microarray deposits performed on intestinal mucosa samples from patients with IBD and healthy individuals. The differentially expressed genes were further studied using in silico pathway analysis. Overexpression of GRß altered a large proportion of genes that were not regulated by dexamethasone suggesting that GRß may have a GRα-independent role in the regulation of gene expression. About 10% of genes differentially expressed in colonic mucosa samples from IBD patients compared to normal subjects were also detected in Caco-2 GRß intestinal cell line. Common genes are involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Overexpression of GRß in intestinal cells may affect appropriate mucosal repair and intact barrier function. The proposed novel role of GRß in intestinal epithelium warrants further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Overexpression of Dyrk1A is implicated in several cognitive, electrophysiological and neuromorphological alterations found in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana García-Cerro

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS phenotypes result from the overexpression of several dosage-sensitive genes. The DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A gene, which has been implicated in the behavioral and neuronal alterations that are characteristic of DS, plays a role in neuronal progenitor proliferation, neuronal differentiation and long-term potentiation (LTP mechanisms that contribute to the cognitive deficits found in DS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Dyrk1A overexpression on the behavioral and cognitive alterations in the Ts65Dn (TS mouse model, which is the most commonly utilized mouse model of DS, as well as on several neuromorphological and electrophysiological properties proposed to underlie these deficits. In this study, we analyzed the phenotypic differences in the progeny obtained from crosses of TS females and heterozygous Dyrk1A (+/- male mice. Our results revealed that normalization of the Dyrk1A copy number in TS mice improved working and reference memory based on the Morris water maze and contextual conditioning based on the fear conditioning test and rescued hippocampal LTP. Concomitant with these functional improvements, normalization of the Dyrk1A expression level in TS mice restored the proliferation and differentiation of hippocampal cells in the adult dentate gyrus (DG and the density of GABAergic and glutamatergic synapse markers in the molecular layer of the hippocampus. However, normalization of the Dyrk1A gene dosage did not affect other structural (e.g., the density of mature hippocampal granule cells, the DG volume and the subgranular zone area or behavioral (i.e., hyperactivity/attention alterations found in the TS mouse. These results suggest that Dyrk1A overexpression is involved in some of the cognitive, electrophysiological and neuromorphological alterations, but not in the structural alterations found in DS, and suggest that pharmacological strategies targeting

  1. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole A Andreassen

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals, applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG, low density lipoproteins (LDL, high density lipoproteins (HDL] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis. We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88, LDL (n = 87 and HDL (n = 52. Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2 and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1. We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents.

  2. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier M Thurlings

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man.We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion.The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  3. Lack of collagen XVIII/endostatin exacerbates immune-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Yuki; Okude, Takashi; Shirai, Ryota; Sato, Ikumi; Kimura, Ryota; Ogawa, Makoto; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Yokosuka, Osamu; Kalluri, Raghu; Ueda, Shiro

    2010-09-01

    Collagen XVIII is a component of the highly specialized extracellular matrix associated with basement membranes of epithelia and endothelia. In the normal kidney, collagen XVIII is distributed throughout glomerular and tubular basement membranes, mesangial matrix, and Bowman's capsule. Proteolytic cleavage within its C-terminal domain releases the fragment endostatin, which has antiangiogenic properties. Because damage to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) accompanies immune-mediated renal injury, we investigated the role of collagen XVIII/endostatin in this disorder. We induced anti-GBM glomerulonephritis in collagen XVIII alpha1-null and wild-type mice and compared the resulting matrix accumulation, inflammation, and capillary rarefaction. Anti-GBM disease upregulated collagen XVIII/endostatin expression within the GBM and Bowman's capsule of wild-type mice. Collagen XVIII/endostatin-deficient mice developed more severe glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury than wild-type mice. Collagen XVIII/endostatin deficiency altered matrix remodeling, enhanced the inflammatory response, and promoted capillary rarefaction and vascular endothelial cell damage, but did not affect endothelial proliferation. Supplementing collagen XVIII-deficient mice with exogenous endostatin did not affect the progression of anti-GBM disease. Taken together, these results suggest that collagen XVIII/endostatin preserves the integrity of the extracellular matrix and capillaries in the kidney, protecting against progressive glomerulonephritis.

  4. Overexpression of NtWRKY50 Increases Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum and Alters Salicylic Acid and Jasmonic Acid Production in Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuping; Liu, Ying; Tang, Yuanman; Chen, Juanni; Ding, Wei

    2017-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) modulate plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we characterized a WRKY IIc TF, NtWRKY50, isolated from tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) plants. The results showed that NtWRKY50 is a nuclear-localized protein and that its gene transcript is induced in tobacco when inoculated with the pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum . Overexpression of NtWRKY50 enhanced bacterial resistance, which correlated with enhanced SA and JA/ET signaling genes. However, silencing of the NtWRKY50 gene had no obvious effects on plant disease resistance, implying functional redundancy of NtWRKY50 with other TFs. In addition, it was found that NtWRKY50 can be induced by various biotic or abiotic stresses, such as Potato virus Y, Rhizoctonia solani, Phytophthora parasitica , hydrogen peroxide, heat, cold, and wounding as well as the hormones salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET). Importantly, additional analysis suggests that NtWRKY50 overexpression markedly promotes SA levels but prevents pathogen-induced JA production. These data indicate that NtWRKY50 overexpression leads to altered SA and JA content, increased expression of defense-related genes and enhanced plant resistance to R. solanacearum. These probably due to increased activity of endogenous NtWRKY50 gene or could be gain-of-function phenotypes by altering the profile of genes affected by NtWRKY50 .

  5. Oxidized SOD1 alters proteasome activities in vitro and in the cortex of SOD1 overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pecheur, Marie; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Paly, Evelyne; Farout, Luc; Friguet, Bertrand; London, Jacqueline

    2005-07-04

    Premature ageing, one of the characteristics of Down syndrome (DS), may involve oxidative stress and impairment of proteasome activity. Transgenic mice overexpressing the human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene are one of the first murine models for DS and it has been shown that SOD1 overexpression might be either deleterious or beneficial. Here, we show a reduction in proteasome activities in the cortex of SOD1 transgenic mice and an associated increase in the content of oxidized SOD1 protein. As we demonstrate that in vitro oxidized SOD can inhibit purified proteasome peptidase activities, modified SOD1 might be partially responsible for proteasome inhibition shown in SOD1 transgenic mice.

  6. Overexpression of GbWRKY1 positively regulates the Pi starvation response by alteration of auxin sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Jin, Li; Long, Lu; Liu, Linlin; He, Xin; Gao, Wei; Zhu, Longfu; Zhang, Xianlong

    2012-12-01

    Overexpression of a cotton defense-related gene GbWRKY1 in Arabidopsis resulted in modification of the root system by enhanced auxin sensitivity to positively regulate the Pi starvation response. GbWRKY1 was a cloned WRKY transcription factor from Gossypium barbadense, which was firstly identified as a defense-related gene and showed moderate similarity with AtWRKY75 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of GbWRKY1 in Arabidopsis resulted in attenuated Pi starvation stress symptoms, including reduced accumulation of anthocyanin and impaired density of lateral roots (LR) in low Pi stress. The study also indicated that overexpression of GbWRKY1 caused plants constitutively exhibited Pi starvation response including increased development of LR, relatively high level of total P and Pi, high expression level of some high-affinity Pi transporters and phosphatases as well as enhanced accumulation of acid phosphatases activity during Pi-sufficient. It was speculated that GbWRKY1 may act as a positive regulator in the Pi starvation response as well as AtWRKY75. GbWRKY1 probably involves in the modulation of Pi homeostasis and participates in the Pi allocation and remobilization but do not accumulate more Pi in Pi-deficient condition, which was different from the fact that AtWRKY75 influenced the Pi status of the plant during Pi deprivation by increasing root surface area and accumulation of more Pi. Otherwise, further study suggested that the overexpression plants were more sensitive to auxin than wild-type and GbWRKY1 may partly influence the LPR1-dependent (low phosphate response 1) Pi starvation signaling pathway and was putatively independent of SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 and PHR1 (phosphate starvation response 1) in response to Pi starvation.

  7. Immune mediated disorders in women with a fragile X expansion and FXTAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalnapurkar, Isha; Rafika, Nuva; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Premutation alleles in fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) can cause the late-onset neurodegenerative disorder, fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and/or the fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency in approximately 20% of heterozygotes. Heterozygotes of the FMR1 premutation have a higher incidence of immune mediated disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disorder, especially when accompanied by FXTAS motor signs. We describe the time course of symptoms of immune mediated disorders and the subsequent development of FXTAS in four women with an FMR1 CGG expansion, including three with the premutation and one with a gray zone expansion. These patients developed an immune mediated disorder followed by neurological symptoms that become consistent with FXTAS. In all patients we observed a pattern involving an initial appearance of disease symptoms-often after a period of heightened stress (depression, anxiety, divorce, general surgery) followed by the onset of tremor and/or ataxia. Immune mediated diseases are associated with the manifestations of FXTAS temporally, although further studies are needed to clarify this association. If a cause and effect relationship can be established, treatment of pre-existing immune mediated disorders may benefit patients with pathogenic FMR1 mutations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. 2,3,7,8-TCDD enhances the sensitivity of mice to concanavalin A immune-mediated liver injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullerton, Aaron M., E-mail: fuller22@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 215, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Roth, Robert A., E-mail: rothr@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Food Safety and Toxicology Building, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 221, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ganey, Patricia E., E-mail: ganey@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Food Safety and Toxicology Building, 1129 Farm Lane, Room 214, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Inflammation plays a major role in immune-mediated liver injury, and exposure to environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to alter the inflammatory response as well as affect immune cell activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates hepatotoxicity in a murine model of immune-mediated liver injury induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration. Mice were pretreated with 30 μg/kg TCDD or vehicle control on day zero and then given either Con A or saline intravenously on day four. Mice treated with TCDD did not develop liver injury; however, TCDD pretreatment increased liver injury resulting from moderate doses of Con A (4–10 mg/kg). TCDD-pretreated mice had altered plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon gamma (IFNγ), and TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity was attenuated in IFNγ knockout mice. At various times after treatment, intrahepatic immune cells were isolated, and expression of cell activation markers as well as cytolytic proteins was determined. TCDD pretreatment increased the proportion of activated natural killer T (NKT) cells and the percent of cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) after Con A administration. In addition FasL knockout mice and mice treated with CD18 antiserum were both protected from TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity, suggesting a requirement for direct cell–cell interaction between effector immune cells and parenchymal cell targets in the development of liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD increased NKT cell activation and exacerbated immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A through a mechanism involving IFNγ and FasL expression. -- Highlights: ► TCDD pretreatment sensitizes mice to Con A-induced hepatotoxicity. ► TCDD pretreatment increased concentration of IFNγ in plasma after Con A. ► Con A-induced activation of NKT cells was increased by TCDD pretreatment. ► Fas

  9. 2,3,7,8-TCDD enhances the sensitivity of mice to concanavalin A immune-mediated liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton, Aaron M.; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a major role in immune-mediated liver injury, and exposure to environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to alter the inflammatory response as well as affect immune cell activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates hepatotoxicity in a murine model of immune-mediated liver injury induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration. Mice were pretreated with 30 μg/kg TCDD or vehicle control on day zero and then given either Con A or saline intravenously on day four. Mice treated with TCDD did not develop liver injury; however, TCDD pretreatment increased liver injury resulting from moderate doses of Con A (4–10 mg/kg). TCDD-pretreated mice had altered plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon gamma (IFNγ), and TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity was attenuated in IFNγ knockout mice. At various times after treatment, intrahepatic immune cells were isolated, and expression of cell activation markers as well as cytolytic proteins was determined. TCDD pretreatment increased the proportion of activated natural killer T (NKT) cells and the percent of cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) after Con A administration. In addition FasL knockout mice and mice treated with CD18 antiserum were both protected from TCDD/Con A-induced hepatotoxicity, suggesting a requirement for direct cell–cell interaction between effector immune cells and parenchymal cell targets in the development of liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD increased NKT cell activation and exacerbated immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A through a mechanism involving IFNγ and FasL expression. -- Highlights: ► TCDD pretreatment sensitizes mice to Con A-induced hepatotoxicity. ► TCDD pretreatment increased concentration of IFNγ in plasma after Con A. ► Con A-induced activation of NKT cells was increased by TCDD pretreatment. ► Fas

  10. Enhanced Stress Response in 5-HT1AR Overexpressing Mice: Altered HPA Function and Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Díaz, Álvaro; Garro-Martínez, Emilio; Linge, Raquel; Castro, Elena; Haberzettl, Robert; Fink, Heidrun; Bert, Bettina; Brosda, Jan; Romero, Beatriz; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Pazos, Ángel

    2017-11-15

    Postsynaptic 5-HT 1A receptors (5-HT 1A R) play an important role in anxiety and stress, although their contribution is still controversial. Previous studies report that mice overexpressing postsynaptic 5-HT 1A Rs show no changes in basal anxiety, though the influence of stress conditions has not been addressed yet. In this study, we used this animal model to evaluate the role of 5-HT 1A Rs in anxiety response after pre-exposure to an acute stressor. Under basal conditions, 5-HT 1A R overexpressing animals presented high corticosterone levels and a lower mineralocorticoid/glucocorticoid receptor ratio. After pre-exposure to a single stressor, they showed a high anxiety-like response, associated with a blunted increase in corticosterone levels and higher c-Fos activation in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, these mice also presented a lack of downregulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation after stress exposure. Therefore, higher postsynaptic 5-HT 1A R activation might predispose to a high anxious phenotype and an impaired stress coping behavior.

  11. Overexpression of SbMyb60 impacts phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and alters secondary cell wall composition in sorghum bicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway that generates lignin subunits represents a significant target to alter the abundance and composition of lignin. The major regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism are myb transcription factors, which have been shown to modulate secondary cell wall compositi...

  12. Overexpression of Rice Wall-Associated Kinase 25 (OsWAK25) Alters Resistance to Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Mitch; Sharma, Rita; De Vleesschauwer, David; Tsao, Li; Zhang, Xuting; Chern, Mawsheng; Canlas, Patrick; Zuo, Shimin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Wall-associated kinases comprise a sub-family of receptor-like kinases that function in plant growth and stress responses. Previous studies have shown that the rice wall-associated kinase, OsWAK25, interacts with a diverse set of proteins associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. Here, we show that wounding and BTH treatments induce OsWAK25 transcript expression in rice. We generated OsWAK25 overexpression lines and show that these lines exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype and enhanced expression of rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1), OsPAL2, PBZ1 and PR10. Furthermore, these lines show resistance to the hemibiotrophic pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Magnaporthe oryzae, yet display increased susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Cochliobolus miyabeanus. PMID:26795719

  13. Acquired mutations in the MXR/BCRP/ABCP gene alter substrate specificity in MXR/BCRP/ABCP-overexpressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honjo, Y; Hrycyna, C A; Yan, Q W

    2001-01-01

    A disparity was noted in the transport of rhodamine 123 among nine MXR/BCRP/ABCP-overexpressing cells studied; all demonstrated mitoxantrone transport, whereas only two effluxed rhodamine 123. When the MXR/BCRP/ABCP gene was sequenced in the cell lines studied, differences were noted at amino acid...... 482, predicted to be at the start of the third transmembrane domain. Sequencing genomic DNA revealed wild-type MXR/BCRP/ABCP to have an arginine at position 482. Cells having a threonine or glycine at position 482 were able to efflux rhodamine 123, whereas cells having an arginine were not. A vaccinia...... virus expression system confirmed that rhodamine as well as doxorubicin efflux is observed with R482T or R482G but not with the wild-type R482; all three MXR/BCRP/ABCP forms transported mitoxantrone. Cross-resistance studies suggest that, compared with wild-type MXR/BCRP/ABCP, cells having an R482T...

  14. RCC2 over-expression in tumor cells alters apoptosis and drug sensitivity by regulating Rac1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Ren, Dong; Li, Su; Ma, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Yan; Xiao, Sheng

    2018-01-10

    Small GTP binding protein Rac1 is a component of NADPH oxidases and is essential for superoxide-induced cell death. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), and this activation can be blocked by regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2), which binds the switch regions of Rac1 to prevent access from GEFs. Three cancer cell lines with up- or down-regulation of RCC2 were used to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis, Rac1 signaling and sensitivity to a group of nine chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 expression in lung cancer and ovarian cancer were studied using immunochemistry stain of tumor tissue arrays. Forced RCC2 expression in tumor cells blocked spontaneous- or Staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. In contrast, RCC2 knock down in these cells resulted in increased apoptosis to STS treatment. The protective activity of RCC2 on apoptosis was revoked by a constitutively activated Rac1, confirming a role of RCC2 in apoptosis by regulating Rac1. In an immunohistochemistry evaluation of tissue microarray, RCC2 was over-expressed in 88.3% of primary lung cancer and 65.2% of ovarian cancer as compared to non-neoplastic lung and ovarian tissues, respectively. Because chemotherapeutic drugs can kill tumor cells by activating Rac1/JNK pathway, we suspect that tumors with RCC2 overexpression would be more resistant to these drugs. Tumor cells with forced RCC2 expression indeed had significant difference in drug sensitivity compared to parental cells using a panel of common chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 regulates apoptosis by blocking Rac1 signaling. RCC2 expression in tumor can be a useful marker for predicting chemotherapeutic response.

  15. Houttuynia cordata modulates oral innate immune mediators: potential role of herbal plant on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satthakarn, S; Chung, W O; Promsong, A; Nittayananta, W

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial cells play an active role in oral innate immunity by producing various immune mediators. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (H. cordata), a herbal plant found in Asia, possesses many activities. However, its impacts on oral innate immunity have never been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H. cordata extract on the expression of innate immune mediators produced by oral epithelial cells. Primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs) were treated with various concentrations of the extract for 18 h. The gene expression of hBD2, SLPI, cytokines, and chemokines was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secreted proteins in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA or Luminex assay. Cytotoxicity of the extract was assessed using CellTiter-Blue Assay. H. cordata significantly induced the expression of hBD2, SLPI, IL-8, and CCL20 in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. The secreted hBD2 and SLPI proteins were modulated, and the levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-γ were significantly induced by the extract. Our data indicated that H. cordata can modulate oral innate immune mediators. These findings may lead to the development of new topical agents from H. cordata for the prevention and treatment of immune-mediated oral diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A case of non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia treated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 12-year-old female Shih Tzu dog was referred with diarrhea. Hematological examination indicated severe nonregenerative anemia. Bone marrow aspiration smears and core biopsy specimens revealed normal bone marrow. Based on those results, non-regenerative immune mediated anemia was diagnosed. The dog ...

  17. High intravascular tissue factor expression in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Brinkhof, B.; Teske, E.; Rothuizen, J.; Dekker, A.; Penning, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    A high mortality occurs in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) during the first 2 weeks after the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response and coagulation abnormalities in dogs with IMHA in relation to the prognosis and to establish the

  18. Genetics of immune-mediated disorders : from genome-wide association to molecular mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified not only hundreds of susceptibility loci to immune-mediated diseases but also pinpointed causal amino-acid variants of HLA genes that contribute to many autoimmune reactions. Majority of non-HLA genetic variants are located within non-coding regulatory

  19. Shared genetics in coeliac disease and other immune-mediated diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez-Achury, J.; Coutinho de Almeida, R.; Wijmenga, C.

    Gutierrez-Achury J, Coutinho de Almeida R, Wijmenga C (University Medical Centre Groningen and University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; University of Brasilia School of Health Sciences, Brasilia, DF, Brazil). Shared genetics in coeliac disease and other immune-mediated diseases

  20. Oncogene alterations in carcinomas of the uterine cervix: overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor is associated with poor prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersemaekers, A. M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Kenter, G. G.; van den Broek, L. J.; Uljee, S. M.; Hermans, J.; van de Vijver, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of carcinomas of the uterine cervix has been firmly established. However, other genetic alterations also play an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. Therefore, we have investigated the role of several (onco)genes in

  1. An overexpression of chalcone reductase of Pueraria montana var. lobata alters biosynthesis of anthocyanin and 5'-deoxyflavonoids in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Jae-youl; Kasthuri, G Mangai; Park, Ji-young; Kang, Won-jin; Kim, Hyun-soon; Yoon, Bong-sik; Joung, Hyouk; Jeon, Jae-heung

    2003-03-28

    We isolated the chalcone reductase (pl-chr) gene of Pueraria montana var. lobata by using a PCR strategy from cDNA pools of storage roots. A high level of expression of RNA was found in both stems and roots. The genomic Southern blot result suggests that pl-chr exists as a member of a small gene family. By introducing a pl-chr gene under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter into the pink-flowering Xanthi line of Nicotiana tabacum, the flower color was changed from pink to white-to-pink. The contents of anthocyanin in the flowers of the transgenic lines were dramatically decreased by 40%, but the total UV absorption compounds remained unchanged. The production of liquiritigenin in pl-chr overexpressed transgenic tobacco lines was confirmed by HPLC and MS analysis. The introduction of pl-chr gene provides a method to redirect the flavonoid pathway into 5'-deoxyflavonoid production in non-legume crops, in order to manipulate the phenylpropanoid pathway for isoflavonoid production.

  2. PRDM14 is expressed in germ cell tumors with constitutive overexpression altering human germline differentiation and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna J. Gell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Germ cell tumors (GCTs are a heterogeneous group of tumors occurring in gonadal and extragonadal locations. GCTs are hypothesized to arise from primordial germ cells (PGCs, which fail to differentiate. One recently identified susceptibility loci for human GCT is PR (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ domain proteins 14 (PRDM14. PRDM14 is expressed in early primate PGCs and is repressed as PGCs differentiate. To examine PRDM14 in human GCTs we profiled human GCT cell lines and patient samples and discovered that PRDM14 is expressed in embryonal carcinoma cell lines, embryonal carcinomas, seminomas, intracranial germinomas and yolk sac tumors, but is not expressed in teratomas. To model constitutive overexpression in human PGCs, we generated PGC-like cells (PGCLCs from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs and discovered that elevated expression of PRDM14 does not block early PGC formation. Instead, we show that elevated PRDM14 in PGCLCs causes proliferation and differentiation defects in the germline. Keywords: Germ cell tumor, PRDM14, Cell differentiation, Primordial germ cell, Proliferation

  3. Targeted Transgenic Overexpression of Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase (TK2) Alters Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Mitochondrial Polypeptide Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed H.; Kohler, James J.; Haase, Chad P.; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-γ. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:17322372

  4. Overexpression of the WOX gene STENOFOLIA improves biomass yield and sugar release in transgenic grasses and display altered cytokinin homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass can be a significant source of renewable clean energy with continued improvement in biomass yield and bioconversion strategies. In higher plants, the leaf blade is the central energy convertor where solar energy and CO2 are assimilated to make the building blocks for biomass production. Here we report that introducing the leaf blade development regulator STENOFOLIA (STF, a WOX family transcription factor, into the biofuel crop switchgrass, significantly improves both biomass yield and sugar release. We found that STF overexpressing switchgrass plants produced approximately 2-fold more dry biomass and release approximately 1.8-fold more solubilized sugars without pretreatment compared to controls. The biomass increase was attributed mainly to increased leaf width and stem thickness, which was also consistent in STF transgenic rice and Brachypodium, and appeared to be caused by enhanced cell proliferation. STF directly binds to multiple regions in the promoters of some cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX genes and represses their expression in all three transgenic grasses. This repression was accompanied by a significant increase in active cytokinin content in transgenic rice leaves, suggesting that the increase in biomass productivity and sugar release could at least in part be associated with improved cytokinin levels caused by repression of cytokinin degrading enzymes. Our study provides a new tool for improving biomass feedstock yield in bioenergy crops, and uncovers a novel mechanistic insight in the function of STF, which may also apply to other repressive WOX genes that are master regulators of several key plant developmental programs.

  5. AAV-mediated overexpression of the CB1 receptor in the mPFC of adult rats alters cognitive flexibility, social behavior and emotional reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eKlugmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid (ECB system is strongly involved in the regulation of cognitive processing and emotional behavior and evidence indicates that ECB signaling might affect these behavioral abilities by modulations of prefrontal cortical functions. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the CB1 receptor in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC on cognitive flexibility and emotional behavior. Therefore, the CB1 receptor was overexpressed by adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-mediated gene transfer specifically in the mPFC of adult Wistar rats. Animals were then tested in different anxiety-related paradigms for emotional reactivity (e.g. elevated plus maze (EPM, light/dark emergence test (EMT, social interaction and the attentional set shift task (ASST - an adaptation of the human Wisconsin card sorting test - for cognitive abilities and behavioral flexibility. A subtle increase in exploratory behavior was found in CB1 receptor overexpressing animals (CB1-R compared to empty vector injected controls (Empty in the EMT and EPM, although general locomotor activity did not differ between the groups. During social interaction testing, social contact behavior towards the unknown conspecific was found to be decreased, whereas social withdrawal was increased in CB1-R animals and they showed an inadequate increase in exploratory behavior compared to control animals. In the ASST, impaired reversal learning abilities were detected in CB1-R animals compared to controls, indicating reduced behavioral flexibility. In conclusion, upregulation of the CB1 receptor specifically in the rat mPFC induces alterations in emotional reactivity, leads to inadequate social behavior and impairs cognitive flexibility. These findings might be relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders, since higher cortical CB1 receptor expression levels as well as similar behavioral impairments as observed in the present study have been described in schizophrenic patients.

  6. The Role of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Immune-Mediated Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meifang; Zhang, Cai

    2017-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified group of innate immune cells lacking antigen-specific receptors that can mediate immune responses and regulate tissue homeostasis and inflammation. ILCs comprise group 1 ILCs, group 2 ILCs, and group 3 ILCs. These ILCs usually localize at mucosal surfaces and combat pathogens by the rapid release of certain cytokines. However, the uncontrolled activation of ILCs can also lead to damaging inflammation, especially in the gut, lung, and skin. Although the physiological and pathogenic roles of ILCs in liver diseases have been attracting increasing attention recently, there has been no systematic review regarding the roles of ILCs in immune-mediated liver diseases. Here, we review the relationships between the ILC subsets and their functions in immune-mediated liver diseases, and discuss their therapeutic potential based on current knowledge about the functional roles of these cells in liver diseases. PMID:28659927

  7. Membrane attack complex of complement is not essential for immune mediated demyelination in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Giang T; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J; Carter, Nicole M; Killingsworth, Murray; Nomura, Masaru; Verma, Nirupama D; Plain, Karren M; Boyd, Rochelle; Hall, Bruce M

    2010-12-15

    Antibody deposition and complement activation, especially membrane attack complex (MAC) formation are considered central for immune mediated demyelination. To examine the role of MAC in immune mediated demyelination, we studied experimental allergic neuritis (EAN) in Lewis rats deficient in complement component 6 (C6) that cannot form MAC. A C6 deficient Lewis (Lewis/C6-) strain of rats was bred by backcrossing the defective C6 gene, from PVG/C6- rats, onto the Lewis background. Lewis/C6- rats had the same C6 gene deletion as PVG/C6- rats and their sera did not support immune mediated haemolysis unless C6 was added. Active EAN was induced in Lewis and Lewis/C6- rats by immunization with bovine peripheral nerve myelin in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and Lewis/C6- rats had delayed clinical EAN compared to the Lewis rats. Peripheral nerve demyelination in Lewis/C6- was also delayed but was similar in extent at the peak of disease. Compared to Lewis, Lewis/C6- nerves had no MAC deposition, reduced macrophage infiltrate and IL-17A, but similar T cell infiltrate and Th1 cytokine mRNA expression. ICAM-1 and P-selectin mRNA expression and immunostaining on vascular endothelium were delayed in Lewis C6- compared to Lewis rats' nerves. This study found that MAC was not required for immune mediated demyelination; but that MAC enhanced early symptoms and early demyelination in EAN, either by direct lysis or by sub-lytic induction of vascular endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rossana C.N., E-mail: rossana.melo@ufjf.edu.br [Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, ICB, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Rua José Lourenço Kelmer, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Weller, Peter F. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, CLS 943, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  9. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Rossana C.N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles – EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses. - Highlights: • Application of EM to understand the complex secretory pathway in human eosinophils. • EM techniques reveal an active vesicular system associated with secretory granules. • Tubular vesicles are involved in the transport of granule-derived immune mediators.

  10. Application of the 2012 revised diagnostic definitions for paediatric multiple sclerosis and immune-mediated central nervous system demyelination disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, E. Danielle; Neuteboom, Rinze F.; Ketelslegers, Immy A.; Boon, Maartje; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    Background Recently, the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group (IPMSSG) definitions for the diagnosis of immune-mediated acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the central nervous system, including paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS), have been revised. Objective To evaluate the

  11. Overexpression of microRNA miR-30a or miR-191 in A549 lung cancer or BEAS-2B normal lung cell lines does not alter phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Patnaik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs (ribonucleic acids that regulate translation. Several miRNAs have been shown to be altered in whole cancer tissue compared to normal tissue when quantified by microarray. Based on previous such evidence of differential expression, we chose to study the functional significance of miRNAs miR-30a and -191 alterations in human lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The functional significance of miRNAs miR-30a and -191 was studied by creating stable transfectants of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and the immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B with modest overexpression of miR-30a or -191 using a lentiviral system. When compared to the corresponding controls, both cell lines overexpressing miR-30a or -191 do not demonstrate any significant changes in cell cycle distribution, cell proliferation, adherent colony formation, soft agar colony formation, xenograft formation in a subcutaneous SCID mouse model, and drug sensitivity to doxorubicin and cisplatin. There is a modest increase in cell migration in cell lines overexpressing miR-30a compared to their controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overexpression of miR-30a or -191 does not lead to an alteration in cell cycle, proliferation, xenograft formation, and chemosensitivity of A549 and BEAS-2B cell lines. Using microarray data from whole tumors to select specific miRNAs for functional study may be a suboptimal strategy.

  12. Immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia : possible association with Ancylostoma caninum infection in three dogs : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Lobetti

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA may be primary or secondary. In primary IMHA, no underlying cause can be found, whereas secondary IMHA is triggered by an underlying cause, such as neoplasia, infectious diseases, or drugs. This paper describes 3 dogs with typical signs of IMHA that was possibly associated with the intestinal parasite Ancylostoma caninum. As intestinal helminths can be difficult to diagnose on faecal examination, it would be pertinent to performmultiple faecal examinations on any animal that has IMHA with no apparent underlying cause, as part of the therapy.

  13. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn). Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) knockout (KO) of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast...

  14. Overexpression of a flower-specific aerolysin-like protein from the dioecious plant Rumex acetosa alters flower development and induces male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Susana; Megías, Zoraida; Martínez, Cecilia; García, Alicia; Aguado, Encarnación; Chileh, Tarik; López-Alonso, Diego; García-Maroto, Federico; Kejnovský, Eduard; Široký, Jiří; Kubát, Zdeněk; Králová, Tereza; Vyskot, Boris; Jamilena, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Sex determination in Rumex acetosa, a dioecious plant with a complex XY 1 Y 2 sex chromosome system (females are XX and males are XY 1 Y 2 ), is not controlled by an active Y chromosome but depends on the ratio between the number of X chromosomes and autosomes. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of sex determination, we generated a subtracted cDNA library enriched in genes specifically or predominantly expressed in female floral buds in early stages of development, when sex determination mechanisms come into play. In the present paper, we report the molecular and functional characterization of FEM32, a gene encoding a protein that shares a common architecture with proteins in different plants, animals, bacteria and fungi of the aerolysin superfamily; many of these function as β pore-forming toxins. The expression analysis, assessed by northern blot, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, demonstrates that this gene is specifically expressed in flowers in both early and late stages of development, although its transcripts accumulate much more in female flowers than in male flowers. The ectopic expression of FEM32 under both the constitutive promoter 35S and the flower-specific promoter AP3 in transgenic tobacco showed no obvious alteration in vegetative development but was able to alter floral organ growth and pollen fertility. The 35S::FEM32 and AP3::FEM32 transgenic lines showed a reduction in stamen development and pollen viability, as well as a diminution in fruit set, fruit development and seed production. Compared with other floral organs, pistil development was, however, enhanced in plants overexpressing FEM32. According to these effects, it is likely that FEM32 functions in Rumex by arresting stamen and pollen development during female flower development. The aerolysin-like pore-forming proteins of eukaryotes are mainly involved in defence mechanisms against bacteria, fungi and insects and are also involved in apoptosis and programmed cell death (PCD

  15. Golimumab as Rescue Therapy for Refractory Immune-Mediated Uveitis: A Three-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cordero-Coma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate, in three Spanish tertiary referral centres, the short-term safety and efficacy of golimumab (GLM for treatment of immune-mediated uveitis resistant to previous immunosuppressive therapy. Methods. Nonrandomized retrospective interventional case series. Thirteen patients with different types of uveitis that were resistant to treatment with at least 2 previous immunosuppressors were included in this study. All included patients were treated with GLM (50 mg every four weeks during at least 6 months. Clinical evaluation and treatment-related side effects were assessed at least four times in all included patients. Results. Eight men and 5 women (22 affected eyes with a median age of 30 years (range 20–38 and active immune-mediated uveitides were studied. GLM was used in combination with conventional immunosuppressors in 7 patients (53.8%. GLM therapy achieved complete control of inflammation in 12/13 patients (92.3% after six months of treatment. There was a statistically significant improvement in mean BCVA (0.60 versus 0.68, P=0.009 and mean 1 mm central retinal thickness (317 versus 261.2 μ, P=0.05 at the six-month endpoint when compared to basal values. No major systemic adverse effects associated with GLM therapy were observed. Conclusions. GLM is a new and promising therapeutic option for patients with severe and refractory uveitis.

  16. Statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy: biology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Basharat, Pari

    2017-04-01

    In the last 6 years, our understanding of statin-associated myopathy expanded to include not only a toxic myopathy with limited and reversible side-effects but also an autoimmune variety in which statins likely induce an autoimmune myopathy that is both associated with a specific autoantibody and responsive to immunosuppression and immune modulation. This review widens the reader's understanding of statin myopathy to include an autoimmune process. Statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy provides an example of an environmental trigger (statins) directly implicated in an autoimmune disease associated with a genetic predisposition as well as potential risk factors including concomitant diseases and specific statins. Given a median exposure to statins of 38 months, providers should be aware that anti-3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) myopathy may occur even after several years of statin exposure. It is important for the reader to understand the clinical presentation of statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy and the difference in its clinical presentation to that of statins as direct myotoxins. Prompt recognition of such an entity allows the clinician to immediately stop the offending agent if it has not already been discontinued as well as to recognize that statin rechallenge is not a likely option, and that prompt treatment with immunosuppression and/or immunomodulation is usually of enormous benefit to the patient in restoring muscle strength and physical function. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  17. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia associated with angiostrongylus vasorum infection in a jack russell terrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JO'Neill Emma

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A twenty-month-old Jack Russell terrier was presented with a four-day history of thrombocytopenia, echymotic inguinal haemorrhages, coughing and reduced exercise tolerance. Clinical examination revealed several petechial haemorrhages on the gingivae and small echymotic haemorrhages in the inguinal region, along with mild bilateral epistaxis. Haematology confirmed a platelet count of 1.0 × 10/L. Thoracic radiographs revealed a wide-spread mixed alveolar-interstitial lung pattern, apparent throughout the entire lungfield, but particularly marked within the left lung lobes. A presumptive diagnosis of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia was made and the dog was treated with vincristine and immunosuppressive doses of prednisolone. Initially anaemia developed following gastrointestinal haemorrhage; however, after symptomatic treatment the dog showed a marked clinical improvement. Evaluation for an underlying cause of the disease revealed Angiostrongylus vasorum L1 larvae on faecal analysis and treatment with fenbendazole was commenced. The dog made a full clinical recovery with all treatment was withdrawn within five weeks of diagnosis. This is the second report of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection and it is the first to be successfully managed. The report highlights that Angiostrongylus vasorum should be considered in young dogs presented with thrombocytopenia.

  18. Reuma.pt contribution to the knowledge of immune-mediated systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria José; Canhão, Helena; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Oliveira Ramos, Filipa; Ponte, Cristina; Duarte, Cátia; Barcelos, Anabela; Martins, Fernando; Melo Gomes, José António

    2017-01-01

    Patient registries are key instruments aimed at a better understanding of the natural history of diseases, at assessing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, as well as identifying rare events or outcomes that are not captured in clinical trials. However, the potential of registries goes far beyond these aspects. For example, registries promote the standardization of clinical practice, can also provide information on domains that are not routinely collected in clinical practice and can support decision-making. Being aware of the importance of registries, the Portuguese Society of Rheumatology developed the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register- Reuma.pt - which proved to be an innovative instrument essential to a better understanding of systemic immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. To describe the contribution of Reuma.pt to the knowledge of systemic immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. Reuma.pt is widely implemented, with 77 centres actively contributing to the recruitment and follow-up of patients. Reuma.pt follows in a standardized way patients with the following systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (n=6218), psoriatic arthritis (n=1498), spondyloarthritis (n=2529), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (n =1561), autoinflammatory syndromes (n=122), systemic lupus erythematosus (n =1718), systemic sclerosis (n=180) and vasculitis (n=221). This platform is intended for use as an electronic medical record, provides standardized assessment of patients and support to the clinical decision, thereby contributing to a better quality of care of rheumatic patients. The research based on Reuma.pt identified genetic determinants of susceptibility and response to therapy, characterized in detail systemic rheumatic diseases and their long-term impact, critically appraised the performance of instruments for monitoring the disease activity, established the effectiveness and safety of biologic therapies and identified predictors of response, and

  19. Suppression of immune-mediated liver injury after vaccination with attenuated pathogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yunhua; Wang, Ying; Xu, Lingyun

    2007-05-15

    Cell vaccination via immunization with attenuated pathogenic cells is an effective preventive method that has been successfully applied in several animal models of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis (CIH) is a commonly used experimental model to study immune-mediated liver injury. Multiple cell types including T lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of CIH. In this study, we used attenuated spleen lymphocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes as vaccines to investigate whether they could induce protective immune responses to prevent mice from developing CIH. We found that mice receiving such vaccination before CIH induction developed much milder diseases, exhibited a lower level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) released into their plasma and had less inflammatory lesions in their livers. Such CIH-suppression is dose- and frequency-dependent. The suppressive effect was associated with inhibition of several major inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  20. Immune-mediated neuropathy with Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takaaki; Arai, Ayako; Yokota, Takanori; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Miura, Osamu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T/NK- cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) developed acute-onset weakness. A nerve conduction study showed a conduction block in both the proximal and most distal segments. Although the patient's neuropathy transiently responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, it was progressive for at least 25 days until the start of prednisolone (PSL) administration, after which it remarkably improved. The neuropathy further improved after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The present patient's clinical course is not consistent with that of typical Guillain-Barré syndrome. This case suggests that EBV-T/NK-LPD can cause progressive immune-mediated neuropathy as a result of chronic EBV antigen presentation and can be treated with PSL and BMT.

  1. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  2. Targeted Transgenic Overexpression of Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase (TK2) Alters Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Mitochondrial Polypeptide Abundance : Transgenic TK2, mtDNA, and Antiretrovirals

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Seyed H.; Kohler, James J.; Haase, Chad P.; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-γ. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK...

  3. Profilin-1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is associated with alterations in proteomics biomarkers of cell proliferation, survival, and motility as revealed by global proteomics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, Joëlle V F; Gau, David; Poljak, Anne; Wasinger, Valerie; Roy, Partha; Moens, Pierre D J

    2014-12-01

    Despite early screening programs and new therapeutic strategies, metastatic breast cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in women in industrialized countries and regions. There is a need for novel biomarkers of susceptibility, progression, and therapeutic response. Global analyses or systems science approaches with omics technologies offer concrete ways forward in biomarker discovery for breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that expression of profilin-1 (PFN1), a ubiquitously expressed actin-binding protein, is downregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer. It has also been reported that PFN1 overexpression can suppress tumorigenic ability and motility/invasiveness of breast cancer cells. To obtain insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of how elevating PFN1 level induces these phenotypic changes in breast cancer cells, we investigated the alteration in global protein expression profiles of breast cancer cells upon stable overexpression of PFN1 by a combination of three different proteome analysis methods (2-DE, iTRAQ, label-free). Using MDA-MB-231 as a model breast cancer cell line, we provide evidence that PFN1 overexpression is associated with alterations in the expression of proteins that have been functionally linked to cell proliferation (FKPB1A, HDGF, MIF, PRDX1, TXNRD1, LGALS1, STMN1, LASP1, S100A11, S100A6), survival (HSPE1, HSPB1, HSPD1, HSPA5 and PPIA, YWHAZ, CFL1, NME1) and motility (CFL1, CORO1B, PFN2, PLS3, FLNA, FLNB, NME2, ARHGDIB). In view of the pleotropic effects of PFN1 overexpression in breast cancer cells as suggested by these new findings, we propose that PFN1-induced phenotypic changes in cancer cells involve multiple mechanisms. Our data reported here might also offer innovative strategies for identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and companion diagnostics for persons with, or susceptibility to, breast cancer.

  4. Escitalopram alters gene expression and HPA axis reactivity in rats following chronic overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor from the central amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandreau, Elizabeth I.; Bourke, Chase H.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Vale, Wylie W.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Owens, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We have previously demonstrated that viral-mediated overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) reproduces many of the behavioral and endocrine consequences of chronic stress. The present experiment sought to determine whether administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram reverses the adverse effects of CeA CRF overexpression. In a 2 × 2 design, adult male rats received bilateral infusions of a control lentivirus or a lentivirus in which a portion of the CRF promoter is used to drive increased expression of CRF peptide. Four weeks later, rats were then implanted with an Alzet minipump to deliver vehicle or 10 mg/kg/day escitalopram for a 4-week period of time. The defensive withdrawal (DW) test of anxiety and the sucrose-preference test (SPT) of anhedonia were performed both before and after pump implantation. Additional post-implant behavioral tests included the elevated plus maze (EPM) and social interaction (SI) test. Following completion of behavioral testing, the dexamethasone/CRF test was performed to assess HPA axis reactivity. Brains were collected and expression of HPA axis-relevant transcripts were measured using in situ hybridization. Amygdalar CRF overexpression increased anxiety-like behavior in the DW test at week eight, which was only partially prevented by escitalopram. In both CRF-overexpressing and control groups, escitalopram decreased hippocampal CRF expression while increasing hypothalamic and hippocampal expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These gene expression changes were associated with a significant decrease in HPA axis reactivity in rats treated with escitalopram. Interestingly, escitalopram increased the rate of weight gain only in rats overexpressing CRF. Overall these data support our hypothesis that amygdalar CRF is critical in anxiety-like behavior; because the antidepressant was unable to reverse behavioral

  5. Immune-Mediated Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis: An Unusual Hematological Association with IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Kim

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are well described in the literature. However, the combination of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia has only been reported once in association with IBD. A case is reported of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in a patient with ulcerative colitis during a relapse. No obvious causes of these hematological abnormalities were found in the patient despite an exhaustive search. An immune-mediated process was confirmed by positive antineutrophil antibody and platelet-associated antibody in the patient’s serum, and the demonstration of binding of the patient’s immunoglobulin G to autologous neutrophils. The patient was treated with high-dose steroid, intravenous gamma-globulin and eventually splenectomy. The platelet count subsequently normalized; although the severe neutropenia recurred, it has subsequently improved without further treatment. Although a definitive cause-effect relationship cannot be established, the immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia may be an unusual hematological manifestation associated with ulcerative colitis.

  6. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Teske, E.; van Leeuwen, M.W.; Day, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT) for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA). Methods Canine (n = 247) and feline (n = 74) blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two

  7. Reliability and responsiveness of a graduated tuning fork in immune mediated polyneuropathies. The Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar); P.I.M. Schmitz (Paul); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the Rydel-Seiffer (RS) graduated tuning fork was evaluated in 113 patients with a clinically stable immune mediated polyneuropathy (83 patients who had had Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in the past, 22 with

  8. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr, STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr, T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr, and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr antigens are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn. Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN knockout (KO of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps, as demonstrated for glycan elongation beyond Tn and STn, can be important for fine tuning of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer cells.

  9. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  10. The Protective Effects of Extra Virgin Olive Oil on Immune-mediated Inflammatory Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Rosa; Estruch, Ramon; Sacanella, Emilio

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in the Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) hinges on the relevant role it plays in inflammatory diseases. Several clinical, epidemiological and experimental evidences suggest that consumption of the MeDiet reduces the incidence of certain pathologies related to oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and immune system diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). These reductions can be partially attributed to extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) consumption which has been described as a key bioactive food because of its high nutritional quality and its particular composition of fatty acids, vitamins and polyphenols. Indeed, the beneficial effects of EVOO have been linked to its fatty acid composition, which is very rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and has moderate saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The current knowledge available on the beneficial effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds, specifically its biological properties and antioxidant capacity against immune-mediated inflammatory responses (atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, obesity, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or neurodegenerative disease, among others) in addition to its potential clinical applications. The increasing body of studies carried out provides compelling evidence that olive polyphenols are potential candidates to combat chronic inflammatory states. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Nodular Scleritis Associated with Herpes Zoster Virus: An Infectious and Immune-Mediated Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Loureiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a case of anterior nodular scleritis, preceded by an anterior hypertensive uveitis, which was primarily caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV. Case Report. A 54-year-old woman presented with anterior uveitis of the right eye presumably caused by herpetic viral disease and was successfully treated. Two months later, she developed a nodular scleritis and started oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory without effect. A complete laboratory workup revealed positivity for HLA-B27; the infectious workup was negative. Therapy was changed to oral prednisolone and an incomplete improvement occurred. Therefore, a diagnostic anterior paracentesis was performed and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis revealed VZV. She was treated with valacyclovir and the oral prednisolone began to decrease; however, a marked worsening of the scleritis occurred with the reduction of the daily dose; subsequently, methotrexate was introduced allowing the suspension of the prednisolone and led to clinical resolution of the scleritis. Conclusion. This report of anterior nodular scleritis caused by VZV argues in favor of an underlying immune-mediated component, requiring immunosuppressive therapy for clinical resolution. The PCR analysis of the aqueous humor was revealed to be a valuable technique and should be considered in cases of scleritis with poor response to treatment.

  12. Acne: a new model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Caproni, M; Fabbri, P

    2015-04-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the sebaceous-pilosebaceous unit. Interestingly, inflammation can be detected by histopathological examination and immuohistochemical analysis even in the apparently non-inflammatory acneic lesions, such as comedones. In the last years, it has been clearly demonstrated that acne development is linked to the combination of predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers, among which a prominent role is played by the follicular colonization by Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). P. acnes displays several activities able to promote the development of acne skin lesions, including the promotion of follicular hyperkeratinisation, the induction of sebogenesis, and the stimulation of an inflammatory response by the secretion of proinflammatory molecules and by the activation of innate immunity, that is followed by a P. acnes-specific adaptive immune response. In addition, P. acnes-independent inflammation mediated by androgens or by a neurogenic activation, followed by the secretion in the skin of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides, can occur in acne lesions. In conclusion, acne can be considered as a model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by an innate immune response that is not able to control P. acnes followed by a Th1-mediated adaptive immune response, that becomes self-maintaining independently from P. acnes itself.

  13. Month of birth, vitamin D and risk of immune-mediated disease: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disanto Giulio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A season of birth effect in immune-mediated diseases (ID such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes has been consistently reported. We aimed to investigate whether season of birth influences the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and systemic lupus erythematosus in addition to multiple sclerosis, and to explore the correlation between the risk of ID and predicted ultraviolet B (UVB light exposure and vitamin D status during gestation. Methods The monthly distribution of births of patients with ID from the UK (n = 115,172 was compared to that of the general population using the Cosinor test. Predicted UVB radiation and vitamin D status in different time windows during pregnancy were calculated for each month of birth and correlated with risk of ID using the Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results The distributions of ID births significantly differed from that of the general population (P = 5e-12 with a peak in April (odds ratio = 1.045, 95% confidence interval = 1.024, 1.067, P P P = 0.00005 and third trimester vitamin D status (Spearman's rho = -0.44, P = 0.0003. Conclusions The risk of different ID in the UK is significantly influenced by the season of birth, suggesting the presence of a shared seasonal risk factor or factors predisposing to ID. Gestational UVB and vitamin D exposure may be implicated in the aetiology of ID.

  14. Immune-mediated keratoconjunctivitis sicca in dogs: current perspectives on management

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    Dodi PL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pier Luigi Dodi Department of Veterinary Medicine Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy Abstract: Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS is a frequent canine ophthalmic disease, resulting from the deficiency of one or more elements in the precorneal tear film. There are different known causes of KCS in dogs, including congenital, metabolic, infectious, drug induced, neurogenic, radiation, iatrogenic, idiopathic, and immune mediated, though the last one is the most prevalent form in dogs. Initially, clinical signs of KCS include blepharospasm caused by ocular pain, mucoid to mucopurulent ocular discharge, and conjunctival hyperemia; secondary bacterial infection may also occur, with chronicity, corneal epithelial hyperplasia, pigmentation, neovascularization, and corneal ulceration. The diagnosis of KCS is based on the presence of consistent clinical signs and measurement of decreased aqueous tear production using the Schirmer tear test. Therapy is based on administering the following topical drugs: ocular lubricant, mucolytics, antibiotics, corticosteroids, pilocarpine, and immunomodulators. These last drugs (eg, cyclosporine, pimecrolimus, and tacrolimus have immunosuppressive activity and stimulate tear production. Furthermore, the nerve growth factor is a new subject matter of the research. Although these therapies are advantageous, stimulation of natural tear production seems to provide the highest recovery in clinical signs and prevention of vision loss. The goal of the following article is to describe the recent developments about KCS in dogs emphasizing the use of new therapies. Keywords: dogs, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, treatment, NGF

  15. Steroid sparing regimens for management of oral immune-mediated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated mucocutaneous disease may present oral symptoms as a first sign of the disease. The primary etiology could be the cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against epithelial or connective tissue, in a chronic and recurrent pattern. Lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid are the most frequent immunologically mediated mucocutaneous diseases. More often than not, patients present with complaints of blisters, oral ulcers, pain, burning sensation, and bleeding from the various oral sites. Steroids, whether topical or systemic, are the treatment of choice as they have both anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressant properties; however, challenges in the treatment of autoimmune diseases are the complexity of symptoms, the need to manage long-term medications for preserving organ function, and the long-term adverse effects of steroids. In such situations steroid sparing agents, such as, tacrolimus, dapsone, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and so on, may be helpful. Here an attempt is made to review various treatment regimens that could be used as alternatives to steroids for management of such diseases.

  16. Over-expression of ascorbate oxidase in the apoplast of transgenic tobacco results in altered ascorbate and glutathione redox states and increased sensitivity to ozone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanmartin, Maite; Drogoudi, Pavlina D.; Lyons, Tom

    2003-01-01

    overexpressing plants exposed to 100 nmol mol-1 ozone for 7 h day-1 exhibited a substantial increase in foliar injury, and a greater pollutant-induced reduction in both the light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation and the maximum in vivo rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase carboxylation......Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) plants expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (EC.1.10.3.3) were used to examine the role of extracellular ascorbic acid in mediating tolerance to the ubiquitous air pollutant, ozone (O3). Three homozygous transgenic lines, chosen on the basis...

  17. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Maringer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA, and dominant negative (DN forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses.

  18. A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jespers, V.; Kyongo, J.; Joseph, S.; Hardy, L.; Cools, P.; Crucitti, T.; Mwaura, M.; Ndayisaba, G.; Delany-Moretlwe, S.; Buyze, J.; Vanham, G.; van de Wijgert, JHHM

    2017-01-01

    In cross-sectional studies increased vaginal bacterial diversity has been associated with vaginal inflammation which can be detrimental for health. We describe longitudinal changes at 5 visits over 8 weeks in vaginal microbiota and immune mediators in African women. Women (N = 40) with a normal Nugent score at all visits had a stable lactobacilli dominated microbiota with prevailing Lactobacillus iners. Presence of prostate-specific antigen (proxy for recent sex) and being amenorrhoeic (due t...

  19. Risk of venous thromboembolism in people admitted to hospital with selected immune-mediated diseases: record-linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handel Adam E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common complication during and after a hospital admission. Although it is mainly considered a complication of surgery, it often occurs in people who have not undergone surgery, with recent evidence suggesting that immune-mediated diseases may play a role in VTE risk. We, therefore, decided to study the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE in people admitted to hospital with a range of immune-mediated diseases. Methods We analysed databases of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and death certificates for the Oxford Record Linkage Study area (ORLS1:1968 to 1998 and ORLS2:1999 to 2008 and the whole of England (1999 to 2008. Rate ratios for VTE were determined, comparing immune-mediated disease cohorts with comparison cohorts. Results Significantly elevated risks of VTE were found, in all three populations studied, in people with a hospital record of admission for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, myxoedema, pemphigus/pemphigoid, polyarteritis nodosa, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Rate ratios were considerably higher for some of these diseases than others: for example, for systemic lupus erythematosus the rate ratios were 3.61 (2.36 to 5.31 in the ORLS1 population, 4.60 (3.19 to 6.43 in ORLS2 and 3.71 (3.43 to 4.02 in the England dataset. Conclusions People admitted to hospital with immune-mediated diseases may be at an increased risk of subsequent VTE. Our findings need independent confirmation or refutation; but, if confirmed, there may be a role for thromboprophylaxis in some patients with these diseases.

  20. The Economic Impact of Biosimilars on Chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentek, Marta; Zrubka, Zsombor; Gulacsi, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Biological drugs represent highly effective but costly treatments for chronic immunemediated inflammatory diseases posing substantial burden on health care budgets. Introduction of biosimilars since 2013 has brought forward the potential of market competition, and as a societal benefit, the hope of increased access at a lower cost. We aim to provide a descriptive review on economic aspects and market changes related to the introduction of biosimilar drugs. Our focus is on chronic immune-mediated inflammatory conditions in rheumatology, gastroenterology and dermatology. Based on available literature data, we discuss the determinants of access to biological treatment, summarize the available health economic evidences with special focus on cost-utility and budget impact analyses. Market penetration of biosimilars and their overall impact on biological markets are analyzed. Biosimilar markets are country specific due to differences in the regulatory and reimbursement systems. Cost-utility analyses suggest, that given the lower price of biosimilars, formerly established biological treatment sequence practices and the eligibility criteria for biological treatment deserve reconsideration. Budget impact analyses forecasted significant budget savings in various diagnoses and countries, providing opportunity for the treatment of more patients. Biosimilars may contribute to better patient-access and provide savings to governments. To increase their acceptability, further clinical evidences and real world experiences are needed, as well as education of physicians and patients. The high biosimilar penetration rates in Norway, Denmark and Poland suggest that policies which support interchanging from the reference product may be important drivers of biosimilar uptake. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Multidisciplinary Management of Spondyloarthritis-Related Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Fernando; Olivieri, Ignazio; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Ayala, Fabio; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Luca; Cimino, Luca; Costanzo, Antonio; Cristaudo, Antonio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Daperno, Marco; Fostini, Anna Chiara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Gilio, Michele; Gionchetti, Paolo; Gisondi, Paolo; Lubrano, Ennio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Offidani, Annamaria; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pugliese, Daniela; Salvarani, Carlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Vecchi, Maurizio; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2018-04-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are chronic autoimmune conditions that share common pathophysiologic mechanisms. The optimal management of patients with IMIDs remains challenging because the coexistence of different conditions requires the intervention of several specialists. The aim of this study was to develop a series of statements defining overarching principles that guide the implementation of a multidisciplinary approach for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA)-related IMIDs including SpA, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and uveitis. A Delphi consensus-based approach was used to identify a core set of statements. The process included development of initial questions by a steering committee, an exhaustive search of the literature using complementary approaches to identify potential statements and two Delphi voting rounds for finalization of the statements. Consensus was achieved on the related nature of IMIDs, the existence of a high prevalence of multiple IMIDs in a single patient and the fact that a multidisciplinary approach can result in a more extensive evaluation and comprehensive approach to treatment. The goals of a multidisciplinary team should be to increase diagnosis of concomitant IMIDs, improve the decision-making process, and increase patient satisfaction and adherence. Early referral and diagnosis, early recognition of concomitant IMIDs and optimizing treatment to improve patient quality of life are some of the advantages of using multidisciplinary teams. To be effective, a multidisciplinary team should be equipped with the appropriate tools for diagnosis and follow-up, and at a minimum the multidisciplinary team should include a dermatologist, gastroenterologist and rheumatologist; providing psychologic support via a psychologist and involving an ophthalmologist, general practitioners and nurses in multidisciplinary care is also important. The present Delphi consensus identified a set of

  2. Treatment of immune-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy with GAD antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malter, M P; Frisch, C; Zeitler, H; Surges, R; Urbach, H; Helmstaedter, C; Elger, C E; Bien, C G

    2015-08-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy with antibodies (abs) against the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 isoform (GAD-TLE) is known as an immune-mediated neurological syndrome. Here we evaluate the therapy response to various immunotherapies and epilepsy surgery in this syndrome. All patients with GAD-TLE and follow-up data and stored serum and CSF samples, identified and treated at the Bonn centre from 2002 to 2010, were studied retrospectively. Seizure freedom for ≥1 year and reduction of ≥50%, i.e. therapy response, were assessed. GAD-ab titres and neuropsychological performances were documented prior and after individual interventions. Thirteen patients with GAD-TLE were identified with the following seizure responses: corticosteroids (5 responders out of 11 treated patients); i.v. immunoglobulins (1/5), apheresis therapy (1/8); and natalizumab (1/1), selective amygdala-hippocampectomy (2/3). None of the patients achieved sustained seizure freedom apart from one patient. This patient was on antiepileptic drug treatment after discontinuation of immunotherapy. The seizure response to immunotherapies in patients with GAD-TLE was poor. Corticosteroids were the most effective regarding seizure response. Especially the poor effects of apheresis therapies support the idea that GAD-abs are not directly pathogenic. None of three patients was seizure-free after temporal lobe surgery suggesting that GAD-TLE patients respond worse than others to this type of intervention. Our results reflect the chronic course of the disease with low likelihood for patients with GAD-TLE to attain long-term seizure freedom. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of the STAT4 gene with increased susceptibility for some immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A; Varadé, J; Márquez, A; Cénit, M C; Espino, L; Perdigones, N; Santiago, J L; Fernández-Arquero, M; de la Calle, H; Arroyo, R; Mendoza, J L; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B; de la Concha, E G; Urcelay, E

    2008-09-01

    The STAT4 gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the signaling pathways of several cytokines, including interleukin-12 (IL-12), the type I interferons, and IL-23. Recently, the association of a STAT4 haplotype marked by rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus was reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of this STAT4 tagging polymorphism in other immune-mediated diseases. The study group comprised 2,776 consecutively recruited Spanish individuals: 575 with RA, 440 with multiple sclerosis, 700 with inflammatory bowel disease, 311 with type 1 diabetes, and 723 ethnically matched healthy control subjects. The STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 was genotyped using a predesigned TaqMan assay. Allele and genotype frequencies in patients and control subjects were compared by chi-square test. The association of STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with RA was validated in patients of Spanish origin (for T versus G, P = 1.2 x 10(-6), odds ratio [OR] 1.59, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.31-1.92), and the association was described for the first time in both clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (for T versus G, P = 0.006, OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.07-1.55), and in type 1 diabetes mellitus (for T versus G, P = 0.008, OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07-1.71). In contrast, the genotypic distribution of this polymorphism showed no difference between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy control subjects (for T versus G, P = 0.83, OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.82-1.28). The STAT4 gene is emerging as a novel common risk factor for diverse complex diseases.

  4. Targeted transgenic overexpression of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) alters mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial polypeptide abundance: transgenic TK2, mtDNA, and antiretrovirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed H; Kohler, James J; Haase, Chad P; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-gamma. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity.

  5. Overexpression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate effluent protein MRP4 induces an altered response to β-adrenergic stimulation in the senescent rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillion, Aude; Feldman, Sarah; Jiang, Cheng; Atassi, Fabrice; Na, Na; Mougenot, Nathalie; Besse, Sophie; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2015-02-01

    In the senescent heart, the positive inotropic response to β-adrenoceptor stimulation is reduced, partly by dysregulation of β1- and β3-adrenoceptors. The multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) takes part in the control of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentration by controlling its efflux but the role of MRP4 in the β-adrenergic dysfunction of the senescent heart remains unknown. The β-adrenergic responses to isoproterenol were investigated in vivo (stress echocardiography) and in vitro (isolated cardiomyocyte by Ionoptix with sarcomere shortening and calcium transient) in young (3 months old) and senescent (24 months old) rats pretreated or not with MK571, a specific MRP4 inhibitor. MRP4 was quantified in left ventricular homogenates by Western blotting. Data are mean ± SD expressed as percent of baseline value. The positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol was reduced in senescent rats in vivo (left ventricular shortening fraction 120 ± 16% vs. 158 ± 20%, P < 0.001, n = 16 rats) and in vitro (sarcomere shortening 129 ± 37% vs. 148 ± 35%, P = 0.004, n = 41 or 43 cells) as compared to young rats. MRP4 expression increased 3.6-fold in senescent compared to young rat myocardium (P = 0.012, n = 8 rats per group). In senescent rats, inhibition of MRP4 by MK571 restored the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol in vivo (143 ± 11%, n = 8 rats). In vitro in senescent cardiomyocytes pretreated with MK571, both sarcomere shortening (161 ± 45% vs. 129 ± 37%, P = 0.007, n = 41 cells per group) and calcium transient amplitude (132 ± 25% vs. 113 ± 27%, P = 0.007) increased significantly. MRP4 overexpression contributes to the reduction of the positive inotropic response to β-adrenoceptor stimulation in the senescent heart.

  6. The use of the rapid osmotic fragility test as an additional test to diagnose canine immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paes, Geert; Paepe, Dominique; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing canine immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) is often challenging because all currently available tests have their limitations. Dogs with IMHA often have an increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF), a characteristic that is sometimes used in the diagnosis of IMHA...... hyperlipemic dogs (group 3), 10 dogs with lymphoma (group 4), 8 dogs with an infection (group 5) and 13 healthy dogs (group 6) were included. In all dogs, blood smear examination, in-saline auto-agglutination test, Coombs' test, COFT and ROFT were performed. In the COFT, OF5, OF50 and OF90 were defined...

  7. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Neto, Heitor A; Ausina, Priscila; Gomez, Lilian S; Leandro, João G B; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney) or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of "lean homeostasis" and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited.

  8. Effects of Food Additives on Immune Cells As Contributors to Body Weight Gain and Immune-Mediated Metabolic Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor A. Paula Neto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food additives are compounds used in order to improve food palatability, texture, and shelf life. Despite a significant effort to assure safety of use, toxicological analysis of these substances, generally, rely on their direct toxicity to target organs (liver and kidney or their genotoxic effects. Much less attention is paid to the effects of these compounds on cells of the immune system. This is of relevance given that metabolic dysregulation and obesity have a strong immune-mediated component. Obese individuals present a state of chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the establishment of insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities known as the metabolic syndrome. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are currently recognized as worldwide epidemics that pose a profound socioeconomic impact and represent a concern to public health. Cells of the immune system contribute to both the maintenance of “lean homeostasis” and the metabolic dysregulation observed in obese individuals. Although much attention has been drawn in the past decades to obesity and metabolic syndrome as a result of ingesting highly processed food containing large amounts of fat and simple sugars, mounting evidence suggest that food additives may also be important contributors to metabolic derangement. Herein, we review pieces of evidence from the literature showing that food additives have relevant effects on cells of the immune system that could contribute to immune-mediated metabolic dysregulation. Considering their potential to predispose individuals to develop obesity and metabolic syndrome, their use should be taken with caution or maybe revisited.

  9. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these r......Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed...... in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more...... that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non...

  10. Influence of maternal age, gestational age and fetal gender on expression of immune mediators in amniotic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissenbacher Tobias

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in cytokine and immune mediator expression patterns in amniotic fluid due to gestational age, maternal age and fetal gender were investigated. Findings Amniotic fluid samples were obtained from 192 women, 82 with a mid-trimester amniocentesis (median gestational age 17 weeks and 110 with a caesarean section not in labor (median gestational age 39 weeks. Amniotic fluid was screened by commercial ELISAs for the TH1/TH2/TH17 cytokines and immune mediators IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, TNF alpha, GRO-alpha, MIP1alpha, MIP1beta, Histone, and IP10. Analysis was by Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. None of the 15 examined cytokines revealed any differences in expression patterns regarding fetal gender. Significant differences were found in IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, TNF- alpha, GRO-alpha and MIP1-beta with respect to gestational age and in GRO-alpha regarding maternal age. Conclusion Cytokines utilized as biomarkers in the diagnosis of intrauterine infections are not influenced in their expression pattern by fetal gender but may vary with respect to maternal age and gestational age.

  11. Immune mediators of sea-cucumber Holothuria tubulosa (Echinodermata) as source of novel antimicrobial and anti-staphylococcal biofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Domenico; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Russo, Debora; Vazzana, Mirella; Vitale, Maria; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2013-06-24

    The present study aims to investigate coelomocytes, immune mediators cells in the echinoderm Holothuria tubulosa, as an unusual source of antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents. The activity of the 5kDa peptide fraction of the cytosol from H. tubulosa coelomocytes (5-HCC) was tested against a reference group of Gram-negative and Gram-positive human pathogens. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 125 to 500 mg/ml were determined against tested strains. The observed biological activity of 5-HCC could be due to two novel peptides, identified by capillary RP-HPLC/nESI-MS/MS, which present the common chemical-physical characteristics of antimicrobial peptides. Such peptides were chemically synthesized and their antimicrobial activity was tested. The synthetic peptides showed broad-spectrum activity at 12.5 mg/ml against the majority of the tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, and they were also able to inhibit biofilm formation in a significant percentage at a concentration of 3.1 mg/ml against staphylococcal and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.The immune mediators in H. tubulosa are a source of novel antimicrobial peptides for the development of new agents against biofilm bacterial communities that are often intrinsically resistant to conventional antibiotics.

  12. Spontaneous, Immune-Mediated Gastric Inflammation in SAMP1/YitFc Mice, a Model of Crohn’s-Like Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Brian K.; Pastorelli, Luca; Brogi, Marco; Garg, Rekha R.; McBride, James A.; Rowlett, Robert M.; Arrieta, Marie C.; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Keller, Erik J.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Mize, James R.; Cominelli, Fabio; Meddings, Jonathan B.; Pizarro, Theresa T.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Crohn’s disease (CD) can develop in any region of the gastrointestinal tract, including the stomach. The etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn’s gastritis are poorly understood, treatment approaches are limited, and there are not many suitable animal models for study. We characterized the features and mechanisms of chronic gastritis in SAMP1/YitFc (SAMP) mice, a spontaneous model of CD-like ileitis, along with possible therapeutic approaches. Methods Stomachs from specific pathogen-free and germ-free SAMP and AKR mice (controls) were evaluated histologically; the presence of Helicobacter spp. was tested in fecal pellets by PCR analysis. In vivo gastric permeability was quantified by fractional excretion of sucrose and epithelial tight junction protein expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. The effects of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or corticosteroids were measured and the ability of pathogenic immune cells to mediate gastritis was assessed in adoptive transfer experiments. Results SAMP mice developed Helicobacter-negative gastritis, characterized by aggregates of mononuclear cells, diffuse accumulation of neutrophils, and disruption of epithelial architecture; SAMP mice also had increased in gastric permeability compared with controls, without alterations in expression of tight junction proteins. The gastritis and associated permeability defect observed in SAMP mice were independent of bacterial colonization and reduced by administration of corticosteroids but not a PPI. CD4+ T cells isolated from draining mesenteric lymph nodes of SAMP mice were sufficient to induce gastritis in recipient SCID mice. Conclusions In SAMP mice, gastritis develops spontaneously and has many features of CD-like ileitis. These mice are a useful model to study Helicobacter-negative, immune-mediated Crohn’s gastritis. PMID:21704001

  13. Good agreement of conventional and gel-based direct agglutination test in immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piek Christine J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare a gel-based test with the traditional direct agglutination test (DAT for the diagnosis of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA. Methods Canine (n = 247 and feline (n = 74 blood samples were submitted for DAT testing to two laboratories. A subset of canine samples was categorized as having idiopathic IMHA, secondary IMHA, or no IMHA. Results The kappa values for agreement between the tests were in one laboratory 0.86 for canine and 0.58 for feline samples, and in the other 0.48 for canine samples. The lower agreement in the second laboratory was caused by a high number of positive canine DATs for which the gel test was negative. This group included significantly more dogs with secondary IMHA. Conclusions The gel test might be used as a screening test for idiopathic IMHA and is less often positive in secondary IMHA than the DAT.

  14. Adherence to systemic therapies for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases in Lebanon: a physicians' survey from three medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammoury, Alfred; Okais, Jad; Hobeika, Mireille; Sayegh, Raymond B; Shayto, Rani H; Sharara, Ala I

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are chronic conditions that may cause tissue damage and disability, reduced quality of life and increased mortality. Various treatments have been developed for IMIDs, including immune modulators and targeted biologic agents. However, adherence remains suboptimal. An adherence survey was used to evaluate physicians' beliefs about adherence to medication in IMID and to evaluate if and how they manage adherence. The survey was distributed to 100 randomly selected physicians from three different specialties. Results were analyzed by four academic experts commissioned to develop an action plan to address practical and perceptual barriers to adherence, integrating it into treatment goals to maximize outcomes in IMID, thereby elevating local standards of care. Eighty-two physicians participated in this study and completed the questionnaire. Most defined adherence as compliance with prescribed treatment. Although the majority of surveyed physicians (74%) did not systematically measure adherence in their practice, 54% identified adherence as a treatment goal of equal or greater importance to therapeutic endpoints. Lack of time and specialized nursing support was reported as an important barrier to measuring adherence. The expert panel identified four key areas for action: 360° education (patient-nurse-physician), patient-physician communication, patient perception and concerns, and market access/cost. An action plan was developed centered on education and awareness, enhanced benefit-risk communication, development of adherence assessment tools and promotion of patient support programs. Nonadherence to medication is a commonly underestimated problem with important consequences. A customized target-based strategy to address the root causes of non-adherence is essential in the management of chronic immune-mediated diseases.

  15. Lipocalin 2 is a novel immune mediator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis pathogenesis and is modulated in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Jennifer L; Zarruk, Juan G; Arbour, Nathalie; Prat, Alexandre; Yong, V Wee; Jacques, Francois H; Akira, Shizuo; David, Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). EAE pathogenesis involves various cell types, cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Given the complexity of the inflammatory response in EAE, it is likely that many immune mediators still remain to be discovered. To identify novel immune mediators of EAE pathogenesis, we performed an Affymetrix gene array screen on the spinal cords of mice at the onset stage of disease. This screening identified the gene encoding lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) as being significantly upregulated. Lcn2 is a multi-functional protein that plays a role in glial activation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stabilization, and cellular iron flux. As many of these processes have been implicated in EAE, we characterized the expression and role of Lcn2 in this disease in C57BL/6 mice. We show that Lcn2 is significantly upregulated in the spinal cord throughout EAE and is expressed predominantly by monocytes and reactive astrocytes. The Lcn2 receptor, 24p3R, is also expressed on monocytes, macrophages/microglia, and astrocytes in EAE. In addition, we show that EAE severity is increased in Lcn2(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type controls. Finally, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Lcn2 are detected in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in MS and in immune cells in CNS lesions in MS tissue sections. These data indicate that Lcn2 is a modulator of EAE pathogenesis and suggest that it may also play a role in MS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cutaneous Alternaria infectoria infection in a dog in association with therapeutic immunosuppression for the management of immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dedola, C.; Stuart, A.P.G.; Ridyard, A.E.; Else, R.W.; Van den Broek, T.; Choi, J.S.; de Hoog, G.S.; Thoday, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    A 4-year-old, ovariohysterectomized, English springer spaniel on immunosuppressive therapy was re-examined for the review of its immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia and the recent development of skin lesions. For the 3 months since hospital discharge, the dog had been receiving 1.3 mg/kg prednisolone

  17. Adherence to systemic therapies for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases in Lebanon: a physicians’ survey from three medical specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammoury A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alfred Ammoury,1 Jad Okais,2 Mireille Hobeika,3 Raymond B Sayegh,4 Rani H Shayto,5 Ala I Sharara5 1Division of Dermatology, St George Hospital University Medical Center, 2Division of Rheumatology, St Joseph University, 3AbbVie Levant, 4Division of Gastroenterology, St Joseph University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon Background: Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs are chronic conditions that may cause tissue damage and disability, reduced quality of life and increased mortality. Various treatments have been developed for IMIDs, including immune modulators and targeted biologic agents. However, adherence remains suboptimal. Methods: An adherence survey was used to evaluate physicians’ beliefs about adherence to medication in IMID and to evaluate if and how they manage adherence. The survey was distributed to 100 randomly selected physicians from three different specialties. Results were analyzed by four academic experts commissioned to develop an action plan to address practical and perceptual barriers to adherence, integrating it into treatment goals to maximize outcomes in IMID, thereby elevating local standards of care. Results: Eighty-two physicians participated in this study and completed the questionnaire. Most defined adherence as compliance with prescribed treatment. Although the majority of surveyed physicians (74% did not systematically measure adherence in their practice, 54% identified adherence as a treatment goal of equal or greater importance to therapeutic endpoints. Lack of time and specialized nursing support was reported as an important barrier to measuring adherence. The expert panel identified four key areas for action: 360° education (patient–nurse–physician, patient–physician communication, patient perception and concerns, and market access/cost. An action plan was developed centered on education and awareness

  18. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Associations With Immune-Mediated Disease and Infection in Childhood: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Doherty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex sugars found in breastmilk, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs, may assist in early-life immune programming and prevention against infectious diseases. This study aimed to systematically review the associations between maternal levels of HMOs and development of immune-mediated or infectious diseases in the offspring. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched (last search on 22 February 2018 according to a predetermined search strategy. Original studies published in English examining the effect of HMOs on immune-mediated and infectious disease were eligible for inclusion. Of 847 identified records, 10 articles from 6 original studies were included, with study quality ranging from low to high. Of three studies to examine allergic disease outcomes, one reported a protective effect against cow’s milk allergy (CMA by 18 months of age associated with lower lacto-N-fucopentaose (LNFP III concentrations (OR: 6.7, 95% CI 2.0–22. Another study found higher relative abundance of fucosyloligosaccharides was associated with reduced diarrhea incidence by 2 years, due to (i stable toxin-E. coli infection (p = 0.04 and (ii “all causes” (p = 0.042. Higher LNFP-II concentrations were associated with (i reduced cases of gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections at 6 weeks (p = 0.004, p = 0.010 and 12 weeks (p = 0.038, p = 0.038 and (ii reduced HIV transmission (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21–0.97 and mortality risk among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants (HR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.14–0.74 by 24 months. Due to heterogeneity of the outcomes reported, pooling of results was not possible. There was limited evidence that low concentrations of LNFP-III are associated with CMA and that higher fucosyloligosaccharide levels protect infants against infectious disease. Further research is needed.

  19. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Associations With Immune-Mediated Disease and Infection in Childhood: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Alice M; Lodge, Caroline J; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Dai, Xin; Bode, Lars; Lowe, Adrian J

    2018-01-01

    Complex sugars found in breastmilk, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), may assist in early-life immune programming and prevention against infectious diseases. This study aimed to systematically review the associations between maternal levels of HMOs and development of immune-mediated or infectious diseases in the offspring. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched (last search on 22 February 2018) according to a predetermined search strategy. Original studies published in English examining the effect of HMOs on immune-mediated and infectious disease were eligible for inclusion. Of 847 identified records, 10 articles from 6 original studies were included, with study quality ranging from low to high. Of three studies to examine allergic disease outcomes, one reported a protective effect against cow's milk allergy (CMA) by 18 months of age associated with lower lacto- N -fucopentaose (LNFP) III concentrations (OR: 6.7, 95% CI 2.0-22). Another study found higher relative abundance of fucosyloligosaccharides was associated with reduced diarrhea incidence by 2 years, due to (i) stable toxin- E. coli infection ( p  = 0.04) and (ii) "all causes" ( p  = 0.042). Higher LNFP-II concentrations were associated with (i) reduced cases of gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections at 6 weeks ( p  = 0.004, p  = 0.010) and 12 weeks ( p  = 0.038, p  = 0.038) and (ii) reduced HIV transmission (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21-0.97) and mortality risk among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants (HR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.14-0.74) by 24 months. Due to heterogeneity of the outcomes reported, pooling of results was not possible. There was limited evidence that low concentrations of LNFP-III are associated with CMA and that higher fucosyloligosaccharide levels protect infants against infectious disease. Further research is needed.

  20. Effects of therapeutic plasma exchange on serum immunoglobulin concentrations in a dog with refractory immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

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    Scagnelli, Alyssa M; Walton, Stuart A; Liu, Chin-Chi; Acierno, Mark J

    2018-05-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 9-year-old 8.3-kg (18.3-lb) neutered male Miniature Schnauzer was referred for diagnosis and treatment of a sudden onset of lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, and pallor. CLINICAL FINDINGS On physical examination, the dog was lethargic with pale mucous membranes and a capillary refill time ≥ 2 seconds. Skin and sclera were mildly icteric. Signs of pain were elicited during abdominal palpation, and an enlarged spleen was noted. Results of agglutination testing and cytologic findings were consistent with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). No contributing factors for development of IMHA were identified. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial treatment included management with immunosuppressant medications. Three packed RBC transfusions were administered, but clinical signs continued to progress. Therefore, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was performed 5 and 9 days after admission. Following each TPE procedure, the dog had an appreciable clinical improvement and decrease in RBC autoagglutination, and the Hct stabilized. Serum IgG and IgM concentrations were measured during and after both TPE procedures. Despite anticoagulative treatment, the dog developed a thrombus in the splenic vein, necessitating a splenectomy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE The decrease and rebound in serum IgG and IgM concentrations following TPE provided evidence that TPE may have the same immunomodulatory effects in dogs as have been proposed to occur in people. Further, findings suggested that TPE may be a useful alternative in dogs with refractory IMHA when traditional treatments fail.

  1. The association of fatigue, pain, depression and anxiety with work and activity impairment in immune mediated inflammatory diseases.

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    Murray W Enns

    Full Text Available Impairment in work function is a frequent outcome in patients with chronic conditions such as immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID, depression and anxiety disorders. The personal and economic costs of work impairment in these disorders are immense. Symptoms of pain, fatigue, depression and anxiety are potentially remediable forms of distress that may contribute to work impairment in chronic health conditions such as IMID. The present study evaluated the association between pain [Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale], fatigue [Daily Fatigue Impact Scale], depression and anxiety [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale] and work impairment [Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Scale] in four patient populations: multiple sclerosis (n = 255, inflammatory bowel disease (n = 248, rheumatoid arthritis (n = 154 and a depression and anxiety group (n = 307, using quantile regression, controlling for the effects of sociodemographic factors, physical disability, and cognitive deficits. Each of pain, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and fatigue individually showed significant associations with work absenteeism, presenteeism, and general activity impairment (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.3 to 1.0. When the distress variables were entered concurrently into the regression models, fatigue was a significant predictor of work and activity impairment in all models (quantile regression standardized estimates ranging from 0.2 to 0.5. These findings have important clinical implications for understanding the determinants of work impairment and for improving work-related outcomes in chronic disease.

  2. Biosimilars for Immune-Mediated Chronic Diseases in Primary Care: What a Practicing Physician Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R; Bagel, Jerry; Namak, Shahla

    2018-05-01

    The introduction of biologics has revolutionized the treatment of immune-mediated diseases, but high cost and limited patient access remain hurdles, and some physicians are concerned that biosimilars are not similar enough. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe biosimilar safety, efficacy, nomenclature, extrapolation and interchangeability. In the United States, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act created an abbreviated pathway for licensing of a biologic that is biosimilar to another licensed product (i.e., the reference product). This approval pathway differs from that of generic small-molecule drugs because biologics are too complex to be perfectly duplicated, and follows a process designed to demonstrate that any differences between the biosimilar and its reference product have no significant impact on safety and efficacy. The US approval process requires extensive analytical assessments, animal studies and clinical trials, assuring that biosimilar products provide clinical results similar to those of the reference product. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Associations in Acquired Immune-Mediated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes: Insights in Aplastic Anemia and Chronic Idiopathic Neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudi, Irene; Papadaki, Helen A.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing interest on the field of autoimmune diseases has unveiled a plethora of genetic factors that predispose to these diseases. However, in immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes, such as acquired aplastic anemia and chronic idiopathic neutropenia, in which the pathophysiology results from a myelosuppressive bone marrow microenvironment mainly due to the presence of activated T lymphocytes, leading to the accelerated apoptotic death of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, such genetic associations have been very limited. Various alleles and haplotypes of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules have been implicated in the predisposition of developing the above diseases, as well as polymorphisms of inhibitory cytokines such as interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β1 along with polymorphisms on molecules of the immune system including the T-bet transcription factor and signal transducers and activators of transcription. In some cases, specific polymorphisms have been implicated in the outcome of treatment on those patients. PMID:22956967

  4. Optimization of the THP-1 activation assay to detect pharmaceuticals with potential to cause immune mediated drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Daniele; Galbiati, Valentina; Gatti, Nicolò; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Corsini, Emanuela

    2015-10-01

    Despite important impacts of systemic hypersensitivity induced by pharmaceuticals, for such endpoint no reliable preclinical approaches are available. We previously established an in vitro test to identify contact and respiratory allergens based on interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in THP-1 cells. Here, we challenged it for identification of pharmaceuticals associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions, with the idea that drug sensitizers share common mechanisms of cell activation. Cells were exposed to drugs associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions (streptozotocin, sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, probenecid, clonidine, procainamide, ofloxacin, methyl salicylate), while metformin was used as negative drug. Differently to chemicals, drugs tested were well tolerated, except clonidine and probenecid, with no signs of cytotoxicity up to 1-2mg/ml. THP-1 activation assay was adjusted, and conditions, that allow identification of all sensitizing drugs tested, were established. Next, using streptozotocin and selective inhibitors of PKC-β and p38 MAPK, two pathways involved in chemical allergen-induced cell activation, we tested the hypothesis that similar pathways were also involved in drug-induced IL-8 production and CD86 upregulation. Results indicated that drugs and chemical allergens share similar activation pathways. Finally, we made a structure-activity hypothesis related to hypersensitivity reactions, trying to individuate structural requisite that can be involved in immune mediated adverse reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers with immune-mediated rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Hanna Dorotea; Hillström, Anna; Kånåhols, Malin; Hagman, Ragnvi; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2017-04-17

    Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTRs) are a dog breed often affected by immune-mediated rheumatic disease (IMRD), a disorder characterised by chronic stiffness and joint pain. Most, but not all, dogs with IMRD, have antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are also commonly present in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical and diagnostic findings of IMRD indicate that it is an SLE-related disorder. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, is a quantitative marker of inflammation for many diseases and is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammation in both humans and dogs. However, in human SLE, CRP concentrations are often elevated but correlate poorly with disease activity; they can be low in individual patients with active disease. The aim of the study was to investigate CRP in a group of NSDTRs with the SLE-related disorder IMRD. The hypothesis was that CRP concentrations would be increased in dogs with IMRD compared to healthy dogs, but that the increase would be mild. Serum CRP concentrations were measured in 18 IMRD-affected NSDTRs and 19 healthy control NSDTRs using two different canine-specific CRP assays. Dogs with IMRD and ANA had higher CRP concentrations than the control dogs, but the concentrations were below the clinical decision limit for systemic inflammation for most of the IMRD dogs. These results indicate that CRP concentrations were increased in dogs with IMRD and ANA, but the increase was mild, similar to what has been observed in human SLE.

  6. Extracellular Calcium Dictates Onset, Severity, and Recovery of Diarrhea in a Child with Immune-Mediated Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Fraebel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea causes monovalent and divalent ion losses that can influence clinical outcome. Unlike the losses of monovalent ions, such as Na+, K+, Cl−, and HCO3−, which are generally large in quantity (osmoles and therefore determine the severity of diarrhea, the losses of divalent ions are relatively small in osmoles and are often overlooked during diarrheal treatment. Studies now suggest that despite divalent ions being small in osmoles, their effects are large due to the presence of divalent ion-sensing receptors and their amplifying effects in the gut. As a result, losses of these divalent ions without prompt replacement could also significantly affect the onset, severity, and/or recovery of diarrheal disease. Herein, we report a case of a malnourished child with an immune-mediated enteropathy who developed episodes of “breakthrough” diarrhea with concurrent hypocalcemia while on appropriate immunotherapy. Interestingly, during these periods of diarrhea, stool volume fluctuated with levels of blood Ca2+. When Ca2+ was low, diarrhea occurred; when Ca2+ levels normalized with replacement, diarrhea stopped. Based on this and other observations, a broader question arises as to whether the Ca2+ lost in diarrhea should be replaced promptly in these patients.

  7. Cytokines in the host response to Candida vaginitis: Identifying a role for non-classical immune mediators, S100 alarmins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), caused by Candida albicans, affects a significant number of women during their reproductive years. More than two decades of research have been focused on the mechanisms associated with susceptibility or resistance to symptomatic infection. Adaptive immunity by Th1-type CD4+ T cells and downstream cytokine responses are considered the predominant host defense mechanisms against mucosal Candida infections. However, numerous clinical and animal studies have indicated no or limited protective role of cells and cytokines of the Th1 or Th2 lineage against vaginal infection. The role for Th17 is only now begun to be investigated in-depth for VVC with results already showing significant controversy. On the other hand, a clinical live-challenge study and an established animal model have shown that a symptomatic condition is intimately associated with the vaginal infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) but with no effect on vaginal fungal burden. Subsequent studies identified S100A8 and S100A9 Alarmins as key chemotactic mediators of the acute PMN response. These chemotactic danger signals appear to be secreted by vaginal epithelial cells upon interaction and early adherence of Candida. Thus, instead of a putative immunodeficiency against Candida involving classical immune cells and cytokines of the adaptive response, the pathological inflammation in VVC is now considered a consequence of a non-productive innate response initiated by non-classical immune mediators. PMID:22182685

  8. The role of basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 in the immune system and immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinghua; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Qianjin

    2017-07-01

    Basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 (also known as NFIL3) has been implicated in the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functions and activities in mammals. The interactions between E4BP4 and major regulators of cellular processes have triggered significant interest in the roles of E4BP4 in the pathogenesis of certain chronic diseases. Indeed, novel discoveries have been emerging to illustrate the involvement of E4BP4 in multiple disorders. It is recognized that E4BP4 is extensively involved in some immune-mediated diseases, but the mechanisms of E4BP4 involvement in these complex diseases remain poorly defined. Here we review the regulatory mechanisms of E4BP4 engaging in not only the biological function but also the development of immune-mediated diseases, paving the way for future therapies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin analysis in neuropediatric patients: establishment of a new cut off-value for the identification of inflammatory-immune mediated processes.

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    Marta Molero-Luis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A high level of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF neopterin is a marker of central nervous system inflammatory-immune mediated processes. We aimed to assess data from 606 neuropediatric patients, describing the clinical and biochemical features of those neurological disorders presenting CSF neopterin values above a new cut-off value that was defined in our laboratory. METHODS: To establish the new CSF neopterin cut-off value, we studied two groups of patients: Group 1 comprised 68 patients with meningoencephalitis, and Group 2 comprised 52 children with a confirmed peripheral infection and no central nervous system involvement. We studied 606 CSF samples from neuropediatric patients who were classified into 3 groups: genetic diagnosis (A, acquired/unknown etiologic neurologic diseases (B and inflammatory-immune mediated processes (C. RESULTS: The CSF neopterin cut-off value was 61 nmol/L. Out of 606 cases, 56 presented a CSF neopterin level above this value. Group C had significantly higher CSF neopterin, protein and leukocyte values than the other groups. Sixteen of twenty-three patients in this group had a CSF neopterin level above the cut-off, whereas three and seven patients presented increased leukocyte and protein values, respectively. A significant association was found among CSF neopterin, proteins and leukocytes in the 606 patients. White matter disturbances were associated with high CSF neopterin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Although children with inflammatory-immune mediated processes presented higher CSF neopterin values, patients with other neurological disorders also showed increased CSF neopterin concentrations. These results stress the importance of CSF neopterin analysis for the identification of inflammatory-immune mediated processes.

  10. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Lage, Kasper; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Tatar, Diana; Benita, Yair

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more densely connected than chance expectation. To confirm biological relevance, we show that the components of the networks tend to be expressed in similar tissues relevant to the phenotypes in question, suggesting the network indicates common underlying processes perturbed by risk loci. Furthermore, we show that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in

  11. Changes in Vaginal Microbiota and Immune Mediators in HIV-1-Seronegative Kenyan Women Initiating Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxby, Alison C; Fredricks, David N; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana; Masese, Linnet; Fiedler, Tina L; De Rosa, Stephen; Jaoko, Walter; Kiarie, James N; Overbaugh, Julie; McClelland, R Scott

    2016-04-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is associated with HIV acquisition. We studied changes in vaginal microbiota and inflammatory milieu after DMPA initiation. In a cohort of HIV-negative Kenyan women, we collected monthly vaginal swabs over 1 year before and after DMPA. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we compared quantities of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus iners, Gardnerella vaginalis, and total bacterial load (16S ribosomal RNA gene levels). Six vaginal immune mediators were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Trends in the detection and quantity of bacteria were estimated by logistic and linear mixed-effects regression. From 2010 to 2012, 15 HIV-seronegative women initiated DMPA, contributing 85 visits (median, 6 visits/woman; range, 3-8 visits/woman). The median time of DMPA-exposed follow-up was 8.4 months (range, 1.5-11.6 months). Seven women (46%) had bacterial vaginosis within 70 days before DMPA start. L. iners was detected in 13 women (87%) before DMPA start, but other lactobacilli were rarely detected. Gardnerella vaginalis decreased by 0.21 log10 copies per swab per month after DMPA exposure (P = 0.01). Total bacterial load decreased by 0.08 log10 copies per swab per month of DMPA (P = 0.02). Sustained decreases in interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0.03), IL-8 (P = 0.04), and IL-1 receptor antagonist (P vaginal bacterial concentrations and levels of inflammatory mediators. Further studies are warranted to outline components of the vaginal microbiota influenced by DMPA use and impact on HIV susceptibility.

  12. Could Sodium Chloride be an Environmental Trigger for Immune-Mediated Diseases? An Overview of the Experimental and Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Eric; Béreau, Matthieu; Vauchy, Charline; Saas, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases (IMDs) are complex chronic inflammatory diseases involving genetic and environmental factors. Salt intake has been proposed as a diet factor that can influence the immune response. Indeed, experimental data report the influence of sodium chloride on the differentiation of naive CD4 + T cells into IL-17 secreting T helper (Th) cells (Th17 cells), by a mechanism involving the serum glucocorticoid kinase-1 (SGK1) that promotes the expression of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R). The IL-23/IL-23R is critical for pathogenic inflammatory Th17 cell differentiation. Experimental data in murine models of arthritis, colitis and encephalomyelitis corroborate these findings. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge on the effects of sodium chloride on innate and adaptive immunity. We also performed a systematic literature review for clinical studies examining the relationships between salt consumption and the development or the activity/severity of the most common IMDs mediated by the IL-23/Th17 pathway, i.e., rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Crohn's disease (CD). Nine studies were found, 4 in RA, 4 in MS and 1 in CD. An association was found between developments of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) positive RA in smokers and salt intake, but these results were not confirmed in another study. For MS, no association was observed in pediatric subjects while in adult patients, a link was found between salt intake and disease activity. However, this result was not confirmed in another study. These conflicting results highlight the fact that further evaluation in human IMDs is required. Moreover, physicians need to develop clinical trials with diet interventions to evaluate the impact of low salt intake on disease activity/severity of IMDs.

  13. Could Sodium Chloride be an Environmental Trigger for Immune-Mediated Diseases? An Overview of the Experimental and Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Toussirot

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases (IMDs are complex chronic inflammatory diseases involving genetic and environmental factors. Salt intake has been proposed as a diet factor that can influence the immune response. Indeed, experimental data report the influence of sodium chloride on the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into IL-17 secreting T helper (Th cells (Th17 cells, by a mechanism involving the serum glucocorticoid kinase-1 (SGK1 that promotes the expression of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R. The IL-23/IL-23R is critical for pathogenic inflammatory Th17 cell differentiation. Experimental data in murine models of arthritis, colitis and encephalomyelitis corroborate these findings. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge on the effects of sodium chloride on innate and adaptive immunity. We also performed a systematic literature review for clinical studies examining the relationships between salt consumption and the development or the activity/severity of the most common IMDs mediated by the IL-23/Th17 pathway, i.e., rheumatoid arthritis (RA, multiple sclerosis (MS, and Crohn's disease (CD. Nine studies were found, 4 in RA, 4 in MS and 1 in CD. An association was found between developments of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA positive RA in smokers and salt intake, but these results were not confirmed in another study. For MS, no association was observed in pediatric subjects while in adult patients, a link was found between salt intake and disease activity. However, this result was not confirmed in another study. These conflicting results highlight the fact that further evaluation in human IMDs is required. Moreover, physicians need to develop clinical trials with diet interventions to evaluate the impact of low salt intake on disease activity/severity of IMDs.

  14. CD8 T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue induce immune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel; Eickmeier, Ira; Kühl, Anja A; Hamann, Alf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schott, Eckart

    2014-02-01

    The pathogenesis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains poorly understood. Since PSC predominantly occurs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity triggered by activated T cells migrating from the gut to the liver is a possible mechanism. We hypothesized that T cells primed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) by a specific antigen migrate to the liver and cause cholangitis when they recognize the same antigen on cholangiocytes. We induced ovalbumin-dependent colitis in mice that express ovalbumin in biliary epithelia (ASBT-OVA mice) and crossed ASBT-OVA mice with mice that express ovalbumin in enterocytes (iFABP-OVA mice). We analyzed T-cell activation in the GALT and crossreactivity to the same antigen in the liver as well as the effects of colitis per se on antigen-presentation and T-cell activation in the liver. Intrarectal application of ovalbumin followed by transfer of CD8 OT-I T cells led to antigen-dependent colitis. CD8 T cells primed in the GALT acquired effector function and the capability to migrate to the liver, where they caused cholangitis in a strictly antigen-dependent manner. Likewise, cholangitis developed in mice expressing ovalbumin simultaneously in biliary epithelia and enterocytes after transfer of OT-I T cells. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis led to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in the portal venous blood, induced activation of resident liver dendritic cells, and promoted the induction of T-cell-dependent cholangitis. Our data strengthen the notion that immune-mediated cholangitis is caused by T cells primed in the GALT and provide the first link between colitis and cholangitis in an antigen-dependent mouse model. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Analysis of audiometric relapse-free survival in patients with immune-mediated hearing loss exclusively treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Castro, Nieves; García-Chilleron, Raimon; Gavilanes-Plasencia, Javier; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael; García-Fernández, Alfredo; García-Berrocal, José Ramón

    2017-10-12

    To describe the results in terms of audiometric relapse-free survival and relapse rate in immunomediated hearing loss patients treated exclusively with corticosteroids. Retrospective study of patients with audiometric relapses, monitored from 1995 to 2014, in two centres of the Community of Madrid. We evaluated 31 patients with a mean age of 48.52 years (14.67 SD), of which 61.3% were women. Most hearing loss was fluctuating (48.4%). Only 16.1% of patients had systemic autoimmune disease. There is a moderate positive correlation between the sex variable and the systemic involvement variable (Spearman's correlation coefficient=0.356): specifically, between being female and systemic disease. The relative incidence rate of relapse in the first year was 2.01 relapses/year with a 95% CI (1.32 to 2.92). The mean survival time of the event (audiometric relapse) was 5.25 months (SD 0.756). With multivariate analysis, the only variable that achieved statistical significance was age, with a hazard ratio of 1.032 (95% CI; 1.001-1.063, P=.043). Immune-mediated disease of the inner ear is a chronic disease with relapses. Half of the patients with immunomediated hearing loss treated exclusively with corticosteroids relapse before 6 months of follow-up. In addition, if a patient has not relapsed, they are more likely to relapse as each year passes. Analysis of the of audiometric relapse- free survival will enable the effect of future treatments to be compared and their capacity to reduce the rhythm of relapses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  16. Immune mediated liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capac...

  17. Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes of progenitor and stem cells: molecular analysis of cytotoxic T cell clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Tiu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of the T cell receptor (TCR enables molecular identification of individual T cell clones and provides an unique opportunity for the design of molecular diagnostic tests based on the structure of the rearranged TCR chain e.g., using the TCR CDR3 region. Initially, clonal T cell malignancies, including T cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL, mucosis fungoides and peripheral T cell lymphoma were targets for the TCR-based analytic assays such as detection of clonality by T-gamma rearrangement using y-chain-specific PCR or Southern Blotting. Study of these disorders facilitated further analytic concepts and application of rational methods of TCR analysis to investigations of polyclonal T cell-mediated diseases. In hematology, such conditions include graft versus host disease (GvHD and immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes. In aplastic anemia (AA, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS or paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH, cytotoxic T cell responses may be directed against certain antigens located on stem or more lineage-restricted progenitor cells in single lineage cytopenias. The nature of the antigenic targets driving polyclonal CTL responses remains unclear. Novel methods of TCR repertoire analysis, include VB flow cytometry, peptide-specific tetramer staining, in vitro stimulation assays and TCR CDR3-specific PCR. Such PCR assay can be either VB family-specific or multiplexed for all VB families. Amplified products can be characterized and quantitated to facilitate detection of the most immunodominant clonotypes. Such clonotypes may serve as markers for the global polyclonal T cell response. Identification of these clonotypes can be performed in blood and tissue biopsy material by various methods. Once immunodominant clonotypes corresponding to pathogenic CTL clones are identified they can serve as surrogate markers for the activity of the pathophysiologic process or even indicate the presence of specific

  18. Building an immune-mediated coagulopathy consensus: early recognition and evaluation to enhance post-surgical patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voils Stacy A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Topical hemostats, fibrin sealants, and surgical adhesives are regularly used in a variety of surgical procedures involving multiple disciplines. Generally, these adjuncts to surgical hemostasis are valuable means for improving wound visualization, reducing blood loss or adding tissue adherence; however, some of these agents are responsible for under-recognized adverse reactions and outcomes. Bovine thrombin, for example, is a topical hemostat with a long history of clinical application that is widely used alone or in combination with other hemostatic agents. Hematologists and coagulation experts are aware that these agents can lead to development of an immune-mediated coagulopathy (IMC. A paucity of data on the incidence of IMC contributes to under-recognition and leaves many surgeons unaware that this clinical entity, originating from normal immune responses to foreign antigen exposure, requires enhanced post-operative vigilance and judicious clinical judgment to achieve best outcomes. Postoperative bleeding may result from issues such as loosened ties or clips or the occurrence of a coagulopathy due to hemodilution, vitamin K deficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC or post-transfusion, post-shock coagulopathic states. Other causes, such as liver disease, may be ruled out by a careful patient history and common pre-operative liver function tests. Less common are coagulopathies secondary to pathologic immune responses. Such coagulopathies include those that may result from inherent patient problems such as patients with an immune dysfunction related to systemic lupus erythrematosus (SLE or lymphoma that can invoke antibodies against native coagulation factors. Medical interventions may also provoke antibody formation in the form of self-directed anti-coagulation factor antibodies, that result in problematic bleeding; it is these iatrogenic post-operative coagulopathies, including those associated with bovine thrombin

  19. Quantitative nature of overexpression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression experiments are sometimes considered as qualitative experiments designed to identify novel proteins and study their function. However, in order to draw conclusions regarding protein overexpression through association analyses using large-scale biological data sets, we need to recognize the quantitative nature of overexpression experiments. Here I discuss the quantitative features of two different types of overexpression experiment: absolute and relative. I also introduce the four primary mechanisms involved in growth defects caused by protein overexpression: resource overload, stoichiometric imbalance, promiscuous interactions, and pathway modulation associated with the degree of overexpression. PMID:26543202

  20. Maternal steroid therapy for fetuses with second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardulli, Andrea; D'Antonio, Francesco; Magro-Malosso, Elena R; Manzoli, Lamberto; Anisman, Paul; Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2018-03-07

    To explore the effect of maternal fluorinated steroid therapy on fetuses affected by second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block. Studies reporting the outcome of fetuses with second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound and treated with fluorinated steroids compared with those not treated were included. The primary outcome was the overall progression of congenital atrioventricular block to either continuous or intermittent third-degree congenital atrioventricular block at birth. Meta-analyses of proportions using random effect model and meta-analyses using individual data random-effect logistic regression were used. Five studies (71 fetuses) were included. The progression rate to congenital atrioventricular block at birth in fetuses treated with steroids was 52% (95% confidence interval 23-79) and in fetuses not receiving steroid therapy 73% (95% confidence interval 39-94). The overall rate of regression to either first-degree, intermittent first-/second-degree or sinus rhythm in fetuses treated with steroids was 25% (95% confidence interval 12-41) compared with 23% (95% confidence interval 8-44) in those not treated. Stable (constant) second-degree congenital atrioventricular block at birth was present in 11% (95% confidence interval 2-27) of cases in the treated group and in none of the newborns in the untreated group, whereas complete regression to sinus rhythm occurred in 21% (95% confidence interval 6-42) of fetuses receiving steroids vs. 9% (95% confidence interval 0-41) of those untreated. There is still limited evidence as to the benefit of administered fluorinated steroids in terms of affecting outcome of fetuses with second-degree immune-mediated congenital atrioventricular block. © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Sympathetic Nerve Hyperactivity in the Spleen: Causal for Nonpathogenic-Driven Chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L. Bellinger

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs is a descriptive term coined for an eclectic group of diseases or conditions that share common inflammatory pathways, and for which there is no definitive etiology. IMIDs affect the elderly most severely, with many older individuals having two or more IMIDs. These diseases include, but are not limited to, type-1 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, chronic pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Sjőgren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. These diseases are ostensibly unrelated mechanistically, but increase in frequency with age and share chronic systemic inflammation, implicating major roles for the spleen. Chronic systemic and regional inflammation underlies the disease manifestations of IMIDs. Regional inflammation and immune dysfunction promotes targeted end organ tissue damage, whereas systemic inflammation increases morbidity and mortality by affecting multiple organ systems. Chronic inflammation and skewed dysregulated cell-mediated immune responses drive many of these age-related medical disorders. IMIDs are commonly autoimmune-mediated or suspected to be autoimmune diseases. Another shared feature is dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis. Here, we focus on dysautonomia. In many IMIDs, dysautonomia manifests as an imbalance in activity/reactivity of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. These major autonomic pathways are essential for allostasis of the immune system, and regulating inflammatory processes and innate and adaptive immunity. Pathology in ANS is a hallmark and causal feature of all IMIDs. Chronic systemic inflammation comorbid with stress pathway dysregulation implicate neural-immune cross-talk in the etiology and pathophysiology of IMIDs

  2. Overexpression of the DYRK1A Gene (Dual-Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1A) Induces Alterations of the Serotoninergic and Dopaminergic Processing in Murine Brain Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Jacqueline; Rouch, Claude; Bui, Linh Chi; Assayag, Elodie; Souchet, Benoit; Daubigney, Fabrice; Medjaoui, Hind; Luquet, Serge; Magnan, Christophe; Delabar, Jean Maurice; Dairou, Julien; Janel, Nathalie

    2018-05-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) or Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic disorder associated with intellectual disability and affects around 5 million persons worldwide. Neuroanatomical phenotypes associated with T21 include slight reduction of brain size and weight, abnormalities in several brain areas including spines dysgenesis, dendritic morphogenesis, and early neuroanatomical characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Monoamine neurotransmitters are involved in dendrites development, functioning of synapses, memory consolidation, and their levels measured in the cerebrospinal fluid, blood, or brain areas that are modified in individuals with T21. DYRK1A is one of the recognized key genes that could explain some of the deficits present in individuals with T21. We investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection the contents and processing of monoamines neurotransmitters in four brain areas of female and male transgenic mice for the Dyrk1a gene (mBactgDyrk1a). DYRK1A overexpression induced dramatic deficits in the serotonin contents of the four brain areas tested and major deficits in dopamine and adrenaline contents especially in the hypothalamus. These results suggest that DYRK1A overexpression might be associated with the modification of monoamines content found in individuals with T21 and reinforce the interest to target the level of DYRK1A expression as a therapeutic approach for persons with T21.

  3. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Immune-Mediated Liver Injury and Compromise Virus Control During Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengmeng; Yuan, Xu; Liu, Dan; Ma, Yuhong; Zhu, Jun; Cui, Jun; Yu, Mengxue; Li, Changyong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used as therapeutic tools not only for their ability to differentiate toward different cells, but also for their unique immunomodulatory properties. However, it is still unknown how MSCs may affect immunity during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study was designed to explore the effect of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on hepatic natural killer (NK) cells in a mouse model of acute HBV infection. Mice were injected with 1 × 10 6 BM-MSCs, which stained with chloromethyl derivatives of fluorescein diacetate fluorescent probe, 24 h before hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA (pHBV1.3) through the tail vein. In vivo imaging system revealed that BM-MSCs were accumulated in the injured liver, and they attenuated immune-mediated liver injury during HBV infection, as shown by lower alanine aminotransferase levels, reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver. Importantly, administration of BM-MSCs restrained the increased expression of natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D), an important receptor required for NK cell activation in the liver from HBV-infected mice. BM-MSCs also reduced NKG2D expression on NK cells and suppressed the cytotoxicity of NK cells in vitro. Furthermore, BM-MSC-derived transforming growth factor-β1 suppressed NKG2D expression on NK cells. As a consequence, BM-MSC treatment enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in vivo. These results demonstrate that adoptive transfer of BM-MSCs influences innate immunity and limits immune-mediated liver injury during acute HBV infection by suppressing NK cell activity. Meanwhile, the effect of BM-MSCs on prolonging virus clearance needs to be considered in the future.

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpression in mice abrogates sex differences in body weight, visceral fat, and food intake response to a fast and alters levels of feeding regulatory hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Yuan, Pu-Qing; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpressing (CRF-OE) male mice showed an inhibited feeding response to a fast, and lower plasma acyl ghrelin and Fos expression in the arcuate nucleus compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We investigated whether hormones and hypothalamic feeding signals are impaired in CRF-OE mice and the influence of sex. Male and female CRF-OE mice and WT littermates (4-6 months old) fed ad libitum or overnight fasted were assessed for body, adrenal glands and perigonadal fat weights, food intake, plasma hormones, blood glucose, and mRNA hypothalamic signals. Under fed conditions, compared to WT, CRF-OE mice have increased adrenal glands and perigonadal fat weight, plasma corticosterone, leptin and insulin, and hypothalamic leptin receptor and decreased plasma acyl ghrelin. Compared to male, female WT mice have lower body and perigonadal fat and plasma leptin but higher adrenal glands weights. CRF-OE mice lost these sex differences except for the adrenals. Male CRF-OE and WT mice did not differ in hypothalamic expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), while female CRF-OE compared to female WT and male CRF-OE had higher NPY mRNA levels. After fasting, female WT mice lost more body weight and ate more food than male WT, while CRF-OE mice had reduced body weight loss and inhibited food intake without sex difference. In male WT mice, fasting reduced plasma insulin and leptin and increased acyl ghrelin and corticosterone while female WT showed only a rise in corticosterone. In CRF-OE mice, fasting reduced insulin while leptin, acyl ghrelin and corticosterone were unchanged with no sex difference. Fasting blood glucose was higher in CRF-OE with female > male. In WT mice, fasting increased hypothalamic NPY expression in both sexes and decreased POMC only in males, while in CRF-OE mice, NPY did not change, and POMC decreased in males and increased in females. These data indicate that CRF-OE mice have abnormal basal and fasting

  5. Skp2B overexpression alters a prohibitin-p53 axis and the transcription of PAPP-A, the protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

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    Harish Chander

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCF(Skp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4, an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established.We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A, the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured.These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B.

  6. Metabolic gene expression changes in astrocytes in Multiple Sclerosis cerebral cortex are indicative of immune-mediated signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Zeis, T.

    2015-04-01

    Emerging as an important correlate of neurological dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), extended focal and diffuse gray matter abnormalities have been found and linked to clinical manifestations such as seizures, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. To investigate possible underlying mechanisms we analyzed the molecular alterations in histopathological normal appearing cortical gray matter (NAGM) in MS. By performing a differential gene expression analysis of NAGM of control and MS cases we identified reduced transcription of astrocyte specific genes involved in the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) and the glutamate–glutamine cycle (GGC). Additional quantitative immunohistochemical analysis demonstrating a CX43 loss in MS NAGM confirmed a crucial involvement of astrocytes and emphasizes their importance in MS pathogenesis. Concurrently, a Toll-like/IL-1β signaling expression signature was detected in MS NAGM, indicating that immune-related signaling might be responsible for the downregulation of ANLS and GGC gene expression in MS NAGM. Indeed, challenging astrocytes with immune stimuli such as IL-1β and LPS reduced their ANLS and GGC gene expression in vitro. The detected upregulation of IL1B in MS NAGM suggests inflammasome priming. For this reason, astrocyte cultures were treated with ATP and ATP/LPS as for inflammasome activation. This treatment led to a reduction of ANLS and GGC gene expression in a comparable manner. To investigate potential sources for ANLS and GGC downregulation in MS NAGM, we first performed an adjuvant-driven stimulation of the peripheral immune system in C57Bl/6 mice in vivo. This led to similar gene expression changes in spinal cord demonstrating that peripheral immune signals might be one source for astrocytic gene expression changes in the brain. IL1B upregulation in MS NAGM itself points to a possible endogenous signaling process leading to ANLS and GGC downregulation. This is supported by our findings that, among others

  7. Sex bias in experimental immune-mediated, drug-induced liver injury in BALB/c mice: suggested roles for Tregs, estrogen, and IL-6.

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    Joonhee Cho

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated, drug-induced liver injury (DILI triggered by drug haptens is more prevalent in women than in men. However, mechanisms responsible for this sex bias are not clear. Immune regulation by CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs and 17β-estradiol is crucial in the pathogenesis of sex bias in cancer and autoimmunity. Therefore, we investigated their role in a mouse model of immune-mediated DILI.To model DILI, we immunized BALB/c, BALB/cBy, IL-6-deficient, and castrated BALB/c mice with trifluoroacetyl chloride-haptenated liver proteins. We then measured degree of hepatitis, cytokines, antibodies, and Treg and splenocyte function.BALB/c females developed more severe hepatitis (p<0.01 and produced more pro-inflammatory hepatic cytokines and antibodies (p<0.05 than did males. Castrated males developed more severe hepatitis than did intact males (p<0.001 and females (p<0.05. Splenocytes cultured from female mice exhibited fewer Tregs (p<0.01 and higher IL-1β (p<0.01 and IL-6 (p<0.05 than did those from males. However, Treg function did not differ by sex, as evidenced by absence of sex bias in programmed death receptor-1 and responses to IL-6, anti-IL-10, anti-CD3, and anti-CD28. Diminished hepatitis in IL-6-deficient, anti-IL-6 receptor α-treated, ovariectomized, or male mice; undetectable IL-6 levels in splenocyte supernatants from ovariectomized and male mice; elevated splenic IL-6 and serum estrogen levels in castrated male mice, and IL-6 induction by 17β-estradiol in splenocytes from naïve female mice (p<0.05 suggested that 17β-estradiol may enhance sex bias through IL-6 induction, which subsequently discourages Treg survival. Treg transfer from naïve female mice to those with DILI reduced hepatitis severity and hepatic IL-6.17β-estradiol and IL-6 may act synergistically to promote sex bias in experimental DILI by reducing Tregs. Modulating Treg numbers may provide a therapeutic approach to DILI.

  8. Drug utilization of biological drugs in the treatment of chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs: an observational study on Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Faccendini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug utilization of biological drugs in the treatment of chronic Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs: an observational study on Italian patientsObjectives:The aim of this analysis was to provide an estimate of drug utilization indicators (dose escalation and dose tapering related to biologic drugs in the chronic treatment of adult patients with Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases (IMIDs.Methods:We conducted an observational retrospective cohort analysis using the Policlinico di Tor Vergata (PTV database. We considered all biologic drugs dispensed by the PTV hospital pharmacy between January 2010 and December 2015:abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab (originator and biosimilar, tocilizumab, and ustekinumab were included. Drug dose escalation and dose tapering were calculated and compared with their Defined Daily Dose (DDD.Results:A total of 1803 patients with IMID and biologic drug prescription were analyzed (male: 51.2%. The majority of patients were in the class 36-50 years (n = 612. The median follow-up was 33.8 months (IQR 14.43-56.20. Dermatology was the ward with the largest number of patients (n = 882; 48.9%, followed by rheumatology (n = 619; 34.3% and gastroenterology (n = 302; 16.8%. Dose escalation was observed in 406 patients (22.5%. Infliximab biosimilar (n = 51 was the biological drug with the highest dose escalation rate (86.3%, followed by infliximab originator (n = 28; 60.3% and ustekinumab (37.8%. Etanercept was the biological drug with the lowest dose escalation rate (7.4%, followed by golimumab (12.2% and adalimumab (13.8%. In 677 patients (37.5% a dose tapering was observed. Etanercept showed the highest rate of patients with dose tapering (41.6%, followed by adalimumab (33.6%.Conclusions:The results of this analysis show that dose modification is quite common in PTV clinical practice. Considering the strong focus on the pharmaceutical expenditure and the need of cost containment

  9. CD40 dependent exacerbation of immune mediated hepatitis by hepatic CD11b+ Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Manns, Michael P.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing mice. We studied hepatic MDSC in two murine models of immune mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of tumor bearing mice with Concanavalin A or α-Galactosylceramide resulted in increased ALT and AST serum levels in comparison to tumor free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC into naïve mice exacerbated Concanavalin A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells revealed a polarized pro-inflammatory gene signature after Concanavalin A treatment. An interferon gamma- dependent up-regulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells along with an up-regulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Concanavalin A treatment was observed. Concanavalin A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSC as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSC led to increased arginase activity upon Concanavalin A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40−/− tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased reactive oxygen species production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSC act as pro-inflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner. PMID:25616156

  10. Chinese Herbal Formula, Modified Danggui Buxue Tang, Attenuates Apoptosis of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A derivative formula, DGBX, which is composed of three herbs (Radix astragali, Radix Angelicae sinensis, and Coptis chinensis Franch, is derived from a famous Chinese herbal formula, Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT (Radix astragali and Radix Angelicae sinensis. We aimed to investigate the effects of DGBX on the regulation of the balance between proliferation and apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs due to the aberrant immune response in a mouse model of aplastic anemia (AA. Cyclosporine (CsA, an immunosuppressor, was used as the positive control. Our results indicated that DGBX could downregulate the production of IFNγ in bone marrow cells by interfering with the binding between SLAM and SAP and the expressions of Fyn and T-bet. This herbal formula can also inhibit the activation of Fas-mediated apoptosis, interferon regulatory factor-1-induced JAK/Stat, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 signaling pathways and thereby induce proliferation and attenuate apoptosis of HSCs. In conclusion, DGBX can relieve the immune-mediated destruction of HSCs, repair hematopoietic failure, and recover the hematopoietic function of HSCs in hematogenesis. Therefore, DGBX can be used in traditional medicine against AA as a complementary and alternative immunosuppressive therapeutic formula.

  11. Pancreatic Tissue Transplanted in TheraCyte Encapsulation Devices Is Protected and Prevents Hyperglycemia in a Mouse Model of Immune-Mediated Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, Tobias; Schneider, Darius; Cheng, Yang; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Martinson, Laura; von Herrath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by destruction of glucose-responsive insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells and exhibits immune infiltration of pancreatic islets, where CD8 lymphocytes are most prominent. Curative transplantation of pancreatic islets is seriously hampered by the persistence of autoreactive immune cells that require high doses of immunosuppressive drugs. An elegant approach to confer graft protection while obviating the need for immunosuppression is the use of encapsulation devices that allow for the transfer of oxygen and nutrients, yet prevent immune cells from making direct contact with the islet grafts. Here we demonstrate that macroencapsulation devices (TheraCyte) loaded with neonatal pancreatic tissue and transplanted into RIP-LCMV.GP mice prevented disease onset in a model of virus-induced diabetes mellitus. Histological analyses revealed that insulin-producing cells survived within the device in animal models of diabetes. Our results demonstrate that these encapsulation devices can protect from an immune-mediated attack and can contain a sufficient amount of insulin-producing cells to prevent overt hyperglycemia.

  12. Insight into Genotype-Phenotype Associations through eQTL Mapping in Multiple Cell Types in Health and Immune-Mediated Disease.

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    James E Peters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have transformed our understanding of the genetics of complex traits such as autoimmune diseases, but how risk variants contribute to pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Identifying genetic variants that affect gene expression (expression quantitative trait loci, or eQTLs is crucial to addressing this. eQTLs vary between tissues and following in vitro cellular activation, but have not been examined in the context of human inflammatory diseases. We performed eQTL mapping in five primary immune cell types from patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (n = 91, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (n = 46 and healthy controls (n = 43, revealing eQTLs present only in the context of active inflammatory disease. Moreover, we show that following treatment a proportion of these eQTLs disappear. Through joint analysis of expression data from multiple cell types, we reveal that previous estimates of eQTL immune cell-type specificity are likely to have been exaggerated. Finally, by analysing gene expression data from multiple cell types, we find eQTLs not previously identified by database mining at 34 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci. In summary, this parallel eQTL analysis in multiple leucocyte subsets from patients with active disease provides new insights into the genetic basis of immune-mediated diseases.

  13. The IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against immune-mediated diseases by impairing IL-23-induced Th17 effector response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Meglio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available IL-23 and Th17 cells are key players in tissue immunosurveillance and are implicated in human immune-mediated diseases. Genome-wide association studies have shown that the IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against psoriasis, Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis. We investigated the immunological consequences of the protective IL23R R381Q gene variant in healthy donors. The IL23R R381Q gene variant had no major effect on Th17 cell differentiation as the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was similar in carriers of the IL23R protective (A and common (G allele. Accordingly, Th17 cells generated from A and G donors produced similar amounts of Th17 cytokines. However, IL-23-mediated Th17 cell effector function was impaired, as Th17 cells from A allele carriers had significantly reduced IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT3 phosphorylation compared to G allele carriers. Our functional analysis of a human disease-associated gene variant demonstrates that IL23R R381Q exerts its protective effects through selective attenuation of IL-23-induced Th17 cell effector function without interfering with Th17 differentiation, and highlights its importance in the protection against IL-23-induced tissue pathologies.

  14. The IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against immune-mediated diseases by impairing IL-23-induced Th17 effector response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meglio, Paola; Di Cesare, Antonella; Laggner, Ute; Chu, Chung-Ching; Napolitano, Luca; Villanova, Federica; Tosi, Isabella; Capon, Francesca; Trembath, Richard C; Peris, Ketty; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-22

    IL-23 and Th17 cells are key players in tissue immunosurveillance and are implicated in human immune-mediated diseases. Genome-wide association studies have shown that the IL23R R381Q gene variant protects against psoriasis, Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis. We investigated the immunological consequences of the protective IL23R R381Q gene variant in healthy donors. The IL23R R381Q gene variant had no major effect on Th17 cell differentiation as the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was similar in carriers of the IL23R protective (A) and common (G) allele. Accordingly, Th17 cells generated from A and G donors produced similar amounts of Th17 cytokines. However, IL-23-mediated Th17 cell effector function was impaired, as Th17 cells from A allele carriers had significantly reduced IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT3 phosphorylation compared to G allele carriers. Our functional analysis of a human disease-associated gene variant demonstrates that IL23R R381Q exerts its protective effects through selective attenuation of IL-23-induced Th17 cell effector function without interfering with Th17 differentiation, and highlights its importance in the protection against IL-23-induced tissue pathologies.

  15. Extrapolation in the development of paediatric medicines: examples from approvals for biological treatments for paediatric chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, Anna M; Distlerová, Dorota; Musaus, Joachim; Olski, Thorsten M; Dunder, Kristina; Salmonson, Tomas; Mentzer, Dirk; Müller-Berghaus, Jan; Hemmings, Robert; Veselý, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The European Union (EU) Paediatric Regulation requires that all new medicinal products applying for a marketing authorisation (MA) in the EU provide a paediatric investigation plan (PIP) covering a clinical and non-clinical trial programme relating to the use in the paediatric population, unless a waiver applies. Conducting trials in children is challenging on many levels, including ethical and practical issues, which may affect the availability of the clinical evidence. In scientifically justified cases, extrapolation of data from other populations can be an option to gather evidence supporting the benefit-risk assessment of the medicinal product for paediatric use. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is working on providing a framework for extrapolation that is scientifically valid, reliable and adequate to support MA of medicines for children. It is expected that the extrapolation framework together with therapeutic area guidelines and individual case studies will support future PIPs. Extrapolation has already been employed in several paediatric development programmes including biological treatment for immune-mediated diseases. This article reviews extrapolation strategies from MA applications for products for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, paediatric psoriasis and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease. It also provides a summary of extrapolation advice expressed in relevant EMA guidelines and initiatives supporting the use of alternative approaches in paediatric medicine development. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. An Evaluation of Twenty Years of EU Framework Programme-funded Immune-mediated Inflammatory Translational Research in Non-human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Geraldine Haanstra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing western societies are facing an increasing prevalence of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases for which often no effective treatments exist, resulting in increasing health care expenditure. Despite high investments in drug development, the number of promising new drug candidates decreases. We propose that preclinical research in non-human primate can help to bridge the gap between drug discovery and drug prescription.Translational research covers various stages of drug development of which pre-clinical efficacy tests in valid animal models is usually the last stage. Pre-clinical research in non-human primates may be essential in the evaluation of new drugs or therapies when a relevant rodent model is not available. Non-human primate models for life-threatening or severely debilitating diseases in humans are available at the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC. These have been instrumental in translational research for several decades.In order to stimulate European health research and innovation from bench to bedside, the European Commission (EC has invested heavily in access to non-human primate research for more than 20 years. BPRC has hosted European users in a series of transnational access programs covering a wide range of research areas with the common theme being immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present an overview of the results and give an account of the studies performed as part of European Union Framework Programme (EU FP-funded translational non-human primate research performed at the BPRC. The data illustrate value of translational non-human primate research for the development of new therapies and emphasize the importance of EU FP funding

  17. Gluten-free diet does not influence the occurrence and the Th1/Th17-Th2 nature of immune-mediated diseases in patients with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatore, Nicola; Rispo, Antonio; Capone, Pietro; Donetto, Sara; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Gerbino, Nicolò; Rea, Matilde; Caporaso, Nicola; Tortora, Raffaella

    2016-07-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is the most common Th1-mediated enteropathy, frequently associated with other immune-mediated disorders (IMD). To evaluate: (1) the prevalence of IMD at the time of and after CD diagnosis; (2) a possible change in immune response to gluten free diet (GFD); (3) the potential role of GFD in reducing and/or preventing IMD in CD. Prospective study including all consecutive adult CD patients who underwent investigations for Th1-Th17/Th2-IMD at the time of CD diagnosis and after a 5-year follow-up period. 1255 CD were enrolled. Of these, 257 patients (20.5%) showed IMD at the time of CD diagnosis, with 58.4% presenting a Th1/Th17-IMD. After a 5-year follow-up period, 682 patients (54.3%) showed new IMD despite GFD. Of these, 57.3% presented a Th1/Th17-IMD and 42.7% a Th2-IMD (p=0.8). When compared the prevalence of each type of IMD before and after CD diagnosis, we did not identify any significant "switch" from Th1/Th17- to Th2-IMD or vice versa. The number of patients with Th1/Th17- and/or Th2-IMD increased during the GFD period (20.5% vs 54.3%; p<0.01; OR 1.9). The prevalence of IMD at the time of CD diagnosis is high and it seems to increase in the follow-up period despite GFD. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin D supplementation and disease activity in patients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, André Silva; Freitas, Thiago Quadrante; Bernardo, Wanderley M; Pereira, Rosa Maria R

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D serum levels and the presence and activity of rheumatic conditions have been associated. However, many studies are merely observational, and the existent randomized clinical trials were never systematically analyzed. Therefore, this study aims to provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of such a topic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE, and CINAHL were explored to identify randomized trials that investigated clinical repercussions of vitamin D (or analogs) supplementation for at least 3 months in rheumatic diseases. Standardized clinical and/or laboratorial outcomes related to disease activity were analyzed according to each disease before and after supplementation. Database searches rendered 668 results; 9 were included-5 on rheumatoid arthritis, 3 on systemic lupus erythematosus, and 1 on systemic sclerosis. Seven of the studies were meta-analyzed. After vitamin D supplementation, rheumatoid arthritis recurrence decreased; however, not significantly (risk difference = -0.10, 95% CI = -0.21, 0.00, P = .05). No statistical significance was observed regarding visual analog scale (mean difference = 2.79, 95% CI = -1.87, 7.44, P = .24) and disease activity score28 (mean difference = -0.31, 95% CI = -0.86, 0.25, P = .28). Regarding systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-dsDNA positivity was significantly reduced (risk difference = -0.10, 95% CI = -0.18, -0.03; P = .005). Vitamin D supplementation reduced anti-dsDNA positivity on systemic lupus erythematosus and could possibly reduce rheumatoid arthritis recurrence, although novel randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm and extend the benefits of this hormone in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases.

  19. Chimeric HCMV/HSV-1 and Δγ134.5 oncolytic herpes simplex virus elicit immune mediated antigliomal effect and antitumor memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed G. Ghonime

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor and are characterized by rapid and highly invasive growth. Because of their poor prognosis, new therapeutic strategies are needed. Oncolytic virotherapy (OV is a promising strategy for treating cancer that incorporates both direct viral replication mediated and immune mediated mechanisms to kill tumor cells. C134 is a next generation Δγ134.5 oHSV-1 with improved intratumoral viral replication. It remains safe in the CNS environment by inducing early IFN signaling which restricts its replication in non-malignant cells. We sought to identify how C134 performed in an immunocompetent tumor model that restricts its replication advantage over first generation viruses. To achieve this we identified tumors that have intact IFN signaling responses that restrict C134 and first generation virus replication similarly. Our results show that both viruses elicit a T cell mediated anti-tumor effect and improved animal survival but that subtle difference exist between the viruses effect on median survival despite equivalent in vivo viral replication. To further investigate this we examined the anti-tumor activity in immunodeficient mice and in syngeneic models with re-challenge. These studies show that the T cell response is integral to C134 replication independent anti-tumor response and that OV therapy elicits a durable and circulating anti-tumor memory. The studies also show that repeated intratumoral administration can extend both OV anti-tumor effects and induce durable anti-tumor memory that is superior to tumor antigen exposure alone.

  20. Differential profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity between endocervical and vaginal secretions from women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Rhoda; Kraus, Thomas A; Ding, Jian; Veretennikova, Alina; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Singh, Tricia; Lo, Yungtai; Quayle, Alison J; Chang, Theresa L

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is one of the most prevalent bacterial STIs in the USA and worldwide, and women with C. trachomatis infection are at increased risk of acquiring HIV. Because immune activation at the genital mucosa facilitates HIV/SIV infection, C. trachomatis-mediated cytokine induction may contribute to increased HIV transmission in asymptomatic women. To begin to elucidate the mechanisms, we longitudinally analyzed profiles of innate immune factors and HIV infectivity in genital secretions from anatomically specific sites in asymptomatic women during C. trachomatis infection and post-antibiotic treatment. We found higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in endocervical secretions than vaginal secretions. Compared with the convalescent state, G-CSF, IL-1α, and RANTES were elevated in endocervical secretions, IFN-γ and TNF-α were elevated in vaginal secretions, and IFNγ, IL-1β, and MIP1-α were elevated in cervicolavage fluid (CVL), before adjustment of multiple comparisons. Elevated endocervical levels of IP-10 and MCP-1 were associated with the use of hormonal contraception in infected women after successful treatment, suggesting the role of hormonal contraception in inflammation independent of STIs. Importantly, soluble factors found in endocervical secretions during infection enhanced HIV infectivity while no difference in HIV infectivity was found with vaginal secretions or CVL during infection or at convalescence. Taken together, the profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity indicate that the endocervical and vaginal mucosa are immunologically distinct. Our results underscore the importance of considering anatomical site and local sampling methodology when measuring mucosal responses, particularly in the presence of C. trachomatis infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Role of the mitochondria in immune-mediated apoptotic death of the human pancreatic β cell line βLox5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaíma L Lightfoot

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are indispensable in the life and death of many types of eukaryotic cells. In pancreatic beta cells, mitochondria play an essential role in the secretion of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. Unregulated blood glucose is a hallmark symptom of diabetes. The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by autoimmune-mediated destruction of beta cells. However, the exact role of mitochondria has not been assessed in beta cell death. In this study, we examine the role of mitochondria in both Fas- and proinflammatory cytokine-mediated destruction of the human beta cell line, βLox5. IFNγ primed βLox5 cells for apoptosis by elevating cell surface Fas. Consequently, βLox5 cells were killed by caspase-dependent apoptosis by agonistic activation of Fas, but only after priming with IFNγ. This beta cell line undergoes both apoptotic and necrotic cell death after incubation with the combination of the proinflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. Additionally, both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms that require proper mitochondrial function are involved. Mitochondrial contributions to βLox5 cell death were analyzed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depleted βLox5 cells, or βLox5 ρ(0 cells. βLox5 ρ(0 cells are not sensitive to IFNγ and TNFα killing, indicating a direct role for the mitochondria in cytokine-induced cell death of the parental cell line. However, βLox5 ρ(0 cells are susceptible to Fas killing, implicating caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptotic death is the mechanism by which these human beta cells die after Fas ligation. These data support the hypothesis that immune mediators kill βLox5 cells by both mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic and caspase-dependent extrinsic pathways.

  3. Targeted overexpression of amelotin disrupts the microstructure of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Nakayama, Yohei; Holcroft, James; Nguyen, Van; Somogyi-Ganss, Eszter; Snead, Malcolm L; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L; Ganss, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We have previously identified amelotin (AMTN) as a novel protein expressed predominantly during the late stages of dental enamel formation, but its role during amelogenesis remains to be determined. In this study we generated transgenic mice that produce AMTN under the amelogenin (Amel) gene promoter to study the effect of AMTN overexpression on enamel formation in vivo. The specific overexpression of AMTN in secretory stage ameloblasts was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The gross histological appearance of ameloblasts or supporting cellular structures as well as the expression of the enamel proteins amelogenin (AMEL) and ameloblastin (AMBN) was not altered by AMTN overexpression, suggesting that protein production, processing and secretion occurred normally in transgenic mice. The expression of Odontogenic, Ameloblast-Associated (ODAM) was slightly increased in secretory stage ameloblasts of transgenic animals. The enamel in AMTN-overexpressing mice was much thinner and displayed a highly irregular surface structure compared to wild type littermates. Teeth of transgenic animals underwent rapid attrition due to the brittleness of the enamel layer. The microstructure of enamel, normally a highly ordered arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals, was completely disorganized. Tomes' process, the hallmark of secretory stage ameloblasts, did not form in transgenic mice. Collectively our data demonstrate that the overexpression of amelotin has a profound effect on enamel structure by disrupting the formation of Tomes' process and the orderly growth of enamel prisms.

  4. Targeted overexpression of amelotin disrupts the microstructure of dental enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo S Lacruz

    Full Text Available We have previously identified amelotin (AMTN as a novel protein expressed predominantly during the late stages of dental enamel formation, but its role during amelogenesis remains to be determined. In this study we generated transgenic mice that produce AMTN under the amelogenin (Amel gene promoter to study the effect of AMTN overexpression on enamel formation in vivo. The specific overexpression of AMTN in secretory stage ameloblasts was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The gross histological appearance of ameloblasts or supporting cellular structures as well as the expression of the enamel proteins amelogenin (AMEL and ameloblastin (AMBN was not altered by AMTN overexpression, suggesting that protein production, processing and secretion occurred normally in transgenic mice. The expression of Odontogenic, Ameloblast-Associated (ODAM was slightly increased in secretory stage ameloblasts of transgenic animals. The enamel in AMTN-overexpressing mice was much thinner and displayed a highly irregular surface structure compared to wild type littermates. Teeth of transgenic animals underwent rapid attrition due to the brittleness of the enamel layer. The microstructure of enamel, normally a highly ordered arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals, was completely disorganized. Tomes' process, the hallmark of secretory stage ameloblasts, did not form in transgenic mice. Collectively our data demonstrate that the overexpression of amelotin has a profound effect on enamel structure by disrupting the formation of Tomes' process and the orderly growth of enamel prisms.

  5. Immune-mediated statin myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Priyadarshini; Oddis, Chester V; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is associated with a unique clinical 5 phenotype of severe proximal muscle weakness during or after exposure to statins in patients with high creatine kinase (CK) levels. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy reveal features of a necrotizing myopathy and the anti-HMGCR autoantibody is frequently detected. Treatment requires a combination of statin discontinuation as well as immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapy. HLA typing (HLADRB1*1101) is strongly associated with anti-10 HMGCR autoantibody positivity in statin-exposed patients. It is well documented that statin triggers autoimmune disease in those with a genetic susceptibility. With the commercial availability of an accurate ELISA test, the natural history of the disease and its phenotypic features are becoming increasingly understood.

  6. Persistence with golimumab in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of real-world evidence in rheumatoid arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedbom A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axel Svedbom,1 Chiara Storck,2 Sumesh Kachroo,3 Marinella Govoni,4 Ahmed Khalifa5 1Real World Strategy and Analytics, Mapi Group, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Real World Strategy and Analytics, Mapi Group, Munich, Germany; 3Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence (CORE, Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ, USA; 4MSD Italy, Rome, Italy; 5Medical Affairs Immunology, MSD Switzerland, Luzern, Switzerland Purpose: In immune-mediated rheumatic diseases (IMRDs, persistence to treatment may be used as a surrogate marker for long-term treatment success. In previous comparisons of persistence to tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNFis, a paucity of data for subcutaneous (SC golimumab was identified. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of persistence to SC golimumab in clinical practice and contextualize these data with five-year persistence estimates from long-term open-label extension (OLE trials of SC TNFis in IMRDs.Patients and methods: PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings from European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR, American College of Rheumatology (ACR, and International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR were searched. All studies on patients treated with SC golimumab for IMRD were included if they reported data on the persistence to golimumab.Results: Of 376 available references identified through the searches, 12 studies with a total of 4,910 patients met the inclusion criteria. Furthermore, nine OLE trials were available. Among the included studies from clinical practice, at six months, one year, two years, and three years, the proportion of patients persistent to treatment ranged from 63% to 91%, 47% to 80%, 40% to 77%, and 32% to 67%, respectively. In the four studies that included comparisons to other biologics, golimumab was either statistically noninferior or statistically superior to other treatments, an observation that was supported by indirect comparisons of unadjusted point

  7. Risk of subsequent coronary heart disease in patients hospitalized for immune-mediated diseases: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden.

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    Bengt Zöller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Certain immune-mediated diseases (IMDs, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, have been linked to cardiovascular disorders. We examined whether there is an association between 32 different IMDs and risk of subsequent hospitalization for coronary heart disease (CHD related to coronary atherosclerosis in a nationwide follow up study in Sweden. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All individuals in Sweden hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an IMD (n = 336,479 without previous or coexisting CHD, between January 1, 1964 and December 31 2008, were followed for first hospitalization for CHD. The reference population was the total population of Sweden. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for CHD were calculated. Overall risk of CHD during the first year after hospitalization for an IMD was 2.92 (95% CI 2.84-2.99. Twenty-seven of the 32 IMDs studied were associated with an increased risk of CHD during the first year after hospitalization. The overall risk of CHD decreased over time, from 1.75 after 1-5 years (95% CI 1.73-1.78, to 1.43 after 5-10 years (95% CI 1.41-1.46 and 1.28 after 10+ years (95% CI 1.26-1.30. Females generally had higher SIRs than males. The IMDs for which the SIRs of CDH were highest during the first year after hospitalization included chorea minor 6.98 (95% CI 1.32-20.65, systemic lupus erythematosus 4.94 (95% CI 4.15-5.83, rheumatic fever 4.65 (95% CI 3.53-6.01, Hashimoto's thyroiditis 4.30 (95% CI 3.87-4.75, polymyositis/dermatomyositis 3.81 (95% CI 2.62-5.35, polyarteritis nodosa 3.81 (95% CI 2.72-5.19, rheumatoid arthritis 3.72 (95% CI 3.56-3.88, systemic sclerosis 3.44 (95% CI 2.86-4.09, primary biliary cirrhosis 3.32 (95% CI 2.34-4.58, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia 3.17 (95% CI 2.16-4.47. CONCLUSIONS: Most IMDs are associated with increased risk of CHD in the first year after hospital admission. Our findings suggest that many hospitalized IMDs are tightly linked to coronary atherosclerosis.

  8. Revolutionizing membrane protein overexpression in bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlegel, Susan; Klepsch, Mirjam; Gialama, Dimitra; Wickstrom, David; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Wickström, David

    The bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used expression host for overexpression trials of membrane proteins. Usually, different strains, culture conditions and expression regimes are screened for to identify the optimal overexpression strategy. However, yields are often not satisfactory,

  9. Oncoprotein MDM2 Overexpression is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Distinct Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    MDM2 is an oncoprotein involved in the regulation of p53. MDM2 exerts its tumorigenic potential through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. It is frequently overexpressed in various malignancies. Little is known about the prognostic value of MDM2 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL...... overexpression was present in 42 (22%) of 188 cases. The frequency was highest in aggressive/very aggressive NHL (P lymphomas, MDM2 overexpression was associated with higher-grade disease (P = .008). MDM2 overexpression was not related to a phenotype indicating...... altered p53. In univariate analysis MDM2 overexpression associated with short survival in follicle center lymphomas (P = .0256), extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (P lymphomas (P = .0047). The relation to poor prognosis was maintained in a Cox regression analysis including known...

  10. Constitutive overexpression of muscarinic receptors leads to vagal hyperreactivity.

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    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in muscarinic receptor expression and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity have been observed in tissues from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. Vagal overactivity has been proposed as a possible cause of SIDS as well as of vasovagal syncopes. The aim of the present study was to seek whether muscarinic receptor overexpression may be the underlying mechanism of vagal hyperreactivity. Rabbits with marked vagal pauses following injection of phenylephrine were selected and crossed to obtain a vagal hyperreactive strain. The density of cardiac muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase (AchE gene expression were assessed. Blood markers of the observed cardiac abnormalities were also sought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiac muscarinic M(2 and M(3 receptors were overexpressed in hyperreactive rabbits compared to control animals (2.3-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively and the severity of the phenylephrine-induced bradycardia was correlated with their densities. A similar overexpression of M(2 receptors was observed in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells, suggesting that cardiac M(2 receptor expression can be inferred with high confidence from measurements in blood cells. Sequencing of the coding fragment of the M(2 receptor gene revealed a single nucleotide mutation in 83% of hyperreactive animals, possibly contributing for the transcript overexpression. Significant increases in AchE expression and activity were also assessed (AchE mRNA amplification ratio of 3.6 versus normal rabbits. This phenomenon might represent a compensatory consequence of muscarinic receptors overexpression. Alterations in M(2 receptor and AchE expression occurred between the 5th and the 7th week of age, a critical period also characterized by a higher mortality rate of hyperreactive rabbits (52% in H rabbits versus 13% in normal rabbits and preceeded the appearance of functional disorders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that

  11. Gene Overexpression: Uses, Mechanisms, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The classical genetic approach for exploring biological pathways typically begins by identifying mutations that cause a phenotype of interest. Overexpression or misexpression of a wild-type gene product, however, can also cause mutant phenotypes, providing geneticists with an alternative yet powerful tool to identify pathway components that might remain undetected using traditional loss-of-function analysis. This review describes the history of overexpression, the mechanisms that are responsible for overexpression phenotypes, tests that begin to distinguish between those mechanisms, the varied ways in which overexpression is used, the methods and reagents available in several organisms, and the relevance of overexpression to human disease. PMID:22419077

  12. APRIL is overexpressed in cancer: link with tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreaux, Jérôme; Veyrune, Jean-Luc; De Vos, John; Klein, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    BAFF and APRIL share two receptors – TACI and BCMA – and BAFF binds to a third receptor, BAFF-R. Increased expression of BAFF and APRIL is noted in hematological malignancies. BAFF and APRIL are essential for the survival of normal and malignant B lymphocytes, and altered expression of BAFF or APRIL or of their receptors (BCMA, TACI, or BAFF-R) have been reported in various B-cell malignancies including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. We compared the expression of BAFF, APRIL, TACI and BAFF-R gene expression in 40 human tumor types – brain, epithelial, lymphoid, germ cells – to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. We found significant overexpression of TACI in multiple myeloma and thyroid carcinoma and an association between TACI expression and prognosis in lymphoma. Furthermore, BAFF and APRIL are overexpressed in many cancers and we show that APRIL expression is associated with tumor progression. We also found overexpression of at least one proteoglycan with heparan sulfate chains (HS), which are coreceptors for APRIL and TACI, in tumors where APRIL is either overexpressed or is a prognostic factor. APRIL could induce survival or proliferation directly through HS proteoglycans. Taken together, these data suggest that APRIL is a potential prognostic factor for a large array of malignancies

  13. Risk of subsequent ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients hospitalized for immune-mediated diseases: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zöller Bengt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain immune-mediated diseases (IMDs have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disorders. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there is an association between 32 different IMDs and first hospitalization for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Methods All individuals in Sweden hospitalized with a main diagnosis of IMD (without previous or coexisting stroke, between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 2008 (n = 216,291, were followed for first hospitalization for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. The reference population was the total population of Sweden. Adjusted standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were calculated. Results Totally 20 and 15 of the 32 IMDs studied, respectively, were associated with an increased risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke during the follow-up. The overall risks of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke during the first year after hospitalization for IMD were 2.02 (95% CI 1.90–2.14 and 2.65 (95% CI 2.27–3.08, respectively. The overall risk of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke decreased over time, to 1.50 (95% CI 1.46–1.55 and 1.83 (95% CI 1.69–1.98, respectively, after 1–5 years, and 1.29 (95% CI 1.23–1.35 and 1.47 (95% CI 1.31–1.65, respectively, after 10+ years. The risk of hemorrhagic stroke was ≥2 during the first year after hospitalization for seven IMDs: ankylosing spondylitis (SIR = 8.11, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (SIR = 8.60, polymyalgia rheumatica (SIR = 2.06, psoriasis (SIR = 2.88, rheumatoid arthritis (SIR = 3.27, systemic lupus erythematosus (SIR = 8.65, and Wegener´s granulomatosis (SIR = 5.83. The risk of ischemic stroke was ≥2 during the first year after hospitalization for twelve IMDs: Addison’s disease (SIR = 2.71, Crohn´s disease (SIR = 2.15, Grave´s disease (SIR = 2.15, Hashimoto´s thyroiditis (SIR = 2.99, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (SIR = 2

  14. Discovery of innovative therapies for rare immune-mediated inflammatory diseases via off-label prescription of biologics: the case of IL-6 receptor blockade in Castleman’s disease

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    Anne eMusters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biologics have revolutionized the field of clinical immunology and proven to be both effective and safe in common immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and various haematological disorders. However, in patients with rare, severe IMIDs failing on standard therapies it is virtually impossible to conduct randomized controlled trials. Therefore, biologics are usually prescribed off-label in these often severely ill patients. Unfortunately, off-label prescription is sometimes hampered in these diseases due to a lack of reimbursement that is often based on a presumed lack of evidence for effectiveness. In the present article will discuss that off-label prescription of biologics can be a good way to discover new treatments for rare diseases. This will be ilustrated using a case of multicentric Castleman’s disease, an immune-mediated lymphoproliferative disorder, in which off-label tocilizumab (humanized anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody treatment resulted in remarkable clinical improvement. Furthermore, we will give recommendations for monitoring efficacy and safety of biologic treatment in rare IMIDs, including the use of registries. In conclusion, we put forward that innovative treatments for rare IMIDs can be discovered via off-label prescription of biologicals, provided that this is based on rational arguments including knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease.

  15. NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer

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    Kittas Christos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR, real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS. It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non

  16. General applicability of synthetic gene-overexpression for cell-type ratio control via reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimatsu, Kana; Hata, Takashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Sekine, Ryoji; Yamamura, Masayuki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-09-19

    Control of the cell-type ratio in multistable systems requires wide-range control of the initial states of cells. Here, using a synthetic circuit in E. coli, we describe the use of a simple gene-overexpression system combined with a bistable toggle switch, for the purposes of enabling the wide-range control of cellular states and thus generating arbitrary cell-type ratios. Theoretically, overexpression induction temporarily alters the bistable system to a monostable system, in which the location of the single steady state of cells can be manipulated over a wide range by regulating the overexpression levels. This induced cellular state becomes the initial state of the basal bistable system upon overexpression cessation, which restores the original bistable system. We experimentally demonstrated that the overexpression induced a monomodal cell distribution, and subsequent overexpression withdrawal generated a bimodal distribution. Furthermore, as designed theoretically, regulating the overexpression levels by adjusting the concentrations of small molecules generated arbitrary cell-type ratios.

  17. Gene expression profiles of immune mediators and histopathological findings in animal models of leptospirosis: comparison between susceptible hamsters and resistant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Rouleau, Vincent; Bruyère-Ostells, Lilian; Goarant, Cyrille

    2011-11-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis characterized by multiple organ failure and variable host susceptibility toward pathogenic Leptospira strains. In this study, we put the role of inflammatory mediators in parallel with bacterial burdens and organ lesions by comparing a susceptible animal model, the hamster, and a resistant one, the Oncins France 1 (OF1) mouse, both infected with virulent Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae strain Verdun. Histological observations evidenced edema, congestion, hemorrhage, and inflammatory infiltration in the organs of hamsters, in contrast to limited changes in mice. Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR techniques, we showed that the relative Leptospira burden progressively increased in hamster tissues, while a rapid clearance was observed in mouse tissues. The early regulation of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and cyclo-oxygenase-2 and the chemokines gamma interferon-inducible protein 10 kDa/CXCL10 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CCL3 in mouse tissues contrasted with their delayed and massive overexpression in hamster tissues. Conversely, the induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was faster in the resistant than in the susceptible animal model. The role of these cytokines in the pathophysiology of leptospirosis and the implications of their differential regulation in the development of this disease are discussed.

  18. Overexpression of BiP in tobacco alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leborgne-Castel, N.; Jelitto- Dooren, E.P.W.M. van; Crofts, A.J.; Denecke, J.

    1999-01-01

    To study the role of the lumenal binding protein (BiP) in the transport and secretion of proteins, we have produced plants with altered BiP levels. Transgenic plants overexpressing BiP showed dramatically increased BiP mRNA levels but only a modest increase in BiP protein levels. The presence of

  19. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers

  20. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers.

  1. Estudo epidemiológico das doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas na cavidade oral An epidemiological study of immune-mediated skin diseases affecting the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyntia Helena Pereira de Carvalho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: As doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas compõem diversas patologias que apresentam formas variadas de manifestação no organismo. OBJETIVO: Foi proposição desta pesquisa, estabelecer a prevalência das principais doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas que apresentam manifestação oral. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados laudos histopatológicos de 10.292 casos arquivados no Serviço de Anatomia Patológica da Disciplina de Patologia Oral da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, no período de 1988 a 2009. Dos casos diagnosticados como algum tipo de doença em estudo, coletaram-se dados clínicos como sexo, idade, raça, sítio anatômico e sintomatologia das doenças. RESULTADOS: Do total de casos registrados, no serviço supracitado, 82 (0,8% corresponderam a doenças dermato lógicas imunologicamente mediadas com manifestação na cavidade oral. As doenças encontradas neste estudo foram: líquen plano oral, pênfigo vulgar e penfigoide benigno das membranas mucosas, sendo o líquen plano oral a lesão mais prevalente, representando 68,05% dos casos analisados, dos quais 64,3% apresentavam-se em mu lheres, sendo a mucosa jugal o sítio anatômico mais acometido (46,8%. CONCLUSÃO: A ocorrência de doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas que apresentam manifestação oral ainda é um fato incomum, semelhante ao observado na maioria das regiões mundiais. No entanto, a busca pelo diagnóstico precoce é um requisito essencial para a condução do tratamento dessas doenças, tendo em vista o possível comprometimento sistêmico do organismo nos pacientes.BACKGROUND: Immune-mediated skin diseases encompass a variety of pathologies that present in different forms in the body. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of the principal immune-mediated skin diseases affecting the oral cavity. METHODS: A total of 10,292 histopathology reports stored in the archives of the

  2. Anti-PD-L1/TGFβR2 (M7824) fusion protein induces immunogenic modulation of human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, rendering them more susceptible to immune-mediated recognition and lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Italia; Donahue, Renee N; Gargulak, Morgan L; Lepone, Lauren M; Roselli, Mario; Bilusic, Marijo; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    Avelumab has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma. M7824 is a novel first-in-class bifunctional fusion protein comprising a monoclonal antibody against programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, avelumab), fused to the extracellular domain of human transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) receptor 2, which functions as a TGFβ "trap." Advanced urothelial tumors have been shown to express TGFβ, which possesses immunosuppressive properties that promote cancer progression and metastasis. The rationale for a combined molecule is to block the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction between tumor cells and immune cell infiltrate and simultaneously reduce or eliminate TGFβ from the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we explored the effect of M7824 on invasive urothelial carcinoma cell lines. Human urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma cell lines HTB-4, HTB-1, and HTB-5 were treated with M7824, M7824mut (M7824 that is mutated in the anti-PD-L1 portion of the molecule and thus does not bind PD-L1), anti-PD-L1 (avelumab), or IgG1 isotype control monoclonal antibody, and were assessed for gene expression, cell-surface phenotype, and sensitivity to lysis by TRAIL, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. M7824 retains the ability to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of tumor cells, although in some cases to a lesser extent than anti-PD-L1. However, compared to anti-PD-L1, M7824 increases (A) gene expression of molecules involved in T-cell trafficking in the tumor (e.g., CXCL11), (B) TRAIL-mediated tumor cell lysis, and (C) antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the immunomodulatory properties of M7824 on both tumor cell phenotype and immune-mediated lysis. Compared to anti-PD-L1 or M7824mut, M7824 induces immunogenic modulation of urothelial carcinoma cell lines, rendering them more susceptible to immune-mediated

  3. Overexpression of neurofilament H disrupts normal cell structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Smith, George M.; Li, Ping; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Studying exogenously expressed tagged proteins in live cells has become a standard technique for evaluating protein distribution and function. Typically, expression levels of experimentally introduced proteins are not regulated, and high levels are often preferred to facilitate detection. However, overexpression of many proteins leads to mislocalization and pathologies. Therefore, for normative studies, moderate levels of expression may be more suitable. To understand better the dynamics of intermediate filament formation, transport, and stability in a healthy, living cell, we inserted neurofilament heavy chain (NFH)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs in adenoviral vectors with tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoters. This system allows for turning on or off the synthesis of NFH-GFP at a selected time, for a defined period, in a dose-dependent manner. We used this inducible system for live cell imaging of changes in filament structure and cell shape, motility, and transport associated with increasing NFH-GFP expression. Cells with low to intermediate levels of NFH-GFP were structurally and functionally similar to neighboring, nonexpressing cells. In contrast, overexpression led to pathological alterations in both filament organization and cell function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  5. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells

  6. Influence of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia on flow velocities in the portal vein and caudal vena cava measured by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel Policelli; Koenigshof, Amy M; Smith, Daniel J; Strom, Phillip R; Nelson, Nathan C

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare blood flow velocities of the portal vein (PV) and caudal vena cava (CVC) measured by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in clinically normal dogs and dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). ANIMALS 11 client-owned dogs admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital for management of primary IMHA and 21 staff- or student-owned clinically normal dogs. PROCEDURES Flow velocities in the PV and CVC at the porta hepatis were evaluated in conscious unsedated dogs with concurrent ECG monitoring; evaluations were performed before dogs with IMHA received heparin or blood transfusions. Three measurements of peak velocity at end expiration were obtained for each vessel, and the mean was calculated. Results were compared between IMHA and control groups. RESULTS Mean ± SD blood flow velocity in the CVC differed between control (63.0 ± 18.6 cm/s) and IMHA (104 ± 36.9 cm/s) groups. Variance in dogs with IMHA was significantly greater than that for the clinically normal dogs. No significant difference in blood flow velocity in the PV was detected between IMHA and control dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Higher blood flow velocities were detected by use of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography in the CVC of dogs with naturally occurring IMHA and may be used to predict anemia in patients suspected of having IMHA.

  7. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  8. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma

  9. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Piia, E-mail: piia.takabe@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Bart, Geneviève [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Ropponen, Antti [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  10. Significance of Aurora B overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Aurora B Overexpression in HCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhong-Zhe; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Hu, Fu-Chang; Pan, Hung-Wei; Tsao, Hsin-Wei; Lai, Po-Lin; Lee, Po-Huang; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Hsu, Hey-Chi

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the significance of Aurora B expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The Aurora B and Aurora A mRNA level was measured in 160 HCCs and the paired nontumorous liver tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mutations of the p53 and β-catenin genes were analyzed in 134 and 150 tumors, respectively, by direct sequencing of exon 2 to exon 11 of p53 and exon 3 of β-catenin. Anticancer effects of AZD1152-HQPA, an Aurora B kinase selective inhibitor, were examined in Huh-7 and Hep3B cell lines. Aurora B was overexpressed in 98 (61%) of 160 HCCs and in all 7 HCC cell lines examined. The overexpression of Aurora B was associated with Aurora A overexpression (P = 0.0003) and p53 mutation (P = 0.002) and was inversely associated with β-catenin mutation (P = 0.002). Aurora B overexpression correlated with worse clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariate analysis confirmed that Aurora B overexpression was an independent poor prognostic factor, despite its interaction with Aurora A overexpression and mutations of p53 and β-catenin. In Huh-7 and Hep3B cells, AZD1152-HQPA induced proliferation blockade, histone H3 (Ser10) dephosphorylation, cell cycle disturbance, and apoptosis. Aurora B overexpression is an independent molecular marker predicting tumor invasiveness and poor prognosis of HCC. Aurora B kinase selective inhibitors are potential therapeutic agents for HCC treatment

  11. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  12. Del-1 overexpression potentiates lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Young; Jing, Feifeng; Kim, Hyesoon [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Chae-Ok [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Deok-Jong [Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Young, E-mail: choieun@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-04

    Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory molecule that is highly expressed in the lung and the brain and limits leukocyte migration to these tissues. We previously reported that the expression of Del-1 is positively regulated by p53 in lung endothelial cells. Although several reports have implicated the altered expression of Del-1 gene in cancer patients, little is known about its role in tumor cells. We here investigated the effect of Del-1 on the features of human lung carcinoma cells. Del-1 mRNA was found to be significantly decreased in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 (containing wild type of p53), H1299 (null for p53) and EKVX (mutant p53), compared to in human normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and MRC-5 fibroblasts. The decrease of Del-1 expression was dependent on the p53 activity in the cell lines, but not on the expression of p53. Neither treatment with recombinant human Del-1 protein nor the introduction of adenovirus expressing Del-1 altered the expression of the apoptosis regulators BAX, PUMA and Bcl-2. Unexpectedly, the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Del-1 gene into the lung carcinoma cell lines promoted proliferation and invasion of the lung carcinoma cells, as revealed by BrdU incorporation and transwell invasion assays, respectively. In addition, overexpression of the Del-1 gene enhanced features of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), such as increasing vimentin while decreasing E-cadherin in A549 cells, and increases in the level of Slug, an EMT-associated transcription regulator. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that there are deleterious effects of high levels of Del-1 in lung carcinoma cells, and suggest that Del-1 may be used as a diagnostic or prognostic marker for cancer progression, and as a novel therapeutic target for lung carcinoma. - Highlights: • Developmental Endothelial Locus-1 (Del-1) expression is downregulated in human lung cancer cells.

  13. Del-1 overexpression potentiates lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Young; Jing, Feifeng; Kim, Hyesoon; Yun, Chae-Ok; Han, Deok-Jong; Choi, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory molecule that is highly expressed in the lung and the brain and limits leukocyte migration to these tissues. We previously reported that the expression of Del-1 is positively regulated by p53 in lung endothelial cells. Although several reports have implicated the altered expression of Del-1 gene in cancer patients, little is known about its role in tumor cells. We here investigated the effect of Del-1 on the features of human lung carcinoma cells. Del-1 mRNA was found to be significantly decreased in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 (containing wild type of p53), H1299 (null for p53) and EKVX (mutant p53), compared to in human normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and MRC-5 fibroblasts. The decrease of Del-1 expression was dependent on the p53 activity in the cell lines, but not on the expression of p53. Neither treatment with recombinant human Del-1 protein nor the introduction of adenovirus expressing Del-1 altered the expression of the apoptosis regulators BAX, PUMA and Bcl-2. Unexpectedly, the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Del-1 gene into the lung carcinoma cell lines promoted proliferation and invasion of the lung carcinoma cells, as revealed by BrdU incorporation and transwell invasion assays, respectively. In addition, overexpression of the Del-1 gene enhanced features of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), such as increasing vimentin while decreasing E-cadherin in A549 cells, and increases in the level of Slug, an EMT-associated transcription regulator. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that there are deleterious effects of high levels of Del-1 in lung carcinoma cells, and suggest that Del-1 may be used as a diagnostic or prognostic marker for cancer progression, and as a novel therapeutic target for lung carcinoma. - Highlights: • Developmental Endothelial Locus-1 (Del-1) expression is downregulated in human lung cancer cells.

  14. Hand1 overexpression inhibits medulloblastoma metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Guda, Maheedhara R. [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Martin, Sarah E. [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Antony, Reuben; Fernandez, Karen [Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Lin, Julian [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Tsung, Andrew J. [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Illinois Neurological Institute, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Velpula, Kiran K., E-mail: velpula@uic.edu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States)

    2016-08-19

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. Current treatment includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, ongoing treatment in patients is further classified according to the presence or absence of metastasis. Since metastatic medulloblastoma are refractory to current treatments, there is need to identify novel biomarkers that could be used to reduce metastatic potential, and more importantly be targeted therapeutically. Previously, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced uPAR overexpression is associated with increased accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that uPAR protein act as cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand1. Among the histological subtypes classical and desmoplastic subtypes account for the majority while large cell/anaplastic variant is most commonly associated with metastatic disease. In this present study using immunohistochemical approach and patient data mining for the first time, we demonstrated that Hand1 expression is observed to be downregulated in all the subtypes of medulloblastoma. Previously we showed that Hand1 overexpression regulated medulloblastoma angiogenesis and here we investigated the role of Hand1 in the context of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Moreover, UW228 and D283 cells overexpressing Hand1 demonstrated decreased-expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, β-catenin and SOX2); metastatic marker (SMA); and increased expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin). Strikingly, human pluripotent stem cell antibody array showed that Hand1 overexpression resulted in substantial decrease in pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Otx2, Flk1) suggesting that Hand1 expression may be essential to attenuate the EMT and our findings underscore a novel role for Hand1 in medulloblastoma metastasis. - Highlights: • Hand1 expression is downregulated in Medulloblastoma. • Hand1 over expression reduce

  15. Hand1 overexpression inhibits medulloblastoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Guda, Maheedhara R.; Martin, Sarah E.; Antony, Reuben; Fernandez, Karen; Lin, Julian; Tsung, Andrew J.; Velpula, Kiran K.

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. Current treatment includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, ongoing treatment in patients is further classified according to the presence or absence of metastasis. Since metastatic medulloblastoma are refractory to current treatments, there is need to identify novel biomarkers that could be used to reduce metastatic potential, and more importantly be targeted therapeutically. Previously, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced uPAR overexpression is associated with increased accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that uPAR protein act as cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand1. Among the histological subtypes classical and desmoplastic subtypes account for the majority while large cell/anaplastic variant is most commonly associated with metastatic disease. In this present study using immunohistochemical approach and patient data mining for the first time, we demonstrated that Hand1 expression is observed to be downregulated in all the subtypes of medulloblastoma. Previously we showed that Hand1 overexpression regulated medulloblastoma angiogenesis and here we investigated the role of Hand1 in the context of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Moreover, UW228 and D283 cells overexpressing Hand1 demonstrated decreased-expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, β-catenin and SOX2); metastatic marker (SMA); and increased expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin). Strikingly, human pluripotent stem cell antibody array showed that Hand1 overexpression resulted in substantial decrease in pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Otx2, Flk1) suggesting that Hand1 expression may be essential to attenuate the EMT and our findings underscore a novel role for Hand1 in medulloblastoma metastasis. - Highlights: • Hand1 expression is downregulated in Medulloblastoma. • Hand1 over expression reduce

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor overexpression in miniaturized follicles in female pattern hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paulo Müller; Brianezi, Gabrielli; Martins, Ana Carolina Pereira; Silva, Márcia Guimarães da; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2017-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of female pattern hair loss is still poorly understood. In addition to genetic and hormonal elements, environmental factors could be involved. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is expressed in keratinocytes and can be activated by environmental pollutants leading to alterations in the cell cycle, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here we demonstrate the overexpression of nuclear aryl hydrocarbon receptors in miniaturized hair follicles in female pattern hair loss.

  17. Two Members of the Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter Family, SlALMT4 and SlALMT5, are Expressed during Fruit Development, and the Overexpression of SlALMT5 Alters Organic Acid Contents in Seeds in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Ariyoshi, Michiyo; Nakano, Ryohei; Ushijima, Koichiro; Kubo, Yasutaka; Mori, Izumi C; Higashiizumi, Emi; Galis, Ivan; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2016-11-01

    The aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) family of proteins transports malate and/or inorganic anions across plant membranes. To demonstrate the possible role of ALMT genes in tomato fruit development, we focused on SlALMT4 and SlALMT5, the two major genes expressed during fruit development. Predicted proteins were classified into clade 2 of the family, many members of which localize to endomembranes. Tissue-specific gene expression was determined using transgenic tomato expressing the β-glucuronidase reporter gene controlled by their own promoters. Both the genes were expressed in vascular bundles connecting to developing seeds in fruit and in the embryo of mature seeds. Further, SlALMT5 was expressed in embryo in developing seeds in fruit. Subcellular localization of both proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was established by transiently expressing the green fluorescent protein fusions in plant protoplasts. SlALMT5 probably localized to other endomembranes as well. Localization of SlALMT5 to the ER was also confirmed by immunoblot analysis. The transport function of both SlALMT proteins was investigated electrophysiologically in Xenopus oocytes. SlALMT5 transported malate and inorganic anions such as nitrate and chloride, but not citrate. SlALMT4 also transported malate, but the results were less consistent perhaps because it did not localize strongly to the plasma membrane. To elucidate the physiological role of SlALMT5 further, we overexpressed SlALMT5 in tomato. Compared with the wild type, overexpressors exhibited higher malate and citrate contents in mature seeds, but not in fruit. We conclude that the malate transport function of SlALMT5 expressed in developing fruit influences the organic acid contents in mature seeds. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Brynn B; Highfill, Steven L; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L; Bachovchin, William W; Fry, Terry J

    2013-10-01

    Multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and result in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologs) enzymes can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b) cells, particularly myeloid DCs, to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11bLy6-CLy6-G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared with either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies, particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT.

  19. Overexpression of SOS genes in ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourahmad Jaktaji, Razieh; Pasand, Shirin

    2016-01-15

    Fluoroquinolones are important antibiotics for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli. Mutational studies have shown that ciprofloxacin, a member of fluoroquinolones induces SOS response and mutagenesis in pathogenic bacteria which in turn develop antibiotic resistance. However, inhibition of SOS response can increase recombination activity which in turn leads to genetic variation. The aim of this study was to measure 5 SOS genes expressions in nine E. coli mutants with different MICs for ciprofloxacin following exposure to ciprofloxacin. Gene expression was assessed by quantitative real time PCR. Gene alteration assessment was conducted by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Results showed that the expression of recA was increased in 5 mutants. This overexpression is not related to gene alteration, and enhances the expression of polB and umuCD genes encoding nonmutagenic and mutagenic polymerases, respectively. The direct relationship between the level of SOS expression and the level of resistance to ciprofloxacin was also indicated. It was concluded that novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits RecA activity would enhance the efficiency of common antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ERAP1 overexpression in HPV-induced malignancies: A possible novel immune evasion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Alina; Winter, Jan; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Blatnik, Renata; Klevenz, Alexandra; Bertrand, Miriam; Hoppe, Stephanie; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Riemer, Angelika B

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion of tumors poses a major challenge for immunotherapy. For human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced malignancies, multiple immune evasion mechanisms have been described, including altered expression of antigen processing machinery (APM) components. These changes can directly influence epitope presentation and thus T-cell responses against tumor cells. To date, the APM had not been studied systematically in a large array of HPV + tumor samples. Therefore in this study, systematic expression analysis of the APM was performed on the mRNA and protein level in a comprehensive collection of HPV16 + cell lines. Subsequently, HPV + cervical tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. ERAP1 (endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1) was the only APM component consistently altered - namely overexpressed - in HPV16 + tumor cell lines. ERAP1 was also found to be overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer samples; expression levels were increasing with disease stage. On the functional level, the influence of ERAP1 expression levels on HPV16 E7-derived epitope presentation was investigated by mass spectrometry and in cytotoxicity assays with HPV16-specific T-cell lines. ERAP1 overexpression did not cause a complete destruction of any of the HPV epitopes analyzed, however, an influence of ERAP1 overexpression on the presentation levels of certain HPV epitopes could be demonstrated by HPV16-specific CD8 + T-cells. These showed enhanced killing toward HPV16 + CaSki cells whose ERAP1 expression had been attenuated to normal levels. ERAP1 overexpression may thus represent a novel immune evasion mechanism in HPV-induced malignancies, in cases when presentation of clinically relevant epitopes is reduced by overactivity of this peptidase.

  1. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jun [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Liu, Pin [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Weiguo [Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-05

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  2. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  3. Narcolepsy as an Immune-Mediated Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto K. De la Herrán-Arita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagonic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. This disease is secondary to the specific loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. An autoimmune basis for the disease has long been suspected based on its strong association with the genetic marker DQB1*06:02, and current studies greatly support this hypothesis. Narcolepsy with hypocretin deficiency is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA and T cell receptor (TCR polymorphisms, suggesting that an autoimmune process targets a peptide unique to hypocretin-producing neurons via specific HLA-peptide-TCR interactions. This concept has gained a lot of notoriety after the increase of childhood narcolepsy in 2010 following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1 in China and vaccination with Pandemrix, an adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine that was used in Scandinavia. The surge of narcolepsy cases subsequent to influenza A H1N1 infection and H1N1 vaccination suggests that processes such as molecular mimicry or bystander activation might be crucial for disease development.

  4. Immune mediated neuropathy following checkpoint immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yufan; Menzies, Alexander M; Long, Georgina V; Fernando, S L; Herkes, G

    2017-11-01

    Checkpoint immunotherapy has revolutionised cancer therapy and is now standard treatment for many malignancies including metastatic melanoma. Acute inflammatory neuropathies, often labelled as Guillain-Barre syndrome, are an uncommon but potentially severe complication of checkpoint immunotherapy with individual cases described but never characterised as a group. We describe a case of acute sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy following a single dose of combination ipilimumab and nivolumab for metastatic melanoma. A literature search was performed, identifying 14 other cases of acute neuropathy following checkpoint immunotherapy, with the clinical, electrophysiological and laboratory features summarised. Most cases described an acute sensorimotor neuropathy (92%) with hyporeflexia (92%) that could occur from induction up till many weeks after the final dose of therapy. In contrast to Guillain-Barre syndrome, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis often shows a lymphocytic picture (50%) and the electrophysiology showed an axonal pattern (55%). Treatment was variable and often in combination. 11 cases received steroid therapy with only 1 death within this group, whereas of the 4 patients who did not receive steroid therapy there were 3 deaths. In conclusion checkpoint immunotherapy - induced acute neuropathies are distinct from and progress differently to Guillain-Barre syndrome. As with other immunotherapy related adverse events corticosteroid therapy should be initiated in addition to usual therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cancer as an immune-mediated disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurin MR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael R ShurinDepartments of Pathology and Immunology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The link between oncology and immunology has a long history and its development is forced by the necessity to develop innovative and highly efficient modalities for immunological destruction of malignant cells. The limited efficacy of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation also exemplify these issues, as these treatments do not eliminate all cancerous cells, do not address the immunosuppressive nature of the disease and can further impair the patient's immune response weakening patient's resistance to the cancer. Multidisciplinary analysis of the interaction between the immune system and cancer in preclinical and clinical settings suggests that the immune system is closely intertwined with both cancer pathogenesis and treatment. On the one hand, cancer is a manifestation of malfunctions in immunity, as malignant cells manage to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. Chronic infections and inflammation associated with limited or polarized immune responses also contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The tumor immunoenvironment represents specific conditions and elements that support cancerous cell survival, proliferation and spreading. On the other hand, the specificity and strength of antitumor immunity is a powerful and efficient tool that can be used to recognize and destroy neoplastic cells or their supporting microenvironment. Understanding the role of the immune system in controlling and supporting tumor initiation, formation, growth and progression has crucial implications for cancer therapy and will therefore guide the future development of cancer immunotherapy and its combination with conventional therapies to achieve optimal antitumor effects in patients with different types of cancer.Keywords: tumor immunology and immunotherapy, tumor immunoenvironment, cancer, immunosuppression, regulatory immune cells

  6. Overexpression of Drosophila frataxin triggers cell death in an iron-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenharter, Oliver; Clement, Janik; Schneuwly, Stephan; Navarro, Juan A

    2017-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most important autosomal recessive ataxia in the Caucasian population. FRDA patients display severe neurological and cardiac symptoms that reflect a strong cellular and axonal degeneration. FRDA is caused by a loss of function of the mitochondrial protein frataxin which impairs the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and in turn the catalytic activity of several enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain leading to a diminished energy production. Although FRDA is due to frataxin depletion, overexpression might also be very helpful to better understand cellular functions of frataxin. In this work, we have increased frataxin expression in neurons to elucidate specific roles that frataxin might play in these tissues. Using molecular, biochemical, histological and behavioral methods, we report that frataxin overexpression is sufficient to increase oxidative phosphorylation, modify mitochondrial morphology, alter iron homeostasis and trigger oxidative stress-dependent cell death. Interestingly, genetic manipulation of mitochondrial iron metabolism by silencing mitoferrin successfully improves cell survival under oxidative-attack conditions, although enhancing antioxidant defenses or mitochondrial fusion failed to ameliorate frataxin overexpression phenotypes. This result suggests that cell degeneration is directly related to enhanced incorporation of iron into the mitochondria. Drosophila frataxin overexpression might also provide an alternative approach to identify processes that are important in FRDA such as changes in mitochondrial morphology and oxidative stress induced cell death.

  7. Overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms cellular metabolism and promotes glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Muraleedharan, Ranjithmenon; Lambert, Paul F.; Lane, Andrew N.; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2017-01-01

    The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in many human malignancies including at early tumor stages. Our reported in vitro and in vivo models of squamous cell carcinoma have demonstrated that DEK contributes functionally to cellular and tumor survival and to proliferation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Based on recent RNA sequencing experiments, DEK expression was necessary for the transcription of several metabolic enzymes involved in anabolic pathways. This identified a possible mechanism whereby DEK may drive cellular metabolism to enable cell proliferation. Functional metabolic Seahorse analysis demonstrated increased baseline and maximum extracellular acidification rates, a readout of glycolysis, in DEK-overexpressing keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DEK overexpression also increased the maximum rate of oxygen consumption and therefore increased the potential for oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). To detect small metabolites that participate in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) that supplies substrate for OxPhos, we carried out NMR-based metabolomics studies. We found that high levels of DEK significantly reprogrammed cellular metabolism and altered the abundances of amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates and the glycolytic end products lactate, alanine and NAD+. Taken together, these data support a scenario whereby overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms keratinocyte metabolism to fulfill energy and macromolecule demands required to enable and sustain cancer cell growth. PMID:28558019

  8. Overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms cellular metabolism and promotes glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie C Matrka

    Full Text Available The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in many human malignancies including at early tumor stages. Our reported in vitro and in vivo models of squamous cell carcinoma have demonstrated that DEK contributes functionally to cellular and tumor survival and to proliferation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Based on recent RNA sequencing experiments, DEK expression was necessary for the transcription of several metabolic enzymes involved in anabolic pathways. This identified a possible mechanism whereby DEK may drive cellular metabolism to enable cell proliferation. Functional metabolic Seahorse analysis demonstrated increased baseline and maximum extracellular acidification rates, a readout of glycolysis, in DEK-overexpressing keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DEK overexpression also increased the maximum rate of oxygen consumption and therefore increased the potential for oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos. To detect small metabolites that participate in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA that supplies substrate for OxPhos, we carried out NMR-based metabolomics studies. We found that high levels of DEK significantly reprogrammed cellular metabolism and altered the abundances of amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates and the glycolytic end products lactate, alanine and NAD+. Taken together, these data support a scenario whereby overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms keratinocyte metabolism to fulfill energy and macromolecule demands required to enable and sustain cancer cell growth.

  9. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ravacci, Graziela Rosa; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Tortelli, Tharcisio Citrângulo; Torrinhas, Raquel Suzana M. M.; Santos, Jéssica Reis; Logullo, Angela Flávia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expressi...

  10. Altered Mucin and Glycoprotein Expression in Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Denise N; McNamara, Nancy A

    2015-09-01

    Mucins are among the many important constituents of a healthy tear film. Mucins secreted and/or associated with conjunctival goblet cells, ocular mucosal epithelial cells, and the lacrimal gland must work together to create a stable tear film. Although many studies have explored the mechanism(s) whereby mucins maintain and protect the ocular surface, the effects of dry eye on the structure and function of ocular mucins are unclear. Here, we summarize current findings regarding ocular mucins and how they are altered in dry eye. We performed a literature review of studies exploring the expression of mucins produced and/or associated with tissues that comprise the lacrimal functional unit and how they are altered in dry eye. We also summarize new insights on the immune-mediated effects of aqueous tear deficiency on ocular surface mucins that we discovered using a mouse model of dry eye. Although consistent decreases in MUC5AC and altered expression of membrane-bound mucins have been noted in both Sjögren and non-Sjögren dry eye, many reports of altered mucins in dry eye are contradictory. Mechanistic studies, including our own, suggest that changes in the glycosylation of mucins rather than the proteins themselves may occur as the direct result of local inflammation induced by proinflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1. Altered expression of ocular mucins in dry eye varies considerably from study to study, likely attributed to inherent difficulties in analyzing small-volume tear samples, as well as differences in tear collection methods and disease severity in dry eye cohorts. To better define the functional role of ocular mucin glycosylation in the pathogenesis of dry eye disease, we propose genomic and proteomic studies along with biological pathway analysis to reveal novel avenues for exploration.

  11. Overexpression of the essential Sis1 chaperone reduces TDP-43 effects on toxicity and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sei-Kyoung; Hong, Joo Y.; Arslan, Fatih; Tietsort, Alex; Tank, Elizabeth M. H.; Li, Xingli

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons with inclusions frequently containing the RNA/DNA binding protein TDP-43. Using a yeast model of ALS exhibiting TDP-43 dependent toxicity, we now show that TDP-43 overexpression dramatically alters cell shape and reduces ubiquitin dependent proteolysis of a reporter construct. Furthermore, we show that an excess of the Hsp40 chaperone, Sis1, reduced TDP-43’s effect on toxicity, cell shape and proteolysis. The strength of these effects was influenced by the presence of the endogenous yeast prion, [PIN+]. Although overexpression of Sis1 altered the TDP-43 aggregation pattern, we did not detect physical association of Sis1 with TDP-43, suggesting the possibility of indirect effects on TDP-43 aggregation. Furthermore, overexpression of the mammalian Sis1 homologue, DNAJB1, relieves TDP-43 mediated toxicity in primary rodent cortical neurons, suggesting that Sis1 and its homologues may have neuroprotective effects in ALS. PMID:28531192

  12. Induction of epigenetic variation in Arabidopsis by over-expression of DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Brocklehurst

    Full Text Available Epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation and histone modification can vary among plant accessions creating epi-alleles with different levels of expression competence. Mutations in epigenetic pathway functions are powerful tools to induce epigenetic variation. As an alternative approach, we investigated the potential of over-expressing an epigenetic function, using DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1 for proof-of-concept. In Arabidopsis thaliana, MET1 controls maintenance of cytosine methylation at symmetrical CG positions. At some loci, which contain dense DNA methylation in CG- and non-CG context, loss of MET1 causes joint loss of all cytosines methylation marks. We find that over-expression of both catalytically active and inactive versions of MET1 stochastically generates new epi-alleles at loci encoding transposable elements, non-coding RNAs and proteins, which results for most loci in an increase in expression. Individual transformants share some common phenotypes and genes with altered gene expression. Altered expression states can be transmitted to the next generation, which does not require the continuous presence of the MET1 transgene. Long-term stability and epigenetic features differ for individual loci. Our data show that over-expression of MET1, and potentially of other genes encoding epigenetic factors, offers an alternative strategy to identify epigenetic target genes and to create novel epi-alleles.

  13. Overexpressed TP73 induces apoptosis in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellino, Robert C; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Lin, Linda L; Skapura, Darlene G; Rajan, Jessen A; Adesina, Adekunle M; Perlaky, Laszlo; Irwin, Meredith S; Kim, John YH

    2007-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Children who relapse usually die of their disease, which reflects resistance to radiation and/or chemotherapy. Improvements in outcome require a better understanding of the molecular basis of medulloblastoma growth and treatment response. TP73 is a member of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors and mediates apoptotic responses to genotoxic stress. In this study, we assessed expression of TP73 RNA species in patient tumor specimens and in medulloblastoma cell lines, and manipulated expression of full-length TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 to assess their effects on growth. We analyzed medulloblastoma samples from thirty-four pediatric patients and the established medulloblastoma cell lines, Daoy and D283MED, for expression of TP73 RNA including the full-length transcript and the 5'-terminal variants that encode the ΔNp73 isoform, as well as TP53 RNA using quantitative real time-RTPCR. Protein expression of TAp73 and ΔNp73 was quantitated with immunoblotting methods. Clinical outcome was analyzed based on TP73 RNA and p53 protein expression. To determine effects of overexpression or knock-down of TAp73 and ΔNp73 on cell cycle and apoptosis, we analyzed transiently transfected medulloblastoma cell lines with flow cytometric and TUNEL methods. Patient medulloblastoma samples and cell lines expressed full-length and 5'-terminal variant TP73 RNA species in 100-fold excess compared to non-neoplastic brain controls. Western immunoblot analysis confirmed their elevated levels of TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 proteins. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed trends toward favorable overall and progression-free survival of patients whose tumors display TAp73 RNA overexpression. Overexpression of TAp73 or ΔNp73 induced apoptosis under basal growth conditions in vitro and sensitized them to cell death in response to

  14. Overexpressed TP73 induces apoptosis in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlaky Laszlo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Children who relapse usually die of their disease, which reflects resistance to radiation and/or chemotherapy. Improvements in outcome require a better understanding of the molecular basis of medulloblastoma growth and treatment response. TP73 is a member of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors and mediates apoptotic responses to genotoxic stress. In this study, we assessed expression of TP73 RNA species in patient tumor specimens and in medulloblastoma cell lines, and manipulated expression of full-length TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 to assess their effects on growth. Methods We analyzed medulloblastoma samples from thirty-four pediatric patients and the established medulloblastoma cell lines, Daoy and D283MED, for expression of TP73 RNA including the full-length transcript and the 5'-terminal variants that encode the ΔNp73 isoform, as well as TP53 RNA using quantitative real time-RTPCR. Protein expression of TAp73 and ΔNp73 was quantitated with immunoblotting methods. Clinical outcome was analyzed based on TP73 RNA and p53 protein expression. To determine effects of overexpression or knock-down of TAp73 and ΔNp73 on cell cycle and apoptosis, we analyzed transiently transfected medulloblastoma cell lines with flow cytometric and TUNEL methods. Results Patient medulloblastoma samples and cell lines expressed full-length and 5'-terminal variant TP73 RNA species in 100-fold excess compared to non-neoplastic brain controls. Western immunoblot analysis confirmed their elevated levels of TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 proteins. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed trends toward favorable overall and progression-free survival of patients whose tumors display TAp73 RNA overexpression. Overexpression of TAp73 or ΔNp73 induced apoptosis under basal growth conditions in vitro and

  15. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  16. Mind-altering with the gut: Modulation of the gut-brain axis with probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namhee; Yun, Misun; Oh, Young Joon; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2018-03-01

    It is increasingly evident that bidirectional interactions exist among the gastrointestinal tract, the enteric nervous system, and the central nervous system. Recent preclinical and clinical trials have shown that gut microbiota plays an important role in these gut-brain interactions. Furthermore, alterations in gut microbiota composition may be associated with pathogenesis of various neurological disorders, including stress, autism, depression, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the concepts of the microbiota-gut-brain axis is emerging. Here, we review the role of gut microbiota in bidirectional interactions between the gut and the brain, including neural, immune-mediated, and metabolic mechanisms. We highlight recent advances in the understanding of probiotic modulation of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders via the gut-brain axis.

  17. Effects of CD44 and E-cadherin overexpression on the proliferation, adhesion and invasion of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meiya; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Jin, Bohong; Zhang, Fubin; Zhu, Linyan; Cui, Lining

    2017-12-01

    CD44 is a prognostic indicator of shorter survival time in ovarian cancer. E-cadherin fragmentation promotes the progression of ovarian cancer. However, the effects of CD44 and E-cadherin overexpression on ovarian cancer cells have remained elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of overexpression of CD44 and E-cadherin on cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. Overexpression of CD44 and E-cadherin was achieved by transfecting SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells with viruses carrying the CD44 or E-cadherin gene, respectively. Expression of CD44 and E-cadherin was detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells was measured by a Cell Counting Kit-8 at 0, 24 and 48 h after viral transfection. The adhesion ability of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells to the endothelial layer was detected. A Transwell invasion assay was utilized to assess the invasion ability of the cells. Overexpression of CD44 and E-cadherin in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells was confirmed by western blot. Compared with the blank or negative control groups, the CD44 overexpression groups of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells exhibited an increased cell proliferation rate at 24 and 48 h, whereas overexpression of E-cadherin did not alter the proliferation of these cells. Furthermore, compared with the blank and negative control groups, the cell adhesion and invasion ability in the CD44 overexpression groups of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells was markedly higher. There were no significant differences in adhesion ability between the E-cadherin overexpression group and the blank/negative control group. Of note, overexpression of E-cadherin decreased the invasive ability of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells. In conclusion, Overexpression of CD44 increased the proliferation, adhesion and invasion of ovarian cancer cells, while overexpression of E-cadherin decreased the invasion of ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Interleukin-6 overexpression induces pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M Kathryn; Syrkina, Olga L; Kolliputi, Narasaish; Mark, Eugene J; Hales, Charles A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2009-01-30

    Inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 is elevated in the serum and lungs of patients with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Several animal models of PAH cite the potential role of inflammatory mediators. We investigated role of IL-6 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease. Indices of pulmonary vascular remodeling were measured in lung-specific IL-6-overexpressing transgenic mice (Tg(+)) and compared to wild-type (Tg(-)) controls in both normoxic and chronic hypoxic conditions. The Tg(+) mice exhibited elevated right ventricular systolic pressures and right ventricular hypertrophy with corresponding pulmonary vasculopathic changes, all of which were exacerbated by chronic hypoxia. IL-6 overexpression increased muscularization of the proximal arterial tree, and hypoxia enhanced this effect. It also reproduced the muscularization and proliferative arteriopathy seen in the distal arteriolar vessels of PAH patients. The latter was characterized by the formation of occlusive neointimal angioproliferative lesions that worsened with hypoxia and were composed of endothelial cells and T-lymphocytes. IL-6-induced arteriopathic changes were accompanied by activation of proangiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, the proproliferative kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase, proproliferative transcription factors c-MYC and MAX, and the antiapoptotic proteins survivin and Bcl-2 and downregulation of the growth inhibitor transforming growth factor-beta and proapoptotic kinases JNK and p38. These findings suggest that IL-6 promotes the development and progression of pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH through proproliferative antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  19. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-01-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  20. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  1. Transgenerational Social Stress Alters Immune–Behavior Associations and the Response to Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Hicks-Nelson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Similar to the multi-hit theory of schizophrenia, social behavior pathologies are mediated by multiple factors across generations, likely acting additively, synergistically, or antagonistically. Exposure to social adversity, especially during early life, has been proposed to induce depression symptoms through immune mediated mechanisms. Basal immune factors are altered in a variety of neurobehavioral models. In the current study, we assessed two aspects of a transgenerational chronic social stress (CSS rat model and its effects on the immune system. First, we asked whether exposure of F0 dams and their F1 litters to CSS changes basal levels of IL-6, TNF, IFN-γ, and social behavior in CSS F1 female juvenile rats. Second, we asked whether the F2 generation could generate normal immunological responses following vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG. We report several changes in the associations between social behaviors and cytokines in the F1 juvenile offspring of the CSS model. It is suggested that changes in the immune–behavior relationships in F1 juveniles indicate the early stages of immune mediated disruption of social behavior that becomes more apparent in F1 dams and the F2 generation. We also report preliminary evidence of elevated IL-6 and impaired interferon-gamma responses in BCG-vaccinated F2 females. In conclusion, transgenerational social stress alters both immune–behavior associations and responses to vaccination. It is hypothesized that the effects of social stress may accumulate over generations through changes in the immune system, establishing the immune system as an effective preventative or treatment target for social behavior pathologies.

  2. CEP55 overexpression predicts poor prognosis in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenpeng; Wang, Zhou; Jia, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) involves alterations in multiple genes with corresponding proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that centrosomal protein 55 (CEP55) shares certain features with oncogenes, and CEP55 overexpression is associated with the development and progression of malignant tumors. The present study aimed to analyze, for the first time, whether CEP55 expression is related to clinicopothalogic features in the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), as well as patient survival. A total of 110 patients with mid-thoracic ESCC who suffered from Ivor-Lewis were enrolled. The CEP55 expression profile of these patients in tumour tissues and corresponding healthy esophageal mucosa (CHEM) was detected by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses. Correlations between CEP55 expression and clinicopathological factors were analyzed using χ 2 test. The log-rank test was employed to calculate survival rate. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed to determine independent prognostic factors. The results demonstrated that CEP55 expression in ESCC was significantly higher than that of CHEM (POverexpression of CEP55 was significantly associated with differentiation degree (P=0.022), T stage (P=0.019), lymph node metastasis (P=0.033), clinicopathological staging (P=0.002) and tumor recurrence (P=0.021) in locally advanced ESCC patients. In addition, CEP55 overexpression was significantly associated with reduced overall survival of patients after surgery (P=0.012). The 5-year survival rate of patients without CEP55 overexpression was significantly higher than that of patients with CEP55 overexpression (P=0.012). Therefore, these findings suggest that CEP55 overexpression correlates with poor prognosis in locally advanced ESCC patients.

  3. Effects of clusterin over-expression on metastatic progression and therapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, Louise; Whyte, Lorna; Chatterjee, Namita; Tenniswood, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Clusterin is a secreted glycoprotein that is upregulated in a variety of cell lines in response to stress, and enhances cell survival. A second nuclear isoform of clusterin that is associated with cell death has also been identified. The aim of this study was to determine the role(s) of the secretory isoform in breast tumor progression and metastasis. To investigate the role of secretory clusterin in the biology of breast cancer tumor growth and resistance to therapy we have engineered an MCF-7 cell line (MCF-7CLU) that over-expresses clusterin. We have measured the in vitro effects of clusterin over-expression on cell cycle, cell death, and sensitivity to TNFalpha and tamoxifen. Using an orthotopic model of breast cancer, we have also determined the effects of over-expression of clusterin on tumor growth and metastatic progression. In vitro, over-expression of secretory clusterin alters the cell cycle kinetics and decreases the rate of cell death, resulting in the enhancement of cell growth. Over-expression of secretory clusterin also blocks the TNFalpha-mediated induction of p21 and abrogates the cleavage of Bax to t-Bax, rendering the MCF-7CLU cells significantly more resistant to the cytokine than the parental cells. Orthotopic primary tumors derived from MCF-7CLU cells grow significantly more rapidly than tumors derived from parental MCF-7 cells and, unlike the parental cells, metastasize frequently to the lungs. These data suggest that secretory clusterin, which is frequently up-regulated in breast cancers by common therapies, including anti-estrogens, may play a significant role in tumor growth, metastatic progression and subsequent drug resistance in surviving cells

  4. Effects of clusterin over-expression on metastatic progression and therapy in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Namita

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clusterin is a secreted glycoprotein that is upregulated in a variety of cell lines in response to stress, and enhances cell survival. A second nuclear isoform of clusterin that is associated with cell death has also been identified. The aim of this study was to determine the role(s of the secretory isoform in breast tumor progression and metastasis. Methods To investigate the role of secretory clusterin in the biology of breast cancer tumor growth and resistance to therapy we have engineered an MCF-7 cell line (MCF-7CLU that over-expresses clusterin. We have measured the in vitro effects of clusterin over-expression on cell cycle, cell death, and sensitivity to TNFalpha and tamoxifen. Using an orthotopic model of breast cancer, we have also determined the effects of over-expression of clusterin on tumor growth and metastatic progression. Results In vitro, over-expression of secretory clusterin alters the cell cycle kinetics and decreases the rate of cell death, resulting in the enhancement of cell growth. Over-expression of secretory clusterin also blocks the TNFalpha-mediated induction of p21 and abrogates the cleavage of Bax to t-Bax, rendering the MCF-7CLU cells significantly more resistant to the cytokine than the parental cells. Orthotopic primary tumors derived from MCF-7CLU cells grow significantly more rapidly than tumors derived from parental MCF-7 cells and, unlike the parental cells, metastasize frequently to the lungs. Conclusions These data suggest that secretory clusterin, which is frequently up-regulated in breast cancers by common therapies, including anti-estrogens, may play a significant role in tumor growth, metastatic progression and subsequent drug resistance in surviving cells.

  5. [Epigenetic alterations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Meneses, María Del Pilar; Pérez-Vera, Patricia

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer. It is well-known that genetic alterations constitute the basis for the etiology of ALL. However, genetic abnormalities are not enough for the complete development of the disease, and additional alterations such as epigenetic modifications are required. Such alterations, like DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA regulation have been identified in ALL. DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions is one of the most frequent epigenetic modifications observed in ALL. This modification frequently leads to gene silencing in tumor suppressor genes, and in consequence, contributes to leukemogenesis. Alterations in histone remodeling proteins have also been detected in ALL, such as the overexpression of histone deacetylases enzymes, and alteration of acetyltransferases and methyltransferases. ALL also shows alteration in the expression of miRNAs, and in consequence, the modification in the expression of their target genes. All of these epigenetic modifications are key events in the malignant transformation since they lead to the deregulation of oncogenes as BLK, WNT5B and WISP1, and tumor suppressors such as FHIT, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and TP53, which alter fundamental cellular processes and potentially lead to the development of ALL. Both genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the development and evolution of ALL. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Overexpression of AtGRDP2, a novel glycine-rich domain protein, accelerates plant growth and improves stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Azucena Ortega-Amaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins with glycine-rich signatures have been reported in a wide variety of organisms including plants, mammalians, fungi, and bacteria. Plant glycine-rich protein genes exhibit developmental and tissue-specific expression patterns. Herein, we present the characterization of the AtGRDP2 gene using Arabidopsis null and knockdown mutants and, Arabidopsis and lettuce over-expression lines. AtGRDP2 encodes a short glycine-rich domain protein, containing a DUF1399 domain and a putative RNA recognition motif. AtGRDP2 transcript is mainly expressed in Arabidopsis floral organs, and its deregulation in Arabidopsis Atgrdp2 mutants and 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines produces alterations in development. The 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines grow faster than the WT, while the Atgrdp2 mutants have a delay in growth and development. The over-expression lines accumulate higher levels of indole-3-acetic acid and, have alterations in the expression pattern of ARF6, ARF8 and miR167 regulators of floral development and auxin signaling. Under salt stress conditions, 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines displayed higher tolerance and increased expression of stress marker genes. Likewise, transgenic lettuce plants over-expressing the AtGRDP2 gene manifest increased growth rate and early flowering time. Our data reveal an important role for AtGRDP2 in Arabidopsis development and stress response, and suggest a connection between AtGRDP2 and auxin signaling.

  7. Homeobox B9 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas and promotes tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fangyi; Dong, Lei; Xing, Rong; Wang, Li; Luan, Fengming; Yao, Chenhui; Ji, Xuening; Bai, Lizhi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation in HCC cells. - Abstract: HomeoboxB9 (HOXB9), a nontransforming transcription factor that is overexpressed in multiple tumor types, alters tumor cell fate and promotes tumor progression. However, the role of HOXB9 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development has not been well studied. In this paper, we found that HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. We investigated HOXB9 expression and its prognostic value for HCC. HCC surgical tissue samples were taken from 89 HCC patients. HOXB9 overexpression was observed in 65.2% of the cases, and the survival analysis showed that the HOXB9 overexpression group had significantly shorter overall survival time than the HOXB9 downexpression group. The ectopic expression of HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells; whereas the knockdown of HOXB9 produced an opposite effect. HOXB9 also modulated the tumorigenicity of HCC cells in vivo. Moreover, we found that the activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation activities. The results provide the first evidence that HOXB9 is a critical regulator of tumor growth factor in HCC

  8. Homeobox B9 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas and promotes tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyi [Department of General Surgery, Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, No. 8 Sanba Square, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dlleidong@126.com [Department of Laparoscopic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, No. 193 Lianhe Street, Shahekou District, Dalian 116001 (China); Xing, Rong [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Dalian Medical University, No. 9 Lvshunnan Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Wang, Li; Luan, Fengming; Yao, Chenhui [Department of General Surgery, Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, No. 8 Sanba Square, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Ji, Xuening [Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, No. 6 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China); Bai, Lizhi, E-mail: dllizhibai@126.com [Department of Emergency, Zhongshan Hospital of Dalian University, No. 6 Jiefang Street, Zhongshan District, Dalian 116001 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation in HCC cells. - Abstract: HomeoboxB9 (HOXB9), a nontransforming transcription factor that is overexpressed in multiple tumor types, alters tumor cell fate and promotes tumor progression. However, the role of HOXB9 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development has not been well studied. In this paper, we found that HOXB9 is overexpressed in human HCC samples. We investigated HOXB9 expression and its prognostic value for HCC. HCC surgical tissue samples were taken from 89 HCC patients. HOXB9 overexpression was observed in 65.2% of the cases, and the survival analysis showed that the HOXB9 overexpression group had significantly shorter overall survival time than the HOXB9 downexpression group. The ectopic expression of HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation of HCC cells; whereas the knockdown of HOXB9 produced an opposite effect. HOXB9 also modulated the tumorigenicity of HCC cells in vivo. Moreover, we found that the activation of TGF-β1 contributes to HOXB9-induced proliferation activities. The results provide the first evidence that HOXB9 is a critical regulator of tumor growth factor in HCC.

  9. Overexpression of transforming growth factor-β1 in fetal monkey lung results in prenatal pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantal, A.F.; Chen, H.; Shi, T.T.; Lu, C-H.; Fang, A.B.; Buckley, S.; Kolb, M.; Gauldie, J.; Warburton, D.; Shi, W.

    2011-01-01

    Altered transforming growth factor (TGF)-β expression levels have been linked to a variety of human respiratory diseases, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary fibrosis. However, a causative role for aberrant TGF-β in neonatal lung diseases has not been defined in primates. Exogenous and transient TGF-β1 overexpression in fetal monkey lung was achieved by transabdominal ultrasound-guided fetal intrapulmonary injection of adenoviral vector expressing TGF-β1 at the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The lungs were then harvested near term, and fixed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Lung hypoplasia was observed where TGF-β1 was overexpressed during the second trimester. The most clearly marked phenotype consisted of severe pulmonary and pleural fibrosis, which was independent of the gestational time point when TGF-β1 was overexpressed. Increased cell proliferation, particularly in α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts, was detected within the fibrotic foci. But epithelium to mesenchyme transdifferentiation was not detected. Massive collagen fibres were deposited on the inner and outer sides of the pleural membrane, with an intact elastin layer in the middle. This induced fibrotic pathology persisted even after adenoviral-mediated TGF-β1 overexpression was no longer evident. Therefore, overexpression of TGF-β1 within developing fetal monkey lung results in severe and progressive fibrosis in lung parenchyma and pleural membrane, in addition to pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:20351039

  10. Glycomic and sialoproteomic data of gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing ST3GAL4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mereiter, Stefan; Magalhães, Ana; Adamczyk, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma MKN45 cells stably transfected with the full-length ST3GAL4 gene were characterised by glycomic and sialoproteomic analysis. Complementary strategies were applied to assess the glycomic alterations induced by ST3GAL4 overexpression. The N- and O-glycome data were generated in two......-MS/MS identification was performed. This analysis identified 47 proteins with significantly increased sialylation. The data in this article is associated with the research article published in Biochim Biophys Acta "Glycomic analysis of gastric carcinoma cells discloses glycans as modulators of RON receptor tyrosine...... kinase activation in cancer" [1]....

  11. Overexpression of osteoprotegerin promotes preosteoblast differentiation to mature osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Hongyou; de Vos, Paul; Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: The hypothesis of the present study is that overexpression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) promotes preosteoblast maturation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 was transfected with OPG overexpression. OPG expression was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

  12. HER2 overexpression elicits a proinflammatory IL-6 autocrine signaling loop that is critical for tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Zachary C; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Glass, Oliver; Lei, Gangjun; Osada, Takuya; Dave, Sandeep S; Morse, Michael A; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, Herbert K

    2011-07-01

    HER2 overexpression occurs in approximately 25% of breast cancers, where it correlates with poor prognosis. Likewise, systemic inflammation in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the process is not understood. In this study, we explored the relationship between HER2 and inflammation, comparing the effects of overexpressing wild-type or mutated inactive forms of HER2 in primary human breast cells. Wild-type HER2 elicited a profound transcriptional inflammatory profile, including marked elevation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, which we established to be a critical determinant of HER2 oncogenesis. Mechanistic investigations revealed that IL-6 secretion induced by HER2 overexpression activated Stat3 and altered gene expression, enforcing an autocrine loop of IL-6/Stat3 expression. Both mouse and human in vivo models of HER2-amplified breast carcinoma relied critically on this HER2-IL-6-Stat3 signaling pathway. Our studies offer the first direct evidence linking HER2 to a systemic inflammatory mechanism that orchestrates HER2-mediated tumor growth. We suggest that the HER2-IL-6-STAT3 signaling axis we have defined in breast cancer could prompt new therapeutic or prevention strategies for treatment of HER2-amplified cancers. ©2011 AACR.

  13. Perturbation of Auxin Homeostasis and Signaling by PINOID Overexpression Induces Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud Saini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Under normal and stress conditions plant growth require a complex interplay between phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, details of the nature of this crosstalk remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that PINOID (PID, a serine threonine kinase of the AGC kinase family, perturbs auxin homeostasis, which in turn modulates rosette growth and induces stress responses in Arabidopsis plants. Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic plants with altered PID expression were used to study the effect on auxin levels and stress-related responses. In the leaves of plants with ectopic PID expression an accumulation of auxin, oxidative burst and disruption of hormonal balance was apparent. Furthermore, PID overexpression led to the accumulation of antioxidant metabolites, while pid knockout mutants showed only moderate changes in stress-related metabolites. These physiological changes in the plants overexpressing PID modulated their response toward external drought and osmotic stress treatments when compared to the wild type. Based on the morphological, transcriptome, and metabolite results, we propose that perturbations in the auxin hormone levels caused by PID overexpression, along with other hormones and ROS downstream, cause antioxidant accumulation and modify growth and stress responses in Arabidopsis. Our data provide further proof for a strong correlation between auxin and stress biology.

  14. Overexpression of hepatoma-derived growth factor in melanocytes does not lead to oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmaier, Angela; Wernert, Nicolas; Gallitzendörfer, Rainer; Abouzied, Mekky M; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Franken, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    HDGF is a growth factor which is overexpressed in a wide range of tumors. Importantly, expression levels were identified as a prognostic marker in some types of cancer such as melanoma. To investigate the presumed oncogenic/transforming capacity of HDGF, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing HDGF in melanocytes. These mice were bred with mice heterozygous for a defective copy of the Ink4a tumor suppressor gene and were exposed to UV light to increase the risk for tumor development both genetically and physiochemically. Mice were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Furthermore, primary melanocytes were isolated from different strains created. Transgenic animals overexpressed HDGF in hair follicle melanocytes. Interestingly, primary melanocytes isolated from transgenic animals were not able to differentiate in vitro whereas cells isolated from wild type and HDGF-deficient animals were. Although, HDGF -/- /Ink4a +/- mice displayed an increased number of epidermoid cysts after exposure to UV light, no melanomas or premelanocytic alterations could be detected in this mouse model. The results therefore provide no evidence that HDGF has a transforming capacity in tumor development. Our results in combination with previous findings point to a possible role in cell differentiation and suggest that HDGF promotes tumor progression after secondary upregulation and may represent another protein fitting into the concept of non-oncogene addiction of tumor tissue

  15. Overexpression of Catalase Enhances Benzo(a)pyrene Detoxification in Endothelial Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Hong; Ramesh, Aramandla; Goodwin, J Shawn; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Guo, ZhongMao

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that overexpression of catalase upregulated xenobiotic- metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression and diminished benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) intermediate accumulation in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the most active organelle involved in BaP metabolism. To examine the involvement of ER in catalase-induced BaP detoxification, we compared the level and distribution of XMEs, and the profile of BaP intermediates in the microsomes of wild-type and catalase transgenic endothelial cells. Our data showed that endothelial microsomes were enriched in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1B1 and epoxide hydrolase 1 (EH1), and contained considerable levels of quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GSTP). Treatment of wild-type MAECs with 1μM BaP for 2 h increased the expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1 and NQO1 by ~300, 64 and 116%, respectively. However, the same treatment did not significantly alter the expression of EH1 and GSTP. Overexpression of catalase did not significantly increase EH1, but upregulated BaP-induced expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1, NQO1 and GSTP in the following order: 1A1>NQO1>GSTP>1B1. Overexpression of catalase did not alter the distribution of each of these enzymes in the microsomes. In contrast to our previous report showing lower level of BaP phenols versus BaP diols/diones in the whole-cell, this report demonstrated that the sum of microsomal BaP phenolic metabolites were ~60% greater than that of the BaP diols/diones after exposure of microsomes to BaP. Overexpression of catalase reduced the concentrations of microsomal BaP phenols and diols/diones by ~45 and 95%, respectively. This process enhanced the ratio of BaP phenol versus diol/dione metabolites in a potent manner. Taken together, upregulation of phase II XMEs and CYP1 proteins, but not EH1 in the ER might be the mechanism by which overexpression of catalase reduces the levels of all the BaP metabolites, and

  16. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Overexpression enhances Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydow, Karsten; Mondon, Carl E.; Schrader, Joerg; Konishi, Hakuoh; Cooke, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) may modulate insulin-induced uptake of glucose in insulin-sensitive tissues. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). We hypothesized that a reduction in endogenous ADMA would increase NO synthesis and thereby enhance insulin sensitivity. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis we employed a transgenic mouse in which we overexpressed human dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH-I). The DDAH-I mice had lower plasma ADMA at all ages (22–70 weeks) by comparison to wild-type (WT) littermates. With a glucose challenge, WT mice showed a prompt increase in ADMA, whereas DDAH-I mice had a blunted response. Furthermore, DDAH-I mice had a blunted increase in plasma insulin and glucose levels after glucose challenge, with a 50% reduction in the insulin resistence index, consistent with enhanced sensitivity to insulin. In liver, we observed an increased Akt phosphorylation in the DDAH-I mice after i.p. glucose challenge. Incubation of skeletal muscle from WT mice ex vivo with ADMA (2μM) markedly suppressed insulin-induced glycogen synthesis in fast-twitch but not slow-twitch muscle. Conclusions These findings suggest that the endogenous NOS inhibitor ADMA reduces insulin sensitivity, consistent with previous observations that NO plays a role in insulin sensitivity. PMID:18239148

  17. Overexpression of GbERF confers alteration of ethylene-responsive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    bState Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, ... R&D Center, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, ... did not change transgenic plant's phenotype and endogenous ethylene level.

  18. Alterations of plasma lipids in mice via adenoviral-mediated hepatic overexpression of human ABCA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellington, Cheryl L.; Brunham, Liam R.; Zhou, Steven; Singaraja, Roshni R.; Visscher, Henk; Gelfer, Allison; Ross, Colin; James, Erick; Liu, Guoqing; Huber, Mary T.; Yang, Yu-Zhou; Parks, Robin J.; Groen, Albert; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Hayden, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a widely expressed lipid transporter essential for the generation of HDL. ABCA1 is particularly abundant in the liver, suggesting that the liver may play a major role in HDL homeostasis. To determine how hepatic ABCA1 affects plasma HDL cholesterol

  19. Altered ingestive behavior, weight changes, and intact olfactory sense in an APP overexpression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vloeberghs, Ellen; Van Dam, Debby; Franck, Frieda; Serroyen, Jan; Geert, Molenberghs; Staufenbiel, Matthias; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2008-06-01

    Transgenic APP23 mice were generated to model Alzheimer's disease. The APP23 model develops pathological features, learning deficits, and memory deficits analogous to dementing patients. In this report, transgenic mice exhibited several behavioral disturbances indicating the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia. Aiming to verify whether the model also develops other behavioral problems, the authors investigated ingestive behavior in APP23 males of 3, 6 and 12 months. In addition, body weights of a naive male group were longitudinally monitored starting at weaning. Olfactory acuity was evaluated in mice of different age groups. Although olfactory functioning of APP23 mice appeared intact, they drank more and took more food pellets compared with wild-type littermates during a 1-week registration period. From the age of 4.5 weeks onward, APP23 males weighed significantly less than their control littermates, whereas this difference became more prominent with increasing age. Our results suggest the presence of a hypermetabolic state in this model. This is the first report, evidencing the presence of changes in eating and drinking behavior in a single transgenic Alzheimer mouse model. (Copyright) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Overexpression of the transcription factor Yap1 modifies intracellular redox conditions and enhances recombinant protein secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marizela Delic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative folding of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a redox active process, which also impacts the redox conditions in the cytosol. As the transcription factor Yap1 is involved in the transcriptional response to oxidative stress, we investigate its role upon the production of secretory proteins, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as model, and report a novel important role of Yap1 during oxidative protein folding. Yap1 is needed for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by increased oxidative protein folding. Constitutive co-overexpression of PpYAP1 leads to increased levels of secreted recombinant protein, while a lowered Yap1 function leads to accumulation of ROS and strong flocculation. Transcriptional analysis revealed that more than 150 genes were affected by overexpression of YAP1, in particular genes coding for antioxidant enzymes or involved in oxidation-reduction processes. By monitoring intracellular redox conditions within the cytosol and the ER using redox-sensitive roGFP1 variants, we could show that overexpression of YAP1 restores cellular redox conditions of protein-secreting P. pastoris by reoxidizing the cytosolic redox state to the levels of the wild type. These alterations are also reflected by increased levels of oxidized intracellular glutathione (GSSG in the YAP1 co-overexpressing strain. Taken together, these data indicate a strong impact of intracellular redox balance on the secretion of (recombinant proteins without affecting protein folding per se. Re-establishing suitable redox conditions by tuning the antioxidant capacity of the cell reduces metabolic load and cell stress caused by high oxidative protein folding load, thereby increasing the secretion capacity.

  1. Overexpression of Catalase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Prevents the Formation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parastatidis, Ioannis; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), but which reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes the development of AAA remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) degrading enzyme catalase on the formation of AAA. Approach and Results AAA were induced with the application of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on mouse infrarenal aortas. The administration of PEG-catalase, but not saline, attenuated the loss of tunica media and protected against AAA formation (0.91±0.1 mm vs. 0.76±0.09 mm). Similarly, in a transgenic mouse model, catalase over-expression in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) preserved the thickness of tunica media and inhibited aortic dilatation by 50% (0.85±0.14 mm vs. 0.57±0.08 mm). Further studies showed that injury with CaCl2 decreased catalase expression and activity in the aortic wall. Pharmacologic administration or genetic over-expression of catalase restored catalase activity and subsequently decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, a profound reduction in inflammatory markers and VSMC apoptosis was evident in aortas of catalase over-expressing mice. Interestingly, as opposed to infusion of PEG-catalase, chronic over-expression of catalase in VSMC did not alter the total aortic H2O2 levels. Conclusions The data suggest that a reduction in aortic wall catalase activity can predispose to AAA formation. Restoration of catalase activity in the vascular wall enhances aortic VSMC survival and prevents AAA formation primarily through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:23950141

  2. Bcl-2 overexpression: effects on transmembrane calcium movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaswami, Arun A.; Premack, Brett; Walleczek, Jan; Killoran, Pamela; Gardner, Phyllis; Knox, Susan J.

    1996-01-01

    calcium influx rate was measured as above. Apoptosis was measured by morphological, DNA fragmentation, and FACS analyses. Levels of Bcl-2 expression in the various cell types were quantified by Western Blot Analysis. Results: In both cell lines, Bcl-2 overexpression had no effect on the resting cytosolic calcium concentration. However, there was a 1.7 to 1.8 fold increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration in the Bcl-2 transfected cells following exposure to 0.5 μM thapsigargin (p<0.001), which was not observed in similarly treated parental or neomycin control transfected cells. Furthermore, this difference was only observed in cells incubated in media containing 2 mM extracellular calcium and was abrogated by chelation of external calcium with EGTA. Quantification of calcium influx rates by the manganese quench technique demonstrated enhanced calcium influx rates in Bcl-2 transfected cell lines both at rest and in response to depletion of cellular calcium stores by thapsigargin. Furthermore, neither hyper polarization of the cells by Valinomycin nor depolarization by isotonic potassium chloride abrogated the relative enhancement of calcium entry in the Bcl-2 over expressing cell lines as compared with the parental or neomycin transfected controls. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that Bcl-2 overexpression may contribute to chemo and radioresistance of tumor cells by altering capacitive calcium entry. Although Bcl-2 overexpression does not alter the resting calcium concentration, it does significantly enhance the resting calcium influx rate, suggesting that the dynamic equilibrium of calcium movement across the plasma membrane is significantly altered in cells which over express the Bcl-2 onco-protein. This perturbation is independent of the effect of Bcl-2 on plasma membrane hyper polarization. Given the importance of calcium in signaling a variety of cellular processes including cell division and differentiation, these findings may help to explain the

  3. C-MET overexpression and amplification in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonjin; Kim, Seong-Ik; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Soon-Tae; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated c-Met overexpression and MET gene amplification in gliomas to determine their incidence and prognostic significance. c-Met immunohistochemistry and MET gene fluorescence in situ hybridization were carried out on tissue microarrays from 250 patients with gliomas (137 grade IV GBMs and 113 grade II and III diffuse gliomas). Clinicopathological features of these cases were reviewed. c-Met overexpression and MET gene amplification were detected in 13.1% and 5.1% of the GBMs, respectively. All the MET-amplified cases showed c-Met overexpression, but MET amplification was not always concordant with c-Met overexpression. None of grade II and III gliomas demonstrated c-Met overexpression or MET gene amplification. Mean survival of the GBM patients with MET amplification was not significantly different from patients without MET amplification (P=0.155). However, GBM patients with c-Met overexpression survived longer than patients without c-Met overexpression (P=0.035). Although MET amplification was not related to poor GBM prognosis, it is partially associated with the aggressiveness of gliomas, as MET amplification was found only in grade IV, not in grade II and III gliomas. We suggest that MET inhibitor therapy may be beneficial in about 5% GBMs, which was the incidence of MET gene amplification found in the patients included in this study.

  4. Neuroglobin Overexpression Inhibits AMPK Signaling and Promotes Cell Anabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Li, Wenjun; Mao, XiaoOu; Winters, Ali; Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Liu, Ran; Greenberg, David A; Wang, Ning; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a recently discovered globin with preferential localization to neurons. Growing evidence indicates that Ngb has distinct physiological functions separate from the oxygen storage and transport roles of other globins, such as hemoglobin and myoglobin. We found increased ATP production and decreased glycolysis in Ngb-overexpressing immortalized murine hippocampal cell line (HT-22), in parallel with inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). In addition, lipid and glycogen content was increased in Ngb-overexpressing HT-22 cells. AMPK signaling was also inhibited in the brain and heart from Ngb-overexpressing transgenic mice. Although Ngb overexpression did not change glycogen content in whole brain, glycogen synthase was activated in cortical neurons of Ngb-overexpressing mouse brain and Ngb overexpression primary neurons. Moreover, lipid and glycogen content was increased in hearts derived from Ngb-overexpressing mice. These findings suggest that Ngb functions as a metabolic regulator and enhances cellular anabolism through the inhibition of AMPK signaling.

  5. Study of gene expression alteration in male androgenetic alopecia: evidence of predominant molecular signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, L; Reygagne, P; Benech, P; Jean-Louis, F; Scalvino, S; Ly Ka So, S; Hamidou, Z; Bianovici, S; Pouch, J; Ducos, B; Bonnet, M; Bensussan, A; Patatian, A; Lati, E; Wdzieczak-Bakala, J; Choulot, J-C; Loing, E; Hocquaux, M

    2017-11-01

    Male androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of hair loss in men. It is characterized by a distinct pattern of progressive hair loss starting from the frontal area and the vertex of the scalp. Although several genetic risk loci have been identified, relevant genes for AGA remain to be defined. To identify biomarkers associated with AGA. Molecular biomarkers associated with premature AGA were identified through gene expression analysis using cDNA generated from scalp vertex biopsies of hairless or bald men with premature AGA, and healthy volunteers. This monocentric study reveals that genes encoding mast cell granule enzymes, inflammatory mediators and immunoglobulin-associated immune mediators were significantly overexpressed in AGA. In contrast, underexpressed genes appear to be associated with the Wnt/β-catenin and bone morphogenic protein/transforming growth factor-β signalling pathways. Although involvement of these pathways in hair follicle regeneration is well described, functional interpretation of the transcriptomic data highlights different events that account for their inhibition. In particular, one of these events depends on the dysregulated expression of proopiomelanocortin, as confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In addition, lower expression of CYP27B1 in patients with AGA supports the notion that changes in vitamin D metabolism contributes to hair loss. This study provides compelling evidence for distinct molecular events contributing to alopecia that may pave the way for new therapeutic approaches. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Cloning, overexpression, and characterization of cobrotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, H.-C.; Kumar, Thallampuranam Krishnaswamy S.; Yu Chin

    2004-01-01

    Cobrotoxin (CBTX) is a highly toxic short neurotoxin, isolated from the Taiwan cobra (Naja naja atra) venom. In the present study for the first time we report the cloning and expression of CBTX in high yields (12 mg/L) in Escherichia coli. CBTX fused to the IgG-binding domain of protein A (IgG-CBTX) was expressed in the soluble form. The misfolded CBTX portion (of the overexpressed fusion protein) was refolded under optimal redox conditions. The fusion protein (IgG-CBTX) was observed to undergo autocatalytic cleavage to yield CBTX with additional 5 amino acids upstream of its N-terminal end. The far UV and near UV circular dichroism spectra of the recombinant CBTX were identical to those of the toxin isolated from the crude venom source. Recombinant CBTX was isotope labeled ( 15 N and 13 C) and all the resonances ( 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N) in the protein have been unambiguously assigned. 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectrum of recombinant CBTX revealed that the protein is in a biologically active conformation. 1 H- 15 N chemical shift perturbation data showed that recombinant CBTX binds to a peptide derived from the α7 subunit of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AchR) with high affinity. The AchR peptide is found to bind to residues located at the tip of Loop-2 in CBTX. The results of the present study provide an avenue to understand the structural basis for the high toxicity exhibited by CBTX. In addition, complete resonance assignments in CBTX (reported in this study) are expected to trigger intensive research towards the design of new pharmacological agents against certain neural disorders

  7. Genomic Instability Promoted by Overexpression of Mismatch Repair Factors in Yeast: A Model for Understanding Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Ujani; Dinh, Timothy A; Alani, Eric

    2018-04-13

    Mismatch repair (MMR) proteins act in spellchecker roles to excise misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. Curiously, large-scale analyses of a variety of cancers showed that increased expression of MMR proteins often correlated with tumor aggressiveness, metastasis, and early recurrence. To better understand these observations, we used the TCGA and GENT databases to analyze MMR protein expression in cancers. We found that the MMR genes MSH2 and MSH6 are overexpressed more frequently than MSH3 , and that MSH2 and MSH6 are often co-overexpressed as a result of copy number amplifications of these genes. These observations encouraged us to test the effects of upregulating MMR protein levels in baker's yeast, where we can sensitively monitor genome instability phenotypes associated with cancer initiation and progression. Msh6 overexpression (2 to 4-fold) almost completely disrupted mechanisms that prevent recombination between divergent DNA sequences by interacting with the DNA polymerase processivity clamp PCNA and by sequestering the Sgs1 helicase. Importantly, co-overexpression of Msh2 and Msh6 (∼8-fold) conferred, in a PCNA interaction dependent manner, several genome instability phenotypes including increased mutation rate, increased sensitivity to the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea and the DNA damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide, and elevated loss of heterozygosity. Msh2 and Msh6 co-overexpression also altered the cell cycle distribution of exponentially growing cells, resulting in an increased fraction of unbudded cells, consistent with a larger percentage of cells in G1. These novel observations suggested that overexpression of MSH factors affected the integrity of the DNA replication fork, causing genome instability phenotypes that could be important for promoting cancer progression. Copyright © 2018, Genetics.

  8. β‑catenin nuclear translocation induced by HIF‑1α overexpression leads to the radioresistance of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Li, Mingchuan; Zuo, Xuemei; Basourakos, Spyridon P; Zhang, Jiao; Zhao, Jiahui; Han, Yili; Lin, Yunhua; Wang, Yongxing; Jiang, Yongguang; Lan, Ling

    2018-04-12

    Hypoxia-inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α) is known to play crucial roles in tumor radioresistance; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the promotion of tumor radioresistance by HIF‑1α remain unclear. β‑catenin is known to be involved in the metastatic potential of prostate cancer (PCa). In this study, to investigate the role of HIF‑1α and β‑catenin in the radioresistance of PCa, two PCa cell lines, LNCaP and C4‑2B, were grouped as follows: Negative control (no treatment), HIF‑1α overexpression group (transfected with HIF‑1α overexpression plasmid) and β‑catenin silenced group (transfected with HIF‑1α plasmids and β‑catenin-shRNA). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell invasion and radiosensitivity were examined under normal or hypoxic conditions. In addition, radiosensitivity was examined in two mouse PCa models (the LNCaP orthotopic BALB/c-nu mice model and the C4‑2B subcutaneous SCID mice model). Our results revealed that in both the LNCaP and C4‑2B cells, transfection with HIF‑1α overexpression plasmid led to an enhanced β‑catenin nuclear translocation, while β‑catenin silencing inhibited β‑catenin nuclear translocation. The enhanced β‑catenin nuclear translocation induced by HIF‑1α overexpression resulted in an enhanced cell proliferation and cell invasion, an altered cell cycle distribution, decreased apoptosis, and improved non‑homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair under normal and irradiation conditions. Similar results were observed in the animal models. HIF‑1α overexpression enhanced β‑catenin nuclear translocation, which led to the activation of the β‑catenin/NHEJ signaling pathway and increased cell proliferation, cell invasion and DNA repair. These results thus suggest that HIF‑1α overexpression promotes the radioresistance of PCa cells.

  9. Regulation of TRAIL-Medicated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer by Overexpression of XIAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to Immune-Mediated Apoptosis 167 REFERENCES Ambrosini, G., Adida , C., and Altieri, D. C. (1997) . A novel auri-apoptosis gene, survivin...of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. This article must therefore be hereby marked advertisement in...the payment of page charges. This article must therefore be hereby marked advertisement in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate

  10. [Overexpression of FKS1 to improve yeast autolysis-stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2015-09-01

    With the development of high gravity brewing, yeast cells are exposed to multiple brewing-associated stresses, such as increased osmotic pressure, enhanced alcohol concentration and nutritional imbalance. These will speed up yeast autolysis, which seriously influence beer flavor and quality. To increase yeast anti-autolytic ability, FKS1 overexpression strain was constructed by 18S rDNA. The concentration of β-1,3-glucan of overexpression strain was 62% higher than that of wild type strain. Meantime, FKS1 overexpression strain increased anti-stress ability at 8% ethanol, 0.4 mol/L NaCl and starvation stress. Under simulated autolysis, FKS1 showed good anti-autolytic ability by slower autolysis. These results confirms the potential of FKS1 overexpression to tackle yeast autolysis in high-gravity brewing.

  11. Transgenic overexpression of BAFF regulates the expression of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To investigate whether transgenic overexpression of the zebrafish BAFF leads to ... and BAFF proteins were expressed separately and confirmed in HeLa cells. ... body homogenate of zebrafish and demonstrated a significant increase in ...

  12. Overexpression of DJ-1/PARK7, the Parkinson's disease-related protein, improves mitochondrial function via Akt phosphorylation on threonine 308 in dopaminergic neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gong, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Sun, Hong-Mei; Guo, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Jing-Hong; Ma, Ling; Li, Ping; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-05-01

    DJ-1/PARK7, the Parkinson's disease-related protein, plays an important role in mitochondrial function. However, the mechanisms by which DJ-1 affects mitochondrial function are not fully understood. Akt is a promoter of neuron survival and is partly involved in the neurodegenerative process. This research aimed at investigating a possible relationship between DJ-1 and Akt signalling in regulating mitochondrial function in the dopaminergic neuron-like cells SH-SY5Y and PC-12. Overexpression of DJ-1 was firstly validated at both the transcriptional and translational levels after transit transfection with plasmid pcDNA3-Flag-DJ-1. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that overexpression of DJ-1 increased the mitochondrial mass, but did not disrupt the mitochondrial morphology. In addition, mitochondrial complex I activity was raised in DJ-1-overexpressing cells, and this rise occurred with an increase in cellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate content. Moreover, immunoblotting demonstrated that the levels of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and the total Akt were not altered in DJ-1-overexpressing cells, and nor was the Akt phosphorylation on serine 473 changed. By contrast, Akt phosphorylation on threonine 308 was significantly augmented by overexpression of DJ-1, and the expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, a downstream effector of Akt, was suppressed. In summary, these results suggest that overexpression of DJ-1 improves the mitochondrial function, at least in part, through a mechanism involving Akt phosphorylation on threonine 308. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Prognostic implication of aquaporin 1 overexpression in resected lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellezza, Guido; Vannucci, Jacopo; Bianconi, Fortunato; Metro, Giulio; Del Sordo, Rachele; Andolfi, Marco; Ferri, Ivana; Siccu, Paola; Ludovini, Vienna; Puma, Francesco; Sidoni, Angelo; Cagini, Lucio

    2017-12-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a group of transmembrane water-selective channel proteins thought to play a role in the regulation of water permeability for plasma membranes. Indeed, high AQP levels have been suggested to promote the progression, invasion and metastasis of tumours. Specifically, AQP1 and AQP5 overexpression in lung adenocarcinoma (AC) have been suggested to be involved in molecular mechanisms in lung cancer. The aim of this retrospective cohort single-centre study was to assess both the levels of expression and therein the prognostic significance, regarding outcome of AQP1 and AQP5 in resected AC patients. Patients with histological diagnoses of lung AC submitted to pulmonary resection were included in this cohort study. Tissue microarrays containing cores from 185 ACs were prepared. AQP1 and AQP5 expressions were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results were scored as either low (Score 0-2) or high (Score 3-9). Clinical data, pathological tumour-node-metastasis staging and follow-up were recorded. Multivariate Cox survival analysis and Fisher's t-test were performed. AQP1 overexpression was detected in 85 (46%) patients, while AQP5 overexpression was observed in 45 (24%) patients. AQP1 did not result being significantly correlated with clinical and pathological parameters, while AQP5 resulted more expressed in AC with mucinous and papillary predominant patterns. Patients with AQP1 overexpression had shorter disease-free survival (P = 0.001) compared with patients without AQP1 overexpression. Multivariate analysis confirmed that AQP1 overexpression was significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival (P = 0.001). Our results evidenced that AQP1 overexpression resulted in a shorter disease-free survival in lung AC patients. Being so, AQP1 overexpression might be an important prognostic marker in lung AC. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights

  14. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Waye, Jerome; Harpaz, Noam; Hibshoosh, Hanina

    2003-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and intramucosal carcinoma). We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG 2 a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508). p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years) was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9) but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6). Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week) was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0) but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7). Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence

  15. Transcriptome response signatures associated with the overexpression of a mitochondrial uncoupling protein (AtUCP1 in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vasconcellos Nunes Laitz

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial inner membrane uncoupling proteins (UCP dissipate the proton electrochemical gradient established by the respiratory chain, thus affecting the yield of ATP synthesis. UCP overexpression in plants has been correlated with oxidative stress tolerance, improved photosynthetic efficiency and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. This study reports the main transcriptomic responses associated with the overexpression of an UCP (AtUCP1 in tobacco seedlings. Compared to wild-type (WT, AtUCP1 transgenic seedlings showed unaltered ATP levels and higher accumulation of serine. By using RNA-sequencing, a total of 816 differentially expressed genes between the investigated overexpressor lines and the untransformed WT control were identified. Among them, 239 were up-regulated and 577 were down-regulated. As a general response to AtUCP1 overexpression, noticeable changes in the expression of genes involved in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis were detected. A substantial set of differentially expressed genes code for products targeted to the chloroplast and mainly involved in photosynthesis. The overall results demonstrate that the alterations in mitochondrial function provoked by AtUCP1 overexpression require important transcriptomic adjustments to maintain cell homeostasis. Moreover, the occurrence of an important cross-talk between chloroplast and mitochondria, which culminates in the transcriptional regulation of several genes involved in different pathways, was evidenced.

  16. RNA-seq analysis of unintended effects in transgenic wheat overexpressing the transcription factor GmDREB1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiyan Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of plants with enhanced tolerance to abiotic stresses typically involves complex multigene networks and may therefore have a greater potential to introduce unintended effects than the genetic modification for simple monogenic traits. For this reason, it is essential to study the unintended effects in transgenic plants engineered for stress tolerance. We selected drought- and salt-tolerant transgenic wheat overexpressing the transcription factor, GmDREB1, to investigate unintended pleiotropic effects using RNA-seq analysis. We compared the transcriptome alteration of transgenic plants with that of wild-type plants subjected to salt stress as a control. We found that GmDREB1 overexpression had a minimal impact on gene expression under normal conditions. GmDREB1 overexpression resulted in transcriptional reprogramming of the salt response, but many of the genes with differential expression are known to mitigate salt stress and contribute incrementally to the enhanced stress tolerance of transgenic wheat. GmDREB1 overexpression did not activate unintended gene networks with respect to gene expression in the roots of transgenic wheat. This work is important for establishing a method of detecting unintended effects of genetic engineering and the safety of such traits with the development of marketable transgenic crops in the near future.

  17. A novel strategy to improve protein secretion via overexpression of the SppA signal peptide peptidase in Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongbo; Wang, Hao; He, Penghui; Zhu, Chengjun; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Nomura, Christopher T; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-24

    Signal peptide peptidases play an important role in the removal of remnant signal peptides in the cell membrane, a critical step for extracellular protein production. Although these proteins are likely a central component for extracellular protein production, there has been a lack of research on whether protein secretion could be enhanced via overexpression of signal peptide peptidases. In this study, both nattokinase and α-amylase were employed as prototypical secreted target proteins to evaluate the function of putative signal peptide peptidases (SppA and TepA) in Bacillus licheniformis. We observed dramatic decreases in the concentrations of both target proteins (45 and 49%, respectively) in a sppA deficient strain, while the extracellular protein yields of nattokinase and α-amylase were increased by 30 and 67% respectively in a strain overexpressing SppA. In addition, biomass, specific enzyme activities and the relative gene transcriptional levels were also enhanced due to the overexpression of sppA, while altering the expression levels of tepA had no effect on the concentrations of the secreted target proteins. Our results confirm that SppA, but not TepA, plays an important functional role for protein secretion in B. licheniformis. Our results indicate that the sppA overexpression strain, B. licheniformis BL10GS, could be used as a promising host strain for the industrial production of heterologous secreted proteins.

  18. Overexpression of Enterococcus faecalis elr operon protects from phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Perez, Naima G; Dumoulin, Romain; Gaubert, Stéphane; Lacoux, Caroline; Bugli, Francesca; Martin, Rebeca; Chat, Sophie; Piquand, Kevin; Meylheuc, Thierry; Langella, Philippe; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Rigottier-Gois, Lionel; Serror, Pascale

    2015-05-25

    Mechanisms underlying the transition from commensalism to virulence in Enterococcus faecalis are not fully understood. We previously identified the enterococcal leucine-rich protein A (ElrA) as a virulence factor of E. faecalis. The elrA gene is part of an operon that comprises four other ORFs encoding putative surface proteins of unknown function. In this work, we compared the susceptibility to phagocytosis of three E. faecalis strains, including a wild-type (WT), a ΔelrA strain, and a strain overexpressing the whole elr operon in order to understand the role of this operon in E. faecalis virulence. While both WT and ΔelrA strains were efficiently phagocytized by RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, the elr operon-overexpressing strain showed a decreased capability to be internalized by the phagocytic cells. Consistently, the strain overexpressing elr operon was less adherent to macrophages than the WT strain, suggesting that overexpression of the elr operon could confer E. faecalis with additional anti-adhesion properties. In addition, increased virulence of the elr operon-overexpressing strain was shown in a mouse peritonitis model. Altogether, our results indicate that overexpression of the elr operon facilitates the E. faecalis escape from host immune defenses.

  19. PTK2B/Pyk2 overexpression improves a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    KAUST Repository

    Giralt, Albert

    2018-05-24

    autophosphorylation and associated Src alterations. Overcoming this deficit by Pyk2 overexpression improved the behavioral and molecular phenotype of 5XFAD mice. Thus, our results in a mouse model of AD suggest that Pyk2 impairment may play a role in the symptoms of the disease.

  20. PTK2B/Pyk2 overexpression improves a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    KAUST Repository

    Giralt, Albert; de Pins, Benoî t; Cifuentes-Dí az, Carmen; Ló pez-Molina, Laura; Farah, Amel Thamila; Tible, Marion; Deramecourt, Vincent; Arold, Stefan T.; Giné s, Silvia; Hugon, Jacques; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2018-01-01

    and associated Src alterations. Overcoming this deficit by Pyk2 overexpression improved the behavioral and molecular phenotype of 5XFAD mice. Thus, our results in a mouse model of AD suggest that Pyk2 impairment may play a role in the symptoms of the disease.

  1. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  2. In vivo overexpression of tumstatin domains by tumor cells inhibits their invasive properties in a mouse melanoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasco, Sylvie; Ramont, Laurent; Venteo, Lydie; Pluot, Michel; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that a synthetic peptide encompassing residues 185-203 of the noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen, named tumstatin, inhibits in vitro melanoma cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, B16F1 melanoma cells were stably transfected to overexpress the complete tumstatin domain (Tum 1-232) or its C-terminal part, encompassing residues 185-203 (Tum 183-232). Tumstatin domain overexpression inhibited B16F1 in vitro cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasive properties. For studying the in vivo effect of overexpression, representative clones were subcutaneously injected into the left side of C57BL6 mice. In vivo tumor growth was decreased by -60% and -56%, respectively, with B16F1 cells overexpressing Tum 1-232 or Tum 183-232 compared to control cells. This inhibitory effect was associated with a decrease of in vivo cyclin D1 expression. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of Tum 1-232 or Tum 183-232 induced an in vivo down-regulation of proteolytic cascades involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially the production or activation of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13, as well as MMP-14. The plasminogen activation system was also altered in tumors with a decrease of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and a strong increase of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumstatin or its C-terminal antitumor fragment, Tum 183-232, inhibits in vivo melanoma progression by triggering an intracellular transduction pathway, which involves a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent mechanism

  3. Overexpression of miR529a confers enhanced resistance to oxidative stress in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Erkui; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chao; Li, Yu; Liu, Qiuxiang; Xu, Jian-Hong

    2017-07-01

    Overexpressing miR529a can enhance oxidative stress resistance by targeting OsSPL2 and OsSPL14 genes that can regulate the expression of their downstream SOD and POD related genes. MicroRNAs are involved in the regulation of plant developmental and physiological processes, and their expression can be altered when plants suffered environment stresses, including salt, oxidative, drought and Cadmium. The expression of microRNA529 (miR529) can be induced under oxidative stress. However, its biological function under abiotic stress responses is still unclear. In this study, miR529a was overexpressed to investigate the function of miR529a under oxidative stress in rice. Our results demonstrated that the expression of miR529a can be induced by exogenous H 2 O 2 , and overexpressing miR529a can increase plant tolerance to high level of H 2 O 2 , resulting in increased seed germination rate, root tip cell viability, reduced leaf rolling rate and chlorophyll retention. The expression of oxidative stress responsive genes and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) were increased in miR529a overexpression plant, which could help to reduce redundant reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, only OsSPL2 and OsSPL14 were targeted by miR529a in rice seedlings, repressing their expression in miR529aOE plants could lead to strengthen plant tolerance to oxidation stress. Our study provided the evidence that overexpression of miR529a could strengthen oxidation resistance, and its target genes OsSPL2 and OsSPL14 were responsible for oxidative tolerance, implied the manipulation of miR529a and its target genes regulation on H 2 O 2 related response genes could improve oxidative stress tolerance in rice.

  4. Overexpression of mtDNA-associated AtWhy2 compromises mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Rached Charbel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background StWhy1, a member of the plant-specific Whirly single-stranded DNA-binding protein family, was first characterized as a transcription factor involved in the activation of the nuclear PR-10a gene following defense-related stress in potato. In Arabidopsis thaliana, Whirlies have recently been shown to be primarily localized in organelles. Two representatives of the family, AtWhy1 and AtWhy3 are imported into plastids while AtWhy2 localizes to mitochondria. Their function in organelles is currently unknown. Results To understand the role of mitochondrial Whirlies in higher plants, we produced A. thaliana lines with altered expression of the atwhy2 gene. Organellar DNA immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AtWhy2 binds to mitochondrial DNA. Overexpression of atwhy2 in plants perturbs mitochondrial function by causing a diminution in transcript levels and mtDNA content which translates into a low activity level of respiratory chain complexes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits. This lowered activity of mitochondria yielded plants that were reduced in size and had distorted leaves that exhibited accelerated senescence. Overexpression of atwhy2 also led to early accumulation of senescence marker transcripts in mature leaves. Inactivation of the atwhy2 gene did not affect plant development and had no detectable effect on mitochondrial morphology, activity of respiratory chain complexes, transcription or the amount of mtDNA present. This lack of phenotype upon abrogation of atwhy2 expression suggests the presence of functional homologues of the Whirlies or the activation of compensating mechanisms in mitochondria. Conclusion AtWhy2 is associated with mtDNA and its overexpression results in the production of dysfunctional mitochondria. This report constitutes the first evidence of a function for the Whirlies in organelles. We propose that they could play a role in the regulation of the gene expression machinery of organelles.

  5. Overexpression of adenosine A2A receptors in rats: effects on depression, locomotion and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana E Coelho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are a sub-type of receptors enriched in basal ganglia, activated by the neuromodulator adenosine, which interact with dopamine D2 receptors. Although this reciprocal antagonistic interaction is well established in motor function, the outcome in dopamine-related behaviors remains uncertain, in particular in depression and anxiety. We have demonstrated an upsurge of A2AR associated to aging and chronic stress. Furthermore, Alzheimer’s disease patients present A2AR accumulation in cortical areas together with depressive signs. We now tested the impact of overexpressing A2AR in forebrain neurons on dopamine related behavior, namely depression. Adult male rats overexpressing human A2AR under the control of CaMKII promoter [Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR] and aged-matched wild-types (WT of the same strain (Sprague-Dawley were studied. The forced swimming test (FST, sucrose preference test (SPT and the open-field test (OFT were performed to evaluate behavioral despair, anhedonia, locomotion and anxiety. Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR animals spent more time floating and less time swimming in the FST and presented a decreased sucrose preference at 48h in the SPT. They also covered higher distances in the OFT and spent more time in the central zone than the WT. The results indicate that Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR rats exhibit depressive-like behavior, hyperlocomotion and altered exploratory behavior. This A2AR overexpression may explain the depressive signs found in aging, chronic stress and Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Overexpression of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Rats: Effects on Depression, Locomotion, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Joana E; Alves, Pedro; Canas, Paula M; Valadas, Jorge S; Shmidt, Tatiana; Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Bader, Michael; Cunha, Rodrigo A; do Couto, Frederico Simões; Lopes, Luísa V

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are a sub-type of receptors enriched in basal ganglia, activated by the neuromodulator adenosine, which interact with dopamine D2 receptors. Although this reciprocal antagonistic interaction is well-established in motor function, the outcome in dopamine-related behaviors remains uncertain, in particular in depression and anxiety. We have demonstrated an upsurge of A2AR associated to aging and chronic stress. Furthermore, Alzheimer's disease patients present A2AR accumulation in cortical areas together with depressive signs. We now tested the impact of overexpressing A2AR in forebrain neurons on dopamine-related behavior, namely depression. Adult male rats overexpressing human A2AR under the control of CaMKII promoter [Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR)] and aged-matched wild-types (WT) of the same strain (Sprague-Dawley) were studied. The forced swimming test (FST), sucrose preference test (SPT), and the open-field test (OFT) were performed to evaluate behavioral despair, anhedonia, locomotion, and anxiety. Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR) animals spent more time floating and less time swimming in the FST and presented a decreased sucrose preference at 48 h in the SPT. They also covered higher distances in the OFT and spent more time in the central zone than the WT. The results indicate that Tg(CaMKII-hA2AR) rats exhibit depressive-like behavior, hyperlocomotion, and altered exploratory behavior. This A2AR overexpression may explain the depressive signs found in aging, chronic stress, and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Increase in cellulose accumulation and improvement of saccharification by overexpression of arabinofuranosidase in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minako Sumiyoshi

    Full Text Available Cellulosic biomass is available for the production of biofuel, with saccharification of the cell wall being a key process. We investigated whether alteration of arabinoxylan, a major hemicellulose in monocots, causes an increase in saccharification efficiency. Arabinoxylans have β-1,4-D-xylopyranosyl backbones and 1,3- or 1,4-α-l-arabinofuranosyl residues linked to O-2 and/or O-3 of xylopyranosyl residues as side chains. Arabinose side chains interrupt the hydrogen bond between arabinoxylan and cellulose and carry an ester-linked feruloyl substituent. Arabinose side chains are the base point for diferuloyl cross-links and lignification. We analyzed rice plants overexpressing arabinofuranosidase (ARAF to study the role of arabinose residues in the cell wall and their effects on saccharification. Arabinose content in the cell wall of transgenic rice plants overexpressing individual ARAF full-length cDNA (OsARAF1-FOX and OsARAF3-FOX decreased 25% and 20% compared to the control and the amount of glucose increased by 28.2% and 34.2%, respectively. We studied modifications of cell wall polysaccharides at the cellular level by comparing histochemical cellulose staining patterns and immunolocalization patterns using antibodies raised against α-(1,5-linked l-Ara (LM6 and β-(1,4-linked d-Xyl (LM10 and LM11 residues. However, they showed no visible phenotype. Our results suggest that the balance between arabinoxylan and cellulose might maintain the cell wall network. Moreover, ARAF overexpression in rice effectively leads to an increase in cellulose accumulation and saccharification efficiency, which can be used to produce bioethanol.

  8. Genetic and genomic analysis modeling of germline c-MYC overexpression and cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline genetic variation is associated with the differential expression of many human genes. The phenotypic effects of this type of variation may be important when considering susceptibility to common genetic diseases. Three regions at 8q24 have recently been identified to independently confer risk of prostate cancer. Variation at 8q24 has also recently been associated with risk of breast and colorectal cancer. However, none of the risk variants map at or relatively close to known genes, with c-MYC mapping a few hundred kilobases distally. Results This study identifies cis-regulators of germline c-MYC expression in immortalized lymphocytes of HapMap individuals. Quantitative analysis of c-MYC expression in normal prostate tissues suggests an association between overexpression and variants in Region 1 of prostate cancer risk. Somatic c-MYC overexpression correlates with prostate cancer progression and more aggressive tumor forms, which was also a pathological variable associated with Region 1. Expression profiling analysis and modeling of transcriptional regulatory networks predicts a functional association between MYC and the prostate tumor suppressor KLF6. Analysis of MYC/Myc-driven cell transformation and tumorigenesis substantiates a model in which MYC overexpression promotes transformation by down-regulating KLF6. In this model, a feedback loop through E-cadherin down-regulation causes further transactivation of c-MYC. Conclusion This study proposes that variation at putative 8q24 cis-regulator(s of transcription can significantly alter germline c-MYC expression levels and, thus, contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility by down-regulating the prostate tumor suppressor KLF6 gene.

  9. Overexpression of histone demethylase Fbxl10 leads to enhanced migration in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Magdalena; Sievers, Elisabeth; Janzer, Andreas [Institute of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Willmann, Dominica [Urologische Klinik/Frauenklinik und Zentrale Klinische Forschung, Klinikum der Universität Freiburg, Breisacherstrasse 66, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Egert, Angela; Schorle, Hubert [Department of Developmental Pathology, Institute of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schüle, Roland [Urologische Klinik/Frauenklinik und Zentrale Klinische Forschung, Klinikum der Universität Freiburg, Breisacherstrasse 66, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Kirfel, Jutta, E-mail: Jutta.Kirfel@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Institute of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Cell migration is a central process in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Tissue formation during embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses and invasive tumors all require the orchestrated movement of cells to specific locations. Histone demethylase proteins alter transcription by regulating the chromatin state at specific gene loci. FBXL10 is a conserved and ubiquitously expressed member of the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase family and is implicated in the demethylation of H3K4me3 and H3K36me2 and thereby removing active chromatin marks. However, the physiological role of FBXL10 in vivo remains largely unknown. Therefore, we established an inducible gain of function model to analyze the role of Fbxl10 and compared wild-type with Fbxl10 overexpressing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Our study shows that overexpression of Fbxl10 in MEFs doesn’t influence the proliferation capability but leads to an enhanced migration capacity in comparison to wild-type MEFs. Transcriptome and ChIP-seq experiments demonstrated that Fbxl10 binds to genes involved in migration like Areg, Mdk, Lmnb1, Thbs1, Mgp and Cxcl12. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that Fbxl10 plays a critical role in migration by binding to the promoter region of migration-associated genes and thereby might influences cell behaviour to a possibly more aggressive phenotype. - Highlights: • Migration capability of MEFs is enhanced after Fbxl10 upregulation. • Overexpression of Fbxl10 induced migration-associated genes. • Fbxl10 binds directly to migration-associated genes.

  10. Overexpression of histone demethylase Fbxl10 leads to enhanced migration in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, Magdalena; Sievers, Elisabeth; Janzer, Andreas; Willmann, Dominica; Egert, Angela; Schorle, Hubert; Schüle, Roland; Kirfel, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a central process in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Tissue formation during embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses and invasive tumors all require the orchestrated movement of cells to specific locations. Histone demethylase proteins alter transcription by regulating the chromatin state at specific gene loci. FBXL10 is a conserved and ubiquitously expressed member of the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase family and is implicated in the demethylation of H3K4me3 and H3K36me2 and thereby removing active chromatin marks. However, the physiological role of FBXL10 in vivo remains largely unknown. Therefore, we established an inducible gain of function model to analyze the role of Fbxl10 and compared wild-type with Fbxl10 overexpressing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Our study shows that overexpression of Fbxl10 in MEFs doesn’t influence the proliferation capability but leads to an enhanced migration capacity in comparison to wild-type MEFs. Transcriptome and ChIP-seq experiments demonstrated that Fbxl10 binds to genes involved in migration like Areg, Mdk, Lmnb1, Thbs1, Mgp and Cxcl12. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that Fbxl10 plays a critical role in migration by binding to the promoter region of migration-associated genes and thereby might influences cell behaviour to a possibly more aggressive phenotype. - Highlights: • Migration capability of MEFs is enhanced after Fbxl10 upregulation. • Overexpression of Fbxl10 induced migration-associated genes. • Fbxl10 binds directly to migration-associated genes.

  11. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  12. Simultaneous Aurora-A/STK15 overexpression and centrosome amplification induce chromosomal instability in tumour cells with a MIN phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentini, Laura; Amato, Angela; Schillaci, Tiziana; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumours and preneoplastic lesions. The predominant form of genome instability in human cancer is chromosome instability (CIN). CIN is characterized by chromosomal aberrations, gains or losses of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy), and it is often associated with centrosome amplification. Centrosomes control cell division by forming a bipolar mitotic spindle and play an essential role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. However, whether centrosome amplification could directly cause aneuploidy is not fully established. Also, alterations in genes required for mitotic progression could be involved in CIN. A major candidate is represented by Aurora-A/STK15 that associates with centrosomes and is overexpressed in several types of human tumour. Centrosome amplification were induced by hydroxyurea treatment and visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Aurora-A/STK15 ectopic expression was achieved by retroviral infection and puromycin selection in HCT116 tumour cells. Effects of Aurora-A/STK15 depletion on centrosome status and ploidy were determined by Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference. Changes in the expression levels of some mitotic genes were determined by Real time RT-PCR. We investigated whether amplification of centrosomes and overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induce CIN using as a model system a colon carcinoma cell line (HCT116). We found that in HCT116 cells, chromosomally stable and near diploid cells harbouring a MIN phenotype, centrosome amplification induced by hydroxyurea treatment is neither maintained nor induces aneuploidy. On the contrary, ectopic overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induced supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference in cells ectopically overexpressing this kinase promptly decreased cell numbers with supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Our results show that centrosome amplification alone is not sufficient

  13. Altered AIB1 or AIB1Δ3 Expression Impacts ERα Effects on Mammary Gland Stromal and Epithelial Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakles, Rebecca E.; Shiffert, Maddalena Tilli; Díaz-Cruz, Edgar S.; Cabrera, M. Carla; Alotaiby, Maram; Miermont, Anne M.; Riegel, Anna T.

    2011-01-01

    Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) (also known as steroid receptor coactivator-3) is a nuclear receptor coactivator enhancing estrogen receptor (ER)α and progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent transcription in breast cancer. The splice variant AIB1Δ3 demonstrates increased ability to promote ERα and PR-dependent transcription. Both are implicated in breast cancer risk and antihormone resistance. Conditional transgenic mice tested the in vivo impact of AIB1Δ3 overexpression compared with AIB1 on histological features of increased breast cancer risk and growth response to estrogen and progesterone in the mammary gland. Combining expression of either AIB1 or AIB1Δ3 with ERα overexpression, we investigated in vivo cooperativity. AIB1 and AIB1Δ3 overexpression equivalently increased the prevalence of hyperplastic alveolar nodules but not ductal hyperplasia or collagen content. When AIB1 or AIB1Δ3 overexpression was combined with ERα, both stromal collagen content and ductal hyperplasia prevalence were significantly increased and adenocarcinomas appeared. Overexpression of AIB1Δ3, especially combined with overexpressed ERα, led to an abnormal response to estrogen and progesterone with significant increases in stromal collagen content and development of a multilayered mammary epithelium. AIB1Δ3 overexpression was associated with a significant increase in PR expression and PR downstream signaling genes. AIB1 overexpression produced less marked growth abnormalities and no significant change in PR expression. In summary, AIB1Δ3 overexpression was more potent than AIB1 overexpression in increasing stromal collagen content, inducing abnormal mammary epithelial growth, altering PR expression levels, and mediating the response to estrogen and progesterone. Combining ERα overexpression with either AIB1 or AIB1Δ3 overexpression augmented abnormal growth responses in both epithelial and stromal compartments. PMID:21292825

  14. Altering β-cell number through stable alteration of miR-21 and miR-34a expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2014-01-01

    RNAs, miR-21 and miR-34a, may be involved in mediating cytokine-induced β-cell dysfunction. Therefore, manipulation of miR-21 and miR-34a levels may potentially be beneficial to β cells. To study the effect of long-term alterations of miR-21 or miR-34a levels upon net β-cell number, we stably overexpressed...

  15. Overexpression of soluble ADAM33 promotes a hypercontractile phenotype of the airway smooth muscle cell in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yiyuan; Long, Jiaoyue; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Yang; Lin, Feng; Zhong, Jun; Xu, Rong [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, and Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400030 (China); Mao, Lizheng [Jiangsu Asialand Biomed-Technology Co. Ltd., Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Deng, Linhong, E-mail: dlh@cczu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, and Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400030 (China); Changzhou Key Laboratory of Respiratory Medical Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China)

    2016-11-15

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 33 (ADAM33) has been identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma, but details of the causality are not fully understood. We hypothesize that soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) overexpression can alter the mechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) via regulation of the cell's contractile phenotype, and thus contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. To test this hypothesis, we either overexpressed or knocked down the sADAM33 in rat ASMCs by transfecting the cells with sADAM33 coding sequence or a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets the ADAM33 disintegrin domain, and subsequently assessed the cells for stiffness, contractility and traction force, together with the expression level of contractile and proliferative phenotype markers. We also investigated whether these changes were dependent on Rho/ROCK pathway by culturing the ASMCs either in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor (H1152). The results showed that the ASMCs with sADAM33 overexpression were stiffer and more contractile, generated greater traction force, exhibited increased expression levels of contractile phenotype markers and markedly enhanced Rho activation. Furthermore these changes were largely attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of H-1152. However, the knock-down of ADAM33 seemed insufficient to influence majority of the mechanical behaviors of the ASMCs. Taken together, we demonstrated that sADAM33 overexpression altered the mechanical behaviors of ASMCs in vitro, which was most likely by promoting a hypercontractile phenotype transition of ASMCs through Rho/ROCK pathway. This revelation may establish the previously missing link between ADAM33 expression and AHR, and also provide useful insight for targeting sADAM33 in asthma prevention and therapy. - Highlights: • sADAM33 overexpression enhances the stiffness, traction force and contractility of ASMCs. • sADAM33 overexpression promotes

  16. Overexpression of soluble ADAM33 promotes a hypercontractile phenotype of the airway smooth muscle cell in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yiyuan; Long, Jiaoyue; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Yang; Lin, Feng; Zhong, Jun; Xu, Rong; Mao, Lizheng; Deng, Linhong

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 33 (ADAM33) has been identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma, but details of the causality are not fully understood. We hypothesize that soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) overexpression can alter the mechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) via regulation of the cell's contractile phenotype, and thus contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. To test this hypothesis, we either overexpressed or knocked down the sADAM33 in rat ASMCs by transfecting the cells with sADAM33 coding sequence or a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets the ADAM33 disintegrin domain, and subsequently assessed the cells for stiffness, contractility and traction force, together with the expression level of contractile and proliferative phenotype markers. We also investigated whether these changes were dependent on Rho/ROCK pathway by culturing the ASMCs either in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor (H1152). The results showed that the ASMCs with sADAM33 overexpression were stiffer and more contractile, generated greater traction force, exhibited increased expression levels of contractile phenotype markers and markedly enhanced Rho activation. Furthermore these changes were largely attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of H-1152. However, the knock-down of ADAM33 seemed insufficient to influence majority of the mechanical behaviors of the ASMCs. Taken together, we demonstrated that sADAM33 overexpression altered the mechanical behaviors of ASMCs in vitro, which was most likely by promoting a hypercontractile phenotype transition of ASMCs through Rho/ROCK pathway. This revelation may establish the previously missing link between ADAM33 expression and AHR, and also provide useful insight for targeting sADAM33 in asthma prevention and therapy. - Highlights: • sADAM33 overexpression enhances the stiffness, traction force and contractility of ASMCs. • sADAM33 overexpression promotes a

  17. Overexpression of Dyrk1A, a Down Syndrome Candidate, Decreases Excitability and Impairs Gamma Oscillations in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mejias, Marcel; Martinez de Lagran, Maria; Mattia, Maurizio; Castano-Prat, Patricia; Perez-Mendez, Lorena; Ciria-Suarez, Laura; Gener, Thomas; Sancristobal, Belen; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Dierssen, Mara

    2016-03-30

    The dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A is a serine/threonine kinase involved in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and a major candidate of Down syndrome brain alterations and cognitive deficits. DYRK1A is strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex, and its overexpression leads to defective cortical pyramidal cell morphology, synaptic plasticity deficits, and altered excitation/inhibition balance. These previous observations, however, do not allow predicting how the behavior of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) network and the resulting properties of its emergent activity are affected. Here, we integrate functional, anatomical, and computational data describing the prefrontal network alterations in transgenic mice overexpressingDyrk1A(TgDyrk1A). Usingin vivoextracellular recordings, we show decreased firing rate and gamma frequency power in the prefrontal network of anesthetized and awakeTgDyrk1Amice. Immunohistochemical analysis identified a selective reduction of vesicular GABA transporter punctae on parvalbumin positive neurons, without changes in the number of cortical GABAergic neurons in the PFC ofTgDyrk1Amice, which suggests that selective disinhibition of parvalbumin interneurons would result in an overinhibited functional network. Using a conductance-based computational model, we quantitatively demonstrate that this alteration could explain the observed functional deficits including decreased gamma power and firing rate. Our results suggest that dysfunction of cortical fast-spiking interneurons might be central to the pathophysiology of Down syndrome. DYRK1Ais a major candidate gene in Down syndrome. Its overexpression results into altered cognitive abilities, explained by defective cortical microarchitecture and excitation/inhibition imbalance. An open question is how these deficits impact the functionality of the prefrontal cortex network. Combining functional, anatomical, and computational approaches, we identified

  18. Adhesion Regulating Molecule 1 Mediates HAP40 Overexpression-Induced Mitochondrial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zih-Ning; Chung, Her Min; Fang, Su-Chiung; Her, Lu-Shiun

    2017-01-01

    Striatal neuron death in Huntington's disease is associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and functions. However, the mechanisms for this mitochondrial dysregulation remain elusive. Increased accumulation of Huntingtin-associated protein 40 (HAP40) has been shown to be associated with Huntington's disease. However, the link between increased HAP40 and Huntington's disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that HAP40 overexpression causes mitochondrial dysfunction and reduces cell viability in the immortalized mouse striatal neurons. HAP40-associated mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with reduction of adhesion regulating molecule 1 (ADRM1) protein. Consistently, depletion of ADRM1 by shRNAs impaired mitochondrial functions and increased mitochondrial fragmentation in mouse striatal cells. Moreover, reducing ADRM1 levels enhanced activity of fission factor dynamin-related GTPase protein 1 (Drp1) via increased phosphorylation at serine 616 of Drp1 (Drp1Ser616). Restoring ADRM1 protein levels was able to reduce HAP40-induced ROS levels and mitochondrial fragmentation and improved mitochondrial functions and cell viability. Moreover, reducing Drp1 activity by Drp1 inhibitor, Mdivi-1, ameliorates both HAP40 overexpression- and ADRM1 depletion-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, our studies suggest that HAP40-mediated reduction of ADRM1 alters the mitochondrial fission activity and results in mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:29209146

  19. Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana FLAVONOL SYNTHASE 1 (FLS1) -overexpression plants in response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Hoai; Kim, Jun Hyeok; Kwon, Jaeyoung; Jeong, Chan Young; Lee, Wonje; Lee, Dongho; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hojoung

    2016-06-01

    Flavonoids are an important group of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant growth and contribute to human health. Many studies have focused on the biosynthesis pathway, biochemical characters, and biological functions of flavonoids. In this report, we showed that overexpression of FLS1 (FLS1-OX) not only altered seed coat color (resulting in a light brown color), but also affected flavonoid accumulation. Whereas fls1-3 mutants accumulated higher anthocyanin levels, FLS1-OX seedlings had lower levels than those of the wild-type. Besides, shoot tissues of FLS1-OX plants exhibited lower flavonol levels than those of the wild-type. However, growth performance and abiotic stress tolerance of FLS1-OX, fls1-3, and wild-type plants were not significantly different. Taken together, FLS1 can be manipulated (i.e., silenced or overexpressed) to redirect the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway toward anthocyanin production without negative effects on plant growth and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. genetic overexpression of NR2B subunit enhances social recognition memory for different strains and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephanie A; Tsien, Joe Z

    2012-01-01

    The ability to learn and remember conspecifics is essential for the establishment and maintenance of social groups. Many animals, including humans, primates and rodents, depend on stable social relationships for survival. Social learning and social recognition have become emerging areas of interest for neuroscientists but are still not well understood. It has been established that several hormones play a role in the modulation of social recognition including estrogen, oxytocin and arginine vasopression. Relatively few studies have investigated how social recognition might be improved or enhanced. In this study, we investigate the role of the NMDA receptor in social recognition memory, specifically the consequences of altering the ratio of the NR2B:NR2A subunits in the forebrain regions in social behavior. We produced transgenic mice in which the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor was overexpressed postnatally in the excitatory neurons of the forebrain areas including the cortex, amygdala and hippocampus. We investigated the ability of both our transgenic animals and their wild-type littermate to learn and remember juvenile conspecifics using both 1-hr and 24-hr memory tests. Our experiments show that the wild-type animals and NR2B transgenic mice preformed similarly in the 1-hr test. However, transgenic mice showed better performances in 24-hr tests of recognizing animals of a different strain or animals of a different species. We conclude that NR2B overexpression in the forebrain enhances social recognition memory for different strains and animal species.

  1. FOX-2 Dependent Splicing of Ataxin-2 Transcript Is Affected by Ataxin-1 Overexpression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Franziska; Kaehler, Christian; Isau, Melanie; Hallen, Linda; Lehrach, Hans; Krobitsch, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental posttranscriptional mechanism for controlling gene expression, and splicing defects have been linked to various human disorders. The splicing factor FOX-2 is part of a main protein interaction hub in a network related to human inherited ataxias, however, its impact remains to be elucidated. Here, we focused on the reported interaction between FOX-2 and ataxin-1, the disease-causing protein in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. In this line, we further evaluated this interaction by yeast-2-hybrid analyses and co-immunoprecipitation experiments in mammalian cells. Interestingly, we discovered that FOX-2 localization and splicing activity is affected in the presence of nuclear ataxin-1 inclusions. Moreover, we observed that FOX-2 directly interacts with ataxin-2, a protein modulating spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 pathogenesis. Finally, we provide evidence that splicing of pre-mRNA of ataxin-2 depends on FOX-2 activity, since reduction of FOX-2 levels led to increased skipping of exon 18 in ataxin-2 transcripts. Most striking, we observed that ataxin-1 overexpression has an effect on this splicing event as well. Thus, our results demonstrate that FOX-2 is involved in splicing of ataxin-2 transcripts and that this splicing event is altered by overexpression of ataxin-1. PMID:22666429

  2. Reduced grain chalkiness and its possible physiological mechanism in transgenic rice overexpressing l-GalLDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Yu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chalkiness is one of the key factors determining rice quality and price. Ascorbic acid (Asc is a major plant antioxidant that performs many functions in plants. l-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (l-GalLDH, EC1.3.2.3 is an enzyme that catalyzes the final step of Asc biosynthesis in plants. Here we show that the l-GalLDH-overexpressing transgenic rice, GO-2, which has constitutively higher leaf Asc content than wild-type (WT plants, exhibits significantly reduced grain chalkiness. Higher foliar ascorbate/dehydroascorbate (Asc/DHA ratios at 40, 60, 80, and 100 days of plant age were observed in GO-2. Further investigation showed that the enhanced level of Asc resulted in a significantly higher ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco protein level in GO-2 at 80 days. In addition, levels of abscisic acid (ABA and jasmonic acid (JA were lower in GO-2 at 60, 80, and 100 days. The results we present here indicate that the enhanced level of Asc is likely responsible for changing redox homeostasis in key developmental stages associated with grain filling and alters grain chalkiness in the l-GalLDH-overexpressing transgenic by maintaining photosynthetic function and affecting phytohormones associated with grain filling.

  3. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  4. Mild Oxidative Damage in the Diabetic Rat Heart Is Attenuated by Glyoxalase-1 Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper G. Schalkwijk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart failure. The increase in advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs and oxidative stress have been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently demonstrated that there is a direct link between AGEs and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate if a reduction of AGEs by overexpression of the glycation precursor detoxifying enzyme glyoxalase-I (GLO-I can prevent diabetes-induced oxidative damage, inflammation and fibrosis in the heart. Diabetes was induced in wild-type and GLO-I transgenic rats by streptozotocin. After 24-weeks of diabetes, cardiac function was monitored with ultrasound under isoflurane anesthesia. Blood was drawn and heart tissue was collected for further analysis. Analysis with UPLC-MSMS showed that the AGE Nε-(1-carboxymethyllysine and its precursor 3-deoxyglucosone were significantly elevated in the diabetic hearts. Markers of oxidative damage, inflammation, and fibrosis were mildly up-regulated in the heart of the diabetic rats and were attenuated by GLO-I overexpression. In this model of diabetes, these processes were not accompanied by significant changes in systolic heart function, i.e., stroke volume, fractional shortening and ejection fraction. This study shows that 24-weeks of diabetes in rats induce early signs of mild cardiac alterations as indicated by an increase of oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis which are mediated, at least partially, by glycation.

  5. IL-6 Overexpression in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Prostaglandin Receptor EP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Constanze; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Andrén, Ove; Kirfel, Jutta; Duensing, Stefan; Perner, Sven; Nowak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer in men and multiple risk factors and genetic alterations have been described. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion event and the overexpression of the transcription factor ERG are present in approximately 50% of all prostate cancer patients, however, the clinical outcome is still controversial. Prostate tumors produce various soluble factors, including the pleiotropic cytokine IL-6, regulating cellular processes such as proliferation and metastatic segregation. Here, we used prostatectomy samples in a tissue microarray format and analyzed the co-expression and the clinicopathologic data of ERG and IL-6 using immunohistochemical double staining and correlated the read-out with clinicopathologic data. Expression of ERG and IL-6 correlated strongly in prostate tissue samples. Forced expression of ERG in prostate tumor cell lines resulted in significantly increased secretion of IL-6, whereas the down-regulation of ERG decreased IL-6 secretion. By dissecting the underlying mechanism in prostate tumor cell lines we show the ERG-mediated up-regulation of the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP3. The prostanoid receptor EP2 was overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion in DU145 cells was reduced after treatment with EP2-receptor antagonist. Collectively, our study shows that the expression of ERG in prostate cancer is linked to the expression of IL-6 mediated by the prostanoid receptor EP2. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The HGF Receptor c-Met Is Overexpressed in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Herrera

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF receptor, Met, has established oncogenic properties; however, its expression and function in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA remain poorly understood. We aimed to determine the expression and potential alterations in Met expression in EA. Met expression was investigated in surgical specimens of EA, Barrett's esophagus (BE, and normal esophagus (NE using immunohistochemistry (IHC and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Met expression, phosphorylation, and the effect of COX-2 inhibition on expression were examined in EA cell lines. IHC demonstrated intense Met immunoreactivity in all (100% EA and dysplastic BE specimens. In contrast, minimal immunostaining was observed in BE without dysplasia or NE specimens. Met mRNA and protein levels were increased in three EA cell lines, and Met protein was phosphorylated in the absence of serum. Sequence analysis found the kinase domain of c-met to be wild type in all three EA cell lines. HGF mRNA expression was identified in two EA cell lines. In COX-2-overexpressing cells, COX-2 inhibition decreased Met expression. Met is consistently overexpressed in EA surgical specimens and in three EA cell lines. Met dysregulation occurs early in Barrett's dysplasia to adenocarcinoma sequence. Future study of Met inhibition as a potential biologic therapy for EA is warranted.

  7. Over-expression of KdSOC1 gene affected plantlet morphogenesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Li; Chen, Jinhua; Liu, Chenglan; Zeng, Huiming; Wang, Huafang

    2017-07-17

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana reproduces asexually by producing plantlets along the leaf margin. The aim of this study was to identify the function of the SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 gene in Kalanchoe daigremontiana (KdSOC1) during plantlet morphogenesis. In this study, KdSOC1 gene expression was detected at stem cell niche during in vitro somatic embryogenesis and plantlet morphogenesis. Disrupting endogenous auxin transportation suppressed the KdSOC1 gene response. Knockdown of the KdSOC1 gene caused a defect in cotyledon formation during the early heart stage of somatic embryogenesis. Over-expression (OE) of the KdSOC1 gene resulted in asymmetric plantlet distribution, a reduced number of plantlets, thicker leaves, and thicker vascular fibers. Higher KdPIN1 gene expression and auxin content were found in OE plant compared to those of wild-type plant leaves, which indicated possible KdSOC1 gene role in affecting auxin distribution and accumulation. KdSOC1 gene OE in DR5-GUS Arabidopsis reporting lines resulted in an abnormal auxin response pattern during different stages of somatic embryogenesis. In summary, the KdSOC1 gene OE might alter auxin distribution and accumulation along leaf margin to initiate plantlet formation and distribution, which is crucial for plasticity during plantlet formation under various environmental conditions.

  8. Overexpression of SIRT1 in mouse forebrain impairs lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Wu

    Full Text Available SIRT1 plays crucial roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and has various functions in different tissues including brain. The brain-specific SIRT1 knockout mice display defects in somatotropic signaling, memory and synaptic plasticity. And the female mice without SIRT1 in POMC neuron are more sensitive to diet-induced obesity. Here we created transgenic mice overexpressing SIRT1 in striatum and hippocampus under the control of CaMKIIα promoter. These mice, especially females, exhibited increased fat accumulation accompanied by significant upregulation of adipogenic genes in white adipose tissue. Glucose tolerance of the mice was also impaired with decreased Glut4 mRNA levels in muscle. Moreover, the SIRT1 overexpressing mice showed decreased energy expenditure, and concomitantly mitochondria-related genes were decreased in muscle. In addition, these mice showed unusual spontaneous physical activity pattern, decreased activity in open field and rotarod performance. Further studies demonstrated that SIRT1 deacetylated IRS-2, and upregulated phosphorylation level of IRS-2 and ERK1/2 in striatum. Meanwhile, the neurotransmitter signaling in striatum and the expression of endocrine hormones in hypothalamus and serum T3, T4 levels were altered. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that SIRT1 in forebrain regulates lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function.

  9. Prognostic implication of NQO1 overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lijuan; Sun, Jie; Tan, Yan; Li, Zhenling; Kong, Fanyong; Shen, Yue; Liu, Chao; Chen, Litian

    2017-11-01

    To explore the role of NQO1 overexpression for prognostic implication in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), NQO1 mRNA levels were detected in HCC fresh tissue samples of HCC and nontumor tissues, respectively. One hundred fifty-six cases of HCC meeting strict follow-up criteria were selected for immunohistochemical staining of NQO1 protein. Correlations between NQO1 overexpression and clinicopathological features of HCC were evaluated using χ 2 tests, survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between prognostic factors and patient 5-year survival was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analysis. In results, the levels of NQO1 mRNA were significantly up-regulated in 14 fresh tissue samples of HCC. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the NQO1 expression and overexpression rates were significantly higher in HCC samples compared with either adjacent nontumor tissues or normal liver tissues. NQO1 overexpression correlated to tumor size, venous infiltration and late pTNM stage of HCC. NQO1 overexpression was also related to low disease-free survival and 5-year survival rates. In the late-stage group, disease-free and 5-year survival rates of patients with NQO1 overexpression were significantly lower than those of patients without NQO1 expression. Further analysis using a Cox proportional hazards regression model revealed that NQO1 expression emerged as a significant independent hazard factor for the 5-year survival rate of patients with HCC. Therefore, NQO1 plays an important role in the progression of HCC. NQO1 may potentially be used as an independent biomarker for prognostic evaluation of HCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. DEK protein overexpression predicts poor prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Bi, Fangfang; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yuan; Jin, Aihua; Li, Jinzi; Lin, Zhenhua

    2017-02-01

    DEK, a transcription factor, is involved in mRNA splicing, transcriptional control, cell division and differentiation. Recent studies suggest that DEK overexpression can promote tumorigenesis in a wide range of cancer cell types. However, little is known concerning the status of DEK in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Based on the microarray data from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), the expression levels of DEK mRNA in PDAC tissues were significantly higher than levels in the adjacent non-tumor tissues. To explore the clinical features of DEK overexpression in PDAC, 87 PDAC and 52 normal pancreas tissues were selected for immunoenzyme staining of the DEK protein. Localization of the DEK protein was detected in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells using immunofluorescence (IF) staining. The correlations between DEK overexpression and the clinical features of PDAC were evaluated using the Chi-squared (χ2) and Fisher's exact tests. The survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between prognostic factors and patient survival was also analyzed by the Cox proportional hazard models. The expression levels of DEK mRNA in PDAC tissues were significantly higher than that in the adjacent non‑tumor tissues. The DEK protein showed a primarily nuclear staining pattern in PDAC. The positive rate of the DEK protein was 52.9% (46/87) in PDAC, which was significantly higher than that in the adjacent normal pancreatic tissues (7.7%, 4/52). DEK overexpression in PDAC was correlated with tumor size, histological grade, tumor‑node‑metastasis (TNM) stage and overall survival (OS) rates. In addition, multivariate analysis demonstrated that DEK overexpression was an independent prognostic factor along with histological grade and TNM stage in patients with PDAC. In conclusion, DEK overexpression is associated with PDAC progression and may be a potential biomarker for poor prognostic evaluation in PDAC.

  11. CD147 overexpression promotes tumorigenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yu-Le; Liao, Cheng-Gong; Wei, Ding; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2016-04-01

    CD147 overexpresses in many epithelium-originated tumors and plays an important role in tumor migration and invasion. Most studies aim at the role of CD147 in tumor progression using tumor cell models. However, the influence of abnormal overexpression of CD147 on neoplastic transformation of normal cells is unknown. Here, the role of CD147 in malignant phenotype transformation in CHO cells was investigated. Three CHO cell lines that stably overexpressed CD147 (CHO-CD147), EGFP-CD147 (CHO-EGFP-CD147), and EGFP (CHO-EGFP) were generated by transfection of plasmids containing human CD147, EGFP-human CD147, and EGFP genes into CHO cells. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing and transwell matrix penetration assay. Trypan blue exclusion, MTT, cell cycle analysis, and BrdU cell proliferation assay were used to detect cell viability and cell proliferation. Annexin V-FITC analysis was performed to detect apoptosis. We found that CD147 overexpression promoted the migration and invasion of CHO cells. CD147 accelerated the G1 to S phase transition and enhanced the CHO cell proliferation. Overexpression of CD147 inhibited both early- and late-stages of apoptosis of CHO-CD147 cells, which is caused by serum deprivation. CHO-EGFP-CD147 cells showed an increased anchorage-independent growth compared with CHO-EGFP cells as detected by soft-agar colony formation assay. The tumors formed by CHO-CD147 cells in nude mice were larger and coupled with higher expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 than that of CHO cells. In conclusion, human CD147 overexpression induces malignant phenotype in CHO cells. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  12. Hippocampal neuroligin-2 overexpression leads to reduced aggression and inhibited novelty reactivity in rats.

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    Christine Kohl

    Full Text Available Disturbances of the excitation/inhibition (E/I balance in the brain were recently suggested as potential factors underlying disorders like autism and schizophrenia resulting in associated behavioral alterations including changes in social and emotional behavior as well as abnormal aggression. Neuronal cell adhesion molecules (nCAMs and mutations in these genes were found to be strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of these disorders. Neuroligin2 (nlgn2 is a postsynaptic cell adhesion molecule, which is predominantly expressed at inhibitory synapses and required for synapse specification and stabilization. Changes in the expression of nlgn2 were shown to result in alterations of social behavior as well as altered inhibitory synaptic transmission, hence modifying the E/I balance. In our study, we focused on the role of nlgn2 in the dorsal hippocampus in the regulation of emotional and social behaviors. To this purpose, we injected an AAV construct overexpressing nlgn2 in the hippocampus of rats and investigated the effects on behavior and on markers for the E/I ratio. We could show an increase in GAD65, a GABA-synthesizing protein in neuronal terminals, and furthermore, reduced exploration of novel stimuli and less offensive behavior. Our data suggest nlgn2 in the hippocampus to be strongly implicated in maintaining the E/I balance in the brain and thereby modulating social and emotional behavior.

  13. AICD Overexpression in Neuro 2A Cells Regulates Expression of PTCH1 and TRPC5

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    Mithu Raychaudhuri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid precursor protein (APP, implicated in Alzheimer's disease, is a transmembrane protein of undetermined function. APP is cleaved by gamma-secretase that releases the APP intracellular domain (AICD in the cytoplasm. In vitro and in vivo studies have implicated the role of AICD in cell signaling and transcriptional regulation of Gsk3β, KAI1, BACE1, EGFR, and other proteins. In this study, by overexpressing AICD in mouse neuroblastoma cell lines, we have demonstrated the alteration in the expressions of two proteins, patched homolog 1 (PTCH1, a receptor for sonic hedgehog signaling, and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily C member 5 (TRPC5, a component of receptor-activated nonselective calcium permeant cation channel. Our results indicate the possibility of regulation by AICD in developmental processes as well as in the maintenance of calcium homeostasis at the transcription level.

  14. Nanotized PPARα Overexpression Targeted to Hypertrophied Myocardium Improves Cardiac Function by Attenuating the p53-GSK3β-Mediated Mitochondrial Death Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Santanu; Datta, Ritwik; Chaudhuri, Ratul Datta; Chatterjee, Emeli; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2018-05-09

    Metabolic remodeling of cardiac muscles during pathological hypertrophy is characterized by downregulation of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Thereby, we hypothesized that a cardiac-specific induction of PPARα might restore the FAO-related protein expression and resultant energy deficit. In the present study, consequences of PPARα augmentation were evaluated for amelioration of chronic oxidative stress, myocyte apoptosis, and cardiac function during pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Nanotized PPARα overexpression targeted to myocardium was done by a stearic acid-modified carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) conjugated to a 20-mer myocyte-targeted peptide (CMCP). Overexpression of PPARα ameliorated pathological hypertrophy and improved cardiac function. Augmented PPARα in hypertrophied myocytes revealed downregulated p53 acetylation (lys 382), leading to reduced apoptosis. Such cells showed increased binding of PPARα with p53 that in turn reduced interaction of p53 with glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which upregulated inactive phospho-GSK3β (serine [Ser]9) expression within mitochondrial protein fraction. Altogether, the altered molecular milieu in PPARα-overexpressed hypertrophy groups restored mitochondrial structure and function both in vitro and in vivo. Cardiomyocyte-targeted overexpression of a protein of interest (PPARα) by nanotized plasmid has been described for the first time in this study. Our data provide a novel insight towards regression of pathological hypertrophy by ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress in targeted PPARα-overexpressed myocardium. PPARα-overexpression during pathological hypertrophy showed substantial betterment of mitochondrial structure and function, along with downregulated apoptosis. Myocardium-targeted overexpression of PPARα during pathological cardiac hypertrophy led to an overall improvement of cardiac energy deficit and subsequent cardiac

  15. Control of cellulose biosynthesis by overexpression of a transcription factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyung-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Kim; , Joo-Yeol

    2017-05-16

    The invention relates to the over-expression of a transcription factor selected from the group consisting of MYB46, HAM1, HAM2, MYB112, WRKY11, ERF6, and any combination thereof in a plant, which can modulate and thereby modulating the cellulose content of the plant.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-8 overexpression prevents proper tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Holst, Anders V; Maltesen, Henrik R

    2011-01-01

    The collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) is essential for normal tissue repair but is often overexpressed in wounds with disrupted healing. Our aim was to study the impact of a local excess of this neutrophil-derived proteinase on wound healing using recombinant adenovirus...

  17. Improvement of daptomycin yield by overexpression of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the accessory genes flanking the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes on daptomycin production were investigated by overexpression under the control of ermE* promoter via the integrative Escherichia coli–Streptomyces vector pIB139. The yield of daptomycin was promoted significantly when ...

  18. Brain phenotype of transgenic mice overexpressing cystathionine β-synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinciane Régnier

    Full Text Available The cystathionine β-synthase (CBS gene, located on human chromosome 21q22.3, is a good candidate for playing a role in the Down Syndrome (DS cognitive profile: it is overexpressed in the brain of individuals with DS, and it encodes a key enzyme of sulfur-containing amino acid (SAA metabolism, a pathway important for several brain physiological processes.Here, we have studied the neural consequences of CBS overexpression in a transgenic mouse line (60.4P102D1 expressing the human CBS gene under the control of its endogenous regulatory regions. These mice displayed a ∼2-fold increase in total CBS proteins in different brain areas and a ∼1.3-fold increase in CBS activity in the cerebellum and the hippocampus. No major disturbance of SAA metabolism was observed, and the transgenic mice showed normal behavior in the rotarod and passive avoidance tests. However, we found that hippocampal synaptic plasticity is facilitated in the 60.4P102D1 line.We demonstrate that CBS overexpression has functional consequences on hippocampal neuronal networks. These results shed new light on the function of the CBS gene, and raise the interesting possibility that CBS overexpression might have an advantageous effect on some cognitive functions in DS.

  19. Laboratory and field studies of guayule modified to overexpress HMGR

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the genetic modification of guayule to overexpress the isoprenoid pathway enzyme HMGR. The rubber content of two-month old in vitro transformed plantlets showed a 65% increase in rubber over the control for one line (HMGR6), and lower resin for another (HMGR2). In field evaluations HMGR6...

  20. Overexpression of CFH gene in pterygiumv patients | Bang | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overexpression of CFH gene in pterygiumv patients. Man-Seok Bang, Chang Rae Rho, Bong-Hui Kang, Kyong Jin Cho, Chung-Hun Oh. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the expression of complement factors in pterygium tissues compared to normal conjunctival samples, using next-generation RNA sequencing. Methods: ...

  1. Brain phenotype of transgenic mice overexpressing cystathionine β-synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Vinciane; Billard, Jean-Marie; Gupta, Sapna; Potier, Brigitte; Woerner, Stéphanie; Paly, Evelyne; Ledru, Aurélie; David, Sabrina; Luilier, Sabrina; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Vacano, Guido; Kraus, Jan P; Patterson, David; Kruger, Warren D; Delabar, Jean M; London, Jaqueline

    2012-01-01

    The cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) gene, located on human chromosome 21q22.3, is a good candidate for playing a role in the Down Syndrome (DS) cognitive profile: it is overexpressed in the brain of individuals with DS, and it encodes a key enzyme of sulfur-containing amino acid (SAA) metabolism, a pathway important for several brain physiological processes. Here, we have studied the neural consequences of CBS overexpression in a transgenic mouse line (60.4P102D1) expressing the human CBS gene under the control of its endogenous regulatory regions. These mice displayed a ∼2-fold increase in total CBS proteins in different brain areas and a ∼1.3-fold increase in CBS activity in the cerebellum and the hippocampus. No major disturbance of SAA metabolism was observed, and the transgenic mice showed normal behavior in the rotarod and passive avoidance tests. However, we found that hippocampal synaptic plasticity is facilitated in the 60.4P102D1 line. We demonstrate that CBS overexpression has functional consequences on hippocampal neuronal networks. These results shed new light on the function of the CBS gene, and raise the interesting possibility that CBS overexpression might have an advantageous effect on some cognitive functions in DS.

  2. Overexpression of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Increases Macrophage-Derived Foam Cell Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Transgenic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoucui Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C are inversely associated with the risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases; thus, pharmacological inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is considered to be a therapeutic method of raising HDL-C levels. However, many CETP inhibitors have failed to achieve a clinical benefit despite raising HDL-C. In the study, we generated transgenic (Tg rabbits that overexpressed the human CETP gene to examine the influence of CETP on the development of atherosclerosis. Both Tg rabbits and their non-Tg littermates were fed a high cholesterol diet for 16 weeks. Plasma lipids and body weight were measured every 4 weeks. Gross lesion areas of the aortic atherosclerosis along with lesional cellular components were quantitatively analyzed. Overexpression of human CETP did not significantly alter the gross atherosclerotic lesion area, but the number of macrophages in lesions was significantly increased. Overexpression of human CETP did not change the plasma levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but lowered plasma HDL-C and increased triglycerides. These data revealed that human CETP may play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis mainly by decreasing HDL-C levels and increasing the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cells.

  3. Overexpression of Rad in muscle worsens diet-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance and lowers plasma triglyceride level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Jacob; Bilan, Philip J.; Kapur, Sonia; Caldwell, James S.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Marette, Andre; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2006-03-01

    Rad is a low molecular weight GTPase that is overexpressed in skeletal muscle of some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or obesity. Overexpression of Rad in adipocytes and muscle cells in culture results in diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To further elucidate the potential role of Rad in vivo, we have generated transgenic (tg) mice that overexpress Rad in muscle using the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter-enhancer. Rad tg mice have a 6- to 12-fold increase in Rad expression in muscle as compared to wild-type littermates. Rad tg mice grow normally and have normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, but have reduced plasma triglyceride levels. On a high-fat diet, Rad tg mice develop more severe glucose intolerance than the wild-type mice; this is due to increased insulin resistance in muscle, as exemplified by a rightward shift in the dose-response curve for insulin stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake. There is also a unexpected further reduction of the plasma triglyceride levels that is associated with increased levels of lipoprotein lipase in the Rad tg mice. These results demonstrate a potential synergistic interaction between increased expression of Rad and high-fat diet in creation of insulin resistance and altered lipid metabolism present in type 2 diabetes. diabetes mellitus | glucose transport | RGK GTPase | transgenic mouse

  4. HER2 overexpression elicits a pro-inflammatory IL-6 autocrine signaling loop that is critical for tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Glass, Oliver; Lei, Gangjun; Osada, Takuya; Dave, Sandeep S.; Morse, Michael A.; Clay, Timothy M.; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2011-01-01

    HER2 overexpression occurs in ~25% of breast cancers where it correlates with poor prognosis. Likewise, systemic inflammation in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis although the process is not understood. In this study, we explored the relationship between HER2 and inflammation, comparing the effects of overexpressing wild-type or mutated inactive forms of HER2 in primary human breast cells. Wild-type HER2 elicited a profound transcriptional inflammatory profile, including marked elevation of IL-6 expression, which we established to be a critical determinant of HER2 oncogenesis. Mechanistic investigations revealed that IL-6 secretion induced by HER2 overexpression activated Stat3 and altered gene expression, enforcing an autocrine loop of IL-6/Stat3 expression. Both mouse and human in vivo models of HER2 amplified breast carcinoma relied critically on this HER2-IL-6-Stat3 signaling pathway. Our studies offer the first direct evidence linking HER2 to a systemic inflammatory mechanism that orchestrates HER2-mediated tumor growth. We suggest that the HER2-IL6-STAT3 signaling axis we have defined in breast cancer could prompt new therapeutic or prevention strategies for treatment of HER2-amplified cancers. PMID:21518778

  5. Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) overexpression increases reactive oxygen species production and inhibits murine muscle satellite cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Shelley D E; Kennedy, Karen A M; Xie, Xiaojun; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Li, Shawn S C

    2014-01-11

    Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) has been associated with the maturation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing enzyme, dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1) in the adult thyroid. However, ROS have also been implicated in the development of several tissues. We found that activated muscle satellite cells and primary myoblasts isolated from mice express robust levels of DUOXA1 and that its levels are altered as cells differentiate. To determine whether DUOXA1 levels affect muscle differentiation, we used an adenoviral construct (pCMV5-DUOXA1-GFP) to drive constitutive overexpression of this protein in primary myoblasts. High levels of DUOXA1 throughout myogenesis resulted in enhanced H2O2 production, fusion defects, reduced expression of early (myogenin) and late (myosin heavy chain) markers of differentiation, and elevated levels of apoptosis compared to control cells infected with an empty adenoviral vector (pCMV5-GFP). DUOXA1 knockdown (using a DUOXA1 shRNA construct) resulted in enhanced differentiation compared to cells subjected to a control shRNA, and subjecting DUOXA1 overexpressing cells to siRNAs targeting DUOX1 or apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) rescued the phenotype. This study represents the first to demonstrate the importance of DUOXA1 in skeletal muscle myoblasts and that DUOXA1 overexpression in muscle stem cells induces apoptosis and inhibits differentiation through DUOX1 and ASK1.

  6. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-04-14

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress.

  7. Transgenic overexpression of 14-3-3 zeta protects hippocampus against endoplasmic reticulum stress and status epilepticus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary P Brennan

    Full Text Available 14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that are abundantly expressed in the brain where they regulate cell functions including metabolism, the cell cycle and apoptosis. Brain levels of several 14-3-3 isoforms are altered in diseases of the nervous system, including epilepsy. The 14-3-3 zeta (ζ isoform has been linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER function in neurons, with reduced levels provoking ER stress and increasing vulnerability to excitotoxic injury. Here we report that transgenic overexpression of 14-3-3ζ in mice results in selective changes to the unfolded protein response pathway in the hippocampus, including down-regulation of glucose-regulated proteins 78 and 94, activating transcription factors 4 and 6, and Xbp1 splicing. No differences were found between wild-type mice and transgenic mice for levels of other 14-3-3 isoforms or various other 14-3-3 binding proteins. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were potently protected against cell death caused by intracerebroventricular injection of the ER stressor tunicamycin. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were also potently protected against neuronal death caused by prolonged seizures. These studies demonstrate that increased 14-3-3ζ levels protect against ER stress and seizure-damage despite down-regulation of the unfolded protein response. Delivery of 14-3-3ζ may protect against pathologic changes resulting from prolonged or repeated seizures or where injuries provoke ER stress.

  8. Overexpression of ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 Enhances Iron and Zinc Accumulation in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzhen Li

    Full Text Available Iron and zinc are important micronutrients for both the growth and nutrient availability of crop plants, and their absorption is tightly controlled by a metal uptake system. Zinc-regulated transporters, iron-regulated transporter-like proteins (ZIP, is considered an essential metal transporter for the acquisition of Fe and Zn in graminaceous plants. Several ZIPs have been identified in maize, although their physiological function remains unclear. In this report, ZmIRT1 was shown to be specifically expressed in silk and embryo, whereas ZmZIP3 was a leaf-specific gene. Both ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 were shown to be localized to the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ZmIRT1 or ZmZIP3 were generated, and the metal contents in various tissues of transgenic and wild-type plants were examined based on ICP-OES and Zinpyr-1 staining. The Fe and Zn concentration increased in roots and seeds of ZmIRT1-overexpressing plants, while the Fe content in shoots decreased. Overexpressing ZmZIP3 enhanced Zn accumulation in the roots of transgenic plants, while that in shoots was repressed. In addition, the transgenic plants showed altered tolerance to various Fe and Zn conditions compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, the genes associated with metal uptake were stimulated in ZmIRT1 transgenic plants, while those involved in intra- and inter- cellular translocation were suppressed. In conclusion, ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 are functional metal transporters with different ion selectivities. Ectopic overexpression of ZmIRT1 may stimulate endogenous Fe uptake mechanisms, which may facilitate metal uptake and homeostasis. Our results increase our understanding of the functions of ZIP family transporters in maize.

  9. High eIF4E Overexpression in Node Negative Breast Cancer as Predictor for Recurrence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    .... EIF4E overexpression has been found in human malignancies (Li, 1997; Nathan, 1997). Furthermore, there appears to be an association of eIF4E overexpression and clinical outcomes (Li, 1998; Nathan, 1997; Li, 2001...

  10. Nmdmc overexpression extends Drosophila lifespan and reduces levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Suyeun; Jang, Yeogil; Paik, Donggi; Lee, Eunil; Park, Joong-Jean

    2015-01-01

    NAD-dependent methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (NMDMC) is a bifunctional enzyme involved in folate-dependent metabolism and highly expressed in rapidly proliferating cells. However, Nmdmc physiological roles remain unveiled. We found that ubiquitous Nmdmc overexpression enhanced Drosophila lifespan and stress resistance. Interestingly, Nmdmc overexpression in the fat body was sufficient to increase lifespan and tolerance against oxidative stress. In addition, these conditions coincided with significant decreases in the levels of mitochondrial ROS and Hsp22 as well as with a significant increase in the copy number of mitochondrial DNA. These results suggest that Nmdmc overexpression should be beneficial for mitochondrial homeostasis and increasing lifespan. - Highlights: • Ubiquitous Nmdmc overexpression enhanced lifespan and stress tolerance. • Nmdmc overexpression in the fat body extended longevity. • Fat body-specific Nmdmc overexpression increased oxidative stress resistance. • Nmdmc overexpression decreased Hsp22 transcript levels and ROS. • Nmdmc overexpression increased mitochondrial DNA copy number.

  11. Nmdmc overexpression extends Drosophila lifespan and reduces levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Suyeun [Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yeogil; Paik, Donggi [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eunil, E-mail: eunil@korea.ac.kr [Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joong-Jean, E-mail: parkjj@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-02

    NAD-dependent methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (NMDMC) is a bifunctional enzyme involved in folate-dependent metabolism and highly expressed in rapidly proliferating cells. However, Nmdmc physiological roles remain unveiled. We found that ubiquitous Nmdmc overexpression enhanced Drosophila lifespan and stress resistance. Interestingly, Nmdmc overexpression in the fat body was sufficient to increase lifespan and tolerance against oxidative stress. In addition, these conditions coincided with significant decreases in the levels of mitochondrial ROS and Hsp22 as well as with a significant increase in the copy number of mitochondrial DNA. These results suggest that Nmdmc overexpression should be beneficial for mitochondrial homeostasis and increasing lifespan. - Highlights: • Ubiquitous Nmdmc overexpression enhanced lifespan and stress tolerance. • Nmdmc overexpression in the fat body extended longevity. • Fat body-specific Nmdmc overexpression increased oxidative stress resistance. • Nmdmc overexpression decreased Hsp22 transcript levels and ROS. • Nmdmc overexpression increased mitochondrial DNA copy number.

  12. Overexpression of Human-Derived DNMT3A Induced Intergenerational Inheritance of Active DNA Methylation Changes in Rat Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguo Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is the major focus of studies on paternal epigenetic inheritance in mammals, but most previous studies about inheritable DNA methylation changes are passively induced by environmental factors. However, it is unclear whether the active changes mediated by variations in DNA methyltransferase activity are heritable. Here, we established human-derived DNMT3A (hDNMT3A transgenic rats to study the effect of hDNMT3A overexpression on the DNA methylation pattern of rat sperm and to investigate whether this actively altered DNA methylation status is inheritable. Our results revealed that hDNMT3A was overexpressed in the testis of transgenic rats and induced genome-wide alterations in the DNA methylation pattern of rat sperm. Among 5438 reliable loci identified with 64 primer-pair combinations using a methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism method, 28.01% showed altered amplified band types. Among these amplicons altered loci, 68.42% showed an altered DNA methylation status in the offspring of transgenic rats compared with wild-type rats. Further analysis based on loci which had identical DNA methylation status in all three biological replicates revealed that overexpression of hDNMT3A in paternal testis induced hypermethylation in sperm of both genotype-negative and genotype-positive offspring. Among the differentially methylated loci, 34.26% occurred in both positive and negative offspring of transgenic rats, indicating intergenerational inheritance of active DNA methylation changes in the absence of hDNM3A transmission. Furthermore, 75.07% of the inheritable loci were hyper-methylated while the remaining were hypomethylated. Distribution analysis revealed that the DNA methylation variations mainly occurred in introns and intergenic regions. Functional analysis revealed that genes related to differentially methylated loci were involved in a wide range of functions. Finally, this study demonstrated that active DNA methylation

  13. Green tea polyphenols rescue of brain defects induced by overexpression of DYRK1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Guedj

    Full Text Available Individuals with partial HSA21 trisomies and mice with partial MMU16 trisomies containing an extra copy of the DYRK1A gene present various alterations in brain morphogenesis. They present also learning impairments modeling those encountered in Down syndrome. Previous MRI and histological analyses of a transgenic mice generated using a human YAC construct that contains five genes including DYRK1A reveal that DYRK1A is involved, during development, in the control of brain volume and cell density of specific brain regions. Gene dosage correction induces a rescue of the brain volume alterations. DYRK1A is also involved in the control of synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Increased gene dosage results in brain morphogenesis defects, low BDNF levels and mnemonic deficits in these mice. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG - a member of a natural polyphenols family, found in great amount in green tea leaves - is a specific and safe DYRK1A inhibitor. We maintained control and transgenic mice overexpressing DYRK1A on two different polyphenol-based diets, from gestation to adulthood. The major features of the transgenic phenotype were rescued in these mice.

  14. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D.; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D.; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas comparedwith normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24–72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca2+ and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  15. Role of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae in bacterial swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ling; Suo, Zhiyong; Lim, Timothy; Jun, Sangmu; Deliorman, Muhammedin; Riccardi, Carol; Kellerman, Laura; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I is a protective antigen and has been overexpressed in bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella Typhimurium H683, to generate vaccines. Effects that overexpressed CFA/I may engender on the bacterial host remain largely unexplored. To investigate, we constructed a high CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC2, and compared it to a low CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC, and to a non-CFA/I expression strain, H683-pY. The results showed that H683-pC2 was less able to migrate into semisolid agar (0.35%) than either H683-pC or H683-pY. Bacteria that migrated showed motility halo sizes of H683-pC2 CFA/I fimbriae on bacterial swimming motility.

  16. Overexpression of esterase D in kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughna, S.; Moore, G. (Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, London (United Kingdom)); Gau, G.; Blunt, S. (Cytogenetics Lab., London (United Kingdom)); Nicolaides, K. (King' s College School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-10-01

    Human trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is compatible with life, but prolonged survival is rare. Anomalies often involve the urogenital, cardiac, craniofacial, and central nervous systems. It is possible that these abnormalities may be due to the overexpression of developmentally important genes on chromosome 13. The expression of esterase D (localized to chromosome 13q14.11) has been investigated in both muscle and kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses and has been compared with normal age- and sex-matched fetal tissues, by using northern analysis. More than a twofold increase in expression of esterase D was found in the kidney of two trisomy 13 fetuses, with normal levels in a third. Overexpression was not seen in the muscle tissues from these fetuses. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Transgenic overexpression of p23 induces spontaneous hydronephrosis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehoon; Kim, Hye Jin; Moon, Jung Ah; Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Roh, Jae-il; Ha, Na Young; Kim, Seung-Yeon; Bahk, Young Yil; Lee, Jong Eun; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Lee, Han-Woong

    2011-01-01

    p23 is a cochaperone of heat shock protein 90 and also interacts functionally with numerous steroid receptors and kinases. However, the in vivo roles of p23 remain unclear. To explore its in vivo function, we generated the transgenic (TG) mice ubiquitously overexpressing p23. The p23 TG mice spontaneously developed kidney abnormalities closely resembling human hydronephrosis. Consistently, kidney functions deteriorate significantly in the p23 TG mice compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Furthermore, the expression of target genes for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), such as cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (Cyp1A1) and cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (Cyp1B1), were induced in the kidneys of the p23 TG mice. These results indicate that the overexpression of p23 contributes to the development of hydronephrosis through the upregulation of the AhR pathway in vivo. PMID:21323770

  18. Modulation of ethylene responses by OsRTH1 overexpression reveals the biological significance of ethylene in rice seedling growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of Arabidopsis Reversion-To-ethylene Sensitivity1 (RTE1) results in whole-plant ethylene insensitivity dependent on the ethylene receptor gene Ethylene Response1 (ETR1). However, overexpression of the tomato RTE1 homologue Green Ripe (GR) delays fruit ripening but does not confer whole-plant ethylene insensitivity. It was decided to investigate whether aspects of ethylene-induced growth and development of the monocotyledonous model plant rice could be modulated by rice RTE1 homologues (OsRTH genes). Results from a cross-species complementation test in Arabidopsis showed that OsRTH1 overexpression complemented the rte1-2 loss-of-function mutation and conferred whole-plant ethylene insensitivity in an ETR1-dependent manner. In contrast, OsRTH2 and OsRTH3 overexpression did not complement rte1-2 or confer ethylene insensitivity. In rice, OsRTH1 overexpression substantially prevented ethylene-induced alterations in growth and development, including leaf senescence, seedling leaf elongation and development, coleoptile elongation or curvature, and adventitious root development. Results of subcellular localizations of OsRTHs, each fused with the green fluorescent protein, in onion epidermal cells suggested that the three OsRTHs were predominantly localized to the Golgi. OsRTH1 may be an RTE1 orthologue of rice and modulate rice ethylene responses. The possible roles of auxins and gibberellins in the ethylene-induced alterations in growth were evaluated and the biological significance of ethylene in the early stage of rice seedling growth is discussed. PMID:22451723

  19. Identification and overexpression of a Knotted1-like transcription factor in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. for lignocellulosic feedstock improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegi eWuddineh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High biomass production and wide adaptation has made switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. an important candidate lignocellulosic bioenergy crop. One major limitation of this and other lignocellulosic feedstocks is the recalcitrance of complex carbohydrates to hydrolysis for conversion to biofuels. Lignin is the major contributor to recalcitrance as it limits the accessibility of cell wall carbohydrates to enzymatic breakdown into fermentable sugars. Therefore, genetic manipulation of the lignin biosynthesis pathway is one strategy to reduce recalcitrance. Here, we identified a switchgrass Knotted1 transcription factor, PvKN1, with the aim of genetically engineering switchgrass for reduced biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production. Gene expression of the endogenous PvKN1 gene was observed to be highest in young inflorescences and stems. Ectopic overexpression of PvKN1 in switchgrass altered growth, especially in early developmental stages. Transgenic lines had reduced expression of most lignin biosynthetic genes accompanied by a reduction in lignin content suggesting the involvement of PvKN1 in the broad regulation of the lignin biosynthesis pathway. Moreover, the reduced expression of the Gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA20ox gene in tandem with the increased expression of Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox genes in transgenic PvKN1 lines suggest that PvKN1 may exert regulatory effects via modulation of GA signalling. Furthermore, overexpression of PvKN1 altered the expression of cellulose and hemicellulose biosynthetic genes and increased sugar release efficiency in transgenic lines. Our results demonstrated that switchgrass PvKN1 is a putative ortholog of maize KN1 that is linked to plant lignification and cell wall and development traits as a major regulatory gene. Therefore, targeted overexpression of PvKN1 in bioenergy feedstocks may provide one feasible strategy for reducing biomass recalcitrance and simultaneously improving plant growth characteristics.

  20. Correlation of cytoplasmic beta-catenin and cyclin D1 overexpression during thyroid carcinogenesis around Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirmanov, Serik; Nakashima, Masahiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Matsufuji, Reiko; Takamura, Noboru; Ishigaki, Katsu; Ito, Masahiro; Prouglo, Yuri; Yamashita, Shunichi; Sekine, Ichiro

    2003-06-01

    The Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS), the Republic of Kazakhstan, has been contaminated by radioactive fallout. The alteration of oncogenic molecules in thyroid cancer around the SNTS was considered worthy of analysis because it presented the potential to elucidate the relationship between radiation exposure and thyroid cancer. This study aimed to analyze both beta-catenin and cyclin D1 expressions in thyroid carcinomas around the SNTS. We examined nine cases of chronic thyroiditis, eight cases of follicular adenomas, and 23 cases of papillary carcinomas. Immunohistochemically, all carcinomas displayed a strong cytosolic beta-catenin expression, while both chronic thyroiditis and follicular adenomas showed a significantly lower cytoplasmic beta-catenin (22.2% and 37.5%, respectively). No cyclin D1 immunoreactivity was evident in chronic thyroiditis. In contrast, 62.5% of follicular adenomas and 87.0% of papillary carcinoma showed cyclin D1 overexpression. Additionally, a strong correlation between cytoplasmic beta-catenin and cyclin D1 expression was suggested in thyroid tumors. This study revealed a higher prevalence of both aberrant beta-catenin expression and cyclin D1 overexpression in papillary thyroid cancers around the SNTS than sporadic cases. The analysis of the alteration of the Wnt signaling-related molecules in thyroid cancer around the SNTS may be important to gain an insight into radiation-induced thyroid tumorigenesis.

  1. Cytogenetic evaluation of human glial tumors: correlation of overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFB) with abnormalities of chromosome 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome banding analysis of human glial tumors were performed using G- and Q-banding techniques in an attempt to establish recurring sites of chromosome change. Results revealed a nonrandom karyotypic profile including aneuploidy and considerable variation in chromosome number (range 40 → 200). All tumors examined displayed numerical abnormalities, with the most common numeric change being a gain of chromosome 7. An attempt was then made to correlate the observed chromosome 7 changes with activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-erb-B, whose produce is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Six human glial tumors were analyzed for 125 I-EGF binding, EGFR gene copy number, EGFR gene rearrangement, mRNA expression, and karyotypic profile. Saturation analysis at 4 0 C revealed significant numbers of EGFR's in all 6 tumors. Southern blotting analysis utilizing cDNA probes for the EGFR failed to demonstrate significant amplification or structural rearrangement of the EFGR gene. The results suggest that overexpression of the EGFR may be related to an alternative mechanism, other than gene amplification and elevated mRNA levels, such as the regulation of receptor biosynthesis and degradation. In summary, findings indicate that alterations of chromosome 7 are the most prevalent chromosomal change in human glial tumors, and that these alterations may lead to overexpression of the protooncogene c-erb-B

  2. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by overexpression of the single genes as well as a combined deregulation of up to all six riboflavin synthesis genes. Results Overexpression of the first gene of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RIB1 is already sufficient to obtain yellow colonies and the accumulation of riboflavin in the supernatant of shake flask cultures growing on glucose. Sequential deregulation of all the genes, by exchange of their native promoter with the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP increases the riboflavin accumulation significantly. Conclusion The regulation of the pathway is distributed over more than one gene. High cell density cultivations of a P. pastoris strain overexpressing all six RIB genes allow the accumulation of 175 mg/L riboflavin in the supernatant. The basis for rational engineering of riboflavin production in P. pastoris has thus been established.

  3. Role of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae in bacterial swimming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Riccardi, Carol; Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Deliorman, Muhammedin; Kellerman, Laura; Avci, Recep

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I is a protective antigen and has been overexpressed in bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella Typhimurium H683, to generate vaccines. Effects that overexpressed CFA/I may engender on the bacterial host remain largely unexplored. To investigate, we constructed a high CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC2, and compared it to a low CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC, and to a non-CFA/I expression strain, H683-pY. The results showed that H683-pC2 was less able to migrate into semisolid agar (0.35%) than either H683-pC or H683-pY. Bacteria that migrated showed motility halo sizes of H683-pC2 < H683-pC < H683-pY. In the liquid culture media, H683-pC2 cells precipitated to the bottom of the tube, while those of H683-pY did not. In situ imaging revealed that H683-pC2 bacilli tended to auto-agglutinate within the semisolid agar, while H683-pY bacilli did not. When the cfaBE fimbrial fiber encoding genes were deleted from pC2, the new plasmid, pC2(-), significantly recovered bacterial swimming capability. Our study highlights the negative impact of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae on bacterial swimming motility. (paper)

  4. Role of neuroinflammation in the emotional and cognitive alterations displayed by animal models of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eCastanon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of mood disorders and cognitive dysfunctions in addition to being a significant risk factor for important health complications such as cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Identifying the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these health issues is a major public health challenge. Based on recent findings, from studies conducted on animal models of obesity, it has been proposed that inflammatory processes may participate in both the peripheral and brain disorders associated with the obesity condition including the development of emotional and cognitive alterations. This is supported by the fact that obesity is characterized by peripheral low-grade inflammation, originating from increased adipose tissue mass and/or dysbiosis (changes in gut microbiota environment, both of which contribute to increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases. In this review, we provide converging evidence showing that obesity is associated with exacerbated neuroinflammation leading to dysfunction in vulnerable brain regions associated with mood regulation, learning and memory such as the hippocampus. These findings give new insights to the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the development of brain disorders in the context of obesity and provide valuable data for introducing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neuropsychiatric complications often reported in obese patients.

  5. Overexpression of MDM2 protein in ameloblastomas as compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies on odontogenic tumors have identified various molecular alterations responsible for their development, and determination of epithelial proliferation is a useful means of investigating the differences in biologic behavior of these tumors. One such specific marker to identify proliferative activity and tumor aggressiveness by immunohistochemistry (IHC is MDM2, 90-95kDa protein. Objective: This immunohistochemical study using MDM2 expression was undertaken to understand better the diverse biological activity of two groups of odontogenic tumors namely ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT based on their cell proliferation activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 cases, comprising of 36 ameloblastoma samples and 14 AOT samples, were subjected to heat-induced antigen retrieval method using citrate buffer in a pressure cooker. Consequently, the sections were stained with MDM2 monoclonal antibody and visualized using an LSAB+ kit. Results: In ameloblastomas, statistically significant association was seen between plexiform ameloblastomas, follicular ameloblastomas with granular cell changes, desmoplastic and unicystic variants. The predominant nuclear staining by MDM2 revealed overexpression in ameloblastomas as compared to AOT. Conclusion: The MDM2 overexpression noticed in plexiform ameloblastoma, follicular ameloblastoma with granular cell changes and acanthomatous ameloblastoma when compared to simple unicystic and desmoplastic ameloblastoma suggest a relatively enhanced proliferative phenotype of these solid multicystic variants of ameloblastomas. On overall comparison, higher expression was noted in ameloblastomas when compared to AOT. This indicates differences in the aggressive nature between these two groups of odontogenic tumors favoring the perception of a greater aggressive nature of ameloblastomas.

  6. Ectoderm-targeted overexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor induces hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascallana, Jose Luis; Bravo, Ana; Donet, Eva; Leis, Hugo; Lara, Maria Fernanda; Paramio, Jesús M; Jorcano, José L; Pérez, Paloma

    2005-06-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a human syndrome defined by maldevelopment of one or more ectodermal-derived tissues, including the epidermis and cutaneous appendices, teeth, and exocrine glands. The molecular bases of this pathology converge in a dysfunction of the transcription factor nuclear factor of the kappa-enhancer in B cells (NF-kappaB), which is essential to epithelial homeostasis and development. A number of mouse models bearing disruptions in NF-kappaB signaling have been reported to manifest defects in ectodermal derivatives. In ectoderm-targeted transgenic mice overexpressing the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) [keratin 5 (K5)-GR mice], the NF-kappaB activity is greatly decreased due to functional antagonism between GR and NF-kappaB. Here, we report that K5-GR mice exhibit multiple epithelial defects in hair follicle, tooth, and palate development. Additionally, these mice lack Meibomian glands and display underdeveloped sweat and preputial glands. These phenotypic features appear to be mediated specifically by ligand-activated GR because the synthetic analog dexamethasone induced similar defects in epithelial morphogenesis, including odontogenesis, in wild-type mice. We have focused on tooth development in K5-GR mice and found that an inhibitor of steroid synthesis partially reversed the abnormal phenotype. Immunostaining revealed reduced expression of the inhibitor of kappaB kinase subunits, IKKalpha and IKKgamma, and diminished p65 protein levels in K5-GR embryonic tooth, resulting in a significantly reduced kappaB-binding activity. Remarkably, altered NF-kappaB activity elicited by GR overexpression correlated with a dramatic decrease in the protein levels of DeltaNp63 in tooth epithelia without affecting Akt, BMP4, or Foxo3a. Given that many of the 170 clinically distinct ectodermal dysplasia syndromes still remain without cognate genes, deciphering the molecular mechanisms of this mouse model with epithelial NF-kappaB and p63 dysfunction may

  7. Overexpression of CHMP7 from rapeseed and Arabidopsis causes dwarfism and premature senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Liu, Jing; Lin, Jiulu; Deng, Linbin; Fan, Shihang; Guo, Yan; Sun, Fengming; Hua, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) are well known in mammalians and yeast and plays an essential role in the formation of multi-vesicular bodies. Accumulating evidence has shown that ESCRT proteins contribute to proper plant development. CHMP7 (charged multi-vesicular body protein 7) is an ESCRT-III-related protein and functions in the endosomal sorting pathway in humans. However, its function in plants has not been explored in detail. In this study, we isolate the putative homolog of CHMP7 from rapeseed, BnCHMP7, which contains eight exons and encodes a protein consisting of 423 amino acid residues. Compared with the wild-type, overexpression of BnCHMP7 in Arabidopsis disturbs plant growth and decreases seed yield. Moreover, the transgenic plants also display early leaf senescence and hypersensitivity to dark treatment due to defects in autophagic degradation. Further study showed that BnCHMP7 is highly expressed in leaves and that YFP-BnCHMP7 is predominantly localized in endosome. Compared with human CHMP7, we found that BnCHMP7 not only interacts with ESCRT-III subunits SNF7.2 (CHMP4B), but also with VPS2.2 and CHMP1B. As expected, microarray analysis revealed that the expression of ESCRT transport genes is significantly affected. Additionally, the expression of some genes that are involved in senescence, protein synthesis and protein degradation is also altered in BnCHMP7-overexpressing plants. Taken together, BnCHMP7 encodes an endosome-localized protein, which causes dwarfism and leaf senescence as an ESCRT-III-related component. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene array analysis of PD-1H overexpressing monocytes reveals a pro-inflammatory profile

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    Preeti Bharaj

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that overexpression of Programmed Death -1 Homolog (PD-1H in human monocytes leads to activation and spontaneous secretion of multiple pro inflammatory cytokines. Here we evaluate changes in monocytes gene expression after enforced PD-1H expression by gene array. The results show that there are significant alterations in 51 potential candidate genes that relate to immune response, cell adhesion and metabolism. Genes corresponding to pro-inflammatory cytokines showed the highest upregulation, 7, 3.2, 3.0, 5.8, 4.4 and 3.1 fold upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IFN-α, γ, λ and IL-27 relative to vector control. The data are in agreement with cytometric bead array analysis showing induction of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α by PD-1H. Other genes related to inflammation, include transglutaminase 2 (TG2, NF-κB (p65 and p50 and toll like receptors (TLR 3 and 4 were upregulated 5, 4.5 and 2.5 fold, respectively. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA also revealed that signaling pathways related to inflammatory response, such as NFκB, AT1R, PYK2, MAPK, RELA, TNFR1, MTOR and proteasomal degradation, were significantly upregulated in response to PD-1H overexpression. We validated the results utilizing a standard inflammatory sepsis model in humanized BLT mice, finding that PD-1H expression was highly correlated with proinflammatory cytokine production. We therefore conclude that PD-1H functions to enhance monocyte activation and the induction of a pro-inflammatory gene expression profile.

  9. CENPA overexpression promotes genome instability in pRb-depleted human cells

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    Lentini Laura

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneuploidy is a hallmark of most human cancers that arises as a consequence of chromosomal instability and it is frequently associated with centrosome amplification. Functional inactivation of the Retinoblastoma protein (pRb has been indicated as a cause promoting chromosomal instability as well centrosome amplification. However, the underlying molecular mechanism still remains to be clarified. Results Here we show that pRb depletion both in wild type and p53 knockout HCT116 cells was associated with the presence of multipolar spindles, anaphase bridges, lagging chromosomes and micronuclei harbouring whole chromosomes. In addition aneuploidy caused by pRb acute loss was not affected by p53 loss. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that pRB depletion altered expression of genes involved in centrosome duplication, kinetochore assembly and in the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC. However, despite MAD2 up-regulation pRb-depleted cells seemed to have a functional SAC since they arrested in mitosis after treatments with mitotic poisons. Moreover pRb-depleted HCT116 cells showed BRCA1 overexpression that seemed responsible for MAD2 up-regulation. Post-transcriptional silencing of CENPA by RNA interference, resulting in CENP-A protein levels similar to those present in control cells greatly reduced aneuploid cell numbers in pRb-depleted cells. Conclusion Altogether our findings indicate a novel aspect of pRb acute loss that promotes aneuploidy mainly by inducing CENPA overexpression that in turn might induce micronuclei by affecting the correct attachment of spindle microtubules to kinetochores.

  10. Tet1 overexpression leads to anxiety-like behavior and enhanced fear memories via the activation of calcium-dependent cascade through Egr1 expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Wookbong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Jeong, Jain; Sung, Yonghun; Choi, Minjee; Park, Song; Lee, Jinhee; Jang, Soyoung; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Sanggyu; Kim, Myoung Ok; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2018-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 ( Tet1 ) initiates DNA demethylation by converting 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) at CpG-rich regions of genes, which have key roles in adult neurogenesis and memory. In addition, the overexpression of Tet1 with 5-hmC alteration in patients with psychosis has also been reported, for instance in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. The mechanism underlying Tet1 overexpression in the brain; however, is still elusive. In the present study, we found that Tet1-transgenic (Tet1-TG) mice displayed abnormal behaviors involving elevated anxiety and enhanced fear memories. We confirmed that Tet1 overexpression affected adult neurogenesis with oligodendrocyte differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Tet1-TG mice. In addition, Tet1 overexpression induced the elevated expression of immediate early genes, such as Egr1 , c-fos , Arc , and Bdnf , followed by the activation of intracellular calcium signals ( i.e. , CamKII, ERK, and CREB) in prefrontal and hippocampal neurons. The expression of GABA receptor subunits ( Gabra2 and Gabra4 ) fluctuated in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We evaluated the effects of Tet1 overexpression on intracellular calcium-dependent cascades by activating the Egr1 promoter in vitro Tet1 enhanced Egr1 expression, which may have led to alterations in Gabra2 and Gabra4 expression in neurons. Taken together, we suggest that the Tet1 overexpression in our Tet1-TG mice can be applied as an effective model for studying various stress-related diseases that show hyperactivation of intracellular calcium-dependent cascades in the brain.-Kwon, W., Kim, H.-S., Jeong, J., Sung, Y., Choi, M., Park, S., Lee, J., Jang, S., Kim, S. H., Lee, S., Kim, M. O., Ryoo, Z. Y. Tet1 overexpression leads to anxiety-like behavior and enhanced fear memories via the activation of calcium-dependent cascade through Egr1 expression in mice. © FASEB.

  11. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Litkouhi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE, is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. METHODS: Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular resistance (Rb in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. RESULTS: Claudin4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. CONCLUSIONS: C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies.

  12. Core I gene is overexpressed in Hürthle and non-Hürthle cell microfollicular adenomas and follicular carcinomas of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Máximo, Valdemar; Preto, Ana; Crespo, Ana; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Machado, José Carlos; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Most of the steps involved in the initiation and progression of Hürthle (oncocytic, oxyphilic) cell carcinomas of the thyroid remain unknown. Using differential display and semiquantitative RT-PCR we found, among other alterations, overexpression of the gene encoding the Core I subunit of the complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in a follicular carcinoma composed of Hürthle cells. Similar high levels of Core I gene expression were detected in nine follicular carcinomas (seven with Hürthle cell features), in seven microfollicular adenomas (one with Hürthle cell features) and in one micro/macrofollicular adenoma, in contrast to a lower/normal expression in nine papillary carcinomas (three with Hürthle cell features) and five macrofollicular adenomas (one of which displaying Hürthle cell features). No significative correlation was found between Core I overexpression and the proliferative activity of the lesions. We conclude that Core I overexpression in thyroid tumours is not associated with malignancy, Hürthle cells or proliferative activity. The pathogenetic mechanism linking Core I overexpression to the microfollicular pattern of growth of thyroid tumours remains to be clarified

  13. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, XIHAI; LIANG, WENNA; YE, HONGZHI; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; LIN, PINGDONG; LIU, XIANXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild-type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice. PMID:26096903

  14. Radiation protection philosophy alters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two significant events that have taken place this year in the field of radiation protection are reported. New SI units have been proposed (and effectively adopted), and the ICRP has revised its recommendations. Changes of emphasis in the latest recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) imply an altered radiation protection philosophy, in particular the relation of dose limits to estimates of average risk, an altered view of the critical organ approach and a new attitude to genetic dose to the population. (author)

  15. Simultaneous Aurora-A/STK15 overexpression and centrosome amplification induce chromosomal instability in tumour cells with a MIN phenotype

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    Schillaci Tiziana

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumours and preneoplastic lesions. The predominant form of genome instability in human cancer is chromosome instability (CIN. CIN is characterized by chromosomal aberrations, gains or losses of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy, and it is often associated with centrosome amplification. Centrosomes control cell division by forming a bipolar mitotic spindle and play an essential role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. However, whether centrosome amplification could directly cause aneuploidy is not fully established. Also, alterations in genes required for mitotic progression could be involved in CIN. A major candidate is represented by Aurora-A/STK15 that associates with centrosomes and is overexpressed in several types of human tumour. Methods Centrosome amplification were induced by hydroxyurea treatment and visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Aurora-A/STK15 ectopic expression was achieved by retroviral infection and puromycin selection in HCT116 tumour cells. Effects of Aurora-A/STK15 depletion on centrosome status and ploidy were determined by Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference. Changes in the expression levels of some mitotic genes were determined by Real time RT-PCR. Results We investigated whether amplification of centrosomes and overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induce CIN using as a model system a colon carcinoma cell line (HCT116. We found that in HCT116 cells, chromosomally stable and near diploid cells harbouring a MIN phenotype, centrosome amplification induced by hydroxyurea treatment is neither maintained nor induces aneuploidy. On the contrary, ectopic overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induced supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference in cells ectopically overexpressing this kinase promptly decreased cell numbers with supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Conclusion Our

  16. Differences in radiosensitivity between three HER2 overexpressing cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Stenerloew, Bo; Goestring, Lovisa; Palm, Stig; Carlsson, Joergen

    2008-01-01

    HER2 is a potential target for radionuclide therapy, especially when HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells are resistant to Herceptin registered treatment. Therefore, it is of interest to analyse whether HER2 overexpressing tumour cells have different inherent radiosensitivity. The radiosensitivity of three often used HER2 overexpressing cell lines, SKOV-3, SKBR-3 and BT-474, was analysed. The cells were exposed to conventional photon irradiation, low linear energy transfer (LET), to characterise their inherent radiosensitivity. The analysis was made with clonogenic survival and growth extrapolation assays. The cells were also exposed to alpha particles, high LET, from 211 At decays using the HER2-binding affibody molecule 211 At-(Z HER2:4 ) 2 as targeting agent. Assays for studies of internalisation of the affibody molecule were applied. SKOV-3 cells were most radioresistant, SKBR-3 cells were intermediate and BT-474 cells were most sensitive as measured with the clonogenic and growth extrapolation assays after photon irradiation. The HER2 dependent cellular uptake of 211 At was qualitatively similar for all three cell lines. However, the sensitivity to the alpha particles from 211 At differed; SKOV-3 was most resistant, SKBR-3 intermediate and BT-474 most sensitive. These differences were unexpected because it is assumed that all types of cells should have similar sensitivity to high-LET radiation. The sensitivity to alpha particle exposure correlated with internalisation of the affibody molecule and with size of the cell nucleus. There can be differences in radiosensitivity, which, if they also exist between patient breast cancer cells, are important to consider for both conventional radiotherapy and for HER2-targeted radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor structural alterations in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutinho, Cátia; Mateus, Ana R; Milanezi, Fernanda; Carneiro, Fátima; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo

    2008-01-01

    EGFR overexpression has been described in many human tumours including gastric cancer. In NSCLC patients somatic EGFR mutations, within the kinase domain of the protein, as well as gene amplification were associated with a good clinical response to EGFR inhibitors. In gastric tumours data concerning structural alterations of EGFR remains controversial. Given its possible therapeutic relevance, we aimed to determine the frequency and type of structural alterations of the EGFR gene in a series of primary gastric carcinomas. Direct sequencing of the kinase domain of the EGFR gene was performed in a series of 77 primary gastric carcinomas. FISH analysis was performed in 30 cases. Association studies between EGFR alterations and the clinical pathological features of the tumours were performed. Within the 77 primary gastric carcinomas we found two EGFR somatic mutations and several EGFR polymorphisms in exon 20. Six different intronic sequence variants of EGFR were also found. Four gastric carcinomas showed balanced polysomy or EGFR gene amplification. We verified that gastric carcinoma with alterations of EGFR (somatic mutations or copy number variation) showed a significant increase of tumour size (p = 0.0094) in comparison to wild-type EGFR carcinomas. We demonstrate that EGFR structural alterations are rare in gastric carcinoma, but whenever present, it leads to tumour growth. We considered that searching for EGFR alterations in gastric cancer is likely to be clinically important in order to identify patients susceptible to respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  18. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

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    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  19. CREB Overexpression Ameliorates Age-related Behavioral and Biophysical Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Wen

    Age-related cognitive deficits are observed in both humans and animals. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are not yet fully elucidated. In aged animals, a decrease in intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons from the CA1 sub-region of hippocampus is believed to contribute to age-related cognitive impairments, but the molecular mechanism(s) that modulate both these factors has yet to be identified. Increasing activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in young adult rodents has been shown to facilitate cognition, and increase intrinsic excitability of their neurons. However, how CREB changes with age, and how that impacts cognition in aged animals, is not clear. Therefore, we first systematically characterized age- and training-related changes in CREB levels in dorsal hippocampus. At a remote time point after undergoing behavioral training, levels of total CREB and activated CREB (phosphorylated at S133, pCREB) were measured in both young and aged rats. We found that pCREB, but not total CREB was significantly reduced in dorsal CA1 of aged rats. Importantly, levels of pCREB were found to be positively correlated with short-term spatial memory in both young and aged rats i.e. higher pCREB in dorsal CA1 was associated with better spatial memory. These findings indicate that an age-related deficit in CREB activity may contribute to the development of age-related cognitive deficits. However, it was still unclear if increasing CREB activity would be sufficient to ameliorate age-related cognitive, and biophysical deficits. To address this question, we virally overexpressed CREB in CA1, where we found the age-related deficit. Young and aged rats received control or CREB virus, and underwent water maze training. While control aged animals exhibited deficits in long-term spatial memory, aged animals with CREB overexpression performed at levels comparable to young animals. Concurrently, aged neurons

  20. MMP20 Overexpression Disrupts Molar Ameloblast Polarity and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, M; Chavez, M B; Ikeda, A; Foster, B L; Bartlett, J D

    2018-02-01

    Ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation express matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20), an enzyme that cleaves enamel matrix proteins, including amelogenin (AMELX) and ameloblastin (AMBN). Previously, we showed that continuously erupting incisors from transgenic mice overexpressing active MMP20 had a massive cell infiltrate present within their enamel space, leading to enamel mineralization defects. However, effects of MMP20 overexpression on mouse molars were not analyzed, although these teeth more accurately represent human odontogenesis. Therefore, MMP20-overexpressing mice ( Mmp20 +/+ Tg + ) were assessed by multiscale analyses, combining several approaches from high-resolution micro-computed tomography to enamel organ immunoblots. During the secretory stage at postnatal day 6 (P6), Mmp20 +/+ Tg + mice had a discontinuous ameloblast layer and, unlike incisors, molar P12 maturation stage ameloblasts abnormally migrated away from the enamel layer into the stratum intermedium/stellate reticulum. TOPflash assays performed in vitro demonstrated that MMP20 expression promoted β-catenin nuclear localization and that MMP20 expression promoted invasion through Matrigel-coated filters. However, for both assays, significant differences were eliminated in the presence of the β-catenin inhibitor ICG-001. This suggests that MMP20 activity promotes cell migration via the Wnt pathway. In vivo, the unique molar migration of amelogenin-expressing ameloblasts was associated with abnormal deposition of ectopic calcified nodules surrounding the adherent enamel layer. Enamel content was assessed just prior to eruption at P15. Compared to wild-type, Mmp20 +/+ Tg + molars exhibited significant reductions in enamel thickness (70%), volume (60%), and mineral density (40%), and MMP20 overexpression resulted in premature cleavage of AMBN, which likely contributed to the severe defects in enamel mineralization. In addition, Mmp20 +/+ Tg + mouse molar enamel organs had increased levels

  1. Upregulation of triglyceride synthesis in skeletal muscle overexpressing DGAT1

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Feifei; Wei, Zhuying; Ding, Xiangbin; Liu, Xinfeng; Ge, Xiuguo; Song, Guimin; Li, Guangpeng; Guo, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT1) is a functional and positional candidate gene for milk and intramuscular fat content. A bovine DGAT1 overexpression vector was constructed containing mouse MCK promoter and bovine DGAT1 cDNA. MCK-DGAT1 transgene in FVB mice was researched in present study. The transgene DGAT1 had a high level of expression in contrast to the endogenous DGAT1 in posterior tibial muscle of the transgenic mice, but a low expression level in the cardiac mus...

  2. Targeting GPR110 in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    34assay"using"the"transwell" inserts"with" (A)"or"without" (B)"matrigel" for"SKBR3" cells "transfected"with"nonAtarge1ng"( NT1 )"orŗ"independent"GPR110"siRNAs...HER2 drug resistant cells and in tumorigenic population using a broad panel of cell line models. We have successfully generated inducible lentiviral...plasmids with GPR110 cDNA and cell lines that inducibly overexpress GPR110. Generation of cell lines with lentiviral plasmids containing GPR110

  3. BRCA1-IRIS Overexpression Promotes Formation of Aggressive Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshiko; Luk, Hugh; Horio, David; Miron, Penelope; Griswold, Michael; Iglehart, Dirk; Hernandez, Brenda; Killeen, Jeffrey; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Women with HER2+ or triple negative/basal-like (TN/BL) breast cancers succumb to their cancer rapidly due, in part to acquired Herceptin resistance and lack of TN/BL-targeted therapies. BRCA1-IRIS is a recently discovered, 1399 residue, BRCA1 locus alternative product, which while sharing 1365 residues with the full-length product of this tumor suppressor gene, BRCA1/p220, it has oncoprotein-like properties. Here, we examine whether BRCA1-IRIS is a valuable treatment target for HER2+ and/or TN/BL tumors. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistochemical staining of large cohort of human breast tumor samples using new monoclonal anti-BRCA1-IRIS antibody, followed by correlation of BRCA1-IRIS expression with that of AKT1, AKT2, p-AKT, survivin and BRCA1/p220, tumor status and age at diagnosis. Generation of subcutaneous tumors in SCID mice using human mammary epithelial (HME) cells overexpressing TERT/LT/BRCA1-IRIS, followed by comparing AKT, survivin, and BRCA1/p220 expression, tumor status and aggressiveness in these tumors to that in tumors developed using TERT/LT/RasV12-overexpressing HME cells. Induction of primary and invasive rat mammary tumors using the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU), followed by analysis of rat BRCA1-IRIS and ERα mRNA levels in these tumors. High BRCA1-IRIS expression was detected in the majority of human breast tumors analyzed, which was positively correlated with that of AKT1-, AKT2-, p-AKT-, survivin, but negatively with BRCA1/p220 expression. BRCA1-IRIS-positivity induced high-grade, early onset and metastatic HER2+ or TN/BL tumors. TERT/LT/BRCA1-IRIS overexpressing HME cells formed invasive subcutaneous tumors that express high AKT1, AKT2, p-AKT and vimentin, but no CK19, p63 or BRCA1/p220. NMU-induced primary and invasive rat breast cancers expressed high levels of rat BRCA1-IRIS mRNA but low levels of rat ERα mRNA. Conclusion/Significance BRCA1-IRIS overexpression triggers aggressive breast tumor formation

  4. Hepatic steatosis in transgenic mice overexpressing human histone deacetylase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ai-Guo; Seo, Sang-Beom; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Shin, Hye-Jun; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2005-01-01

    It is generally thought that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the transcriptional regulation of genes. However, little information is available concerning the specific functions of individual HDACs in disease states. In this study, two transgenic mice lines were established which harbored the human HDAC1 gene. Overexpressed HDAC1 was detected in the nuclei of transgenic liver cells, and HDAC1 enzymatic activity was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in control littermates. The HDAC1 transgenic mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatic steatosis and nuclear pleomorphism. Molecular studies showed that HDAC1 may contribute to nuclear pleomorphism through the p53/p21 signaling pathway

  5. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xihai; Liang, Wenna; Ye, Hongzhi; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Lin, Pingdong; Liu, Xianxiang

    2015-09-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild‑type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression‑associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice.

  6. Leptin as immune mediator: Interaction between neuroendocrine and immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially described as an anti-obesity hormone, leptin has subsequently been shown to exert pleiotropic effects, being also able to influence haematopoiesis, thermogenesis, reproduction, angiogenesis, and more importantly immune homeostasis. As a cytokine, leptin can affect both innate and adaptive immunity, by inducing a pro-inflammatory response and thus playing a key role in the regulation of the pathogenesis of several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances on the role of leptin as immune-modulator in mammals and we also provide an overview on its main functions in non-mammalian vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastrointestinal hyperplasia with altered expression of DNA polymerase beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Yoshizawa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta has been documented in a large percentage of human tumors. However, tumor prevalence or predisposition resulting from Pol beta over-expression has not yet been evaluated in a mouse model.We have recently developed a novel transgenic mouse model that over-expresses Pol beta. These mice present with an elevated incidence of spontaneous histologic lesions, including cataracts, hyperplasia of Brunner's gland and mucosal hyperplasia in the duodenum. In addition, osteogenic tumors in mice tails, such as osteoma and osteosarcoma were detected. This is the first report of elevated tumor incidence in a mouse model of Pol beta over-expression. These findings prompted an evaluation of human gastrointestinal tumors with regard to Pol beta expression. We observed elevated expression of Pol beta in stomach adenomas and thyroid follicular carcinomas, but reduced Pol beta expression in esophageal adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas.These data support the hypothesis that balanced and proficient base excision repair protein expression and base excision repair capacity is required for genome stability and protection from hyperplasia and tumor formation.

  8. Prothymosin α overexpression contributes to the development of pulmonary emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bing-Hua; Tseng, Yau-Lin; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Shiang, Ya-Chieh; Wu, Pensee; Li, Kuo-Jung; Yen, Te-Hsin; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Emphysema is one of the disease conditions that comprise chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prothymosin α transgenic mice exhibit an emphysema phenotype, but the pathophysiological role of prothymosin α in emphysema remains unclear. Here we show that prothymosin α contributes to the pathogenesis of emphysema by increasing acetylation of histones and nuclear factor-kappaB, particularly upon cigarette smoke exposure. We find a positive correlation between prothymosin α levels and the severity of emphysema in prothymosin α transgenic mice and emphysema patients. Prothymosin α overexpression increases susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema, and cigarette smoke exposure further enhances prothymosin α expression. We show that prothymosin α inhibits the association of histone deacetylases with histones and nuclear factor-kappaB, and that prothymosin α overexpression increases expression of nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9, which are found in the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These results demonstrate the clinical relevance of prothymosin α in regulating acetylation events during the pathogenesis of emphysema. PMID:23695700

  9. Overexpression of host plant urease in transgenic silkworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Huang, Chunlin; Sun, Qiang; Guo, Huizhen; Peng, Zhengwen; Dang, Yinghui; Liu, Weiqiang; Xing, Dongxu; Xu, Guowen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-06-01

    Bombyx mori and mulberry constitute a model of insect-host plant interactions. Urease hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and is important for the nitrogen metabolism of silkworms because ammonia is assimilated into silk protein. Silkworms do not synthesize urease and acquire it from mulberry leaves. We synthesized the artificial DNA sequence ureas using the codon bias of B. mori to encode the signal peptide and mulberry urease protein. A transgenic vector that overexpresses ure-as under control of the silkworm midgut-specific P2 promoter was constructed. Transgenic silkworms were created via embryo microinjection. RT-PCR results showed that urease was expressed during the larval stage and qPCR revealed the expression only in the midgut of transgenic lines. Urea concentration in the midgut and hemolymph of transgenic silkworms was significantly lower than in a nontransgenic line when silkworms were fed an artificial diet. Analysis of the daily body weight and food conversion efficiency of the fourth and fifth instar larvae and economic characteristics indicated no differences between transgenic silkworms and the nontransgenic line. These results suggested that overexpression of host plant urease promoted nitrogen metabolism in silkworms.

  10. c-myc overexpression causes anaplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Duncan; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Abel, Ty W; Burger, Peter C; Dang, Chi V; Eberhart, Charles G

    2006-01-15

    Both anaplasia and increased c-myc gene expression have been shown to be negative prognostic indicators for survival in medulloblastoma patients. myc gene amplification has been identified in many large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma, but no causative link between c-myc and anaplastic changes has been established. To address this, we stably overexpressed c-myc in two medulloblastoma cell lines, DAOY and UW228, and examined the changes in growth characteristics. When analyzed in vitro, cell lines with increased levels of c-myc had higher rates of growth and apoptosis as well as significantly improved ability to form colonies in soft agar compared with control. When injected s.c. into nu/nu mice, flank xenograft tumors with high levels of c-myc in DAOY cell line background were 75% larger than those derived from control. Overexpression of c-myc was required for tumor formation by UW228 cells. Most remarkably, the histopathology of the Myc tumors was severely anaplastic, with large areas of necrosis/apoptosis, increased nuclear size, and macronucleoli. Indices of proliferation and apoptosis were also significantly higher in Myc xenografts. Thus, c-myc seems to play a causal role in inducing anaplasia in medulloblastoma. Because anaplastic changes are often observed in recurrent medulloblastoma, we propose that c-myc dysregulation is involved in the progression of these malignant embryonal neoplasms.

  11. Music and Alterity Processes

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    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  12. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells

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    Graziela Rosa Ravacci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic genes involved in uptake (CD36, transport (FABP4, and storage (DGAT of exogenous fatty acids (FA, as well as increased activation of “de novo” FA synthesis (FASN. We further investigate whether this lipogenesis reprogramming might be regulated by mTOR/PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway markers, p70S6 K1, SREBP1, and LIPIN1, as well as an increase in DEPTOR expression (the main inhibitor of the mTOR was detected in HB4aC5.2. Based on these results, a PPARγ selective antagonist, GW9662, was used to treat both cells lines, and the lipogenic genes remained overexpressed in the HB4aC5.2 but not HB4a cells. DHA treatment inhibited all lipogenic genes (except for FABP4 in both cell lines yet only induced death in the HB4aC5.2 cells, mainly when associated with trastuzumab. Neither trastuzumab nor GW9662 alone was able to induce cell death. In conclusion, oncogenic transformation of breast cells by HER2 overexpression may require a reprogramming of lipogenic genetic that is independent of mTORC1 pathway and PPARγ activity. This reprogramming was inhibited by DHA.

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravacci, Graziela Rosa; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Tortelli, Tharcisio Citrângulo; Torrinhas, Raquel Suzana M M; Santos, Jéssica Reis; Logullo, Angela Flávia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic genes involved in uptake (CD36), transport (FABP4), and storage (DGAT) of exogenous fatty acids (FA), as well as increased activation of "de novo" FA synthesis (FASN). We further investigate whether this lipogenesis reprogramming might be regulated by mTOR/PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway markers, p70S6 K1, SREBP1, and LIPIN1, as well as an increase in DEPTOR expression (the main inhibitor of the mTOR) was detected in HB4aC5.2. Based on these results, a PPARγ selective antagonist, GW9662, was used to treat both cells lines, and the lipogenic genes remained overexpressed in the HB4aC5.2 but not HB4a cells. DHA treatment inhibited all lipogenic genes (except for FABP4) in both cell lines yet only induced death in the HB4aC5.2 cells, mainly when associated with trastuzumab. Neither trastuzumab nor GW9662 alone was able to induce cell death. In conclusion, oncogenic transformation of breast cells by HER2 overexpression may require a reprogramming of lipogenic genetic that is independent of mTORC1 pathway and PPARγ activity. This reprogramming was inhibited by DHA.

  14. Regulation, overexpression, and target gene identification of Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) – a class-I KNOX gene in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ameya S.; Kondhare, Kirtikumar R.; Rajabhoj, Mohit P.; Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Tejashree; Ravindran, Nevedha; Habib, Farhat; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Banerjee, Anjan K.

    2016-01-01

    Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) is a KNOX-I (Knotted1-like homeobox) family gene in potato that is orthologous to Shoot Meristemless (STM) in Arabidopsis. Despite numerous reports on KNOX genes from different species, studies in potato are limited. Here, we describe photoperiodic regulation of POTH15, its overexpression phenotype, and identification of its potential targets in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena). qRT-PCR analysis showed a higher abundance of POTH15 mRNA in shoot tips and stolons under tuber-inducing short-day conditions. POTH15 promoter activity was detected in apical and axillary meristems, stolon tips, tuber eyes, and meristems of tuber sprouts, indicating its role in meristem maintenance and leaf development. POTH15 overexpression altered multiple morphological traits including leaf and stem development, leaflet number, and number of nodes and branches. In particular, the rachis of the leaf was completely reduced and leaves appeared as a bouquet of leaflets. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of 35S::GUS and two POTH15 overexpression lines identified more than 6000 differentially expressed genes, including 2014 common genes between the two overexpression lines. Functional analysis of these genes revealed their involvement in responses to hormones, biotic/abiotic stresses, transcription regulation, and signal transduction. qRT-PCR of selected candidate target genes validated their differential expression in both overexpression lines. Out of 200 randomly chosen POTH15 targets, 173 were found to have at least one tandem TGAC core motif, characteristic of KNOX interaction, within 3.0kb in the upstream sequence of the transcription start site. Overall, this study provides insights to the role of POTH15 in controlling diverse developmental processes in potato. PMID:27217546

  15. Effects of striatal ΔFosB overexpression and ketamine on social defeat stress-induced anhedonia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Rachel J; Muschamp, John W; Russo, Scott J; Nestler, Eric J; Carlezon, William A

    2014-10-01

    Chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) produces persistent behavioral adaptations in mice. In many behavioral assays, it can be difficult to determine if these adaptations reflect core signs of depression. We designed studies to characterize the effects of CSDS on sensitivity to reward because anhedonia (reduced sensitivity to reward) is a defining characteristic of depressive disorders in humans. We also examined the effects of striatal ΔFosB overexpression and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine, both of which promote resilience, on CSDS-induced alterations in reward function and social interaction. Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) was used to quantify CSDS-induced changes in reward function. Mice were implanted with lateral hypothalamic electrodes, and ICSS thresholds were measured after each of 10 daily CSDS sessions and during a 5-day recovery period. We also examined if acute intraperitoneal administration of ketamine (2.5-20 mg/kg) reverses CSDS-induced effects on reward or, in separate mice, social interaction. ICSS thresholds were increased by CSDS, indicating decreases in the rewarding impact of lateral hypothalamic stimulation (anhedonia). This effect was attenuated in mice overexpressing ∆FosB in striatum, consistent with pro-resilient actions of this transcription factor. High, but not low, doses of ketamine administered after completion of the CSDS regimen attenuated social avoidance in defeated mice, although this effect was transient. Ketamine did not block CSDS-induced anhedonia in the ICSS test. This study found that CSDS triggers persistent anhedonia and confirms that ΔFosB overexpression produces stress resilience. The findings of this study also indicate that acute administration of ketamine fails to attenuate CSDS-induced anhedonia despite reducing other depression-related behavioral abnormalities. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A53T-alpha-synuclein overexpression impairs dopamine signaling and striatal synaptic plasticity in old mice.

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    Alexander Kurz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder at old age, can be caused by elevated expression or the A53T missense mutation of the presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (SNCA. PD is characterized pathologically by the preferential vulnerability of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal projection neurons.Here, we used two mouse lines overexpressing human A53T-SNCA and studied striatal dysfunction in the absence of neurodegeneration to understand early disease mechanisms. To characterize the progression, we employed young adult as well as old mice. Analysis of striatal neurotransmitter content demonstrated that dopamine (DA levels correlated directly with the level of expression of SNCA, an observation also made in SNCA-deficient (knockout, KO mice. However, the elevated DA levels in the striatum of old A53T-SNCA overexpressing mice may not be transmitted appropriately, in view of three observations. First, a transcriptional downregulation of the extraneural DA degradation enzyme catechol-ortho-methytransferase (COMT was found. Second, an upregulation of DA receptors was detected by immunoblots and autoradiography. Third, extensive transcriptome studies via microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR of altered transcript levels of the DA-inducible genes Atf2, Cb1, Freq, Homer1 and Pde7b indicated a progressive and genotype-dependent reduction in the postsynaptic DA response. As a functional consequence, long term depression (LTD was absent in corticostriatal slices from old transgenic mice.Taken together, the dysfunctional neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity seen in the A53T-SNCA overexpressing mice reflect early changes within the basal ganglia prior to frank neurodegeneration. As a model of preclinical stages of PD, such insights may help to develop neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  17. ZEB1 overexpression associated with E-cadherin and microRNA-200 downregulation is characteristic of undifferentiated endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Pérez, Laura; López-García, M Ángeles; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Biscuola, Michele; Castilla, M Ángeles; Tafe, Laura J; Garg, Karuna; Oliva, Esther; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Soslow, Robert A; Palacios, José

    2013-11-01

    Undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas are very aggressive high-grade endometrial carcinomas that are frequently under-recognized. This study aimed to analyze the molecular alterations underlying the development of these endometrial carcinomas, focusing on those related to dedifferentiation. We assessed a series of 120 tumors: 57 grade 1 and 2 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 15 grade 3 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 27 endometrial serous carcinomas, and 21 undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas. We found a high frequency of DNA mismatch repair deficiency (38%) and moderate rate of p53 overexpression (∼33%) in undifferentiated carcinomas. In contrast to the characteristic endometrioid phenotype, there was a dramatic downregulation of E-cadherin expression in the undifferentiated subtype. Quantitative methylation studies dismissed CDH1 promoter hypermethylation as the mechanism responsible for this change in gene expression, while immunohistochemistry revealed that the E-cadherin repressor ZEB1 was frequently overexpressed (62%) in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas. This finding was accompanied by a sharp downregulation in the expression of the miR-200 family of microRNAs, well-known targets of ZEB1. Furthermore, there was enhanced expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, such as N-cadherin, cytoplasmic p120, and osteonectin. In addition, HMGA2, a regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that is expressed in aggressive endometrial tumors, such as endometrial serous carcinomas and carcinosarcomas, was expressed in >20% of undifferentiated carcinomas. These results suggest that ZEB1 overexpression, associated with E-cadherin and miR-200s downregulation, and the expression of mesenchymal markers might enhance the metastatic potential of undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, leading to a poor prognosis. In addition, our observations suggest that the immnohistochemical analysis

  18. Co-ordinate regulation of the cytoskeleton in 3T3 cells overexpressing thymosin-beta4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golla, R; Philp, N; Safer, D; Chintapalli, J; Hoffman, R; Collins, L; Nachmias, V T

    1997-01-01

    In several cell types, short-term increases in the concentration of the G-actin-sequestering peptide thymosin-beta4 (Tbeta4) cause the disassembly of F-actin bundles. To determine the extent of cell adaptability to these reductions in F-actin, we overexpressed Tbeta4 in NIH 3T3 cells. In cell lines with Tbeta4 levels twice those of vector controls, G-actin increased approximately twofold as expected. However, F-actin did not decrease as in short-term experiments but rather also increased approximately twofold so that the G-F ratio remained constant. Surprisingly, the cytoskeletal proteins myosin IIA, alpha-actinin, and tropomyosin also increased nearly twofold. These increases were specific; DNA, total protein, lactic dehydrogenase, profilin, and actin depolymerizing factor levels were unchanged in the overexpressing cells. The Tbeta4 lines spread more fully and adhered to the dish more strongly than vector controls; this altered phenotype correlated with a twofold increase in talin and alpha5-integrin and a nearly threefold increase in vinculin. Focal adhesions, detected by indirect immunofluorescence with antivinculin, were increased in size over the controls. Northern blotting showed that mRNAs for both beta-actin and vinculin were increased twofold in the overexpressing lines. We conclude that 1) NIH 3T3 cells adapt to increased levels of G-actin sequestered by increased Tbeta4 by increasing their total actin so that the F-actin/G-actin ratio remains constant; 2) these cells coordinately increase several cytoskeletal and adhesion plaque proteins; and 3) at least for actin and vinculin, this regulation is at the transcriptional level. We therefore propose that the proteins of this multimember interacting complex making up the actin-based cytoskeleton, are coordinately regulated by factors that control the expression of several proteins. The mechanism may bear similarities to the control of synthesis of another multimember interacting complex, the myofibril of

  19. POD-1/Tcf21 overexpression reduces endogenous SF-1 and StAR expression in rat adrenal cells

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    M. M. França

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During gonad and adrenal development, the POD-1/capsulin/TCF21transcription factor negatively regulates SF-1/NR5A1expression, with higher SF-1 levels being associated with increased adrenal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In adrenocortical tumor cells, POD-1 binds to the SF-1 E-box promoter region, decreasing SF-1 expression. However, the modulation of SF-1 expression by POD-1 has not previously been described in normal adrenal cells. Here, we analyzed the basal expression of Pod-1 and Sf-1 in primary cultures of glomerulosa (G and fasciculata/reticularis (F/R cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and investigated whether POD-1 overexpression modulates the expression of endogenous Sf-1 and its target genes in these cells. POD-1 overexpression, following the transfection of pCMVMycPod-1, significantly decreased the endogenous levels of Sf-1 mRNA and protein in F/R cells, but not in G cells, and also decreased the expression of the SF-1 target StAR in F/R cells. In G cells overexpressing POD-1, no modulation of the expression of SF-1 targets, StAR and CYP11B2, was observed. Our data showing that G and F/R cells respond differently to ectopic POD-1 expression emphasize the functional differences between the outer and inner zones of the adrenal cortex, and support the hypothesis that SF-1 is regulated by POD-1/Tcf21 in normal adrenocortical cells lacking the alterations in cellular physiology found in tumor cells.

  20. Biologic role of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule overexpression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Müller, Volkmar; Köhler, Nadine; Wikman, Harriet; Krenkel, Sylke; Streichert, Thomas; Schweizer, Michaela; Riethdorf, Sabine; Assmann, Volker; Ihnen, Maike; Beck, Katrin; Issa, Rana; Jänicke, Fritz; Pantel, Klaus; Milde-Langosch, Karin

    2011-09-01

    The activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is overexpressed in many mammary tumors, but controversial results about its role and prognostic impact in breast cancer have been reported. Therefore, we evaluated the biologic effects of ALCAM expression in two breast cancer cell lines and a larger cohort of mammary carcinomas. By stable transfections, MCF7 cells with ALCAM overexpression and MDA-MB231 cells with reduced ALCAM levels were generated and analyzed in functional assays and cDNA microarrays. In addition, an immunohistochemical study on 347 patients with breast cancer with long-term follow-up and analysis of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) was performed. In both cell lines, high ALCAM expression was associated with reduced cell motility. In addition, ALCAM silencing in MDA-MB231 cells resulted in lower invasive potential, whereas high ALCAM expression was associated with increased apoptosis in both cell lines. Among genes which were differentially expressed in clones with altered ALCAM expression, there was an overlap of 15 genes between both cell lines, among them cathepsin D, keratin 7, gelsolin, and ets2 whose deregulation was validated by western blot analysis. In MDA-MB231 cells, we observed a correlation with VEGF expression which was validated by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). Our IHC results on primary breast carcinomas showed that ALCAM expression was associated with an estrogen receptor-positive phenotype. In addition, strong ALCAM immunostaining correlated with nodal involvement and the presence of tumor cells in bone marrow. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, strong ALCAM expression in ductal carcinomas correlated with shorter recurrence-free intervals (P=0.048) and overall survival (OAS, P=0.003). Our results indicate that the biologic role of ALCAM in breast cancer is complex, but overexpression might be relevant for outcome in ductal carcinomas.

  1. Production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid using two sequential enzymes overexpressed as double-tagged fusion proteins

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    Cheng Chung-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two sequential enzymes in the production of sialic acids, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase, were overexpressed as double-tagged gene fusions. Both were tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST at the N-terminus, but at the C-terminus, one was tagged with five contiguous aspartate residues (5D, and the other with five contiguous arginine residues (5R. Results Both fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and retained enzymatic activity. The fusions were designed so their surfaces were charged under enzyme reaction conditions, which allowed isolation and immobilization in a single step, through a simple capture with either an anionic or a cationic exchanger (Sepharose Q or Sepharose SP that electrostatically bound the 5D or 5R tag. The introduction of double tags only marginally altered the affinity of the enzymes for their substrates, and the double-tagged proteins were enzymatically active in both soluble and immobilized forms. Combined use of the fusion proteins led to the production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac from N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc. Conclusion Double-tagged gene fusions were overexpressed to yield two enzymes that perform sequential steps in sialic acid synthesis. The proteins were easily immobilized via ionic tags onto ionic exchange resins and could thus be purified by direct capture from crude protein extracts. The immobilized, double-tagged proteins were effective for one-pot enzymatic production of sialic acid.

  2. Overexpression of Arabidopsis plasmodesmata germin-like proteins disrupts root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Kang, Byung-Ho; Zeng, Fanchang; Lucas, William J

    2012-09-01

    In plants, a population of non-cell-autonomous proteins (NCAPs), including numerous transcription factors, move cell to cell through plasmodesmata (PD). In many cases, the intercellular trafficking of these NCAPs is regulated by their interaction with specific PD components. To gain further insight into the functions of this NCAP pathway, coimmunoprecipitation experiments were performed on a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plasmodesmal-enriched cell wall protein preparation using as bait the NCAP, pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) PHLOEM PROTEIN16 (Cm-PP16). A Cm-PP16 interaction partner, Nt-PLASMODESMAL GERMIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (Nt-PDGLP1) was identified and shown to be a PD-located component. Arabidopsis thaliana putative orthologs, PDGLP1 and PDGLP2, were identified; expression studies indicated that, postgermination, these proteins were preferentially expressed in the root system. The PDGLP1 signal peptide was shown to function in localization to the PD by a novel mechanism involving the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway. Overexpression of various tagged versions altered root meristem function, leading to reduced primary root but enhanced lateral root growth. This effect on root growth was corrected with an inability of these chimeric proteins to form stable PD-localized complexes. PDGLP1 and PDGLP2 appear to be involved in regulating primary root growth by controlling phloem-mediated allocation of resources between the primary and lateral root meristems.

  3. Vesicular Axonal Transport is Modified In Vivo by Tau Deletion or Overexpression in Drosophila

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    Yasmina Talmat-Amar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural microtubule associated protein Tau is found in high amount in axons and is involved in several neurodegenerative diseases. Although many studies have highlighted the toxicity of an excess of Tau in neurons, the in vivo understanding of the endogenous role of Tau in axon morphology and physiology is poor. Indeed, knock-out mice display no strong cytoskeleton or axonal transport phenotype, probably because of some important functional redundancy with other microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. Here, we took advantage of the model organism Drosophila, which genome contains only one homologue of the Tau/MAP2/MAP4 family to decipher (endogenous Tau functions. We found that Tau depletion leads to a decrease in microtubule number and microtubule density within axons, while Tau excess leads to the opposite phenotypes. Analysis of vesicular transport in tau mutants showed altered mobility of vesicles, but no change in the total amount of putatively mobile vesicles, whereas both aspects were affected when Tau was overexpressed. In conclusion, we show that loss of Tau in tau mutants not only leads to a decrease in axonal microtubule density, but also impairs axonal vesicular transport, albeit to a lesser extent compared to the effects of an excess of Tau.

  4. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Narayanan; Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Gaitán-Solis, Eliana; Grusak, Michael A; Taylor, Nigel; Anderson, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indicates a potential application for iron biofortification in crop plants. Here, we have overexpressed AtVIT1 in the starchy root crop cassava using a patatin promoter. Under greenhouse conditions, iron levels in mature cassava storage roots showed 3-4 times higher values when compared with wild-type plants. Significantly, the expression of AtVIT1 showed a positive correlation with the increase in iron concentration of storage roots. Conversely, young leaves of AtVIT1 transgenic plants exhibit characteristics of iron deficiency such as interveinal chlorosis of leaves (yellowing) and lower iron concentration when compared with the wild type plants. Interestingly, the AtVIT1 transgenic plants showed 4 and 16 times higher values of iron concentration in the young stem and stem base tissues, respectively. AtVIT1 transgenic plants also showed 2-4 times higher values of iron content when compared with wild-type plants, with altered partitioning of iron between source and sink tissues. These results demonstrate vacuolar iron sequestration as a viable transgenic strategy to biofortify crops and to help eliminate micronutrient malnutrition in at-risk human populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase protects against cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Lark, Daniel S; Reese, Lauren R; Torres, Maria J; Ryan, Terence E; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Neufer, P Darrell

    2016-08-01

    The loss of strength in combination with constant fatigue is a burden on cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and increases mitochondrial H2O2 We hypothesized that the combined effect of cancer and chemotherapy in an immunocompetent breast cancer mouse model (E0771) would compromise skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function, leading to an increase in H2O2-emitting potential and impaired muscle function. Here, we demonstrate that cancer chemotherapy decreases mitochondrial respiratory capacity supported with complex I (pyruvate/glutamate/malate) and complex II (succinate) substrates. Mitochondrial H2O2-emitting potential was altered in skeletal muscle, and global protein oxidation was elevated with cancer chemotherapy. Muscle contractile function was impaired following exposure to cancer chemotherapy. Genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle attenuated mitochondrial H2O2 emission and protein oxidation, preserving mitochondrial and whole muscle function despite cancer chemotherapy. These findings suggest mitochondrial oxidants as a mediator of cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Human HMGA2 protein overexpressed in mice induces precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A; Zanesi, N; Coppola, V; Nuovo, G; Bolon, B; Wernicle-Jameson, D; Lagana, A; Hansjuerg, A; Pichiorri, F; Croce, C M

    2014-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a neoplasia of thymocytes characterized by the rapid accumulation of the precursors of T lymphocytes. HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) gene expression is extremely low in normal adult tissues, but it is overexpressed in many tumors. To identify the biological function of HMGA2, we generated transgenic mice carrying the human HMGA2 gene under control of the V H promoter/Eμ enhancer. Approximately 90% of Eμ-HMGA2 transgenic mice became visibly sick between 4 and 8 months due to the onset and progression of a T-ALL-like disease. Characteristic features included severe alopecia (30% of mice); enlarged lymph nodes and spleen; and profound immunological abnormalities (altered cytokine levels, hypoimmunoglobulinemia) leading to reduced immune responsiveness. Immunophenotyping showed accumulation of CD5+CD4+, CD5+CD8+ or CD5+CD8+CD4+ T-cell populations in the spleens and bone marrow of sick animals. These findings show that HMGA2-driven leukemia in mice closely resembles spontaneous human T-ALL, indicating that HMGA2 transgenic mice should serve as an important model for investigating basic mechanisms and potential new therapies of relevance to human T-ALL

  7. Overexpression of arginase alters circulating and tissue amino acids and guanidino compounds and affects neuromotor behavior in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de W.J.M.; Marescau, B.; D'Hooge, R.; Deyn, de P.P.; Hallemeesch, M.M.; Deutz, N.E.; Ruijter, J.M.; Lamers, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Arginine is an intermediate of the ornithine cycle and serves as a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide, creatine, agmatine and proteins. It is considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid because endogenous synthesis only barely meets daily requirements. In rapidly growing suckling

  8. Over-expression of p53 mutants in LNCaP cells alters tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perryman, L.A.; Blair, J.M.; Kingsley, E.A.; Szymanska, B.; Ow, K.T.; Wen, V.W.; MacKenzie, K.L.; Vermeulen, P.B.; Jackson, P.; Russell, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    This study has investigated the impact of three specific dominant-negative p53 mutants (F134L, M237L, and R273H) on tumorigenesis by LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Mutant p53 proteins were associated with an increased subcutaneous 'take rate' in NOD-SCID mice, and increased production of PSA. Tumors expressing F134L and R273H grew slower than controls, and were associated with decreased necrosis and apoptosis, but not hypoxia. Interestingly, hypoxia levels were increased in tumors expressing M237L. There was less proliferation in F134L-bearing tumors compared to control, but this was not statistically significant. Angiogenesis was decreased in tumors expressing F134L and R273H compared with M237L, or controls. Conditioned medium from F134L tumors inhibited growth of normal human umbilical-vein endothelial cells but not telomerase-immortalized bone marrow endothelial cells. F134L tumor supernatants showed lower levels of VEGF and endostatin compared with supernatants from tumors expressing other mutants. Our results support the possibility that decreased angiogenesis might account for reduced growth rate of tumor cells expressing the F134L p53 mutation

  9. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomela, Johanna; Valta, Maija; Seppänen, Jani; Tarkkonen, Kati; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Härkönen, Pirkko

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig) and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p < 0.05) and inhibited metastasis to iliac and sacral lymph nodes. In addition, tumor volumes were smaller in the VEGFR3-Ig-treated group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Transfection of PC-3 cells with the VEGF-C gene led to a high level of 29/31 kD VEGF-C expression in PC-3 cells. The size of orthotopic and subcutaneous PC-3/VEGF-C tumors was significantly greater than that of PC-3/mock tumors (both p < 0.001). Interestingly, while most orthotopic PC-3 and PC-3/mock tumors grown for 4 weeks metastasized to prostate-draining lymph nodes, orthotopic PC-3/VEGF-C tumors primarily metastasized to the lungs. PC-3/VEGF-C tumors showed highly angiogenic morphology with an increased density of blood capillaries compared with PC-3/mock tumors (p < 0.001). The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites

  10. Overexpression of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase in Arabidopsis Mitochondria Triggers Light-dependent Lesion Formation and Alters Cytokinin Homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manzano, D.; Busquets, A.; Closa, M.; Hoyerová, Klára; Schaller, H.; Kamínek, Miroslav; Arró, M.; Ferrer, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, 1-2 (2006), s. 195-213 ISSN 0167-4412 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600380507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * cytokinin * farnesyl diphosphate synthase * isoprenoid Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.577, year: 2006

  11. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Hu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zhiqhutg@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  12. Overexpression of galectin-7 in mouse epidermis leads to loss of cell junctions and defective skin repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Gendronneau

    Full Text Available The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo.We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury.The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis.These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations.

  13. Effect of Rad 51 overexpression on chromosomal stability and radiation sensitivity in tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, C.; Stuerzbecher, H.W.; Dikomey, E.; Borgmann, K.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was dedicated to examining the effects of Rad51 overexpression on genomic instability, expressed in terms of chromosomal aberrations in G1 and G2 phases following X-ray irradiation. For this purpose an osteosarcoma cell line (Ui-OS) which shows inducing Rad51 overexpression (UiRad5-2) after stable transfection was compared with an isogenetic line (UiLacZ) which overexpresses beta-galactosidase instead of Rad51 [de

  14. ADAM12 overexpression does not improve outcome in mice with laminin alpha2-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Wewer, Ulla M

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that overexpression of ADAM12 results in increased muscle regeneration and significantly reduced pathology in mdx, dystrophin deficient mice. In the present study, we tested the effect of overexpressing ADAM12 in dy(W) laminin-deficient mice. dy mice have a very severe...... clinical phenotype and would be expected to benefit greatly from enhanced regeneration. We found that dy(W) mice overexpressing ADAM12 indeed have increased muscle regeneration, as evidenced by increased numbers of muscle fibers expressing fetal myosin. However, overexpression of ADAM12 had no significant...

  15. Electrical remodeling of cardiac myocytes from mice with heart failure due to the overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova-Kirova, Polina S; Gursoy, Erdal; Mehdi, Haider; McTiernan, Charles F; London, Barry; Salama, Guy

    2006-05-01

    Mice that overexpress the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the heart (TNF mice) develop heart failure characterized by atrial and ventricular dilatation, decreased ejection fraction, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and increased mortality (males > females). Abnormalities in Ca2+ handling, prolonged action potential duration (APD), calcium alternans, and reentrant atrial and ventricular arrhythmias were previously observed with the use of optical mapping of perfused hearts from TNF mice. We therefore tested whether altered voltage-gated outward K+ and/or inward Ca2+ currents contribute to the altered action potential characteristics and the increased vulnerability to arrhythmias. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings of K+ currents from left ventricular myocytes of TNF mice revealed an approximately 50% decrease in the rapidly activating, rapidly inactivating transient outward K+ current Ito and in the rapidly activating, slowly inactivating delayed rectifier current IK,slow1, an approximately 25% decrease in the rapidly activating, slowly inactivating delayed rectifier current IK,slow2, and no significant change in the steady-state current Iss compared with controls. Peak amplitudes and inactivation kinetics of the L-type Ca2+ current ICa,L were not altered. Western blot analyses revealed a reduction in the proteins underlying Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Kv1.5. Thus decreased K+ channel expression is largely responsible for the prolonged APD in the TNF mice and may, along with abnormalities in Ca2+ handling, contribute to arrhythmias.

  16. Fascin overexpression promotes neoplastic progression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Hunain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fascin is a globular actin cross-linking protein, which plays a major role in forming parallel actin bundles in cell protrusions and is found to be associated with tumor cell invasion and metastasis in various type of cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Previously, we have demonstrated that fascin regulates actin polymerization and thereby promotes cell motility in K8-depleted OSCC cells. In the present study we have investigated the role of fascin in tumor progression of OSCC. Methods To understand the role of fascin in OSCC development and/or progression, fascin was overexpressed along with vector control in OSCC derived cells AW13516. The phenotype was studied using wound healing, Boyden chamber, cell adhesion, Hanging drop, soft agar and tumorigenicity assays. Further, fascin expression was examined in human OSCC samples (N = 131 using immunohistochemistry and level of its expression was correlated with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients. Results Fascin overexpression in OSCC derived cells led to significant increase in cell migration, cell invasion and MMP-2 activity. In addition these cells demonstrated increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. Our in vitro results were consistent with correlative studies of fascin expression with the clinico-pathological parameters of the OSCC patients. Fascin expression in OSCC showed statistically significant correlation with increased tumor stage (P = 0.041, increased lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001, less differentiation (P = 0.005, increased recurrence (P = 0.038 and shorter survival (P = 0.004 of the patients. Conclusion In conclusion, our results indicate that fascin promotes tumor progression and activates AKT and MAPK pathways in OSCC-derived cells. Further, our correlative studies of fascin expression in OSCC with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients indicate that fascin may prove to be useful in prognostication and

  17. Tubular overexpression of gremlin induces renal damage susceptibility in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Droguett

    Full Text Available A growing number of patients are recognized worldwide to have chronic kidney disease. Glomerular and interstitial fibrosis are hallmarks of renal progression. However, fibrosis of the kidney remains an unresolved challenge, and its molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Gremlin is an embryogenic gene that has been shown to play a key role in nephrogenesis, and its expression is generally low in the normal adult kidney. However, gremlin expression is elevated in many human renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and chronic allograft nephropathy. Several studies have proposed that gremlin may be involved in renal damage by acting as a downstream mediator of TGF-β. To examine the in vivo role of gremlin in kidney pathophysiology, we generated seven viable transgenic mouse lines expressing human gremlin (GREM1 specifically in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under the control of an androgen-regulated promoter. These lines demonstrated 1.2- to 200-fold increased GREM1 expression. GREM1 transgenic mice presented a normal phenotype and were without proteinuria and renal function involvement. In response to the acute renal damage cause by folic acid nephrotoxicity, tubule-specific GREM1 transgenic mice developed increased proteinuria after 7 and 14 days compared with wild-type treated mice. At 14 days tubular lesions, such as dilatation, epithelium flattening and hyaline casts, with interstitial cell infiltration and mild fibrosis were significantly more prominent in transgenic mice than wild-type mice. Tubular GREM1 overexpression was correlated with the renal upregulation of profibrotic factors, such as TGF-β and αSMA, and with increased numbers of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, our results suggest that GREM1-overexpressing mice have an increased susceptibility to renal damage, supporting the involvement of gremlin in renal damage

  18. Fascin overexpression promotes neoplastic progression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Hunain; Kannanl, Sadhna; Gude, Rajiv; Kane, Shubhada; Dalal, Sorab N; Vaidya, Milind M; Bhate, Amruta V; Gangadaran, Prakash; Sawant, Sharda S; Salot, Shimul; Sehgal, Lalit; Dange, Prerana P; Chaukar, Devendra A; D'cruz, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Fascin is a globular actin cross-linking protein, which plays a major role in forming parallel actin bundles in cell protrusions and is found to be associated with tumor cell invasion and metastasis in various type of cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Previously, we have demonstrated that fascin regulates actin polymerization and thereby promotes cell motility in K8-depleted OSCC cells. In the present study we have investigated the role of fascin in tumor progression of OSCC. To understand the role of fascin in OSCC development and/or progression, fascin was overexpressed along with vector control in OSCC derived cells AW13516. The phenotype was studied using wound healing, Boyden chamber, cell adhesion, Hanging drop, soft agar and tumorigenicity assays. Further, fascin expression was examined in human OSCC samples (N = 131) using immunohistochemistry and level of its expression was correlated with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients. Fascin overexpression in OSCC derived cells led to significant increase in cell migration, cell invasion and MMP-2 activity. In addition these cells demonstrated increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. Our in vitro results were consistent with correlative studies of fascin expression with the clinico-pathological parameters of the OSCC patients. Fascin expression in OSCC showed statistically significant correlation with increased tumor stage (P = 0.041), increased lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), less differentiation (P = 0.005), increased recurrence (P = 0.038) and shorter survival (P = 0.004) of the patients. In conclusion, our results indicate that fascin promotes tumor progression and activates AKT and MAPK pathways in OSCC-derived cells. Further, our correlative studies of fascin expression in OSCC with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients indicate that fascin may prove to be useful in prognostication and treatment of OSCC

  19. Overexpression of microRNA-206 in the skeletal muscle from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini Corrado

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are highly conserved, noncoding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. They have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes, including myogenesis and muscle regeneration. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that myo-miRs (myo = muscle + miR = miRNA expression is altered in muscle from patients affected by myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, the most frequently inherited neuromuscular disease in adults. In order to gain better insights about the role of miRNAs in the DM1 pathogenesis, we have also analyzed the muscular expression of miR-103 and miR-107, which have been identified in silico as attractive candidates for binding to the DMPK mRNA. Methods To this aim, we have profiled the expression of miR-133 (miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-1, miR-181 (miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-181c and miR-206, that are specifically induced during myogenesis in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. miR-103 and miR-107, highly expressed in brain, heart and muscle have also been included in this study. QRT-PCR experiments have been performed on RNA from vastus lateralis biopsies of DM1 patients (n = 7 and control subjects (n = 4. Results of miRNAs expression have been confirmed by Northern blot, whereas in situ hybridization technique have been performed to localize misexpressed miRNAs on muscle sections from DM1 and control individuals. Results Only miR-206 showed an over-expression in 5 of 7 DM1 patients (threshold = 2, fold change between 1.20 and 13.22, average = 5.37 compared to the control group. This result has been further confirmed by Northern blot analysis (3.37-fold overexpression, R2 = 0.89. In situ hybridization localized miR-206 to nuclear site both in normal and DM1 tissues. Cellular distribution in DM1 tissues includes also the nuclear regions of centralized nuclei, with a strong signal corresponding to nuclear clumps. Conclusions This work provides, for the first time, evidences about

  20. Immunization alters body odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Overexpression of prostate tumor overexpressed 1 correlates with tumor progression and predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Fangyong; Zhang, Longjuan; Li, Xinghua; Lin, Xi; Wu, Shu; Li, Fengyan; Liu, Junling

    2014-01-01

    Prostate tumor overexpressed 1 (PTOV1) was demonstrated to play an important role in cancer progression and was correlated with unfavorable clinical outcome. However, the clinical role of PTOV1 in cancer remains largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the expression and clinicopathological significance of PTOV1 in breast cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PTOV1 were analyzed in 12 breast cancer cell lines and eight paired breast cancer tumors by semi-quantitative real time-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess PTOV1 protein expression in 169 paraffin-embedded, archived breast cancer samples. Survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were performed to investigate the clinicopathological significance of PTOV1 expression. Our data revealed that PTOV1 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines compared to normal human breast epithelial cells and in primary breast cancer samples compared to adjacent noncancerous breast tissues, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, high expression of PTOV1 in breast cancer is strongly associated with clinicopathological characteristics and estrogen receptor expression status (P = 0.003). Breast cancer patients with higher PTOV1 expression had substantially shorter survival times than patients with lower PTOV1 expression (P < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that PTOV1 might be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer patients (P = 0.005). Our study showed that PTOV1 is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples, and its expression was positively associated with progression and aggressiveness of breast cancer, suggesting that PTOV1 could serve as an independent prognostic marker

  2. Mechanisms of resistance to quinolones: target alterations, decreased accumulation and DNA gyrase protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Joaquim

    2003-05-01

    Quinolones are broad-spectrum antibacterial agents, commonly used in both clinical and veterinary medicine. Their extensive use has resulted in bacteria rapidly developing resistance to these agents. Two mechanisms of quinolone resistance have been established to date: alterations in the targets of quinolones, and decreased accumulation due to impermeability of the membrane and/or an overexpression of efflux pump systems. Recently, mobile elements have also been described, carrying the qnr gene, which confers resistance to quinolones.

  3. Clinicopathological correlation and prognostic significance of sonic hedgehog protein overexpression in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanyang; Li, Fang; Tang, Bo; Shi, Yan; Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein in gastric cancer, and correlated it with clinicopathological parameters. The prognostic significance of Shh protein was analyzed. Shh protein expression was evaluated in 113 cases of gastric cancer and 60 cases of normal gastric mucosa. The immunoreactivity was scored semi quantitatively as: 0 = absent; 1 = weak; 2 = moderate; and 3 = strong. All cases were further classified into two groups, namely non-overexpression group with score 0 or 1, and overexpression group with score 2 or 3. The overexpression of Shh protein was correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Survival analysis was then performed to determine the Shh protein prognostic significance in gastric cancer. In immunohistochemistry study, nineteen (31.7%) normal gastric mucosa revealed Shh protein overexpression, while eighty-one (71.7%) gastric cancer revealed overexpression. The expression of Shh protein were significantly higher in gastric cancer tissues than in normal gastric mucosa (P overexpression and non-expression groups P = 0.168 and 0.071). However, Shh overexpression emerged as a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.187, P = 0.041). Shh protein expression is upregulated and is statistically correlated with age, tumor differentiation, depth of invasion, pathologic staging, and nodal metastasis. The Shh protein overexpression is a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis in gastric cancer.

  4. Transcription factors and molecular epigenetic marks underlying EpCAM overexpression in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; de Groote, M. L.; Kazemier, H. G.; Arendzen, A. J.; Terpstra, P.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; McLaughlin, P. M. J.; Rots, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on carcinomas, and its downregulation inhibits the oncogenic potential of multiple tumour types. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of epcam overexpression in ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Expression of EpCAM and DNA

  5. Over-expression of HER-2 is associated with the stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The frequency of over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) in bladder cancer is one of the highest among all human malignancies. This over-expression is thought to play a role in aberrant proliferation of cancer cells. Studies on HER-2 expression in bladder carcinoma have shown ...

  6. Correlation between human papillomavirus and p16 overexpression in oropharyngeal tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, C; Gyldenløve, M; Jensen, D H

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (OP-SCC) are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and p16 overexpression. This subgroup proves better prognosis and survival but no evidence exists on the correlation between HPV and p16 overexpression based on diag...

  7. Long-term polarization of microglia upon alpha-synuclein overexpression in nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa Maria; Kirik, Denis

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that persistent ﰇ-sy- nuclein overexpression in ventral midbrain of marmoset leads to a distinctive neurodegenerative process and motor defects. The neurodegeneration was confined to caudate putamen dopaminergic fibers in animals overexpressing wild-type (wt) ﰇ-synuclein....

  8. Combined gene overexpression of neuropeptide Y and its receptor Y5 in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Casper René; Nikitidou, Litsa; Sørensen, Andreas Toft

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-induced hippocampal overexpression of neuropeptide Y receptor, Y2, exerts a seizure-suppressant effect in kindling and kainate-induced models of epilepsy in rats. Interestingly, additional overexpression of neuropeptide Y...

  9. Over-expression of the mycobacterial trehalose-phosphate phosphatase OtsB2 results in a defect in macrophage phagocytosis associated with increased mycobacterial-macrophage adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2 is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-BCG (BCG over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage-mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host-pathogen interactions. Macrophage-mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study.

  10. ABF2, an ABRE-binding bZIP factor, is an essential component of glucose signaling and its overexpression affects multiple stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunmi; Kang, Jung-Youn; Cho, Dong-Im; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Soo Young

    2004-10-01

    Phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates stress-responsive gene expression during vegetative growth, which is mediated largely by cis-elements sharing the ACGTGGC consensus. Although many transcription factors are known to bind the elements in vitro, only a few have been demonstrated to have in vivo functions and their specific roles in ABA/stress responses are mostly unknown. Here, we report that ABF2, an ABF subfamily member of bZIP proteins interacting with the ABA-responsive elements, is involved in ABA/stress responses. Its overexpression altered ABA sensitivity, dehydration tolerance, and the expression levels of ABA/stress-regulated genes. Furthermore, ABF2 overexpression promoted glucose-induced inhibition of seedling development, whereas its mutation impaired glucose response. The reduced sugar sensitivity was not observed with mutants of two other ABF family members, ABF3 and ABF4. Instead, these mutants displayed defects in ABA, salt, and dehydration responses, which were not observed with the abf2 mutant. Our data indicate distinct roles of ABF family members: whereas ABF3 and ABF4 play essential roles in ABA/stress responses, ABF2 is required for normal glucose response. We also show that ABF2 overexpression affects multiple stress tolerance.

  11. Altered metabolism in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locasale Jason W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements from their normal counterparts. Understanding the consequences of this differential metabolism requires a detailed understanding of glucose metabolism and its relation to energy production in cancer cells. A recent study in BMC Systems Biology by Vasquez et al. developed a mathematical model to assess some features of this altered metabolism. Here, we take a broader look at the regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells, considering their anabolic as well as catabolic needs. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/4/58/

  12. WDR62 overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Inoue, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Satoki; Fujita, Hidehiko; Funai, Kazuhito; Tanahashi, Masayuki; Niwa, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2017-08-01

    Human WDR62, which is localized in the cytoplasm including the centrosome, is known to be responsible for primary microcephaly; however, the role of WDR62 abnormality in cancers remains largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to reveal the pathological role of WDR62 abnormality in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). We first examined the WDR62 mRNA expression level of LAC (n = 64) using a QRT-PCR analysis and found that WDR62 mRNA transcripts were significantly overexpressed in LAC (P = 0.0432, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). An immunohistochemical analysis for LAC (n = 237) showed that WDR62 proteins were also significantly overexpressed in LAC (P overexpression have a short overall survival (P = 0.0378, log-rank test), and a multivariate analysis revealed that WDR62 overexpression was an independent predictor of a poor survival outcome among LAC patients (hazard ratio, 2.032; 95% confidence interval, 1.071-3.777; P = 0.0305). Next, we examined the functional effect of WDR62 overexpression on the lung cancer cell line H1299. WDR62-overexpressing lung cancer cells exhibited an increase in cell growth. Moreover, the concurrent overexpression of WDR62 and TPX2, a WDR62-interacting protein that is also overexpressed in LAC, induced centrosome amplification in the lung cells. Finally, we disclosed that the concurrent overexpression of WDR62 and TPX2 is common in diverse human cancers, using data from the Cancer Genome Atlas. These results suggested that WDR62 overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with LAC and leads to an increase in the malignant potential of lung cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Overexpression of mouse TTF-2 gene causes cleft palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tian; Shi, Jia-Yu; Wu, Min; Wang, Yan; Li, Ling; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Qian; Huang, Lei; Shi, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In humans, mutations of the gene encoding for thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2 or FOXE1) result in Bamforth syndrome. Bamforth syndrome is characterized by agenesis, cleft palate, spiky hair and choanal atresia. TTF-2 null mice (TTF-2−/−) also exhibit cleft palate, suggesting its involvement in the palatogenesis. However, the molecular pathology and genetic regulation by TTF2 remain largely unknown. In the present study, the recombinant expression vector pBROAD3-TTF-2 containing the promoter of the mouse ROSA26 gene was created to form the structural gene of mouse TTF-2 and was microinjected into the male pronuclei of fertilized ova. Sequence analysis confirmed that the TTF-2 transgenic mouse model was established successfully. The transgenic mice displayed a phenotype of cleft palate. In addition, we found that TTF-2 was highly expressed in the medial edge epithelium (MEE) from the embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) to E14.5 in TTF-2 transgenic mice. These observations suggest that overexpression of TTF-2 during palatogenesis may contribute to formation of cleft palate. PMID:22304410

  14. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

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    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  15. GNB3 overexpression causes obesity and metabolic syndrome.

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    Alev Cagla Ozdemir

    Full Text Available The G-protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3 gene has been implicated in obesity risk; however, the molecular mechanism of GNB3-related disease is unknown. GNB3 duplication is responsible for a syndromic form of childhood obesity, and an activating DNA sequence variant (C825T in GNB3 is also associated with obesity. To test the hypothesis that GNB3 overexpression causes obesity, we created bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice that carry an extra copy of the human GNB3 risk allele. Here we show that GNB3-T/+ mice have increased adiposity, but not greater food intake or a defect in satiety. GNB3-T/+ mice have elevated fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, as well as glucose intolerance, indicating type 2 diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids are elevated, suggesting metabolic syndrome. Based on a battery of behavioral tests, GNB3-T/+ mice did not exhibit anxiety- or depressive-like phenotypes. GNB3-T/+ and wild-type animals have similar activity levels and heat production; however, GNB3-T/+ mice exhibit dysregulation of acute thermogenesis. Finally, Ucp1 expression is significantly lower in white adipose tissue (WAT in GNB3-T/+ mice, suggestive of WAT remodeling that could lead to impaired cellular thermogenesis. Taken together, our study provides the first functional link between GNB3 and obesity, and presents insight into novel pathways that could be applied to combat obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  16. GNB3 overexpression causes obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Alev Cagla; Wynn, Grace M; Vester, Aimee; Weitzmann, M Neale; Neigh, Gretchen N; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Rudd, M Katharine

    2017-01-01

    The G-protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3) gene has been implicated in obesity risk; however, the molecular mechanism of GNB3-related disease is unknown. GNB3 duplication is responsible for a syndromic form of childhood obesity, and an activating DNA sequence variant (C825T) in GNB3 is also associated with obesity. To test the hypothesis that GNB3 overexpression causes obesity, we created bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice that carry an extra copy of the human GNB3 risk allele. Here we show that GNB3-T/+ mice have increased adiposity, but not greater food intake or a defect in satiety. GNB3-T/+ mice have elevated fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, as well as glucose intolerance, indicating type 2 diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids are elevated, suggesting metabolic syndrome. Based on a battery of behavioral tests, GNB3-T/+ mice did not exhibit anxiety- or depressive-like phenotypes. GNB3-T/+ and wild-type animals have similar activity levels and heat production; however, GNB3-T/+ mice exhibit dysregulation of acute thermogenesis. Finally, Ucp1 expression is significantly lower in white adipose tissue (WAT) in GNB3-T/+ mice, suggestive of WAT remodeling that could lead to impaired cellular thermogenesis. Taken together, our study provides the first functional link between GNB3 and obesity, and presents insight into novel pathways that could be applied to combat obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  17. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  18. Overexpression of chitinase like protein YKL-40 in leukemia patients

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    Anil K. Hurmale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available YKL-40 is a member of mammalian chitanase (CHI3L1, expressed and secreted by several types of solid tumor cells, inflammatory cells and stem cells. The precise physiological role of YKL-40 in cancer is still not clear and it is suggested that it play a role in cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, metastatic potential, cell attachment and migration, reorganization and tissue remodeling.The aim of the study was to check the appearance of YKL-40 in leukemic cells and over-expression of YKL-40 in the plasma of leukemia patients in comparison to healthy controls, and find whether YKL-40 could serve as a peripheral biomarker for leukemia. The study was conducted between July 2012 and March 2013 and included 67 volunteers, 55 having leukemia at the stage of diagnosis ofthe disease and 12 normal healthy volunteers. YKL-40 levels were determined in all plasma samples using the YKL-40 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit and expression of YKL-40 was observed by using immunocytochemical (ICC analysis. YKL-40 plasma levels differed significantly between patients with leukemia and the normal healthy volunteers (P=<0.001 and YKL-40 was positively expressed in all four types of leukemia (AML, ALL, CLL and CML specimens.

  19. Caveolin-1 overexpression in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Nazhvani, Ali Dehghani; Azizi, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Caveolin-1, a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, is supposed to have different regulatory roles as promoter or suppressor in many human cancers. However, no published study concerned its expression in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of Cav-1 in the most common benign and malignant salivary gland tumors and evaluate its correlation with proliferation activity. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, immunohistochemical expression of caveolin-1 and Ki67 were evaluated in 49 samples, including 11 normal salivary glands, 15 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PA), 13 adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCC), and 10 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC). The expression of Cav-1 was seen in 18 % of normal salivary glands and 85 % of tumors. The immunoreaction in the tumors was significantly higher than normal tissues (P = 0.001), but the difference between benign and malignant tumors was not significant (P = 0.07). Expression of Cav-1 was correlated with Ki67 labeling index in PAs, but not in malignant tumors. Cav-1 expression was not in association with tumor size and stage. Overexpression of Cav-1 was found in salivary gland tumors in comparison with normal tissues, but no significant difference was observed between benign and malignant tumors. Cav-1 was inversely correlated with proliferation in PA. Therefore, this marker may participate in tumorigenesis of salivary gland tumors and may be a potential biomarker for cancer treatments.

  20. Clinical significance of Phosphatidyl Inositol Synthase overexpression in oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Jatinder; Sawhney, Meenakshi; DattaGupta, Siddartha; Shukla, Nootan K; Srivastava, Anurag; Ralhan, Ranju

    2010-01-01

    We reported increased levels of Phosphatidyl Inositol synthase (PI synthase), (enzyme that catalyses phosphatidyl inositol (PI) synthesis-implicated in intracellular signaling and regulation of cell growth) in smokeless tobacco (ST) exposed oral cell cultures by differential display. This study determined the clinical significance of PI synthase overexpression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and premalignant lesions (leukoplakia), and identified the downstream signaling proteins in PI synthase pathway that are perturbed by smokeless tobacco (ST) exposure. Tissue microarray (TMA) Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, Confocal laser scan microscopy, RT-PCR were performed to define the expression of PI synthase in clinical samples and in oral cell culture systems. Significant increase in PI synthase immunoreactivity was observed in premalignant lesions and OSCCs as compared to oral normal tissues (p = 0.000). Further, PI synthase expression was significantly associated with de-differentiation of OSCCs, (p = 0.005) and tobacco consumption (p = 0.03, OR = 9.0). Exposure of oral cell systems to smokeless tobacco (ST) in vitro confirmed increase in PI synthase, Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and cyclin D1 levels. Collectively, increased PI synthase expression was found to be an early event in oral cancer and a target for smokeless tobacco

  1. Impaired baroreflex function in mice overexpressing alpha-synuclein

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    Sheila eFleming

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, such as orthostatic hypotension consequent to baroreflex failure and cardiac sympathetic denervation, is frequently observed in the synucleinopathy Parkinson’s disease (PD. In the present study, the baroreceptor reflex was assessed in mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein (Thy1-aSyn, a genetic mouse model of synucleinopathy. The beat-to-beat change in heart rate, computed from R-R interval, in relation to blood pressure was measured in anesthetized and conscious mice equipped with arterial blood pressure telemetry transducers during transient bouts of hypertension and hypotension. Compared to wildtype, tachycardia following nitroprusside-induced hypotension was significantly reduced in Thy1-aSyn mice. Thy1-aSyn mice also showed an abnormal cardiovascular response (i.e., diminished tachycardia to muscarinic blockade with atropine. We conclude that Thy1-aSyn mice have impaired basal and dynamic range of sympathetic and parasympathetic-mediated changes in heart rate and will be a useful model for long-term study of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction associated with PD.

  2. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: Potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent ERG gene fusions, the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, drive overexpression of the nuclear transcription factor ERG, and are early clonal events in prostate cancer progression. The nuclear transcription factor MYC is also frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer and may play a role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The relationship between nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression in prostate cancer, as well as the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of ERG-positive/MYC high tumors, is not well understood. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ERG and MYC was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs), and nuclear staining was scored semi-quantitatively (IHC product score range = 0-300). Correlation between nuclear ERG and MYC protein expression and association with clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy was assessed. 29.1% of all tumor nodules showed concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression (i.e., ERG-positive/MYC high), including 35.0% of secondary nodules. Overall, there was weak positive correlation between ERG and MYC expression across all tumor nodules (rpb  = 0.149, P = 0.045), although this correlation was strongest in secondary nodules (rpb  = 0.520, P = 0.019). In radical prostatectomy specimens, ERG-positive/MYC high tumors were positively associated with the presence of extraprostatic extension (EPE), relative to all other ERG/MYC expression subgroups, however, there was no significant association between concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression and time to biochemical recurrence. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression is common in prostate cancer and defines a subset of locally advanced tumors. Recent data indicates that BET bromodomain proteins regulate ERG gene fusion and MYC gene expression in prostate cancer, suggesting possible synergistic

  3. Overexpression of pucC improves the heterologous protein expression level in a Rhodobacter sphaeroides expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Chen, G; Ding, G; Zhao, Z; Dong, T; Hu, Z

    2015-04-27

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides system has been used to express membrane proteins. However, its low yield has substantially limited its application. In order to promote the protein expression capability of this system, the pucC gene, which plays a crucial role in assembling the R. sphaeroides light-harvesting 2 complex (LH2), was overexpressed. To build a pucC overexpression strain, a pucC overexpression vector was constructed and transformed into R. sphaeroides CQU68. The overexpression efficiency was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. A well-used reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) was fusion-expressed with LH2 to evaluate the heterologous protein expression level. As a result, the cell culture and protein in the pucC overexpression strain showed much higher typical spectral absorption peaks at 800 and 850 nm compared with the non-overexpression strain, suggesting a higher expression level of LH2-GUS fusion protein in the pucC overexpression strain. This result was further confirmed by Western blot, which also showed a much higher level of heterologous protein expression in the pucC overexpression strain. We further compared GUS activity in pucC overexpression and non-overexpression strains, the results of which showed that GUS activity in the pucC overexpression strain was approximately ten-fold that in the non-overexpression strain. These results demonstrate that overexpressed pucC can promote heterologous protein expression levels in R. sphaeroides.

  4. Transcriptomic changes reveal gene networks responding to the overexpression of a blueberry DWARF AND DELAYED FLOWERING 1 gene in transgenic blueberry plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Qing; Gao, Xuan

    2017-06-19

    Constitutive expression of the CBF/DREB1 for increasing freezing tolerance in woody plants is often associated with other phenotypic changes including dwarf plant and delayed flowering. These phenotypic changes have been observed when Arabidopsis DWARF AND DELAYED FLOWERING 1 (DDF1) was overexpressed in A. thaliana plants. To date, the DDF1 orthologues have not been studied in woody plants. The aim of this study is to investigate transcriptomic responses to the overexpression of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) DDF1 (herein, VcDDF1-OX). The VcDDF1-OX resulted in enhanced freezing tolerance in tetraploid blueberry plants and did not result in significant changes in plant size, chilling requirement, and flowering time. Comparative transcriptome analysis of transgenic 'Legacy-VcDDF1-OX' plants containing an overexpressed VcDDF1 with non-transgenic highbush blueberry 'Legacy' plants revealed the VcDDF1-OX derived differentially expressed (DE) genes and transcripts in the pathways of cold-response, plant flowering, DELLA proteins, and plant phytohormones. The increase in freezing tolerance was associated to the expression of cold-regulated genes (CORs) and the ethylene pathway genes. The unchanged plant size, dormancy and flowering were due to the minimal effect of the VcDDF1-OX on the expression of DELLA proteins, flowering pathway genes, and the other phytohormone genes related to plant growth and development. The DE genes in auxin and cytokinin pathways suggest that the VcDDF1-OX has also altered plant tolerance to drought and high salinity. A DDF1 orthologue in blueberry functioned differently from the DDF1 reported in Arabidopsis. The overexpression of VcDDF1 or its orthologues is a new approach to increase freezing tolerance of deciduous woody plant species with no obvious effect on plant size and plant flowering time.

  5. Overexpression of FurA in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 reveals new targets for this regulator involved in photosynthesis, iron uptake and cellular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Andrés; Bes, M Teresa; Barja, François; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2010-11-01

    Previous genomic analyses of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 have identified three ferric uptake regulator (Fur) homologs with low sequence identities and probably different functions in the cell. FurA is a constitutive protein that shares the highest homology with Fur from heterotrophic bacteria and appears to be essential for in vitro growth. In this study, we have analysed the effects of FurA overexpression on the Anabaena sp. phenotype and investigated which of the observed alterations were directly operated by FurA. Overexpression of the regulator led to changes in cellular morphology, resulting in shorter filaments with rounded cells of different sizes. The furA-overexpressing strain showed a slower photoautotrophic growth and a marked decrease in the oxygen evolution rate. Overexpression of the regulator also decreased both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, but did not lead to an increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. By combining phenotypic studies, reverse transcription-PCR analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified three novel direct targets of FurA, including genes encoding a siderophore outer membrane transporter (schT), bacterial actins (mreBCD) and the PSII reaction center protein D1 (psbA). The affinity of FurA for these novel targets was markedly affected by the absence of divalent metal ions, confirming previous evidence of a critical role for the metal co-repressor in the function of the regulator in vivo. The results unravel new cellular processes modulated by FurA, supporting its role as a global transcriptional regulator in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  6. Overexpression of cotton RAV1 gene in Arabidopsis confers transgenic plants high salinity and drought sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jie; Li, Mo; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Shan; Hu, Rong; Chen, Yun; Li, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-01

    RAV (related to ABI3/VP1) protein containing an AP2 domain in the N-terminal region and a B3 domain in the C-terminal region, which belongs to AP2 transcription factor family, is unique in higher plants. In this study, a gene (GhRAV1) encoding a RAV protein of 357 amino acids was identified in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Transient expression analysis of the eGFP:GhRAV1 fusion genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) epidermal cells revealed that GhRAV1 protein was localized in the cell nucleus. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of GhRAV1 in cotton is induced by abscisic acid (ABA), NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Overexpression of GhRAV1 in Arabidopsis resulted in plant sensitive to ABA, NaCl and PEG. With abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, seed germination and green seedling rates of the GhRAV1 transgenic plants were remarkably lower than those of wild type. In the presence of NaCl, the seed germination and seedling growth of the GhRAV1 transgenic lines were inhibited greater than those of wild type. And chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of the transgenic plants were significantly lower than those of wild type. Under drought stress, the GhRAV1 transgenic plants displayed more severe wilting than wild type. Furthermore, expressions of the stress-related genes were altered in the GhRAV1 transgenic Arabidopsis plants under high salinity and drought stresses. Collectively, our data suggested that GhRAV1 may be involved in response to high salinity and drought stresses through regulating expressions of the stress-related genes during cotton development.

  7. Overexpression of the AtSHI gene in poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima, results in compact plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashraful Islam

    Full Text Available Euphorbia pulcherrima, poinsettia, is a non-food and non-feed vegetatively propagated ornamental plant. Appropriate plant height is one of the most important traits in poinsettia production and is commonly achieved by application of chemical growth retardants. To produce compact poinsettia plants with desirable height and reduce the utilization of growth retardants, the Arabidopsis SHORT INTERNODE (AtSHI gene controlled by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter was introduced into poinsettia by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Three independent transgenic lines were produced and stable integration of transgene was verified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Reduced plant height (21-52% and internode lengths (31-49% were obtained in the transgenic lines compared to control plants. This correlates positively with the AtSHI transcript levels, with the highest levels in the most dwarfed transgenic line (TL1. The indole-3-acetic acid (IAA content appeared lower (11-31% reduction in the transgenic lines compared to the wild type (WT controls, with the lowest level (31% reduction in TL1. Total internode numbers, bract numbers and bract area were significantly reduced in all transgenic lines in comparison with the WT controls. Only TL1 showed significantly lower plant diameter, total leaf area and total dry weight, whereas none of the AtSHI expressing lines showed altered timing of flower initiation, cyathia abscission or bract necrosis. This study demonstrated that introduction of the AtSHI gene into poinsettia by genetic engineering can be an effective approach in controlling plant height without negatively affecting flowering time. This can help to reduce or avoid the use of toxic growth retardants of environmental and human health concern. This is the first report that AtSHI gene was overexpressed in poinsettia and transgenic poinsettia plants with compact growth were produced.

  8. Overexpression of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Is Associated With Penile Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Mark W; Bezerra, Stephania M; Chaux, Alcides; Faraj, Sheila F; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Munari, Enrico; Sharma, Rajni; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Netto, George J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) expression in penile cancer and its association with oncologic outcomes. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 53 patients treated at our institution. Expression of IGF1R was evaluated using a Her2-like scoring system. Overexpression was defined as 1+ or greater membranous staining. Association of IGF1R expression with pathologic features was assessed with comparative statistics, and association with local recurrence, progression to nodal or distance metastases, or death was assessed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Overall, IGF1R overexpression was seen in 33 (62%) cases. With a median follow-up of 27.8 months, IGF1R overexpression was associated with inferior progression-free survival (PFS) (P  =  .003). In a multivariable model controlling for grade, T stage, perineural invasion, and lymphovascular invasion, IGF1R expression was independently associated with disease progression (hazard ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1-5.1, P  =  .03. Comparing patients without IGF1R overexpression to those with overexpression, 5-year PFS was 94.1% vs 45.8%. IGF1R overexpression was associated with inferior PFS in penile cancer. Drugs that target IGF1R and downstream messengers may have a therapeutic benefit in patients that exhibit IGF1R overexpression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MET overexpression, gene amplification and relevant clinicopathological features in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Lei; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Wenbin; Ying, Jianming

    2017-02-07

    This study was conducted to investigate the expression of MET in Chinese gastric adenocarcinoma cohort, the correlation between MET overexpression and clinical pathological features, HER2 expression and MET gene amplification. A total of 816 gastric adenocarcinoma patients were included and MET and HER2 immunohistochemical (IHC) staining were performed. IHC and dual-color silver in situ hybridization analysis were performed in the tissue microarrays, constructed from the 240 patients who were randomly selected. MET overexpression (IHC 3+) was observed in 6.0% (49/816) of the cohort. MET overexpression rate was higher in patients with poor prognostic factors, such as clinical stages III/IV (p =0.012) and pathologic stages T3/T4 (p =0.027). The HER2 overexpression (IHC 3+) rate was 8.8% (72/816) and MET overexpression rate was higher in HER2 positive patients (9.7%, 7/72). A high concordance rate (94.6%) between MET overexpression and gene amplification was demonstrated. Therefore, MET overexpression could serve as a prognostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  10. Overexpression of decorin promoted angiogenesis in diabetic cardiomyopathy via IGF1R-AKT-VEGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jinsheng; Chen, Fuqiong; Chen, Jing; Ruan, Guoran; He, Mengying; Chen, Chen; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Dao Wen

    2017-03-14

    Microcirculatory dysfunction is believed to play an important role in diabetic cardiomyopathy. The small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin is generally considered a pro-angiogenic factor. Here, we investigate whether overexpression of decorin ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy and its effects on angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Diabetes was induced through intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin combined with a high-fat diet, and decorin was overexpressed via recombinant adeno-associated virus in Wistar rats. Six months later, cardiac function was determined using an echocardiography and cardiac catheter system. The results showed that cardiac function was decreased in diabetic rats and restored by overexpression of decorin. In addition, overexpression of decorin upregulated the expression of VEGF and attenuated the reduction in the cardiac capillary density. In the in vitro study, high glucose induced apoptosis and inhibited the capabilities of tube formation, migration and proliferation, which were all ameliorated by decorin overexpression. Meanwhile, decorin overexpression increased the expression of VEGF and IGF1R, as well as the phosphorylation level of AKT and AP-1. Nonetheless, all of these effects were abolished by pretreatment with the IGF1R antibody or AKT inhibitor. In conclusion, overexpression of decorin ameliorated diabetic cardiomyopathy and promoted angiogenesis through the IGF1R-AKT-VEGF signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  11. Overexpression of protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma progression via the Notch signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Lijie; Dong, Pingping; Liu, Longzi; Gao, Qiang; Duan, Meng; Zhang, Si; Chen, She; Xue, Ruyi; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Notch signaling frequently occurs in liver cancer, and is associated with liver malignancies. However, the mechanisms regulating pathologic Notch activation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) catalyzes the addition of O-linked fucose to the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of Notch. In the present study, we detected the expression of Pofut1 in 8 HCC cell lines and 253 human HCC tissues. We reported that Pofut1 was overexpressed in HCC cell lines and clinical HCC tissues, and Pofut1 overexpression clinically correlated with the unfavorable survival and high disease recurrence in HCC. The in vitro assay demonstrated that Pofut1 overexpression accelerated the cell proliferation and migration in HCC cells. Furthermore, Pofut1 overexpression promoted the binding of Notch ligand Dll1 to Notch receptor, and hence activated Notch signaling pathway in HCC cells, indicating that Pofut1 overexpression could be a reason for the aberrant activation of Notch signaling in HCC. Taken together, our findings indicated that an aberrant activated Pofut1-Notch pathway was involved in HCC progression, and blockage of this pathway could be a promising strategy for the therapy of HCC. - Highlights: • Pofut1 overexpression in HCC was correlated with aggressive tumor behaviors. • Pofut1 overexpression in HCC was associated with poor prognosis. • Pofut1 promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion in hepatoma cells. • Pofut1 activated Notch signaling pathway in hepatoma cells.

  12. Overexpression of protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma progression via the Notch signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Lijie [Liver Surgery Department, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai (China); Dong, Pingping [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shanghai Institute of Liver Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Longzi; Gao, Qiang; Duan, Meng [Liver Surgery Department, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Si; Chen, She [Key Laboratory of Glycoconjugate Research Ministry of Public Health, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Xue, Ruyi, E-mail: xue.ruyi@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shanghai Institute of Liver Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xiaoying, E-mail: xiaoyingwang@fudan.edu.cn [Liver Surgery Department, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-29

    Aberrant activation of Notch signaling frequently occurs in liver cancer, and is associated with liver malignancies. However, the mechanisms regulating pathologic Notch activation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) catalyzes the addition of O-linked fucose to the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of Notch. In the present study, we detected the expression of Pofut1 in 8 HCC cell lines and 253 human HCC tissues. We reported that Pofut1 was overexpressed in HCC cell lines and clinical HCC tissues, and Pofut1 overexpression clinically correlated with the unfavorable survival and high disease recurrence in HCC. The in vitro assay demonstrated that Pofut1 overexpression accelerated the cell proliferation and migration in HCC cells. Furthermore, Pofut1 overexpression promoted the binding of Notch ligand Dll1 to Notch receptor, and hence activated Notch signaling pathway in HCC cells, indicating that Pofut1 overexpression could be a reason for the aberrant activation of Notch signaling in HCC. Taken together, our findings indicated that an aberrant activated Pofut1-Notch pathway was involved in HCC progression, and blockage of this pathway could be a promising strategy for the therapy of HCC. - Highlights: • Pofut1 overexpression in HCC was correlated with aggressive tumor behaviors. • Pofut1 overexpression in HCC was associated with poor prognosis. • Pofut1 promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion in hepatoma cells. • Pofut1 activated Notch signaling pathway in hepatoma cells.

  13. ERBB-2 overexpression as a risk factor for malignant phaeochromocytomas and paraganglinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqing; Zhong, Xu; Ye, Lei; Qi, Yan; Su, TingWei; Wei, Qing; Xie, Jing; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Zhou, Weiwei; Cui, Bin; Ning, Guang

    2016-06-01

    There are currently no good histological or molecular markers to differentiate benign from malignant phaeochromocytomas and paraganglinomas (PPGLs). Our previous cross-sectional study observed that ERBB-2 overexpression was associated with malignant PPGLs. This study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of ERBB-2 overexpression for metastasis in PPGLs in a large population. A total of 262 patients diagnosed as PPGLs in our institution between 2002 and 2012 were included. We analysed ERBB-2 protein expression in the primary PPGL tumours by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ERBB-2 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Direct Sanger sequencing was performed to examine ERBB-2 exon 20 mutations. The occurrence of malignant PPGLs was documented in the follow-up period. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the association between ERBB-2 overexpression and metastasis of PPGLs. Twenty-six (9·9%) patients had ERBB-2 overexpression in their primary PPGL tumours, which was significantly associated with ERBB-2 amplification (17/25, 68%). No ERBB-2 mutation was found. At a median follow-up of 4·5 years, a total of 23 malignant PPGLs were documented, including eight (30·8%) patients in the ERBB-2 overexpression group and 15 (6·4%) patients in the ERBB-2-negative group. The incidence rate of metastasis was 5·3 per 100 person-years vs 1·4 per 100 person-years in the ERBB-2 overexpression and ERBB-2-negative groups (P overexpression was associated with decreased metastasis-free survival (P = 0·001, log-rank test). After adjusting for primary tumour size and location, Cox regression analysis revealed that ERBB-2 overexpression was independently associated with risk of malignant PPGLs (HR = 2·78; 95% CI, 1·12-6·90; P = 0·028). Patients harbouring tumours with ERBB-2 overexpression have a significantly higher risk of developing malignant PPGLs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Overexpression of Oct4 suppresses the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells via Rnd1 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Long; Qin, Kunhua; Wang, Dekun; Zhang, Yan; Bai, Nan; Yang, Shengyong; Luo, Yunping; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2014-11-01

    Although Oct4 is known as a critical transcription factor involved in maintaining "stemness", its role in tumor metastasis is still controversial. Herein, we overexpressed and silenced Oct4 expression in two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and 4T1, separately. Our data showed that ectopic overexpression of Oct4 suppressed cell migration and invasion in vitro and the formation of metastatic lung nodules in vivo. Conversely, Oct4 downregulation increased the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we identified Rnd1 as the downstream target of Oct4 by ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, which was significantly downregulated upon Oct4 overexpression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the binding of Oct4 to the promoter region of Rnd1 by ectopic overexpression of Oct4. Dual luciferase assays indicated that Oct4 overexpression suppressed transcriptional activity of the Rnd1 promoter. Moreover, overexpression of Rnd1 partially rescued the inhibitory effects of Oct4 on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Overexpression of Rnd1 counteracted the influence of Oct4 on the formation of cell adhesion and lamellipodia, which implied a potential underlying mechanism involving Rnd1. In addition, we also found that overexpression of Oct4 led to an elevation of E-cadherin expression, even in 4T1 cells that possess a relatively high basal level of E-cadherin. Rnd1 overexpression impaired the promoting effects of Oct4 on E-cadherin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. These results suggest that Oct4 affects the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells through Rnd1-mediated effects that influence cell motility and E-cadherin expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpression of Myo1e in mouse podocytes enhances cellular endocytosis, migration, and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xia; Wang, Wenjing; Mao, Jianhua; Shen, Huijun; Fu, Haidong; Wang, Xia; Gu, Weizhong; Liu, Aimin; Yu, Huimin; Shu, Qiang; Du, Lizhong

    2014-02-01

    Podocytes are a terminally differentiated and highly specialized cell type in the glomerulus that forms a crucial component of the glomerular filtration barrier. Recently, Myo1e was identified in the podocytes of glomeruli. Myo1e podocyte-specific knockout mice exhibit proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement, glomerular basement membrane disorganization, signs of chronic renal injury, and kidney inflammation. After overexpression of Myo1e in a conditionally immortalized mouse podocyte cell line (MPC5), podocyte migration was evaluated via transwell assay, endocytosis was evaluated using FITC-transferrin, and adhesion was evaluated using a detachment assay after puromycin aminonucleoside treatment. Myo1e overexpression significantly increased the adherence of podocytes. ANOVA analysis indicated significant differences for cell adhesion between the overexpression and control groups (overexpression vs. control, t = 11.3199, P = 0.005; overexpression vs. negative control, t = 12.0570, P = 0.0006). Overexpression of Myo1e inhibited puromycin aminonucleoside-induced podocyte detachment, and the number of cells remaining on the bottom of the culture plate increased. Cell migration was enhanced in Myo1e-overexpressing podocytes in the transwell migration assay. Internalization of FITC-transferrin also increased in Myo1e-overexpressing podocytes relative to control cells. Overexpression of Myo1e can enhance podocyte migration ability, endocytosis, and attachment to the glomerular basement membrane. Restoration of Myo1e expression in podocytes may therefore strengthen their functional integrity against environmental and mechanical injury. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Ectopic overexpression of WsSGTL1, a sterol glucosyltransferase gene in Withania somnifera, promotes growth, enhances glycowithanolide and provides tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saema, Syed; Rahman, Laiq Ur; Singh, Ruchi; Niranjan, Abhishek; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Misra, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of sterol glycosyltransferase (SGTL1) gene of Withania somnifera showing its involvement in glycosylation of withanolide that leads to enhanced growth and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Withania somnifera is widely used in Ayurvedic medicines for over 3000 years due to its therapeutic properties. It contains a variety of glycosylated steroids called withanosides that possess neuroregenerative, adaptogenic, anticonvulsant, immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities. The WsSGTL1 gene specific for 3β-hydroxy position has a catalytic specificity to glycosylate withanolide and sterols. Glycosylation not only stabilizes the products but also alters their physiological activities and governs intracellular distribution. To understand the functional significance and potential of WsSGTL1 gene, transgenics of W. somnifera were generated using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Stable integration and overexpression of WsSGTL1 gene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis followed by quantitative real-time PCR. The WsGTL1 transgenic plants displayed number of alterations at phenotypic and metabolic level in comparison to wild-type plants which include: (1) early and enhanced growth with leaf expansion and increase in number of stomata; (2) increased production of glycowithanolide (majorly withanoside V) and campesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol in glycosylated forms with reduced accumulation of withanolides (withaferin A, withanolide A and withanone); (3) tolerance towards biotic stress (100 % mortality of Spodoptera litura), improved survival capacity under abiotic stress (cold stress) and; (4) enhanced recovery capacity after cold stress, as indicated by better photosynthesis performance, chlorophyll, anthocyanin content and better quenching regulation of PSI and PSII. Our data demonstrate overexpression of WsSGTL1 gene which is responsible for increase in glycosylated withanolide and sterols, and confers better growth and

  17. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karhumaa Kaisa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media

  18. Mechanisms of MRP over-expression in four human lung-cancer cell lines and analysis of the MRP amplicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijdems, E. W.; de Haas, M.; Coco-Martin, J. M.; Ottenheim, C. P.; Zaman, G. J.; Dauwerse, H. G.; Breuning, M. H.; Twentyman, P. R.; Borst, P.; Baas, F.

    1995-01-01

    Some multidrug resistant cell lines over-express the gene encoding the multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP). In all cell lines reported thus far, over-expression is associated with gene amplification. We have studied the predominant mechanisms of MRP over-expression in 4 human lung-cancer

  19. Enhanced accumulation of carotenoids in sweetpotato plants overexpressing IbOr-Ins gene in purple-fleshed sweetpotato cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Chul; Kim, Sun Ha; Park, Seyeon; Lee, Hyeong-Un; Lee, Joon Seol; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Yun-Hee; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] is an important root crop that produces low molecular weight antioxidants such as carotenoids and anthocyanin. The sweetpotato orange (IbOr) protein is involved in the accumulation of carotenoids. To increase the levels of carotenoids in the storage roots of sweetpotato, we generated transgenic sweetpotato plants overexpressing IbOr-Ins under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in an anthocyanin-rich purple-fleshed cultivar (referred to as IbOr plants). IbOr plants exhibited increased carotenoid levels (up to 7-fold) in their storage roots compared to wild type (WT) plants, as revealed by HPLC analysis. The carotenoid contents of IbOr plants were positively correlated with IbOr transcript levels. The levels of zeaxanthin were ∼ 12 times elevated in IbOr plants, whereas β-carotene increased ∼ 1.75 times higher than those of WT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that most carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes were up-regulated in the IbOr plants, including PDS, ZDS, LCY-β, CHY-β, ZEP and Pftf, whereas LCY-ɛ was down-regulated. Interestingly, CCD1, CCD4 and NCED, which are related to the degradation of carotenoids, were also up-regulated in the IbOr plants. Anthocyanin contents and transcription levels of associated biosynthetic genes seemed to be altered in the IbOr plants. The yields of storage roots and aerial parts of IbOr plants and WT plants were not significantly different under field cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that overexpression of IbOr-Ins can increase the carotenoid contents of sweetpotato storage roots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Over-expression of two different forms of the alpha-secretase ADAM10 affects learning and memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ulrich; Hiemke, Christoph; Fahrenholz, Falk; Schroeder, Anja

    2006-12-15

    Members of the ADAM family (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) are the main candidates for physiologically relevant alpha-secretases. The alpha-secretase cleaves in the non-amyloidogenic pathway the amyloid precursor protein within the region of the Abeta peptides preventing their aggregation in the brain. The increase of alpha-secretase activity in the brain provides a plausible strategy to prevent Abeta formation. Concerning this possibility two transgenic mouse lines (FVB/N) have been created: mice over-expressing the bovine form of the alpha-secretase (ADAM10) and mice over-expressing an inactive form of the alpha-secretase (ADAM10-E348A-HA; ADAM10-dn). For behavioral examination a F1 generation of transgenic mice (C57Bl/6 x FVB/N (tg)) was generated and compared to wild type F1 generation (C57Bl/6 x FVB/N). Behavior was characterized in the following tasks: standard open field, enriched open field, elevated plus-maze, and the Morris water maze hidden platform task. Concerning basal activity, exploration, and anxiety, transgenic mice behaved similar to controls. With respect to learning and memory both transgenic lines showed a significant deficit compared to controls. ADAM10 mice however, showed thigmotaxis with passive floating behavior in the Morris water maze indicating differences in motivation, whereas, ADAM10-dn mice displayed an inconspicuous but limited goal-directed search pattern. Thus variation of the enzymatic activity of alpha-secretase ADAM10 alters learning and memory differentially. Nevertheless, it could be concluded that both, ADAM10 and ADAM10-dn mice are suitable control mice for the assessment of alpha-secretase-related effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Sevoflurane Inhalation Accelerates the Long-Term Memory Consolidation via Small GTPase Overexpression in the Hippocampus of Mice in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Emi; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Feng, Guo-Gang; Hayashi, Hisaki; Satomoto, Maiko; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposure impairs the long-term memory in neonates. Whether the exposure to animals in adolescence affects the memory, however, has been unclear. A small hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate (GTPase) rac1 plays a role in the F-actin dynamics related to the synaptic plasticity, as well as superoxide production via reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation. The current study was designed to examine whether sevoflurane exposure to mice in early adolescence modifies the long-term learning ability concomitantly with the changes in F-actin constitution as well as superoxide production in the hippocampus according to the levels of rac1 protein expression. Four-week-old mice were subjected to the evaluation of long-term learning ability for three days. On day one, each mouse was allowed to enter a dark chamber for five min to acclimatization. On day two, the procedure was repeated with the addition of an electric shock as soon as a mouse entered the dark chamber. All mice subsequently inhaled 2 L/min air with (Sevoflurane group) and without (Control group) 2.5% sevoflurane for three hours. On day three, each mouse was placed on the platform and retention time, which is the latency to enter the dark chamber, was examined. The brain removed after the behavior test, was used for analyses of immunofluorescence, Western immunoblotting and intracellular levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure significantly prolonged retention time, indicating the enhanced long-term memory. Sevoflurane inhalation augmented F-actin constitution coexisting with the rac1 protein overexpression in the hippocampus whereas it did not alter the levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure to 4-week-old mice accelerates the long-term memory concomitantly with the enhanced F-actin constitution coexisting with the small GTPase rac1 overexpression in the hippocampus. These results suggest that sevoflurane inhalation may amplify long-term memory

  2. Overexpression of thioredoxin in islets transduced by a lentiviral vector prolongs graft survival in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytwu Huey-Kang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic islet transplantation is considered an appropriate treatment to achieve insulin independence in type I diabetic patients. However, islet isolation and transplantation-induced oxidative stress and autoimmune-mediated destruction are still the major obstacles to the long-term survival of graft islets in this potential therapy. To protect islet grafts from inflammatory damage and prolong their survival, we transduced islets with an antioxidative gene thioredoxin (TRX using a lentiviral vector before transplantation. We hypothesized that the overexpression of TRX in islets would prolong islet graft survival when transplanted into diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Methods Islets were isolated from NOD mice and transduced with lentivirus carrying TRX (Lt-TRX or enhanced green fluorescence protein (Lt-eGFP, respectively. Transduced islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of female diabetic NOD mice, and blood glucose concentration was monitored daily after transplantation. The histology of the islet graft was assessed at the end of the study. The protective effect of TRX on islets was investigated. Results The lentiviral vector effectively transduced islets without altering the glucose-stimulating insulin-secretory function of islets. Overexpression of TRX in islets reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. After transplantation into diabetic NOD mice, euglycemia was maintained for significantly longer in Lt-TRX-transduced islets than in Lt-eGFP-transduced islets; the mean graft survival was 18 vs. 6.5 days (n = 9 and 10, respectively, p Conclusion We successfully transduced the TRX gene into islets and demonstrated that these genetically modified grafts are resistant to inflammatory insult and survived longer in diabetic recipients. Our results further support the concept that the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and antiapoptotic functions of TRX are critical to islet survival after

  3. Ischaemic tolerance in aged mouse myocardium: the role of adenosine and effects of A1 adenosine receptor overexpression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, John P; Willems, Laura; Ashton, Kevin J; Holmgren, Kirsten; Peart, Jason; Matherne, G Paul

    2003-01-01

    The genesis of the ischaemia intolerant phenotype in aged myocardium is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that impaired adenosine-mediated protection contributes to ischaemic intolerance, and examined whether this is countered by A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) overexpression. Responses to 20 min ischaemia and 45 min reperfusion were assessed in perfused hearts from young (2–4 months) and moderately aged (16–18 months) mice. Post-ischaemic contractility was impaired by ageing with elevated ventricular diastolic (32 ± 2 vs. 18 ± 2 mmHg in young) and reduced developed (37 ± 3 vs. 83 ± 6 mmHg in young) pressures. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) loss was exaggerated (27 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 IU g−1in young) whereas the incidence of tachyarrhythmias was similar in young (15 ± 1 %) and aged hearts (16 ± 1 %). Functional analysis confirmed equipotent effects of 50 μm adenosine at A1 and A2 receptors in young and aged hearts. Nonetheless, while 50 μm adenosine improved diastolic (5 ± 1 mmHg) and developed pressures (134 ± 7 mmHg) and LDH loss (6 ± 2 IU g−1) in young hearts, it did not alter these variables in the aged group. Adenosine did attenuate arrhythmogenesis for both ages (to ∼10 %). In contrast to adenosine, 50 μm diazoxide reduced ischaemic damage and arrhythmogenesis for both ages. Contractile and anti-necrotic effects of adenosine were limited by 100 μm 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and 3 μm chelerythrine. Anti-arrhythmic effects were limited by 5-HD but not chelerythrine. Non-selective (100 μm 8-sulfophenyltheophylline) and A1-selective (150 nm 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) adenosine receptor antagonism impaired ischaemic tolerance in young but not aged hearts. Quantitative real-time PCR and radioligand analysis indicated that impaired protection is unrelated to changes in A1AR mRNA transcription, or receptor density (∼8 fmol mg−1 protein in both age groups). However, A1AR overexpression improved tolerance for both ages, restoring

  4. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  5. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bralten, Linda B. C.; French, Pim J.

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  6. Altered Perspectives: Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Immersive environments provide an exciting experiential technology to visualize the natural world. Given the increasing accessibility of 360o cameras and virtual reality headsets we are now able to visualize artistic principles and scientific concepts in a fully immersive environment. The technology has become popular for photographers as well as designers, industry, educational groups, and museums. Here we show a sci-art perspective on the use of optics and light in the capture and manipulation of 360o images and video of geologic phenomena and cultural heritage sites in Alaska, England, and France. Additionally, we will generate intentionally altered perspectives to lend a surrealistic quality to the landscapes. Locations include the Catacombs of Paris, the Palace of Versailles, and the Northern Lights over Fairbanks, Alaska. Some 360o view cameras now use small portable dual lens technology extending beyond the 180o fish eye lens previously used, providing better coverage and image quality. Virtual reality headsets range in level of sophistication and cost, with the most affordable versions using smart phones and Google Cardboard viewers. The equipment used in this presentation includes a Ricoh Theta S spherical imaging camera. Here we will demonstrate the use of 360o imaging with attendees being able to be part of the immersive environment and experience our locations as if they were visiting themselves.

  7. Effect of secretory pathway gene overexpression on secretion of a fluorescent reporter protein in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    2016-01-01

    roles in the process have been identified through transcriptomics. The assignment of function to these genes has been enabled in combination with gene deletion studies. In this work, 14 genes known to play a role in protein secretion in filamentous fungi were overexpressed in Aspergillus nidulans....... The background strain was a fluorescent reporter secreting mRFP. The overall effect of the overexpressions could thus be easily monitored through fluorescence measurements, while the effects on physiology were determined in batch cultivations and surface growth studies. Results: Fourteen protein secretion...... pathway related genes were overexpressed with a tet-ON promoter in the RFP-secreting reporter strain and macromorphology, physiology and protein secretion were monitored when the secretory genes were induced. Overexpression of several of the chosen genes was shown to cause anomalies on growth, micro...

  8. The effect of aquaporin 5 overexpression on the Ras signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Kim, Myoung Sook; Jang, Se Jin; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-01-01

    Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) has been shown to be overexpressed in multiple cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Furthermore, it has been reported that ectopic expression of AQP5 leads to many phenotypic changes characteristic of transformation. However, the biochemical mechanism leading to transformation in AQP5-overexpressing cells has not been clearly elucidated. In this report, the overexpression of AQP5 in NIH3T3 cells demonstrated a significant effect on Ras activity and, thus, cell proliferation. Furthermore, this influence was shown to be mediated by phosphorylation of the PKA consensus site of AQP5. This is the first evidence demonstrating an association between AQP5 and a signaling pathway, namely the Ras signal transduction pathway, which may be the basis of the oncogenic properties seen in AQP-overexpressing cells

  9. Metabolic engineering of apple by overexpression of the MdMyb10 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A.L. Rihani

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, the flavonoid pathway was successfully modified in apple by overexpressing the MdMyb10 transcription factor to validate the hypothesis of increased effect on plant disease resistance.

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE Co-overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purpose:The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) ... Half LIM domain protein2), and the transcription factor Lef1 that is cleaved by presenilin-2 ..... and self-renewal capability, producing a rapidly dividing tumor mass.

  11. Growth Hormone Overexpression Disrupts Reproductive Status Through Actions on Leptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2018-03-01

    pituitary might be part of the response to overexpression of GH and the resulting delay in puberty onset.

  12. Comparison of HER2 gene amplification and KRAS alteration in eyelid sebaceous carcinomas with that in other eyelid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mi Jung; Shin, Hyung Sik; Nam, Eun Sook; Cho, Seong Jin; Lee, Min Joung; Lee, Samuel; Park, Hye-Rim

    2015-05-01

    Eyelid sebaceous carcinoma (SC) represents a highly aggressive malignancy. Despite the poor prognosis, genetic alterations as potential molecular targets are not available. KRAS mutation and HER2 gene amplification may be candidates related to their genetic alterations. We examined the HER2 and KRAS alteration status in eyelid SCs and compared it with that in other eyelid tumors. The controversial topics of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and p16 expression were also investigated. HER2 amplification was determined by silver in situ hybridization, while immunohistochemistry was performed to study protein expressions in 14 SCs and controls, including 23 other eyelid malignancies and 14 benign tumors. Peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR clamping and direct sequencing were used to detect KRAS mutations. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 85.7% (12/14) of the SCs, of which two-thirds showed HER2 gene amplification. HER2 protein overexpression and HER2 amplification were found more frequently in eyelid SCs than in other eyelid tumors. All SCs harbored wild type KRAS genes. No HPV infections were identified in the SCs. Nevertheless, p16 overexpression was found in 71.4% (10/14) of SCs, irrespective of the status of HPV infection. Furthermore, p16 overexpression in eyelid SCs was also significantly higher than that in other eyelid tumors. HER2 protein overexpression, HER2 gene amplifications, and wild type KRAS genes are common in eyelid SCs. HER2 gene amplification may represent potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of eyelid SCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  14. Effect of SOCS1 overexpression on RPE cell activation by proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazewicz, Magdalena; Draganova, Dafina; Makhoul, Maya; Chtarto, Abdel; Elmaleh, Valerie; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Caspers, Laure; Bruyns, Catherine; Willermain, François

    2016-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) overexpression in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells on their activation by pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ, TNFα and IL-17. Retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) were stably transfected with the control plasmid pIRES2-AcGFP1 or the plasmid pSOCS1-IRES2-AcGFP1. They were stimulated by IFNγ (150ng/ml), TNFα (30ng/ml) or IL-17 (100ng/ml). The levels of SOCS1 mRNA were measured by real-time PCR. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation and IκBα expression were analysed by western Blot (WB). IL-8 secretion was analysed by ELISA and expression of MHCII molecules and ICAM-1/CD54 by flow cytometry. Our data show that SOCS1 mRNA overexpression in RPE cells prevents IFNγ-induced SOCS1 mRNA increase and IFNγ-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation. Moreover, SOCS1 overexpression in RPE cells inhibits IFNγ-induced decrease of IL-8 secretion and prevents IFNγ-induced MHC II and ICAM1/CD54 upregulation. However, SOCS1 overexpression does not affect TNFα-induced IκBα degradation nor block TNFα-induced or IL-17-induced IL-8 secretion. On the contrary, IL-17-induced secretion is increased by SOCS1 overexpression. In conclusion, SOCS1 overexpression in RPE cells inhibits some IFNγ-mediated responses that lead to uveitis development. This notion raises the possibility that SOCS1 overexpression could be a novel target for treating non-infectious uveitis. However, some proinflammatory effects of TNFα and IL-17 stimulation on RPE are not blocked by SOCS1 overexpression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity by overexpression of cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Hung; Chang, Yu-Hsien; Huang, Pin-Yao; Huang, Jing-Bo; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) such as the bacterial flagellin (or the derived peptide flg22) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2), plants activate the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) response. The L-type lectin receptor kinase-VI.2 (LecRK-VI.2) is a positive regulator of Arabidopsis thaliana PTI. Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) possess two copies of the C-X8-C-X2-C (DUF26) motif in their extracellular domains and are thought to be involved in plant stress resistance, but data about CRK functions are scarce. Here, we show that Arabidopsis overexpressing the LecRK-VI.2-responsive CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 demonstrated an enhanced PTI response and were resistant to virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Notably, the flg22-triggered oxidative burst was primed in CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 transgenics and up-regulation of the PTI-responsive gene FLG22-INDUCED RECEPTOR-LIKE 1 (FRK1) was potentiated upon flg22 treatment in CRK4 and CRK6 overexpression lines or constitutively increased by CRK36 overexpression. PTI-mediated callose deposition was not affected by overexpression of CRK4 and CRK6, while CRK36 overexpression lines demonstrated constitutive accumulation of callose. In addition, Pst DC3000-mediated stomatal reopening was blocked in CRK4 and CRK36 overexpression lines, while overexpression of CRK6 induced constitutive stomatal closure suggesting a strengthening of stomatal immunity. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation analyses in Arabidopsis protoplasts suggested that the plasma membrane localized CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 associate with the PRR FLS2. Association with FLS2 and the observation that overexpression of CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 boosts specific PTI outputs and resistance to bacteria suggest a role for these CRKs in Arabidopsis innate immunity.

  16. In vivo overexpression of Emi1 promotes chromosome instability and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, S; Cato, K; Tang, L; Pavey, S; Haass, N K; Gabrielli, B G; Duijf, P H G

    2016-10-13

    Cell cycle genes are often aberrantly expressed in cancer, but how their misexpression drives tumorigenesis mostly remains unclear. From S phase to early mitosis, EMI1 (also known as FBXO5) inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, which controls cell cycle progression through the sequential degradation of various substrates. By analyzing 7403 human tumor samples, we find that EMI1 overexpression is widespread in solid tumors but not in blood cancers. In solid cancers, EMI1 overexpression is a strong prognostic marker for poor patient outcome. To investigate causality, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which we overexpressed Emi1. Emi1-overexpressing animals develop a wide variety of solid tumors, in particular adenomas and carcinomas with inflammation and lymphocyte infiltration, but not blood cancers. These tumors are significantly larger and more penetrant, abundant, proliferative and metastatic than control tumors. In addition, they are highly aneuploid with tumor cells frequently being in early mitosis and showing mitotic abnormalities, including lagging and incorrectly segregating chromosomes. We further demonstrate in vitro that even though EMI1 overexpression may cause mitotic arrest and cell death, it also promotes chromosome instability (CIN) following delayed chromosome alignment and anaphase onset. In human solid tumors, EMI1 is co-expressed with many markers for CIN and EMI1 overexpression is a stronger marker for CIN than most well-established ones. The fact that Emi1 overexpression promotes CIN and the formation of solid cancers in vivo indicates that Emi1 overexpression actively drives solid tumorigenesis. These novel mechanistic insights have important clinical implications.

  17. Transgenic overexpression of adenine nucleotide translocase 1 protects ischemic hearts against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpe, Inga; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Westermann, Dirk; Tschöpe, Carsten; Rauch, Ursula; Landmesser, Ulf; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Dörner, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia impairs the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), which transports ADP and ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. We investigated whether ANT1 overexpression has protective effects on ischemic hearts. Myocardial infarction was induced in wild-type (WT) and heart-specific ANT1-transgenic (ANT1-TG) rats, and hypoxia was set in isolated cardiomyocytes. ANT1 overexpression reduced the myocardial infarct area and increased the survival rate of infarcted rats. Reduced ANT1 expression and increased 4-hydroxynonenal modification of ANT paralleled to impaired ANT function in infarcted WT hearts. ANT1 overexpression improved ANT expression and function. This was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial cytochrome C release and caspase-3 activation. ANT1-TG hearts suffered less from oxidative stress, as shown by lower protein carbonylation and 4-hydroxynonenal modification of ANT. ANT1 overexpression also increased cell survival of hypoxic cardiomyocytes and attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This was linked to higher stability of mitochondrial membrane potential and lower activity of ROS detoxifying catalase. ANT1-TG cardiomyocytes also showed higher resistance against H2O2 treatment, which was independent of catalase activity. In conclusion, ANT1 overexpression compensates impaired ANT activity under oxygen-restricted conditions. It reduces ROS production and oxidative stress, stabilizes mitochondrial integrity, and increases survival, making ANT1 a component in ROS management and heart protection during ischemia. ANT1 overexpression reduces infarct size and increases survival after infarction. ANT1 overexpression compensates restricted ANT expression and function in infarcted hearts. Increased ANT1 expression enhances mitochondrial integrity. ANT1-overexpressing hearts reduce oxidative stress by decreasing ROS generation. ANT1 is a component in ROS management and heart protection.

  18. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  19. Overexpression of K-p21Ras play a prominent role in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng-bo; Zhou, Xin-liang; Yang, Ju-lun

    2018-06-01

    The proto-oncogene ras product, p21Ras, has been found overexpression in many human tumors. However, the subtypes of overexpressed p21Ras still remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate overexpressed isoforms of p21Ras and their roles in the progress of lung cancer. Method: The expression of total p21Ras in normal lung tissues and lung cancers was determined by immunohistochemically staining with monoclonal antibody (Mab) KGHR-1 which could recognize and broad spectrum reaction with the (K/H/N) ras protein. Then, the isoforms of p21Ras was examined by specific Mab for each p21Ras subtypes. Results: Low expression of total p21Ras was found in 26.67% (8/30) of normal lung tissues, and 81.31% (87/107) of adenocarcinoma harbored overexpressed total p21Ras. Besides, 70.00% (35/50) of squamous cell carcinoma were detected overexpressed total p21Ras. In addition, 122 lung cancer tissues from overexpression of total p21Ras protein were selected to detect the expression of each subtype. And all the 122 lung cancer tissues were K-p21Ras overexpression. Moreover, there was a statistical significance difference between the expression level of total p21Ras and differentiation, and the same results were observed between the expression level of total p21Ras and lymph node metastasis (P0.05). Conclusions: Overexpression of K-p21Ras plays a prominent role in the progress of lung cancer and it is suggested that the p21Ras could serve as a promising treatment target in lung cancer.

  20. The production of nitric oxide in EL4 lymphoma cells overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robyn E; Weigent, Douglas A

    2003-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is produced by immunocompetent cells and has been implicated in the regulation of a multiplicity of functions in the immune system involved in growth and activation. However, the actions of endogenous or lymphocyte GH and its contribution to immune reactivity when compared with those of serum or exogenous GH are still unclear. In the present study, we overexpressed lymphocyte GH in EL4 lymphoma cells, which lack the GH receptor (GHR), to determine the role of endogenous GH in nitric oxide (NO) production and response to genotoxic stress. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the levels of GH increased approximately 40% in cells overexpressing GH (GHo) when compared with cells with vector alone. The results also show a substantial increase in NO production in cells overexpressing GH that could be blocked by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), an L-arginine analogue that competitively inhibits all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). No evidence was obtained to support an increase in peroxynitrite in cells overexpressing GH. Overexpression of GH increased NOS activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter activity, and iNOS protein expression, whereas endothelial nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein levels were essentially unchanged. In addition, cells overexpressing GH showed increased arginine transport ability and intracellular arginase activity when compared with control cells. GH overexpression appeared to protect cells from the toxic effects of the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. This possibility was suggested by maintenance of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential in cells overexpressing GH when compared with control cells that could be blocked by L-NMMA. Taken together, the data support the notion that lymphocyte GH, independently of the GH receptor, may play a key role in the survival of lymphocytes exposed to stressful stimuli via the production of NO.

  1. Prediction of recombinant protein overexpression in Escherichia coli using a machine learning based model (RPOLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Narjeskhatoon; Norouzi, Alireza; Mohd Hashim, Siti Z; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Samian, Razip

    2015-11-01

    Recombinant protein overexpression, an important biotechnological process, is ruled by complex biological rules which are mostly unknown, is in need of an intelligent algorithm so as to avoid resource-intensive lab-based trial and error experiments in order to determine the expression level of the recombinant protein. The purpose of this study is to propose a predictive model to estimate the level of recombinant protein overexpression for the first time in the literature using a machine learning approach based on the sequence, expression vector, and expression host. The expression host was confined to Escherichia coli which is the most popular bacterial host to overexpress recombinant proteins. To provide a handle to the problem, the overexpression level was categorized as low, medium and high. A set of features which were likely to affect the overexpression level was generated based on the known facts (e.g. gene length) and knowledge gathered from related literature. Then, a representative sub-set of features generated in the previous objective was determined using feature selection techniques. Finally a predictive model was developed using random forest classifier which was able to adequately classify the multi-class imbalanced small dataset constructed. The result showed that the predictive model provided a promising accuracy of 80% on average, in estimating the overexpression level of a recombinant protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of NIMA-related kinase 2 is associated with poor prognoses in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huajie; Liu, Bin; Hou, Xianzeng; Pang, Bo; Guo, Pengbo; Jiang, Wanli; Ding, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Xin, Tao; Guo, Hua; Xu, Shangchen; Pang, Qi

    2017-05-01

    Eleated expression of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2) was frequently observed in a variety of malignant cancers, and it appears to be involved in the initiation, maintenance, progression, metastasis of cancer and is positively associated with poor prognosis. We sought to investigate NEK2 expression and its predictive roles in malignant gliomas, and study the correlation of NEK2 protein expression with proliferation, clinical parameters, overall survival and some other parameters. We investigate NEK2 protein expression in 99 samples of malignant gliomas, including 35 WHO grade II, 22 grade III, and 42 grade IV gliomas, by immunohistochemistry and western blot (n = 50). We then made correlative analysis of protein overexpression using the Kaplan-Meier method, Log rank test, and Cox proportional-hazards model analysis. NEK2 protein was overexpressed in malignant gliomas, but not in normal brain tissues. Overexpression of NEK2 correlated with malignancy, proliferation and adverse overall survival in gliomas. Moreover, chemotherapy, resection extent and WHO grade also correlate with overall survival in gliomas. However, within WHO grade II glioma subgroup, NEK2 overexpression showed no impact on overall survival. The present study firstly reveals that NEK2 protein is widely overexpressed in gliomas. NEK2 overexpression correlates significantly with malignancy (WHO grades), proliferation (Ki-67) and prognosis in malignant gliomas. NEK2 is a potential gene therapy target and prognostic indicator.

  3. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Faria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs. RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01 and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01 suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions.

  4. Attenuation of teratoma formation by p27 overexpression in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu-ura, Toru; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Okada, Motoi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-02-15

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells, have a great potential for regenerative medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells, in particular, are suitable for replacement of tissue by autologous transplantation. However, tumorigenicity is a major risk in clinical application of both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. This study explores the possibility of manipulating the cell cycle for inhibition of tumorigenicity. We genetically modified mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) to overexpress p27 tumor suppressor and examined their proliferation rate, gene expression, cardiac differentiation, tumorigenicity, and therapeutic potential in a mouse model of coronary artery ligation. Overexpression of p27 inhibited cell division of miPSCs, and that inhibition was dependent on the expression level of p27. p27 overexpressing miPSCs had pluripotency characteristics but lost stemness earlier than normal miPSCs during embryoid body and teratoma formation. These cellular characteristics led to none or smaller teratoma when the cells were injected into nude mice. Transplantation of both miPSCs and p27 overexpressing miPSCs into the infarcted mouse heart reduced the infarction size and improved left ventricular function. The overexpression of p27 attenuated tumorigenicity by reducing proliferation and earlier loss of stemness of miPSCs. The overexpression of p27 did not affect pluripotency and differentiation characteristics of miPSC. Therefore, regulation of the proliferation rate of miPSCs offers great therapeutic potential for repair of the injured myocardium.

  5. Energetic heavy ions overcome tumor radioresistance caused by overexpression of Bcl-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Omura-Minamisawa, Motoko; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Sora, Sakura; Yokota, Yuichiro; Nakano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Overexpression of Bcl-2 is frequent in human cancers and has been associated with radioresistance. Here we investigated the potential impact of heavy ions on Bcl-2 overexpressing tumors. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 cells (Bcl-2 overexpressing HeLa cells) and Neo cells (neomycin resistant gene-expressing HeLa cells) exposed to γ-rays or heavy ions were assessed for the clonogenic survival, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. Results: Whereas Bcl-2 cells were more resistant to γ-rays (0.2 keV/μm) and helium ions (16.2 keV/μm) than Neo cells, heavy ions (76.3-1610 keV/μm) yielded similar survival regardless of Bcl-2 overexpression. Carbon ions (108 keV/μm) decreased the difference in the apoptotic incidence between Bcl-2 and Neo cells, and prolonged G 2 /M arrest that occurred more extensively in Bcl-2 cells than in Neo cells. Conclusions: High-LET heavy ions overcome tumor radioresistance caused by Bcl-2 overexpression, which may be explained at least in part by the enhanced apoptotic response and prolonged G 2 /M arrest. Thus, heavy-ion therapy may be a promising modality for Bcl-2 overexpressing radioresistant tumors

  6. Overexpression of allene oxide cyclase improves the biosynthesis of artemisinin in Artemisia annua L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lu

    Full Text Available Jasmonates (JAs are important signaling molecules in plants and play crucial roles in stress responses, secondary metabolites' regulation, plant growth and development. In this study, the promoter of AaAOC, which was the key gene of jasmonate biosynthetic pathway, had been cloned. GUS staining showed that AaAOC was expressed ubiquitiously in A. annua. AaAOC gene was overexpressed under control of 35S promoter. RT-Q-PCR showed that the expression levels of AaAOC were increased from 1.6- to 5.2-fold in AaAOC-overexpression transgenic A. annua. The results of GC-MS showed that the content of endogenous jasmonic acid (JA was 2- to 4.7-fold of the control level in AaAOC-overexpression plants. HPLC showed that the contents of artemisinin, dihydroartemisinic acid and artemisinic acid were increased significantly in AaAOC-overexpression plants. RT-Q-PCR showed that the expression levels of FPS (farnesyl diphosphate synthase, CYP71AV1 (cytochrome P450 dependent hydroxylase and DBR2 (double bond reductase 2 were increased significantly in AaAOC-overexpression plants. All data demonstrated that increased endogenous JA could significantly promote the biosynthesis of artemisinin in AaAOC-overexpression transgenic A. annua.

  7. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  8. Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 4 Overexpression in Cells Prevents Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Apoptosis via the Upregulation of eNOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Julie A.; Kilbane Myers, Joanna; Khan, Mahmood; Angelos, Mark G.; Chen, Chun-An

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling cascades regulate several cellular functions, including differentiation, proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. The duration and magnitude of phosphorylation of these MAPKs are decisive determinants of their physiological functions. Dual-specificity phosphatases exert kinetic control over these signaling cascades. Previously, we demonstrated that DUSP4−/− hearts sustain a larger infarct and have poor functional recovery, when isolated hearts were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Uncontrolled p38 activation and upregulation of Nox4 expression are the main effectors for this functional alteration. Here, dual-specificity phosphatase 4 (DUSP4) overexpression in endothelial cells was used to investigate the role of DUSP4 on the modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and vascular function, when cells were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) insult. Immunostaining with cleaved caspase-3 revealed that DUSP4 overexpression prevents caspase-3 activation and apoptosis after H/R. The beneficial effects occur via modulating p38 activity, increased NO bioavailability, and reduced oxidative stress. More importantly, DUSP4 overexpression upregulates eNOS protein expression (1.62 ± 0.33 versus 0.65 ± 0.16) during H/R-induced stress. NO is a critical small molecule involved in regulating vascular tone, vascular growth, platelet aggregation, and modulation of inflammation. The level of NO generation determined using DAF-2 fluorescence demonstrated that DUSP4 overexpression augments NO production and thus improves vascular function. The level of superoxide generated from cells after being subjected to H/R was determined using dihydroethidium-HPLC method. The results suggested that DUSP4 overexpression in cells decreases H/R-induced superoxide generation (1.56 ± 0.14 versus 1.19 ± 0.05) and thus reduces oxidant stress. This also correlates with the reduction in the total protein S

  9. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Overexpression in Micropapillary and Other Variants of Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzatoğlu, Kemal; Yörükoğlu, Kutsal; Demir, Hale; Bal, Nebil

    2016-06-21

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein overexpression or gene amplification has been shown in urothelial bladder cancer. This could be helpful when using targeted anti-HER2 therapy on these tumors. To evaluate HER2 immunohistochemical expression in conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC), in situ UC, and UC variants primarily in micropapillary urothelial carcinoma (MPUC). The study evaluated 60 MPUC cases; 25 invasive, 20 low-grade noninvasive, and 10 high-grade noninvasive UC cases; 8 in situ UC cases; and 69 UC variant cases. The immunohistochemistry staining was scored according to recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists 2013 HER2 test guideline established for breast cancer and only 3+ staining was considered HER2 overexpression. HER2 overexpression was determined by 3+ staining. 34 of 60 MPUC cases (56%) showed HER2 overexpression (3+ staining). We observed 3+ staining HER2 overexpression in nine of 25 conventional invasive UC cases (36%), four of eight in situ UC cases (50%), and three of six lipid cell variant cases (50%). 3+ staining HER2 overexpression was not seen in eight glandular, six small cell, and five sarcomatoid variant cases. HER2 overexpression was negative in the 20 low-grade noninvasive UC cases but positive in two of the 10 high-grade noninvasive UC cases (20%). We observed HER2 overexpression most commonly in MPUC cases. We also found HER2 overexpression in conventional invasive and in situ UC cases. Pure in situ UC and conventional invasive UC, especially MPUC, could be candidate tumors for treatment with anti-HER2 antibody (trastuzumab therapy). Targeted therapy has a limited place in treatment of bladder cancer. In this study, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression in bladder carcinomas was evaluated in a large number of cases. Anti-HER2 therapy could be used in bladder cancers, as in breast and gastric cancers. Copyright © 2016 European

  10. The frequency and clinical impact of HER2 alterations in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyung Kim

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2 can be overexpressed, amplified and/or mutated in malignant tumors, and is a candidate for therapeutic targeting. However, molecular associations and clinical significances of these alterations were controversial in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the frequency and clinicopathological significance of HER2 dysregulation in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. HE