WorldWideScience

Sample records for outstanding young researchers

  1. World Class: USBBY's Outstanding International Books for Young People

    Angus, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Some of the world's best children's book artists got together to help Amnesty International celebrate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights' 60th anniversary in "We Are All Born Free," one of the 42 titles recommended by the fourth annual United States Board on Books for Young People's (USBBY) Outstanding International Books…

  2. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  3. Outstanding Issues and Future Directions of Inner Magnetospheric Research (Invited)

    Brandt, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    Several research areas of the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere (MI) system have reached a state, where the coupling mechanisms can no longer be treated as boundary conditions or ad-hoc assumptions in our physical models. It is nothing new that our community has become increasingly aware of the necessity to use global measurements from multiple observation platforms and missions, in order to understand both the system as a whole as well as its individual subsystems. In this presentation we briefly review the current status and outstanding issues of inner MI research. We attempt to establish a working definition of the term "Systems Approach", then present observational tools and techniques that enable such an approach. Physical modeling plays a central role not only in understanding the mechanisms at work, but also in determining the key quantities to be measured. We conclude by discussing questions relevant to future directions. Are there new techniques that need more attention? Should multi-platform observations be included as a default component already at the mission-level in the future? Is solar minimum uninteresting from an MI perspective? Should we actively compare to magnetospheres of other planets? Examples of outstanding issues in inner MI research include the circulation of ionospheric plasma from low to high latitudes and its escape to the magnetosphere, where it is energized by magnetospheric processes and becomes a part of the plasma pressure that in turn affects the ionospheric and magnetospheric electric field. The electric field, in turn, plays a controlling role in the transport of both magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma, which is intimately linked with ionospheric conductance. The conductance, in turn, is controlled by thermospheric chemistry coupled with plasma flow and heating and magnetospheric precipitation and Joule heating. Several techniques have emerged as important tools: auroral imaging, inversions of ENA images to retrieve the

  4. Can outstanding research be done under less than ideal conditions?

    Igić Rajko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Great scientific discoveries rarely originate from small and poor countries. However, the lives and achievements of three Yugoslav scientists who were active in the biomedical sciences, Laza K. Lazarević (1851-1891, Ivan Djaja (1884-1957, and Pavao Stern (1913-1976, serve as an example of success in this environment. These scientists, as well as the majority of other successful investigators in small and poor countries, were trained in foreign and developed countries and, upon return, were given the freedom to start a self dependent research program. They overcame many obstacles, including wars and civil unrests, to contribute significantly to certain medical fields. It is interesting that although a Jew, Stern was allowed to work during the World War II in Zagreb, which became capital of the so-called Independent State of Croatia, a puppet state under German control. Perhaps his good name among pharmacologists helped him to keep position during this tough period. Nowadays, new technologies requiring for biomedical research are rather expensive, and poor countries cannot afford to finance many scientists. Thus, selection of the most productive researchers is the challenge for those who finance scientific work.

  5. Unconscious and Unnoticed Professional Practice within an Outstanding School for Children and Young People with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities

    Crombie, Richard; Sullivan, Lesley; Walker, Kate; Warnock, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a three-year project undertaken at Pear Tree School for children and young people with severe and multiple and profound learning difficulties. Lesley Sullivan, the school's head teacher, believed that much of the value within the work of this outstanding school went unidentified by existing approaches to planning, monitoring…

  6. The Training Project of Star Researchers, Outstanding Teaching Staff and Leaders with Facilities Available

    Ömer KARAHAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus on the requirement of a serious regulation at our universities. It is argued that it is necessary to change Constitution and Institution of Higher Education Law for the serious regulation. However, it is impossible to say that all the facilities of the present legislation are used. Our aim is to create a project based on benefiting from continuing education centers to meet the need of star researchers, outstanding teaching staff and leaders in Turkey via the legislation in force. In this study, accessible studies from publications related to university, higher education and continuing education centers are studied. Th e current situation and solution off ers, applications and continuing education centers'activities have been determined. In accordance with these data, solution off ers have been proposed and discussed in line with the literature. According to the data obtained, our students who come with deficiencies from high schools to universities are not given the adequate undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate education. Th ere are studies such as ‘Double Major Program', ‘Medical-Science Physicians Integrated (MD-PhD Doctorate Program which upgrade the qualities. However, these programs are not suff icient and common. Th erefore, it is imposssible to train outstanding teaching staff , star researchesr and leaders who will meet the needs of our country and contribute to the World. Our academic potential needs a quality training except for branch training. On the other hand, the contribution of the Continuing Education Centers existing in university embodiments is limited. It is possible to provide basic skills, integration and research education to the outstanding teaching staff , star researcher and leader candidates. Th ese trainings should be given in a continuous instutionalization and in the formal education system. For this purpose, an academician school can be established within the body continuing

  7. Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Debt Burden of Young Adults in the United States

    Kim, Jinhee; Chatterjee, Swarn; Kim, Jung Eun

    2012-01-01

    Factors associated with the borrowing behavior of young adults who are transitioning from financial dependence to financial independence were identified. Data used were from the 2009 Transition to Adulthood and its parental companion data set, Panel Studies of Income Dynamics. Results indicate that age, gender, race, and work status are associated…

  8. Aiming for outstanding: Action research from students of the MSc in the Teaching of Psychology

    Lintern, Fiona; Davies, Jamie; McGinty, Andrew; Fisher, Jeannine

    2014-01-01

    The first cohort of a new MSc programme is due to complete the course in August 2014. During the three-year online course students conduct several pieces of action research in their classrooms. There is little research specifically related classroom practice in the pre-tertiary psychology classroom. The following describes the rationale and context of the MSc in the Teaching of Psychology and reports on three students’ final year research. The first considers the benefits of Psychology Applie...

  9. DER 83: outstanding events

    1984-01-01

    The DER's activity is presented through 82 ''outstanding events''. Each one is a stage in the effort of research and development of the DER. These events concern the following fields: new applications of electric power for customers; environment protection and new energy sources; improvements of electric power production units; electrical materials; electric network planning and control; computer codes. In the production field, one deals more particularly with nuclear reactor safety studies: analysis of the behaviour of different components; reactor safety experiments; reliability of different systems (safety, communications...) [fr

  10. Make pupils young researchers!

    Gouhier, Armelle

    2015-04-01

    With the 2011 educational reform in France, a new course has been created in secondary schools : Methods & Practices in Science (MPS). The main goal was to improve the pupils working methods in science, including laboratory and field works. In addition, the pedagogy develops pupils autonomy and creativity, a key factor in a research process. Three teachers are working together (Mathematics, Physics and Geology-Biology), showing how different disciplines complement one another. Eventually, this is aimed at attracting more students in scientific sections. This course is optional, in the "seconde" class in French secondary schools (i.e., for 15 years old students). For the next class, they will have to choose between scientific, economic and literature sections : it is a useful option for them to decide which section has their preference. In my high-school in Clermont-Ferrand, we have chosen a research subject on hydrogeology & water quality improvement in region "Auvergne". The pupils will have to develop and set up appropriate tools to check and improve the water quality, related to different disciplines : - Geology & Biology: hydrogeology, effects of different pollutants on aquatic life, solutions to improve water quality (example of the natural water treatment zone in the lake of "Aydat, Auvergne, France"). - Physics & Chemistry: water potability criteria, pollution tests in water, water treatment plants working. - Mathematics: algorithm development, modeling on excel of the dispersion of pollutants The pedagogy of this course is new in French high-schools : pupils work in groups of three, so as to develop cooperation and autonomy. The teachers give the guidelines at the beginning of each working session, and answer the students questions when necessary. The evaluation is competence-based : instead of a mark, which is the main evaluation method in France, the pupils have to evaluate their own skills. Then, the teachers make an evaluation, and the global process is

  11. Branched tetraether membrane lipids: A versatile group of molecular fossils as testimony of past climate change (Outstanding Young Scientist Lecture)

    Weijers, J. W. H.

    2009-04-01

    Studying fossils of any kind provides a small window into past times and could learn us why the world around us is as it is today (and might become in the near future). Like paleontologists studying bone remains and palaeobotanists studying fossil plant remains, many organic geochemists study fossil molecules to learn about geochemical cycles, evolution, ecology and climate. Branched Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids are an example of such molecular fossils and have been the core subject of my research. These molecules were initially detected a decade ago in near coastal marine sediments and structurally resemble isoprenoid GDGTs, a group of membrane lipids synthesised by Archaea, a Domain of life separate from Bacteria and Eukarya. With nuclear magnetic resonance techniques we showed, however, that branched GDGTs are of bacterial rather than archaeal origin and analysis of soils, peat bogs and marine surface sediments pointed to a terrestrial origin. As isoprenoid GDGTs are mainly produced by marine archaea the ratio between the two groups, the Branched vs. Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index, could be used to trace the input of soil organic matter into marine sediments. In this lecture I will provide examples of applications of this BIT index in the Channel River during the last Glacial Maximum and the Congo deep sea fan over the last deglaciation. Meanwhile, it appeared that in soils the distribution of individual branched GDGTs, which differ in their content of methyl branches and cyclopentane rings, was different from place to place. Analysis of over 100 soils at different locations revealed that the distribution of the branched GDGTs is most strongly related to both soil pH and annual mean air temperature. This is explained by the fact that bacteria have to adapt the composition of their cell membrane to ambient conditions in order to keep it properly functioning. This empirical relation opened opportunities to reconstruct past annual

  12. 7th Young Researcher Meeting

    2017-01-01

    Young Researcher Meeting, Torino 2016 F Agostini, C Antolini, A Avella, G Cattani, R Cuccaro, A Cultrera, M Di Stefano, G Fragione, L Lolli, M Migliaccio, L Pagnanini, E Pessana, F Piacentini, D Pietrobon, E Pusceddu, R Romeo, M Serra, E Simonetto, F Stellato Preface The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been established as a forum for students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers determined to play a proactive role in the scientific progress. Since 2009 we run itinerant yearly meetings to discuss the most recent developments and achievements in Physics, as we are firmly convinced that sharing expertise and experience is the foundation of the research activity. One of the main purposes of the conference is actually to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theoreticians, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of Physics. The format we chose is an informal meeting primarily aimed at students and researchers at the beginning of their scientific career, who are encouraged to present their work in brief presentations able to provide genuine engagement of the audience and cross-pollination of ideas. The 7 th edition of the Young Researcher Meeting was held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM) in Turin, the Italian National Metrology Institute responsible for the national standards of the International System of Units. The conference took place from Monday 24 th to Wednesday 26 th October 2016. This edition gathered 120 participants belonging to universities and research centres from all over the world. The plenary talk sessions covered several areas of pure and applied Physics, and they were complemented by an extremely rich and interactive poster session, which was also extended to the coffee breaks. The programme included a “poster and wine” session on the first evening, a guided tour at the Turin Astrophysical Observatory and a very enjoyable and friendly conference

  13. 1996 outstanding facts

    1996-01-01

    This progress report of the Direction of Studies and Research (DER) of Electricite de France (EdF) reports on some outstanding studies carried out during the year 1996 and concerning: new applications of electric power (thermal comfort, heating floors, building diagnosis, energy management, customers communicating interfaces, services, air conditioning, off-peak tariffs, power demand mastery in the industry, infrared dryers for paper industry); production means (automatic systems for nuclear power plants operation, management of reactors shutdown schedules for refuelling operations, optimization of fuel loading patterns for PWRs, neutronic and thermohydraulic computer codes for steam pipes rupture accidents, thermo-hydraulic modeling of the confinement building during post-accidental situation, 3D numerical simulation of overpressures inside reactor valves and of vortex and two-phase flow inside auxiliary pipes, control of vibrating fatigue of pipe nozzles, qualification of the adjustable speed drives of the Gravelines' cooling pumps, 3D analysis of new steam turbine designs, identification of bi-metal welding surface defects, a simple method for the evaluation of in-service fatigue of components, the probabilistic dimensioning of safety coefficients, the modeling of thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling of geo-materials for radioactive wastes storage, the supply of isolated sites using renewable energies); environment protection (batteries for electric-powered vehicles, modeling of atmospheric reactive flows, chlorination of the Dampierre's cooling circuits for pathogen amoebas elimination, in-situ treatment of PCBs isolated transformers); and development and exploitation of materials for power networks. (J.S.)

  14. Outstanding engineering achievement

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The annual award of the South African Institution of Civil Engineers for 'The Most Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement of 1982' was made to Escom for the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station. In the site selection a compromise had to be made between an area remote from habitation, and an area relatively close to the need for power, sources of construction materials, transportation, operational staff and large quantities of cooling water. In the construction of Koeberg the safety of the workers and the public was regarded with the utmost concern

  15. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    2004-04-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  16. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2013

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Martinelli, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Ricci Pacifici, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2013-12-01

    YRM logo The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been a rapidly growing event for the last few years. Together with other initiatives which have emerged in several research areas, the young researcher meeting marks the awareness and the desire of PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in scientific progress. Devoted to the discussion and the interchange of new developments and ideas in physics, the meeting is primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in an informal atmosphere. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. Born in Rome in 2009, after three editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2013 was held in Trieste. Propelled by the past success, the fourth meeting was a two-day conference on 3-4June. It was sponsored by the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA - and the University of Padova, thus acquiring an even further international drive. In this volume, we collect some of the contributions that were presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, biophysics and medical physics. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma, Italy Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Matteo Martinelli (mmartin@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di

  17. Young Engineers & Scientists (YES) - Engaging Teachers in Space Research

    Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and local high schools in San Antonio. It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences, information sciences, and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) An intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, C++ programming, the Internet, careers, science ethics, social impact of technology, and other topics; and select their individual research project with their mentor (SwRI staff member) to be completed during the academic year; and 2) A collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors and teachers during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past nineteen (19) years. A total of 258 students have completed or are currently enrolled in YES. Of these students, 38% are females and 57% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local diversity of the San Antonio area. All YES graduates have entered college, several work or have worked for SwRI, two businesses have formed, and three scientific publications have resulted. Sixteen (16) teacher participants have attended the YES workshop and have developed classroom materials based on their experiences in research at SwRI in the past three (3) years. In recognition of its excellence, YES received the Celebrate Success in 1996 and the Outstanding Campus Partner-of-the-Year Award in 2005, both from Northside Independent School District (San Antonio

  18. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    YRM_LOGO The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has confirmed once again this year the enthusiasm and determination of Ph.D. students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in the scientific progress. Since 2009, we regularly gather together to discuss the most recent developments and achievements in Physics, firmly convinced that sharing our expertise and experience is the foundation of research activity. The format we chose is an informal meeting primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in brief presentations that provide genuine engagement of the audience and cross-pollination of ideas. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of Physics. After four editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2014 was held at the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA, Trieste, for the second time. The fifth appointment was a two-day conference on July 14th-15th 2014. It has been sponsored by a number of research groups of SISSA, the University of Udine and the Solar Physics group of the University of Rome "Tor Vergata", thus gathering even broader support than previous editions. The success of this year event is testified by an increased number of participants and institutions all around Europe. This resulted in an extremely rich and interactive poster session that covered several areas of pure and applied Physics. With the intent of broadening the contents and stimuli adopting multidisciplinary tools, the YRM 2014 hosted the workshop "Communicating Science" held in collaboration with SISSA Medialab. This choice reflects the growing importance of the outreach activity performed by scientists, especially at the earliest stages of their career, as a way of increasing their expertise and developing soft

  19. 1st Roman Young Researchers Meeting Proceedings

    Cannuccia, E; Pietrobon, D; Stellato, F; Veneziani, M

    2009-01-01

    During the last few decades scientists have been able to test the bases of the physics paradigms, where the quantum mechanics has to match the cosmological scales. Between the extremes of this scenario, biological phenomena and their complexity take place, challenging the laws we observe in the atomic and sub-atomic world. In order to explore the details of this world, new huge experimental facilities are under construction. These projects involve people coming from several countries and give physicists the opportunity to work together with chemists, biologists and other scientists. The Roman Young Researchers Meeting is a conference, organised by Ph. D. students and young postdocs connected to the Roman area. It is aimed primarily at graduate students and post-docs, working in physics. The 1st conference has been held on the 21st of July 2009 at the University of Roma Tor Vergata. It was organised in three sessions, devoted to Astrophysics and Cosmology, Soft and Condensed Matter Physics and Theoretical and ...

  20. Outstanding events D.E.R. 84

    1984-01-01

    The DER's activity is presented through 72 ''outstanding envents''. For the DER, each one is a stage in its effort of research and development. These 72 events can be divided into four classes: development of materials, problems concerning works and realizations, methods and tools development and adjustment. The main subjects concerned are: electric power penetration, the quality of service, the optimization of the exploitation of nuclear power plants [fr

  1. A World of Stories: 2008 Outstanding International Books

    Angus, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in its three-year history, the United States Board on Books for Young People's (USBBY) Outstanding International Books list includes foreign titles coming from publishers with U.S. distributors, as well as those acquired by U.S. publishers. The selection committee read 380 books published in 2007, narrowing down the best of…

  2. Spring 1991 Meeting outstanding papers

    The Atmospheric Sciences Committee has presented Kaye Brubaker and Jichun Shi with Outstanding Student Paper awards for presentations given at the AGU 1991 Spring Meeting, held in Baltimore May 28-31.Brubaker's paper, “Precipitation Recycling Estimated from Atmospheric Data,” presented quantitative estimates of the contribution of locallyevaporated moisture to precipitation over several large continental regions. Recycled precipitation is defined as water that evaporates from the land surface of a specified region and falls again as precipitation within the region. Brubaker applied a control volume analysis based on a model proposed by Budyko.

  3. Researching Oral Production Skills of Young Learners

    Szpotowicz, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the development of young learners' ability to communicate in a foreign language. An empirical study was carried out to determine whether, after four years of learning English as a compulsory school subject, children are ready to engage in oral interaction in a semi-controlled task and produce answers and questions in…

  4. Young Researchers Advancing Computational Science: Perspectives of the Young Scientists Conference 2015

    Boukhanovsky, A.V.; Ilyin, V.A; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Athanassoulis, G.A.; Klimentov, A.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present an annual international Young Scientists Conference (YSC) on computational science http://ysc.escience.ifmo.ru/, which brings together renowned experts and young researchers working in high-performance computing, data-driven modeling, and simulation of large-scale complex systems. The

  5. Original Research Challenges facing young African scientists in ...

    This study aimed at identifying the challenges that young African scientists face in their career development. Methods ... The research profile of Africans is relatively new, and the .... outside the country because it will support my original ideas.”.

  6. Young Academics in E-Learning Research - Editorial

    Martin Ebner; Ortrun Gröblinger; Stephan Waba; Kai Erenli; Erwin Bratengeyer; Reinhard Staber

    2012-01-01

    The special track “Young Academics in E-Learning Research”, shortly YAER2012, took place within the “International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning” (ICL 2012) in Villach, Austria. The conference slot aims to invite young researchers in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) to present their thesis or ongoing work. We asked for contributions, which address the interdisciplinary research field. YAER 2012 provided an excellent space for discussions in order to improve l...

  7. Improving the Integration of Young African Researchers into ...

    The freeze on recruitment in many research institutions and universities has resulted in an aging cohort of teaching and research personnel. Many young researchers work in the precarious situation of teaching assistants or temporary replacements, without the necessary scientific sponsorship to allow them to evolve in their ...

  8. Student Poster Days Showcase Young Researchers | Poster

    Student interns presented their research to the NCI at Frederick community during the annual Student Poster Days event, held in the Building 549 lobby and the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) atrium over two days.

  9. Recent Brain Research on Young Children.

    Flohr, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Provides information about current brain research. Explains that some of the basic tenets that have guided research are outlined in R. Shore's "Rethinking the Brain: New Insights into Early Development." Offers five hypotheses: (1) nature/nurture; (2) effects of nurture; (3) optimal music learning; (4) minimal disadvantages; and (5) early music…

  10. Conducting Research with young people and developing the MTW Approach

    Frostholm, Peter Hornbæk; Mikkelsen, Sidse Hølvig; Gravesen, David Thore

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this article we present our qualitative mixed-methods methodology that we name the Map-Talk-Walk Approach (MTW Approach). We developed the approach to better grasp young people’s understandings of youth, normality and belonging, which make up the thematic framework of our current youth...... research. The MTW Approach is based on three phases, 1) Researcher-initiated workshops, 2) Focus group interviews, and 3) Walk-and-talks in the young people’s local environments. In the article, we discuss the ethical complications related to doing research with young people and positioning them as experts...... in their life worlds. Our ambition is to create a democratized research process that allows the participants ownership, and we find this to be a challenging task. In the closing section, after a thorough presentation of the three phases, we discuss some of the pitfalls we experienced during the process...

  11. Researching Oral Production Skills of Young Learners

    Magdalena Szpotowicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter focuses on the development of young learners’ ability to communicate in a foreign language. An empirical study was carried out to determine whether, after four years of learning English as a compulsory school subject, children are ready to engage in oral interaction in a semicontrolled task and produce answers and questions in English. A convenience sample of ten-year-old children was selected from 180 participants in ELLiE2 in Poland. Six learners from one class of each of seven schools were selected on the basis of teachers’ reports to ensure equal proportions of learners with low, medium and high ability. Schools were chosen to represent different socio-economic milieux. The results of the Year Four oral test (an interactive task showed that almost all the participating childrencould respond to questions but only half were able to ask questions.Considering generally positive attitudes to speaking activities, the results suggest that ten-year-old children are already developing their interactive skills and could benefit from more interaction-focused classroom activities. Further experimental classroom-based studies are necessary to gain better insight into potential oral achievements in this age group. The results are discussed in the context of national curriculum requirements, drawing on the Common European Framework of Reference level descriptors.

  12. Driving Cultures: Cars, Young People and Cultural Research

    Sarah Redshaw

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the Driving Cultures research, the cultural importance of the car and the psychological approaches central to research in the field of road safety and investigations of the over–representation of young people in crashes. The aim of the article is to outline driving as a cultural practice drawing on the experiences of young people as described in focus groups in order to show how cultural research can contribute to a social concern such as traffic injury and death.

  13. Training young researchers to influence telecommunications policy ...

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... Communication Policy Research: south (CPRsouth) conferences showcase ... The potential for these scholars to shape appropriate policies is significant. ... of Microbusinesses: Evidence from the Peruvian Case (2007–2010) ...

  14. CASE STUDY: China — Young researchers battle poverty and ...

    2010-12-14

    Dec 14, 2010 ... CASE STUDY: China — Young researchers battle poverty and bureaucracy in rural China ... And the “three pig rule” is just one example of the problems the local people ... Revenues were applied to system maintenance and all financial ... The researchers, of course, were trained in science, fieldwork, and ...

  15. Engaging Young Children in Research through Photo Elicitation

    Pyle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Embracing the new sociology of childhood, this paper describes a participatory research method built on a belief in the competency of young children. The paper begins with a critical review of the photo elicitation literature exploring the varied levels of children's participation. Drawing on the strengths of the previous research, a multi-step…

  16. RESEARCH ON THE EXPECTATIONS OF EMPLOYERS AND YOUNG EMPLOYEES

    Mirabela Matei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The world is changing at a fast pace and companies must keep up or step aside. Thus, the importance of work motivation and innovation is undeniable. Companies have to direct their attention to 'ordinary', employees, who, provided the suitable motivational framework, can become 'exceptional',. But what do employers expect from their young employees? What does the young generation want in a job? Is there a gap between employers and employees? In order to answer these questions, we conducted two studies. The first is a qualitative research, using content analysis as research method, in which we analyzed 100 online recruitment advertisements for entry-level positions. Only jobs that require higher education were taken into consideration. The employer requirements collected from the ads were divided into technical and personal characteristics and then analyzed. The second study and aims at identifying the young generations’ expectations. It uses both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The studied population consists of 3rd year students. Questionnaires were sent out to universities from different geographical areas and two focus groups were conducted in order to identify the expectations of the young generation of employees. The results of the two studies are discussed. One of the main research findings is that there is an inconsistency between what employers and young employees want. The main discontent of students refers to the significant importance given by employers to work experience, even for jobs where it would not be necessary.

  17. Young Researchers Advancing Computational Science: Perspectives of the Young Scientists Conference 2015

    Boukhanovsky, Alexander V; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V; Athanassoulis, Gerassimos A; Klimentov, Alexei A; Sloot, Peter M A

    2015-01-01

    We present an annual international Young Scientists Conference (YSC) on computational science http://ysc.escience.ifmo.ru/, which brings together renowned experts and young researchers working in high-performance computing, data-driven modeling, and simulation of large-scale complex systems. The first YSC event was organized in 2012 by the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands and ITMO University, Russia with the goal of opening a dialogue on the present and the future of computational science and its applications. We believe that the YSC conferences will strengthen the ties between young scientists in different countries, thus promoting future collaboration. In this paper we briefly introduce the challenges the millennial generation is facing; describe the YSC conference history and topics; and list the keynote speakers and program committee members. This volume of Procedia Computer Science presents selected papers from the 4th International Young Scientists Conference on Computational Science held on 25 ...

  18. Young Academics in E-Learning Research - Editorial

    Martin Ebner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The special track “Young Academics in E-Learning Research”, shortly YAER2012, took place within the “International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning” (ICL 2012 in Villach, Austria. The conference slot aims to invite young researchers in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL to present their thesis or ongoing work. We asked for contributions, which address the interdisciplinary research field. YAER 2012 provided an excellent space for discussions in order to improve learning and teaching of tomorrow. Education without technology seems to be nearly impossible and this issue helps to increase the impact of technology for learning.

  19. Young Children Learning for the Environment: Researching a Forest Adventure

    Gambino, Agatha; Davis, Julie; Rowntree, Noeleen

    2009-01-01

    Field experiences for young children are an ideal medium for environmental education/education for sustainability because of opportunities for direct experience in nature, integrated learning, and high community involvement. This research documented the development--in 4-5 year old Prep children--of knowledge, attitudes and actions/advocacy in…

  20. Challenges facing young African scientists in their research careers ...

    Background: Africa accounts for 14% of world's population, and the economies of most African countries are considered to be growing, but this is not reflected in the amount of research published by Africans. This study aimed at identifying the challenges that young African scientists face in their career development.

  1. Religiosity and value system of young lecturers: qualitative research data

    Pavenkov Oleg Vladimirovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the Orthodox religion as a factor of formation of spiritual and value system of young teachers. Young lecturers belong to the socio-demographic group of 20 to 35 years involved mainly in teaching and research activities. The article presents the results of a qualitative study of value system of 23 informants. The study showed that the system of values of informants is characterized by syncretism. Almost all the informants are religious, but religiosity is differently ranked in their value system. Religiosity is often in a latent form.

  2. Ethics in Researching Young Children's Play in Preschool

    Sørensen, Hanne Værum

    2014-01-01

    uncomfortable in the situation? How does the researcher know if a child wants to withdraw from the research? The permission has to be negotiated in relation to the specific child and in the specific situation. Examples from a study of children's physical activities in sprots preschool are applied to illustrate......This chapter discusses what considerations a researcher must do in the research of young children's play in preschool when she is using video. In using video technology, several researchers have described how their activities are technically, analytically, and interpretively done......, but there is a lack of understanding methodological reflections and knowledge of guidelines in research of the topic. Researchers can get permission from parents and pedagogues to film children, but how can a researcher get an informed permission from the children? And how can a researcher detect if a child feel...

  3. Recruiting Young Adult Cancer Survivors for Behavioral Research

    Horowitz, Santina; Marcus, Bess

    2012-01-01

    Young adults have been dramatically underrepresented in cancer survivorship research. One contributing factor is the difficulty recruiting this population. To identify effective recruitment strategies, the current study assessed the yield of strategies used to recruit young survivors for an exercise intervention including: clinic-based recruitment, recruitment at cancer-related events, mailings, telephone-based recruitment, advertising on the internet, radio, television and social networking media, distributing brochures and word-of-mouth referrals. When taking into account the strategies for which we could track the number of survivors approached, recruitment at an oncology clinic was the most productive: 38 % of those approached were screened and 8 % enrolled. When evaluating which strategy yielded the greatest percentage of the sample, however, mailings were the most productive. Given widespread use of the internet and social networking by young adults, investigators should also consider these low-cost recruitment strategies. PMID:22810954

  4. Recruiting young adult cancer survivors for behavioral research.

    Rabin, Carolyn; Horowitz, Santina; Marcus, Bess

    2013-03-01

    Young adults have been dramatically underrepresented in cancer survivorship research. One contributing factor is the difficulty recruiting this population. To identify effective recruitment strategies, the current study assessed the yield of strategies used to recruit young survivors for an exercise intervention including: clinic-based recruitment, recruitment at cancer-related events, mailings, telephone-based recruitment, advertising on the internet, radio, television and social networking media, distributing brochures and word-of-mouth referrals. When taking into account the strategies for which we could track the number of survivors approached, recruitment at an oncology clinic was the most productive: 38 % of those approached were screened and 8 % enrolled. When evaluating which strategy yielded the greatest percentage of the sample, however, mailings were the most productive. Given widespread use of the internet and social networking by young adults, investigators should also consider these low-cost recruitment strategies.

  5. Life Strategies of Young People: Sociological Research Experience

    Lyubov’ Borisovna Osipova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern reality is the world of formation of various life prospects of a young person. The relevance of the topic depends, firstly, on insufficient sociological research into the mechanism of formation and realization of life strategies of modern youth; and, secondly, on the need to substantiate the sociological concept of youth life strategies in terms of professional self-determination with regard to its social and group characteristics. In this context, young people as the most active social group are of great interest to the authors who consider them a research target. Due to the transitivity of a social status and the incomplete processes of social maturity formation young people need a targeted design of their future. The sociological analysis of the issue involves a clarification of the concept of “life strategy” at the conceptual level (A.A. Volokitin, S.N. Ikonnikova, E.I. Golovakha, Yu.A. Zubok, V.T. Lisovsky, M.N. Rutkevich, G.V. Leonidova, K.A. Ustinova, etc.. The article presents the author’s definition of “life strategies”, which is a dynamic system of perspective individual orientation aimed at designing one’s life in the future. At the same time the results of the author’s sociological research are presented, including a standardized interview, questionnaires, which provide an opportunity to form an idea about the living choices of young people living in Yugra. The declining influence of social institutions and the emerging opportunities for developing their life prospects on their own challenges young people to select their life targets and ways of their implementation independently. The article justifies the necessity of intensified activation of new forms of young students’ management when planning their life trajectory. Life strategies disclose its content in specific life situations associated with choice. The key choice is the career choice of young people which directly depends on the socio

  6. The Development of Research Skills in Young Adults with Intellectual Disability in Participatory Research

    Morgan, Michelle F.; Moni, Karen B.; Cuskelly, Monica

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information about specific research constructs developed by adults with intellectual disability in undertaking research despite increasing involvement in research "with" rather than "on" these individuals. Participatory research was used with three young adults with intellectual disability to collaboratively…

  7. 1996 outstanding facts; Faits marquants 1996

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This progress report of the Direction of Studies and Research (DER) of Electricite de France (EdF) reports on some outstanding studies carried out during the year 1996 and concerning: new applications of electric power (thermal comfort, heating floors, building diagnosis, energy management, customers communicating interfaces, services, air conditioning, off-peak tariffs, power demand mastery in the industry, infrared dryers for paper industry); production means (automatic systems for nuclear power plants operation, management of reactors shutdown schedules for refuelling operations, optimization of fuel loading patterns for PWRs, neutronic and thermohydraulic computer codes for steam pipes rupture accidents, thermo-hydraulic modeling of the confinement building during post-accidental situation, 3D numerical simulation of overpressures inside reactor valves and of vortex and two-phase flow inside auxiliary pipes, control of vibrating fatigue of pipe nozzles, qualification of the adjustable speed drives of the Gravelines` cooling pumps, 3D analysis of new steam turbine designs, identification of bi-metal welding surface defects, a simple method for the evaluation of in-service fatigue of components, the probabilistic dimensioning of safety coefficients, the modeling of thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling of geo-materials for radioactive wastes storage, the supply of isolated sites using renewable energies); environment protection (batteries for electric-powered vehicles, modeling of atmospheric reactive flows, chlorination of the Dampierre`s cooling circuits for pathogen amoebas elimination, in-situ treatment of PCBs isolated transformers); and development and exploitation of materials for power networks. (J.S.).

  8. 1996 outstanding facts; Faits marquants 1996

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This progress report of the Direction of Studies and Research (DER) of Electricite de France (EdF) reports on some outstanding studies carried out during the year 1996 and concerning: new applications of electric power (thermal comfort, heating floors, building diagnosis, energy management, customers communicating interfaces, services, air conditioning, off-peak tariffs, power demand mastery in the industry, infrared dryers for paper industry); production means (automatic systems for nuclear power plants operation, management of reactors shutdown schedules for refuelling operations, optimization of fuel loading patterns for PWRs, neutronic and thermohydraulic computer codes for steam pipes rupture accidents, thermo-hydraulic modeling of the confinement building during post-accidental situation, 3D numerical simulation of overpressures inside reactor valves and of vortex and two-phase flow inside auxiliary pipes, control of vibrating fatigue of pipe nozzles, qualification of the adjustable speed drives of the Gravelines` cooling pumps, 3D analysis of new steam turbine designs, identification of bi-metal welding surface defects, a simple method for the evaluation of in-service fatigue of components, the probabilistic dimensioning of safety coefficients, the modeling of thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling of geo-materials for radioactive wastes storage, the supply of isolated sites using renewable energies); environment protection (batteries for electric-powered vehicles, modeling of atmospheric reactive flows, chlorination of the Dampierre`s cooling circuits for pathogen amoebas elimination, in-situ treatment of PCBs isolated transformers); and development and exploitation of materials for power networks. (J.S.).

  9. Young Researchers Engaged in Educational Outreach to Increase Polar Literacy

    Raymond, M.; Baeseman, J.; Xavier, J.; Kaiser, B.; Vendrell-Simon, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) grew out of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY-4) 2007-08 and is an international and interdisciplinary organization of over 1200 undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the wider cryosphere from more than 40 countries. Our aims are to stimulate interdisciplinary and international research collaborations, and develop effective future leaders in polar research, education and outreach. As potentially one of the major legacies of IPY-4, APECS members have been at the forefront of increasing scientific knowledge and public interest in the polar regions, centered around global climate change, and enhancing scientific understanding, media attention, primary and secondary school (K-12) educational programs, undergraduate institutions, and public literacy campaigns. Research and Educational Outreach activities by APECS members during IPY-4 have improved both our understanding and the communication of all aspects of the Polar Regions and the importance of their broader global connections. APECS National Committees have run Polar Contests where young researchers partnered with teachers and students to develop curriculum and activities to share their research, have participated in many field based communication exchanges and are mentoring youth to pursue careers in science, and enhancing the public perception of scientists through photo, video and museum exhibits. In cooperation with the IPY Teachers Network and the IPY IPO, APECS is developing a polar education resource book that will feature education and outreach activities by young researchers, as well as provide examples of classroom activities for teachers to incorporate polar literacy into their curriculum and a How-To guide for researchers interested in conducting education and outreach. As young researchers interactively share their excitement and

  10. Ethical issues in research involving children and young people

    Scally, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies the key ethical issues that need to be addressed in any research study involving children and young people, accessed through the NHS. It makes specific reference to the Declaration of Helsinki and to additional guidance developed for researchers from a variety of disciplines, both within healthcare and in other fields of study. The focus of the paper is on defining the key ethical issues, identifying the complexities in the legislative framework underpinning research involving this patient group and offering practical advice on when, and how, ethical approval needs to be sought

  11. Rutgers Young Horse Teaching and Research Program: undergraduate student outcomes.

    Ralston, Sarah L

    2012-12-01

    Equine teaching and research programs are popular but expensive components of most land grant universities. External funding for equine research, however, is limited and restricts undergraduate research opportunities that enhance student learning. In 1999, a novel undergraduate teaching and research program was initiated at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. A unique aspect of this program was the use of young horses generally considered "at risk" and in need of rescue but of relatively low value. The media interest in such horses was utilized to advantage to obtain funding for the program. The use of horses from pregnant mare urine (PMU) ranches and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mustangs held the risks of attracting negative publicity, potential of injury while training previously unhandled young horses, and uncertainty regarding re-sale value; however, none of these concerns were realized. For 12 years the Young Horse Teaching and Research Program received extensive positive press and provided invaluable learning opportunities for students. Over 500 students, at least 80 of which were minorities, participated in not only horse management and training but also research, event planning, public outreach, fund-raising, and website development. Public and industry support provided program sustainability with only basic University infrastructural support despite severe economic downturns. Student research projects generated 25 research abstracts presented at national and international meetings and 14 honors theses. Over 100 students went on to veterinary school or other higher education programs, and more than 100 others pursued equine- or science-related careers. Laudatory popular press articles were published in a wide variety of breed/discipline journals and in local and regional newspapers each year. Taking the risk of using "at risk" horses yielded positive outcomes for all, especially the undergraduate students.

  12. Some outstanding issues in severe accidents containment performance

    Sehgal, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of the outstanding issues in severe accident performance of Light Water Reactor containments that have been raised in the last several years. The results of the research that has been performed on the topics concerning these issues will be described. Some of these issues have been resolved, some are close to resolution, while others need further evaluation and research results. (author)

  13. Mommy dances: Theatre for the very young as artistic research

    Lise Hovik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses different approaches to artistic research based on her own research project involving several closely related theatre performances for young children. Key to the project is the development of a form of dance theatre in which the child audience is given the opportunity to actively participate and interact with the performers. The dramatic structure of the improvised dance concert Mamma Danser (2011 alternates between a common focus, an individual, “own” focus and a “multifocus”. The article discusses what implications this may have for the children, the performers and the researching artist. In scientific research a clear focus and a reflective perspective are often seen as crucial for the result, while in artistic processes more intuitive and improvised approaches are employed, consequently providing a different type of knowledge. Such knowledge, which is not readily accessible through the “outsider" perspective of hermeneutic interpretation, becomes evident by setting different interpretations and perspectives in dialogue with each other and with the performers’ own bodily experiences. Henk Borgdorff’s separation between an interpretive, an instrumental, and a performative research perspective is applied to provide a comprehensive picture of the process of creating artistic performances for young children. In conclusion, the author maintains that this research project demonstrates the possibility of creating common art experiences in which both adults and children take part in reciprocal interaction and improvisation.

  14. Mechanical Researches on Young's Modulus of SCS Nanostructures

    Qinhua Jin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures of SingleCrystalSilicon (SCS with superior electrical, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties are emerging in the development of novel nanodevices. Mechanical properties especially Young's modulus are essential in developing and utilizing such nanodevices. In this paper, experimental researches including bending tests, resonance tests, and tensile tests on Young' s modulus of nanoscaled SCS are reviewed, and their results are compared. It was found that the values of E measured by different testing methods cannot match to each other. As the differences cannot be explained as experimental errors, it should be understood by taking surface effect into account. With a simplified model, we qualitatively explained the difference in E value measured by tensile test and by resonance test for Si nanobeams.

  15. PROFESSOR ZDZISŁAW ŻYGULSKI JR.: AN OUTSTANDING PERSON, A GREAT PERSONALITY, A MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL, A RESEARCHER ON ANTIQUE WEAPONS, ORIENTAL ART AND EUROPEAN PAINTING (1921–2015

    Teresa Grzybkowska

    2017-02-01

    . Wielecki. He was an outstanding researcher on Oriental art to which he dedicated several books: Sztuka turecka [Turkish art], Sztuka perska [Persian art], Sztuka mauretańska i jej echa w Polsce [Moorish art and its echoes in Poland]. Prof. Zdzisław Żygulski Jr. was a prominent educator who enjoyed great respect. He taught costume design and the history of art and interiors at the Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow, as well as Mediterranean culture at the Mediterranean Studies Department and at the Postgraduate Museum Studies at the UJ. His lectures attracted crowds of students, for whose needs he wrote a book Muzea na świecie. Wstęp do muzealnictwa [Museums in the world. Introduction to museum studies]. He also lectured at the Florence Academy of Art and at the New York University. He was active in numerous Polish scientific organisations such as PAU, PAN and SHS, and in international associations such as ICOMAM and ICOM. He represented Polish art history at general ICOM congresses many times. He was also active on diverse museum councils all over Poland.

  16. How to design an outstanding poster.

    Gemayel, Rita

    2018-04-01

    Poster sessions are an important forum for getting feedback on your results and engaging with the scientific community. In this instalment of the Words of Advice series, we provide you with a guide to designing an outstanding poster and offer tips on how to effectively communicate your results using your poster. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Young Scientists Discuss Recent Advances, Future Challenges.

    Baum, Rudy M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a National Academy of Science forum at which a group of outstanding young researchers in astronomy, molecular and developmental biology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, atmospheric science, and materials science met for three days of formal presentations and informal conversations. Provides a short synopsis of major speakers. (MVL)

  18. Young Researcher Meeting, L'Aquila 2015

    Agostini, F; Antolini, C; Bossa, M; Cattani, G; Dell'Oro, S; D'Angelo, M; Di Stefano, M; Fragione, G; Migliaccio, M; Pagnanini, L; Pietrobon, D; Pusceddu, E; Serra, M; Stellato, F

    2016-01-01

    The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been established as a forum for students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers determined to play a proactive role in the scientific progress. Since 2009, we run itinerant, yearly meetings to discuss the most recent developments and achievements in physics, as we are firmly convinced that sharing expertise and experience is the foundation of the research activity. One of the main purposes of the conference is actually to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. The format we chose is an informal meeting primarily aimed at students and postdoctoral researchers at the beginning of their scientific career, who are encouraged to present their work in brief presentations able to provide genuine engagement of the audience and cross-pollination of ideas. The sixth edition of the Young Researcher Meeting was held at the Gran Sasso Science Institute (GSSI), L'Aquila. The high number of valuable contributions gave rise to a busy program for a two-day conference on October 12 th -13 th . The event gathered 70 participants from institutes all around the world. The plenary talk sessions covered several areas of pure and applied physics, and they were complemented by an extremely rich and interactive poster session. This year's edition of the meeting also featured a lectio magistralis by Prof. E. Coccia, director of the GSSI, who discussed the frontiers in gravitational wave physics, commemorating the International Year of Light on the centenary of Einstein's theory of general relativity. On October 14 th , the participants to the conference took part to a guided tour of the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS), one of the major particle physics laboratories in the world. In this volume, we collect part of the contributions that have been presented at the conference as either talks or

  19. Review of a nursing research report. Young people with depression: review of a nursing research report.

    Collins, Janay

    2013-01-01

    McCann's et al. (2012) research study revealed several adverse effects that depression can have on young adults. The findings showed that depression in young adults can be life-threatening if not treated (McCann et al., 2012). One implication for evidenced-based nursing practice would be to educate family and friends on the signs of depression and how to respond to them. A suggestion for future research would be to conduct a study showing the effectiveness of different treatment methods (e.g., therapy, medications) on adolescent depression.

  20. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Collins, Chimere C; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D; Zeldin, Leslie P; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community. This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software. Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources. Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are pervasive, but parents

  1. Planning outstanding reserves in general insurance

    Raeva, E.; Pavlov, V.

    2017-10-01

    Each insurance company have to ensure its solvency through presentation of accounts for its own reserves in the start of the year. Usually the task of the actuary is to estimate the state of the company on an annual basis and the expectation of the status of the company for a future period. One of the major problem when calculating the liabilities of the incurred claims, is related to the delay of payments. Object of consideration in the present note are the outstanding claim reserves, which are set aside to cover claims, occurred before the date of the annual account, but still not paid, and related with them expenses. There may be different reasons for the delay of claims settlement. For example, continuation the process of the liquidation of the damage waiting for necessary documents or the presence of controversial cases whose permission takes time, etc. Thus the claims, which determine the outstanding reserves could be divided in the following types: claims, which are reported, but not settled (RBNS); claims, which are incurred but not reported (IBNR); claims, whose case is finished, but it is possible to be reopened. When calculating the reserves for IBNR claims, most widely used is the Chain-ladder method and its modification presented by the Bornhuetter - Ferguson method. For modeling the outstanding claims, the available data should be presented in so called run-off triangle, which underlies in the basis of such methods. The present work provides a review of the algorithm for calculating insurance outstanding claim reserves according to the Chain-ladder method. Using available data for claims related to liability of drivers, registered in Bulgaria an example is constructed to illustrate the methodology of the Chain-Ladder method. Back-testing approach is used for validating the results.

  2. Original Research by Young Twinkle Students (ORBYTS): When Can Students Start Performing Original Research?

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; McKemmish, Laura K.; Chubb, Katy L.; Gorman, Marie N.; Baker, Jack S.; Barton, Emma J.; Rivlin, Tom; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Involving students in state-of-the-art research from an early age eliminates the idea that science is only for the scientists and empowers young people to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects. It is also a great opportunity to dispel harmful stereotypes about who is suitable for STEM careers, while leaving students…

  3. Initiation to research in Brazil: p olicies for educating young researchers

    Lucídio Bianchetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific Initiation (SI is a process which, through universities, challenges young people and provides them a set of attitudes and knowledge that is indispensable to their initiation to research, and the production and socializing of knowledge. Situated in the context of our broader research, this text is based on bibliographic research. It critically analyzes the importance of SI to qualify the approximation between basic education and undergraduate and graduate studies, given that the range of options of this mode of education has significantly expanded in recent years. Entrance into SI contributes in particular to theoretical grounding and to developing a familiarity with research methodology, complementing the academic training of young students with a process in which knowledge, in addition to being constructed in relation to teaching-research, comes to be re-evaluated and recreated, challenging young people to become researchers. Finally, we detect an increasingly evident instrumentalization of this locus of education and research by CAPES and CNPq, to improve evaluation indicators for undergraduate courses.

  4. Young children’s perspectives researched from everyday life

    Juhl, Pernille

    -Holzkamp 1991]. This theoretical juxtaposition contributes by linking children’s experiences and emotional feelings to concrete social situations in everyday life. These theoretical discussions contribute to methodological considerations in relation to doing situated analysis of preverbal children’s first......The paper discusses methodological issues in relation to researching young (0-4 year) children’s first person’s perspectives. Drawing on a recent Danish study of children’s compound everyday life across day care contexts and family life, I argue that focusing on the children’s gazes and bodily...... expressions constitute a central knowledge source for learning about the children’s perspectives. The aim is to raise a theoretical discussion about how the concept ‘conduct of life’ is related to the concept ‘first person perspective’ by a third concept ‘subjective situation’ [befindlichkeit, Osterkamp...

  5. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Chimere C Collins

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community.This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software.Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources.Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are

  6. PREFACE: 5th Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy & Astrophysics

    Forgács-Dajka, Emese; Plachy, Emese; Molnár, László

    2010-04-01

    The 5th Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy and Astrophysics was held on 2-4 September 2009 at the Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. This meeting fits into a conference series which can already be considered a tradition where the younger generation has the opportunity to present their work. The event was also a great opportunity for senior astronomers and physicists to form new connections with the next generation of researchers. The selection of invited speakers concentrated on the researchers currently most active in the field, mostly on a post-doctoral/tenure/fresh faculty position level. A number of senior experts and PhD students were also invited. As the conference focused on people rather than a specific field, various topics from theoretical physics to planetology were covered in three days. The programme was divided into six sections: Physics of the Sun and the Solar System Gravity and high-energy physics Galactic and extragalactic astronomy, cosmology Celestial mechanics and exoplanets Infrared astronomy and young stars Variable stars We had the pleasure of welcoming 10 invited review talks from senior researchers and 42 contributed talks and a poster from the younger generation. Participants also enjoyed the hospitality of the pub Pál at the Pálvölgyi-cave after giving, hearing and disputing countless talks. Brave souls even descended to the unbuilt, adventurous Mátyásvölgyi-cave. Memories of the conference were shadowed though. Péter Csizmadia, one of our participants and three other climbers attempted a first ever ascent to the Ren Zhong Feng peak in Sichuan, China, but they never returned from the mountains. Péter departed to China shortly after the conference, with best wishes from participants and friends. We dedicate this volume to his memory. The organisers thankthe Physics Doctoral School of Eötvös University for its hospitality. The workshop was supported by the Mecenatúra and Polányi Mihály Programmes of the National

  7. Engaging Students in Space Research: Young Engineers and Scientists 2008

    Boice, D. C.; Asbell, H. E.; Reiff, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA) during the past 16 years. The YES program provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science) and engineering. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI and a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their professional mentors during the academic year. During the summer workshop, students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has developed a website for topics in space science from the perspective of high school students, including NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) (http://yesserver.space.swri.edu). Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. Over the past 16 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, one business has started, and three scientific publications have resulted. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, Northside Independent School District, SwRI, and several local charitable foundations.

  8. Identification and Support of Outstanding Astronomy Students

    Stoev, A. D.; Bozhurova, E. S.

    2006-08-01

    The aims, organizational plan and syllabus of a specialized Astronomy School with a subject of training students for participation in the International Astronomy Olympiad, are presented. Thematic frame includes basic educational activities during the preparation and self-preparation of the students and their participation in astronomical Olympiads. A model of identification and selection of outstanding students for astronomical Olympiads has been developed. Examples of didactic systems of problems for development of mathematical, physical and astronomical skills are shown. The programme ends with individual training for solving problems on astronomy and astrophysics. Possibilities, which the characteristic, non-standard astronomical problems give for stimulating the creative and original thinking, are specified. Basic psychological condition for development of the students' creative potential - transformation of the cognitive content in emotional one - is demonstrated. The programme of identification and support of outstanding students on astronomy is realized in collaboration with The Ministry of Education and Science, Public Astronomical Observatories and Planetaria, Institute of Astronomy - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, and The Union of Astronomers in Bulgaria.

  9. Research Ethics Committees and Participatory Action Research With Young People: The Politics of Voice.

    Yanar, Zeynep M; Fazli, Mehria; Rahman, Jahanara; Farthing, Rys

    2016-04-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) is a methodological approach that seeks to maximize the participation of people whose lives it researches. It is underpinned by an ethical concern to research "with" people, rather than "on" people. However, this ethical approach to research is often, paradoxically, problematized by universities' research ethics committees (RECs). This article explores one site of tension between PAR and RECs-the requirement for anonymity for below 18-year-olds. It explores this tension by exploring a case study of a peer-to-peer research project undertaken by young women in East London, and using our own experiences and perspectives, it argues that anonymity can be unjust, disempowering, and unnecessary, and can reduce "pride." Without wanting to develop specific recommendations, given the limited scope of our case study, this article uses firsthand experiences to add weight to the broader discussions calling for a critical rethink of REC guidelines. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Thomas Young's research on fluid transients: 200 years on

    Tijsseling, A.S.; Anderson, A.; Hunt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Thomas Young published in 1808 his famous paper (1) in which he derived the pressure wave speed in an incompressible liquid contained in an elastic tube. Unfortunately, Young's analysis was obscure and the wave speed was not explicitly formulated, so his achievement passed unnoticed until it was

  11. Thomas Young's research on fluid transients : 200 years on

    Tijsseling, A.S.; Anderson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Thomas Young published in 1808 his famous paper (1) in which he derived the pressure wave speed in an incompressible liquid contained in an elastic tube. Unfortunately, Young's analysis was obscure and the wave speed was not explicitly formulated, so his achievement passed unnoticed until it was

  12. Well Researched, Yet Little Understood: Young Adults and Physical Activity

    Cothran, Donetta; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2005-01-01

    The authors present two beginning studies. One investigated the teaching-style preferences of young adults, and the other looked at physical activity trends within this age group. One key to understanding young adults and physical activity is to recognize the importance of participant cognition on physical activity patterns. From this…

  13. Young people's views regarding participation in mental health and wellbeing research through social media

    Monks, Helen; Cardoso, Patricia; Papageorgiou, Alana; Carolan, Catherine; Costello, Leesa; Thomas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Social media is a central component in the lives of many young people, and provides innovative potential to conduct research among this population. Ethical issues around online research have been subject to much debate, yet young people have seldom been consulted to provide a youth perspective and voice. Eight (8) focus groups involving 48 Grade 9 Western Australian secondary school students aged 13-14 years were held in 2012, to investigate how young people perceive the feasibility and accep...

  14. Young People's Views Regarding Participation in Mental Health and Wellbeing Research through Social Media

    Monks, Helen; Cardoso, Patricia; Papageorgiou, Alana; Carolan, Catherine; Costello, Leesa; Thomas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Social media is a central component in the lives of many young people, and provides innovative potential to conduct research among this population. Ethical issues around online research have been subject to much debate, yet young people have seldom been consulted to provide a youth perspective and voice. Eight (8) focus groups involving 48 Grade 9…

  15. Key health outcomes for children and young people with neurodisability: qualitative research with young people and parents

    Allard, Amanda; Fellowes, Andrew; Shilling, Valerie; Janssens, Astrid; Beresford, Bryony; Morris, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify key health outcomes, beyond morbidity and mortality, regarded as important in children and young people with neurodisability, and their parents. Design Qualitative research incorporating a thematic analysis of the data supported by the Framework Approach; the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provided a theoretical foundation. Setting The study was conducted in community settings. Participants Participants were 54 children and young people with neurodisability: 50 participated in focus groups, and 4 in interviews; 53 parents participated: 47 in focus groups and 6 in interviews. Children/young people and parents were recruited through different networks, and were not related. Results Children/young people and parents viewed health outcomes as inter-related. Achievement in some outcomes appeared valued to the extent that it enabled or supported more valued domains of health. Health outcomes prioritised by both young people and parents were: communication, mobility, pain, self-care, temperament, interpersonal relationships and interactions, community and social life, emotional well-being and gaining independence/future aspirations. Parents also highlighted their child's sleep, behaviour and/or safety. Conclusions Those responsible for health services for children/young people with neurodisability should take account of the aspects of health identified by families. The aspects of health identified in this study provide a basis for selecting appropriate health indicators and outcome measures. PMID:24747792

  16. Faculty and Student Perceptions of Outstanding University Teachers in the USA and Russia

    Lammers, William John; Savina, Elena; Skotko, David; Churlyaeva, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The majority of research that relates teacher characteristics to student learning in the university has come from Western universities. Using various methodologies, research continues to examine the characteristics of outstanding university teachers. Much of that research in the USA assesses faculty and student perspectives. However, there are…

  17. Young Solid Earth Researchers of the World Unite!

    Simons, Frederik J.; Becker, Thorsten W.; Kellogg, James B.; Billen, Magali; Hardebeck, Jeanne; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Panero, Wendy; Zhong, Shijie

    2004-04-01

    In early January 2004, one of us attended a workshop on ``science priorities and educational opportunities that can be addressed using ocean observatories.'' The attendees constituted a broad group-men and women, scientists, engineers, educators, representatives from the private and public sector-but lacked diversity in at least one important aspect: age. A well-known marine geophysicist (with a published record stretching over 30 years) came to me at the ice-breaker party and said (and I paraphrase): ``I'm glad you're here: you're young, you might actually see this project flourish before you retire. There're not enough young people here.`` At some point or another, every young scientist may have a similar experience.

  18. Original Research By Young Twinkle Students(ORBYTS): When can students start performingoriginal research?

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; ORBYTS, Twinkle Space Mission, ExoMol

    2018-01-01

    Involving students in state-of-the-art research from an early age eliminates the idea that science is only for the scientists and empowers young people to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects. It is also a great opportunity to dispel harmful stereotypes about who is suitable for STEM careers, while leaving students feeling engaged in modern science and the scientific method. As part of the Twinkle Space Mission’s educational programme, EduTwinkle, students between the ages of 15 and 18 have been performing original research associated with the exploration of space since January 2016. The student groups have each been led by junior researchers - PhD student and post-doctoral scientists - who themselves benefit substantially from the opportunity to supervise and manage a research project. This research aims to meet a standard for publication in peer-reviewed journals. At present the research of one ORBYTS team has been published in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series and another submitted to JQSRT; we expect more papers to follow. Here we outline the necessary steps for a productive scientific collaboration with school children, generalising from the successes and downfalls of the pilot ORBYTS projects.

  19. Mediating Gendered Performances: Young People Negotiating Embodiment in Research Discussions

    Phoenix, Ann; Pattman, Rob; Croghan, Rosaleen; Griffin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Gender inequalities in schools have implications for life chances, emotional well-being and educational policies and practices, but are apparently resistant to change. This paper employs Judith Butler's conceptualisation of performativity in a study of young people and consumption to provide insights into gendered inequities. It argues that how…

  20. [Experimental research of gaits based on young plantar pressure test].

    Meng, Qingyun; Tan, Shili; Yu, Hongliu; Shen, Lixing; Zhuang, Jianhai; Wang, Jinwu

    2014-10-01

    The present paper is to study the center line of the plantar pressure of normal young people, and to find the relation between center line of the plantar pressure and gait stability and balance. The paper gives the testing principle and calculating methods for geometric center of plantar pressure distribution and the center of pressure due to the techniques of footprint frame. The calculating formulas in both x direction and y direction are also deduced in the paper. In the experiments carried out in our laboratory, the gait parameters of 131 young subjects walking as usual speed were acquired, and 14 young subjects of the total were specially analyzed. We then provided reference data for the walking gait database of young people, including time parameters, space parameters and plantar pressure parameters. We also obtained the line of geometry center and pressure center under the foot. We found that the differences existed in normal people's geometric center line and the pressure center line. The center of pressure trajectory revealed foot movement stability. The length and lateral changes of the center line of the plantar pressure could be applied to analysis of the plantar pressure of all kinds of people. The results in this paper are useful in clinical foot disease diagnosis and evaluation of surgical effect.

  1. A view of technology maturity assessment to realize fusion reactor by Japanese young researchers

    Kasada, Ryuta; Goto, Takuya; Miyazawa, Junichi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Japanese young researchers who have interest in realizing fusion reactor have analyzed Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) in Young Scientists Special Interest Group on Fusion Reactor Realization. In this report, brief introduction to TRL assessment and a view of TRL assessment against fusion reactor projects conducting in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  2. Involving children and young people in clinical research through the forum of a European Young Persons' Advisory Group: needs and challenges.

    Gaillard, Segolene; Malik, Salma; Preston, Jenny; Escalera, Begonya Nafria; Dicks, Pamela; Touil, Nathalie; Mardirossian, Sandrine; Claverol-Torres, Joana; Kassaï, Behrouz

    2018-02-19

    Children and young people are seen as fundamental to the design and delivery of clinical research as active and reflective participants. In Europe, involvement of children and young people in clinical research is promoted extensively in order to engage young people in research as partners and to give them a voice to raise their own issues or opinions and for their involvement in planning and decision making in addition to learning research skills. Children and young people can be trained in clinical research through participation in young person advisory groups (YPAGs). Members of YPAGs assist other children and young people to learn about clinical research and share their experience and point of view with researchers, thereby possibly influencing all phases of research including the development and prioritization of research questions, design and methods, recruitment plans, and strategies for results dissemination. In the long term, the expansion of YPAGs in Europe will serve as a driving force for refining pediatric clinical research. It will help in a better definition of research projects according to the patients' needs. Furthermore, direct engagement of children and young people in research will be favorable to both researchers and young people. © 2018 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Original Research By Young Twinkle Students (ORBYTS): when can students start performing original research?

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; McKemmish, Laura K.; Chubb, Katy L.; Gorman, Maire N.; Baker, Jack S.; Barton, Emma J.; Rivlin, Tom; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Involving students in state-of-the-art research from an early age eliminates the idea that science is only for the scientists and empowers young people to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects. It is also a great opportunity to dispel harmful stereotypes about who is suitable for STEM careers, while leaving students feeling engaged in modern science and the scientific method. As part of the Twinkle Space Mission’s educational programme, EduTwinkle, students between the ages of 15 and 18 have been performing original research associated with the exploration of space since January 2016. The student groups have each been led by junior researchers—PhD and post-doctoral scientists—who themselves benefit substantially from the opportunity to supervise and manage a research project. This research aims to meet a standard for publication in peer-reviewed journals. At present the research of two ORBYTS teams have been published, one in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series and another in JQSRT; we expect more papers to follow. Here we outline the necessary steps for a productive scientific collaboration with school children, generalising from the successes and downfalls of the pilot ORBYTS projects.

  4. A participatory study of teenagers and young adults views on access and participation in cancer research.

    Taylor, Rachel M; Solanki, Anita; Aslam, Natasha; Whelan, Jeremy S; Fern, Lorna A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to elicit young people's views on access and participation in cancer research. Eight young people aged 18-25 years with a previous cancer diagnosis aged 15-24 participated in a one day workshop utilising participatory methodology. The workshop consisted of four exercises: role play/scene setting; focus group examining thoughts and opinions of research access and participation; individual reflection on access to different types of research; and creative interpretation of the workshop. Further consultation with 222 young people with cancer was conducted using an electronic survey. Three themes emerged: • Patient choice: Young people thought it was their right to know all options about available research. Without knowledge of all available studies they would be unable to make an informed choice about participation. • Role of healthcare professionals as facilitators/barriers: Young people suggested non-clinical healthcare professionals such as social workers and youth support coordinators may be more suited to approaching young people about participation in psychosocial and health services research. • Value of the research: The what, when and how information was delivered was key in relaying the value of the study and assisting young people in their decision to participate. Further consultation showed approximately 70% wanted to find out about all available research. However, one third trusted healthcare professionals to decide which research studies to inform them of. Effective ways to support healthcare professionals approaching vulnerable populations about research are needed to ensure young people are empowered to make informed choices about research participation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Blogging as a viable research methodology for young people with arthritis: a qualitative study.

    Prescott, Julie; Gray, Nicola J; Smith, Felicity J; McDonagh, Janet E

    2015-03-05

    The development of services that are responsive to the needs of users is a health policy priority. Finding ways of engaging young people in research to gain insights into their particular experiences, perspectives, and needs is vital but challenging. These data are critical to improving services in ways that meet the needs of young people. Our aim was to evaluate Web-based blogging as a viable method for understanding the daily experiences and condition management strategies of young people with juvenile arthritis. To meet the objectives of the study, a qualitative approach was required to gather information on the experiences and perspectives of young people regarding the management of their condition and its daily impact. In collaboration with a group of young people with arthritis, a custom website was developed. This website provided the opportunity for young people (aged 11-19) with arthritis from a United Kingdom pediatric hospital to contribute blogs. It was designed so that young people were free to write about whatever was important to them, but the site also included some structure and prompts to facilitate the writing of blogs. Qualitative analytical procedures were employed, supported by NVivo software. Engagement in the study by young people was variable in terms of their participation rates, frequency of website visits, and the length of their blogs. Young people used the site in different ways, some responding to the website categories and prompts that the team created, while others used it as a diary to record their experiences and thoughts. In line with principles of qualitative inquiry, the data collection was participant-led. Young people were in control of what, how much, and how often they wrote. However, some young people expressed difficulty regarding knowing what they should blog about. For a number of reasons, discussed here, the blogs may also not be fully reflective of experiences and perspectives of the participants. However, the data

  6. La politique britannique d’aide à l’innovation : pour une recherche scientifique d’excellence British Policy and Innovation: Supporting Outstanding World-Class Scientific Research

    Marie-Claude Esposito

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available After justifying the role played by the government in the financing of R&D and investigating the link between innovation, productivity and economic growth, this article deals with the research and innovation policies under Tony Blair. It focuses on the financing of public research institutions whose objective is to ensure that the British economy becomes a knowledge-based economy with increased productivity and economic growth. Since 1997 there has been a strong increase in public funding for the best institutions especially in “project” type funding.

  7. Creating Robust STEM Research Ecosystems in Schools: Joining the Dots for Young Researchers

    Pritchard, M.; Ibarra, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Developing an intelligent curiosity about the world in school-aged learners is one of the key purposes of education. Nurturing this intelligent curiosity in a systematic and integrated manner is essential for rigorous, scientific literacy, which in turn inspires advanced research and innovation in post-school life. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education has been widely adopted as the conceptual framework to achieve this goal. For young learners, their experienced world is largely confined to the spaces within the boundaries of educational institutions. This type of environment might be perceived as sterile or even hostile to genuine research, as institutional endeavor is largely shaped by examination syllabi. This can be changed by viewing the school as a living laboratory of processes and products, all of which offer enormous potential for meaningful and valuable student-led STEM research. Creating research-focused ecosystems within schools, however, requires considerable effort to create a learning culture that defragments knowledge systems and connects isolated pools of inquiry. The existing parameters and processes of school ecosystems, such as energy generation, consumption, waste creation and disposal offer opportunities for school students to utilize STEM-related skills observe and measure their own ecological footprint, undertake research into these living processes in an integrated manner, and develop solutions to create closed loops of optimally managed and measured consumption with the institution. For example, connecting a deep understanding of the principles of renewable energy generation with close, real-time monitoring of classroom energy usage creates the opportunity to develop a higher level of user awareness and more optimized consumption habits. Food waste, when composted and recycled on-site, similarly offers the potential to connect the sociological issue of excess consumption with a scientific understanding of

  8. Attitude towards assisted reproductive technology - surrogacy at todays young women (Qualitative research)

    LAVIČKOVÁ, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    The Bachelor thesis describes the implementation of surrogate maternity. It observe at it from the ethical and legal perspective. The research shows the attitude of today´s young women to the substitute maternity.

  9. Centauri High School Teacher Honored as Colorado Outstanding Biology

    Teacher Centauri High School Teacher Honored as Colorado Outstanding Biology Teacher For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 2, 1997 -- Tracy Swedlund, biology teacher at Centauri High School in LaJara, was selected as Colorado's 1997 Outstanding Biology Teacher and will be

  10. The Journal of Consumer Policy Outstanding Reviewer Award 2016

    Reisch, Lucia A.

    2016-01-01

    The article announces the Outstanding Reviewer Award 2016 to be given by the journal to Wencke Gwozdz, Associate Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.......The article announces the Outstanding Reviewer Award 2016 to be given by the journal to Wencke Gwozdz, Associate Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark....

  11. PROFESSOR ZDZISŁAW ŻYGULSKI JR.: AN OUTSTANDING PERSON, A GREAT PERSONALITY, A MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL, A RESEARCHER ON ANTIQUE WEAPONS, ORIENTAL ART AND EUROPEAN PAINTING (1921–2015)

    Teresa Grzybkowska

    2017-01-01

    Professor Zdzisław Żygulski Jr. (1921–2015) was one of the most prominent Polish art historians of the second half of the 20th century. He treated the history of art as a broadly understood science of mankind and his artistic achievements. His name was recognised in global research on antique weapons, and among experts on Rembrandt and Leonardo da Vinci. He studied museums and Oriental art. He wrote 35 books, about 200 articles, and numerous essays on art; he wrote for the daily press about h...

  12. Using a Picture Book to Gain Assent in Research with Young Children

    Pyle, Angela; Danniels, Erica

    2016-01-01

    There has been a shift in perspective from viewing children as adults-in-the-making to individual agents, possessing the right and the competence to meaningfully participate in research. Many researchers are striving to obtain informed assent from young children prior to their participation in research. Methodological concerns have been presented…

  13. Training of young researchers and PhD supervisors for the future

    Kolmos, Anette

    2004-01-01

    If Europe is to develop an integrated knowledge society and ERA, the research practice has to be developed. Further development of the research practice can among others take place through training of young researchers, which is not only based on the principles of apprenticeship, but a training w...

  14. UNESCO Launches Open Access Curriculum for Young and Early Career Researchers

    Das, Anup-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This article narrates the background of UNESCO Curriculum titled "Open Access for Researchers" which was launched on 16th March 2015. This Open Access Curriculum contains five modules for capacity building, awareness raising and sensitizing young and early career researchers affiliated to research laboratories or higher educational institutions across the world.

  15. Towards beneficence for young children in research: challenges for bioethics committees.

    Farrell, Ann

    2010-09-01

    Bioethics committees are the focus of international scrutiny, particularly in relation to their application of the principle of beneficence, ensuring that risks incurred in research are outweighed by benefits to those involved directly and to the broader society. Beneficence, in turn, has become an international focus in research with young children, who hitherto had been rarely seen or heard in their own right in research. Twenty years ago, The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989 raised global awareness of children's human rights to both participation and protection, and articulation of children's rights came to inform understandings of young children's rights in research. In the intervening period, countries such as Australia came to favour child protection and risk minimisation in research over the notion of children's bone fide participation in research. A key element of the protection regime was the theoretical understanding of young children as developmentally unable and, therefore, unfit to understand, consent to and fully participate as research participants. This understanding has been challenged in recent decades by new theoretical understandings of children's competence, where children can be seen to demonstrate competence, even at an early age, in consenting to, participating in and withdrawing from research. The paper draws on these understandings to provide insights for human research gatekeepers, such as bioethics committees, to deal with the challenges of research with young children and to realize the benefits that may accrue to children in research.

  16. Towards Sensorial Approaches to Visual Research with Racially Diverse Young Men

    Emmanuel Tabi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a collaborative ethnographic research project that highlights the artistic, literary contributions of racially diverse young men. It uses Critical Race Theory to question conventional, Eurocentric educational approaches that historically and currently continue to suppress various socially and culturally learned modes of communication. This article presents two research projects in urban and suburban formal and informal educational institutions to highlight multimodal literary approaches. The first project is an amalgamation of two critical, ethnographic case studies that explores how racially diverse young men express their literacy through rap and spoken word poetry. The second project uses ethnographic methods to observe racially diverse young men’s production of films and photographs in high school, community centers, and art gallery spaces. This study uses visual methods coupled with affect and sensory-laden approaches to collect data and conduct an analysis. The article reflects on conversations surrounding young men, particularly racialized young men, their relationship with literacy, and how these conversations are founded on their failure and deficit language about their literacy repertoires. We believe that such research is closely tied with other social justice themes and modes of inquiry. This article steers away from the ways racialized young men do not use literacy, and focuses instead on the ways that they do use literacy. Their literacy practices are predominantly visual in nature, frequently accompanied by other modes such as words and moving images. Fitting within the scope of the special issue on social justice and visual methods, we argue for a greater acknowledgement and analytical gaze on sensory and affective nuances within visual research. This approach adds texture and volume to interpreting racialized young men’s narratives. Interrogating their visuals and talking through their narratives that have agentive

  17. Application of Modern Simulation Technology in Mechanical Outstanding Engineer Training

    Gongfa Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This text has described the relationship between outstanding engineer training and modern simulation technology, have recommended the characteristics of mechanical outstanding engineer in detail. Aiming at the importance of the teaching practice link to course of theory of mechanics, mechanical design and mechanical signal analysis, have expounded the function of modern simulation technology in the mechanical outstanding engineer training, especially on teaching practice in the theory of mechanics, mechanical design and mechanical signal analysis. It has the advantages of economizing the teaching cost, overcoming the hardware constrains, model prediction, promoting student's innovation and manipulative ability, so can popularize and develop in a more cost-effective manner in the university.

  18. Tablet-Based eBooks for Young Children: What Does the Research Say?

    Reich, SM; Yau, JC; Warschauer, M

    2016-01-01

    Young children's use of electronic books (eBooks) is increasing as handheld touch screen devices, such as tablets, become increasingly available. Although older children's reading on tablets has been more broadly investigated, less is known about the impacts of digital reading for infant, toddlers, and preschoolers. This review compares the educational affordances of reading on tablets versus print books for young children's learning.A qualitative synthesis of research on tablet-based eReadin...

  19. Retention of young female post-doc physics researchers in the UK

    Whitelegg, Elizabeth

    2004-03-01

    The talk will describe the results of a research project to investigate the problems young women physics researchers encountered during early stages of their careers and their perceptions of the longer-term difficulties they anticipated were they to pursue a career in physics research. The project examined quantitative data from a large sample of female members of the UK Institute of Physics (IOP) and qualitative data from intensive interviews with 27 young female doctoral and post-doctoral researchers at an early stage in their careers. In the survey of women PhD members of the IOP, only 15% of the younger women (aged under 30) said they had encountered gender barriers compared with 45% of older women. However, within a few years of completing their PhDs only 25% of the young women remained in physics research although they had previously aspired to work in this area. The reasons given for leaving physics included a dislike of the male culture or atmosphere in research labs, the fact that few of the young women thought that they would ever attain a senior physics post, concerns about balancing a research career with raising a young family and anticipating a need to relocate to match a partners career moves. These are clearly gender-related barriers and constraints although these young women often did not perceive them in this way. This research examines the notion of direct and indirect gender barriers. It addresses the idea of subtle discrimination by examining both institutional employment practices and the prevalent male culture or atmosphere in physics research, which contribute to the leaky pipeline in womens physics employment in the UK.

  20. Psychological and pedagogical research of modern young people values

    Vlasova N.V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available this article is based on the psycho-pedagogical research of values orientation formation in different age groups. This research touches upon diverse approaches to values development and acceptance among children, teenagers and youngsters. This article adduses quantitative analysis of values preferences in different periods of life as well as qualitative analysis of these values in each age group.

  1. 7 CFR 1786.209 - Outstanding loan documents.

    2010-01-01

    ... all provisions of its RUS loan contract, its outstanding notes issued to RUS, and the RUS mortgage. (b... making prepayments on any loans pursuant to the RE Act in accordance with the terms thereof or as may be...

  2. 7 CFR 1786.162 - Outstanding loan documents.

    2010-01-01

    ... outstanding notes issued to RUS, and the RUS Mortgage. (b) Nothing in this subpart shall affect any rights of... shall prohibit a borrower from making prepayments of any loans pursuant to the RE Act in accordance with...

  3. Young people’s views regarding participation in mental health and wellbeing research through social media

    Helen Monks

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Social media is a central component in the lives of many young people, and provides innovative potential to conduct research among this population. Ethical issues around online research have been subject to much debate, yet young people have seldom been consulted to provide a youth perspective and voice. Eight (8 focus groups involving 48 Grade 9 Western Australian secondary school students aged 13-14 years were held in 2012, to investigate how young people perceive the feasibility and acceptability of social media when used as a research tool to investigate various issues relevant to their mental health and wellbeing. Whilst young people recognise many benefits of researchers using social media in this way, such as its relevance, innovation and accessibility, there were salient issues of privacy, consent, and practicality that require careful negotiation. There is a need for continued exploration and scientific debate of the moral and ethical implications of using social media for research, to help ensure this is employed in an appropriate and effective way that is respectful of and sensitive to the needs and views of young people.

  4. An outstanding researcher of the solar eclipses- Nicolas Donitch

    Gaina, Alex

    1998-09-01

    Nicolae Donitch (1874, Chisinau-1958, Nice, France?) worked in Russia (until 1917), Romania (1918-1944) and France (1945-1958?). His observatory was placed in Dubossary-Vechi (where he worked with some intervals between 1908 and 1944. He was designated by the Russian Academy of Sciences for the observations of the total Solar eclipse in Elche (Spain) on 28 May 1900. Other solar eclipses observed by N. Donitch: 17-18 may 1901, Padong (Sumatra); 1904 - the annular eclipse of the Sun in Pnom-Penh (Cambodge); august 1905, Alcala de Chisvert (Spain) and Assuan (Upper Egypt); 16/17 April 1912, Portugal; 21 august 1914, Crimea; 1925, USA; 1929 Indochina and Philipines; 1930, Egypt; 1932 Egypt and cape Porpoise,Maine USA; 1936, Inneboli, Turkey. Other solar investigations by N. Donitch; Solar cromosphere (Odessa, 1902; Mount- Blanch, 1902-1903); The passage of the planet Mercury through the solar disk (November, 1907, Egypt; October 1914, Algeria).

  5. Research program in elementary particle theory: Outstanding Junior Investigator Program

    Bowick, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: aspects of string theory; nonlinear sigma models and high-T c superconductivity; axionic black holes; topological mass generation; and quantum gravity in 2 + 1 dimensions

  6. Research program in elementary particle theory: Outstanding junior investigator program

    Bowick, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: high-temperature strings; axionic black holes and wormholes; equations of motion for massless modes as vanishing curvature; vertex algebras and string theory; and massive axions

  7. Young researchers battle poverty and bureaucracy in rural China

    Cathy Egan

    ensure a steady supply of manure to produce the gas. Three pigs was more than most ... industrial development plans, turning forests and pastures into unproductive ... researchers who were willing to learn, to try new methods, to spend long ...

  8. Research on the Communication Development of Young Children with Deaf-Blindness.

    Bullis, Michael, Ed.

    This booklet collects seven papers drawing on research performed through the Communication Skills Center for Young Children with Deaf Blindness of the Oregon State System of Higher Education and its affiliated sites. Papers include: "Research on Vision Assessment" (Pamela Cress); "Use of Microswitch Technology To Facilitate Social…

  9. Best Practices for Young Children's Music Education: Guidance from Brain Research

    Flohr, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews best practices for young children's music experiences in light of developments in brain research. The first section reviews research music and brain topics including neuromyths, effect of music on structural brain changes and general intelligence, plasticity, critical and optimal periods, and at-risk student populations. The…

  10. Risk and Protective Factors in Young Children's Adjustment to Parental Divorce: A Review of the Research.

    Leon, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on parental divorce and early childhood development, using developmental psychopathology as an organizing framework. Because this review is unique in its focus on divorce-related issues specific to young children, limitations of existing research are noted and directions for future research are suggested. (Contains 63…

  11. Social networking and young adults’ drinking practices:innovative qualitative methods for health behavior research

    Lyons, Antonia C.; Goodwin, Ian; McCreanor, Tim; Griffin, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Understandings of health behaviours can be enriched by employing innovative qualitative research designs. We draw on research that employed a range of qualitative methods to explore young adults’ drinking behaviours and social networking in Aotearoa New Zealand. We demonstrate the importance of multiple research approaches to situate drinking practices within their broader social context. The research involved three data collection stages. First, 34 friendship focus group discussions were con...

  12. Task J: Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI)

    Karchin, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    We report on an existing program of research on the production and decay of particles containing the charm and beauty quarks. Charm is studied in Fermilab fixed target experiments E769 and E691. Design and development for a hadron collider beauty experiment is studied in CERN test experiment P238 and in simulation studies for the SSC

  13. Young men's health promotion and new information communication technologies: illuminating the issues and research agendas.

    Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve

    2010-09-01

    The article examines the use of newer, interactive information and communication technologies (ICTs) in young men's health promotion (HP), drawing on gender theory, HP research and evidence on young men's Internet usage. The focus is on highlighting an agenda for research in terms of emerging issues. New forms of social media ICT (for example 'web 2'-based on-line social networking sites, micro-blogging services, i-phones and podcasts) have the potential to enable young men to engage with health information in new and interesting ways. Given concerns about young men's engagement with health services, innovative ICT formats, particularly using the Internet, have been tried. However, issues persist around surfing 'addiction', quality control and equal access. Approaches to HP using new ICTs offer distributed control over information content and quality and a lay social context for accessing information. Online communities can potentially legitimize young men's participation in discourses around health, and support sustained engagement. The article discusses how this could support young men to re-conceptualize healthy choices in the context of masculine imperatives and responsible citizenship if specific conditions are met (for trusting engagement) and risks addressed (such as commercial disinformation). The skill requirements for young men to engage effectively with new ICTs are explored, focusing on health literacy (HL). It is predicted that social marketing approaches to HP for young men will increasingly include new ICTs, making specific requirements for HL. These approaches may appeal narrowly to hegemonic masculinities or broadly to multiple masculinities, including those historically marginalized. Recommendations are made for future research.

  14. Informing Intervention Strategies to Reduce Energy Drink Consumption in Young People: Findings From Qualitative Research.

    Francis, Jacinta; Martin, Karen; Costa, Beth; Christian, Hayley; Kaur, Simmi; Harray, Amelia; Barblett, Ann; Oddy, Wendy Hazel; Ambrosini, Gina; Allen, Karina; Trapp, Gina

    2017-10-01

    To determine young people's knowledge of energy drinks (EDs), factors influencing ED consumption, and intervention strategies to decrease ED consumption in young people. Eight group interviews with young people (aged 12-25 years). Community groups and secondary schools in Perth, Western Australia. Forty-one young people, 41% of whom were male and 73% of whom consumed EDs. Factors influencing ED consumption and intervention strategies informed by young people to reduce ED consumption. Two researchers conducted a qualitative content analysis on the data using NVivo software. Facilitators of ED consumption included enhanced energy, pleasant taste, low cost, peer pressure, easy availability, and ED promotions. Barriers included negative health effects, unpleasant taste, high cost, and parents' disapproval. Strategies to reduce ED consumption included ED restrictions, changing ED packaging, increasing ED prices, reducing visibility in retail outlets, and research and education. Because many countries allow the sale of EDs to people aged consumption. In addition to more research and education, these strategies included policy changes targeting ED sales, packaging, price, and visibility. Future research might examine the feasibility of implementing such interventions. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Longitudinal Study of Aging in Human Young Adults: Knowledge Gaps and Research Agenda.

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Danese, Andrea; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2017-02-01

    To prevent onset of age-related diseases and physical and cognitive decline, interventions to slow human aging and extend health span must eventually be applied to people while they are still young and healthy. Yet most human aging research examines older adults, many with chronic disease, and little is known about aging in healthy young humans. This article explains how this knowledge gap is a barrier to extending health span and puts forward the case that geroscience should invest in researching the pace of aging in young adults. As one illustrative example, we describe an initial effort to study the pace of aging in a young-adult birth cohort by using repeated waves of biomarkers collected across the third and fourth decades to quantify the pace of coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple organ systems (eg, pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, metabolic, and immune function). Findings provided proof of principle that it is possible to quantify individual variation in the pace of aging in young adults still free of age-related diseases. This article articulates research needs to improve longitudinal measurement of the pace of aging in young people, to pinpoint factors that slow or speed the pace of aging, to compare pace of aging against genomic clocks, to explain slow-aging young adults, and to apply pace of aging in preventive clinical trials of antiaging therapies. This article puts forward a research agenda to fill the knowledge gap concerning lifelong causes of aging. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Video Games Related to Young Adults: Mapping Research Interest

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the typological-research domain of the extant literature on video games related to college-age samples (18-29 years-of-age). A content analysis of 264 articles, from PsycINFO for these identifiers, was performed. Findings showed that negative or pathological aspects of video gaming, i.e., violence potential,…

  17. Outstanding Junior Investigator Award. Final report

    Ellison, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The OJI supported research of J. Ellison has been concentrated in two areas: study of Wγ and Zγ production at the Tevatron, which probes the trilinear boson coupling; design, fabrication and testing of silicon microstrip detectors for the D0 upgrade silicon tracking system. The Wγ analysis using data from the first D0 run (∼14 pb -1 integrated luminosity) has been completed - J. Ellison and a postdoctoral research working with him (B. Choudhary) were responsible for the muon channel analysis. This analysis is an important test of the Standard Model (SM), since it probes the nature of the WWγ coupling, which is related to the W boson magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Any deviation from the SM value of the WWγ coupling would be an indication of either composite structure of the W or higher order loop corrections involving physics beyond the SM. The analysis has resulted in the world's most sensitive limits on the WWγ coupling parameters. In addition the author has also worked on an analysis of Zγ production which has yielded sensitive limits on the ZZγ and Zγγ couplings. The work on the D0 Silicon Tracker has also made very good progress. The team led by J. Ellison includes two postdoctoral researchers (A. Bischoff and C. Boswell), one graduate student (M. Mason) and three undergraduate students. They have fully evaluated proptotype detectors which were designed at UCR and have completed a detailed simulation study of the detector performance for different strip geometries. The results were used to optimize the design of the final D0 detectors, for which UR has sole responsibility. The author has completed the mask design for the 3-chip barrel detectors and production of the final detectors as now begun

  18. Recruitment and retention of young women into nutrition research studies: practical considerations.

    Leonard, Alecia; Hutchesson, Melinda; Patterson, Amanda; Chalmers, Kerry; Collins, Clare

    2014-01-16

    Successful recruitment and retention of participants into research studies is critical for optimising internal and external validity. Research into diet and lifestyle of young women is important due to the physiological transitions experienced at this life stage. This paper aims to evaluate data related to recruitment and retention across three research studies with young women, and present practical advice related to recruiting and retaining young women in order to optimise study quality within nutrition research. Recruitment and retention strategies used in three nutrition studies that targeted young women (18 to 35 years) were critiqued. A randomised controlled trial (RCT), a crossover validation study and a cross-sectional survey were conducted at the University of Newcastle, Australia between 2010 and 2013Successful recruitment was defined as maximum recruitment relative to time. Retention was assessed as maximum participants remaining enrolled at study completion. Recruitment approaches included notice boards, web and social network sites (Facebook and Twitter), with social media most successful in recruitment. The online survey had the highest recruitment in the shortest time-frame (751 participants in one month). Email, phone and text message were used in study one (RCT) and study two (crossover validation) and assisted in low attrition rates, with 93% and 75.7% completing the RCT and crossover validation study respectively. Of those who did not complete the RCT, reported reasons were: being too busy; and having an unrelated illness. Recruiting young women into nutrition research is challenging. Use of social media enhances recruitment, while Email, phone and text message contact improves retention within interventions. Further research comparing strategies to optimise recruitment and retention in young women, including flexible testing times, reminders and incentives is warranted.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Outstanding Claim Reserves

    Zlata Djuric

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The key processes in the business of insurance companies which define the financial viability of their business activities, as the most important element, are the adequate amount of technical reserves. A qualitative assessment of the technical reserves level is the basic support to the management of the key business processes and proper strategic and financial decision-making in order to maximize the viability, profitability, competitiveness, and further development of the company. Based on the data on the operations of an insurance company, within a single line of insurance, different, in practice, most frequently used methods were applied in order to determine the deviation amplitude of the projected amounts from the actual claims. Another direction of research focuses on actuarial practice in non-life insurance companies operating in the territory of the Republic of Serbia. The comparative analysis of the obtained projection points to the fact that the chosen methods, commonly used in actuarial practice in the Republic of Serbia, should be monitored and reviewed. The results of the multidirectional research and detection of the existing problems provide a useful framework and a stimulating mechanism, as well as the guidelines to improve the operations and better positioning of insurance in the commercial and economic environment of the Republic of Serbia.

  20. Proceedings of the first ADVISES Young Researchers Workshop

    2005-01-01

    The research training network Analysis Design and Validation of Interactive Safety-critical and Error-tolerant Systems (ADVISES) focus on coaching and supervising Post Docs and Ph.D. students. The main objective is to provide a multi-disciplinary researchtraining that can combat the impact of human...... is a position paper on voice recognition in multimodal systems focusing on a case study of anesthesia patient journal. In emergency situations during anesthesia, when doctors and nurses are busyand maybe stressed, the registration process is delayed. This is a problem, because postponing the registration often...

  1. Involving disabled children and young people as partners in research: a systematic review.

    Bailey, S; Boddy, K; Briscoe, S; Morris, C

    2015-07-01

    Children and young people can be valuable partners in research, giving their unique perspectives on what and how research should be done. However, disabled children are less commonly involved in research than their non-disabled peers. This review investigated how disabled children have been involved as research partners; specifically how they have been recruited, the practicalities and challenges of involvement and how these have been overcome, and impacts of involvement for research, and disabled children and young people. The INVOLVE definition of involvement and the Equality and Human Rights Commission definition of disability were used. Relevant bibliographic databases were searched. Websites were searched for grey literature. Included studies had involved disabled children and young people aged 5-25 years in any study design. Reviews, guidelines, reports and other documents from the grey literature were eligible for inclusion. Twenty-two papers were included: seven reviews, eight original research papers, three reports, three guidelines and one webpage. Nine examples of involvement were identified. Recommendations included developing effective communication techniques, using flexible methods that can be adapted to needs and preferences, and ensuring that sufficient support and funding is available for researchers undertaking involvement. Positive impacts of involvement for disabled children included increased confidence, self-esteem and independence. Positive impacts for research were identified. Involving disabled children in research can present challenges; many of these can be overcome with sufficient time, planning and resources. More needs to be done to find ways to involve those with non-verbal communication. Generally, few details were reported about disabled children and young people's involvement in studies, and the quality of evidence was low. Although a range of positive impacts were identified, the majority of these were authors' opinions rather

  2. Kids, Adolescents, and Young Adults Cancer Study-A Methodological Approach in Cancer Epidemiology Research

    Link, N. L.; Maurer, E.; Largent, J.; Kent, E.; Sender, E.; Culver, H. A.; Morris, R. A.; Sender, E.

    2009-01-01

    Advances have been made in treatment and outcomes for pediatric cancer. However adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer have not experienced similar relative improvements. We undertook a study to develop the methodology necessary for epidemiologic cancer research in these age groups. Our goal was to create the Kids, Adolescents, and Young Adults Cancer (KAYAC) project to create a resource to address research questions relevant to this population. We used a combination of clinic and population-based ascertainment to enroll 111 cases aged 0-39 for this methodology development study. The largest groups of cancer types enrolled include: breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, and melanoma. The overall participation rate is 69.8% and varies by age and tumor type. The study included patients, mothers, and fathers. The methods used to establish this resource are described, and the values of the resource in studies of childhood and young adult cancer are outlined.

  3. Beyond Mentoring: Social Support Structures for Young Australian Carpentry Apprentices. Research Report

    Buchanan, John; Raffaele, Catherine; Glozier, Nick; Kanagaratnam, Aran

    2016-01-01

    This research focused on how apprenticeships, at their best, provide extensive social support for young people. It draws on, and contributes to, debates about workforce (and especially vocational) development in contemporary Australia. It also contributes to the growing literature on social support and health, especially the role that work could…

  4. Understanding Suicidal Behaviour in Young People Referred to Specialist CAMHS: A Qualitative Psychoanalytic Clinical Research Project

    Anderson, Jan; Hurst, Margaret; Marques, Ana; Millar, David; Moya, Sue; Pover, Lesley; Stewart, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative psychoanalytic clinical research project using a post-Kleinian contemporary approach was undertaken by a team of seven qualified and experienced child psychotherapists working in community Tier 3 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). A number of referred young people who deliberately harmed themselves or attempted…

  5. Research on the Boost of Development on Young Children's Fine Motor by Folk Games

    Wei, Xia

    2016-01-01

    As Chinese traditional folk culture, folk games have unique educational value which can boost the development of young children's fine motor. Based on previous investigation of fine motor skill of children in Nanchong, Sichuan Province, the researcher chose a middle class in public city kindergarten A with lower survey score as the study object.…

  6. Communication and Language Development of Young Children with Autism: A Review of Research in Music

    Vaiouli, Potheini; Andreou, Georgia

    2018-01-01

    Research demonstrates connections among children's music actions, their engagement abilities, and their language development. Although the link between music and the engagement abilities of young children with autism is well established, there is not enough evidence on the effectiveness of music strategies and music therapy interventions to…

  7. Methodologies for tracking learning paths in the Making a filmmaker research study of young Nordic filmmakers

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik; Öhman-Gullberg, Lisa

    The aim of this paper is twofold. On the one hand, to present an outline of the ongoing research study Making a filmmaker, which examines how young Nordic filmmakers create their own learning paths along formal and/or informal contexts. Our focus in this paper is especially directed towards issues...

  8. Research and Reflections on the Spiritual Development of Young Jewish Children

    Schein, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    This article is about spiritual development for early childhood Jewish education. Findings from a research study defines the spiritual development of young children as an integration of deep connections, basic dispositions (strengthened from experiences of wonderment, awe, joy, inner peace), and complex dispositions (displayed through acts of…

  9. CMS Young Researchers Award 2013 and Fundamental Physics Scholars Award from the CMS Experiment

    Lapka, Marzena

    2014-01-01

    Photo 2: CMS Fundamental Physics Scholars (FPSs) 1st prize: Joosep Pata, from Estonian National Institue of Chemical Physics and Biophysics / Photo 1 and 3: CMS Young Researchers Award. From left to right: Guido Tonelli, Colin Bernet, Andre David, Oliver Gutsche, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Andrea Petrucci, Joe Incandela and Jim Virdee

  10. The Family's Influence on Adolescent and Young Adult Career Development: Theory, Research and Practice.

    Hughes, Cathy; Thomas, Trang

    2003-01-01

    A research review identified a range of family process variables associated with enhanced career development for adolescents and young adults. Findings were consistent with the theories of Roe (personality development and career choice) and Super (life-span, life-space) regarding the influence of family processes on career development. (Contains…

  11. 2017 Outstanding Contributions to ISCB Award: Fran Lewitter.

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E; Berger, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    The Outstanding Contributions to the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Award was launched in 2015 to recognize individuals who have made lasting and valuable contributions to the Society through their leadership, service, and educational work, or a combination of these areas. Fran Lewitter is the 2017 winner of the Outstanding Contributions to ISCB Award and will be recognized at the 2017 Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB)/European Conference on Computational Biology, meeting in Prague, Czech Republic being held from July 21-25, 2017.

  12. Protecting Young People From Junk Food Advertising: Implications of Psychological Research for First Amendment Law

    Harris, Jennifer L.; Graff, Samantha K.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, one third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese, yet food and beverage companies continue to target them with advertising for products that contribute to this obesity crisis. When government restrictions on such advertising are proposed, the constitutional commercial speech doctrine is often invoked as a barrier to action. We explore incongruities between the legal justifications for the commercial speech doctrine and the psychological research on how food advertising affects young people. A proper interpretation of the First Amendment should leave room for regulations to protect young people from advertising featuring calorie-dense, nutrient-poor foods and beverages. PMID:22390435

  13. Protecting young people from junk food advertising: implications of psychological research for First Amendment law.

    Harris, Jennifer L; Graff, Samantha K

    2012-02-01

    In the United States, one third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese, yet food and beverage companies continue to target them with advertising for products that contribute to this obesity crisis. When government restrictions on such advertising are proposed, the constitutional commercial speech doctrine is often invoked as a barrier to action. We explore incongruities between the legal justifications for the commercial speech doctrine and the psychological research on how food advertising affects young people. A proper interpretation of the First Amendment should leave room for regulations to protect young people from advertising featuring calorie-dense, nutrient-poor foods and beverages.

  14. Behind the Headlines: Media Representation of Children and Young People in Northern Ireland:Summary of Research Findings

    Gordon, Faith; McAlister, Siobhán; Scraton, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council this partnership project between the Childhood, Transition and Social Justice Initiative at Queen’s University and Include Youth focuses on the negative stereotyping of children and young people and the role and responsibilities of the media in the creation and transmission of negative images. Engaging with children, young people, organisations working with children and young people and media representatives, the project uses research evidenc...

  15. In memoriam of Professor Theodore L. Munsat (1930-2013): his outstanding legacy with the WFN.

    Medina, Marco T

    2014-04-15

    The World Federation of Neurology (WFN) lost an outstanding leader on November 22, 2013 with the death of Professor Theodore Leon Munsat ("Ted"), in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA. Professor Munsat was Emeritus professor of Neurology at Tufts University School of Medicine and served the WFN in several capacities as trustee, chairman of the WFN Education and research committees, chairman of the WFN ALS Research group and founding director of the WFN Seminars in Clinical Neurology. He was president of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), 1989-1991, chairman of the Continuing Educational Committee of the AAN and founding director of AAN's premier continuing medical education journal Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology. He left an outstanding legacy with the WFN. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Social networking and young adults' drinking practices: innovative qualitative methods for health behavior research.

    Lyons, Antonia C; Goodwin, Ian; McCreanor, Tim; Griffin, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Understandings of health behaviors can be enriched by using innovative qualitative research designs. We illustrate this with a project that used multiple qualitative methods to explore the confluence of young adults' drinking behaviors and social networking practices in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Participants were 18-25 year old males and females from diverse ethnic, class, and occupational backgrounds. In Stage 1, 34 friendship focus group discussions were video-recorded with 141 young adults who talked about their drinking and social networking practices. In Stage 2, 23 individual interviews were conducted using screen-capture software and video to record participants showing and discussing their Facebook pages. In Stage 3, a database of Web-based material regarding drinking and alcohol was developed and analyzed. In friendship group data, young adults co-constructed accounts of drinking practices and networking about drinking via Facebook as intensely social and pleasurable. However, this pleasure was less prominent in individual interviews, where there was greater explication of unpleasant or problematic experiences and practices. The pleasure derived from drinking and social networking practices was also differentiated by ethnicity, gender, and social class. Juxtaposing the Web-based data with participants' talk about their drinking and social media use showed the deep penetration of online alcohol marketing into young people's social worlds. Multiple qualitative methods, generating multimodal datasets, allowed valuable nuanced insights into young adults' drinking practices and social networking behaviors. This knowledge can usefully inform health policy, health promotion strategies, and targeted health interventions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Cross-sectional online survey of research productivity in young Japanese nursing faculty.

    Oyama, Yumiko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Narama, Miho; Kono, Ayumi; Atogami, Fumi; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Okaya, Keiko; Takamizawa, Emiko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the factors affecting the research productivity of young nursing faculty in Japan. An online survey targeting young nursing scholars (aged ≤ 39 years) who were members of the Japan Academy of Nursing Science was conducted from October to November 2012. Of 1634 potential respondents, 648 completed the survey (39.7%), and 400 full-time faculty of a baccalaureate degree program were selected for the analysis. The numbers of English-language and Japanese publications in the past 3 years were regressed onto personal characteristics, such as academic degree and type of university. The mean numbers of publications in English and Japanese in the past 3 years were 0.41 and 1.63, respectively. Holding a doctoral degree was significantly related to a higher number of publications in English and Japanese (e(β) = 5.78 and e(β) = 1.89, respectively). Working at a national university (e(β) = 2.15), having a research assistant (e(β) = 2.05), and the ability to read research articles in English (e(β) = 2.27) were significantly related to more English-language publications. Having the confidence to conduct quantitative research (e(β) = 1.67) was related to a larger number of Japanese publications. The lack of mentoring (e(β) = 0.97) and university workload (e(β) = 0.96) were associated with a lesser number of Japanese publications. The research productivity of young nursing faculty appeared to be quite low. Strategies to enhance research productivity in young nursing faculty, such as encouraging the achievement of a doctoral degree or enrichment of research resources, should be undertaken. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  18. Proceedings of the young scientist research awardee's meet: pre-proceedings volume

    2012-01-01

    Youth is the life line for the progress of any nation, be it science, academics, industry or enterpreneurship. In scientific research, it is always interesting to enumerate the ideas that are created by young minds. It is important to identify bright ideas and nurture the young scientists so that the promise shown through bright ideas will be directed towards logical execution. It is crucial for the funding agencies to be proactive to convert potential into performance. Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India supports extra mural research in nuclear and allied sciences, engineering and technology. With an aim to accomplish this objective, BRNS has been continuously encouraging and supporting scientists and engineers to pursue excellence in R and D programmes of interest and relevance to DAE. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Wildlife, Snow, Coffee, and Video: The IPY Activities of the University of Alaska Young Researchers' Network

    Pringle, D.; Alvarez-Aviles, L.; Carlson, D.; Harbeck, J.; Druckenmiller, M.; Newman, K.; Mueller, D.; Petrich, C.; Roberts, A.; Wang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The University of Alaska International Polar Year (IPY) Young Researchers' Network is a group of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Our interdisciplinary group operates as a volunteer network to promote the International Polar Year through education and outreach aimed at the general public and Alaskan students of all ages. The Young Researchers' Network sponsors and organizes science talks or Science Cafés by guest speakers in public venues such as coffee shops and bookstores. We actively engage high school students in IPY research concerning the ionic concentrations and isotopic ratios of precipitation through Project Snowball. Our network provides hands-on science activities to encourage environmental awareness and initiate community wildlife monitoring programs such as Wildlife Day by Day. We mentor individual high school students pursuing their own research projects related to IPY through the Alaska High School Science Symposium. Our group also interacts with the general public at community events and festivals to share the excitement of IPY for example at the World Ice Art Championship and Alaska State Fair. The UA IPY Young Researchers' Network continues to explore new partnerships with educators and students in an effort to enhance science and education related to Alaska and the polar regions in general. For more information please visit: http://ipy-youth.uaf.edu or e-mail: ipy-youth@alaska.edu

  20. William Knocke receives 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    William R. Knocke, W.C. English Professor and head of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, was awarded the 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award at the Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) banquet, held recently in Williamsburg, Va.

  1. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Today's classrooms have no real walls! Students explore the world on field trips, during virtual journeys on the world wide web, and through the books they read. These pathways help them fly to the ends of the universe to satisfy their scientific curiosity. Again this year, the professionals of the NSTA/CBC Review Panel for Outstanding Science…

  2. 29 CFR 4281.18 - Outstanding claims for withdrawal liability.

    2010-07-01

    ... INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION, TERMINATION, AND OTHER RULES APPLICABLE TO MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS DUTIES OF PLAN... in insolvency proceedings. The plan sponsor shall value an outstanding claim for withdrawal liability... title 11, United States Code, or any case or proceeding under similar provisions of state insolvency...

  3. Outstanding High School Coaches: Philosophies, Views, and Practices

    Miller, Glenn A.; Lutz, Rafer; Fredenburg, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the coaching philosophies, views, and practices of outstanding high school coaches of various male and female sports across the United States. The intention was to determine whether these coaches used unique or innovative techniques or strategies that contributed to their success and, if so, whether these…

  4. Young women's experiences of psychotic illness: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Chernomas, Wanda M; Rieger, Kendra L; Karpa, Jane V; Clarke, Diana E; Marchinko, Shelley; Demczuk, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between young adulthood, women and psychosis was the focus for this systematic review. Age and gender are factors that can influence responses to illness. Research indicates that there are differences in how young men and women are affected biologically and psychosocially, including the presentation of a constellation of symptoms, response to anti-psychotic medications and how they assess their life circumstances. Yet in literature that examines experiences of young people with psychosis, the specific needs of young women are usually not presented separately. To better understand and address young adult women's healthcare and social service needs, a synthesis of evidence addressing the relationship between young adulthood, women and psychosis is needed. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the best available evidence on the experiences of young adult women (aged 18-35 years) living with a psychotic illness in the community. Specifically, the review question was:What are the experiences of young adult women living with a psychotic illness? Participants were young women between 18 and 35 years of age who were living with a psychotic illness in the community. The phenomenon of interest was the experiences of living with a psychotic illness of women aged 18-35 years in the community. Experiences were defined broadly as and inclusive of perceptions and experiences with health and social systems. The context for this review was the community setting. The current review included studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research, feminist research and the qualitative component of mixed methods studies. A three-step search strategy was used to locate both published and unpublished studies. The search was limited to studies published from 1995 to the search date of May 13, 2015. Two reviewers independently appraised the nine included studies

  5. Recruiting and retaining youth and young adults: challenges and opportunities in survey research for tobacco control.

    Cantrell, Jennifer; Hair, Elizabeth C; Smith, Alexandria; Bennett, Morgane; Rath, Jessica Miller; Thomas, Randall K; Fahimi, Mansour; Dennis, J Michael; Vallone, Donna

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation studies of population-based tobacco control interventions often rely on large-scale survey data from numerous respondents across many geographic areas to provide evidence of their effectiveness. Significant challenges for survey research have emerged with the evolving communications landscape, particularly for surveying hard-to-reach populations such as youth and young adults. This study combines the comprehensive coverage of an address-based sampling (ABS) frame with the timeliness of online data collection to develop a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of young people aged 15-21. We constructed an ABS frame, partially supplemented with auxiliary data, to recruit this hard-to-reach sample. Branded and tested mail-based recruitment materials were designed to bring respondents online for screening, consent and surveying. Once enrolled, respondents completed online surveys every 6 months via computer, tablet or smartphone. Numerous strategies were utilized to enhance retention and representativeness RESULTS: Results detail sample performance, representativeness and retention rates as well as device utilization trends for survey completion among youth and young adult respondents. Panel development efforts resulted in a large, nationally representative sample with high retention rates. This study is among the first to employ this hybrid ABS-to-online methodology to recruit and retain youth and young adults in a probability-based online cohort panel. The approach is particularly valuable for conducting research among younger populations as it capitalizes on their increasing access to and comfort with digital communication. We discuss challenges and opportunities of panel recruitment and retention methods in an effort to provide valuable information for tobacco control researchers seeking to obtain representative, population-based samples of youth and young adults in the U.S. as well as across the globe. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  6. Hydrography - RIVERS_OUTSTANDING_NRC_IN: Outstanding Rivers in Indiana Listed by the Natural Resource Commission (Bernardin-Lochmueller and Associates, 1:100,000, Line Shapefile)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — RIVERS_OUTSTANDING_NRC_IN represents river and stream segments on the NRC’s Outstanding Rivers list for Indiana. The source data was last updated in October 1997....

  7. Survey on research environment for young researchers in the U.S.. What attractive environment is for young researchers; Beikoku ni okeru wakate kenkyusha no kenkyu kankyo ni kansuru chosa. Wakate kenkyusha ni totte miryokutekina kankyo towa

    NONE

    2001-03-28

    A survey was conducted on 'what attractive research environment is for young researchers' as a theme. The young researchers are referred to as those who are registered on a master's or doctor's degree courses and what is called postdoctoral scholars who received a doctor's degree. In the survey, a few common comments were seen in over interviews on the U.S. research environment. The comments were such that, needless to say, subsidies are indispensable for researches but economic aspects of treatment are not necessarily satisfactory, that the research environment is generally good, allowing freedom in research, and that results tend to be achieved by providing a subsidy for experienced knowledgeable researchers rather than directly subsidizing young researchers with a large sum, while programs with individuality such as a fellowship are desired more. It is apparent that the interests of postdoctoral scholars are economic stability; in fact, uneasiness and dissatisfaction in the status and the treatment are pointed out in a survey by the U.S. Science Academy. (NEDO)

  8. Tablet-Based eBooks for Young Children: What Does the Research Say?

    Reich, Stephanie M; Yau, Joanna C; Warschauer, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Young children's use of electronic books (eBooks) is increasing as handheld touch screen devices, such as tablets, become increasingly available. Although older children's reading on tablets has been more broadly investigated, less is known about the impacts of digital reading for infant, toddlers, and preschoolers. This review compares the educational affordances of reading on tablets versus print books for young children's learning. A qualitative synthesis of research on tablet-based eReading and young children's learning from screens was conducted. When eBooks are designed well, preschool-aged children learn equally well and sometimes more than from print books. However, enhanced eBooks with sounds, animations, and games can distract children and reduce learning. When book-sharing with an adult, conversations during eBook reading are often about the platform while print book conversations are more often about the book content. For young children (0-2 yr), there is a paucity of research, but broader studies on learning from screens suggest limited educational benefits of tablet use for this age group. The authors recommend that (1) the selection of eBooks (especially enhanced eBooks) be thoughtful as games or animations that are not related to the story content can be distracting for young children, (2) adults share in the reading experience as discussions of the story, text, and characters have been found to enhance comprehension, language development, and print awareness, and (3) tablet eBook use be restricted for infants and toddlers, as they benefit more from face-to-face interaction with caregivers than from interactive screens alone.

  9. Binge Drinking Episodes in Young Adults: How Should We Measure Them in a Research Setting?

    Piano, Mariann R; Mazzuco, Adriana; Kang, Minkyung; Phillips, Shane A

    2017-07-01

    Worldwide, consequences of binge drinking are a major health and policy concern. This article reviews contemporary binge drinking definitions as well as different questionnaires and biomarkers that have been used in research settings to examine binge drinking behavior among young adults. A review of electronic databases was conducted for binge drinking definitions, questionnaires, and biomarkers for the measurement of binge drinking in young adults (18-30 years). Binge drinking is often defined as four or more drinks for females and five or more drinks for males on an occasion or in one sitting within a designated time frame (2 weeks vs. past 30 days). Several tools and questionnaires are available to identify young adult repeated binge drinkers. Biomarkers have been used to corroborate self-reported alcohol consumption, of which direct biomarkers such as phosphatidylethanol may be useful in confirming recent heavy drinking. It is important to measure binge drinking along a continuum and to use questions that allow for assessment of intensity, frequency, duration, and daily versus weekend consumption patterns. Open-ended questions that allow for intensity (number of drinks) and frequency can be used to determine dose-response relationships with respect to specific outcome measures. Direct alcohol biomarkers reflecting alcohol consumption over a period of several days are useful in conjunction with questionnaire data for identifying young adult binge drinkers.

  10. Young Travellers and the Children's Fund: Some Practical Notes on an Experimental Image-Based Research Project

    Dean, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    The paper reflects on how photography was used during a small piece of mixed methods qualitative research with some young Travellers and their families. The context for the study was "Every Child Matters" and the accompanying push aimed to include groups considered as marginalised, such as young Travellers, in mainstream educational provision, as…

  11. Participants' Reactions to and Suggestions for Conducting Intimate Partner Violence Research: A Study of Rural Young Adults.

    Edwards, Katie M; Greaney, Kayleigh; Palmer, Kelly M

    2016-01-01

    To document rural young adults' reasons for emotional reactions to participating in intimate partner violence (IPV) research as well as to hear young adults' perspectives on how to most effectively conduct comprehensive IPV research in their rural communities. The data presented in this paper draw from 2 studies (ie, an online survey study and an in-person or telephone interview study) that included the same 16 US rural counties in New England and Appalachia. Participants, 47% of whom were in both studies, were young (age range 18-24), white (92%-94%), heterosexual (89%-90%), female (62%-68%), and mostly low to middle income. Nine percent of participants reported they were upset by the questions due to personal experiences with IPV or for other reasons not related to personal IPV experiences. Forty percent of participants reported they personally benefited from participating in the study, and they provided various reasons for this benefit. Regarding suggestions for conducting IPV research with rural young adults, participants believed that both online recruitment and online data collection methods were the best ways to engage young adults, although many participants suggested that more than 1 modality was ideal, which underscores the need for multimethod approaches when conducting research with rural young adults. These findings are reassuring to those committed to conducting research on sensitive topics with rural populations and also shed light on best practices for conducting this type of research from the voices of rural young adults themselves. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  12. Defining core elements and outstanding practice in Nutritional Science through collaborative benchmarking.

    Samman, Samir; McCarthur, Jennifer O; Peat, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Benchmarking has been adopted by educational institutions as a potentially sensitive tool for improving learning and teaching. To date there has been limited application of benchmarking methodology in the Discipline of Nutritional Science. The aim of this survey was to define core elements and outstanding practice in Nutritional Science through collaborative benchmarking. Questionnaires that aimed to establish proposed core elements for Nutritional Science, and inquired about definitions of " good" and " outstanding" practice were posted to named representatives at eight Australian universities. Seven respondents identified core elements that included knowledge of nutrient metabolism and requirement, food production and processing, modern biomedical techniques that could be applied to understanding nutrition, and social and environmental issues as related to Nutritional Science. Four of the eight institutions who agreed to participate in the present survey identified the integration of teaching with research as an indicator of outstanding practice. Nutritional Science is a rapidly evolving discipline. Further and more comprehensive surveys are required to consolidate and update the definition of the discipline, and to identify the optimal way of teaching it. Global ideas and specific regional requirements also need to be considered.

  13. Twitter Chats as a Research Tool: A Study of Young Adult Financial Decisions

    Barbara O’Neill

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers collect online survey data because it is cost-effective and less time-consuming than traditional research methods. This paper describes Twitter chats as a research tool vis-à-vis two other online research methods: providing links to electronic surveys to respondents and use of commercially available survey panels through vendors with readily available respondents. Similar to a face-to-face focus group, Twitter chats provide a synchronous environment for participants to answer a structured series of questions and to respond to both the chat facilitator and each other. This paper also reports representative responses from a Twitter chat that explored financial decisions of young adults. The chat was sponsored by a multi-state group of land-grant university researchers, in cooperation with WiseBread, a personal finance website targeted to millennials, to recruit respondents for a more extensive month-long online survey about the financial decisions of young adults. The Twitter chat responses suggest that student loans were the top concern of participants, and debt and housing rounded out the top three concerns. The internet, both websites and social media, was the most frequently cited source of financial information. The article concludes with a discussion of lessons learned from the Twitter chat experience and suggestions for professional practice.

  14. A call to improve sampling methodology and reporting in young novice driver research.

    Scott-Parker, B; Senserrick, T

    2017-02-01

    Young drivers continue to be over-represented in road crash fatalities despite a multitude of research, communication and intervention. Evidence-based improvement depends to a great extent upon research methodology quality and its reporting, with known limitations in the peer-review process. The aim of the current research was to review the scope of research methodologies applied in 'young driver' and 'teen driver' research and their reporting in four peer-review journals in the field between January 2006 and December 2013. In total, 806 articles were identified and assessed. Reporting omissions included participant gender (11% of papers), response rates (49%), retention rates (39%) and information regarding incentives (44%). Greater breadth and specific improvements in study designs and reporting are thereby identified as a means to further advance the field. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. "A Virtual Canvas"—Designing a Blog Site to Research Young Muslims' Friendships & Identities

    Orla McGarry

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on research among a group of Muslim youth living in the west of Ireland as part of a study on "social belonging" and identity. One part of the research involved designing a youth centered, participatory research method, in the form of a blog site, to investigate what young people say and do when they are asked to talk about themselves and their relationships, with minimal researcher involvement. Participants were presented with a "blank virtual canvas" where they determined what became discussed. Twenty-two teenaged Muslims—comprising close friends as well as fellow students of the same school and living in the same West of Ireland town—contributed to a time limited, closed blog site over a four month period. The blog site offers interesting snippets of Muslim identification, and how they choose to present themselves to others. In the process of contributing to this exercise, we can also observe subtle means through which inclusion and exclusion co-exist online, refracting young people's offline worlds. The blog affords an opportunity to consciously "do" friendship by presenting to each other images, symbols and statements of friendship that invoke both cohesion and closure. The research unravels certain gendered patterns in online performances. In demonstrating this evidence, we argue that the study of online interactions of youth can provide an alternative window in exploring relationships, identification and social positioning. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs130115

  16. Young language learner (YLL research: An overview of some international and national approaches

    Ion Drew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing attention is being given to young language learners (YLL, following a global trend to introduce foreign languages at earlier stages of the curriculum. This article provides an overview of some recent international YLL research and follows this up by comparing it to current YLL research in Norway. A YLL research network has recently been established in Norway in order to share and promote research in the field. Eight Norwegian YLL research projects, involving both English and other foreign languages, are presented. The scope of this research in Norway is compared with international research being conducted in the field. Although the Norwegian YLL research is active in certain areas, such as starting age of second foreign languages, teachers’ practices and attitudes, the use of extensive reading, vocabulary and the analysis of written texts, there appear to be gaps in other areas. These include research into the effects of story-telling and drama in the classroom, processes in writing, pupils’ cognitive skills, the use of textbooks and the effect of the curriculum. The establishment of a YLL network is considered as an important step in both consolidating current YLL research in Norway and initiating new research projects.

  17. Exploring the Use of Emoji as a Visual Research Method for Eliciting Young Children's Voices in Childhood Research

    Fane, Jennifer; MacDougall, Colin; Jovanovic, Jessie; Redmond, Gerry; Gibbs, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Recognition of the need to move from research "on" children to research "with" children has prompted significant theoretical and methodological debate as to how young children can be positioned as active participants in the research process. Visual research methods such as drawing, photography, and videography have received…

  18. What Are the Main Drivers of Young Consumers Purchasing Traditional Food Products? European Field Research

    Kyrgiakos, Leonidas

    2018-01-01

    In this research, the attitude of European young adults (age 18 to 30 years) regarding their consumption of local and traditional products was examined. The survey was conducted on a sample of 836 consumers from seven European countries (Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Slovenia, Croatia, Denmark and France). Data collection was made by distributing a developed questionnaire through social media and university mail services. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to identify consumer perception comparing the overall sample with two subsets (consumers from Eastern and Western European countries). Six major factors were revealed: consumer behavior, uncertainty about health issues, cost, influence of media and friends and availability in store. Young adults had a positive attitude to local and traditional food products, but they expressed insecurity about health issues. Cost factor had less of an influence on interviewees from Eastern European countries than those from the overall sample (3rd and 5th factor accordingly). Influence of close environment was a different factor in Eastern countries compared to Western ones, for which it was common to see an influence from media. Females and older people (25–30 years old) have fewer doubts about Traditional Food Products, while media have a high influence on consumers’ decisions. The aim of this survey was to identify the consumer profiles of young adults and create different promotion strategies of local and traditional products among the two groups of countries. PMID:29439536

  19. What Are the Main Drivers of Young Consumers Purchasing Traditional Food Products? European Field Research

    George Vlontzos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the attitude of European young adults (age 18 to 30 years regarding their consumption of local and traditional products was examined. The survey was conducted on a sample of 836 consumers from seven European countries (Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Slovenia, Croatia, Denmark and France. Data collection was made by distributing a developed questionnaire through social media and university mail services. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was used to identify consumer perception comparing the overall sample with two subsets (consumers from Eastern and Western European countries. Six major factors were revealed: consumer behavior, uncertainty about health issues, cost, influence of media and friends and availability in store. Young adults had a positive attitude to local and traditional food products, but they expressed insecurity about health issues. Cost factor had less of an influence on interviewees from Eastern European countries than those from the overall sample (3rd and 5th factor accordingly. Influence of close environment was a different factor in Eastern countries compared to Western ones, for which it was common to see an influence from media. Females and older people (25–30 years old have fewer doubts about Traditional Food Products, while media have a high influence on consumers’ decisions. The aim of this survey was to identify the consumer profiles of young adults and create different promotion strategies of local and traditional products among the two groups of countries.

  20. Qualitative Research to study the attempted suicide of Tabasco´s young people

    Ángela B. Martínez G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: this paper intends to give an account concerning the progress of a doctoral research with regards to suicidal attempts in young people along with their meanings. Methodology: qualitative research. It presents the theories which support my work (collective health, cultural studies, and youth sociology in the search of understanding how the hegemonic medical thinking has had an influence in the production of scientific knowledge about suicide. Results: there is a need to construct an overlook which may allow discovering the meanings that death, life, and life style may have for men and women with suicidal attempts. Discussion: It concludes with the presentation of the development that has taken this research with regard to the analysis interviews that give it origin.

  1. Mixed methods research in tobacco control with youth and young adults: A methodological review of current strategies.

    Craig S Fryer

    Full Text Available Tobacco use among young people is a complex and serious global dilemma that demands innovative and diverse research approaches. The purpose of this methodological review was to examine the current use of mixed methods research in tobacco control with youth and young adult populations and to develop practical recommendations for tobacco control researchers interested in this methodology.Using PubMed, we searched five peer-reviewed journals that publish tobacco control empirical literature for the use of mixed methods research to study young populations, age 12-25 years. Our team analyzed the features of each article in terms of tobacco control topic, population, youth engagement strategies, and several essential elements of mixed methods research.We identified 23 mixed methods studies published by authors from five different countries reported between 2004 and 2015. These 23 articles examined various topics that included tobacco use behavior, tobacco marketing and branding, and cessation among youth and young adults. The most common mixed methods approach was variations of the concurrent design in which the qualitative and quantitative strands were administered at the same time and given equal priority. This review documented several innovative applications of mixed methods research as well as challenges in the reporting of the complex research designs.The use of mixed methods research in tobacco control has great potential for advancing the understanding of complex behavioral and sociocultural issues for all groups, especially youth and young adults.

  2. Mixed methods research in tobacco control with youth and young adults: A methodological review of current strategies.

    Fryer, Craig S; Seaman, Elizabeth L; Clark, Rachael S; Plano Clark, Vicki L

    2017-01-01

    Tobacco use among young people is a complex and serious global dilemma that demands innovative and diverse research approaches. The purpose of this methodological review was to examine the current use of mixed methods research in tobacco control with youth and young adult populations and to develop practical recommendations for tobacco control researchers interested in this methodology. Using PubMed, we searched five peer-reviewed journals that publish tobacco control empirical literature for the use of mixed methods research to study young populations, age 12-25 years. Our team analyzed the features of each article in terms of tobacco control topic, population, youth engagement strategies, and several essential elements of mixed methods research. We identified 23 mixed methods studies published by authors from five different countries reported between 2004 and 2015. These 23 articles examined various topics that included tobacco use behavior, tobacco marketing and branding, and cessation among youth and young adults. The most common mixed methods approach was variations of the concurrent design in which the qualitative and quantitative strands were administered at the same time and given equal priority. This review documented several innovative applications of mixed methods research as well as challenges in the reporting of the complex research designs. The use of mixed methods research in tobacco control has great potential for advancing the understanding of complex behavioral and sociocultural issues for all groups, especially youth and young adults.

  3. Marketing alcohol to young people: implications for industry regulation and research policy.

    Jackson, M C; Hastings, G; Wheeler, C; Eadie, D; Mackintosh, A M

    2000-12-01

    This paper focuses on the marketing of alcohol to young people in the United Kingdom, but the lessons that emerge have international significance. Alcohol is a global enterprise and recent consolidation means that it is controlled by a decreasing number of expanding multi-nationals. Alcohol companies are able to allocate significant resources to researching consumer preferences, developing new products and promoting them on an international level. Recent years have seen a growth in the value that youth culture attaches to brand labels and symbols and a move away from the healthy-living ethos. The alcohol industry's response to these trends has been to design alcoholic beverages that appeal to young people, using well-informed and precisely targeted marketing strategies. This has led to growing concerns about the implications for public health and a demand for tighter controls to regulate alcohol marketing practices. In the United Kingdom, controls on alcohol are piecemeal and reactive and the current system of voluntary regulation appears ineffective. This paper argues for more research to establish current industry practice and inform the development of a comprehensive regulatory structure and system of monitoring.

  4. Dispelling Stereotypes of Young People Who Leave School before Graduation. "Don't Call Them Dropouts" Research Series. Research Brief

    Center for Promise, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The number of young people who leave school before graduation continues to be a problem in the United States, with approximately 485,000 young people leaving school each year. Not graduating translates to substantial individual and societal economic, civic, and social costs. Understanding the factors that lead young people to leave school can have…

  5. STRATEGIES OF COPING WITH DIFFICULTIES DURING RESEARCH PERFORMED BY YOUNG SCIENTISTS

    Tatiana G. Bokhan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: young scientists engaged in creative activities face difficulties during scientific research, implementation and commercialisation of the results. The impossibility of coping with obstacles leads to the impairment of motivational and creative activity. The problem of studying the main semantic contents of difficult situations and strategies to cope with them becomes relevant as it is conducive to the process of personal development of young scientists. Materials and Methods: the authors used a questionnaire with open-ended questions for revealing the main difficulties and coping strategies in the process of research activity; COPE questionnaire adapted by E. Rasskazova, T. Gordeyeva, E. Osin; Style of Self-Regulation of Behaviour technique by V. I. Morosanova. Statistical data processing was carried out with descriptive statistics methods, analysis of frequencies, factor analysis (Varimax rotation with Kaiser normalisation, cluster analysis (furthest neighbour method and Ward’s method. Results: eight main semantic categories related to difficulties experienced in the process of performing the research work have been detected. The main ways of coping with arising difficulties have been identified. Types of respondents different in terms of coping strategies and regulatory-behavioural characteristics have been distinguished. Discussion and Conclusions: difficulties of self-organisation in time for realisation of new meanings, difficulties in structuring the research work and search for information act as psychological barriers provoking mental stress. The most efficient coping strategies in respondents are strategies Active coping and search for positive meaning and personal development. The inefficient coping strategy with difficulties complicating the process of self-development is Avoiding problems strategies.

  6. Music's relevance for adolescents and young adults with cancer: a constructivist research approach.

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Barry, Philippa; Thompson, Kate

    2012-04-01

    Music is one of the most widely used activities amongst young people, significant in personal and group identity, motivation, physical release, and emotional support. Adolescents and young adults with cancer (AYA) require specialized care because of intensified challenges related to developmental vulnerability, treatment toxicity effects, and slower improvements in survival rates compared to other age groups. To advance effective supportive care for AYA, understanding their thoughts about music is necessary. This study examines AYAs' perspectives about music's role in their lives. A constructivist research approach with grounded theory design was applied. Twelve people, 15 to 25 years old, known to onTrac@PeterMac Victorian Adolescent & Young Adult Cancer Service, participated. Respondents completed a brief music demographic questionnaire and participated in a semi-structured interview. Qualitative inter-rater reliability was integrated. Participants mostly reported music's calming, supportive, and relaxing effects, which alleviated hardship associated with their cancer diagnoses. Themes encompassed: music backgrounds, changed "musicking", endurance and adjustment, time with music therapists, and wisdom. Music provided supportive messages, enabled personal and shared understandings about cancer's effects, and elicited helpful physical, emotional, and imagery states. Music therapy could also promote normalized and supportive connections with others. A musician, however, struggled to get music "back" post-treatment. Supportive music-based strategies were recommended for other AYA and their health care providers. Music can signify and creatively enable AYAs' hope, endurance, identity development, and adjustment through cancer treatment and post-treatment phases. Health professionals are encouraged to support AYAs' music-based self-care and "normalized" activities.

  7. Advancing Research to Inform Practice within Community "supporting interventions for young people and families’ affected by substance misuse"

    Murray, Denis Dominic

    2017-01-01

    Issues and trends in relation to substance misuse normally develop in the transitional phase of adolescence, as young people begin looking towards their peers for direction and are less subject to parental authority (1.2). Risk factors are predictors of the likelihood that an individual or group will be involved in activity leading to adverse consequences. Research indicates that some young people are beginning to initiate alcohol and drug use earlier than many adults suspect (3). In relation...

  8. Mathematical modeling and GEOGEBRA in the development of competences in young researchers

    Pabón Gómez, Jorge Angelmiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to analyze the competences of young researchers using Geogebra software; Allows to know the shared experience from a quasi-experimental research, in a sample of 27 students of the tenth grade of the educational institution José María Córdoba, 7 of whom were researchers of the proposal "Mathematics Divertida" of the research group "The Pythagoreans" Enrolled in the Swarm project led by the CUN, the purpose was to show the importance of introducing the student in the management of GEOGEBRA as a facilitating tool for the development of mathematical competences as it allows him to visualize and simulate real situations in a dynamic and interactive way; And in turn of the necessity of its incorporation to the curricular plans for the teaching of the mathematics. Results: The referent of the research proposal was the modeling of functions by means of which the student learned to represent mathematically the processes to follow in order to find solutions to a real life problem, besides acquiring the skill to represent the results obtained for A later interpretation and analysis of the results. Conclusion: The student acquired strengths and also detected weaknesses, improved the ability to face new educational realities.

  9. Attitudes towards mental health, mental health research and digital interventions by young adults with type 1 diabetes: A qualitative analysis.

    Clarke, Janine; Proudfoot, Judy; Vatiliotis, Veronica; Verge, Charles; Holmes-Walker, Deborah J; Campbell, Lesley; Wilhelm, Kay; Moravac, Catherine; Indu, Pillaveetil S; Bridgett, Madeleine

    2018-06-01

    Young people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of mental disorders. Whereas treatment need is high, difficulty recruiting young people with type 1 diabetes into psychosocial studies complicates development, testing and dissemination of these interventions. Interviews with young adults with type 1 diabetes were conducted to examine attitudes towards mental health and mental health research, including barriers and motivators to participation in mental health studies and preferred sources of mental health support. The interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and evaluated via thematic analysis. Young adults with type 1 diabetes were recruited via social media channels of 3 advocacy organizations. A total of 31 young adults (26 females and 5 males) with an average age of 22 years were interviewed between October 2015 and January 2016. Participants were largely unaware of their increased vulnerability to common mental health problems and knew little about mental health research. Major barriers to participation included perceived stigma and lifestyle issues and low levels of trust in researchers. Opportunities to connect with peers and help others were described as key motivators. Psychological distress was considered normal within the context of diabetes. A need for some level of human contact in receiving psychosocial support was expressed. Findings provide valuable insights into the complex dynamics of engaging young adults with type 1 diabetes in mental health studies. Interviewees provided practical suggestions to assist investigation and delivery of psychosocial interventions for this vulnerable group. © 2018 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Using Facebook to Recruit Young Adult Veterans: Online Mental Health Research

    2015-01-01

    Background Veteran research has primarily been conducted with clinical samples and those already involved in health care systems, but much is to be learned about veterans in the community. Facebook is a novel yet largely unexplored avenue for recruiting veteran participants for epidemiological and clinical studies. Objective In this study, we utilized Facebook to recruit a sample of young adult veterans for the first phase of an online alcohol intervention study. We describe the successful Facebook recruitment process, including data collection from over 1000 veteran participants in approximately 3 weeks, procedures to verify participation eligibility, and comparison of our sample with nationally available norms. Methods Participants were young adult veterans aged 18-34 recruited through Facebook as part of a large study to document normative drinking behavior among a large community sample of veterans. Facebook ads were targeted toward young veterans to collect information on demographics and military characteristics, health behaviors, mental health, and health care utilization. Results We obtained a sample of 1023 verified veteran participants over a period of 24 days for the advertising price of approximately US $7.05 per verified veteran participant. Our recruitment strategy yielded a sample similar to the US population of young adult veterans in most demographic areas except for race/ethnicity and previous branch of service, which when we weighted the sample on race/ethnicity and branch a sample better matched with the population data was obtained. The Facebook sample recruited veterans who were engaged in a variety of risky health behaviors such as binge drinking and marijuana use. One fourth of veterans had never since discharge been to an appointment for physical health care and about half had attended an appointment for service compensation review. Only half had attended any appointment for a mental health concern at any clinic or hospital. Despite more

  11. A Quantitative Research on the Level of Social Media Addiction among Young People in Turkey

    Ali Murat KIRIK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Internet technology today shows a quick progress, and social networks increase their number of users on each day. Social networking, which is one of the main indicators of th e technology era, attracts people of all ages while the virtual world goes beyond the real life via the applications it offers. Especially young people show an intense interest in social media which is an extension of the Internet technology. Social media addiction is increasing both in Turkey and all around the world. This study aims to determine the level of social media addiction in young people in Turkey, and to make suggestions on the prevention of the addiction while stating the current work carried o ut on the subject in Turkey. Survey type research model is used in the study, and social media addiction is examined in depth to determine causes of the addiction among young people. In this study, the addiction factor of the Social Networking Status Scale is used as a data collection tool to measure social media addiction among young people. The scale has three factors including addiction, ethics and convergence, and it is a reliable and valid scale, as the reliability and validity of the scale had been te sted. The study is conducted on 271 students between the ages of 13 - 19. It has been found that gender (t=0.406; P>0.05 makes no significant difference in social media addiction while the factors of age (F= 6.256; P<0.05, daily time spent on the Internet ( F= 44.036; P<0.05 and daily frequency of visiting social media profiles (F= 53.56; P<0.05 make significant differences in addiction level. The results have showed that low addiction level of 14 - year group increases with age up to 17 years, and the level de creases in 18 - year group. Social media addiction level shows a dramatic increase also in the case of daily time spent on the Internet increases. More frequent d aily visits to social media profiles increase the addiction as well. The study also provides sug

  12. Using facebook to recruit young adult veterans: online mental health research.

    Pedersen, Eric R; Helmuth, Eric D; Marshall, Grant N; Schell, Terry L; PunKay, Marc; Kurz, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Veteran research has primarily been conducted with clinical samples and those already involved in health care systems, but much is to be learned about veterans in the community. Facebook is a novel yet largely unexplored avenue for recruiting veteran participants for epidemiological and clinical studies. In this study, we utilized Facebook to recruit a sample of young adult veterans for the first phase of an online alcohol intervention study. We describe the successful Facebook recruitment process, including data collection from over 1000 veteran participants in approximately 3 weeks, procedures to verify participation eligibility, and comparison of our sample with nationally available norms. Participants were young adult veterans aged 18-34 recruited through Facebook as part of a large study to document normative drinking behavior among a large community sample of veterans. Facebook ads were targeted toward young veterans to collect information on demographics and military characteristics, health behaviors, mental health, and health care utilization. We obtained a sample of 1023 verified veteran participants over a period of 24 days for the advertising price of approximately US $7.05 per verified veteran participant. Our recruitment strategy yielded a sample similar to the US population of young adult veterans in most demographic areas except for race/ethnicity and previous branch of service, which when we weighted the sample on race/ethnicity and branch a sample better matched with the population data was obtained. The Facebook sample recruited veterans who were engaged in a variety of risky health behaviors such as binge drinking and marijuana use. One fourth of veterans had never since discharge been to an appointment for physical health care and about half had attended an appointment for service compensation review. Only half had attended any appointment for a mental health concern at any clinic or hospital. Despite more than half screening positive for

  13. Obstacles in Advancement of Young Female Geoscientists: Research Results from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Kogan, M.; Laursen, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    While the number of women receiving advanced degrees in the geosciences has been rising, the faces of scientific leaders in academia remain dominantly male. Women are currently underrepresented in tenure-track positions in Earth science departments at research universities. Additionally, women are less likely to have more senior positions within their academic institutions. ESWN is a peer-mentoring network of early career women in the Earth sciences. We conducted a survey of ESWN members as part of an evaluation-with-research study that aims to determine the career needs of young female geoscientists. We also conducted a survey of the co-ed Earth Science Jobs list also run by ESWN and used its male and female members as comparison samples. The survey data provide insight into critical career junctures for women in geosciences and identify salient issues that institutions will need to address to successfully recruit, retain and promote women scientists. Prior research has shown that women are subjected to unintended and unrecognized biases that can have an ultimate impact on their productivity, advancement, and success. Our data corroborate these findings: women consistently rated the professional atmosphere in their departments and their interactions with colleagues less favorably than men. Moreover, women indicated lower rates of collaboration with colleagues in their unit compared to their male peers. Possibly due to this discrepancy in collaboration, women also reported lower research productivity than men in our study. Attaining work/life balance is a particular concern to early-career scientists, especially since tenure clock and the biological clock can coincide and reduce the opportunity for women to achieve tenure and have children. Family issues may impact the success of women in academic careers, such as travel to meetings and field work. Our research shows that women's partners more often worked in STEM fields, potentially complicating women's careers by

  14. A systematic review of social networking sites: innovative platforms for health research targeting adolescents and young adults.

    Park, Bu Kyung; Calamaro, Christina

    2013-09-01

    To review the evidence to determine if social networking sites (SNS) are effective tools for health research in the adolescent and young adult populations. Systematic review of published research articles focused on use of SNS for youth health research. Seventeen articles were selected that met the following criteria: used SNS at any stage of study, participants between 13 and 25 years of age, English language, and both international and national studies. Reviewers categorized selected studies based on the way SNS were used. Utilization of SNS for effectively implementing research with adolescents and young adults include (a) recruitment, (b) intervention, and (c) measurement. Four findings about advantages of using SNS apparent in this review are (a) ease of access to youth, (b) cost effectiveness in recruitment, (c) ease of intervention, and (d) reliable screening venue of mental status and high-risk behaviors. Although this literature review showed relatively minimal research to date on the use of SNS for research targeting adolescents and young adults, the impact of using SNS for health research is of considerable importance for researchers as well as participants. With careful focus, SNS can become a valuable platform to access, recruit, and deliver health interventions in a cost-effective manner to youth populations as well as hard-to-reach minority or underserved populations. The evidence demonstrates the usefulness of SNS as innovative platforms for health promotion among adolescents and young adults. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Collaborative agency to support integrated care for children, young people and families: an action research study

    Karen Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Collaboration was legislated in the delivery of integrated care in the early 2000s in the UK. This research explored how the reality of practice met the rhetoric of collaboration.Theory: The paper is situated against a theoretical framework of structure, agency, identity and empowerment. Collectively and contextually these concepts inform the proposed model of ‘collaborative agency’ to sustain integrated care. The paper brings sociological theory on structure and agency to the dilemma of collaboration.Methods: Participative action research was carried out in collaborative teams that aspired to achieve integrated care for children, young people and families between 2009 and 2013. It was a part time, PhD study in collaborative practice.Results: The research established that people needed to be able to be jointly aware of their context, to make joint decisions, and jointly act in order to deliver integrated services, and proposes a model of collaborative agency derived from practitioner’s experiences and integrated action research and literature on agency. The model reflects the effects of a range of structures in shaping professional identity, empowerment, and agency in a dynamic. The author proposes that the collaborative agency model will support integrated care, although this is, as yet, an untested hypothesis.

  16. Collaborative agency to support integrated care for children, young people and families: an action research study

    Karen Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Collaboration was legislated in the delivery of integrated care in the early 2000s in the UK. This research explored how the reality of practice met the rhetoric of collaboration. Theory: The paper is situated against a theoretical framework of structure, agency, identity and empowerment. Collectively and contextually these concepts inform the proposed model of ‘collaborative agency’ to sustain integrated care. The paper brings sociological theory on structure and agency to the dilemma of collaboration. Methods: Participative action research was carried out in collaborative teams that aspired to achieve integrated care for children, young people and families between 2009 and 2013. It was a part time, PhD study in collaborative practice. Results: The research established that people needed to be able to be jointly aware of their context, to make joint decisions, and jointly act in order to deliver integrated services, and proposes a model of collaborative agency derived from practitioner’s experiences and integrated action research and literature on agency. The model reflects the effects of a range of structures in shaping professional identity, empowerment, and agency in a dynamic. The author proposes that the collaborative agency model will support integrated care, although this is, as yet, an untested hypothesis.

  17. The Rise of Basic Research at tha Bell Labs: Young Turks and Younger Turks

    Anderson, Philip

    2004-03-01

    ABSTRACT Even before World War II, a certain amount of fundamental physics research came out of the Bell Labs. Already in the 20's, before the Labs were five years old, the discoveries of electron diffraction by Davisson and Germer, and of thermal noise by Johnson and Nyquist, had come as byproducts of wide-ranging technological studies. By the late '30's, there was a small group of broadly-trained scientists who formed a nucleus around which the "young turks" in management --J B Fisk, M J Kelly, W Shockley, perhaps others--formed the postwar physical research department, comprising at first perhaps 50 people with a mandate to do exploratory but "relevant" research. This talk will diiscuss how some of the generation of postwar hires, with the cooperation of enlightened managers like W O Baker and A H White, further tested and enlarged their freedom to do basic, curiosity-driven research in an academic atmosphere. I call this group, consisting of individuals like B T Matthias, G H Wannier, R G Shulman, P A Wolff, myself , and a number of others, the "younger Turks".

  18. Collaborative agency to support integrated care for children, young people and families: an action research study.

    Stuart, Kaz

    2014-04-01

    Collaboration was legislated in the delivery of integrated care in the early 2000s in the UK. This research explored how the reality of practice met the rhetoric of collaboration. The paper is situated against a theoretical framework of structure, agency, identity and empowerment. Collectively and contextually these concepts inform the proposed model of 'collaborative agency' to sustain integrated care. The paper brings sociological theory on structure and agency to the dilemma of collaboration. Participative action research was carried out in collaborative teams that aspired to achieve integrated care for children, young people and families between 2009 and 2013. It was a part time, PhD study in collaborative practice. The research established that people needed to be able to be jointly aware of their context, to make joint decisions, and jointly act in order to deliver integrated services, and proposes a model of collaborative agency derived from practitioner's experiences and integrated action research and literature on agency. The model reflects the effects of a range of structures in shaping professional identity, empowerment, and agency in a dynamic. The author proposes that the collaborative agency model will support integrated care, although this is, as yet, an untested hypothesis.

  19. Towards a Creative Synthesis of Participant Observation and Participatory Research: Reflections on Doing Research "with" and "on" Young Bhutanese Refugees in Nepal

    Evans, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    This article responds to Wright and Nelson's (1995) call for a "creative synthesis" of participant observation and participatory research, which may allow the limitations of both methods to be addressed. It does so by reflecting on the experience of doing long-term research both with and on young Bhutanese refugees in Nepal. Although…

  20. RESSIGNIFICANDO THE TEACHING PRACTICE FOR YOUNG AND ADULTS EDUCATION BASED ON PARTICIPANT RESEARCH

    Marcio Hoff

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this document is make a brief report of the evolution of Young and Adults Education (EJA in the historical-educational context of Brazil, over all from century XX till the 90 decade, with the writing of the new LDBEN- Guidelines and Bases National Education Law and the guidelines concerning to EJA, focusing the situation of this modality of education post-LDBEN, specially in relation to teachers’s pedagogical formation. The text brings up the problematic of the necessity of permanent spaces of teachers continued formation of this modality and tells a practical experience of formation accomplished with teachers of the Education State System in the cities of Cidreira, Capivari and Palmares do Sul, of Rio Grande do Sul State. Approaching the participant research from the classroom, the meetings have happened from July to December, 2006, with UNESCO and Education State Secretaryship support according to UNISC – Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul.

  1. Rutgers Young Horse Teaching and Research Program: sustainability of taking a risk with "at risk" horses.

    Ralston, Sarah L; Molnar, Anne

    2012-12-01

    In 1999, the Young Horse Teaching and Research Program (YHTRP) was initiated at Rutgers University. The unique aspect of the program was using horses generally considered "at risk" and in need of rescue, but of relatively low value. The risks of using horses from pregnant mare urine (PMU) ranches and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mustangs were high, but, ultimately, unrealized. No students or staff members were seriously injured over the course of the next 12 yr, and the horses were sold annually as highly desirable potential athletes or pleasure horses, usually at a profit. The use of "at risk" horses generated a significant amount of positive media attention and attracted substantial funding in the form of donations and sponsorships, averaging over $60,000 (USD)per year. Despite economic downturns, public and industry support provided sustainability for the program with only basic University infrastructural support. Taking the risk of using "at risk" horses paid off, with positive outcomes for all.

  2. Researching local sports initiatives for young migrants from a political perspective: methodological and practical challenges

    Noemi García-Arjona

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The processes of incorporation of young migrants have been studied using a range of new approaches. Among them, sports and physical activity have been claimed as a space for social and cultural integration. To date, most research has been based mainly on ethnographic and grassroots perspectives to better understand the experiences of sports practices of migrants and their families. However, fewer contributions have focused on the political discourse on sports as a field of integration. This article explores methodological challenges arosen when choosing sports policies as a field of study. The main methodological challenges considered include the contested conceptualizations of the target population in sports initiatives and the development of comparative selection criteria for different levels of institutional participants. An indepth analysis of these methodological issues can help to reflect on the ideological constructs of sports as a field of integration and highlight the contribution of the political sociological perspective to existing migration studies.

  3. The production of knowledge about sexually transmitted diseases in young people: a bibliometric research

    Thelma Spindola

    2015-07-01

      ABSTRACT Objective: To identify and characterize the scientific production of nurses related to young people's vulnerability to sexually transmitted diseases (STD. Method: Descriptive study of transverse cutting (2009-2013, bibliometric research, conducted through the search of publications on the Health Virtual Library and the catalog of theses and dissertations of Brazilian Association of Nursing. The sample consisted of 40 articles, 05 theses and 05 dissertations. Results: The most of the publications were carried out by nurses’ teachers with doctoral degree. The theme of HIV/aids, focus of health education, field research and qualitative analysis of the findings had greater representativeness in the sample analyzed. Conclusion: Although STD have been manifested in young people and the Health Ministry of Brazil showing the increased incidence of HIV/aids in this group, the scientific literature on the subject in the studied timeframe is irregular and reduced. Descriptors: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Adolescent, Young adult, Bibliometrics.   RESUMEN Objetivo: Identificar y caracterizar la producción científica de enfermería relacionado a la vulnerabilidad de los jóvenes con enfermedades de transmisión sexual. Método: Estudio descriptivo de tipo bibliométrico (2009-2013, de corte transversal realizado en la Biblioteca Virtual de salud y en el catálogo de tesis y disertaciones de la Asociación Brasileña de enfermería. La muestra estuvo compuesta por 40 artículos, 05 tesis y 05 disertaciones. Resultados: La mayoría de las publicaciones se llevó a cabo por enfermeras docentes con grado de doctorado. El tema del VIH/SIDA, el enfoque de educación para la salud, la investigación de campo y análisis cualitativo de los resultados tuvieron mayor representatividad en la muestra analizada. Conclusión: Aunque las enfermedades de transmisión sexual si manifiesta en los jóvenes y los documentos del Ministerio de salud de Brasil demostra el aumento

  4. White matter development and tobacco smoking in young adults: A systematic review with recommendations for future research.

    Gogliettino, Alex R; Potenza, Marc N; Yip, Sarah W

    2016-05-01

    Adolescence and young adulthood are critical vulnerability periods for initiation of tobacco smoking. White matter development is ongoing during this time and may be influenced by exposure to nicotine. Synthesis of findings from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies of adolescent and young adult smokers may be helpful in understanding the relationship between neurodevelopment and initiation and progression of tobacco-use behaviors and in guiding further research. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify DTI studies comparing adolescent and young adult (mean age adult studies. Directions for further research are also discussed. All identified studies reported increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) among adolescent/young adult smokers in comparison to non-smokers. Increased FA was most frequently reported in regions of the corpus callosum (genu, body and spenium), internal capsule and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Findings of increased FA among adolescent/young adult smokers are contrary to those from most adult studies and thus raise the possibility of differential effects of nicotine on white matter across the lifespan. Further research including multiple time points is needed to test this hypothesis. Other areas warranting further research include DTI studies of e-cigarette use and studies incorporating measures of pubertal stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-method and innovative approaches to researching the learning and social practices of young digital users

    Vittadini, Nicoletta; Carlo, Simone; Gilje, Øystein

    2012-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in researching the social aspects of contemporary societies is to adapt the methodological approach to complex digital media environments. Learning processes take place in this complex environment, and they include formal and informal experiences (learning...... in school, home, and real-virtual communities), peer cultures and intergenerational connections, production and creation as relevant activities, and personal interests as a focal point. Methods used in the study of learning and the social practices of young people must take into account four key issues......: boundaries between online and offline experiences are blurring; young people act performatively; young people act knowingly or reflexively; and the activities of young people cannot be understood through the use of a single method but require the use of multiple tools of investigation. The article discusses...

  6. Sexual Health Education for Young People with Disabilities: Research and Resources for Parents/Guardians. From Research to Practice

    Szydlowski, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    All young people need access to and can benefit from sexual health information. Young people with disabilities have the same right to this education as their peers. However, considerations must be made in order to modify the program to allow for information to be understood and learned in a way that is meaningful to them. Parents/guardians might…

  7. Sexual Health Education for Young People with Disabilities: Research and Resources for Educators. From Research to Practice

    Szydlowski, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    All young people need access to and can benefit from sexual health information. Young people with disabilities have the same right to this education as their peers. However, considerations must be made in order to modify the program to allow for information to be understood and learned in a way that is meaningful to them. Educators are in the…

  8. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  9. Religiosity As An Antecedent Of Attitude Towards Green Products: An Exploratory Research On Young Malaysian Consumers

    Lau Teck Chai

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Religion has long been acknowledged as an important social force that influences human behavior but yet in the secular society its influence on consumer behavior appears to be underestimated. Of the sporadic research conducted, findings indicated that religion can be a significant factor in relation to consumption patterns, innovativeness, media usage, family decision-making, purchase risk aversion and selected store patronage behavior. The current research is exploratory in nature and attempts to investigate the influence of religiosity on attitudes towards green products especially among young Malaysian consumers. Religiosity, the independent variable, was measured by the intrinsic/ extrinsic religious orientation scale adopted from Allport and Ross (1967. The dependent variable was derived from a study on attitudes towards green product (Mostafa, 2007. The questionnaires were distributed to students in a large private university located in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Reliability analysis and multiple linear regressions were conducted. The results from the multiple linear regression analysis indicate that intrinsic religiosity has a significant relationship on consumer’s attitude towards green product. However, in the case of extrinsic religiosity, there is no significant relationship on consumer’s attitude towards green product.

  10. Forbidden Fruit: The Politics of Researching Young People's Use of Online Sexually Explicit Materials in South African Schools

    Carboni, Nicci; Bhana, Deevia

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores some of the difficulties of doing research concerning young people's use of online sexually explicit materials in three high schools in South Africa. Against the backdrop of young people's sexual agency, we elaborate on the ways in which getting permission to conduct the research unsettled gatekeepers, as research on young…

  11. The need for mental health services research focusing on poor young women.

    Miranda, Jeanne; Green, Bonnie L.

    1999-06-01

    Despite the fact that the relationship between poverty and increased risk for a broad spectrum of mental disorders has been documented for several decades, very little is known about providing mental health treatments to poor individuals. In this paper, we emphasize the importance of developing, and empirically evaluating, sensitive and appropriate interventions for poor young women who suffer from common mental disorders. WHO ARE THE US POOR?: In the US, nearly 14% of individuals live in poverty, and another 20% in near poverty. The poor are disproportionally women and children such that 63% of female-headed households are poor. Young women and ethnic minorities are over-represented among the poor also, with 55% of those living below the poverty level being minorities. NEEDS AND BARRIERS TO CARE AMONG POOR, YOUNG WOMEN: The poor have more mental disorders than those with more resources. Further, women are twice as likely as men to have a mood or anxiety disorder, including major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with younger women at higher risk than older women. Research alos indicates that poor women have high exposure to traumatic events and cumulative adversity that is directly related to their mental health. This history may serve, in part, as a barrier to seeking mental health care. Other barriers in this population include lack of insurance, lack of access to primary care where mental disorders might be detected, practical problems like lack of childcare or transportation, and the inflexibility of low-income service jobs. Religious beliefs and attitudes about mental health treatment may play a role as well. Recent policy changes in the US have contributed to the vulnerability of this group as eligibility for welfare programs has reduced, and time limits have decreasd. Services for immigrants are also severely limited, and managed care strategies for those in the public sector may be confusing. IMPORTANT, UNANSWERED QUESTION: More needs

  12. Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) 2009 - Engaging Students and Teachers in Space Research

    Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    During the past 17 years, Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering, to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice, and to promote teacher development in STEM fields. This is accomplished by allowing students and teachers to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including space science), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. A total of 218 students have completed YES or are currently enrolled. Of these students, 37% are females and 56% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local ethnic diversity, and 67% represent underserved groups. Presently, there are 20 students and 3 teachers enrolled in the YES 2009/2010 Program. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students and teachers experience the research environment and a collegial mentorship where they complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. Teachers participate in an in-service workshop to share classroom materials and spread awareness of space-related research. YES students develop a website (yesserver.space.swri.edu) for topics in space science (this year was NASA's MMS Mission) and high school science teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, can positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences with

  13. Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) 2010 - Engaging Teachers in Space Research

    Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    During the past 18 years, Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering, to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice, and to promote teacher development in STEM fields. This is accomplished by allowing students and teachers to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including space science), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. A total of 239 students have completed YES or are currently enrolled. Of these students, 38% are females and 56% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local ethnic diversity, and 67% represent underserved groups. Presently, there are 21 students and 9 secondary school teachers enrolled in the YES 2010/2011 Program. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students and teachers experience the research environment and a collegial mentorship where they complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. YES students develop a website (yesserver.space.swri.edu) for topics in space science (this year was ESA's Rosetta Mission) and high school STEM teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Teachers participate in an in-service workshop to share their developed classroom materials and spread awareness of space-related research. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, can positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real

  14. DRIVING AND LIMITING FACTORS IN THE FARM MANAGEMENT BY YOUNG FARMERS IN THE CONTEXT OF SURVEY RESEARCH

    Barbara Kiełbasa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify driving and limiting factors of farm management in a region of fragmented agriculture. The paper presents the results of the research conducted in the South-Eastern Poland (Macroregion of Małopolska and Pogórze. The survey was conducted in 2014 in the farms managed by young farmers, i.e. the benefi ciaries of the measure “Setting up of young farmers” from the RDP 2007–2013, with the use of a survey method with a questionnaire interview. The research was empirical, and its main goal was to present a case study of the farm management by young farmers in terms of specifi c management barriers. The results of the studies pointed to the fragmented agrarian structure as the one of the biggest barriers of the eff ective farm management. The young farmers pointed that fragmented agrarian structure signifi cantly impedes the purchase or lease of agricultural land, and the farm development in the same way. The survey pointed to the factors that contribute to the young farmers: the entrepreneurial attitude, activity and creativity, training, the management knowledge and better access to the Common Agricultural Policy instruments.

  15. Contextuality of Young People's Attitudes and Its Implications for Research on Religion: A Response to Julia Ipgrave

    Schihalejev, Olga

    2012-01-01

    This is a response to Julia Ipgrave's contribution on the contextuality of young people's views on religion and religious diversity in this collection of essays on "Religion in Education". First I will highlight and reflect on methodological issues raised by Ipgrave's observations in the light of my own research. The first problem highlighted is…

  16. Experiences of SKYPE Communication in Education and Research--Data Collection Concerning Young Children with Long-Term Illness

    Svensson, Agneta Simeonsdotter; Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling; Hellström, Anna-Lena; Nolbris, Margaretha Jenholt

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide knowledge about communication using SKYPE with young children with chronic illness; advantages and barriers are investigated related to education and data issues collection. A qualitative exploratory research method was applied to interviews and notes via SKYPE between children and their web teachers. The…

  17. Young Children's Research Behaviour? Children Aged Four to Eight Years Finding Solutions at Home and at School

    Murray, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Children's research abilities have become increasingly recognised by adults, yet children remain excluded from the academy. This restricts children's freedom to make choices in matters affecting them, underestimates their capabilities and denies children particular rights. The present paper reports on young children's problem-solving as part of a…

  18. Change Agent Research on the BANA-Can/Am Summer Camp for Young People with Eating Disorders.

    Moriarty, Dick; And Others

    This document reports on the model and method used to design, implement, coordinate, and evaluate a summer camp for young people with eating disorders. The basic approach used at the camp is described as the Sports Institute for Research model, a systems analysis model which focuses on: (1) the ultimate goal or mission; (2) obstacles or problems…

  19. Young Investigator Proposal, Research Area 7.4 Reactive Chemical Systems: Multifunctional, Bimetallic Nanomaterials Prepared by Atomic Layer Electroless Deposition

    2017-09-30

    Report: Young Investigator Proposal, Research Area 7.4 Reactive Chemical Systems: Multifunctional, Bimetallic Nanomaterials Prepared by Atomic Layer ...Chemical Systems: Multifunctional, Bimetallic Nanomaterials Prepared by Atomic Layer Electroless Deposition Report Term: 0-Other Email: pcappillino... Layer Electroless Deposition (ALED, Figure 1) is the ability to tune growth mechanism, hence growth morphology, by altering conditions. In this

  20. Changing Deficit Narratives about Young Latino Men in Texas through a Research-Based Mentorship Program

    Campos, Emmet E.; Van Ryn, Rebekah; Davidson, Ty J.

    2018-01-01

    Austin Independent School District (AISD) and the University of Texas's Project MALES began a partnership to design a mentoring system for young men of color in hopes of improving the the matriculation and sustainability of this group in college by addressing the social, economic, and cultural obstacles impacting these young men. This strong…

  1. Bouncing forward of young refugees: a perspective on resilience research directions.

    Sleijpen, M.; Heide, F.J.J. ter; Mooren, T.; Boeije, H.R.; Kleber, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    While studies on the consequences of trauma and forced migration on young refugees have focused mainly on their pathology, a focus on resilience in young refugees is needed to adequately represent their response to adversity and to help understand their needs. The aim of this article is to present a

  2. Children and Young People's Views on Web 2.0 Technologies. LGA Research Report

    Rudd, Peter; Walker, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are online tools that allow users to share, collaborate and interact with one another. This small-scale project focused on young people's personal use of social media, and on the potential to use these tools to collect the views of young people and involve them in democracy in communities and local authorities. The main…

  3. Measuring Infant and Young Child Complementary Feeding Practices: Indicators, Current Practice, and Research Gaps.

    Ruel, Marie T

    2017-01-01

    The publication of the WHO Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) indicators in 2008 equipped the nutrition and broader development community with an invaluable tool for measuring, documenting, and advocating for faster progress in improving these practices in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The indicators, with 5 of them focusing on complementary feeding (CF) practices, were originally designed for population level assessment, targeting, monitoring, and evaluation. This chapter takes stock of where we are with the existing CF indicators: it reviews how the indicators have been used, what we have learned, and what their strengths and limitations are, and it suggests a way forward. We find that the indicators have been used extensively for population level assessments and country comparisons, and to track progress. They have also been adopted by researchers in program impact evaluations and in research seeking to understand the determinants and consequences of poor CF practices for child growth and development outcomes. In addition to generating a wealth of knowledge and unveiling the severity of the global problem of poor CF practices in LMICs, the indicators have been an invaluable tool to raise awareness and call for urgent action on improving CF practices at scale. The indicators have strengths and limitations, which are summarized in this chapter. Although enormous progress has been achieved since the indicators were released in 2008, we feel it is time to reflect and revisit the CF indicators, improve them, develop new ones, and promote their appropriate use. Better indicators are critically important to stimulate action and investments in improving CF practices at scale. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. NSF-supported education/outreach program takes young researchers to the Arctic

    Alexeev, V. A.; Walsh, J. E.; Hock, R.; Kaden, U.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Kholodov, A. L.; Bret-Harte, M. S.; Sparrow, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    Today, more than ever, an integrated cross-disciplinary approach is necessary to explain changes in the Arctic and understand their implications for the human environment. Advanced training and active involvement of early-career scientists is an important component of this cross-disciplinary approach. This effort led by the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) started in 2003. The newly supported project in 2013 is planning four summer schools (one per year) focused on four themes in four different Arctic locations. It provides the participants with an interdisciplinary perspective on Arctic change and its impacts on diverse sectors of the North. It is linked to other ongoing long-term observational and educational programs (e.g. NABOS, Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System; LTER, Long Term Environmental Research) and targets young scientists by using the interdisciplinary and place-based setting to broaden their perspective on Arctic change and to enhance their communication skills. Each course for 15-20 people consists of classroom and hands-on components and work with a multidisciplinary group of mentors on projects devoted to themes exemplified by the location. A specialist from the School of Education at UAF evaluates student's progress during the summer schools. Lessons learned during the 12 years of conducting summer schools, methods of attracting in-kind support and approaches to teaching students are prominently featured in this study. Activities during the most recent school, conducted in Fairbanks and LTER Toolik Lake Field Station in 2015 are the focus of this presentation.

  5. International research on the civic engagement of the youth and adolescents. Young citizens in the digital age

    María Carmen Robles Vílchez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of some of the research in the international context aimed at unveiling and valuing the experience of young people in experiences and beliefs regarding citizenship (Burke, 2007. Such research is generally intended to obtain information on students’ knowledge, attitudes and civic behavior in their own schools. We will highlight throughout the present paper that previous studies and the current state of scientific knowledge in civic education focuses on purely formal and structural aspects and lack a deep understanding and interpretation of the experiences of young citizens. We conclude, after our review, that it is necessary to include more comprehensive factors in the research and enquiry into the experiences and civic training of the youth.

  6. The Potential of Digital Technologies for Transforming Informed Consent Practices with Children and Young People in Social Research

    Sarah Parsons

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available How children and young people understand and exercise their autonomy, engagement and decision-making is fundamental to learning how to become active and engaged citizens, and to be socially included. Digital technologies are increasingly an integral part of children’s everyday lives and, therefore, valuable tools for supporting social inclusion. This paper discusses how digital technologies might positively support autonomy, engagement and decision-making through the lens of informed consent practices within social research. Current research practices are dominated by paper-based methods for obtaining informed consent which could be exclusionary for children and young people generally, and children with additional learning and support needs in particular. Digital technologies (laptops, PCs, tablet devices, smartphones offer the potential to support accessibility and understanding of ideas and activities, as well as engagement with and autonomy in decision-making and participation. This paper explores this potential as well as the challenges that researchers may face in this context.

  7. Outstanding accumulation of Sphagnum palustre in central-southern Italy

    Casella, Laura; Zaccone, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    Lake Fibreno is a site where some outstanding anomalies for the flora and vegetation of the wetlands of peninsular Italy are concentrated. Here one the southernmost European population of Sphagnum palustre occurs, and is restricted on the surface of a free-floating island, i.e., a round-shaped portion of fen (with a core of Sphagnum), erratically floating on the surface of a submerged sinkhole. Geological evidences point out the existence in the area of a large lacustrine basin since Late Pleistocene. The progressive filling of the lake, caused by changing in climatic conditions and neotectonic events, resulted in the formation of peat deposits in the area, following different depositional cycles in a swampy environment. So that, the studied free-floating island, probably originated around lake margins in the waterlogged area, was somehow isolated from the bank and started to float. Once the separation occurred, sedge peat stopped to accumulate, thus enhancing the role of S. palustre as the main peat-forming plant. The vegetation occurring at the moment of the isolation of the island was a coverage of Salix cinerea/Populus tremula stands below which cushions of moss and, in a lower extent, Thelypteris palustris/Equisetum palustre accumulated resulting in the formation of 2-3 meters of peat dominated by reeds and sedges. This vegetation has been partially degraded by grazing until 1970s, while in 1980s the lake became a nature reserve. Since then, the succession could resume in a spontaneous and natural way and it was possible for the vegetation to recover to natural dynamics and growing rate. The Sphagnum tussocks were measured in an empirical way at a distance of about 60 years after the last signaling and the result was a measurement of an accretion open to about 70 cm thick. Moreover, in a recent study, a 4-m deep peat core was collected from the centre of the island and results were surprising. In fact, 14C age dating, confirmed using 210Pb and 137Cs, showed

  8. Research on Clinical Preventive Services for Adolescents and Young Adults: Where Are We and Where Do We Need to Go?

    Harris, Sion K; Aalsma, Matthew C; Weitzman, Elissa R; Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Wong, Charlene; Hadland, Scott E; Santelli, John; Park, M Jane; Ozer, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    We reviewed research regarding system- and visit-level strategies to enhance clinical preventive service delivery and quality for adolescents and young adults. Despite professional consensus on recommended services for adolescents, a strong evidence base for services for young adults, and improved financial access to services with the Affordable Care Act's provisions, receipt of preventive services remains suboptimal. Further research that builds off successful models of linking traditional and community clinics is needed to improve access to care for all youth. To optimize the clinical encounter, promising clinician-focused strategies to improve delivery of preventive services include screening and decision support tools, particularly when integrated into electronic medical record systems and supported by training and feedback. Although results have been mixed, interventions have moved beyond increasing service delivery to demonstrating behavior change. Research on emerging technology-such as gaming platforms, mobile phone applications, and wearable devices-suggests opportunities to expand clinicians' reach; however, existing research is based on limited clinical settings and populations. Improved monitoring systems and further research are needed to examine preventive services facilitators and ensure that interventions are effective across the range of clinical settings where youth receive preventive care, across multiple populations, including young adults, and for more vulnerable populations with less access to quality care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adolescent and Young Adult Patient Engagement and Participation in Survey-Based Research: A Report From the "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer" Study.

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Bona, Kira; Wharton, Claire M; Bradford, Miranda; Shaffer, Michele L; Wolfe, Joanne; Baker, Kevin Scott

    2016-04-01

    Conducting patient-reported outcomes research with adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is difficult due to low participation rates and high attrition. Forty-seven AYAs with newly diagnosed cancer at two large hospitals were prospectively surveyed at the time of diagnosis and 3-6 and 12-18 months later. A subset participated in 1:1 semistructured interviews. Attrition prompted early study closure at one site. The majority of patients preferred paper-pencil to online surveys. Interview participants were more likely to complete surveys (e.g., 93% vs. 58% completion of 3-6 month surveys, P = 0.02). Engaging patients through qualitative methodologies and using patient-preferred instruments may optimize future research success. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Announcing the 2013 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Yacoot, Andrew; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Peters, Kara

    2014-07-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believe that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards'. This year awards were presented in the areas of Fluid Mechanics, Measurement Science, Precision Measurement, Sensors and Sensing Systems, and Optical and Laser-based Techniques. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. 2013 Award Winner—Fluid Mechanics Extraction of skin-friction fields from surface flow visualizations Tianshu Liu Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA The skin friction or wall shear stress, τ w, for a wall bounded turbulent flow is a quantity of fundamental importance. It is the basis for the wall unit, ν/u τ (kinematic viscosity/friction velocity: [τ w/ρ ]1/2), which establishes the intrinsic length scale in the flow. The selected paper [1] provides a comprehensive review of—and builds upon—prior techniques to obtain τ w values over an area of interest for flow past complex geometries. The quantities that can be measured by optical imaging are shown to be related to the skin friction by the optical flow equation, which in turn is solved numerically as an inverse problem via the variational approach. The paper provides a well defined set of guidelines for other investigators. Detailed examples of skin-friction measurements using luminescent oil films as well as temperature- and pressure-sensitive paints are presented. Quantitative uncertainty estimates are included in the

  11. The Reasons of Young Consumers’ Choice on Chain Café Stores: A Research on Starbucks

    Akgün, Serkan; Yalım, Funda

    2015-01-01

    Corporations providing services and making goods are forced to ensure customer satisfaction, to build brand loyalty, to change the way being in service by taking some changes into consideration, such as changes in living conditions, in consumers’ supply and demand, fi erce competition environment. At this point, chain café stores are appeared as preferred ones by especially young consumers in direct proportion to changes in consumers’ supply and demand. Young consumers, while going for a chai...

  12. 7 CFR 1901.508 - Servicing of insured notes outstanding with investors.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Servicing of insured notes outstanding with investors. 1901.508 Section 1901.508 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL... Ownership and Insured Notes § 1901.508 Servicing of insured notes outstanding with investors. The Director...

  13. Doing more good than harm? The effects of participation in sex research on young people in the Netherlands.

    Kuyper, Lisette; de Wit, John; Adam, Philippe; Woertman, Liesbeth

    2012-04-01

    Ethical guidelines for research with human participants stress the importance of minimizing risks and maximizing benefits. In order to assist Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and researchers to make more informed risk/benefit analyses with regard to sex research among adolescents, the current study examined the effects of participation in sex research among 899 young people (15-25 years old). Participants completed three questionnaires on a wide range of sexuality-related measures. They also completed scales measuring their levels of distress, need for help, and positive feelings due to their research participation. In general, negative effects of research participation seemed limited, while benefits of participation appeared substantial. Several differences with regard to sociodemographic characteristics were found (e.g., females experienced more distress then males and younger or lower educated participants experienced more positive feelings). In addition, victims of sexual coercion reported more distress and need for help due to their participation, but also experienced more positive feelings. No significant differences were found in relation to experience with sexual risk behaviors (e.g., experience with one-night-stands). Several limitations of the study were discussed, as were implications for future research. Overall, the findings caution IRBs and researchers against being overly protective regarding the inclusion of young people in sex research.

  14. CE: Original Research: The Lived Experience of Social Media by Young Adult Burn Survivors.

    Giordano, Marie S

    2016-08-01

    : Young adult burn survivors who were burned before they reached young adulthood (before the age of 18) face particular challenges in meeting their needs for socialization. Social media are widely used by adolescents and young adults, and permit socialization without face-to-face communication. This qualitative, phenomenological study was conducted in order to explore and describe the lived experience of social media by young adult burn survivors. Five women and four men between the ages of 20 and 25 years were interviewed; before the age of 18 years, each had sustained burns over more than 25% of their total body surface area. Van Manen's phenomenological methodology provided the study framework. Five essential themes emerged: identity, connectivity, social support, making meaning, and privacy. The participants used social media as a way to express their identity while safeguarding their privacy, and as a way to make meaning out of their traumatic experiences. Connecting with others facilitated a flow of social support and information, which was motivating and encouraging. The findings indicate that the use of social media by young adult burn survivors may be warranted as a way to further their healing processes. The knowledge gained from this study may also be useful in facilitating the development of nursing interventions aimed at preparing young adult burn survivors for reentry into society.

  15. Monogenic diabetes in children and young adults: Challenges for researcher, clinician and patient

    2006-01-01

    Monogenic diabetes results from one or more mutations in a single gene which might hence be rare but has great impact leading to diabetes at a very young age. It has resulted in great challenges for researchers elucidating the aetiology of diabetes and related features in other organ systems, for clinicians specifying a diagnosis that leads to improved genetic counselling, predicting of clinical course and changes in treatment, and for patients to altered treatment that has lead to coming off insulin and injections with no alternative (Glucokinase mutations), insulin injections being replaced by tablets (e.g. low dose in HNFα or high dose in potassium channel defects -Kir6.2 and SUR1) or with tablets in addition to insulin (e.g. metformin in insulin resistant syndromes). Genetic testing requires guidance to test for what gene especially given limited resources. Monogenic diabetes should be considered in any diabetic patient who has features inconsistent with their current diagnosis (unspecified neonatal diabetes, type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and clinical features of a specific subtype of monogenic diabetes (neonatal diabetes, familial diabetes, mild hyperglycaemia, syndromes). Guidance is given by clinical and physiological features in patient and family and the likelihood of the proposed mutation altering clinical care. In this article, I aimed to provide insight in the genes and mutations involved in insulin synthesis, secretion, and resistance, and to provide guidance for genetic testing by showing the clinical and physiological features and tests for each specified diagnosis as well as the opportunities for treatment. PMID:17186387

  16. Setting research priorities to improve the health of children and young people with neurodisability: a British Academy of Childhood Disability-James Lind Alliance Research Priority Setting Partnership.

    Morris, Christopher; Simkiss, Doug; Busk, Mary; Morris, Maureen; Allard, Amanda; Denness, Jacob; Janssens, Astrid; Stimson, Anna; Coghill, Joanna; Robinson, Kelly; Fenton, Mark; Cowan, Katherine

    2015-01-28

    To engage young people, parent carers and clinicians in a systematic process to identify and prioritise research questions regarding ways to improve the health and well-being of children and young people with neurodisability. British Academy of Childhood Disability (BACD)-James Lind Alliance research priority setting partnership bringing together patients, carers and clinicians as equal stakeholders. UK health service and community. The BACD Strategic Research Group formed the partnership. A Steering Group was established; charity and professional partner organisations were recruited. Suggestions were gathered in an open survey and from research recommendations for statutory guidance. Items were aggregated to formulate indicative research questions and verified as uncertainties from research evidence. An interim survey was used to rank the questions to shortlist topics. A mixed group of stakeholders discussed the top 25 questions at the final priority setting workshop agreeing a final rank order and the top 10 research priorities. Partner organisations were 13 charities and 8 professional societies. 369 people submitted suggestions (40% non-clinicians). 76 people participated in the interim prioritisation (26 parents, 1 young person, 10 charity representatives, 39 clinicians); 22 took part in the final workshop (3 young people, 7 parents, 3 charity representatives, 9 professionals). The top three research priorities related to (1) establishing the optimal frequency and intensity (dose) for mainstream therapies, (2) means for selecting and encouraging use of communication strategies and (3) ways to improve children's attitudes towards disability. The top 10 included evaluating interventions to promote mobility, self-efficacy, mental health, continence, physical fitness, educational inclusion and reduce impacts of sleep disturbance. The methodology provided a systematic and transparent process to identify research priorities that included stakeholders that have

  17. Youth and Society: The Two Transitions. A Review of Australian Research on Young People in Work and Education. ACER Research Monograph No. 38.

    Blakers, Catherine

    This literature review is part of a project designed to provide an in-depth picture of the experiences and views of long-term unemployed people in Australia. The review outlines what the research shows and says about the situation of young people (15-24 years) in work and education in the changing society of the 1980s in Australia. The book is…

  18. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Open access unsolicited emails for scholarly work - Young and senior researchers perspectives.

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Grech, Victor

    2018-04-20

    The increasing demand on academics and researchers to publish has led to the development of fake journals (also known as predatory journals). Such journals lack peer review and precipitate unfair criticism toward legitimate open access journals. Predatory journals tend to bombard a researcher's mailbox on a daily basis, inviting authors to submit a review/manuscript/opinion/short case to their journal while promising expedited publication - against a fee. This study assessed the unsolicited emails received over the period of November 2017 by a young and by a senior researcher. The young researcher received a substantially higher amount of emails (n = 101) compared to the senior researcher (n = 23). The article processing costs for solicited journals received, ranged between $49 and $3019. These journals are almost all only indexed in Google Scholar and do not display any meaningful journal metrics. Furthermore, the majority of the unsolicited emails were not relevant to the researcher's field of study. Therefore authors and readers alike should evaluate emails received with regard to journal legitimacy prior to submission of work to possibly predatory journals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Outstanding scientist of the year 2006: Rogel Patawaran, BS.

    Rubin, Robert A; Hazirjian, Courtney L

    2006-01-01

    to the encryption process will aid in the number of lives saved as well as helping to avoid medical malpractice by ensuring the accuracy of medical records, as well as reducing the number of medication errors or inappropriate prescriptions being filled. These remarkable accomplishments in patient safety are accomplished at a rapid speed that ensures that data-sensitive patient files can be securely transmitted between and within hospitals. Finally, with the growing need for an electronic system within the medical field, doctors will be able to securely access all such data from anywhere and at any time, thus reducing the age-old problem of time constraints that a paper system presented doctors and hospitals alike. In recognition of Rogel Patawaran's contributions to the medical field through the use of encryption teamed with the transferring of sensitive data such as hospital records, Rogel Patawaran has been selected as the Outstanding Scientist of 2006.

  20. Young Lives” Ethiopia is a 15-year research project concerned with ...

    “We have to think in more complex ways about who is in the household and what their ... with practical indicators of how young people are faring in their daily lives. ... substantial hours — so their chances for academic success are diminished.

  1. Digital Games for Young Children Ages Three to Six: From Research to Design

    Lieberman, Debra A.; Fisk, Maria Chesley; Biely, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Young children ages 3 to 6 play a wide range of digital games, which are now available on large screens, handheld screens, electronic learning systems, and electronic toys, and their time spent with games is growing. This article examines effects of digital games and how they could be designed to best serve children's needs. A small body of…

  2. Is Anyone Listening? Young People Speak about Work and Unemployment. ACER Research Monograph No. 42.

    Blakers, Catherine

    This report presents the results of an Australian survey investigating the issues raised by unemployment in society, using extensive quotations from the respondents. In 1983 an open-ended questionnaire was sent to a group of about 10,000 young people (aged 18-22) in Australia to determine their opinions about unemployment and the future and to…

  3. Predicting Career Adaptability through Self-Esteem and Social Support: A Research on Young Adults

    Ataç, Lale Oral; Dirik, Deniz; Tetik, Hilmiye Türesin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between career adaptability and self-esteem, and analyze the moderating role of social support in this relationship on a sample of 313 young adults. The results of the study confirm that career adaptability is significantly predicted by self-esteem. Moreover, findings suggest that (1)…

  4. "¿Tu te Acuerdas de Ganchulinas?": Longitudinal Research with Young Emergent Bilinguals

    Axelrod, Ysaaca

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Celia Genishi, this article discusses data from an ethnographic case study of young Latina/o children, starting in their four-year-olds classroom in a Head Start Program through their first grade year in a dual-language program in a public school. The children attended a bilingual Head Start program that followed a…

  5. Young Children and E-Reading: Research to Date and Questions for the Future

    Miller, Elizabeth B.; Warschauer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The practice of reading is rapidly moving from print to screen. Young children are not immune from this trend; indeed, many children's principal literacy experiences occur using iPads and other handheld digital devices. This transition raises important questions about how the emergence and development of literacy might change in these new…

  6. The PhD Ethos-Mythos: What Chances do Have Young Talented Researchers in Reality? (Invited Paper

    Bernard Wallner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear tasks of universities did not change in the course of time. However, new responsibilities are added mostly depending on the en vogue zeitgeist, which does not necessarily facilitate strategic planning in an easy way. Because changes following the ideology of the spirit of the time are frequently not really adaptable to established structures. The classical parameters of university achievements are research and its output as well as teaching concepts to educate young scientists. Both, teaching and research, represent the major performance columns for universities and are dependent from each other and cause each other mutually. Many institutions proclaim that research-led approaches of scientific teaching generates the best academically trained graduates, who succeed competitively in the working environment and in the research world of universities. However, during the last 100 years the developments in the academic world showed that teaching and research do not cause each other like Castor and Pollux in order to be successful.

  7. Research on System Environment for Growth and Development of Young College Instructors--Taking China University of Geosciences Beijing as an Example

    Zhang, Long; Cao, Yong; Shi, Yunlong

    2017-01-01

    Young college instructors have become an important force of college teachers in teaching courses and doing research, who play an essential role in promoting the development of high education. From the perspective of system environment for the growth and development of young college instructors, five parts closest to the growth and development of…

  8. Multi-method and innovative approaches to researching the learning and social practices of young digital users

    Vittadini, Nicoletta; Carlo, Simone; Gilje, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in researching the social aspects of contemporary societies is to adapt the methodological approach to complex digital media environments. Learning processes take place in this complex environment, and they include formal and informal experiences (learning...... in school, home, and real-virtual communities), peer cultures and inter-generational connections, production and creation as relevant activities, and personal interests as a focal point. Methods used in the study of learning and the social practices of young people must take into account four key issues......: boundaries between online and offline experiences are blurring; young people act performatively, knowingly, or reflexively; and their activities cannot be understood through the use of a single method, but require the use of multiple tools of investigation. The article discusses three methodological issues...

  9. The Outstanding Universal Values of the Wadden Sea: an ecological perspective

    Baptist, M.J.; Dankers, N.M.J.A.; Smit, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the Outstanding Unique Values of the Wadden Sea from an ecological perspective, that is, according to criteria IX and X for the nomination of World Heritage Sites, as defined by the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas.

  10. Stories of HERMES: An Analysis of the Issues Faced by Young European Researchers in Migration and Ethnic Studies

    Maren Borkert

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces contemporary migration research from the perspective of a cross-section of itinerant European academics at the early stages of their research career. Specifically, it examines self-reflexivity as an effective tool to support qualitative data analysis in light of the multiple dimensions of migration and ethnic research in Europe. As part of this reflexivity, the paper considers the complex relations and relationships that shape researcher-participant interaction. It shows how these are made even more intricate and confusing by research conducted outside ones home country and/ or with national communities to which one does not "naturally" belong. Over recent years, the European Commission has sought to foster inter-academic exchange, especially amongst new European researchers. Emphasis has been placed on the need to build up effective international and inter-disciplinary research networks but, we argue, very little attention has been directed towards how the processes of up-rooting and re-grouping facilitate and/ or restrict the research experience. Using self-reflexivity, and in light of the particular complexities of carrying out international migration research, the paper will review these issues and seek to increase our understanding of how young European academics become successful transnational researchers. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs060397

  11. Distress and burnout in young medical researchers before and during the Greek austerity measures: forerunner of a greater crisis?

    Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Melidoniotis, Evangelos; Mechili, Enkeleint-Aggelos

    2018-07-01

    Distress and burnout are strongly correlated with austerity and financial recessions. Aim of this study was to assess distress and burnout among young medical researchers (YMR) in Greece before and during the financial crisis. In total 2050 YMR affiliated in all the nursing and medical departments of Greece were enrolled (1025 in Period A: 2008 and 1025 in Period B: 2017). Distress and burnout were measured via DASS-21 and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) questionnaires. Before the crisis, prevalence of distress and burnout among young medical researchers was 24 and 20%, respectively. During the financial crisis distress prevalence increased significantly (56%), while there has also been a tremendous increase in burnout occurrence (60%). Specific sociodemographic characteristics presented significantly increased rate of change (females, singles and divorced/widowers, living with family members, volunteers, smokers and heavy alcohol consumers). Distress and burnout scales were positively correlated (Spearman's r = 0.81; p = 0.01). Depression scores shifted from normal to moderate (rate of change = 13.1%), anxiety levels increased from normal to severe (rate of change = 14.3%) and tension/stress scores elevated from normal to severe (rate of change = 20.2%). It is evident that the current financial crisis and working conditions have a strong impact on health status of young medical researchers in Greece. The observed increased trends and the identified predictors could guide targeted and comprehensive interventions towards tackling distress among the medical researchers not only in Greece but also in other countries suffering from financial crisis.

  12. [Clinical research progress of direct surgical repair of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients].

    Liu, Haichao; Qian, Jixian

    2013-01-01

    To review and summarize the surgical techniques and their outcomes for the treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients by direct surgical repair. Both home and abroad literature on the surgical techniques and their outcomes respectively for the treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients by direct surgical repair was reviewed extensively and summarized. Direct surgical repair of lumbar spondylolysis can offer a simple reduction and fixation for the injured vertebra, which is also in accord with normal anatomy and physiology. In this way, normal anatomy of vertebra can be sustained. As reported surgical techniques of direct repair, such as single lag screw, hook screw, cerclage wire, pedicle screw cable, pedicle screw rod, and pedicle screw hook system, they all can provide acceptable results for lumbar spondylolysis in young patients. Furthermore, to comply strictly with the inclusion criteria of surgical management and select the appropriate internal fixation can also contribute to a good effectiveness. Within the various methods of internal fixation, pedicle screw hook system has been widely recognized. Pedicle screw hook system fixation is simple and safe clinically. With the gradual improvement of this method and the development of minimally invasive technologies, it will have broad application prospects.

  13. From informed consent to dissemination: Using participatory visual methods with young people with long-term conditions at different stages of research.

    Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia; Martins, Ana; Coyne, Imelda; Bryan, Gemma; Gibson, Faith

    2016-01-01

    Research with young people suffering from a long-term illness has more recently incorporated the use of visual methods to foster engagement of research participants from a wide age range, capture the longitudinal and complex factors involved in young people's experiences of care, and allow young people to express their views in multiple ways. Despite its contributions, these methods are not always easy to implement and there is a possibility that they might not generate the results or engagement initially anticipated by researchers. We hope to expand on the emerging discussion on the use of participatory visual methods by presenting the practical issues we have faced while using this methodology during different stages of research: informed assent/consent, data collection, and the dissemination of findings. We propose a combination of techniques to make sure that the research design is flexible enough to allow research participants to shape the research process according to their needs and interests.

  14. Limits to modern contraceptive use among young women in developing countries: a systematic review of qualitative research

    Wight Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the reproductive health of young women in developing countries requires access to safe and effective methods of fertility control, but most rely on traditional rather than modern contraceptives such as condoms or oral/injectable hormonal methods. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to examine the limits to modern contraceptive use identified by young women in developing countries. Focusing on qualitative research allows the assessment of complex processes often missed in quantitative analyses. Methods Literature searches of 23 databases, including Medline, Embase and POPLINE®, were conducted. Literature from 1970–2006 concerning the 11–24 years age group was included. Studies were critically appraised and meta-ethnography was used to synthesise the data. Results Of the 12 studies which met the inclusion criteria, seven met the quality criteria and are included in the synthesis (six from sub-Saharan Africa; one from South-East Asia. Sample sizes ranged from 16 to 149 young women (age range 13–19 years. Four of the studies were urban based, one was rural, one semi-rural, and one mixed (predominantly rural. Use of hormonal methods was limited by lack of knowledge, obstacles to access and concern over side effects, especially fear of infertility. Although often more accessible, and sometimes more attractive than hormonal methods, condom use was limited by association with disease and promiscuity, together with greater male control. As a result young women often relied on traditional methods or abortion. Although the review was limited to five countries and conditions are not homogenous for all young women in all developing countries, the overarching themes were common across different settings and contexts, supporting the potential transferability of interventions to improve reproductive health. Conclusion Increasing modern contraceptive method use requires community-wide, multifaceted

  15. Political participation and sustainability: reflections on a research-intervention with youngs in Cearas’s semi-arid region

    Domingos Arthur Feitosa Petrola

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Participating socially and politically in the country's life still is a huge democratic challenge, especially when it concerns Brazilian youth. This research therefore sought to understand the social and political participation of young people in the semi-arid region, analyzing their relations with sustainability. With a qualitative nature, it was developed between May and August of 2014 with a group of subjects, with 15 to 30 years old, members of a non-governmental organization in the city of Arneiroz, countryside of the State of Ceara. The type of research is expressed in the research-intervention which assumes a political and methodological feature. The Freirean Culture Circles were also used as a "place-instruments" of data collection. By the results, it was observed that young people have demonstrated that, despite recognizing the importance of acting and assuming a political role at the transformation of reality through participation mechanisms, they do not feel invited to occupy this place given the traditional and technocratic model of social control and, therefore, they show little interest in effective participatory action. It is urgent to elaborate methodologies that promote and reach to a committed and critical participation, structured through an ideal of sustainable and ethical public policies, stimulating more creative forms of emancipation.

  16. An outstanding female figure in the history of occupational health: Ersilia Majno Bronzini.

    Salerno, Silvana

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the obituary "Ersilia Majno Bronzini: an outstanding female figure in Occupational Health", probably written by Luigi Devoto and published in the journal La Medicina del Lavoro (1933), a reappraisal is made of Majno Bronzini's contribution to occupational health. Most references were collected from the archives of the journal Il Lavoro (1901), the archives of the association "Union of Women", the periodical founded by Majno Bronzini (1899) and other material. Majno Bronzini's selected published papers (1895, 1900, 1902) on the working conditions of women and child labour proposing a national occupational health law were found. The importance of a women's network for occupational health is also shown in Majno Bronzini's correspondence with Anna Celli Frantzel and Maria Montessori. In 1902 Angelo Celli officially congratulated Majno Bronzini's (and Anne Kuliscioff's) efforts to promulgate the first law on women and child labour during his speech before the Italian Parliament, published by II Lavoro. Majno Bronzini and Nina Rignano Sullam were the only two women participating in the First International Congress on Occupational Health in Milan (1906). The correspondence between Majno Bronzini and Devoto (1901-1933) and Devoto's formal acknowledgement of Majno Bronzini (1910) when inaugurating the new "Clinica del Lavoro" institute is well documented. Majno Bronzini dedicated a significant part of her life to occupational health, together with Anna Celli Frantzel and Maria Montessori along with many others. This research shows how important her contribution was to occupational health development.

  17. Influenza type A virus: an outstandingly protean pathogen and a potent modular weapon.

    Shoham, Dany

    2013-05-01

    A remarkable debate recently arose on a global scale, about bioethics, biohazard, bioweaponry and bioterrorism issues related to scientific research concerning the induced transition of the highly lethal H5N1 avian flu virus from a non-pandemic to a tentatively pandemic strain, which might fall into malevolent hands. Appreciable ecogenetic complexity marks the main attributes of influenza type A viruses, namely infectivity, virulence, antigenicity, transmissibility, host range, endemicity, and epidemicity. They all shape, conjunctively, the outstanding protean nature of this pathogen, hence the modularity of the latter as a potent weapon. The present analysis inquires into those attributes, so as to profile and gauge threat, usability, impact and coping, particularly that the dimension of genetic engineering of this virus largely amplifies its potential. Within that context, various human interventions and misuses, including human experimental infections, undesirable vaccinations, as well as unauthorized and unskillful operations, led to bad corollaries and are also discussed in the present study. Altogether, a variety of interrelated properties underlying the complicatedness of and menaces posed by influenza A virus as a grave medical challenge, a dually explorable pathogen, and a modular biological warfare agent, are thereby illuminated, alongside with their scientific, strategic and practical implications.

  18. Research notes about the ways of appropriation of films by educators in young and adults education

    Evelyn Fernandes Azevedo Faheina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the presence of film useage in young and adults education. It shows results of a survey that aimed to know the ways of appropriation of film at school by the educators of adult education. To understand that question, it was analyzed the content of the speech of teachers and observed some teaching practice in which film was used. From the analysis of collected data, it was concluded that educators have appropriated and used film like illus - tration of the curriculum contents and of the subjects studied, cha - racterizing the use of film as an additional and secondary resource in activities of school.

  19. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2012 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2012 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Yacoot, Andrew; Regtien, Paul; Peters, Kara

    2013-07-01

    conclusions to the case of low Reynolds number flows. It is expected that further developments of this work could lead to successful applications at higher Reynolds numbers and turbulent flows. For the cases analyzed in this work, the authors have achieved a significant improvement in describing the velocity and the vorticity in proximity of the wall. Lastly, the authors have discussed with an open attitude the possible shortcomings of the method. They have indicated the points that will deserve attention when further research efforts are dedicated to the topic. Given the above considerations, the MST outstanding paper selection committee for measurements in fluids, chaired by Professor John Foss, has nominated this article for the MST 2012 outstanding paper award. The chairmen would like to thank the authors for choosing to publish their work in Measurement Science and Technology, and hope that other researchers enjoy reading these works and feel encouraged to submit their own best work to the journal. References [1] Hiller J, Maisl M and Reindl L M 2012 Physical characterization and performance evaluation of an x-ray micro-computed tomography system for dimensional metrology applications Meas. Sci. Technol. 23 085404 (18pp) [2] Samarage C R, Carberry J, Sheard G J and Fouras A 2012 Polynomial element velocimetry (PEV): a technique for continuous in-plane velocity and velocity gradient measurements for low Reynolds number flows Meas. Sci. Technol. 23 105304 (16pp)

  20. Metallic iron for water treatment and environmental remediation: A handout to young researchers

    Nkundimana, Emmanuel; Noubactep, Chicgoua; Uwamariya, Valentine

    2015-01-01

    The premise of this research note is that current research on metallic iron (Fe0) for environmental remediation and water treatment has started on a biased basis. Before expecting experienced researchers to correct flawed approaches compromising the future of the technology, the attention of new researchers should be drawn on the prevailing flawed conceptual models. There are guides on how to select good research topics, to perform good literature review, to select good mentors, and to write ...

  1. Empowering young people/ young adults to action

    Brander, Birgitte Gade

    Research questions: How do the young students relate to their community? How do young students position themselves as agents in their own lives and in the places they live – which discourse is used?......Research questions: How do the young students relate to their community? How do young students position themselves as agents in their own lives and in the places they live – which discourse is used?...

  2. Research on the productive performance of young rabbit hybrid bred in a household system (II

    Marian Bura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To ease the shock of weaning, the young hybrid rabbits were held between the ages of 30 days and 37 days in a farrowing cage and than they were transfered inside growing pens (148/123 cm, where they remained until slaughter. Before slaughter, youth has undergone a finishing process. Youth received treatment with vitamins, coccidiostatics and specific vaccinations. The finishing process began when youth Hybrid reached a body mass of 1700-1900 g and consisted of removal of the ration of grain and vitamins. Youth hybrid was sacrificed to a body weight of 2500 g, weight being achieved between the ages of 107-142 days. Youth consumed between 140.86 to 663.50 g / day juicy fodder, from 806.14 to 1225.82 g / day bulky and concentrated feed. Carcasses of youth hybrid weighed between 1596.70 to 1886.40 g. Slaughter yield ranged from 50.25 to 68.67%. The average price on housing in young hybrid rabbits, calculated at a price of 17 lei/kg carcass, ranged from 27.10 to 33.40 lei / housing.

  3. Educational utilization of outstanding spherulitic rhyolite occurred in Cheongsong, Korea

    Jang, Y. D.; Woo, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cheongsong is located in the central eastern area of South Korea. Unique spherulitic rhyolites occur in this region as dykes formed about 48 to 50 million years ago. Composed of quartz and feldspar these spherulitic rhyolites show various flowerlike shapes, such as chrysanthemum, dandelion, rose, carnation, sunflower, dahlia and so on, so they are called 'flower stones'. The spherulite indicates that it was undercooled caused by very fast cooling at a shallow depth near the surface and the variety of shapes resulted from the difference of crystallizing conditions. According to the condition, minerals start to crystallize homogeneously or heterogeneously and develop as rounded or fibrous shapes, representing beautiful patterns when combined. These spherulitic structures are very rare not only in Korea but also globally, being valuable for research and preservation because of their rarity, beauty and diversity. Cheongsong therefore applies to the UGG (UNESCO Global Geopark) in an attempt to popularize the flower stones and use them as education materials which can also be incorporated in other valuable sites. The exhibition center provides diverse types of flower stones in which visitors could learn about rhyolitic volcanism, crystallization and spherulite and can experience the process of changing a rough stone into a flower stone. A geotrail course has also been created, showing each type of flower stone on the outcrop and providing educational programs about geological mechanisms of the stones with a trained guide.

  4. ISMB 2016 offers outstanding science, networking, and celebration.

    Fogg, Christiana

    2016-01-01

    The annual international conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) is the major meeting of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB). Over the past 23 years the ISMB conference has grown to become the world's largest bioinformatics/computational biology conference. ISMB 2016 will be the year's most important computational biology event globally. The conferences provide a multidisciplinary forum for disseminating the latest developments in bioinformatics/computational biology. ISMB brings together scientists from computer science, molecular biology, mathematics, statistics and related fields. Its principal focus is on the development and application of advanced computational methods for biological problems. ISMB 2016 offers the strongest scientific program and the broadest scope of any international bioinformatics/computational biology conference. Building on past successes, the conference is designed to cater to variety of disciplines within the bioinformatics/computational biology community.  ISMB 2016 takes place July 8 - 12 at the Swan and Dolphin Hotel in Orlando, Florida, United States. For two days preceding the conference, additional opportunities including Satellite Meetings, Student Council Symposium, and a selection of Special Interest Group Meetings and Applied Knowledge Exchange Sessions (AKES) are all offered to enable registered participants to learn more on the latest methods and tools within specialty research areas.

  5. Sexual Health Research With Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men: Experiences of Benefits and Harms.

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Morgan, Anthony; Oidtman, Jessica; Dao, Ann; Moon, Margaret; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Ott, Mary A

    2017-05-01

    Young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) are often underrepresented in sexual health research because of concerns about safety, privacy, and the potential for research harms. Empirical data are needed to understand YBMSM experience of participating in research, benefits and harms (discomfort), to inform policy and regulatory decisions. Using qualitative methods, this article examines 50 YBMSM, aged 15-19 years, experiences of benefits/harms, challenges of participating in sexual health research, and contextual factors impacting research experiences. Participants were asked about benefits and harms experienced in answering questions about sexual orientation, first same-sex attraction, and same-sex sexual experiences after completing an in-depth interview. Interviews were transcribed and coded. Inductive open coding was used to identify themes within and between interviews. Participants were able to describe perceived direct benefits resulting from research interview participation, including awareness of risky sexual behaviors, a safe space to share early coming out stories and same-sex sexual experiences, and a sense of empowerment and comfort with one's sexual orientation. Indirect benefits described by participants included perceptions of helping others and the larger gay community. Few participants described harms (discomfort recalling experiences). Our data suggest that participating in qualitative sexual health research focused on sexual orientation, sexual attraction, and early same-sex sexual experiences may result in minimal harms for YBMSM and multiple benefits, including feeling more comfortable than in a general medical visit.

  6. Salvator Karabaić (1884-1956): the profile of an eyceptional Psychiatrist/Neuropsychiatrist with outstanding managing capabilities.

    Pavlovic, Eduard

    2008-01-01

    Salvator Karabaić was born in Krk in 1884. In 1904, he finished a grammar school in Susak, and in 1910 graduated from the Vienna Medical School. From 1910 to 1919, he worked in Pula/Pola and Kovin. From 1919 to 1929 he worked at the Institute for Mental illnesses Stenjevec (today the Psychiatric Hospital Vrapce) where in 1921 he became the head physician (orig. primarius) at the age of 37 years only. Between 1929 and 1945, he worked in Sarajevo as a Head of the State Hospital's Neuropsychiatry Department. In 1948 he was appointed the director of the Hospital for Mental Illnesses in Sarajevo. The hospital was in fact a remodelled rope factory with a favourable position near a homestead. He managed this institution until 1956. He died on 24 September 1956 at a hospital surgery ward in Sarajevo. Judging by Dr Karabaić's ability to take care of 200 psychiatric patients alone, he was an outstanding figure with enormous experience. A lot of it he earned during the Vrapce hospital period between 1919 and 1929. He had the opportunity to work with the outstanding figures of Croatian psychiatry such as Dr Ivo Zirovcić, Dr Laza Stanojević, Dr Ivan Barbot, and Dr Aleksej KuljZenko The author suggests that a more systematic research is needed to understand the work and the life of Dr Salvator Karabaić, who was a talented and hardworking psychiatrist/ neuropsychiatrist with outstanding managing capabilities, and a person who above all cared for his patients.

  7. Young Lives” Ethiopia is a 15-year research project concerned with ...

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... In 2002, researchers began collecting data from 20 sentinel sites across the ... More generally, says Jones, education is a major area where refinement of ... Amerindian researcher brings grassroots views on mining to fore.

  8. Young Love

    Regmi, Pramod; Simkhada, Padam; Van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Your article on love and relationship deals with a very important issue (“Love makes the world go round,” Feb. 15, Page 1).It is now widely accepted that romantic relationships and dating are normative among adolescents and young people in Nepal. In our qualitative study of urban and rural young males and females using same sex researchers — in perhaps the first study of dating practice among Nepali youth — almost all of our respondents reported that young people in Nepal form partnerships wi...

  9. A Diversified Recruitment Approach Incorporating Social Media Leads to Research Participation Among Young Adult-Aged Female Cancer Survivors.

    Gorman, Jessica R; Roberts, Samantha C; Dominick, Sally A; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Dietz, Andrew C; Su, H Irene

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer survivors in their adolescent and young adult (AYA) years are an understudied population, possibly in part because of the high effort required to recruit them into research studies. The aim of this paper is to describe the specific recruitment strategies used in four studies recruiting AYA-aged female cancer survivors and to identify the highest yielding approaches. We also discuss challenges and recommendations. Methods: We recruited AYA-aged female cancer survivors for two studies conducted locally and two conducted nationally. Recruitment strategies included outreach and referral via: healthcare providers and clinics; social media and the internet; community and word of mouth; and a national fertility information hotline. We calculated the yield of each recruitment approach for the local and national studies by comparing the number that participated to the number of potential participants. Results: We recruited a total of 534 participants into four research studies. Seventy-one percent were diagnosed as young adults and 61% were within 3 years of their cancer diagnosis. The highest-yielding local recruitment strategy was healthcare provider and clinic referral. Nationally, social media and internet outreach yielded the highest rate of participation. Overall, internet-based recruitment resulted in the highest number and yield of participants. Conclusion: Our results suggest that outreach through social media and the internet are effective approaches to recruiting AYA-aged female cancer survivors. Forging collaborative relationships with survivor advocacy groups' members and healthcare providers also proved beneficial.

  10. So Round the Spiral Again: A Reflective Participatory Research Project with Children and Young People

    O'Brien, Niamh; Moules, Tina

    2007-01-01

    Historically the voices of children in research have been silent. They are often seen as victims or beneficiaries of research rather than co-researchers or partners. This is beginning to change with growing awareness that involving children in the design, delivery and evaluation of services can make services more accessible to them and their…

  11. Technology-assisted Interventions for Parents of Young Children: Emerging Practices, Current Research, and Future Directions.

    Hall, Cristin M; Bierman, Karen L

    Technology can potentially expand the reach and cut the costs of providing effective, evidence-based interventions. This paper reviews existing publications that describe the application and evaluation of technology-assisted interventions for parents of young children. A broad review of the early childhood literature revealed 48 studies describing technology-assisted parent education and interventions. Across these studies, multiple forms of technology were used, including web-based platforms, discussion forums, mobile devices, and video conferencing. Results are described moving from feasibility and acceptability of technology-based delivery systems to more rigorous evaluations examining their impact on parent and child outcomes. Potential exists for technology to deliver interventions to parents. Limitations are discussed including differential acceptability and elevated attrition associated with internet-only intervention delivery.

  12. Understanding Eating Behavior during the Transition from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: A Literature Review and Perspective on Future Research Directions

    F. Marijn Stok

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eating behavior often becomes unhealthier during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood, but not much is known about the factors that drive this change. We assess the available evidence on this topic through a literature review and pay special attention to the research designs employed in the studies available as well as the modifiability of the factors investigated in previous research. Method: We systematically conducted a scoping review by searching literature published in or after 2000 in three databases that described one or more factors associated with eating behavior or changes in eating behavior during the transition from adolescence to adulthood in the general population. Our search identified eighteen articles meeting these inclusion criteria. The socio-ecological DONE (Determinants of Nutrition and Eating framework, a recently developed dynamic framework of factors shaping dietary behavior, was used to structure and categorize the factors identified. Results: Most factors identified in the literature were individual-level factors (67% such as food beliefs, time constraints, and taste preferences; on the other hand, interpersonal-level factors (e.g., social support, environmental-level factors (e.g., product characteristics and policy-level factors (e.g., market regulations have been reported on less extensively. Furthermore, most factors discussed in the literature have been classified in the DONE framework as not easily modifiable. Moreover, previous studies largely used static research designs and focused primarily on one specific population (US freshmen. Discussion: This systematic scoping review identified several gaps in the available literature that hinder insight into the drivers of eating behavior (change during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood. There is an urgent need for research on broader populations, employing dynamic repeated-measures designs, and taking modifiability of

  13. ["The Talpiot medical leadership program"--advancing the brightest young physicians and researchers to fill future leadership roles].

    Adler, Yehuda; Kinori, Michael; Zimlichman, Eyal; Rosinger, Avivit; Shalev, Guzu; Talmi, Rachel; Noy, Shlomo; Rotstein, Zeev

    2015-02-01

    The modern medical world is dynamic and boundless. There is a need for the medical training system currently existing in Israel to undergo a thorough conceptual change in order to strive for excellence and innovation on the one hand and to prevent the "brain drain" from Israel on the other. To report on the "Talpiot" program at the "Sheba Medical Center", which identifies, promotes and prepares the most talented young doctors to fill key positions in the fields of medicine and health in Israel. This study is based on a project with the same name in the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). It promotes an elite group of physicians and researchers at the medical center and includes the provision of scholarships, personal guidance and customized educational opportunities for its members. Conversely, every member in the program is committed to complete five years of training followed by another five years as a senior physician or a researcher at the medical center. Since 2002, there have been six cycles of "Talpionaires". The current 46 members of the program fill key leadership roles in the medical center and are considered leaders in their field. Among the program's alumni are managers of institutes, units and research institutes. This group is responsible for the publication of hundreds of scientific papers studies and dozens of patents in medical technology. Some of them have progressed academically far beyond their peers. Excellence programs are an integral part of any institution which considers itself a leader, both in medicine and beyond. The exciting and visionary "Talpiot" program is Sheba's contribution to the quality of the medical system in the country of Israel in the long run. Promoting young doctors and researchers to become leaders in the Israeli medical system is an integral part of national interests.

  14. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2005 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2006-06-01

    , both in tables and graphs. The paper concludes with a convincing discussion and outlook for further research. The results are of great value in the field of non-destructive testing. The Outstanding Paper Awards, comprising a cash honorarium and certificate, will be presented to the authors of the winning papers at suitable venues in the near future. The Editorial Board would like to congratulate the winning authors and would like to encourage all researchers to think of Measurement Science and Technology as the home for your best submissions.

  15. A community based field research project investigating anaemia amongst young children living in rural Karnataka, India: a cross sectional study

    Black Jim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia is an important problem amongst young children living in rural India. However, there has not previously been a detailed study of the biological aetiology of this anaemia, exploring the relative contributions of iron, vitamin B12, folate and Vitamin A deficiency, inflammation, genetic haemoglobinopathy, hookworm and malaria. Nor have studies related these aetiologic biological factors to household food security, standard of living and child feeding practices. Barriers to conducting such work have included perceived reluctance of village communities to permit their children to undergo venipuncture, and logistical issues. We have successfully completed a community based, cross sectional field study exploring in detail the causes of anaemia amongst young children in a rural setting. Methods and design A cross sectional, community based study. We engaged in extensive community consultation and tailored our study design to the outcomes of these discussions. We utilised local women as field workers, harnessing the capacity of local health workers to assist with the study. We adopted a programmatic approach with a census rather than random sampling strategy in the village, incorporating appropriate case management for children identified to have anaemia. We developed a questionnaire based on existing standard measurement tools for standard of living, food security and nutrition. Specimen processing was conducted at the Primary Health Centre laboratory prior to transport to an urban research laboratory. Discussion Adopting this study design, we have recruited 415 of 470 potentially eligible children who were living in the selected villages. We achieved support from the community and cooperation of local health workers. Our results will improve the understanding into anaemia amongst young children in rural India. However, many further studies are required to understand the health problems of the population of rural India, and

  16. A community based field research project investigating anaemia amongst young children living in rural Karnataka, India: a cross sectional study.

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Vijaykumar, Varalaxmi; Prashanth, N S; Sudarshan, H; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Black, Jim; Shet, Arun

    2009-02-17

    Anaemia is an important problem amongst young children living in rural India. However, there has not previously been a detailed study of the biological aetiology of this anaemia, exploring the relative contributions of iron, vitamin B12, folate and Vitamin A deficiency, inflammation, genetic haemoglobinopathy, hookworm and malaria. Nor have studies related these aetiologic biological factors to household food security, standard of living and child feeding practices. Barriers to conducting such work have included perceived reluctance of village communities to permit their children to undergo venipuncture, and logistical issues. We have successfully completed a community based, cross sectional field study exploring in detail the causes of anaemia amongst young children in a rural setting. A cross sectional, community based study. We engaged in extensive community consultation and tailored our study design to the outcomes of these discussions. We utilised local women as field workers, harnessing the capacity of local health workers to assist with the study. We adopted a programmatic approach with a census rather than random sampling strategy in the village, incorporating appropriate case management for children identified to have anaemia. We developed a questionnaire based on existing standard measurement tools for standard of living, food security and nutrition. Specimen processing was conducted at the Primary Health Centre laboratory prior to transport to an urban research laboratory. Adopting this study design, we have recruited 415 of 470 potentially eligible children who were living in the selected villages. We achieved support from the community and cooperation of local health workers. Our results will improve the understanding into anaemia amongst young children in rural India. However, many further studies are required to understand the health problems of the population of rural India, and our study design and technique provide a useful demonstration of a

  17. Facilitating War-Affected Young Mothers¡¯ Reintegration: Lessons from a Participatory Action Research Study in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Uganda

    Miranda Worthen; Grace Onyango; Mike Wessells; Angela Veale; Susan McKay

    2013-01-01

    Young women and girls formerly associated with armed forces and armed groups face multiple challenges. Many become pregnant or have children while they are associated and face stigma and marginalization upon reintegration into civilian communities. This article describes a multi-year participatory action research study that took place in twenty communities in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and northern Uganda from 2006 ¨C 2009 and included more than 650 young mother participants. We find that this co...

  18. Original research: online social networking patterns among adolescents, young adults, and sexual offenders.

    Dowdell, Elizabeth B; Burgess, Ann W; Flores, J Robert

    2011-07-01

    The use of online social networks like Facebook continues to increase rapidly among all age groups and segments of our society, presenting new opportunities for the exchange of sexual information as well as for potentially unsafe encounters between predators and the vulnerable or young. This study surveyed middle school, high school, and college-age students, as well as sexual offenders, regarding their use of social networking sites in order to provide information to better focus education and prevention efforts from nurses and other health care providers. Written questionnaires asking about various characteristics of participants' use of social networking sites were distributed to each group and filled out by 404 middle school students, 2,077 high school students, 1,284 students drawn from five traditional four-year colleges, and 466 adults who had committed either an Internet sexual offense or a hands-on sexual offense (in some cases both). Notable findings emerging from our analysis of the questionnaire responses included the following: offenders and students both frequent social networking sites, although at the time of the study offenders reported that they preferred Myspace and students that they preferred Facebook; nearly two-thirds of the Internet offenders said they'd initiated the topic of sex in their first chat session; more than half of the Internet offenders disguised their identity when online; most Internet offenders we surveyed said they preferred communicating with teenage girls rather than teenage boys; high school students' experience with "sexting" (sharing nude photos of themselves or others on cell phones or online) differed significantly according to their sex; a small number of students are being threatened and assaulted by people they meet online; avatar sites such as Second Life were used both by students and offenders, with both child molesters and Internet offenders expressing interest in Second Life. The use of the Internet presents

  19. Research Notes: Young People Face Issues of Self-Esteem and Child Abuse.

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews current research on the effects of physical appearance on children's self-esteem and research on posttraumatic stress syndrome in abused children. Implications for staff at youth camps include discouraging children from ridiculing others and being alert to the signs and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. (LP)

  20. Nurturing the Young Shoots of Talent: Using Action Research for Exploration and Theory Building

    Koshy, Valsa; Pascal, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of a set of action research projects carried out by teacher researchers in 14 local education authorities in England, working collaboratively with university tutors, over a period of three years. The common aim of all the projects was to explore practical ways of nurturing the gifts and talents of children aged…

  1. Research and Engagement Strategies for Young Adult Immigrants Without Documentation: Lessons Learned Through Community Partnership.

    Raymond-Flesch, Marissa; Siemons, Rachel; Brindis, Claire D

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has focused on undocumented immigrants' health and access to care. This paper describes participant engagement strategies used to investigate the health needs of immigrants eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Community-based strategies engaged advocates and undocumented Californians in study design and recruitment. Outreach in diverse settings, social media, and participant-driven sampling recruited 61 DACA-eligible focus group participants. Social media, community-based organizations (CBOs), family members, advocacy groups, and participant-driven sampling were the most successful recruitment strategies. Participants felt engaging in research was instrumental for sharing their concerns with health care providers and policymakers, noteworthy in light of their previously identified fears and mistrust of government officials. Using multiple culturally responsive strategies including participant-driven sampling, engagement with CBOs, and use of social media, those eligible for DACA eagerly engage as research participants. Educating researchers and institutional review boards (IRBs) about legal and safety concerns can improve research engagement.

  2. Research needed to strengthen science and programs for the control of iron deficiency and its consequences in young children.

    Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight critical research needs for the effective prevention and control of iron deficiency and its consequences in children living in low-income countries. Four types of research are highlighted: The first involves scaling up interventions that we know are effective, namely iron supplementation of pregnant women, delayed cord clamping at delivery, immediate and exclusive breast-feeding, and continued exclusive breast-feeding for approximately 6 mo. The second entails evaluation research of alternative interventions that are likely to work, to find the most cost-effective strategies for a given social, economic, and epidemiological context. This research is especially needed to expand the implementation of appropriate complementary feeding interventions. In this area, research needs to be designed to provide causal evidence, to measure cost-effectiveness, and to measure potential effect modifiers. The third is efficacy research to discover promising practices where we lack proven interventions. Examples include how to detect infants younger than 6 mo who are at high risk of iron deficiency, efficacious and safe interventions for those young high-risk infants, and best protocols for the treatment of severe anemia. The fourth includes basic research to elucidate physiological processes and mechanisms underlying the risks and benefits of supplemental iron for children exposed to infectious diseases, especially malaria. Strategic research in all 4 areas will ensure that interventions to control pediatric iron deficiency are integrated into national programs and global initiatives to make pregnancy safer, reduce newborn deaths, and promote child development, health, and survival.

  3. Young people's views about the purpose and composition of research ethics committees: findings from the PEARL qualitative study.

    Audrey, Suzanne; Brown, Lindsey; Campbell, Rona; Boyd, Andy; Macleod, John

    2016-09-02

    Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a birth cohort study within which the Project to Enhance ALSPAC through Record Linkage (PEARL) was established to enrich the ALSPAC resource through linkage between ALSPAC participants and routine sources of health and social data. PEARL incorporated qualitative research to seek the views of young people about data linkage, including their opinions about appropriate safeguards and research governance. In this paper we focus on views expressed about the purpose and composition of research ethics committees. Digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 48 participants aged 17-19 years. Participants were asked about whether medical research should be monitored and controlled, their knowledge of research ethics committees, who should sit on these committees and what their role should be. Interview recordings were fully transcribed and anonymised. Thematic analysis was undertaken, assisted by the Framework approach to data management. The majority of interviewees had little or no specific knowledge of ethics committees. Once given basic information about research ethics committees, only three respondents suggested there was no need for such bodies to scrutinise research. The key tasks of ethics committees were identified as monitoring the research process and protecting research participants. The difficulty of balancing the potential to inhibit research against the need to protect research participants was acknowledged. The importance of relevant research and professional expertise was identified but it was also considered important to represent wider public opinion, and to counter the bias potentially associated with self-selection possibly through a selection process similar to 'jury duty'. There is a need for more education and public awareness about the role and composition of research ethics committees. Despite an initial lack of knowledge, interviewees were able to contribute their ideas and balance

  4. Improving adolescent and young adult health - training the next generation of physician scientists in transdisciplinary research.

    Emans, S Jean; Austin, S Bryn; Goodman, Elizabeth; Orr, Donald P; Freeman, Robert; Stoff, David; Litt, Iris F; Schuster, Mark A; Haggerty, Robert; Granger, Robert; Irwin, Charles E

    2010-02-01

    To address the critical shortage of physician scientists in the field of adolescent medicine, a conference of academic leaders and representatives from foundations, National Institutes of Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and the American Board of Pediatrics was convened to discuss training in transdisciplinary research, facilitators and barriers of successful career trajectories, models of training, and mentorship. The following eight recommendations were made to improve training and career development: incorporate more teaching and mentoring on adolescent health research in medical schools; explore opportunities and electives to enhance clinical and research training of residents in adolescent health; broaden educational goals for Adolescent Medicine fellowship research training and develop an intensive transdisciplinary research track; redesign the career pathway for the development of faculty physician scientists transitioning from fellowship to faculty positions; expand formal collaborations between Leadership Education in Adolescent Health/other Adolescent Medicine Fellowship Programs and federal, foundation, and institutional programs; develop research forums at national meetings and opportunities for critical feedback and mentoring across programs; educate Institutional Review Boards about special requirements for high quality adolescent health research; and address the trainee and faculty career development issues specific to women and minorities to enhance opportunities for academic success. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Cultural Attitudes and Body Dissatisfaction: Morgan State Researchers Find that Perceptions of Body Image among Young African Americans May Be Life Threatening

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2005-01-01

    Young African Americans don't appear to perceive obesity in the way the medical community does, putting them at greater risk for developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and cancer, says a first-ever study led by researchers at the Morgan State University Prevention Sciences Research Center. The pilot study, which provides a rare…

  6. Slum Tourism: Developments in a young field of interdisciplinary tourism research

    Frenzel, F.; Koens, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the Special Issue on slum tourism with a reflection on the state of the art on this new area of tourism research. After a review of the literature we discuss the breadth of research that was presented at the conference 'Destination Slum', the first international conference on slum tourism. Identifying various dimensions, as well as similarities and differences, in slum tourism in different parts of the world, we contest that slum tourism has evolved from being practised ...

  7. Listening to old beech and young cherry trees - long-term research in the Alleghenies

    Susan L. Stout; Coeli M. Hoover; Todd E. Ristau

    2006-01-01

    Long-term research results have been a foundation of forestry practice on the Allegheny Plateau since the 1970s. This includes results from monitoring reference conditions in areas set aside for this purpose and from long-running manipulative studies, some dating back to the 1920s. The success of long-term research in this region reflects the commitment of a handful of...

  8. Development of a Child Abuse Level Management (CALM) Guide for Research with Young Children.

    Lewin, Linda C; Schim, Stephanie Myers

    2016-05-01

    Reporting child abuse or neglect is an ethical expectation and a legislated mandate of behavioral and health care professionals in the United States. In particular, researchers who investigate parent-child dyads are responsible for submitting procedures and informed consent documents to institutional review boards that provide for the protection of children. The challenge for researchers is to recognize failing quality of parent-child interaction, prior to any event of maltreatment and to intercede in a deteriorating dynamic. The obligation to report any suspicions of child maltreatment supersedes the responsibility to provide for confidentiality of research data. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale for the development of a research protocol guide, Child Abuse Level Management (CALM), and address protection of children in research. The CALM is a brief, flexible guide designed for use by researchers to help identify and respond to negative trends in the parent-child interaction during data collection. Suggested intervention scripts are provided that can be modified for specific culture-focused samples. The CALM guide can be used for training of data collectors using simulations prior to initiating any study involving higher-risk dyads. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Falls: A novel management approach for a subglacial feature of outstanding scientific importance

    Carr, J. R.; Penhale, P. A.; Dahood, A.; Biletnikoff, N.; Harris, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Blood Falls is a subglacial feature located in the ablation zone of the Taylor Glacier, Taylor Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Blood Falls has a unique physical configuration, microbial ecology and geochemistry and consists of a subglacial brine reservoir and an iron-rich, saline surface discharge at the Taylor Glacier terminus. The feature provides a rare opportunity to sample properties of a subglacial reservoir and its ecosystem without the need for direct contact and is a key site for exobiological studies. The Blood Falls subglacial feature is globally unique and of outstanding scientific importance. As such, it warrants special protection from potential damage by drilling and/or surface activities. Moreover, currently subglacial environments are not represented in the Antarctic protected area network. To address these points, the United States National Science Foundation is working with the scientific community to develop at Blood Falls the first subglacial protected area in Antarctica. The protected area aims to maintain the integrity of the Blood Falls system, whilst allowing continued access for scientific and management purposes. Novel management approaches are being designed to protect the values of the site in three dimensions. Specific guidelines on activities conducted within the area, most notably drilling and coring, are being defined in a management plan. This new approach incorporates uncertainties in the location of the Blood Falls brine reservoir and the connectivity of the subglacial hydrological system of the Taylor Glacier. The management approaches employed at Blood Falls draw on the experience of the subglacial research community and potentially offer an effective framework for the protection of other subglacial environments.

  10. Final report on LDRD project : outstanding challenges for AlGaInN MOCVD.

    Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Russell, Michael J.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2005-03-01

    The AlGaInN material system is used for virtually all advanced solid state lighting and short wavelength optoelectronic devices. Although metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has proven to be the workhorse deposition technique, several outstanding scientific and technical challenges remain, which hinder progress and keep RD&A costs high. The three most significant MOCVD challenges are: (1) Accurate temperature measurement; (2) Reliable and reproducible p-doping (Mg); and (3) Low dislocation density GaN material. To address challenge (1) we designed and tested (on reactor mockup) a multiwafer, dual wavelength, emissivity-correcting pyrometer (ECP) for AlGaInN MOCVD. This system simultaneously measures the reflectance (at 405 and 550 nm) and emissivity-corrected temperature for each individual wafer, with the platen signal entirely rejected. To address challenge (2) we measured the MgCp{sub 2} + NH{sub 3} adduct condensation phase diagram from 65-115 C, at typical MOCVD concentrations. Results indicate that it requires temperatures of 80-100 C in order to prevent MgCp{sub 2} + NH{sub 3} adduct condensation. Modification and testing of our research reactor will not be complete until FY2005. A new commercial Veeco reactor was installed in early FY2004, and after qualification growth experiments were conducted to improve the GaN quality using a delayed recovery technique, which addresses challenge (3). Using a delayed recovery technique, the dislocation densities determined from x-ray diffraction were reduced from 2 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} to 4 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. We have also developed a model to simulate reflectance waveforms for GaN growth on sapphire.

  11. Psychosocial oncofertility issues faced by adolescents and young adults over their lifetime: a review of the research.

    Crawshaw, Marilyn

    2013-03-01

    This review considers psychosocial oncofertility research relevant to adolescents and young adults over their lifetime. There is growing awareness of the fertility preservation needs of younger males including lowering practical barriers and attending to emotional impact. Despite decisional challenges facing females--the experimental nature of procedures, time involved and potential involvement of partners/donors (for embryo cryopreservation)--findings suggest they too benefit from fertility information at diagnosis and access to fertility specialists. Studies consistently report that fertility concerns affect well-being, relationships and life planning. Both genders thus want fertility issues to be raised proactively by professionals in the years following diagnosis: to help them make informed decisions at a time relevant to them, develop coping strategies for current and future related areas and to be referred to specialist and/or therapeutic help if needed. Little is known about why cancer survivors are less likely to marry or have children, or about their parenthood experiences.

  12. Can We Build an Open-Science Model to Fund Young, Risky, Blue-Sky Research? First Insights into Funding Geoscientists Via Thinkable.Org

    McNeil, B.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the biggest discoveries and advances in geoscience research have come from purely curiosity-driven, blue-sky research. Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura's discovery of Green-Fluorecent Protein (GFP) in the 1960s during his postdoc is just one example, which came about through his interest and pursuit of how certain jellyfish bioluminescence. His discovery would eventually revolutionise medicine, culminating in a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2008. Despite the known importance of "blue-sky" research that doesn't have immediate commercial or social applications, it continues to struggle for funding from both government and industry. Success rates for young scientists also continue to decline within the government competitive granting models due to the importance of track records, yet history tells us that young scientists tend to come up with science's greatest discoveries. The digital age however, gives us a new opportunity to create an alternative and sustainable funding model for young, risky, blue-sky science that tends not to be supported by governments and industry anymore. Here I will discuss how new digital platforms empower researchers and organisations to showcase their research using video, allowing wider community engagment and funding that can be used to directly support young, risky, blue-sky research that is so important to the future of science. I will then talk about recent experience with this model from some ocean researchers who used a new platform called thinkable.org to showcase and raise funding via the public.

  13. PYRN-Bib: The Permafrost Young Researchers Network Bibliography of Permafrost-Related Degree-Earning Theses

    Grosse, Guido; Lantuit, Hugues; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    PYRN-Bib is an international bibliographical database aiming at collecting and distributing information on all theses submitted for earning a scientific degree in permafrost-related research. PYRN-Bib is hosted by the Permafrost Young Researchers Network (PYRN, http://pyrn.ways.org), an international network of early career students and young scientists in permafrost related research with currently more than 750 members. The fully educational, non-profit project PYRN-Bib is published under the patronage of the International Permafrost Association (IPA). The bibliography covers all theses as long as they clearly treat aspects of permafrost research from such diverse fields as: Geophysics, Geology, Cryolithology, Biology, Biogeochemistry, Microbiology, Astrobiology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geomorphology, Remote Sensing, Modeling, Mineral and Hydrocarbon Exploration, and Science History and Education. The specific goals of PYRN-Bib are (1) to generate a comprehensive database that includes all degree-earning theses (e.g. Diploma, Ph.D., Master, etc.), coming from any country and any scientific field, under the single condition that the thesis is strongly related to research on permafrost and/or periglacial processes; (2) to reference unique but buried sources of information including theses published in languages other than English; (3) to make the database widely available to the scientific community and the general public; (4) to solicit PYRN membership; and (5) to provide a mean to map the evolution of permafrost research over the last decades, including regional trends, shifts in research direction, and/or the place of permafrost research in society. PYRN-Bib is available online and maintained by PYRN. The complete bibliography can be downloaded at no cost and is offered in different file formats: tagged Endnote library, XML, BibTex, and PDF. New entries are continuously provided by PYRN members and the scientific community. PYRN-Bib currently contains more than

  14. What separates outstanding from average leaders? A study identifies leadership competencies and implications for professional development.

    Nygren, D J; Ukeritis, M D

    1992-11-01

    As the healthcare crisis mounts, healthcare organizations must be managed by especially competent leaders. It is important for executives to assess and develop the competencies necessary to become "outstanding" leaders. In our study of leadership competencies among leaders of religious orders, we found that outstanding and average leaders appear to share characteristics such as the ability to articulate their group's mission, the ability to act efficiently, and the tendency to avoid impulsive behavior or excessive emotional expression. Outstanding leaders, however, differed from average leaders in seemingly small but significant ways. For instance, nearly three times as often as average leaders, outstanding leaders expressed a desire to perform tasks well--or better than they had been performed in the past. The study also assessed how members of religious orders perceived their leaders. In general, they tended to rate leaders of their religious institutes as transformational leaders--leaders who welcomed doing things in a new way and inspiring their own staffs to search out new ways to provide services.

  15. Assessing the critical behavioral competencies of outstanding managed care primary care physicians.

    Duberman, T L

    1999-03-01

    This study used job competence assessment to identify the behavioral characteristics that distinguish outstanding job performances of primary care physicians (PCPs) within a network-model HMO. Primary care physicians were chosen for the study based on six standard performance measures: (1) member satisfaction, (2) utilization, (3) patient complaints, (4) emergency room referrals, (5) out-of-network referrals, and (6) medical record completeness. Outstanding PCPs (N = 16) were identified as those performing within one standard deviation above the mean on all six of the performance measures. A control group of typical PCPs (N = 10) was selected from those performing outside the peer group mean on at least two performance measures. Subjects were administered the Behavioral Event Interview and the Picture Story Exercise. Higher overall competency levels of achievement orientation, concern for personal influence, empathic caregiving, and empowerment drive distinguished outstanding from typical PCPs. Outstanding PCPs also had higher overall frequency of competency in building team effectiveness and interpersonal understanding when compared with typical PCPs. This study suggests that PCP performance is the product of measurable competencies that are potentially amenable to improvement. Competency assessment and development of PCPs may benefit both organizational efficiency and physician and patient satisfaction.

  16. Research-based Reflections on How the Educational, Economic and Social Circumstances Faced by Some Children and Young People Can Lead to Significant Disadvantage and Vulnerability

    Tucker Stanley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides detailed reflections on the educational, economic and social circumstances that impact on the lives of many disadvantaged and vulnerable children and young people. Drawing largely on primary research data collected in Romania, Germany and the United Kingdom, three illustrative case studies are presented for consideration focusing on: life in residential care and youth offending institutions; experiences of educational vulnerability; and human trafficking. The methodological approach adopted across the research projects explored, was shaped by the demands and expectations of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC. All of the reported data reflects the views of children and young people who were interviewed as part of three research projects. It is argued that the difficult and challenging circumstances that many children and young people find themselves in, place them at significant disadvantage and increased vulnerability in terms of their social and educational development and life chances.

  17. Shedding Light: Private "For Profit" Training Providers and Young Early School Leavers. NCVER Research Report

    Myconos, George; Clarke, Kira; te Riele, Kitty

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the oft-criticised segment of the vocational education and training (VET) sector in Australia--private, for-profit registered training organisations (RTOs)--with the aim of gaining a clearer understanding of the approaches they adopt in training 15 to 19-year-olds who have left school early. Through a nationwide survey…

  18. Young Gifted Children: Meeting Their Needs. Research in Practice Series. Volume 12, Number 3

    Porter, Louise

    2005-01-01

    The "Research in Practice Series" is published four times each year by Early Childhood Australia. The series aims to provide practical, easy to read, up-to-date information and support to a growing national readership of early childhood workers. The books bring together the best information available on wide-ranging topics and are an…

  19. "Hey, I Can Do This!" The Benefits of Conducting Undergraduate Psychology Research for Young Adult Development

    Searight, H. Russell; Ratwik, Susan; Smith, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Many undergraduate programs require students to complete an independent research project in their major field prior to graduation. These projects are typically described as opportunities for integration of coursework and a direct application of the methods of inquiry specific to a particular discipline. Evaluations of curricular projects have…

  20. Strengthening policy research on infant and young child feeding: An imperative to support countries in scaling up impact on nutrition.

    Menon, Purnima; Thow, Anne Marie

    2017-06-13

    Enabling policy environments for nutrition require require evidence to support best practice and engagement with political and policy contexts, as well as leadership, resourcing, advocacy, and technical support. However, research on nutrition policy contexts is limited. The papers in this special supplement on policy contexts for infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in South Asia makes a valuable contribution to understanding the policy landscape and political dynamics in the region and the global literature. Studies included in this special supplement analyzed policy content and stakeholder influence on IYCF in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and assess the role of advocacy in addressing multiple elements of the policy environment. These analyses highlight opportunities to harmonize and manage the demands and interests of multiple actors while strengthening policy to strategically support optimal IYCF as the ultimate goal. They also provide robust examples of research on policy environments and policy change. Further investments in research on policy contexts for nutrition can help to understand and support continued progress towards improved actions for nutrition.

  1. RedeAmericas: building research capacity in young leaders for sustainable growth in community mental health services in Latin America.

    Yang, L; Pratt, C; Valencia, E; Conover, S; Fernández, R; Burrone, M S; Cavalcanti, M T; Lovisi, G; Rojas, G; Alvarado, R; Galea, S; Price, L N; Susser, E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and initial accomplishments of a training program of young leaders in community mental health research as part of a Latin American initiative known as RedeAmericas. RedeAmericas was one of five regional 'Hubs' funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to improve community mental health care and build mental health research capacity in low- and middle-income countries. It included investigators in six Latin American cities - Santiago, Chile; Medellín, Colombia; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and Córdoba, Neuquén, and Buenos Aires in Argentina - working together with a team affiliated with the Global Mental Health program at Columbia University in New York City. One component of RedeAmericas was a capacity-building effort that included an Awardee program for early career researchers in the mental health field. We review the aims of this component, how it developed, and what was learned that would be useful for future capacity-building efforts, and also comment on future prospects for maintaining this type of effort.

  2. Strengthening policy research on infant and young child feeding: An imperative to support countries in scaling up impact on nutrition

    Purnima Menon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enabling policy environments for nutrition require require evidence to support best practice and engagement with political and policy contexts, as well as leadership, resourcing, advocacy, and technical support. However, research on nutrition policy contexts is limited. The papers in this special supplement on policy contexts for infant and young child feeding (IYCF in South Asia makes a valuable contribution to understanding the policy landscape and political dynamics in the region and the global literature. Studies included in this special supplement analyzed policy content and stakeholder influence on IYCF in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and assess the role of advocacy in addressing multiple elements of the policy environment. These analyses highlight opportunities to harmonize and manage the demands and interests of multiple actors while strengthening policy to strategically support optimal IYCF as the ultimate goal. They also provide robust examples of research on policy environments and policy change. Further investments in research on policy contexts for nutrition can help to understand and support continued progress towards improved actions for nutrition.

  3. Transition to Parenthood and Susceptibility to Divorce: qualitative research of divorced young parents in Slovenia

    Nataša Rijavec Klobučar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transition to parenthood is a vulnerable period for spouses and can consequently lead to the disintegration of their relationship. The purpose of this research was to examine the experience of this transition, circumstances and risk factors for divorce from the perspective of divorcees in Slovenia who divorced in the first year of their child’s life. On the basis of semi -structured interviews with 15 divorcees, the findings of studies examining changes after the birth of a child were confirmed. The results pointed to risk factors for marriage, such as uncertain relationship between spouses prior to the childbirth, permeable boundaries in relations with families of origin, lack of practical and emotional support, and unreal expectations. The child’s arrival accentuates unsolved issues from the past and brings additional vulnerability to the relationship. The findings of this research are a contribution to the development of preventive, educative and therapeutic programmes for couples in transition to parenthood.

  4. Important themes in research on and education of young children in day care centres: Finnish viewpoints

    Maritta Hännikäinen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to outline important themes, according to Finnish early childhood education researchers, that need to be addressed in researching and educating children under three years of age in Finland. To achieve this aim, the article divides into two parts. First, we present and discuss the results of a small-scale survey, conducted in Finland, on the views of key informants in the early childhood education units of Finnish universities. Second, the views presented in the survey are used as a starting point to introduce two ongoing qualitative case studies on the everyday life of toddlers in Finnish day care centres. In line with the survey findings, these case studies emphasize in particular the importance of the relational, social nature of children, the educational community, and the sensitivity of the adult for children’s wellbeing in day care groups.

  5. What is the best surgical intervention for stress urinary incontinence in the very young and very old? An International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society update.

    Robinson, Dudley; Castro-Diaz, David; Giarenis, Ilias; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Anding, Ralf; Burton, Claire; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of continence procedures are being performed in women of all ages. An overview of the existing literature and consensus regarding surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the young and the old was presented and discussed at the International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society Think Tank. This manuscript reflects the Think Tank's summary and opinion. Despite the increasing number of continence procedures, there are relatively few data to guide management in the very young and the very old. When considering continence surgery in the young, long-term efficacy and safety are paramount, and the future effects of pregnancy and childbirth need to be carefully considered. Conversely, in the elderly, minimally invasive procedures with low morbidity are important, especially in the frail elderly who may have significant co-morbidities. Further research including prospective randomised trials, cohort studies and national registries, should help guide our management in these two challenging groups of patients.

  6. Reliability of heart rate mobile apps in young healthy adults: exploratory study and research directions

    Maria Parpinel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, a number of smartphone apps appeared that allow for heart rate measurements basing on the photoplethysmography principle. In fact, almost every smartphone now has a camera with flash that could be used for that. Some studies appeared on the reliability of some of those apps, with heterogeneous results. Objectives: The present study aims at adding up evidence in particular during physical activity, by comparing 3 apps on two different platforms (IOs and Android, on a broad range of heart rates. As gold standard, heart rate has been measured with a traditional heart rate monitor. Results: The results suggest that heart rate apps might be used for measuring heart rate for fitness aims for many individuals, but further research is needed to i analyse influence of smartphone features; ii identify personal factors hindering measurements, and iii verify reliability on different measurement sites.

  7. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2010 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2010 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. This year, for example, the winning article of the Outstanding Paper Award in Sensors and Sensing Systems was an article published in the 'Novel Instrumentation' section. 2010 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics Assessment of pressure field calculations from particle image velocimetry measurements John J Charonko, Cameron V King, Barton L Smith and Pavlos P Vlachos Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA VT-WFU School of Biomedical Engineering & Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Utah State University, UMC4130, Logan, UT 84322, USA Measuring p(t) in the interior of a flow field is one of the most challenging measurements in our field of study. An accurate knowledge of these interior pressures is of considerable value for fundamental studies. Since the gradient of the pressure appears in the Navier-Stokes equations, a knowledge of the pressure at a bounding surface followed by operations on the measured velocity components within the flow field can be analytically related to the pressure at an interior location. Bringing this long-recognized possibility to operational status has been greatly aided by the advent of

  8. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2006 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2007-07-01

    dynamic drag forces up to a few kHz. The Outstanding Paper Awards, comprising a cash honorarium and certificate, will be presented to the authors of the winning papers at suitable venues in the near future. The Editorial Board would like to congratulate the winning authors and would like to encourage all researchers to think of Measurement Science and Technology as the home for your best submissions.

  9. Young women describe the ideal first pelvic examination: Qualitative research using semistructured interviews.

    Freyens, Anne; Dejeanne, Mélanie; Fabre, Elise; Rouge-Bugat, Marie-Eve; Oustric, Stéphane

    2017-08-01

    To explore representations of the first pelvic examination (PE) among adolescents who had not yet had this examination and to identify their criteria for a positive experience of it. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Midi-Pyrénées and Auvergne in France. Adolescents aged 15 to 19 years who had never had a PE. Participants were recruited through snowball sampling and targeted sampling until data saturation was reached. Maximum variation was sought in the profiles of the study participants. Open-ended questions dealt with the interviewee's sources of information, knowledge of the PE, criteria for a positive PE experience, and representations of the PE itself. Verbatim transcripts were immediately subjected to longitudinal analysis with the context (researchers' notes) and key themes of the interview. Cross-sectional analysis was then performed. Many adolescents lack knowledge about the PE and believe that it is mandatory. According to study participants, the ideal PE would take place when they felt ready. They would be given adequate information in advance and the option of being accompanied by a friend or family member. They described the ideal examining room as warm, comfortable, and reassuring. The quality of their relationship with the examining physician would also affect their acceptance of this examination. An information session before the consultation for the PE would make it possible to reduce the patient's apprehension, improve her level of knowledge, and set the right tone for the upcoming PE, both for her and for the physician. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  10. Effects of a Socially Interactive Robot on the Conversational Turns between Parents and Their Young Children with Autism. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 6

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a socially interactive robot on the conversational turns between four young children with autism and their mothers were investigated as part of the intervention study described in this research report. The interventions with each child were conducted over 4 or 5 days in the children's homes where a practitioner facilitated…

  11. A Critical Appraisal of Foreign Language Research in Content and Language Integrated Learning, Young Language Learners, and Technology-Enhanced Language Learning Published in Spain (2003-2012)

    Dooly, Melinda; Masats, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    This state-of-the-art review provides a critical overview of research publications in Spain in the last ten years in three areas of teaching and learning foreign languages (especially English): context and language integrated learning (CLIL), young language learners (YLL), and technology-enhanced language learning (TELL). These three domains have…

  12. The politics of sex research and constructions of female sexuality: what relevance to sexual health work with young women?

    Few, C

    1997-03-01

    By examining the relationship between the cultural construction of female sexuality and the lack of potential for many young heterosexual women to be truly sexually healthy this paper submits that messages for women within HIV prevention programmes can be confused, confining and at times dangerous to women's health and well-being. It is suggested that these messages also reinforce a traditional, biologically determined medical understanding of female sexuality that does not take note of social or culturally based research or commentary on female experience or female desire, but rather confines many women to sexual restrictions, doing little to empower women to prevent sexual risk-taking. The ideological basis of the discussion within this paper is informed by the awareness that applications and understandings of 'sexuality' are diverse and contested within sex research traditions and will influence the choice of research concerns. The 'deterministic' explanation of sexuality that 'sexuality' (the abstract noun referring to the quality of being 'sexual', Williams 1983) is your fate or destiny and that biology causes the patterns of sexual life, is abandoned in this paper in favour of a search for a definition of sexuality which brings together a host of different biological and mental possibilities which are given meaning only in social relations. This allows for a framework for the study of sexuality that relates it to other social phenomena, particularly economic, political and social structures (Foucault 1979); in other words, a study of the 'social construction' of sexuality. This paper suggests that health care professionals need to develop an awareness of the diversities within female sexuality and gain insight into their own values and assumptions about female sexuality if these are not to inhibit effective approaches and interventions in the areas of HIV and sexual health.

  13. Progress report for an Outstanding Junior Investigator Award in experimental high energy physics

    Partridge, R.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program based upon the study of hadron collisions at the highest available energy is being carried out with the support of an Outstanding Junior Investigator Award to Prof. Richard Partridge. The work described in this report includes the development of the Level 0 trigger for the D0 experiment at Fermilab preparation for the D0 physics program, and studies of detector design for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC)

  14. Peningkatan Mutu Pendidikan SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo sebagai Sekolah Berkategori The Outstanding School of Muhammadiyah

    Hidayatulloh Hidayatulloh

    2016-01-01

    This article examines about improving the education quality of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo as the Outstanding School of Muhammadiyah. This article reveals that the quality improvement of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo was conducted through: the arrangement of school program and self evaluation, the reinforcement of vision, mission and education objective, the reinforcement of leadership and teamwork, the improvement of teachers and educators competence, the improvement learners quality input, th...

  15. Puncturing Notions of Precarity through Critical Educational Research on Young Lives in Australia: Towards a Critical Ethnography of Youth

    Smyth, John

    2016-01-01

    This papers deals in a polemical fashion with what is arguably one of the most contentious issues in education--the disengagement of increasing numbers of young people from schooling. It makes the argument that what is occurring is that global forces are conspiring to position young people as a form of "social waste" and that allowing…

  16. "If You Look, You Have to Leave": Young Children Regulating Research Interviews about Experiences of Domestic Violence

    Evang, Are; Øverlien, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the competence of young children staying with their mothers in refuges for abused women as participants in qualitative interviews. Discourse of the verbal and non-verbal actions of seven young children (4-7 years old) was analysed using a theory originally developed to describe infant-mother interaction as…

  17. Action Research in the Design, Development and Delivery of a Sustainable, School-based, Health Promotion Intervention for Children and Young People

    Nobles, JD; Staniford, LJ; Gately, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interventions are often developed without the guidance of the target group to be worked with. Action research (programme development with the input of researchers and clients) has been highlighted as a useful method for increasing programme engagement and achieving programme outcomes [1]. Hearty Lives Renfrewshire (HLR), is a British Heart Foundation a community-based intervention aiming to increase knowledge and awareness of CVD risk factors in young people, adopted an action r...

  18. A "Child's Rights Perspective": The "Right" of Children and Young People to Participate in Health Care Research.

    Clarke, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    As all human beings are consumers of health care provision across the life span and in receipt of care delivered by accountable health care professionals, all should have the right to be involved in shaping the future of their own health care. Rights-based participation, when applied successfully, has the potential to inform and influence the delivery of child health care, the child's experience of health care, plus children's nursing education (Coyne & Gallagher, 2011). The "right" of every child and young person to participate in research that relates to their own health care is also sustained by the author's lead position as a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education for pre-registration children's nursing in Northern Ireland and the appreciation of their voice when practicing as a registered children's nurse and ward sister. The report provides an insight into seminal work on human and child rights; the historical context of children in Western society, and the evolution of children's nursing amid the child's right to participate in shaping their own health care.

  19. Science ethics education: effects of a short lecture on plagiarism on the knowledge of young medical researchers.

    Brkic, S; Bogdanovic, G; Vuckovic-Dekic, Lj; Gavrilovic, D; Kezic, I

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism is the most common form of scientific fraud. It is agreed that the best preventive measure is education of young scientists on basic principles of responsible conduct of research and writing. The purpose of this article was to contribute to the students' knowledge and adoption of the rules of scientific writing. A 45 min lecture was delivered to 98 attendees during 3 courses on science ethics. Before and after the course the attendees fulfilled an especially designed questionnaire with 13 questions, specifically related to the definition and various types of plagiarism and self-plagiarism. Although considering themselves as insufficiently educated in science ethics, the majority of the attendees responded correctly to almost all questions even before the course, with percentages of correct responses to the specific question varying from 45.9-85.7%. After completion of the course, these percentages were significantly (pplagiarism ranged from 9.18- 42.86%. The percentage of impairment ranged from 1.02- 16.33%, the latter being related to the question on correct citing unpublished materials of other people; only for this question the percentage of impairment (16.33%) was greater than the percentage of improvement (11.22%). Even a short lecture focused on plagiarism contributed to the students' awareness that there are many forms of plagiarism, and that plagiarism is a serious violation of science ethics. This result confirms the largely accepted opinion that education is the best means in preventing plagiarism.

  20. Delivering an action agenda for nutrition interventions addressing adolescent girls and young women: priorities for implementation and research.

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lassi, Zohra S; Bergeron, Gilles; Koletzko, Berthold; Salam, Rehana; Diaz, Angela; McLean, Mireille; Black, Robert E; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Christian, Parul; Prentice, Andrew M; Klein, Jonathan D; Keenan, William; Hanson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent nutritional behaviors are assuming considerable importance in nutrition interventions given their important relationships with medium- and long-term outcomes. This is the period when young people undergo major anatomical and physiological maturational changes in preparation for adulthood. Nutritional requirements during puberty are higher during adolescence than during the prepubertal stage and during adulthood. A significant proportion of adolescents also become parents, and hence the importance of their health and nutritional status before as well as during pregnancy has its impact on their own health, fetal well-being, and newborn health. In this paper, we describe the evidence-based nutrition recommendations and the current global guidance for nutrition actions for adolescents. Despite the limitations of available information, we believe that a range of interventions are feasible to address outcomes in this age group, although some would need to start earlier in childhood. We propose packages of preventive care and management comprising nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions to address adolescent undernutrition, overnutrition, and micronutrient deficiencies. We discuss potential delivery platforms and strategies relevant to low- and middle-income countries. Beyond the evidence synthesis, there is a clear need to translate evidence into policy and for implementation of key recommendations and addressing knowledge gaps through prioritized research. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Using a creativity-focused science program to foster general creativity in young children: A teacher action research study

    Gomes, Joan Julieanne Mariani

    The importance of thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to integrate and analyze information has been recognized and yet may be lacking in schools. Creativity is inherently linked to problem finding, problem solving, and divergent thinking (Arieti, 1976; Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; Milgram, 1990). The importance of early childhood education and its role in the formation of young minds has been recognized (Caine & Caine, 1991; Montessori, 1967a, 1967b; Piaget, 1970). Early childhood education also impacts creativity (Gardner, 1999). The features of brain-based learning (Caine & Caine, 1991; Jensen, 1998; Sousa, 2001; Wolfe, 2001) have a clear connection to nurturing the creative potential in students. Intrinsic motivation and emotions affect student learning and creativity as well (Hennessey & Amabile, 1987). The purpose of this study was to discern if a creativity-focused science curriculum for the kindergarteners at a Montessori early learning center could increase creativity in students. This action research study included observations of the students in two classrooms, one using the creativity-focused science curriculum, and the other using the existing curriculum. The data collected for this interpretive study included interviews with the students, surveys and interviews with their parents and teachers, teacher observations, and the administration of Torrance's (1981) Thinking Creatively in Action and Movement (TCAM) test. The interpretation of the data indicated that the enhanced science curriculum played a role in enhancing the creativity of the children in the creativity-focused group. The results of the TCAM (Torrance, 1981) showed a significant increase in scores for the children in the creativity-focused group. The qualitative data revealed a heightened interest in science and the observation of creative traits, processes, and products in the creativity-focused group children. The implications of this study included the need for meaningful

  2. Anthropogenic control on geomorphic process rates: can we slow down the erosion rates? (Geomorphology Outstanding Young Scientist Award & Penck Lecture)

    Vanacker, V.

    2012-04-01

    The surface of the Earth is changing rapidly, largely in response to anthropogenic perturbation. Direct anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments may be much larger in many places than the (projected) indirect effects of climate change. There is now large evidence that humans have significantly altered geomorphic process rates, mainly through changes in vegetation composition, density and cover. While much attention has been given to the impact of vegetation degradation on geomorphic process rates, I suggest that the pathway of restoration is equally important to investigate. First, vegetation recovery after crop abandonment has a rapid and drastic impact on geomorphic process rates. Our data from degraded catchments in the tropical Andes show that erosion rates can be reduced by up to 100 times when increasing the protective vegetation cover. During vegetation restoration, the combined effects of the reduction in surface runoff, sediment production and hydrological connectivity are stronger than the individual effects together. Therefore, changes in erosion and sedimentation during restoration are not simply the reverse of those observed during degradation. Second, anthropogenic perturbation causes a profound but often temporary change in geomorphic process rates. Reconstruction of soil erosion rates in Spain shows us that modern erosion rates in well-vegetated areas are similar to long-term rates, despite evidence of strong pulses in historical erosion rates after vegetation clearance and agriculture. The soil vegetation system might be resilient to short pulses of accelerated erosion (and deposition), as there might exist a dynamic coupling between soil erosion and production also in degraded environments.

  3. Global patterns of organic carbon export and sequestration in the ocean (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists)

    Henson, S.; Sanders, R.; Madsen, E.; Le Moigne, F.; Quartly, G.

    2012-04-01

    A major term in the global carbon cycle is the ocean's biological carbon pump which is dominated by sinking of small organic particles from the surface ocean to its interior. Here we examine global patterns in particle export efficiency (PEeff), the proportion of primary production that is exported from the surface ocean, and transfer efficiency (Teff), the fraction of exported organic matter that reaches the deep ocean. This is achieved through extrapolating from in situ estimates of particulate organic carbon export to the global scale using satellite-derived data. Global scale estimates derived from satellite data show, in keeping with earlier studies, that PEeff is high at high latitudes and low at low latitudes, but that Teff is low at high latitudes and high at low latitudes. However, in contrast to the relationship observed for deep biomineral fluxes in previous studies, we find that Teff is strongly negatively correlated with opal export flux from the upper ocean, but uncorrelated with calcium carbonate export flux. We hypothesise that the underlying factor governing the spatial patterns observed in Teff is ecosystem function, specifically the degree of recycling occurring in the upper ocean, rather than the availability of calcium carbonate for ballasting. Finally, our estimate of global integrated carbon export is only 50% of previous estimates. The lack of consensus amongst different methodologies on the strength of the biological carbon pump emphasises that our knowledge of a major planetary carbon flux remains incomplete.

  4. Who to Blame: Irrational Decision-Makers or Stupid Modelers? (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    Madani, Kaveh

    2016-04-01

    Water management benefits from a suite of modelling tools and techniques that help simplifying and understanding the complexities involved in managing water resource systems. Early water management models were mainly concerned with optimizing a single objective, related to the design, operations or management of water resource systems (e.g. economic cost, hydroelectricity production, reliability of water deliveries). Significant improvements in methodologies, computational capacity, and data availability over the last decades have resulted in developing more complex water management models that can now incorporate multiple objectives, various uncertainties, and big data. These models provide an improved understanding of complex water resource systems and provide opportunities for making positive impacts. Nevertheless, there remains an alarming mismatch between the optimal solutions developed by these models and the decisions made by managers and stakeholders of water resource systems. Modelers continue to consider decision makers as irrational agents who fail to implement the optimal solutions developed by sophisticated and mathematically rigours water management models. On the other hand, decision makers and stakeholders accuse modelers of being idealist, lacking a perfect understanding of reality, and developing 'smart' solutions that are not practical (stable). In this talk I will have a closer look at the mismatch between the optimality and stability of solutions and argue that conventional water resources management models suffer inherently from a full-cooperation assumption. According to this assumption, water resources management decisions are based on group rationality where in practice decisions are often based on individual rationality, making the group's optimal solution unstable for individually rational decision makers. I discuss how game theory can be used as an appropriate framework for addressing the irrational "rationality assumption" of water resources management models and for better capturing the social aspects of decision making in water management systems with multiple stakeholders.

  5. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2008 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2008 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2009-05-01

    gauge based sensors and the new FBG sensor are presented as well, demonstrating the superiority of the latter. The paper received high quality ratings by the reviewers, and the appreciation by the readers of MST is confirmed by a high number of downloads. The reduction of sensor diameter (from a few mm down to 400 μm) and the higher flexibility are important features of this application. The use of a silicone sealant in a steel hypodermic tube around the fibre, resulting in a higher sensitivity compared to a bare fibre, is a significant achievement of this research. Its sensitivity can further be increased by a reduction of the fibre diameter: this is the subject of another excellent article [5] by the authors, which appeared in the December issue of 2008. The Outstanding Paper Awards, comprising a cash honorarium and certificate, will be presented to the authors of the winning papers at suitable venues in the near future. The Editorial Board would like to congratulate the winning authors and would like to encourage all researchers to think of Measurement Science and Technology as the home for your best submissions. References [1] Aerts J R M, Lataire J, Pintelon R and Dirckx J J J 2008 Noise level estimation in weakly nonlinear slowly time-varying systems Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 105101 (14pp) [2] Mansour M, Chokani N, Kalfas A I and Abhari R S 2008 Time-resolved entropy measurements using a fast response entropy probe Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 115401 (10pp) [3] Probst R 2008 Self-calibration of divided circles on the basis of a prime factor algorithm Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 015101 (11pp) [4] Dennison C R, Wild P M, Wilson D R and Cripton P A 2008 A minimally invasive in-fiber Bragg grating sensor for intervertebral disc pressure measurements Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 085201 (12pp) [5] Dennison C R and Wild P M 2008 Enhanced sensitivity of an in-fibre Bragg grating pressure sensor achieved through fibre diameter reduction Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 125301 (11pp)

  6. Naloxone and the Inner City Youth Experience (NICYE): a community-based participatory research study examining young people's perceptions of the BC take home naloxone program.

    Mitchell, Keren; Durante, S Elise; Pellatt, Katrina; Richardson, Chris G; Mathias, Steve; Buxton, Jane A

    2017-06-07

    Take home naloxone (THN) programs reduce mortality by training bystanders to respond to opioid overdoses. Clinical observation by the health care team at the Inner City Youth (ICY) program indicated that young adults appeared to enthusiastically participate in the THN program and developed improved relationships with staff after THN training. However, we found a dearth of literature exploring the experiences of young adults with THN programs. This study set out to address this gap and identify suggestions from the young adults for program improvement. The primary research question was "How do street-involved young people experience the THN Program in Vancouver, BC?" The study was undertaken at the ICY Program. Two peer researchers with lived experience of THN were recruited from ICY and were involved in all phases of the study. The peer researchers and a graduate student facilitated two focus groups and five individual interviews with ICY program participants using a semi-structured interview guide. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim. The cut-up-and-put-in-folders approach was used to identify emerging themes. The themes that emerged were perceptions of risk, altruism, strengthening relationship with staff, access to training, empowerment, and confidence in ability to respond, and suggestions for youth-friendly training. These themes were then situated within the framework of the health belief model to provide additional context. Participants viewed themselves as vulnerable to overdose and spoke of the importance of expanding access to THN training. Following training, participants reported an increase in internal locus of control, an improved sense of safety among the community of people who use drugs, improved self-esteem, and strengthened relationships with ICY staff. Overall, participants found THN training engaging, which appeared to enhance participation in other ICY programming. Young people perceived THN training as a positive experience that

  7. A locally funded Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata genome sequencing project increases avian data and advances young researcher education

    Oleksyk Taras K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amazona vittata is a critically endangered Puerto Rican endemic bird, the only surviving native parrot species in the United States territory, and the first parrot in the large Neotropical genus Amazona, to be studied on a genomic scale. Findings In a unique community-based funded project, DNA from an A. vittata female was sequenced using a HiSeq Illumina platform, resulting in a total of ~42.5 billion nucleotide bases. This provided approximately 26.89x average coverage depth at the completion of this funding phase. Filtering followed by assembly resulted in 259,423 contigs (N50 = 6,983 bp, longest = 75,003 bp, which was further scaffolded into 148,255 fragments (N50 = 19,470, longest = 206,462 bp. This provided ~76% coverage of the genome based on an estimated size of 1.58 Gb. The assembled scaffolds allowed basic genomic annotation and comparative analyses with other available avian whole-genome sequences. Conclusions The current data represents the first genomic information from and work carried out with a unique source of funding. This analysis further provides a means for directed training of young researchers in genetic and bioinformatics analyses and will facilitate progress towards a full assembly and annotation of the Puerto Rican parrot genome. It also adds extensive genomic data to a new branch of the avian tree, making it useful for comparative analyses with other avian species. Ultimately, the knowledge acquired from these data will contribute to an improved understanding of the overall population health of this species and aid in ongoing and future conservation efforts.

  8. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  9. Hypothesis-driven research for G × E interactions: the relationship between oxytocin, parental divorce during adolescence, and depression in young adulthood.

    Windle, Michael; Mrug, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene-environment (G × E) studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about G × E relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis testing of G × E relationships in this study. The study investigated whether the oxytocin polymorphism, rs53576, moderated the relationship between parental divorce during adolescence and depression symptoms in young adulthood. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that has been related to the regulation of complex social cognition and behaviors such as empathy, attachment, and nurturance. We hypothesized that the GG polymorphism would be associated with more depressive symptoms following parental divorce, and that this effect would be stronger in females than males. The sample consisted of 340 individuals who participated in a longitudinal study with data used both from adolescence and young adulthood. Findings using prospective follow-up and autoregressive change models supported the hypothesized relationships. Young adult females who had experienced parental divorce during adolescence and had the GG oxytocin genotype reported almost twice as many depressive symptoms relative to young adult females who also experienced parental divorce during adolescence but had the AA or AG genotype. This pattern was not indicated among males. Findings were discussed with regard to how molecular genetic factors in combination with environmental stressors, such parental divorce, framed within a developmental framework may facilitate the future study of G × E relationships in the parental divorce-child adjustment literature and contribute to a prevention science perspective.

  10. Hypothesis-Driven Research for G x E Interactions: The Relationship between Oxytocin, Parental Divorce during Adolescence, and Depression in Young Adulthood

    Michael eWindle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene-environment (GE studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about GE relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis testing of GE relationships in this study. The study investigated whether the oxytocin polymorphism, rs53576, moderated the relationship between parental divorce during adolescence and depression symptoms in young adulthood. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that has been related to the regulation of complex social cognition and behaviors such as empathy, attachment, and nurturance. We hypothesized that the GG polymorphism would be associated with more depressive symptoms following parental divorce, and that this effect would be stronger in females than males. The sample consisted of 340 individuals who participated in a longitudinal study with data used both from adolescence and young adulthood. Findings using prospective follow-up and autoregressive change models supported the hypothesized relationships. Young adult females who had experienced parental divorce during adolescence and had the GG oxytocin genotype reported almost twice as many depressive symptoms relative to young adult females who also experienced parental divorce during adolescence but had the AA or AG genotype. This pattern was not indicated among males. Findings were discussed with regard to how molecular genetic factors in combination with environmental stressors, such parental divorce, framed within a developmental framework may facilitate the future study of G X E relationships in the parental divorce-child adjustment literature and contribute to a prevention science perspective.

  11. Developing a Mental Health eClinic to Improve Access to and Quality of Mental Health Care for Young People: Using Participatory Design as Research Methodologies.

    Ospina-Pinillos, Laura; Davenport, Tracey A; Ricci, Cristina S; Milton, Alyssa C; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2018-05-28

    Each year, many young Australians aged between 16 and 25 years experience a mental health disorder, yet only a small proportion access services and even fewer receive timely and evidence-based treatments. Today, with ever-increasing access to the Internet and use of technology, the potential to provide all young people with access (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) to the support they require to improve their mental health and well-being is promising. The aim of this study was to use participatory design (PD) as research methodologies with end users (young people aged between 16 and 25 years and youth health professionals) and our research team to develop the Mental Health eClinic (a Web-based mental health clinic) to improve timely access to, and better quality, mental health care for young people across Australia. A research and development (R&D) cycle for the codesign and build of the Mental Health eClinic included several iterative PD phases: PD workshops; translation of knowledge and ideas generated during workshops to produce mockups of webpages either as hand-drawn sketches or as wireframes (simple layout of a webpage before visual design and content is added); rapid prototyping; and one-on-one consultations with end users to assess the usability of the alpha build of the Mental Health eClinic. Four PD workshops were held with 28 end users (young people n=18, youth health professionals n=10) and our research team (n=8). Each PD workshop was followed by a knowledge translation session. At the conclusion of this cycle, the alpha prototype was built, and one round of one-on-one end user consultation sessions was conducted (n=6; all new participants, young people n=4, youth health professionals n=2). The R&D cycle revealed the importance of five key components for the Mental Health eClinic: a home page with a visible triage system for those requiring urgent help; a comprehensive online physical and mental health assessment; a detailed dashboard of results; a

  12. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    with a similar device but restricted to 1D only. In the awarded paper, not only is the extension to 2D presented, but also a thorough analysis of the system's performance is given. A clear description of the general concept is followed by the derivation of the intensity distribution on the four-quadrant photodetector. In the next section, the design of the mechanical part is detailed, including a FEM analysis for obtaining optimal performance characteristics in terms of resonance frequency, sensitivity and range. The system is extensively tested, and the paper presents a useful selection of the measurement data in graphical and numerical format. Altogether, theory, experimental and measurement results are presented in a clear and well balanced way, and illustrated with neat graphics. A missing uncertainty analysis is the only deficiency in this otherwise excellent paper. A sequel to this paper from the same authors appeared a few issues later [6], presenting the DVD head as a nanoscale touch trigger probe. Both papers belong to the top 60 most downloaded papers in the 2007 volume. The Outstanding Paper Awards, comprising a cash honorarium and certificate, will be presented to the authors of the winning papers at suitable venues in the near future. The Editorial Board would like to congratulate the winning authors and would like to encourage all researchers to think of Measurement Science and Technology as the home for your best submissions. References [1] Theunissen R, Scarano F and Riethmuller M L 2007 An adaptive sampling and windowing interrogation method in PIV Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 275-87 [2] Sun T, Gawad S, Bernabini C, Green N G and Morgan H 2007 Broadband single cell impedance spectroscopy using maximum length sequences: theoretical analysis and practical considerations Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 2859-68 [3] Küng A, Meli F and Thalmann R 2007 Ultraprecision micro-CMM using a low force 3D touch probe Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 319-27 [4] Chu C-L, Lin C-H and Fan K

  13. Using formative research to design a context-specific behaviour change strategy to improve infant and young child feeding practices and nutrition in Nepal.

    Locks, Lindsey M; Pandey, Pooja R; Osei, Akoto K; Spiro, David S; Adhikari, Debendra P; Haselow, Nancy J; Quinn, Victoria J; Nielsen, Jennifer N

    2015-10-01

    Global recommendations on strategies to improve infant feeding, care and nutrition are clear; however, there is limited literature that explains methods for tailoring these recommendations to the local context where programmes are implemented. This paper aims to: (1) highlight the individual, cultural and environmental factors revealed by formative research to affect infant and young child feeding and care practices in Baitadi district of Far Western Nepal; and (2) outline how both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used to design a context-specific behaviour change strategy to improve child nutrition. Quantitative data on 750 children aged 12-23 months and their families were collected via surveys administered to mothers. The participants were selected using a multistage cluster sampling technique. The survey asked about knowledge, attitude and behaviours relating to infant and young child feeding. Qualitative data on breastfeeding and complementary feeding beliefs and practices were also collected from a separate sample via focus group discussions with mothers, and key informant interviews with mothers-in-law and husbands. Key findings revealed gaps in knowledge among many informants resulting in suboptimal infant and young child feeding practices - particularly with relation to duration of exclusive breastfeeding and dietary diversity of complementary foods. The findings from this research were then incorporated into a context-specific nutrition behaviour change communication strategy. © 2013 Helen Keller International © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A novel poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/diatomite composite flocculant with outstanding flocculation performance.

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Yao; Wang, Yang; Tan, Ying; Liang, Xuecheng; Lu, Cuige; Wang, Haiwei; Liu, Xiusheng; Wang, Pixin

    2015-01-01

    Series of anionic flocculants with outstanding flocculation performance, poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/diatomite composite flocculants (PAAD) were successfully prepared through aqueous solution copolymerization and applied to flocculate from oil-field fracturing waste-water. The structure of PAAD was characterized by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction tests, and its properties were systematically evaluated by viscometer, thermogravimetry analysis and flocculation measurements. Furthermore, the influences of various reaction parameters on the apparent viscosity of flocculant solution were studied, and the optimum synthesis condition was determined. The novel composite flocculants exhibited outstanding flocculation properties. Specifically, the dosage of composite flocculants that could make the transmittance of treated wastewater exceed 90% was only approximately 12-35 ppm, which was far lower than that of conventional flocculants. Meanwhile, the settling time was lower than 5 s, which was similar to that of conventional flocculants. This was because PAAD flocculants had a higher absorption capacity, and larger chain extending space than conventional linear flocculants, which could refrain from the entanglement of linear polymer chains and significantly improve flocculation capacity.

  15. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2011 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2011 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul; Tatam, Ralph

    2012-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believe that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards'. This year awards were presented in the areas of 'Measurement Science', 'Fluid Mechanics' and 'Precision Measurement'. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. 2011 Award Winners—Measurement Science Simultaneous measurement of internal and surrounding flows of a moving droplet using multicolour confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) M Oishi, H Kinoshita, T Fujii and M Oshima Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan Whilst the award last year [1] was concerned with the application of microscopy to ultra-high vacuum dynamic force measurements, this year's award [2] goes to another micro-measurement technique, one concerned with measurements related to particle image velocimetry. The technique relates to multiphase flow in microfluidic devices, and offers a non-contact methodology for examining simultaneous dynamic interactions between flows having different phases. There are several features which make this an excellent paper. It introduces its subject with a clear and concise description of previous advances in related measurement methods, before introducing the additional feature of two-colour fluorescent monitoring of flow in two independent optical channels. By adapting a

  16. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2009 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2009 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. This year also saw the introduction of a new category—Optical and Laser-based Techniques. 2009 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) robust phase correlation Adric Eckstein and Pavlos P Vlachos Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA This paper [1] represents a valuable improvement to the phase-only correlation technique (first proposed by Wernet in this journal in 2005 (Wernet M 2005 Symmetric phase-only filtering: a new paradigm for DPIV data processing Meas. Sci. Technol. 16 601-18) for particle-image-velocimetry (PIV) measurements of fluid flow. The authors establish a sound theoretical foundation and clearly describe the working principle of their robust phase correlation method. The methodology for assessing performance is excellent. Detailed results on several internationally recognized PIV test cases are presented. The robust phase correlation method is of general applicability and therefore can be expected to have substantial impact in this very active area of fluid-mechanics measurements. 2009 Award Winner—Precision Measurement A nanonewton force facility and a novel method for measurements of the air and vacuum permittivity at zero frequencies V Nesterov Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany This paper [2] describes a

  17. Cool? Young people investigate living in cold housing and fuel poverty. A mixed methods action research study

    Kimberley C. O'Sullivan

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The integrated results confirm that cold housing and risk of fuel poverty are important problems for young people in New Zealand. Results contribute to the evidence-base for policy targeting of schemes such as the Government-sponsored retrofitting of insulation to households with dependent children.

  18. Sexual practices of young educated men: implications for further research and health education in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).

    Raheel, Hafsa; Mahmood, Muhammad Afzal; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz

    2013-03-01

    Considering the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and other associated health problems among young people globally, it is important to identify sexual practices that could potentially compromise health. This study explored the sexual practices of young men in Riyadh city, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Materials and methodology A cross-sectional study among young, male students was conducted using a pre-tested, structured, self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive analysis and adjusted odds ratio (OR) were calculated. Among 225 study participants, 31% had engaged in premarital sexual activity at least once and 61% viewed pornographic movies/materials. Only 51% knew that condom use could prevent STIs, 20% were not aware that HIV could be transmitted through both homosexual and heterosexual contacts. Premarital sexual activity was associated with the use of illegal drugs (OR: 2.51), viewing of pornographic movies (OR: 6.79) and traveling alone abroad (OR: 3.10). and recommendations Our study was the first to report the existence of premarital sexual practices among young educated men in KSA. There is a need to identify in detail the risks and the knowledge gaps, and base sexual health awareness among youth on such knowledge in order to prevent the spread of STIs and HIV.

  19. Capitalizing on Bourdieu: How Useful Are Concepts of "Social Capital" and "Social Field" for Researching "Marginalized" Young Women?

    Allard, Andrea C.

    2005-01-01

    This article considers Bourdieu's concepts of "social capital" and "social fields", comparing and contrasting his use of these concepts with that of James Coleman and Robert Putnam. It examines how Bourdieu's ideas offer a different way of understanding the lives of economically disadvantaged young women designated as "at…

  20. Can Classroom Play Ease the Transition to a New Culture? Applying Research on Young Children from Puerto Rico

    Trawick-Smith, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted in the fields of both education and psychology that play can help young children cope with troubling circumstances in their lives. It would be logical to assume that play activities may be ideal for assisting children whose families have immigrated to the United States in adjusting to the puzzling, and even frightening,…

  1. RESEARCH CONCERNING THE EFFECTS OF THE PUBLIC POLICIES ON THE UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG THE YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE NORTH-EAST REGION OF ROMANIA

    Iulian CONDRATOV

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the goal to identify the specific role that various regulatory institutions of the labor market have on the variation of the macroeconomic indicators which describe the employment situation of the young people on the labor market in the North-East Region of Romania. In this research we have used statistic data provided by the National Institute of Statistics of Romania among which we have selected a series of relevant variables regarding the characterization of the public policies for the labor market and the legislation of employees’ protection. Their influence on the variation of the unemployment rate and the employment rate concerning the young people in the North-East Region was studied using the method of the statistics regression, undergoing a filtration using the Stepwise procedure, implemented within the informatics program SPSS.

  2. Associations between Grawe's general mechanisms of change and Young's early maladaptive schemas in psychotherapy research: a comparative study of change processes.

    Mander, Johannes V; Jacob, Gitta A; Götz, Lea; Sammet, Isa; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at analyzing associations between Grawe's general mechanisms of change and Young's early maladaptive schemas (EMS). Therefore, 98 patients completed the Scale for the Multiperspective Assessment of General Change Mechanisms in Psychotherapy (SACiP), the Young Shema Questionnaire-Short Form Revised (YSQ S3R), and diverse outcome measures at the beginning and end of treatment. Our results are important for clinical applications, as we demonstrated strong predictive effects of change mechanisms on schema domains using regression analyses and cross-lagged panel models. Resource activation experiences seem to be especially crucial in fostering alterations in EMS, as this change mechanism demonstrated significant associations with several schema domains. Future research should investigate these aspects in more detail using observer-based micro-process analyses.

  3. Activated carbon derived from melaleuca barks for outstanding high-rate supercapacitors

    Luo, Qiu-Ping; Huang, Liang; Gao, Xiang; Cheng, Yongliang; Yao, Bin; Hu, Zhimi; Wan, Jun; Xiao, Xu; Zhou, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) was prepared via carbonizing melaleuca bark in an argon atmosphere at 600 °C followed with KOH activation for high-rate supercapacitors. This AC electrode has a high capacitance of 233 F g-1 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 and an excellent rate capability of ˜80% when increasing the sweep rate from 2 to 500 mV s-1. The symmetric supercapacitor assembled by the above electrode can deliver a high energy density of 4.2 Wh kg-1 with a power density of 1500 W kg-1 when operated in the voltage range of 0-1 V in 1 M H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte while maintaining great cycling stability (less than 5% capacitance loss after 10 000 cycles at sweep rate of 100 mV s-1). All the outstanding electrochemical performances make this AC electrode a promising candidate for potential energy storage application.

  4. Outstanding Questions In First Amendment Law Related To Food Labeling Disclosure Requirements For Health.

    Pomeranz, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The federal and state governments are increasingly focusing on food labeling as a method to support good health. Many such laws are opposed by the food industry and may be challenged in court, raising the question of what is legally feasible. This article analyzes outstanding questions in First Amendment law related to commercial disclosure requirements and conducts legal analysis and policy evaluation for three current policies. These include the Food and Drug Administration's draft regulation requiring an added sugar disclosure on the Nutrition Facts panel, California's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage safety warning label bill, and Vermont's law requiring labels of genetically engineered food to disclose this information. I recommend several methods for policy makers to enact food labeling laws within First Amendment parameters, including imposing factual commercial disclosure requirements, disclosing the government entity issuing a warning, collecting evidence, and identifying legitimate governmental interests. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  5. Graphene with outstanding anti-irradiation capacity as multialkylated cyclopentanes additive toward space application

    Fan, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Liping

    2015-07-01

    Multialkylated cyclopentanes (MACs), a class of synthetic hydrocarbon fluid have attracted intensive interest as possible space lubricants due to a series of unique physical and chemical properties. Here, we used graphene with high mechanical strength and chemical inertness as lubricant additive to explore its potential for space application. The effects of space irradiation on graphene and the tribological properties of graphene as lubricant additive were firstly investigated in detail under simulated space environment composed of high vacuum, high/low temperature and irradiation. Results demonstrate that graphene not only possesses outstanding anti-irradiation capacity but also significantly improves the space performance and tribological properties of MACs, which depends on the excellent physicochemical properties and high load-carrying ability of graphene as well as more effective separation of the sliding surfaces.

  6. Preventative lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) and young child feeding practices: findings from qualitative research in Haiti.

    Lesorogol, Carolyn; Jean-Louis, Sherlie; Green, Jamie; Iannotti, Lora

    2015-12-01

    To prevent undernutrition in an urban slum in Haiti, a lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) was introduced through a randomised control trial. Food supplementation for young child nutrition has a long history in Haiti, but there is little empirical information regarding the effects of supplementation on young child feeding practices. One of the concerns raised by supplementation is that it may disrupt other positive feeding practices such as breastfeeding and use of other complementary foods, with negative consequences for child nutrition. We conducted 29 in-depth interviews with mother-baby pairs from the three comparison groups: control, 3-month LNS supplementation and 6-month LNS supplementation. Findings from those in the LNS groups indicated high acceptance and satisfaction with LNS and perceptions that it positively affects child health and development. LNS was integrated into and enhanced ongoing complementary feeding practices. The effects of LNS use on duration and perceived quantity of breastfeeding were variable, but generally, breastfeeding was maintained during and after the intervention. Interviews generated insights into beliefs regarding infant and young child feeding practices such as introduction and use of complementary foods, and breastfeeding duration, exclusivity and cessation. Implications for the use of LNS in public health nutrition programmes are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hippocampus and amygdala volumes in children and young adults at high-risk of schizophrenia: research synthesis.

    Ganzola, Rossana; Maziade, Michel; Duchesne, Simon

    2014-06-01

    Studies have reported hippocampal and amygdala volume abnormalities in schizophrenic patients. It is necessary to explore the potential for these structures as early disease markers in subjects at high risk (HR) of schizophrenia. We performed a review of 29 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies measuring hippocampal and amygdala volumes in subjects at HR for schizophrenia. We reclassified subjects in 3 new HR categories: presence of only risk symptoms (psychotic moderate symptoms), presence of only risk factors (genetic, developmental or environmental), and presence of combined risk symptoms/factors. Hippocampal volume reductions were detected in subjects with first episode (FE) of psychosis, in all young adults and in adolescents at HR of schizophrenia. The loss of tissue was mainly located in the posterior part of hippocampus and the right side seems more vulnerable in young adults with only risk symptoms. Instead, the anterior sector seems more involved in HR subjects with genetic risks. Abnormal amygdala volumes were found in FE subjects, in children with combined risk symptoms/factors and in older subjects using different inclusion criteria, but not in young adults. Hippocampal and amygdala abnormalities may be present before schizophrenia onset. Further studies should be conducted to clarify whether these abnormalities are causally or effectually related to neurodevelopment. Shape analysis could clarify the impact of environmental, genetic, and developmental factors on the medial temporal structures during the evolution of this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Application of Ground-Penetrating Radar to Transportation Engineering: Recent Advances and New Perspectives (GI Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara; Alani, Amir M.

    2017-04-01

    aims at presenting the recent advances and the new perspectives in the application of GPR to transportation engineering. This study reports on new experimental-based and theoretical models for the assessment of the physical (i.e., clay and water content in subgrade soils, railway ballast fouling) and the mechanical (i.e., the Young's modulus of elasticity) properties that are critical in maintaining the structural stability and the bearing capacity of the major transport infrastructures, such as highways, railways and airfields. With regard to the physical parameters, the electromagnetic behaviour related to the clay content in the load-bearing layers of flexible pavements as well as in subgrade soils has been analysed and modelled in both dry and wet conditions. Furthermore, it is discussed a new simulation-based methodology for the detection of the fouling content in railway ballast. Concerning the mechanical parameters, experimental based methods are presented for the assessment of the strength and deformation properties of the soils and the top-bounded layers of flexible pavements. Furthermore, unique case studies in terms of the methodology proposed, the survey planning and the site procedures in rather complex operations, are discussed in the case of bridges and tunnels inspections. Acknowledgements The Authors are grateful to the GI Division President Dr. Francesco Soldovieri and the relevant Award Committee in the context of the "GI Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award" of the European Geosciences Union. We also acknowledge the COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" for providing networking and discussion opportunities throughout its activity and operation as well as facilitating prospect for publishing research outputs.

  9. Yoga for Children and Young People's Mental Health and Well-Being: Research Review and Refections on the Mental Health Potentials of Yoga

    Ingunn eHagen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article discusses yoga as a potential tool for children to deal with stress and regulate themselves. Yoga provides training of mind and body to bring emotional balance. We argue that children and young people need such tools to listen inward to their bodies, feelings, and ideas. Yoga may assist them in developing in sound ways, to strengthen themselves, and be contributing social beings.First, we address how children and young people in today’s world face numerous expectations and constant stimulation through the Internet and other media and communication technologies. One reason why children experience stress and mental health challenges is that globalization exposes the youth all over the world to various new standards and options. There is also increased pressure to succeed in school, partly due to a diverse range of options available for young people in contemporary times than in the past. Our argument also partially rests on the fact that modern society offers plenty of distractions and unwelcome attractions, especially linked to new media technologies. The dominant presence of multimedia devices and the time spent on them by children are clear indicators of the shift in lifestyles and priorities of our new generation. A main concept in our article is that yoga may help children and young people cope with stress and thus contribute positively to mental health. We present research literature suggesting that yoga improves children’s physical and mental well-being. Similarly, yoga in schools helps students improve resilience, mood, and self-regulation skills pertaining to emotions and stress.

  10. The role of schools in children and young people's self-harm and suicide: systematic review and meta-ethnography of qualitative research.

    Evans, Rhiannon; Hurrell, Chloe

    2016-05-14

    Evidence reports that schools influence children and young people's health behaviours across a range of outcomes. However there remains limited understanding of the mechanisms through which institutional features may structure self-harm and suicide. This paper reports on a systematic review and meta-ethnography of qualitative research exploring how schools influence self-harm and suicide in students. Systematic searches were conducted of nineteen databases from inception to June 2015. English language, primary research studies, utilising any qualitative research design to report on the influence of primary or secondary educational settings (or international equivalents) on children and young people's self-harm and suicide were included. Two reviewers independently appraised studies against the inclusion criteria, assessed quality, and abstracted data. Data synthesis was conducted in adherence with Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach. Of 6744 unique articles identified, six articles reporting on five studies were included in the meta-ethnography. Five meta-themes emerged from the studies. First, self-harm is often rendered invisible within educational settings, meaning it is not prioritised within the curriculum despite students' expressed need. Second, where self-harm transgresses institutional rules it may be treated as 'bad behaviour', meaning adequate support is denied. Third, schools' informal management strategy of escalating incidents of self-harm to external 'experts' serves to contribute to non-help seeking behaviour amongst students who desire confidential support from teachers. Fourth, anxiety and stress associated with school performance may escalate self-harm and suicide. Fifth, bullying within the school context can contribute to self-harm, whilst some young people may engage in these practices as initiation into a social group. Schools may influence children and young people's self-harm, although evidence of their impact on suicide remains

  11. The role of schools in children and young people’s self-harm and suicide: systematic review and meta-ethnography of qualitative research

    Rhiannon Evans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence reports that schools influence children and young people’s health behaviours across a range of outcomes. However there remains limited understanding of the mechanisms through which institutional features may structure self-harm and suicide. This paper reports on a systematic review and meta-ethnography of qualitative research exploring how schools influence self-harm and suicide in students. Methods Systematic searches were conducted of nineteen databases from inception to June 2015. English language, primary research studies, utilising any qualitative research design to report on the influence of primary or secondary educational settings (or international equivalents on children and young people’s self-harm and suicide were included. Two reviewers independently appraised studies against the inclusion criteria, assessed quality, and abstracted data. Data synthesis was conducted in adherence with Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnographic approach. Of 6744 unique articles identified, six articles reporting on five studies were included in the meta-ethnography. Results Five meta-themes emerged from the studies. First, self-harm is often rendered invisible within educational settings, meaning it is not prioritised within the curriculum despite students’ expressed need. Second, where self-harm transgresses institutional rules it may be treated as ‘bad behaviour’, meaning adequate support is denied. Third, schools’ informal management strategy of escalating incidents of self-harm to external ‘experts’ serves to contribute to non-help seeking behaviour amongst students who desire confidential support from teachers. Fourth, anxiety and stress associated with school performance may escalate self-harm and suicide. Fifth, bullying within the school context can contribute to self-harm, whilst some young people may engage in these practices as initiation into a social group. Conclusions Schools may influence children

  12. Short Tools to Assess Young Children's Dietary Intake: A Systematic Review Focusing on Application to Dietary Index Research

    Lucinda K. Bell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary indices evaluate diet quality, usually based on current dietary guidelines. Indices can therefore contribute to our understanding of early-life obesity-risk dietary behaviours. Yet indices are commonly applied to dietary data collected by onerous methods (e.g., recalls or records. Short dietary assessment instruments are an attractive alternative to collect data from which to derive an index score. A systematic review of studies published before April 2013 was conducted to identify short (≤50 items tools that measure whole-of-diet intake of young children (birth-five years and are applicable to dietary indices, in particular screening obesogenic dietary behaviours. The search identified 3686 papers of which 16, reporting on 15 tools (n=7, infants and toddlers birth-24 months; n=8, preschoolers 2–5 years, met the inclusion criteria. Most tools were food frequency questionnaires (n=14, with one innovative dietary questionnaire identified. Seven were tested for validity or reliability, and one was tested for both. Six tools (n=2, infants and toddlers; n=4, preschoolers are applicable for use with current dietary indices, five of which screen obesogenic dietary behaviours. Given the limited number of brief, valid and reliable dietary assessment tools for young children to which an index can be applied, future short tool development is warranted, particularly for screening obesogenic dietary behaviours.

  13. Do Community Characteristics Relate to Young Adult College Students' Credit Card Debt? The Hypothesized Role of Collective Institutional Efficacy.

    Friedline, Terri; West, Stacia; Rosell, Nehemiah; Serido, Joyce; Shim, Soyeon

    2017-03-01

    This study examines the extent of emergent, outstanding credit card debt among young adult college students and investigates whether any associations existed between this credit card debt and the characteristics of the communities in which these students grew up or lived. Using data (N = 748) from a longitudinal survey and merging community characteristics measured at the zip code level, we confirmed that a community's unemployment rate, average total debt, average credit score, and number of bank branch offices were associated with a young adult college student's acquisition and accumulation of credit card debt. For example, a community's higher unemployment rate and lower number of bank branches were associated with a young adult college student's greater accumulated debt. Community characteristics had the strongest associations with credit card debt, especially after controlling for individual characteristics (i.e., a young adult college student's race and financial independence) and familial characteristics (i.e., their parents' income and parents' discussions of financial matters while growing up at home). The findings may help to understand the unique roles that communities play in shaping children and young adults' financial capability, and how communities can be better capacitated to support the financial goals of their residents. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  14. Young skateboarders their everyday

    Marcelo Rampazzo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we focus on young people and their daily lives, bringing elements discussing leisure, family, education and work. Research conducted with a group of young skaters in a public track skating in the city of Porto Alegre - RS. In a total nine months of direct observation, each reported in Field Diaries. We seek to understand how the leisure of young people who gave the practice of skateboarding, was related to other aspects of their daily lives. After completing the work, we consider that - to remain in practice the skateboard - young people needed to reconcile the charges of their families, in addition to labels and stereotypes imposed from "outside" the universe of practitioners of this sport. We noticed also that young people go through all this in order to keep their "projects" on the skateboard.

  15. Outstanding personalities in German-speaking mycology : Dedicated to Professor Dr. Johannes Müller.

    Seebacher, Claus; Lotti, Torello; Roccia, Maria Grazia; Fioranelli, Massimo; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-10-01

    The history of medical and veterinary mycology in general has been reviewed in the excellent monography by G.C. Ainsworth (1905-1998) published in 1986. Here, we will focus on German-speaking mycology and their outstanding personalities. We will start with the early years when medical mycology was in its infancy. Microscopy was a most valuable tool for the identification of fungi followed by cultivation and staining methods. Human pathologies became linked to fungi. After World War I, medical mycology flourished as an integral part of dermatology at universities and in private institutes. The development was interrupted by World War II, which divided Germany. In both parts of Germany, medical mycology had to be re-established. After re-unification the two different medical societies joined together. The development of DMyK (Deutschsprachigen Mykologischen Gesellschaft - Mykologie) is illustrated. Important personalities and some of their achievements are mentioned. Mycology has attracted other fields of medicine including internal medicine, pediatrics, microbiology, and veterinary medicine.

  16. Outstanding visible photocatalytic activity of a new mixed bismuth titanatate material

    Zambrano, P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 410092, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento Cristalografía, Mineralogía y Química Agrícola, Universidad de Sevilla, C/Profesor García González s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Sayagués, M.J.; Navío, J.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 410092, Sevilla (Spain); Hidalgo, M.C., E-mail: carmen.hidalgo@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 410092, Sevilla (Spain)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Photocatalyst based on bismuth titanates with high visible activity. • Its visible activity as high as UV activity of TiO{sub 2} P25 for phenol degradation. • Photocatalyst is majority of phase Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} with Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} and amorphous TiO{sub 2}. • High visible activity due to low BG, interconnected phases and high surface area. - Abstract: In this work, a new photocatalyst based on bismuth titanates with outstanding visible photocatalytic activity was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The synthesised material showed visible activity as high as UV activity of commercial TiO{sub 2} P25 under the same experimental conditions for phenol degradation. A wide characterisation of the photocatalyst was performed. The material was composed of three phases; majority of Bi{sub 20}TiO{sub 32} closely interconnected to Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} and amorphous TiO{sub 2}. The high visible activity showed by this material could be ascribed to a combination of several features; i.e. low band gap energy value (2.1 eV), a structure allowing a good separation path for visible photogenerated electron-holes pairs and a relatively high surface area. This photocatalyst appeared as a promising material for solar and visible applications of photocatalysis.

  17. Outstanding diversity of heritage features in large geological bodies: The Gachsaran Formation in southwest Iran

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-09-01

    The ideas of geological heritage and geological diversity have become very popular in the modern science. These are usually applied to geological domains or countries, provinces, districts, etc. Additionally, it appears to be sensible to assess heritage value of geological bodies. The review of the available knowledge and the field investigation of the Gachsaran Formation (lower Miocene) in southwest Iran permit to assign its features and the relevant phenomena to as much as 10 geological heritage types, namely stratigraphical, sedimentary, palaeontological, palaeogeographical, geomorphological, hydrogeological, engineering, structural, economical, and geohistorical types. The outstanding diversity of the features of this formation determines its high heritage value and the national rank. The geological heritage of the Gachsaran Formation is important to scientists, educators, and tourists. The Papoon and Abolhaiat sections of this formation are potential geological heritage sites, although these do not represent all above-mentioned types. The large territory, where the Gachsaran Formation outcrop, has a significant geoconservation and geotourism potential, and further inventory of geosites on this territory is necessary. Similar studies of geological bodies in North Africa and the Middle East can facilitate better understanding of the geological heritage of this vast territory.

  18. Solvent evaporation induced graphene powder with high volumetric capacitance and outstanding rate capability for supercapacitors

    Zhang, Xiaozhe; Raj, Devaraj Vasanth; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Zhaoping

    2018-04-01

    Graphene-based electrode materials for supercapacitors usually suffer from poor volumetric performance due to the low density. The enhancement of volumetric capacitance by densification of graphene materials, however, is usually accompanied by deterioration of rate capability, as the huge contraction of pore size hinders rapid diffusion of electrolytes. Thus, it is important to develop suitable pore size in graphene materials, which can sustain fast ion diffusion and avoid excessive voids to acquire high density simultaneously for supercapacitor applications. Accordingly, we propose a simple solvent evaporation method to control the pore size of graphene powders by adjusting the surface tension of solvents. Ethanol is used instead of water to reduce the shrinkage degree of graphene powder during solvent evaporation process, due to its lower surface tension comparing with water. Followed by the assistance of mechanical compression, graphene powder having high compaction density of 1.30 g cm-3 and a large proportion of mesopores in the pore size range of 2-30 nm is obtained, which delivers high volumetric capacitance of 162 F cm-3 and exhibits outstanding rate performance of 76% capacity retention at a high current density of 100 A g-1 simultaneously.

  19. Ternary graphene/amorphous carbon/nickel nanocomposite film for outstanding superhydrophobicity

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Zhou, Shengguo; Yan, Qingqing

    2018-04-01

    A novel superhydrophobic ternary graphene/amorphous carbon/nickel (G-Ni/a-C:H) carbon-based film was fabricated by a green approach of high-voltage electrochemical deposition without using aqueous solution, which was systematically investigated including the structure and relating applications on self-cleaning and corrosion resistance. Graphene and nickel nano-particle inserts were effective to tailor the feature of nanocrystallite/amorphous microstructure as well as micro-nanoscale hierarchical rose-petal-like surface for G-Ni/a-C:H carbon-based film. Surprisingly, this deposit could present outstanding superhydrophobicity with the contact angle of 158.98 deg and sliding angle of 2.75 deg without any further surface modification meanwhile it could possess fairly well adhesion. Furthermore, the superhydrophobic G-Ni/a-C:H carbon-based film could exhibit excellent corrosion resistance and self-cleaning performances compared to no graphene incorporated deposit. The procedure of fabricating deposit might be simple, scalable, and environmental friendly, indicating a promising prospect for industrial applications in the field of anti-fouling, anti-corrosion and drag resistance.

  20. Peningkatan Mutu Pendidikan SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo sebagai Sekolah Berkategori The Outstanding School of Muhammadiyah

    Hidayatulloh Hidayatulloh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines about improving the education quality of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo as the Outstanding School of Muhammadiyah. This article reveals that the quality improvement of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo was conducted through: the arrangement of school program and self evaluation, the reinforcement of vision, mission and education objective, the reinforcement of leadership and teamwork, the improvement of teachers and educators competence, the improvement learners quality input, the development of curriculum and learning, the development of school culture, the development of facilities and infrastructure, the development of community service, the cooperation of education and student exchange, the mobilization of education funding resources, the develop-ment of SIM, monitoring and evaluation, and education quality system. The management quality of SMA Muhammadiyah 2 Sidoarjo was run through input-process-output formula. The process of quality containes the process of quality planning, main process, supporting process, dan quality improvement process. Factors supporting the quality improvement are: Muhammadiyah’s popular name, the doctrine of education quality improvement, the leadership of TORSIE paradigm, the school academicians’ spirit of gaining achievement, the synergy of school academicians, the appropriate facilities, and the supports of all stakeholders.

  1. Integrating themes, evidence gaps, and research needs identified by workshop on iron screening and supplementation in iron-replete pregnant women and young children.

    Brannon, Patsy M; Stover, Patrick J; Taylor, Christine L

    2017-12-01

    This report addresses the evidence and the uncertainties, knowledge gaps, and research needs identified by participants at the NIH workshop related to iron screening and routine iron supplementation of largely iron-replete pregnant women and young children (6-24 mo) in developed countries. The workshop presentations and panel discussions focused on current understanding and knowledge gaps related to iron homeostasis, measurement of and evidence for iron status, and emerging concerns about supplementing iron-replete members of these vulnerable populations. Four integrating themes emerged across workshop presentations and discussion and centered on 1 ) physiologic or developmental adaptations of iron homeostasis to pregnancy and early infancy, respectively, and their implications, 2 ) improvement of the assessment of iron status across the full continuum from iron deficiency anemia to iron deficiency to iron replete to iron excess, 3 ) the linkage of iron status with health outcomes beyond hematologic outcomes, and 4 ) the balance of benefit and harm of iron supplementation of iron-replete pregnant women and young children. Research that addresses these themes in the context of the full continuum of iron status is needed to inform approaches to the balancing of benefits and harms of screening and routine supplementation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Jóvenes y VIH/SIDA: enfoques y perspectivas en investigación Young people and the HIV/AIDS: research approaches and perspectives

    Yurian Lida Rubiano Mesa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Este escrito realiza un acercamiento a las investigaciones sobre el Virus de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirido (VIH y del Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida (SIDA de los jóvenes, como problema social. Analiza los principales temas, enfoques metodológicos y respuestas, perfilando sus límites y posibilidades para reconocer las tensiones y los conflictos que viven estos jóvenes en la sociedad actual. Resalta la escasa producción investigativa a partir de la experiencia de los jóvenes que viven con el VIH/SIDA y propone pensar en un nuevo proyecto de investigación que respalde una forma de conocer y de responder a este complejo fenómeno, con una mirada integradora que genere nuevos sentidos, para comprender y desarrollar nuevas formas de acción.This article aims at approaching the different studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS from a perspective as a social issue. By examining the main topics, methodological approaches and actions, this study intends to outline limits as well as possibilities in order to identify the most common tensions and conflicts these young people usually go through at present. It is also a call to think of a new research project that could support new ways of approaching and finding solutions for this complex phenomenon since there is too little research production on how young people live and cope with HIV/AIDS.

  3. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  4. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT). Key topic / Outstanding know-how and sustainable innovations

    Raetzke, Christian [CONLAR - Consulting on Nuclear Law, Licensing and Regulation, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    Summary report on the Key Topic Outstanding Know-How and Sustainable Innovations, Focus Session: International Regulation: Leveraging the Experience of Established Nuclear Countries for Regulations and Projects in Newcomer Countries, of the 48th Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology (AMNT 2017) held in Berlin, 16 to 17 May 2017.

  5. 41 CFR 301-71.304 - Are we responsible for ensuring the collection of outstanding travel advances?

    2010-07-01

    ... ensuring the collection of outstanding travel advances? 301-71.304 Section 301-71.304 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Accounting for Travel Advances § 301-71.304 Are we...

  6. The potential Outstanding Universal Value and natural heritage values of Bonaire National Marine Park: an ecological perspective

    Beek, van I.J.M.; Cremer, J.S.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Becking, L.E.; Langley, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Bonaire National Marine Park is an outstanding example of a fringing coral reef that has evolved to one of the most diverse reef in the Caribbean. The Bonaire Marine Park, protected since 1979 and declared a National Park in 1999, includes one of the healthiest coral reef in the Caribbean and

  7. Reasons for an outstanding plant diversity in the tropical Andes of Southern Ecuador

    Michael Richter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term field studies in the scope of a multidisciplinary project in southern Ecuador revealed extraordinary high species numbers of many organismic groups. This article discusses reasons for the outstanding vascular plant diversity using a hierarchical scale-oriented top-down approach (Grüninger 2005, from the global scale to the local microscale. The global scale explains general (paleo- ecological factors valid for most parts of the humid tropics, addressing various hypotheses and theories, such as the “greater effective evolutionary time”, constant input of “accidentals”, the “seasonal variability hypothesis”, the “intermediate disturbance hypothesis”, and the impact of soil fertility. The macroscale focuses on the Andes in northwestern South America. The tropical Andes are characterised by many taxa of restricted range which is particularly true for the Amotape-Huancabamba region, i.e. the so called Andean Depression, which is effective as discrete phytogeographic transition as well as barrier zone. Interdigitation of northern and southern flora elements, habitat fragmentation, geological and landscape history, and a high speciation rate due to rapid genetic radiation of some taxa contribute to a high degree of diversification. The mesoscale deals with the special environmental features of the eastern mountain range, the Cordillera Real and surrounding areas in southern Ecuador. Various climatic characteristics, the orographic heterogeneity, the geologic and edaphic conditions as well as human impact are the most prominent factors augmenting plant species diversity. On microscale, prevailing regimes of disturbance and environmental stresses, the orographic basement, as well as the general role on the various mountain chains are considered. Here, micro-habitats e.g. niches for epiphytes, effects of micro-relief patterns, and successions after small-sized disturbance events are screened. Direct effects of human impact are

  8. Unplanned unavailability of the French nuclear plants. Evolution. Outstanding facts applications

    Coppe, P.

    2001-01-01

    The presentation gives a description of the unplanned unavailability of the whole French nuclear units on the aspect performance. The French fleet comprises 58 nuclear units including 34 from the series 900 MW, 20 from the stage 1300 MW and 4 units from the new series N4 of 1450 MW recently commissioned. Because of this width, even if the unavailability of the park remains on a low level on average, the experience feedback on this parameter gives very a rich lesson. The general evolution of unavailability over the last years is the subject of the first part of the talk. Several modes of analysis are examined: by year on the whole of the units, for the various series, by order of age of the various units. The different modes of gathering are examined and others are evoked, in order to reveal those which allow an optimal use of the experience feedback. The outstanding facts are then presented: the principal causes of unavailability are raised and examined. Certain equipment stand out particularly: the reasons of these singularities are exposed as well as the lesson and the modifications brought, the committed actions. Finally the applications resulting from the studies of the unplanned unavailability of the nuclear units are developed. Of course they relate in the forefront to the field of maintenance with the use of these studies within the framework of optimized and adapted programs of maintenance. The contributions are examined. The aging evolution of the plants is also analyzed starting from these studies. The stress is put however on a less obvious application: this one of the future units in design. (author)

  9. “If it Feels Good…”: Research on School Selection Process Motives Among Parents of Young Children

    ter Avest, I.; Bertram-Troost, G.D.; Miedema, S.

    2015-01-01

    From (inter)national research we know about parents’ priorities in the school selection process. In this research the authors focus on parents’ motivations underpinning these priorities. The question is: “What motivates parents to send their child to a Christian primary school?” In the Dutch plural

  10. Qualitative Inquiry into Premarital Sexual Behaviours and Contraceptive Use among Multiethnic Young Women: Implications for Education and Future Research

    Wong, Li Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was a qualitative investigation into sexual attitudes and behaviours, and contraceptive use among Malaysian youth, based on constructs from the health belief model, theory of reasoned action, and problem behaviour theory. Methods A total of 34 focus group discussions with 185 participants were conducted among the Malay (35%), Chinese (34%), and Indian (31%) young females between November, 2010 and April, 2011. The participants were secondary school students and university undergraduates from Selangor and the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur. Results The study found a lack of knowledge about sexual issues and contraception among the participants. Many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse and relied on periodic abstinence, natural methods, and traditional folk pregnancy preventive practices. The findings also revealed numerous categories of factors influencing sexual attitudes and behaviours: ethnic group and religion, level of religiosity, peer pressure and norms, and parental monitoring. With regard to condom use, factors such as embarrassment about condom acquisition, low perceived susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and perceived efficacy of traditional and folk methods of contraception, were uncovered from the discussions. Conclusion This study underscores the importance of development of culturally specific interventions that address the identified promoting factors of premarital sex. Behavioral interventions to promote condom use should increase awareness about condom effectiveness against not only unwanted pregnancies but also STIs. PMID:23272156

  11. How might schools influence young people's drug use? Development of theory from qualitative case-study research.

    Fletcher, Adam; Bonell, Chris; Sorhaindo, Annik; Strange, Vicki

    2009-08-01

    To explore young people's experiences of school and drug use, generate hypotheses regarding the pathways through which schools may influence students' drug use, and examine how these may vary according to students' sociodemographic characteristics. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with 30 students (aged 14-15) and 10 teachers in two case-study schools. Students were purposively sampled to encompass variations in socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity, and school engagement. Techniques associated with thematic content analysis and grounded theory were used to analyze the data and generate hypotheses. Three potential pathways via which school effects on drug use may occur were identified: (1) peer-group sorting and drug use as a source of identity and bonding among students who are disconnected from the main institutional markers of status; (2) students' desire to "fit in" at schools perceived to be unsafe and drug use facilitating this; and/or (3) drug use as a strategy to manage anxieties about school work and escape unhappiness at schools lacking effective social support systems. Various pathways may plausibly underlie school effects on drug use. These support the idea of "whole-school" interventions to reduce drug use through: recognizing students' varied achievements and promoting a sense of belonging, reducing bullying and aggression, and providing additional social support for students. Such interventions should be piloted and evaluated in a range of settings to examine effects on students' drug use. Broader policies relating to secondary school targets, curricula, assessment, and streaming may also influence rates of adolescent drug use.

  12. Developmental Assessments during Injury Research: Is Enrollment of Very Young Children in Crèches Associated with Better Scores?

    Divya Nair

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Developmental Study is part of a larger intervention on “saving of lives from drowning (SoLiD” where children were enrolled either into crèches (daycare centers or playpens to prevent drowning in rural Bangladesh. Sampling ~1000 children between the ages of 9–17 months, we compared problem-solving, communication, motor and personal-social outcomes assessed by the Ages and Stages Questionnaire in the two interventions. After controlling for variables such as home stimulation in multivariate regressions, children in crèches performed about a quarter of a standard deviation better in total scores (p < 0.10 and 0.45 standard deviations higher in fine motor skills (p < 0.05. Moreover, once the sample was stratified by length of exposure to the intervention, then children in crèches performed significantly better in a number of domains: those enrolled the longest (about 5 months have higher fine motor (1.47, p < 0.01, gross motor (0.40, p < 0.05 and personal-social skills (0.95, p < 0.01 than children in playpens. In addition, children in crèches with the longer exposure (about 5 months have significantly higher personal-social and problem-solving scores than those in crèches with minimum exposure. Enrollment in crèches of very young children may be positively associated with psychosocial scores after accounting for important confounding variables.

  13. Qualitative inquiry into premarital sexual behaviours and contraceptive use among multiethnic young women: implications for education and future research.

    Li Ping Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was a qualitative investigation into sexual attitudes and behaviours, and contraceptive use among Malaysian youth, based on constructs from the health belief model, theory of reasoned action, and problem behaviour theory. METHODS: A total of 34 focus group discussions with 185 participants were conducted among the Malay (35%, Chinese (34%, and Indian (31% young females between November, 2010 and April, 2011. The participants were secondary school students and university undergraduates from Selangor and the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur. RESULTS: The study found a lack of knowledge about sexual issues and contraception among the participants. Many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse and relied on periodic abstinence, natural methods, and traditional folk pregnancy preventive practices. The findings also revealed numerous categories of factors influencing sexual attitudes and behaviours: ethnic group and religion, level of religiosity, peer pressure and norms, and parental monitoring. With regard to condom use, factors such as embarrassment about condom acquisition, low perceived susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs, and perceived efficacy of traditional and folk methods of contraception, were uncovered from the discussions. CONCLUSION: This study underscores the importance of development of culturally specific interventions that address the identified promoting factors of premarital sex. Behavioral interventions to promote condom use should increase awareness about condom effectiveness against not only unwanted pregnancies but also STIs.

  14. The health and wellbeing of young people in sub-Saharan Africa: an under-researched area?

    Kabiru, Caroline W; Izugbara, Chimaraoke O; Beguy, Donatien

    2013-02-13

    A third of sub-Saharan Africa's (SSA) population comprises persons aged 10-24 years. These youth are growing up in a context marked by pervasive poverty, limited educational opportunities, high HIV/AIDS prevalence, widespread conflict, and weak social controls. Published research on the broad issues that affect youth health and wellbeing in SSA is limited and centers heavily on sexual and reproductive health. In this commentary, we provide a broad overview of sub-Saharan African youth, highlight research gaps with respect to youth health and wellbeing, and describe potential avenues to develop the region's research capacity on youth health and wellbeing.

  15. The health and wellbeing of young people in sub-Saharan Africa: an under-researched area?

    Kabiru Caroline W

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A third of sub-Saharan Africa’s (SSA population comprises persons aged 10–24 years. These youth are growing up in a context marked by pervasive poverty, limited educational opportunities, high HIV/AIDS prevalence, widespread conflict, and weak social controls. Published research on the broad issues that affect youth health and wellbeing in SSA is limited and centers heavily on sexual and reproductive health. In this commentary, we provide a broad overview of sub-Saharan African youth, highlight research gaps with respect to youth health and wellbeing, and describe potential avenues to develop the region’s research capacity on youth health and wellbeing.

  16. Incidental findings are frequent in young healthy individuals undergoing magnetic resonance imaging in brain research imaging studies

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Siebner, Hartwig R; Deuschl, Günther

    2010-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about how to handle incidental findings (IF) detected in healthy individuals who participate in research-driven magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. There are currently no established guidelines regarding their management....

  17. Understanding Engagement in HIV Risk and Prevention Research Among Black Young Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women in the District of Columbia.

    Glick, Sara Nelson; Houston, Ebony; Peterson, James; Kuo, Irene; Magnus, Manya

    2016-08-01

    To develop optimal methods to study sexual health among black young men who have sex with men and transgender women (BYMSM/TW). We conducted a mixed-methods prospective study to identify recruitment and retention strategies for BYMSM/TW (age 16-21) in Washington D.C., and describe HIV risk behaviors and context. Incentivized peer referral was highly productive, and 60% of BYMSM/TW were retained for 3 months. Participants reported high levels of sexual risk, homophobia, racism, and maternal support. BYMSM/TW studies should utilize a combination of peer-based, in-person, and technology-based recruiting strategies. Additional research is needed to leverage mobile technology and social media to enhance retention.

  18. Development of a Self-Help Web-Based Intervention Targeting Young Cancer Patients With Sexual Problems and Fertility Distress in Collaboration With Patient Research Partners.

    Winterling, Jeanette; Wiklander, Maria; Obol, Claire Micaux; Lampic, Claudia; Eriksson, Lars E; Pelters, Britta; Wettergren, Lena

    2016-04-12

    The Internet should be suitable for delivery of interventions targeting young cancer patients. Young people are familiar with the technologies, and this patient group is small and geographically dispersed. Still, only few psycho-educational Web-based interventions are designed for this group. Young cancer patients consider reproductive health, including sexuality, an area of great importance and approximately 50% report sexual problems and fertility-related concerns following cancer treatment. Therefore, we set out to develop a self-help Web-based intervention, Fex-Can, to alleviate such problems. To improve its quality, we decided to involve patients and significant others as research partners. The first 18 months of our collaboration are described in this paper. The intervention will subsequently be tested in a feasibility study followed by a randomized controlled trial. The study aims to describe the development of a Web-based intervention in long-term collaboration with patient research partners (PRPs). Ten former cancer patients and two significant others participated in building the Web-based intervention, using a participatory design. The development process is described according to the design step in the holistic framework presented by van Gemert-Pijnen et al and evaluates the PRPs' impact on the content, system, and service quality of the planned intervention. The collaboration between the research group and the PRPs mainly took place in the form of 1-day meetings to develop the key components of the intervention: educational and behavior change content, multimedia (pictures, video vignettes, and audios), interactive online activities (eg, self-monitoring), and partial feedback support (discussion forum, tailored feedback from experts). The PRPs influenced the intervention's content quality in several ways. By repeated feedback on prototypes, the information became more comprehensive, relevant, and understandable. The PRPs gave suggestions concerning the

  19. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  20. The future of bioenergy in Sweden. Background and summary of outstanding issues

    Berndes, G.

    2006-01-01

    biomass as raw material for the production of renewable materials and chemicals in addition to the established uses in for instance the forest and wood material industries. Europe and the US are promoting biomaterials in agricultural and energy policy measures, and high oil prices have increased their competitiveness. A large interest is addressed to 'biorefineries' as an efficient component in the production of both biofuels and materials. The report is concluded with a discussion of outstanding issues and proposals for further studies.

  1. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    Cotte, Michel

    2016-10-01

    This communication presents the situation regarding astronomical and archaeoastronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention through recent years up until today. Some parallel events and works were promoted strongly within the IAU-UNESCO Initiative during the International Year of Astronomy (2009). This was followed by a joint program by the IAU and ICOMOS-an official advisory body assisting the World Heritage Committee in the evaluation of nomination dossiers. The result of that work is an important publication by around 40 authors from 20 different countries all around the world: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the Context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (Ruggles & Cotte 2010). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives such as the ``Windows to the Universe" organisation and the parallel constitution of local ``Starlight Reserves''. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied the global trend for astronomical heritage. WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. A key phrase is ``demonstration of Outstanding Universal Value'' to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. This communication first examines the requirements and evaluation practices about of demonstrating OUV for a given place in the context of astronomical or archaeoastronomical heritage. That means the examination of the tangible attributes, an inventory of the property in terms of immoveable and moveable components and an inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in the context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). This is also related to the application to the site of the concept of integrity and authenticity, as regards the place itself and in comparison with other similar places (WH sites already listed, sites on national WH Tentative Lists

  2. Outstanding Universal Values of the Korean Archipelago Getbol: Its potential for World Heritage Nomination

    Woo, K. S.; Chun, S. S.; Moon, K. O.

    2017-12-01

    The `Korean Archipelago Getbol (KAG; Getbol means tidal flat deposits in Korean)' has developed due to the decreasing accommodation space during the Holocene sea-level rise on the broad epicontinental shelf of the southeastern part of the Yellow Sea. Sedimentation and evolution show a variety of quite distinctive tidal flat patterns with intertidal and subtidal drainage systems depending upon the location and orientation of rocky shores. The following KAG`s Outstanding Universal Values are suggested to support the WH: 1) It is the unique coastal sedimentary environment formed by special geological and oceanographic setting in the world. It is the only place in the world where tide-controlled sedimentation processes have produced special tidal flats surrounding numerous rocky islands on a broad epicontinental shelf near convergent tectonic boundary. Macrotidal currents combined with waves and typhoons in this semi-closed oceanographic setting have provided unique geological and oceanographic conditions for their formation. 2) It diplays the most dynamic and complicated, but stable coastal depositional system in the world. Even though the property has been constantly influenced by strong microtidal currents combined with East Asian Monsoon climate (winter erosion and summer deposition) with occasional typhoons during summer, Getbol has maintained its stable depositional system and tidal flat sediments have been accumulated for the past 9,000 years. Sufficient supply of suspended load through Geumgang River provides sustainable depositional system within the property. Complicated island-topography also produced the most complicated and divese depositional systems as well as the deepest tidal channels in the world. (3) The KAG shows the thickest tidal flat sediments protected by numerous islands. Aggradation of tidal sediments has caught up with the rapid Holocene sealevel rise and produced the thickest tidal flat sediments in the world. As a results, numerous former

  3. Forest fires and lightning activity during the outstanding 2003 and 2005 fire seasons

    Russo, Ana; Ramos, Alexandre; Trigo, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Wildfires in southern Europe cause frequent extensive economical and ecological losses and, even human casualties. Comparatively to other Mediterranean countries, Portugal is the country with more burnt area and fires per unit area in the last decade, mainly during the summer season (Pereira et al., 2011). According to the fire records available, between 1980 and 2009, wildfires have affected over 3 million hectares in Portugal (JRC, 2011), which corresponds to approximately a third of the Portuguese Continental territory. The main factors that influence fire ignition and propagation are: (1) the presence of fuel (i.e. vegetation); (2) climate and weather; (3) socioeconomic conditions that affect land use/land cover patterns, fire-prevention and fire-fighting capacity and (4) topography. Specifically, weather (e.g. wind, temperature, precipitation, humidity, and lightning occurrence) plays an important role in fire behavior, affecting both ignition and spread of wildfires. Some countries have a relatively large fraction of fires caused by lightning, e.g. northwestern USA, Canada, Russia (). In contrast, Portugal has only a small percentage of fire records caused by lightning. Although significant doubts remain for the majority of fires in the catalog since they were cataloged without a likely cause. The recent years of 2003 and 2005 were particularly outstanding for fire activity in Portugal, registering, respectively, total burned areas of 425 726 ha and 338 262 ha. However, while the 2003 was triggered by an exceptional heatwave that struck the entire western Europe, the 2005 fire season registered was coincident with one of the most severe droughts of the 20th century. In this work we have used mainly two different databases: 1) the Portuguese Rural Fire Database (PRFD) which is representative of rural fires that have occurred in Continental Portugal, 2001-2011, with the original data provided by the Autoridade Florestal Nacional (AFN, 2011); 2) lightning

  4. The future of bioenergy in Sweden. Background and summary of outstanding issues

    Berndes, G. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy and Environment; Magnusson, Leif [EnerGia Konsulterande Ingenjoerer AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-12-30

    biomass as raw material for the production of renewable materials and chemicals in addition to the established uses in for instance the forest and wood material industries. Europe and the US are promoting biomaterials in agricultural and energy policy measures, and high oil prices have increased their competitiveness. A large interest is addressed to 'biorefineries' as an efficient component in the production of both biofuels and materials. The report is concluded with a discussion of outstanding issues and proposals for further studies.

  5. Assessing the outstanding 2003 fire events in Portugal with a Regional Climate Model

    Trigo, Ricardo; Jerez, Sonia; Camara, Carlos; Montávez, Juan Pedro

    2013-04-01

    The heatwave that struck western Iberia in the early days of August 2003 was characterized by record high values of both maximum (47.3°C) and minimum (30.6°c) temperatures in Portugal, associated with extremely low humidity levels and relatively intense wind speed (Trigo et al., 2006). These conditions triggered the most devastating sequence of large fires ever registered in Portugal. The estimated total burnt area was about 450.000 ha, including 280.000 ha of forest (Pereira et al., 2011). The outstanding total burnt area value corresponds to roughly 5% of the Portuguese territory, and represents approximately twice the previous maximum observed in 1998 (~220.000 ha), and about four times the long-term average observed between 1980 and 2004. Here we characterise this unusual episode using meteorological fields obtained from both observations and a regional climate model. In this work we use the longest (49-years) high-resolution regional climate simulation available driven by reanalysis data spanning from 1959 to 2007 and covering the entire Iberian Peninsula. This long run was obtained using the MM5 model with a spatial resolution of 10 km. Using this high spatial and temporal resolution we have computed the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI) System to produce hourly values of fire risk. The FWI System consists of six components that account for the effects of fuel moisture and wind on fire behaviour (van Wagner, 1987). We show the temporal evolution of high resolution patterns for several fire related variables during the most important days for triggering new fires (the first week of August 2003). Besides the absolute value of Tmax, Tmin, wind (speed and direction), relative humidity and FWI we also evaluate the corresponding anomalies of these fields, obtained after removing the long-term smoothed daily climatology. Pereira M.G., Malamude B.D., Trigo R.M., Alves P.I. (2011) "The History and Characteristics of the 1980-2005 Portuguese Rural Fire Database

  6. Playing by the Rules: Researching, Teaching and Learning Sexual Ethics with Young Men in the Australian National Rugby League

    Albury, Kath; Carmody, Moira; Evers, Clifton; Lumby, Catharine

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the Australian National Rugby League (NRL) commissioned the Playing By The Rules research project in response to allegations of sexual assault by members of a professional rugby league team. This article offers an overview of the theoretical and methodological approaches adopted by the team, and the subsequent workplace education…

  7. Vocal Production of Young Children with Disabilities during Child-Robot Interactions. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 5

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a socially interactive robot on the vocalization production of five children with disabilities (4 with autism, 1 with a sensory processing disorder) were the focus of the intervention study described in this research report. The interventions with each child were conducted over 4 or 5 days in the children's homes and involved…

  8. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    2010-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? You...

  9. Research

    abp

    2015-10-22

    Oct 22, 2015 ... There was no significant difference for knee scores and time for returning to work between patients with ... The management of ACL injuries is both ... with sports actively, young people, active people and heavy-workers.

  10. 47{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key topic / Outstanding know-how and sustainable innovations

    Zwermann, Winfried [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany). Forschungszentrum

    2016-11-15

    Summary report on the Key Topic ''Outstanding Know-How and Sustainable Innovations'' Technical Session ''Reactor Physics, Thermo, and Fluid Dynamics'' of the 47th Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology (AMNT 2016) held in Hamburg, 10 to 12 May 2016. Other Sessions of AMNT 2016 have been and will be covered in further issues of atw.

  11. An Outstanding Junior Investigator Award in experimental high energy physics: Progress report, January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989

    Partridge, R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program based upon the study of hadron collisions at the highest available energy is being carried out with the support of an Outstanding Junior Investigator Award to Dr. Richard Partridge. The work described in this report includes the development of the Level 0 trigger for the D/null/ experiment at Fermilab, preparation for the D/null/ physics program, and studies of detector design and physics at the Superconducting Super Collider

  12. Novartis School Lab: bringing young people closer to the world of research and discovering the excitement of science.

    Michel, Christiane Röckl; Standke, Gesche; Naef, Reto

    2012-01-01

    The Novartis School Lab (http://www.novartis.ch/schullabor) is an institution with an old tradition. The School Lab reaches about 5000 students through internal courses and an additional 5000 children at public science events where they can enjoy hands-on science in disciplines of biomedical research. The subjects range from chemistry, physics, molecular biology and genetics to toxicology and medical topics. The Novartis School Lab offers a variety of activities for youngsters aged 10-20 ranging from lab courses for school classes, continuing education for teachers and development of teaching kits, support for individual research projects to outreach for public science events. Innovation and adaptation to changes of current needs are essential aspects for the Novartis School Lab. Ongoing activities to shape the Novartis Biomedical Learning Lab include design of new teaching experiments, exploration into additional disciplines of biomedical science and the creation of a fascinating School Lab of the future.

  13. The Florida Prostate Cancer Research Training Opportunities for Outstanding Leaders (ReTOOL) Program: Creating Opportunities for Minority HBCU Students

    2015-03-01

    Pembroke Pines, FL  Teen center Educator for Sexual health Awareness February 2008 – August 2010 The American Society for Microbiology Honorarium...Cancer Education Conference in Clearwater, FL February 2014 April 2014 October 2014 Guest Speaker, “Only Rain Down the Drain” --- the Teen 411

  14. The health and wellbeing of young people in sub-Saharan Africa: an under-researched area?

    Kabiru, Caroline W; Izugbara, Chimaraoke O; Beguy, Donatien

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A third of sub-Saharan Africa’s (SSA) population comprises persons aged 10–24 years. These youth are growing up in a context marked by pervasive poverty, limited educational opportunities, high HIV/AIDS prevalence, widespread conflict, and weak social controls. Published research on the broad issues that affect youth health and wellbeing in SSA is limited and centers heavily on sexual and reproductive health. In this commentary, we provide a broad overview of sub-Saharan African yout...

  15. Potential of qualitative network analysis in migration studies- Reflections based on an empirical analysis of young researchers' mobility aspirations

    Elisabeth Scheibelhofer

    2011-01-01

    Based on the example of an empirical research study, the paper examines the strengths and limitations of a qualitative network approach to migration and mobility. The method of graphic drawings produced by the respondents within an interview setting was applied. With this method, we argue to be able to analyse migrants’ specific social embeddedness and its influence on future mobility aspirations. Likewise, connections between the migratory biography and the individuals’ various social relati...

  16. FIRST AND SECOND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG CHILDREN AND BILINGUALISM IN LIGHT OF LINGUISTICS, NEUROLINGUISTICS AND FINDINGS FROM BRAIN RESEARCH

    Yunus PINAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review shows that infants begin picking up elements of what will be their first language in the womb, and certainly long before their first coo according to the current guidelines and it presents a descriptive approach to bilingualism and multilingualism. This article is the outcome of a thorough survey of literature and primarily it aims to present the similarities and differences between the L1 and L2 acquisition in light of linguistics, neurolinguistics and findings from brain research. This Review will illustrate various thought and new hypotheses on first and second language development, bilingualism and multilingualism derived from studies in linguistics, neurolinguistics and brain research. In the context of our paper we shall try to describe aspects and stages of first language acquisition from even before birth especially the 20th week of the fetal development of the baby to 60th week of life, as well as the second language acquisition process, which is divided into three types: simultaneous, consecutive and adult. In particular, we will present and discuss some of the main results of the brain researchers like Franceschini and De Bleser and we shall interpret them.

  17. Young people and sexual orientation

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues:

  18. Initiatives of the Belgian SCK•CEN Academy to attract young talent in nuclear research and technology

    Coeck, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Our aim: • Explain/refresh basics of radioactivity; • Discuss several examples of nuclear applications → In nuclear, medical, non-nuclear industry, daily life, … • Present research activities of SCK•CEN, justify why nuclear research is important, how does it contribute to well-being of society in general; • Discuss with teachers how the standard education programs can integrate a pluralistic approach to complex technical issues such as applications of radioactivity. Conclusions: • Focus on knowledge, understanding, skills, attitudes, … and show “real-life” situations = added value; • Mention the whole picture: → ALL application fields, ALL issues; • Motivate to choose for scientific or technical studies can be one aim, but equally (or more) important: discuss risks and benefits of nuclear applications in general, develop an open and critical mind in order to gain more insight in multi-facetted issues such as risks and benefits of radioactivity and nuclear technology, and contribute in serene way to the societal debate; • Contribution to critical-intellectual nuclear capacities for society

  19. FAIRNESS 2016 [4. workshop for young scientists with research interests focused on physics at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany), 14-19 Feb 2016

    2016-01-01

    FAIRNESS 2016 was the fourth edition in a series of workshops designed to bring together excellent international young scientists with research interests focused on physics at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) and was held on February 14-19 2016 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. The topics of the workshops cover a wide range of aspects in both theoretical developments and current experimental status, concentrated around the four scientific pillars of FAIR. FAIR is a new accelerator complex with brand new experimental facilities, that is currently being built next to the existing GSI facility close to Darmstadt, Germany. The spirit of the conference is to bring together young scientists, e.g. young non-tenured scientists, postdocs and advanced PhD students to present their work, to foster active informal discussions and build up networks. Every participant in the meeting with the exception of the organizers gives an oral presentation, and all sessions are followed by an hour long discussion period. During the talks, questions are anonymously collected in a box to stimulate discussions. The broad physics program at FAIR is reflected in the wide range of topics covered by the workshop: • Atomic and plasma physics, biophysics, material sciences and applications • Nuclear structure, astrophysics and reactions • Physics of hot and dense nuclear matter, QCD phase transitions and critical point • Hadron Spectroscopy, Hadrons in matter and Hypernuclei • Experimental programs APPA, CBM, HADES, PANDA, NUSTAR, as well as BES, NICA and the RHIC beam energy scan For these different areas one invited speaker was selected to give a longer introductory presentation. The write-ups of the talks presented at FAIRNESS 2016 are the content of this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and have been refereed according to the IOP standard for peer review. This issue constitutes therefore a collection of the forefront of research that is dedicated to the

  20. Annual Research Review: Digital health interventions for children and young people with mental health problems - a systematic and meta-review.

    Hollis, Chris; Falconer, Caroline J; Martin, Jennifer L; Whittington, Craig; Stockton, Sarah; Glazebrook, Cris; Davies, E Bethan

    2017-04-01

    Digital health interventions (DHIs), including computer-assisted therapy, smartphone apps and wearable technologies, are heralded as having enormous potential to improve uptake and accessibility, efficiency, clinical effectiveness and personalisation of mental health interventions. It is generally assumed that DHIs will be preferred by children and young people (CYP) given their ubiquitous digital activity. However, it remains uncertain whether: DHIs for CYP are clinically and cost-effective, CYP prefer DHIs to traditional services, DHIs widen access and how they should be evaluated and adopted by mental health services. This review evaluates the evidence-base for DHIs and considers the key research questions and approaches to evaluation and implementation. We conducted a meta-review of scoping, narrative, systematic or meta-analytical reviews investigating the effectiveness of DHIs for mental health problems in CYP. We also updated a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of DHIs for CYP published in the last 3 years. Twenty-one reviews were included in the meta-review. The findings provide some support for the clinical benefit of DHIs, particularly computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT), for depression and anxiety in adolescents and young adults. The systematic review identified 30 new RCTs evaluating DHIs for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, anxiety, depression, psychosis, eating disorders and PTSD. The benefits of DHIs in managing ADHD, autism, psychosis and eating disorders are uncertain, and evidence is lacking regarding the cost-effectiveness of DHIs. Key methodological limitations make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions from existing clinical trials of DHIs. Issues include variable uptake and engagement with DHIs, lack of an agreed typology/taxonomy for DHIs, small sample sizes, lack of blinded outcome assessment, combining different comparators, short-term follow-up and poor specification of

  1. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study

    Birnie, Kate; Hay, Alastair D.; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; MacGowan, Alasdair; Whiting, Penny; Lawton, Michael; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Hollingworth, William; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Harman, Kim; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    laboratories should consider adopting procedures used in the research laboratory for paediatric urine samples. Primary care clinicians should try to obtain clean catch samples, even in very young children. PMID:28199403

  2. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study.

    Kate Birnie

    in the research laboratory for paediatric urine samples. Primary care clinicians should try to obtain clean catch samples, even in very young children.

  3. Young Black Gay/Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Review and Content Analysis of Health-Focused Research Between 1988 and 2013.

    Wade, Ryan M; Harper, Gary W

    2017-09-01

    Black young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YGBMSM) are at high risk for negative health outcomes, though this population is underrepresented in the health literature. An extensive literature review and content analysis of health-related peer-reviewed articles (1988-2013) was conducted that targeted Black YGBMSM, examining five content areas: sexual health, health care, substance use, psychosocial functioning, and sociostructural factors. A coding sheet was created to collect information on all content areas and related subtopics and computed descriptive statistics. Out of 54 articles, most were published after 2004 ( N = 49; 90.7%) and addressed some aspect of sexual health ( N = 50; 92.6%). Few articles included content on psychosocial functioning, including bullying/harassment, suicide, and racial/ethnic identity. Data on health care delivery/receipt and health insurance were underrepresented; tobacco use and substance abuse were seldom addressed. Important sociostructural factors, including sexual networks and race-based discrimination, were poorly represented. Last, there was a noteworthy deficit of qualitative studies and research exploring intersectional identity and health. This review concludes that studies on Black YGBMSM health places sex at the forefront to the neglect of other critical health domains. More research is needed on the diverse health issues of a vulnerable and underexamined population.

  4. STUDYING OF THE PROBLEM SUPERSTITION STUDENTS AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN WORK RUSSIAN AND FOREIGN RESEARCHERS IN XX – XXI CENTURIES

    Ulyanchenko Anton Leonidovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In given article due to studies a number of scientists (sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists is done attempt to mark main purpose of superstition in our modern culture, where students faces with lacking of time, which does not give the student properly to prepare the material for passing of the session. The students have to apply by superstition in order to reduce the psychological pressure, study the culture of folk past, be prepared by session in order to pass all exams more successfully. Among patterns for analyzing of problem superstitious perception the gender aspect was chosen in our society. It is important to underline in article a general features both man superstitions and female superstitions of student environment, mentioned in work. Female (girl student superstitious views are horoscopes, fortune-telling, predicting of dreams. Man (youth is prohibition at shaving of beard before session, anecdotes, «money superstitions». It is importantly to notice in article a contribution not only Russian researches (Kondrya, Razumova, Mezencev and etc. in development of problem contemporary superstitions, but also and foreign researchers – Mark Griffiths, Carolyn Bingham, Vyse. This problem is brilliantly described by Mark Griffiths, Carolyn Bingham, who concern life of people, superstitious perception of players «bingo». Student life in during passing of exams is also «gambling». Before exam students don’t know numbers of tickets, which they will take. This procedure is lot, «gambling». Here isn’t importantly knowledge of student. It is important a fortune and chance, which will be beside with student in minutes of exam. All students have to take tickets. «To catch a fortune for tail» is a main task of student in passing of exams.

  5. STUDYING OF THE PROBLEM SUPERSTITION STUDENTS AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN WORK RUSSIAN AND FOREIGN RESEARCHERS IN XX – XXI CENTURIES

    Антон Леонидович Ульянченко

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In given article due to studies a number of scientists (sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists is done attempt to mark main purpose of superstition in our modern culture, where students faces with lacking of time, which does not give the student properly to prepare the material for passing of the session. The students have to apply by superstition in order to reduce the psychological pressure, study the culture of folk past, be prepared by session in order to pass all exams more successfully. Among patterns for analyzing of problem superstitious perception the gender aspect was chosen in our society. It is important to underline in article a general features both man superstitions and female superstitions of student environment, mentioned in work. Female (girl student superstitious views are horoscopes, fortune-telling, predicting of dreams. Man (youth is prohibition at shaving of beard before session, anecdotes, «money superstitions». It is importantly to notice in article a contribution not only Russian researches (Kondrya, Razumova, Mezencev and etc. in development of problem contemporary superstitions, but also and foreign researchers – Mark Griffiths, Carolyn Bingham, Vyse. This problem is brilliantly described by Mark Griffiths, Carolyn Bingham, who concern life of people, superstitious perception of players «bingo». Student life in during passing of exams is also «gambling». Before exam students don’t know numbers of tickets, which they will take. This procedure is lot, «gambling». Here isn’t importantly knowledge of student. It is important a fortune and chance, which will be beside with student in minutes of exam. All students have to take tickets. «To catch a fortune for tail» is a main task of student in passing of exams.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-7

  6. Young Money

    Roelsgaard Obling, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Book review of: Kevin Roose: "Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits". New York: Grand Central Publishing, 2014. 320 pp.......Book review of: Kevin Roose: "Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits". New York: Grand Central Publishing, 2014. 320 pp....

  7. The Cool Club: Creating engaging, experimental and creative encounters between young minds and polar researchers at SPRI

    Weeks, S. M.; Pope, A.

    2011-12-01

    Whilst the scientific case for current climate change is compelling, the consequences of climate change have largely failed to permeate through to individuals. This lack of public awareness of the science and the potential impacts could be considered a key obstacle to action. The possible reasons for such limited success centre on the issue that climate change is a complex subject, and that a wide ranging academic, political and social research literature on the science and wider implications of climate change has failed to communicate the key issues in an accessible way. These failures to adequately communicate both the science and the social science of climate change at a number of levels results in ';communication gaps' that act as fundamental barriers to both understanding and engagement with the issue. Meyer and Land (2003) suggest that learners can find certain ideas and concepts within a discipline difficult to understand and these act as a barrier to deeper understanding of a subject. To move beyond these threshold concepts, they suggest that the expert needs to support the learner through a range of learning experiences that allows the development of learning strategies particular to the individual. Meyer and Land's research into these threshold concepts has been situated within Economics, but has been suggested to be more widely applicable though there has been no attempt to either define or evaluate threshold concepts to climate change science. By identifying whether common threshold concepts exist specifically in climate science for cohorts of either formal or informal learners, scientists will be better able to support the public in understanding these concepts by changing how the knowledge is communicated to help overcome these barriers to learning. This paper reports on the findings of a study that examined the role of threshold concepts as barriers to understanding climate science in a UK University and considers its implications for wider

  8. Announcing the 2015 Viruses Young Investigator Prize and Graduate Student/Postdoctoral Fellow Travel Awards

    Eric O. Freed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of virology by early-career investigators, last year Viruses accepted nominations for a 2015 Young Investigator Prize in Virology. The target age was set at 40 and under. Over 50 nominations were received and were evaluated by a panel of judges comprised of Viruses editorial board members.[...

  9. Improving the peer review skills of young rheumatologists and researchers in rheumatology: the EMEUNET Peer Review Mentoring Program.

    Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; Putrik, Polina; Sepriano, Alexandre; Moltó, Anna; Nikiphorou, Elena; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K; Ramiro, Sofia

    2018-01-01

    Although peer review plays a central role in the maintenance of high standards in scientific research, training of reviewing skills is not included in the common education programmes. The Emerging EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) Network (EMEUNET) developed a programme to address this unmet need. The EMEUNET Peer Review Mentoring Program for Rheumatology Journals promotes a systematic training of reviewing skills by engaging mentees in a 'real world' peer review experience supervised by experienced mentors with support from rheumatology journals. This viewpoint provides an overview of this initiative and its outcomes, and discusses its potential limitations. Over 4 years, 18 mentors and 86 mentees have participated. Among the 33 participants who have completed the programme, 13 (39.3%) have become independent reviewers for Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases after the training. This programme has been recently evaluated by a survey and qualitative interviews, revealing a high interest in this initiative. The main strengths (involvement of a top journal and learning opportunities) and weaknesses of the programme (limited number of places and insufficient dissemination) were identified. Overall, this programme represents an innovative and successful approach to peer review training. Continuous evaluation and improvement are key to its functioning. The EMEUNET Peer Review Mentoring Program may be used as a reference for peer review training in areas outside rheumatology.

  10. A manifesto for critical narrative research and pedagogy for/with young children: Teacher and child as critical annalist

    O’Loughlin Michael

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I pose the question of whether it might be possible to articulate a collaborative, critical narrative mode of research in which teachers and students come together using a critical and analytic epistemology to engage in adventurous pedagogy. This approach has echoes of Freire’s “teachers-as-students and students- -as-teachers,” but elaborates the Freirean metaphor to include conceptions of emotion, creativity, and incorporation of the latent historical subjectivities of teachers and students in the process. Contrary to the deadening, circumscribed epistemology of putatively “evidence-based” pedagogies, in which teachers and children are expected to check their cultural meaning-making capacities and their emotional investments at the door, this is a plea for a regenerative, engaged, local curriculum making process. As I note in the essay, “This is a strategy that cannot work in the service of utilitarian modes of education that are focused only on value (cf. Appiah, 2015. It can only work for forms of schooling that seek to foster values of receptivity, cultural respect, open-mindedness, and critical imaginaries. In these coldly utilitarian times we need to provide leadership to progressively minded teachers to allow them to develop, document, and disseminate such practices.”

  11. Education and Labour Market Transitions in Young Adulthood. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 075

    Shaienks, Danielle; Gluszynski, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Young adulthood is filled with major life events and pursuing higher education is one of the most common transitions. It is also the time when many young adults enter the labour market, move out of their parents' household and begin family formation. These significant events affect each other and impact the rest of their lives. Given the…

  12. Research

    abp

    2013-03-05

    Mar 5, 2013 ... the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, The Gambia. These were collected routinely .... and are poorly educated with little or no dietary awareness. In many .... the media involvement in chronic diseases prevention and management ..... Global Brand for Young Adults: Implication for International. Tobacco ...

  13. Research

    raoul

    2011-09-23

    Sep 23, 2011 ... working mothers, young women, mothers with poor education and ... fulfilling the basic human rights of the child to attain the highest .... operated by Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, ... During these meetings, a Committee was formed, and the strategy ..... Brazil: nested case control study.

  14. Research

    abp

    2016-02-09

    Feb 9, 2016 ... PubMed | Google Scholar. 5. Bode CO, Ikhisemojie S, Ademuyiwa AO. Penile injuries from proximal migration of the Plastibell circumcision ring. J Pediatr. Urol. 2010; 6(1):23-27. PubMed | Google Scholar. 6. Manji KP. Circumcision of the young infant in a developing country using the Plastibell. Ann Trop ...

  15. Research

    abp

    2015-06-09

    Jun 9, 2015 ... Many women were married (73.5%), did not complete primary education ... 41.1, 47.2) women vs 55.1% (49.1, 55.1) men, Odds Ratio (OR). 1.38 (1.16 ... ignorant about sex, unmarried young women should be virgins and.

  16. The Challenge of Being Outstanding: A Look Back and Ahead After 25 Years of Guiding Business Excellence

    Harry S. Hertz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of organizational performance is a challenge faced by every business, nonprofit, and government organization. The attributes of an outstanding organization have evolved over time as complexity has increased and change has become constant. The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program has closely tracked these attributes and changes to always reflect the leading edge of management practice. What these attributes and changes are, the challenges CEOs and organizations face today, and performance management areas that will need attention in the future are explored.

  17. [Outstanding Soviet zoologist and parasitologist E. N. Pavlovsky--the creator of the theory of natural foci of disease].

    Pavlovskyĭ, L N

    2011-01-01

    The article presents information on the outstanding Soviet Zoology and Parasitology, Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labour, Lieutenant-General of the Medical Service E. N. Pavlovsky, the author of more than 1500 scientific papers, the founder of scientific school, one of the few scholars the twentieth century, approaching the level of scientists and encyclopedists. Considered its contribution to the study of natural foci of diseases has promoted the development of environmental trends in parasitology.

  18. The Inter-Life project: researching the potential of art, design and virtual worlds as a vehicle for assisting young people with key life changes and transitions.

    Lally, Victor; Sclater, Madeleine

    2013-06-01

    Careers work in the twenty-first century faces a key challenge in terms of digital technologies: to evaluate their potential for careers work in challenging settings. Given the rapidity of developments, technologies require evaluation in research innovations and naturalistic settings. Virtual worlds offer potential for careers and guidance work, and the therapeutic domain. To illustrate this, we present examples in which young people explore their feelings and ideas, plans and difficulties, while preparing for film-making. During this they develop important life transition skills. We argue that the power of virtual worlds - to support emotional and cognitive engagement - could be utilised in practice settings. We conclude that they are serious candidates as digital tools in the careers and guidance domain. We need intermediate runaway objects which are less spectacular and more inviting… bringing together the big and the small, the impossible and the possible, the future-oriented activity level vision and the here and now consequential action. (Engeström, 2009, p. 305 and p. 328).

  19. Technology Use and Preferences for Mobile Phone–Based HIV Prevention and Treatment Among Black Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: Exploratory Research

    Winder, Terrell JA; Lea III, Charles Herbert; Tan, Diane; Boyd, Donte; Novak, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Black young men who have sex with men (BYMSM) experience higher human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence than their white and Latino counterparts. Objective The aim of our study was to understand BYMSM’s preferences for mobile phone–based HIV prevention and treatment in order to inform culturally tailored interventions to reduce the spread of HIV and improve HIV treatment outcomes in this population. Methods Qualitative focus groups (N=6) with BYMSM aged 18-29 years (N=41; 46%, 19/41 HIV-positive) were conducted to elucidate their preferences for the design and delivery of mobile phone–based HIV prevention and treatment interventions. A modified grounded theory approach to data analysis was undertaken using ATLAS.ti textual analysis software. Results Participants preferred holistic health interventions that did not focus exclusively on HIV prevention and treatment. Issues of privacy and confidentiality were paramount. Participants preferred functionality that enables discreet connections to culturally competent health educators and treatment providers who can address the range of health and psychosocial concerns faced by BYMSM. Conclusions Mobile phone–based HIV prevention has the potential to increase engagement with HIV prevention and treatment resources among BYMSM. For these approaches to be successful, researchers must include BYMSM in the design and creation of these interventions. PMID:28408360

  20. Technology Use and Preferences for Mobile Phone-Based HIV Prevention and Treatment Among Black Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: Exploratory Research.

    Holloway, Ian W; Winder, Terrell Ja; Lea, Charles Herbert; Tan, Diane; Boyd, Donte; Novak, David

    2017-04-13

    Black young men who have sex with men (BYMSM) experience higher human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence than their white and Latino counterparts. The aim of our study was to understand BYMSM's preferences for mobile phone-based HIV prevention and treatment in order to inform culturally tailored interventions to reduce the spread of HIV and improve HIV treatment outcomes in this population. Qualitative focus groups (N=6) with BYMSM aged 18-29 years (N=41; 46%, 19/41 HIV-positive) were conducted to elucidate their preferences for the design and delivery of mobile phone-based HIV prevention and treatment interventions. A modified grounded theory approach to data analysis was undertaken using ATLAS.ti textual analysis software. Participants preferred holistic health interventions that did not focus exclusively on HIV prevention and treatment. Issues of privacy and confidentiality were paramount. Participants preferred functionality that enables discreet connections to culturally competent health educators and treatment providers who can address the range of health and psychosocial concerns faced by BYMSM. Mobile phone-based HIV prevention has the potential to increase engagement with HIV prevention and treatment resources among BYMSM. For these approaches to be successful, researchers must include BYMSM in the design and creation of these interventions. ©Ian W Holloway, Terrell JA Winder, Charles Herbert Lea III, Diane Tan, Donte Boyd, David Novak. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 13.04.2017.

  1. Seeing How Far I've Come: The Impact of the Digital Sexual Life History Calendar on Young Adult Research Participants.

    Bay-Cheng, Laina Y

    2017-01-01

    The Digital Sexual Life History Calendar (d/SLHC) is a Web-based platform for collecting young adults' sexual histories. In addition to collecting diverse data, the d/SLHC was designed to benefit participants by enabling reflection on their sexual and relationship experiences in the context of other life events and circumstances. In a pilot study of the d/SLHC, survey data were collected to test whether creating a d/SLHC timeline had any impact on sexual well-being. A sample of 18- to 25-year-old participants recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) completed an online survey about sexuality and relationships. Of those, 113 also completed d/SLHC timelines and 262 served as a comparison group. Six months later, participants from both groups were invited to complete a follow-up survey (total N = 249). Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) results indicated that participants who completed d/SLHC timelines exhibited higher sexual esteem immediately following d/SLHC completion and at follow-up. No changes in sexual esteem were observed in the comparison group, and there were no differences between the groups with regard to sexual health behaviors and outcomes. These findings suggest that sexuality studies may have the potential to yield not only rich data for researchers but also rich experiences for participants.

  2. Young Migrants and Discourses on Young Migrants in the Netherlands

    Gerritsen, Debby; Maier, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the perspectives of young migrants in the Netherlands with the dominant discourse on "migrants" at present. The integration of young "migrants" have been studied in the European research projects TRESEGY and PROFACITY with the help of a number of ethnographic studies and a questionnaire in the Netherlands.…

  3. Human resource development contributes to the creation of outstanding regenerative medicine products

    Fusako Nishigaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is currently the focus of global attention. Countries all around the world are actively working to create new regenerative treatment modalities through pioneering research and novel technologies. This is wonderful news for patients who could not be treated with existing medical options. New venture businesses and companies are being established in regenerative medicine and their rapid industrialization is anticipated. However, to ensure high-quality products, human resources qualified in research and development and the manufacturing of these products are essential. The Forum for Innovative Regenerative Medicine (FIRM conducted a questionnaire of its industry members to examine the training and hiring of people in research and development, product creation, manufacturing, and more. Regenerative medicine is a brand new field; thus, many different businesses will need to cooperate together. People with a broad range of technical skills, abilities, and knowledge will be in demand, with various levels of expertise, from basic to advanced.

  4. Facile fabrication of robust TiO2@SnO2@C hollow nanobelts for outstanding lithium storage

    Tian, Qinghua; Li, Lingxiangyu; Chen, Jizhang; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2018-02-01

    Elaborate fabrication of state-of-the-art nanostructure SnO2@C-based composites greatly contributes to alleviate the huge volume expansion issue of the SnO2 anodes. But the preparation processes of most of them are complicated and tedious, which is generally adverse to the development of SnO2@C-based composite anodes. Herein, a unique nanostructure of TiO2@SnO2@C hollow nanobelts (TiO2@SnO2@C HNBs), including the characteristics of one-dimensional architecture, sandwich protection, hollow structure, carbon coating, and a mechanically robust TiO2 support, has been fabricated by a facile approach for the first time. As anodes for lithium-ion batteries, the as-fabricated TiO2@SnO2@C HNBs exhibit an outstanding lithium storage performance, delivering capacity of 804.6 and 384. 5 mAh g-1 at 200 and even 1000 mA g-1 after 500 cycles, respectively. It is demonstrated that thus outstanding performance is mainly attributed to the unique nanostructure of TiO2@SnO2@C HNBs.

  5. Outstanding animal studies in allergy I. From asthma to food allergy and anaphylaxis.

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Roth-Walter, Franziska

    2017-06-01

    Animal models published within the past 18 months on asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis, all conditions of rising public health concern, were reviewed. While domestic animals spontaneously develop asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis, in animal models, divergent sensitization and challenge routes, dosages, intervals and antigens are used to induce asthmatic, food allergic or anaphylactic phenotypes. This must be considered in the interpretation of results. Instead of model antigens, gradually relevant allergens such as house dust mite in asthma, and food allergens like peanut, apple and peach in food allergy research were used. Novel engineered mouse models such as a mouse with a T-cell receptor for house dust mite allergen Der p 1, or with transgenic human hFcγR genes, facilitated the investigation of single molecules of interest. Whole-body plethysmography has become a state-of-the-art in-vivo readout in asthma research. In food allergy and anaphylaxis research, novel techniques were developed allowing real-time monitoring of in-vivo effects following allergen challenge. Networks to share tissues were established as an effort to reduce animal experiments in allergy which cannot be replaced by in-vitro measures. Natural and artificial animal models were used to explore the pathophysiology of asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis and to improve prophylactic and therapeutic measures. Especially the novel mouse models mimicking molecular aspects of the complex immune network in asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis will facilitate proof-of-concept studies under controlled conditions.

  6. Bioanalysis young investigator: Maria Rambla-Alegre.

    Rambla-Alegre, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Maria Rambla-Alegre obtained the European doctorate in March 2011, with the maximum qualification: Excellent "Cum Laude", and has already published 33 articles in reputable scientific journals, presented 61 communications in international symposia, participated in nine research projects, as well as received several awards since 2006. Nowadays, Maria is contracted at Ghent University (Belgium) where she is completing a post-doc. During the time I have known her, I have frequently been impressed by her exceptional capabilities to quickly learn new skills to develop and validate new liquid chromatographic procedures, and by her constant initiative to bring together innovative analytical methods. Maria has always adopted a positive, critical view and shows eagerness to better herself. Besides her exceptional knowledge in LC, she has a sound scientific background in capillary electrophoresis, GC, sample preparation and optimization procedures that allows her to complement her investigations and has resulted in significant papers in the analytical chemistry field. Our research group has greatly benefited from Maria's capabilities, as can be seen in recent publications in the Journal of Chromatography A, Talanta, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry and other specialized journals that directly represent her work, mainly as corresponding author. It is extremely remarkable that she has published a review of her PhD results. Not everyone has the possibility to publish it. This is a clear sign of the high quality of her research. Compared to other fellows that I have supervised, Maria is undoubtedly the best one. I can, beyond all doubt, give a score of 10/10 to the quality of her research activity. Finally, I would personally like to add that she is an outstanding, serious, independent thinker who is always well informed about the topics she tackles. Maria is also very friendly, a good worker and always willing to help others, which has been a most positive characteristic

  7. APA/Psi Chi Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award: Meghan H. Puglia.

    2016-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). The 2016 recipient is Meghan H. Puglia, who was chosen for "an outstanding foundational research paper that establishes a relationship between a functional epigenetic modification to the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and neural response during social perception." Puglia's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Risk of Late Mortality and Second Malignant Neoplasms among 5-Year Survivors of Young Adult Cancer: A Report of the Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer Survivors Research Program

    Zhang, Y.; Spinelli, J. J.; Gotay, C.; McBride, M. L.; Zhang, Y.; Spinelli, J. J.; Goddard, K.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based retrospective study to assess the long-term risks of overall and cause-specific mortality and second malignant neoplasm (SMN) among survivors of young adult cancer compared to the risk in British Columbia (BC) population and to evaluate the effects of demographic and clinical factors on risk. 1248 5-year survivors of young adult cancer diagnosed 1970-1995 between 20 and 24 years of age were identified from the BC Cancer Registry and followed to the end of 2007. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the effects of different demographic and disease-related characteristics on the risk of death and SMN. A total of 138 deaths and 62 SMNs were observed during follow-up. The overall SMR was 5.9 (95% CI 4.9-6.9) and the absolute excess risk was 5.3 per 1,000 person-years. The overall SIR was 3.0 (95% CI 2.3-3.8). Treatment with radiation resulted in increased risks of death and SMN. These observed increased risks emphasize the importance of prevention, surveillance, and treatment of late effects in survivors of young adult cancers.

  9. Perspectives on Phytochemicals as Antibacterial Agents: An Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics.

    Khatri, Savita; Kumar, Manish; Phougat, Neetu; Chaudhary, Renu; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable advancements in the development of antimicrobial agents, incidents of epidemics due to multi drug resistance in microorganisms have created a massive hazard to mankind. Due to increased resistance against conventional antibiotics, researchers and pharmaceutical industries are more concerned about novel therapeutic agents for the prevention of bacterial infections. Enormous wealth of traditional system of medicine gains importance in health therapies over again. With ancient credentials of potent medicinal plants, various herbal remedies came forward for the management of bacterial infections. The Ayurvedic approach facilitates the development of new therapeutic agents due to structural and functional diversity among phytochemicals. The abundance and diversity is responsible for the characterization of new lead structures from medicinal plants. Industrial interest has increased due to recent research advancements viz. synergistic and high-throughput screening approach for the evaluation of vast variety of phytochemicals. The review certainly emphasizes on the traditional medicines as alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. The review briefly describes mode of action of various antibiotics and resistance mechanisms. This review focuses on the chemical diversity and various mechanisms of action of phytochemicals against bacterial pathogens.

  10. New Perspectives on How to Discover Drugs from Herbal Medicines: CAM's Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics

    Si-Yuan Pan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With tens of thousands of plant species on earth, we are endowed with an enormous wealth of medicinal remedies from Mother Nature. Natural products and their derivatives represent more than 50% of all the drugs in modern therapeutics. Because of the low success rate and huge capital investment need, the research and development of conventional drugs are very costly and difficult. Over the past few decades, researchers have focused on drug discovery from herbal medicines or botanical sources, an important group of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapy. With a long history of herbal usage for the clinical management of a variety of diseases in indigenous cultures, the success rate of developing a new drug from herbal medicinal preparations should, in theory, be higher than that from chemical synthesis. While the endeavor for drug discovery from herbal medicines is “experience driven,” the search for a therapeutically useful synthetic drug, like “looking for a needle in a haystack,” is a daunting task. In this paper, we first illustrated various approaches of drug discovery from herbal medicines. Typical examples of successful drug discovery from botanical sources were given. In addition, problems in drug discovery from herbal medicines were described and possible solutions were proposed. The prospect of drug discovery from herbal medicines in the postgenomic era was made with the provision of future directions in this area of drug development.

  11. New Perspectives on How to Discover Drugs from Herbal Medicines: CAM's Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics.

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Gao, Si-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Shuo-Feng; Tang, Min-Ke; Sun, Jian-Ning; Ma, Dik-Lung; Han, Yi-Fan; Fong, Wang-Fun; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2013-01-01

    With tens of thousands of plant species on earth, we are endowed with an enormous wealth of medicinal remedies from Mother Nature. Natural products and their derivatives represent more than 50% of all the drugs in modern therapeutics. Because of the low success rate and huge capital investment need, the research and development of conventional drugs are very costly and difficult. Over the past few decades, researchers have focused on drug discovery from herbal medicines or botanical sources, an important group of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy. With a long history of herbal usage for the clinical management of a variety of diseases in indigenous cultures, the success rate of developing a new drug from herbal medicinal preparations should, in theory, be higher than that from chemical synthesis. While the endeavor for drug discovery from herbal medicines is "experience driven," the search for a therapeutically useful synthetic drug, like "looking for a needle in a haystack," is a daunting task. In this paper, we first illustrated various approaches of drug discovery from herbal medicines. Typical examples of successful drug discovery from botanical sources were given. In addition, problems in drug discovery from herbal medicines were described and possible solutions were proposed. The prospect of drug discovery from herbal medicines in the postgenomic era was made with the provision of future directions in this area of drug development.

  12. New Perspectives on How to Discover Drugs from Herbal Medicines: CAM's Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Gao, Si-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Shuo-Feng; Tang, Min-Ke; Sun, Jian-Ning; Han, Yi-Fan; Fong, Wang-Fun; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2013-01-01

    With tens of thousands of plant species on earth, we are endowed with an enormous wealth of medicinal remedies from Mother Nature. Natural products and their derivatives represent more than 50% of all the drugs in modern therapeutics. Because of the low success rate and huge capital investment need, the research and development of conventional drugs are very costly and difficult. Over the past few decades, researchers have focused on drug discovery from herbal medicines or botanical sources, an important group of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy. With a long history of herbal usage for the clinical management of a variety of diseases in indigenous cultures, the success rate of developing a new drug from herbal medicinal preparations should, in theory, be higher than that from chemical synthesis. While the endeavor for drug discovery from herbal medicines is “experience driven,” the search for a therapeutically useful synthetic drug, like “looking for a needle in a haystack,” is a daunting task. In this paper, we first illustrated various approaches of drug discovery from herbal medicines. Typical examples of successful drug discovery from botanical sources were given. In addition, problems in drug discovery from herbal medicines were described and possible solutions were proposed. The prospect of drug discovery from herbal medicines in the postgenomic era was made with the provision of future directions in this area of drug development. PMID:23634172

  13. Draft genome sequence of an inbred line of Chenopodium quinoa, an allotetraploid crop with great environmental adaptability and outstanding nutritional properties.

    Yasui, Yasuo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Oikawa, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Masami; Matsuzaki, Chiaki; Ueno, Mariko; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Imamura, Tomohiro; Miyago, Manami; Tanaka, Kojiro; Mise, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Mizukoshi, Hiroharu; Mori, Masashi; Fujita, Yasunari

    2016-12-01

    Chenopodium quinoa Willd. (quinoa) originated from the Andean region of South America, and is a pseudocereal crop of the Amaranthaceae family. Quinoa is emerging as an important crop with the potential to contribute to food security worldwide and is considered to be an optimal food source for astronauts, due to its outstanding nutritional profile and ability to tolerate stressful environments. Furthermore, plant pathologists use quinoa as a representative diagnostic host to identify virus species. However, molecular analysis of quinoa is limited by its genetic heterogeneity due to outcrossing and its genome complexity derived from allotetraploidy. To overcome these obstacles, we established the inbred and standard quinoa accession Kd that enables rigorous molecular analysis, and presented the draft genome sequence of Kd, using an optimized combination of high-throughput next generation sequencing on the Illumina Hiseq 2500 and PacBio RS II sequencers. The de novo genome assembly contained 25 k scaffolds consisting of 1 Gbp with N50 length of 86 kbp. Based on these data, we constructed the free-access Quinoa Genome DataBase (QGDB). Thus, these findings provide insights into the mechanisms underlying agronomically important traits of quinoa and the effect of allotetraploidy on genome evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  14. How young people describe the impact of living with and beyond a cancer diagnosis: feasibility of using social media as a research method.

    Gibson, F; Hibbins, S; Grew, T; Morgan, S; Pearce, S; Stark, D; Fern, L A

    2016-11-01

    Young people with cancer exhibit unique needs. During a time of normal physical and psychological change, multiple disease and treatment-related symptoms cause short and long-term physical and psychosocial effects. Little is known about how young people cope with the impact of cancer and its treatment on daily routines and their strategies to manage the challenges of cancer and treatments. We aimed to determine how young people describe these challenges through a social media site. Using the principles of virtual ethnography and watching videos on a social media site we gathered data from young people describing their cancer experience. Qualitative content analysis was employed to analyse and interpret the narrative from longitudinal 'video diaries' by 18 young people equating to 156 films and 27 h and 49 min of recording. Themes were described then organized and clustered into typologies grouping commonalities across themes. Four typologies emerged reflective of the cancer trajectory: treatment and relenting side effects, rehabilitation and getting on with life, relapse, facing more treatment and coming to terms with dying. This study confirms the need for young people to strive towards normality and creating a new normal, even where uncertainty prevailed. Strategies young people used to gain mastery over their illness and the types of stories they choose to tell provide the focus of the main narrative. Social Media sites can be examined as a source of data, to supplement or instead of more traditional routes of data collection known to be practically challenging with this population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain…

  16. Young Artists@ CERN

    2004-01-01

    In view of 50th anniversary of CERN, about 20 young artists will be visiting CERN from 26 to 31 January to learn about the laboratory's research and the mysterious world of particle physics. The impressions they take home will be the main inspiration for the artwork they will then produce for an exhibition to be inaugurated in October 2004 as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebration. We are looking for scientists who are interested in the Art-Science synergy and who can volunteer to discuss their work at CERN to these young artists during this week (25-31/01). Please contact renilde.vanden.broeck@cern.ch if you are interested. The project is called Young Artists@ CERN and for more information look at this website: http://www.hep.ucl.ac.uk/~andy/CERNart/

  17. Research

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  18. Managing deliberate self-harm in young people: An evaluation of a training program developed for school welfare staff using a longitudinal research design

    McGorry Patrick D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although deliberate self-harm is prevalent among young people, many who engage in deliberate self-harm receive sub-optimal care. Although schools are a well placed setting to support young people who engage in self-harm there are no specific training packages designed to assist school welfare staff to support these young people. The current study aimed to design, deliver and evaluate a training course specifically for school staff. Methods The study employed a longitudinal design. Two hundred and thirteen people participated in the training and evaluation. A questionnaire was administered at baseline, immediately after the training and at 6-month follow-up in order to determine if the training led to improvements in confidence when working with young people who self-harm, perceived skill, knowledge of, and attitudes towards people who self harm. Results Prior to the course, the majority of participants demonstrated relatively high levels of confidence, perceived skill and knowledge of self-harm and endorsed relatively positive attitudes towards people who engage in self-harm. Despite this, significant improvements were observed in terms of increased confidence, increased perceptions of skill along with increased knowledge of deliberate self-harm. These improvements were sustained over the follow-up period. Conclusion The results demonstrated that the provision of specifically designed training can help school welfare staff to feel better equipped to support young people who are engaging in deliberate self-harm.

  19. The (r,q) policy for the lost-sales inventory system when more than one order may be outstanding

    Johansen, Søren Glud; Thorstenson, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We study the continuous-review (r; q) system in which un_lled demands are treated as lost sales. The reorder point r is allowed to be equal to or larger than the order quantity q. Hence, we do not restrict our attention to the well-known case with at most one replenishment order outstanding...... instants from the solution (obtained by the Gauss-Seidel method) of the equilibrium equations of a Markov chain. To optimize r and q we develop an adapted version of the algorithm suggested by Federgruen and Zheng for the backorders model (BO). The results obtained in our numerical study show...... that the suggested procedure dominates standard textbook approximations. In particular, the reductions in the average cost of a simple Economic Order Quantity policy are in the range of 3-14%. Except when lead times are long and variable or when the unit cost of shortage is low, the optimal BO policy provides a fair...

  20. Development of a universally applicable household food insecurity measurement tool: process, current status, and outstanding issues.

    Swindale, Anne; Bilinsky, Paula

    2006-05-01

    The United States Public Law 480 Title II food aid program is the largest U.S. government program directed at reducing hunger, malnutrition, and food insecurity in the developing world. USAID and Title II implementing partners face challenges in measuring the success of Title II programs in reducing household food insecurity because of the technical difficulty and cost of collecting and analyzing data on traditional food security indicators, such as per capita income and caloric adequacy. The Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) holds promise as an easier and more user-friendly approach for measuring the access component of household food security. To support the consistent and comparable collection of the HFIAS, efforts are under way to develop a guide with a standardized questionnaire and data collection and analysis instructions. A set of domains have been identified that is deemed to capture the universal experience of the access component of household food insecurity across countries and cultures. Based on these domains, a set of questions has been developed with wording that is deemed to be universally appropriate, with minor adaptation to local contexts. These underlying suppositions, based on research in multiple countries, are being verified by potential users of the guide. The key remaining issue relates to the process for creating a categorical indicator of food insecurity status from the HFIAS.

  1. Integrating surface and mantle constraints for palaeo-ocean evolution: a tour of the Arctic and adjacent regions (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    Shephard, Grace E.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions heavily rely on absolute motions derived from hotspot trails or palaeomagnetic data and ocean-floor magnetic anomaies and fracture-zone geometries to constrain the detailed history of ocean basins. However, as oceanic lithosphere is progressively recycled into the mantle, kinematic data regarding the history of these now extinct-oceans is lost. In order to better understand their evolution, novel workflows, which integrate a wide range of complementary yet independent geological and geophysical datasets from both the surface and deep mantle, must be utilised. In particular, the emergence of time-dependent, semi or self-consistent geodynamic models of ever-increasing temporal and spatial resolution are revealing some critical constraints on the evolution and fate of oceanic slabs. The tectonic evolution of the circum-Arctic is no exception; since the breakup of Pangea, this enigmatic region has seen major plate reorganizations and the opening and closure of several ocean basins. At the surface, a myriad of potential kinematic scenarios including polarity, timing, geometry and location of subduction have emerged, including for systems along continental margins and intra-oceanic settings. Furthermore, recent work has reignited a debate about the origins of 'anchor' slabs, such as the Farallon and Mongol-Okhotsk slabs, which have been used to refine absolute plate motions. Moving to the mantle, seismic tomography models reveal a region peppered with inferred slabs, however assumptions about their affinities and subduction location, timing, geometry and polarity are often made in isolation. Here, by integrating regional plate reconstructions with insights from seismic tomography, satellite derived gravity gradients, slab sinking rates and geochemistry, I explore some Mesozoic examples from the palaeo-Arctic, northern Panthalassa and western margin of North America, including evidence for a discrete and previously undescribed slab under present-day Greenland. While regional in focus, the methods and insights described have global applications and illustrate the power of an integrated approach.

  2. Assessment of scientific programs: a necessary procedure for Brazilian scientific policy - the Young Investigator Program of the State of São Paulo Research Foundation

    Carlos A. de Pian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Programs of Science and Technology research have grown significantly in Brazil over the last decades. Until the 1980s the so-called undirected programs, without specific goals and requiring only scientific merit, prevailed. The few programs with defined goals in this period were never objectively assessed. The same situation occurred in developed countries. In the early 1990s, the assessment of programs supported by public funding became mandatory in US and some European countries. In Brazil, program assessment has so far not been implemented yet. The Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa no Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP (Brazilian funding agency Young Investigator (YI Program is in its eleventh year, with approximately eight hundred projects awarded. Although it is free-demand based as concerns areas of knowledge, it has specific goals : (1 conceding grants to YI in view of the balance between funding, merit and real needs so as to enable satisfactory working conditions in the short term, (2 providing priority for institutions with a less extensive background in research, (3 granting a special fellowship to YI with no employment connection and (4 introduction of new research fronts in centers with a sound research background. This assessment provided evidence for the achievement of first three goals. The fourth one is still pending on additional data requiring survey assessment. Actions in this direction are recommended.Programas de Ciência e Tecnologia cresceram significativamente no Brasil nas últimas décadas. Até a década de 80 os assim chamados programas não dirigidos, sem metas específicas e requerendo apenas mérito científico prevaleciam. Os poucos programas com metas definidas neste período não foram jamais objetivamente avaliados. A mesma situação ocorria nos países desenvolvidos. No início da década de 90, a avaliação de programas dependentes de recursos públicos tornou-se mandatória nos Estados Unidos e em alguns pa

  3. Young Murderers.

    Garbarino, James

    1999-01-01

    Reflects on the moral world of children who have committed acts of lethal violence. Young killers do not see any positive alternatives at the moment of violence. When they kill, they are seeking justice--as they see it. Emphasizes the importance of adults stimulating the development of empathy and spirituality. (SLD)

  4. Superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs – extraordinary and outstanding success of evolution

    Kazimierz Kochman

    2014-10-01

    , via their C-terminal domain, with proteins containing PDZ domains, which are present in the PDZ proteins. These proteins organize the NMDA receptors and some K+ channels while their PDZ domains generally bind 3-4 amino-acid stretches of C-terminal sequences of target proteins. The -S/TXV motif was found in some PDZ target proteins. GPCRs can also interact with the Enabled/VASP homology (EVH-like domain which interacts directly with group 1 mGluR receptors. Every year brings new very important data in research of these proteins, which should be called “the most successful structures evolved during the whole of animal evolution”.

  5. Research

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  6. Research

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  7. Influences of a Socially Interactive Robot on the Affective Behavior of Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 3

    Dunst, Carl J.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from two studies of 11 young children with autism, Down syndrome, or attention deficit disorders investigating the effects of Popchilla, a socially interactive robot, on the children's affective behavior are reported. The children were observed under two conditions, child-toy interactions and child-robot interactions, and ratings of child…

  8. Effects of Child-Robot Interactions on the Vocalization Production of Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots. Research Reports, Number 4

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Findings from two studies investigating the effects of a socially interactive robot on the vocalization production of young children with disabilities are reported. The two studies included seven children with autism, two children with Down syndrome, and two children with attention deficit disorders. The Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA)…

  9. The Transition to Full-Time Work of Young People Who Do Not Go to University. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 49

    Marks, Gary N.

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the transition to full-time employment of young people who do not go to university. The majority of Australia's school leavers do not enroll in university, and it is important to better understand the pathways that they follow. The report uses a substantial longitudinal dataset to map the dynamics of the youth labour market,…

  10. The Price We Pay: Young People, Poverty & Long-Term Unemployment in Australia. A Report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme.

    Crooks, Mary L.; Webb, Marcia; Forster, Jacinda

    A study was conducted of the social and economic costs of persistently high youth unemployment in Australia. The impact of youth unemployment and education, training, and employment policies that might help the situation were also studied. Data were obtained from 13 focus groups, involving 102 young people who were not employed or were from…

  11. The Inter-Life Project: Inter-Cultural Spaces for Young People to Use Creative Practices and Research to Assist with Life Changes and Transition

    Lally, Vic; Sclater, Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Inter-Life Project was to investigate the use of virtual worlds and creative practices to support the acquisition of transition skills for young people to enhance their management of important life events. In particular, the authors have been investigating the role of the Inter-Life virtual worlds in supporting the development of…

  12. Parents' Appraisals of the Animacy and Likability of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 2

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Embler, Davon

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a survey of parents' ratings of seven different human-like qualities of four socially interactive robots are reported. The four robots were Popchilla, Keepon, Kaspar, and CosmoBot. The participants were 96 parents and other primary caregivers of young children with disabilities 1 to 12 years of age. Results showed that Popchilla, a…

  13. Parents' Judgments of the Acceptability and Importance of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 1

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Embler, Davon

    2013-01-01

    A number of different types of socially interactive robots are being used as part of interventions with young children with disabilities to promote their joint attention and language skills. Parents' judgments of two dimensions (acceptance and importance) of the social validity of four different social robots were the focus of the study described…

  14. Toward More Equitable Outcomes: A Research Synthesis on Out-of-School Time Work with Boys and Young Men of Color

    Gilgoff, Jon; Ginwright, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Detroit's Flip the Script afterschool program offers academic support, leadership development, and guidance from positive male mentors to young men of color ages 11-15. At Male Leadership Academy, another program in the city's West Side, youth receive similar services, including life lessons from peers and adults provided in a guest speaker…

  15. Media life of the young

    Westlund, Oscar; Bjur, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    This is a thorough investigation into contemporary young people and their media life. The article conceptualizes a typology of media life, drawing on a theoretical body involving the sociology of generations, life course research, media life and individualization. This empirically derived typology...... makes a strong instrument for an understanding of the media life of the young, furnishing insights into how they have constructed their use of media. The investigation is based on a robust national survey with Swedes born 1994–2001, conducted in 2010, and focusing on four media: television, gaming......, the Internet and mobile devices. Two of the findings are particularly surprising. Firstly, the results reveal that the young generally lead heterogeneous media lives, varying with age and sex. Secondly, although some young people literarily live their life in media, there are also de facto young who live...

  16. An outstanding guest

    2004-01-01

    The person celebrating CERN's 25th anniversary whose photograph we published last week was not just any guest. Readers have pointed out that it was Wim Klein, whose remarkable abilities are part of CERN's history. Well known as one of the best "human calculators", Wim was recruited by CERN in 1957 to verify computer programs, which at the time were still stumbling. Moreover, he regularly beat their speed in calculating and gave breath-taking demonstrations. During one such demonstration in September 1973, he calculated the 19th root of a 133-digit number in less than 2 minutes !

  17. Some outstanding assumpti

    D.H. Tarling

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Three examples of incorrect or incomplete assumptions are considered. (1 The oceanic geothermal gradient was originally established using an assumed temperature at the boundary between the rigid lithospheric tectonic plate and the underlying plastically deforming asthenospheric mantle. Revising this invalid temperature assumption has major implications for the concentration of radio-active elements within the mantle, convective patterns and the rate of cooling of the Earth, etc. (2 The earliest 19th century spectral observations of the surface of the Sun identified meteoritic components. This was plausible as Sunspots were thought to be meteoritic impacts, but are now known to be of internal origin. The Sun has no meteoritic materials and its age and origin require major revision. (3 Astronomical changes in the position of objects in the solar system provide causative mechanisms for periodicities in many Earth processes – climate, sea-level, sea-floor spreading, volcanism, etc. Unexplained spectral features probably originate from effects due to the same bodies influencing the solar processes that then affect the magnitude and nature of solar radiation, solar wind, electromagnetic storms, etc., reaching the Earth’s upper atmosphere.

  18. Research

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  19. Research

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  20. Research

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  1. Young men using pornography

    Flood, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Most everyday users of pornography are heterosexual men. Looking at, and masturbating to, pornography is the routine practice of large numbers of men. And most of the commercial pornographic industry caters to heterosexual men. These men – and their consumption of pornography – are the subject of a growing body of research. This chapter offers an overview of what we can learn about heterosexual boys' and young men's use of pornography, focusing particularly on quantitative studies of the exte...

  2. Perceived harms and benefits of tobacco, marijuana, and electronic vaporizers among young adults in Colorado: implications for health education and research.

    Popova, Lucy; McDonald, Emily Anne; Sidhu, Sohrab; Barry, Rachel; Richers Maruyama, Tracey A; Sheon, Nicolas M; Ling, Pamela M

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate how young adults perceive and compare harms and benefits of marijuana and tobacco products in the context of a legal marijuana market in Colorado. Semi-structured qualitative interviews. Denver, CO, USA. Thirty-two young adults (aged 18-26 years) who used tobacco/marijuana/vaporizers. Semi-structured interviews addressed perceived harms and benefits of various tobacco and marijuana products and personal experiences with these products. Young adults evaluated harms and benefits using five dimensions: (1) combustion-smoking was considered more harmful than non-combustible products (e.g. e-cigarettes, vaporizers and edibles); (2) potency-edibles and marijuana concentrates were perceived as more harmful than smoking marijuana flower because of potential to receive too large a dose of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC); (3) chemicals-products containing chemical additives were seen as more harmful than 'pure' or 'natural' plant products; (4) addiction-participants recognized physiological addiction to nicotine, but talked primarily about psychological or life-style dependence on marijuana; and (5) source of knowledge-personal experiences, warning labels, campaigns, the media and opinions of product retailers and medical practitioners affected perceptions of harms and benefits. Among young adults in Colorado, USA, perceived harms and benefits of tobacco and marijuana include multiple dimensions. Health educational campaigns could benefit from addressing these dimensions, such as the potency of nicotine and cannabis concentrates and harmful chemicals present in the organic material of tobacco and marijuana. Descriptors such as 'natural' and 'pure' in the promotion or packaging of tobacco and marijuana products might be misleading. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Effect of participatory selection of varieties on the identification of outstanding common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Alexis Lamz Piedra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the main factors affecting bean production is poor distribution of varieties for different environmental conditions in which its are grown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of participatory selection of foreign genetic materials and national commercial and pre-commercial common bean in identifying genotypes for their outstanding performance and resistance to common bacteriosis (Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Smith Dye (Xcp. In the "El Mulato" farm belonging to the Empowered Cooperative of Credit and Services (CCSF "Orlando Cuellar" in the municipality San José de las Lajas, Mayabeque, two experiments were conducted. In the first one, 15 genotypes were planted in 13 September 2014 (early season in experimental plots to develop a diversity Fair and evaluate the natural incidence of common bean bacteriosis. In the second experiment, they were sown on 25 December (late season the materials selected by farmers with superior agronomic performance (7 genotypes to validate the stability of its performance. Among the results, an effective range of 93,33 % between the selected materials and selective criteria that this diversity was identified were high performance, resistance to common bacteriosis and color of beans. It was found that the selection of the diversity of beans by farmers is not influenced by the origin of materials and participatory selection identified common bean genotypes with high yield potential and stability between planting seasons.

  4. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  5. The Implementation of Analytical Hierarchy Process Method for Outstanding Achievement Scholarship Reception Selection at Universal University of Batam

    Marfuah; Widiantoro, Suryo

    2017-12-01

    Universal University of Batam offers outstanding achievement scholarship to the current students to be each year of new academic year, seeing the large number of new Students who are interested to get it then the selection team should be able to filter and choose the eligible ones. The selection process starting with evaluation and judgement made by the experts. There were five criteria as the basic of selection and each had three alternatives that must be considered. Based on the policy of University the maximum number of recipients are five for each of six study programs. Those programs are art of music, dance, industrial engineering, environmental engineering, telecommunication engineering, and software engineering. The expert choice was subjective that AHP method was used to help in making decision consistently by doing pairwise comparison matrix process between criteria based on selected alternatives, by determining the priority order of criteria and alternatives used. The results of these calculations were used as supporting decision-making to determine the eligible students receiving scholarships based on alternatives of selected criteria determined by the final results of AHP method calculation with the priority criterion A (0.37%), C (0.23%), E (0.21%), D (0.14%) and B (0.06%), value of consistency ratio 0.05. Then the alternative priorities 1 (0.63), 2 (0.26) and 3 (0.11) the consistency ratio values 0.03, where each CR ≤ 0.1 or consistent weighting preference.

  6. Outstanding resistance and passivation behaviour of new Fe-Co metal-metal glassy alloys in alkaline media.

    Khadijah M Emran

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of the oxide layers on two metal-metal glassy alloys, Fe78Co9Cr10Mo2Al1 (VX9and Fe49Co49V2 (VX50 (at.%, were studied using electrochemical techniques including electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic polarization (CP measurements. The morphology and composition of the alloy surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The corrosion rate and surface roughness of both alloys increased as the concentration of NaOH in aqueous solution was raised. The presence of some protective elements in the composition of the alloys led to the formation of a spontaneous passive layer on the alloy surface. The higher resistance values of both alloys were associated with the magnitude of the dielectric properties of the passive films formed on their surfaces. Both alloys are classified as having outstanding resistance to corrosion, which results from the formation of a passive film that acts as an efficient barrier to corrosion in alkaline solution.

  7. A contemplation in negation and emphasizes of outstanding philosophers of Tehran philosophy school in immortality of subject in substantial movement.

    mohamad khosravi farsani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Agha Ali and Jelveh ,two of outstanding of Tehran philosophy school, have reconsidered Sandra's opinions in two opposite sides. Agha Ali is the claimant of negation and ambiguity in most of Sandra's opinions while emphasizing on transcendent theosophy foundations ,and he tries to make these ambiguities clear .However , Jelveh follows Avicenna's way and has the idea of criticizing Sandra .This article has chosen the problem Of immortality of subject in substantial movement between all debates of these two philosophers of the same age.in this essay we are going to survey Agha Ali's claims in his new explantation in one hand ,and survey and criticize the new explanation of Jelveh in negation Of substantial movement .One of the consequences of surveying and criticizing these two philosophers is that we recognize Agha Ali has succeeded in making Sadra's opinions clear by presenting a new explanation of substantial movement subject. However ,Jelveh has merged Sadra's opinions with Avicenna's instead of debilitating Sadra's opinions and stabilizing Avicenna's opinions.

  8. Large-scale production of graphitic carbon nitride with outstanding nitrogen photofixation ability via a convenient microwave treatment

    Ma, Huiqiang [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); College of Environment and Resources, Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Shi, Zhenyu; Li, Shuang [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Liu, Na, E-mail: Naliujlu@163.com [College of Environment and Resources, Key Lab of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Microwave method for synthesizing g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with N{sub 2} photofixation ability is reported. • Nitrogen vacancies play the important role on the nitrogen photofixation ability. • The present process is a convenient method for large-scale production of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: A convenient microwave treatment for synthesizing graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) with outstanding nitrogen photofixation ability under visible light is reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, UV–vis spectroscopy, SEM, N{sub 2}-TPD, EPR, photoluminescence (PL) and photocurrent measurements were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The results indicate that microwave treatment can form many irregular pores in as-prepared g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, which causes the increased surface area and separation rate of electrons and holes. More importantly, microwave treatment causes the formation of many nitrogen vacancies in as-prepared g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These nitrogen vacancies not only serve as active sites to adsorb and activate N{sub 2} molecules but also promote interfacial charge transfer from catalysts to N{sub 2} molecules, thus significantly improving the nitrogen photofixation ability. Moreover, the present process is a convenient method for large-scale production of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} which is significantly important for the practical application.

  9. Large-scale production of graphitic carbon nitride with outstanding nitrogen photofixation ability via a convenient microwave treatment

    Ma, Huiqiang; Shi, Zhenyu; Li, Shuang; Liu, Na

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave method for synthesizing g-C_3N_4 with N_2 photofixation ability is reported. • Nitrogen vacancies play the important role on the nitrogen photofixation ability. • The present process is a convenient method for large-scale production of g-C_3N_4. - Abstract: A convenient microwave treatment for synthesizing graphitic carbon nitride (g-C_3N_4) with outstanding nitrogen photofixation ability under visible light is reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N_2 adsorption, UV–vis spectroscopy, SEM, N_2-TPD, EPR, photoluminescence (PL) and photocurrent measurements were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The results indicate that microwave treatment can form many irregular pores in as-prepared g-C_3N_4, which causes the increased surface area and separation rate of electrons and holes. More importantly, microwave treatment causes the formation of many nitrogen vacancies in as-prepared g-C_3N_4. These nitrogen vacancies not only serve as active sites to adsorb and activate N_2 molecules but also promote interfacial charge transfer from catalysts to N_2 molecules, thus significantly improving the nitrogen photofixation ability. Moreover, the present process is a convenient method for large-scale production of g-C_3N_4 which is significantly important for the practical application.

  10. AFECTAR LECTURAS Y PRÁCTICAS: RECONSTRUCCIÓN Y RELACIÓN ENTRE INVESTIGACIÓN E INTERVENCIÓN CON JÓVENES Affecting theories and practices: reconstruction and relation between research and intervention with the young

    MARIANA PATRICIA ACEVEDO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I intend to reconstruct the methodological definitions made in the research on popular sectors young people, highlighting the circumstances, tensions, and accumulations we have produced in each stage of this process. On the basis of that analysis I develop some conclusions in terms of tensions, learning, and challenges. I recover my own backgrounds and those from the research group I lead at Escuela de Trabajo Social – UNC; which since many years intends to characterize and understand young people in Cordoba, their ways of organization, their motivations for participate, their representations and assessments towards work. Additionally, I recover concerns and personal accumulations in my history as a teacher and activist at public university; which have led to different texts, articles, courses, and productions about the relation between the three public university functions: research, extension and teaching. I intend to attach these reflections to two accumulation lines: on the one hand, the texts, articles and pieces of work that account for what Catalina Wainerman and Ruth Sautu (1998 names “research behind the scenes”; on the other, the concerns about the ways we study subjects, their living conditions, their representations, problems, and ways of solving them. These two lines are connected to Social Work as profession and discipline; occupation from which I produce, teach and intervene.

  11. Research

    abp

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... stigma and superstition are known to lead to frequent presentation .... The limited documented research on challenges to help-seeking behaviour for cancer ..... to touch your breast [16] that breast self-examination may cause.

  12. Research

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-02

    Oct 2, 2015 ... thought to prevent infection, but recent research has proven otherwise. In addition ... One patient had ophthalmalgia and was exposed to. Kaiy for one year and ... migraine, ear infections, tuberculosis, bone fractures, epilepsy,.

  13. Research

    abp

    2016-07-12

    Jul 12, 2016 ... multiple risk factors provides support for multiple-behavior interventions as ... consumption) with smoking therefore needs further research. As such this study .... restaurants, in bars, and on a statewide basis. They preferred to.

  14. Research

    The mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is a way of assessing the clinical ... Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Medical Health. Research ..... mini-CEX assessment and feedback session, the greater the likelihood of.

  15. Research

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Qualitative data, content analysis approach was used. Results: Overall 422 .... Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] ...

  16. Research

    1999-01-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance

  17. Research

    Research. December 2017, Vol. 9, No. 4 AJHPE 171. During curriculum development, teachers ... Ideally, examiners need an educational method to determine ..... A major focus of this study was addressing the human resource gap when.

  18. 47{sup th} Annual conference on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key topics / Outstanding know-how and sustainable innovations - enhanced safety and operation excellence

    Raetzke, Christian [CONLAR - Consulting on Nuclear Law, Licensing and Regulation, Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, Erwin [PreussenElektra GmbH, Hannover (Germany). Management Board; Mohrbach, Ludger [VGB PowerTech e.V., Essen (Germany). Competence Center ' ' Nuclear Power Plants' '

    2016-08-15

    Summary report on the Key Topics ''Outstanding Know-How and Sustainable Innovations'' and ''Enhanced Safety and Operation Excellence'' of the 47{sup th} Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology (AMNT 2016) held in Hamburg, 10 to 12 May 2016. Other Sessions of AMNT 2016 will be covered in further issues of atw.

  19. It's Not Just about Value for Money: A Case Study of Values-Led Implementation of the Pupil Premium in Outstanding Schools

    Abbott, Ian; Middlewood, David; Robinson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data collected from a series of semi-structured interviews with headteachers and other stakeholders on the use of the Pupil Premium in Ofsted-rated outstanding schools. It has a focus on the significance of fundamental principles in determining how effective use is made of additional resources. In particular, the importance…

  20. Research

    abp

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... available to populations of developing countries [2-5]. In 2013, in. Western and Central Europe and ..... initiation among the infected persons in the community. Addressing stigma and educating ... Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (P30AI042853). Tables. Table 1: Baseline characteristics of ...

  1. Research

    abp

    15 févr. 2016 ... présentent un Indice de Masse Corporel (IMC) normal, les autres femmes sont soit ..... In The health belief model and personal health behavior, edited by MH ... Evaluation of the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale. Research in.

  2. Research

    2017-03-14

    Mar 14, 2017 ... R Ebrahim,1 MSc (Dent); H Julie,2 MPH, MCur, PhD. 1 Extended ... and research is applied to develop and sustain society.[5]. Methods .... service they want, not the service we want to give whether they want it or. Co math. G.

  3. Research

    abp

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Page number not for citation purposes. 1. Prevalence and determinants of common mental ..... illnesses were smoke cigarette in the last 3 months that make prevalence of tobacco use 38.2%. ..... Okasha A, Karam E.Mental health services and research in the. Arab world. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

  4. Research

    abp

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... Prospective assessment of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea in ... Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of .... University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethics Committee ... BANG, Berlin questionnaire and the American Society of .... The epidemiology of adult obstructive sleep.

  5. Research

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark, 3Center for Global Health, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000. Odense .... BHP is a Danish-Guinean Demographic Surveillance Site with a study-area .... variables such as age groups, previous military duty, history of.

  6. Research

    abp

    2015-06-24

    Jun 24, 2015 ... related immunosuppression, previous history of TB, and pause in treatment [6]. In Brazil, researchers .... treatment, use of traditional medicines or herbs, history of TB drug side effects and treatment delay). ..... therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in Lima Ciudad, Peru. International journal of tuberculosis and ...

  7. Research

    Research. May 2016, Vol. 8, No. 1 AJHPE 37. Students who enrol in occupational therapy (OT) at the. University of Kwa Zulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa ... The latter may include becoming familiar with the disintegrating social systems in primary .... They also lacked the skills needed to adapt sessions and failed to ...

  8. Research

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... collaboration with Makerere University, School of Public Health. We acknowledge The Family Health Research and Development Centre. (FHRDC) Uganda. Supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for. Population & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, ...

  9. Research

    However, a focus on competence alone is inadequate to produce graduates who are capable of adapting to the changing needs of health systems. While knowledge and technical ... shared their responses to guided questions. There were three sessions; after each session the researcher aggregated participant responses ...

  10. Research

    abp

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... by Hazarika in a population-based study in India. The researcher noted that patients' preference to the private health facilities was due mainly to their dissatisfaction with the services in the public health facilities [11]. Furthermore, the quality of the services in the private health facilities could also be a major ...

  11. Research

    2018-03-20

    Mar 20, 2018 ... student health professionals in various institutions, both in South Africa. (SA) and internationally. ... field include dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in training, .... The College of Health Sciences at UKZN has four schools: clinical ..... Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy ...

  12. Research

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Abstract. Introduction: Medical and dental students are a high-risk group for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection which is an ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. ... Research ... in the College of Health Sciences and clinical students (years four to .... Hepatology International.2017 Jan; 11(1):.

  13. Research

    abp

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... One research assistant was available to assist the learners and to answer questions while they completed the questionnaires during a classroom period. ..... PubMed | Google Scholar. 4. Hall PA, Holmqvist M, Sherry SB. Risky adolescent sexual behaviour: A psychological perspective for primary care.

  14. Introduction to Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers

    Cancer researchers, advocates, and a cancer survivor introduce the topic of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers, covering distinct aspects of cancer in these patients and research questions to answer.

  15. The Carbon_h-factor: predicting individuals' research impact at early stages of their career.

    Claus-Christian Carbon

    Full Text Available Assessing an individual's research impact on the basis of a transparent algorithm is an important task for evaluation and comparison purposes. Besides simple but also inaccurate indices such as counting the mere number of publications or the accumulation of overall citations, and highly complex but also overwhelming full-range publication lists in their raw format, Hirsch (2005 introduced a single figure cleverly combining different approaches. The so-called h-index has undoubtedly become the standard in scientometrics of individuals' research impact (note: in the present paper I will always use the term "research impact" to describe the research performance as the logic of the paper is based on the h-index, which quantifies the specific "impact" of, e.g., researchers, but also because the genuine meaning of impact refers to quality as well. As the h-index reflects the number h of papers a researcher has published with at least h citations, the index is inherently positively biased towards senior level researchers. This might sometimes be problematic when predictive tools are needed for assessing young scientists' potential, especially when recruiting early career positions or equipping young scientists' labs. To be compatible with the standard h-index, the proposed index integrates the scientist's research age (Carbon_h-factor into the h-index, thus reporting the average gain of h-index per year. Comprehensive calculations of the Carbon_h-factor were made for a broad variety of four research-disciplines (economics, neuroscience, physics and psychology and for researchers performing on three high levels of research impact (substantial, outstanding and epochal with ten researchers per category. For all research areas and output levels we obtained linear developments of the h-index demonstrating the validity of predicting one's later impact in terms of research impact already at an early stage of their career with the Carbon_h-factor being approx

  16. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial.

    Doubé, Wendy; Carding, Paul; Flanagan, Kieran; Kaufman, Jordy; Armitage, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate "Correct"/"Incorrect" feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a "Wizard of Oz" experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human "Wizard" will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children.

  17. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial

    Doubé, Wendy; Carding, Paul; Flanagan, Kieran; Kaufman, Jordy; Armitage, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate “Correct”/”Incorrect” feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a “Wizard of Oz” experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human “Wizard” will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children. PMID:29674986

  18. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial

    Wendy Doubé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate “Correct”/”Incorrect” feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a “Wizard of Oz” experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human “Wizard” will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children.

  19. Nutrition for Young Men

    ... Healthy Aging Nutrition for Young Men Print Email Nutrition for Young Men Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, ... 2017 XiXinXing/iStock/Thinkstock For many young men, nutrition isn't always a focus. There are many ...

  20. YOUNG INVESTIGATOR SPECIAL ISSUE (Editorial

    Eric Eils

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to the first Young Investigator Special Issue of the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM. The JSSM family is proud to start this new service to the Sport Science community and to young researchers. The background in starting this issue was the observation that large amounts of high-quality research is conducted every year by students and young investigators, but often remains solely in local university libraries and never reaches the scientific community or databases. In addition, most international journals have a high threshold in accepting papers, and it is often hard to reach this level for junior scientists because of lack of experience, supervision or confidence. These are major reasons that delay or in some cases stop young researchers from publishing their valuable work. We all received help from senior colleagues in the beginning of our career. Now it is our turn to help youngsters. With this special issue, the JSSM is now serving young researchers as a channel for publishing their work. Our goal is to motivate young researchers to submit their work to JSSM, but we also aim to motivate supervisors and expert referees to be supportive and constructive towards these young scientists at the very beginning of their career. The Young Investigator Special Issue followed a normal peer-review process, except that there were no straight rejections in the first phase of review. We advised the reviewers of the Young Investigator Special Issue to proceed with constructive advice and remarks for all manuscripts. This offered a great opportunity for the Young Investigators to revise the manuscript, while at the same time contributing to the learning process. Thereafter, if the revisions were properly conducted according to the remarks from reviewers, the manuscripts were accepted for publication. We have received many manuscripts from young researchers with a lot of potential. There has been plenty of evidence of great talent

  1. Hypothesis-Driven Research for G x E Interactions: The Relationship between Oxytocin, Parental Divorce during Adolescence, and Depression in Young Adulthood

    Michael eWindle; Sylvie eMrug

    2015-01-01

    Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene-environment (GE) studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about GE relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis testi...

  2. Hypothesis-driven research for G × E interactions: the relationship between oxytocin, parental divorce during adolescence, and depression in young adulthood

    Windle, Michael; Mrug, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Research in molecular genetics has generally focused on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and exploratory candidate gene and candidate gene–environment (G × E) studies. In this article it is proposed that hypothesis-driven and biologically informed research provides a complementary approach to GWAS to advance pressing research questions about G × E relations that are of public health relevance. Prior research studies and developmental and evolutionary theory were used to guide hypothesis...

  3. Schooling of young and adults people with intellectual disabilities: considerations on research dissertations and theses in the period 1988 to 2008

    Jéssica de Brito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific production on the theme of youth and adults with intellectual disabilities, found in dissertations and theses in the period 1988 to 2008. For this, we carried out the survey on the bank of the CAPES, by searching with keywords specific to contemplate the education of youth and adults, special education, and intellectual disability and mental. We selected ten productions distributed in six Higher Education Institutions (HEI, the majority coming from public higher education institutions, for the Graduate Program in Education, and defended in the 2000s. Most studies focused on literacy and signaled the need for improvement of teaching practices, as well as the importance of the interaction of young people and adults with intellectual disabilities with their teachers. It was also found that there are few studies relevant to this population in question, pointing to a field of knowledge to be properly understood.

  4. Importance of Urine Dipstick in Evaluation of Young Febrile Infants With Positive Urine Culture: A Spanish Pediatric Emergency Research Group Study.

    Velasco, Roberto; Benito, Helvia; Mozun, Rebeca; Trujillo, Juan E; Merino, Pedro A; de la Torre, Mercedes; Gomez, Borja; Mintegi, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics define urinary tract infection (UTI) as the growth of greater than 50,000 ufc/mL of a single bacterium in a urine culture with a positive urine dipstick or with a urinalysis associated. Our objective was to evaluate the adequacy of this cutoff point for the diagnosis of UTI in young febrile infants. Subanalysis of a prospective multicenter study developed in RISeuP-SPERG Network between October 11 and September 13. To carry out the study, it was performed a comparison of analytical and microbiological characteristics of patients younger than 90 days with fever without focus, taking into account the results of urine dipstick and urine culture. Of a total of 3333 infants younger than 90 days with fever without focus which were included in the study, 538 were classified as UTI in accordance with American Academy of Pediatrics' guidelines. These patients were similar to those who had a positive urine dipstick and a urine culture yielding of 10,000 to 50,000 ufc/mL, and they were different from those who had a normal urine dipstick and a urine culture >50,000 ufc/mL, being focused on the isolated bacteria and blood biomarkers values. Forty-five invasive bacterial infections were diagnosed (5.9% of the 756 with a urine culture >10,000 ufc/mL). Half of the infants with a normal urine dipstick diagnosed with invasive bacterial infections were younger than 15 days. It might be inadequate to use a threshold of 50,000 cfu/mL to consider a urine culture as positive in young febrile infants given the fact that it would misdiagnose several UTIs.

  5. Young Journalists in Vojvodina

    Smiljana Milinkov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available According to a recent study entitled, ”Professional Status of Young Journalists in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina”, the primary complaints of journalists thirty-years old and younger are overtime,small salaries, uneducated executives, censorship, and the infl uence of politics and advertisers on editorial policy. Most of the interviewees are not permanently employed, receiving some 200€ honoraria,and as they have mentioned, executives and editors do not suffi ciently trust them, nor are they aff orded adequate space to express themselves. While Serbia has enacted nominal steps toward democracy over the past ten years, and in the process has reduced the number of persecutions and arrests of journalists and punishments and cancellations of media, more than half of the young journalists surveyed have experienced restraints in freedom of speech while doing their job. Further, ten percent of those surveyed state that they are often censored. The basis of this examination emanates from research on the professional status of ”eternal freelancers”, conducted in 2009 by the Youth Development Fund (Razvojni fond za mlade – RFM expert team, with the support from the Provincial Secretariat for Sport and Youth. In addition, a questionnaire has been filled out by over 50 young journalists from Vojvodina.

  6. European research and development strategy for clean power

    Linkohr, R.

    2006-01-01

    We need more rather than less money for research, energy research in particular, research being an important contributor to progress, in order to achieve peak performance, comply with the quest for knowledge about the structure of the world, or to be able to further improve our quality of life at far less expense of materials and energy. This latter concept is in line with European identity. If we succeed in demonstrating to the world that people can live a better life if they manage their affairs sustainably, we Europeans will have won a new trademark: a sustainable Europe which can be left to future generations. For this purpose Europeans, more than before, must perceive Europe as a space of knowledge. Science policy must be geared to Europe, not just to a national territory. Also, Europe should devote more attention to fundamental research. Some outstanding projects are needed, particularly in energy research, with the participation of industry in order to reduce materials consumption and avoid emissions. Education, too, must be given much attention. In the absence of enthusiastic young scientists, engineers, and skilled workers who know their neighboring countries and their technologies and languages from an early age, European energy policy is bound to remain fragmented. (orig.)

  7. Young children as Internet users

    Daramola, O. (Oladipo)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the current available research concerning the real usage of the internet among the young children, most researchers particularly emphases on the risk and opportunities regarding the active use of the internet. Limited experimental research emphases on the role-based and impact of the parent guidelines in the context. In the current studies, internet parenting methods are well-defined and operationalized to study...

  8. Whose Side Are You on? Advocacy Ethnography: Some Methodological Aspects of Narrative Portraits of Disadvantaged Young People, in Socially Critical Research

    Smyth, John; McInerney, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper is primarily interested in opening up a strategy to counter the increasing silencing of perspectives resulting from the press towards "evidence-based" forms of research. We argue that all researchers have interests, declared or otherwise. What we advance in the paper is an approach to ethnography that is inclusive of the lives,…

  9. Living arrangements of young adults in Europe

    Schwanitz, Katrin; Mulder, Clara H.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative research suggests that there are great cross-national and cross-temporal differences in living arrangements of young adults aged 18-34 in Europe. In this paper, we examine young adults’ living arrangements (1) across several European countries and different national contexts, and (2) by

  10. The complexities of 'otherness': reflections on embodiment of a young White British woman engaged in cross-generation research involving older people in Indonesia.

    Norris, Meriel

    2015-05-01

    If interviews are to be considered embodied experiences, than the potential influence of the embodied researcher must be explored. A focus on specific attributes such as age or ethnicity belies the complex and negotiated space that both researcher and participant inhabit simultaneously. Drawing on empirical research with stroke survivors in an ethnically mixed area of Indonesia, this paper highlights the importance of considering embodiment as a specific methodological concern. Three specific interactions are described and analysed, illustrating the active nature of the embodied researcher in narrative production and development. The intersectionality of embodied features is evident, alongside their fluctuating influence in time and place. These interactions draw attention to the need to consider the researcher within the interview process and the subsequent analysis and presentation of narrative findings. The paper concludes with a reinforcement of the importance of ongoing and meaningful reflexivity in research, a need to consider the researcher as the other participant, and specifically a call to engage with and present the dynamic nature of embodiment.

  11. Positive Psychology: Transforming Young Lives

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    To reach responsible independence, young people must become invested in setting their life course. A rich history of research and practice shows that democratic group climates foster autonomy and prosocial behavior. This article explores principles and practices for creating positive peer cultures to develop strengths and help youth meet their…

  12. Burnout and young workers

    Marina Batista Chaves Azevedo de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article intends to conduct an analysis of the dimensions of the a model about the burnout syndrome, from the reality of young workers who are doing some vocational courses in the city of Recife/PE. Objective: Description of characteristics of a predetermined population. Still, the research is in a field of research and using content analysis method to discuss the data obtained through interviews that had their questions based on the original questionnaire that were validity (Maslach Burnout Inventory. Method: The study is characterized as exploratory and descriptive, given the need to provide greater familiarity with the relationship between the phenomenon to be studied and the target audience that was wanted to interview. Results: The results indicated that the size of the professional fulfillment is committed to moderate level, the size of depersonalization is not compromised and emotional exhaustion is present in youth work routine. Thus, although not found the burnout itself, there are remarkable risk behaviors that could be generate the syndrome on the future. Conclusion: The results may indicate the need for intervention in the company, in order to allow greater enrichment activities developed by young learners, as well as prevent the emergence of situations that may lead to suffering at work .

  13. Sexting among young adults

    Gordon-Messer, Deborah; Bauermeister, Jose Arturo; Grodzinski, Alison; Zimmerman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sexting has stirred debate over its legality and safety, but few researchers have documented the relationship between sexting and health. We describe the sexting behavior of young adults in the United States, and examine its association with sexual behavior and psychological well-being. Methods Using an adapted web version of Respondent-Driven Sampling (webRDS) we recruited a sample of U.S. young adults (ages 18 to 24; N=3447). We examined participant sexting behavior using 4 categories of sexting: 1) Non-Sexters, 2) Receivers, 3) Senders, and 4) Two-way Sexters. We then assessed the relationships between sexting categories and sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behavior and psychological well-being. Results Over half (57%) of respondents were Non-Sexters, 28.2% of the sample were Two-way Sexters, 12.6% were Receivers, and 2% were Senders. Males were more likely to be Receivers than females. Sexually active respondents were more likely to be Two-way Sexters than non-sexually active respondents. Among participants who were sexually active in the past 30 days, we found no differences across sexting groups in number of sexual partners, or number of unprotected sex partners in the past 30 days. We also found no relationship between sexting and psychological well-being. Conclusions Our results suggest that sexting is not related to sexual risk behavior or psychological well-being. We discuss the findings of this study and propose directions for further research on sexting. PMID:23299018

  14. Sexing young snowy owls

    Seidensticker, M.T.; Holt, D.W.; Detienne, J.; Talbot, S.; Gray, K.

    2011-01-01

    We predicted sex of 140 Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) nestlings out of 34 nests at our Barrow, Alaska, study area to develop a technique for sexing these owls in the field. We primarily sexed young, flightless owls (3844 d old) by quantifying plumage markings on the remiges and tail, predicting sex, and collecting blood samples to test our field predictions using molecular sexing techniques. We categorized and quantified three different plumage markings: two types of bars (defined as markings that touch the rachis) and spots (defined as markings that do not touch the rachis). We predicted sex in the field assuming that males had more spots than bars and females more bars than spots on the remiges and rectrices. Molecular data indicated that we correctly sexed 100% of the nestlings. We modeled the data using random forests and classification trees. Both models indicated that the number and type of markings on the secondary feathers were the most important in classifying nestling sex. The statistical models verified our initial qualitative prediction that males have more spots than bars and females more bars than spots on flight feathers P6P10 for both wings and tail feathers T1 and T2. This study provides researchers with an easily replicable and highly accurate method for sexing young Snowy Owls in the field, which should aid further studies of sex-ratios and sex-related variation in behavior and growth of this circumpolar owl species. ?? 2011 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  15. Prayer practices among young adults.

    Nance, Jennifer G; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; McNulty, Sister Rita; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-01-01

    Prayer is the most common complementary and alternative intervention used by most Americans. Yet, little is known about the prayer practices of young adults. In this exploratory study, 4 types of prayer practices of 62 young adults (21-30 years old) are described. The 4 different categories of prayer were: contemplative-meditative, ritualistic, petitionary, and colloquial. Participants most often used colloquial prayer practice, that is, asking God to provide guidance or talking to God in their own words. Recommendations for future research are included.

  16. Research Ethics

    Dooly, Melinda; Moore, Emilee; Vallejo, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative research, especially studies in educational contexts, often brings up questions of ethics because the study design involves human subjects, some of whom are under age (e.g. data collected in primary education classrooms). It is not always easy for young researchers to anticipate where ethical issues might emerge while designing their…

  17. Life Satisfaction of Young Australians: Relationships between Further Education, Training and Employment and General and Career Satisfaction. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth Research Report 43

    Hillman, Kylie; McMillan, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Prepared by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) under an agreement with the Australian Government Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST), this report has three broad aims: (1) To describe the relationship between life satisfaction and participation in a range of post-school education, training and labour market…

  18. Developing a Research Protocol to Investigate Stress, Workload, and Driving Apprehension during Driving Lessons in Young Adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Feasibility Study

    Ross, Veerle; Cox, Daniel; Noordzij, Matthijs Leendert; Geryl, Kimberly; Spooren, Annemie

    2018-01-01

    Background Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are known to impact quality-of-life (QoL). Driving can increase autonomy and QoL by enabling maintenance of work and social contacts. Research suggests people with ASD experience difficulties in complex driving situations. These difficulties may induce

  19. A Missing Link in Suggestibility Research: What Is Known About the Behavior of Field Interviewers in Unstructured Interviews With Young Children?

    Gilstrap, Livia L.

    2004-01-01

    Despite suggestibility researchers' focus on adult behaviors that distort children's reports, whether behaviors examined in experimental work are used in the field is unknown. The current study presents a mutually exclusive and exhaustive hierarchical coding system that reflects interview questioning behaviors of concern in experimental work. The…

  20. Young Women and the Co-Construction of Leadership

    McNae, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Young women's leadership is an area frequently overlooked in educational leadership development. This paper aims to bring young women's voices into educational leadership conversations and illustrate an alternative approach to young women's leadership development. Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative action research study was…