WorldWideScience

Sample records for outer core pressure

  1. Differential Rotation within the Earth's Outer Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, R.; Boggs, D. H.; Dickey, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    Non-steady differential rotation drive by bouyancy forces within the Earth's liquid outer core (OC) plays a key role not only in the generation of the main geomagnetic field by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo process but also in the excitation of irregular fluctuations in the angular speed of rotation of the overlying solid mantle, as evidenced by changes in the length of the day (LOD) on decadal and longer timescales (1-8).

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Convection in the Outer Core and its Geodynamic Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2004-01-01

    The Earth's fluid outer core is in vigorous convection through much of the Earth's history. In addition to generating and maintaining Earth s time-varying magnetic field (geodynamo), the core convection also generates mass redistribution in the core and a dynamical pressure field on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). All these shall result in various core-mantle interactions, and contribute to surface geodynamic observables. For example, electromagnetic core-mantle coupling arises from finite electrically conducting lower mantle; gravitational interaction occurs between the cores and the heterogeneous mantle; mechanical coupling may also occur when the CMB topography is aspherical. Besides changing the mantle rotation via the coupling torques, the mass-redistribution in the core shall produce a spatial-temporal gravity anomaly. Numerical modeling of the core dynamical processes contributes in several geophysical disciplines. It helps explain the physical causes of surface geodynamic observables via space geodetic techniques and other means, e.g. Earth's rotation variation on decadal time scales, and secular time-variable gravity. Conversely, identification of the sources of the observables can provide additional insights on the dynamics of the fluid core, leading to better constraints on the physics in the numerical modeling. In the past few years, our core dynamics modeling efforts, with respect to our MoSST model, have made significant progress in understanding individual geophysical consequences. However, integrated studies are desirable, not only because of more mature numerical core dynamics models, but also because of inter-correlation among the geophysical phenomena, e.g. mass redistribution in the outer core produces not only time-variable gravity, but also gravitational core-mantle coupling and thus the Earth's rotation variation. They are expected to further facilitate multidisciplinary studies of core dynamics and interactions of the core with other

  3. Earth's Outer Core Properties Estimated Using Bayesian Inversion of Normal Mode Eigenfrequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Cottaar, S.; Lekic, V.

    2016-12-01

    modulus, its pressure derivative, and molar mass and volume, with particular attention paid to the (inherent) trade-offs between the different coefficients. We discuss our results in terms of added uncertainty to the light element composition of the outer core and the potential existence of anomalous structure near the outer core's boundaries.

  4. Superrotation of Earth’s Inner Core, Extraterrestrial Impacts, and the Effective Viscosity of Outer Core

    OpenAIRE

    Pirooz Mohazzabi; John D. Skalbeck

    2015-01-01

    The recently verified superrotation of Earth’s inner core is examined and a new model is presented which is based on the tidal despinning of the mantle and the viscosity of the outer core. The model also takes into account other damping mechanisms arising from the inner core superrotation such as magnetic and gravitational coupling as well as contribution from eddy viscosity in the outer core. The effective viscosity obtained in this model confirms a previously well constrained value of about...

  5. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  6. The Effects of Earth's Outer Core's Viscosity on Geodynamo Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Jiao, L.; Zhang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Geodynamo process is controlled by mathematic equations and input parameters. To study effects of parameters on geodynamo system, MoSST model has been used to simulate geodynamo outputs under different outer core's viscosity ν. With spanning ν for nearly three orders when other parameters fixed, we studied the variation of each physical field and its typical length scale. We find that variation of ν affects the velocity field intensely. The magnetic field almost decreases monotonically with increasing of ν, while the variation is no larger than 30%. The temperature perturbation increases monotonically with ν, but by a very small magnitude (6%). The averaged velocity field (u) of the liquid core increases with ν as a simple fitted scaling relation: u∝ν0.49. The phenomenon that u increases with ν is essentially that increasing of ν breaks the Taylor-Proudman constraint and drops the critical Rayleigh number, and thus u increases under the same thermal driving force. Forces balance is analyzed and balance mode shifts with variation of ν. When compared with former studies of scaling laws, this study supports the conclusion that in a certain parameter range, the magnetic field strength doesn't vary much with the viscosity, but opposes to the assumption that the velocity field has nothing to do with the outer core viscosity.

  7. Normal Mode Derived Models of the Physical Properties of Earth's Outer Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Cottaar, S.; Lekic, V.; Wu, W.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's outer core, the largest reservoir of metal in our planet, is comprised of an iron alloy of an uncertain composition. Its dynamical behaviour is responsible for the generation of Earth's magnetic field, with convection driven both by thermal and chemical buoyancy fluxes. Existing models of the seismic velocity and density of the outer core exhibit some variation, and there are only a small number of models which aim to represent the outer core's density.It is therefore important that we develop a better understanding of the physical properties of the outer core. Though most of the outer core is likely to be well mixed, it is possible that the uppermost outer core is stably stratified: it may be enriched in light elements released during the growth of the solid, iron enriched, inner core; by elements dissolved from the mantle into the outer core; or by exsolution of compounds previously dissolved in the liquid metal which will eventually be swept into the mantle. The stratified layer may host MAC or Rossby waves and it could impede communication between the chemically differentiated mantle and outer core, including screening out some of the geodynamo's signal. We use normal mode center frequencies to estimate the physical properties of the outer core in a Bayesian framework. We estimate the mineral physical parameters needed to best produce velocity and density models of the outer core which are consistent with the normal mode observations. We require that our models satisfy realistic physical constraints. We create models of the outer core with and without a distinct uppermost layer and assess the importance of this region.Our normal mode-derived models are compared with observations of body waves which travel through the outer core. In particular, we consider SmKS waves which are especially sensitive to the uppermost outer core and are therefore an important way to understand the robustness of our models.

  8. HYDROGEN IN THE EARTH’S OUTER CORE, AND ITS ROLE IN THE DEEP EARTH GEODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Rumyantsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of hydrogen in the outer core of the Earth is roughly quantified from the dependence of the density of iron (viewed as the main component of the core on the amount of hydrogen dissolved in the core, with account of the most likely presence of iron hydrogen in the outer core, and the matter’s density jumps at the boundaries between the outer liquid core and the internal solid core (that is devoid of hydrogen and the mantle. Estimations for the outer liquid core show that the hydrogen content varies from 0.67 wt. % at the boundary with the solid inner core to 3.04 wt. % at the boundary with the mantle.Iron occlusion is viewed as the most likely mechanism for the iron–nickel core to capture such a significant amount of hydrogen. Iron occlusion took place at the stage of the young sun when the metallic core emerged in the cooling protoplanetary cloud containing hydrogen in high amounts, and non-volatile hydrogen was accumulated. Absorption (occlusion of molecular hydrogen was preceded by dissociation of molecules into atoms and ionization of the atoms, as proved by results of studies focused on Fe–H2 system, and hydrogen dissipation was thus prevented. The core matter was subject to gravitational compression at high pressures that contributed to the forced rapprochement of protons and electrons which interaction resulted by the formation of hydrogen atoms. Highly active hydrogen atoms reacted with metals and produced hydrides of iron and nickel, FeH and NiH. While the metallic core and then the silicate mantle were growing and consolidating, the stability of FeH and NiH was maintained due to pressures that were steadily increasing. Later on, due to the impacts of external forces on the Earth, marginal layers at the mantle–core boundary were detached and displaced, pressures decreased in the system, and iron and nickel hydrides were decomposed to produce molecular hydrogen. Consequences of the hydrides transformation into

  9. Precise seismic-wave velocity atop Earth's core: No evidence for outer-core stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, Catherine; Eaton, David W.

    2010-05-01

    Earth's outer core is composed of liquid Fe and Ni alloyed with a ˜10% fraction of light elements such as O, S, or Si. Secular cooling and compositional buoyancy drive vigorous convection that sustains the geodynamo, but critical details of light-element composition and thermal regime remain uncertain. Seismic velocities can provide important observational constraints on these parameters, but global reference models such as Preliminary Reference Earth Model ( PREM), IASP91 and AK135 exhibit significant discrepancies in the outermost ˜200 km of the core. Here, we apply an Empirical Transfer Function method to obtain precise arrival times for SmKS waves, a whispering-gallery mode that propagates near the underside of the core-mantle boundary. Models that fit our data are all characterized by seismic velocities and depth gradients in the outermost 200 km of the core that correspond best with PREM. This similarity to PREM, which has a smooth velocity profile that satisfies the adiabatic Adams and Williamson equation, argues against the presence of an anomalous layer of light material near the top of the core as suggested in some previous studies. A new model, AE09, is proposed as a slight modification to PREM for use as a reference model of the outermost core.

  10. Equation of state fits to the lower mantle and outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, R.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The lower mantle and outer core are subjected to tests for homogeneity and adiabaticity. An earth model is used which is based on the inversion of body waves and Q-corrected normal-mode data. Homogeneous regions are found at radii between 5125 and 4825 km, 4600 and 3850 km, and 3200 and 2200 km. The lower mantle and outer core are inhomogeneous on the whole and are only homogeneous in the above local regions. Finite-strain and atomistic equations of state are fit to the homogeneous regions. The apparent convergence of the finite-strain relations is examined to judge their applicability to a given region. In some cases the observed pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are used as additional constraints. The effect of minor deviations from adiabaticity on the extrapolations is also considered. An ensemble of zero-pressure values of the density and seismic velocities are found for these regions. The range of extrapolated values from these several approaches provides a measure of uncertainties involved.

  11. Pressure Gradients in the Inner Surf and Outer Swash Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, A.; Puleo, J. A.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.

    2010-12-01

    The swash zone is a highly dynamic region of the beach profile. Although there has been significant progression in understanding the complex hydrodynamics of the swash zone, an improvement in the understanding of the sediment transport mechanisms deserves further investigation. Prior studies have demonstrated that the existing formulations derived from the energetics-type formulation do not accurately and consistently predict sediment transport. Thus, measurements and numerical modeling can contribute in the improvement of the current predictive capability of sediment transport. A potential enhancement to nearshore sediment transport is the horizontal pressure gradient. However, measuring the dynamic pressure gradient in nearshore flows is a difficult task. For instance, standard pressure sensors are generally ill-suited for this type of measurement in shallow swash flows due to the obstructing size of the sensor and the potential for flow interference. With improved measurement apparati and techniques, it is possible to obtain measurements of the horizontal pressure gradient. Our current research includes laboratory and numerical model investigation of the horizontal pressure gradient in the inner surf and outer swash zone. An inexpensive differential pressure gauge is employed allowing for a pressure port on the order of 2 mm diameter. Four pressure sensor pairs are installed 1 cm above the bed with a cross-shore spacing of 8 cm. The sensors are deployed just outside of and at various locations within the outer swash zone to determine spatio-temporal pressure variations. The measurement of total pressure coupled with the corresponding free surface measurements from co-located capacitance wave gauges yields time series of the hydrostatic and dynamic pressure and pressure gradients. A VOF-type RANS model is employed in this investigation. Firstly, the numerical model is validated with swash measurements. Then, model simulations will be performed in order to

  12. Direct observations of the viscosity of Earth's outer core and extrapolation of measurements of the viscosity of liquid iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smylie, D E; Brazhkin, Vadim V; Palmer, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Estimates vary widely as to the viscosity of Earth's outer fluid core. Directly observed viscosity is usually orders of magnitude higher than the values extrapolated from high-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments, which are close to those for liquid iron at atmospheric pressure. It turned out that this discrepancy can be removed by extrapolating via the widely known Arrhenius activation model modified by lifting the commonly used assumption of pressure-independent activation volume (which is possible due to the discovery that at high pressures the activation volume increases strongly with pressure, resulting in 10 2 Pa s at the top of the fluid core, and in 10 11 Pa s at its bottom). There are of course many uncertainties affecting this extrapolation process. This paper reviews two viscosity determination methods, one for the top and the other for the bottom of the outer core, the former of which relies on the decay of free core nutations and yields 2371 ± 1530 Pa s, while the other relies on the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the solid inner core oscillations and yields an average of 1.247 ± 0.035 Pa s. Encouraged by the good performance of the Arrhenius extrapolation, a differential form of the Arrhenius activation model is used to interpolate along the melting temperature curve and to find the viscosity profile across the entire outer core. The viscosity variation is found to be nearly log-linear between the measured boundary values. (methodological notes)

  13. Experimental constraints on light elements in the Earth’s outer core

    OpenAIRE

    Youjun Zhang; Toshimori Sekine; Hongliang He; Yin Yu; Fusheng Liu; Mingjian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Earth?s outer core is liquid and dominantly composed of iron and nickel (~5?10?wt%). Its density, however, is ~8% lower than that of liquid iron, and requires the presence of a significant amount of light element(s). A good way to specify the light element(s) is a direct comparison of density and sound velocity measurements between seismological data and those of possible candidate compositions at the core conditions. We report the sound velocity measurements of a model core composition in th...

  14. Effect of outer stagnation pressure on jet structure in supersonic coaxial jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Jong; Woo, Sang Woo; Lee, Byeong Eun; Kwon, Soon Bum

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of dual coaxial jet which composed of inner supersonic nozzle of 26500 in constant expansion rate with 1.91 design Mach number and outer converging one with 40 .deg. C converging angle with the variation of outer nozzle stagnation pressure are experimentally investigated in this paper. In which the stagnation pressure for the inner supersonic nozzle is 750kPa thus, the inner jet leaving the nozzle is slightly underexpanded. The plenum pressure of outer nozzle are varied from 200 to 600kPa. Flow visualizations by shadowgraph method, impact pressure and centerline static pressure measurements of dual coaxial jet are presented. The results show that the presence of outer jet affects significantly the structures and pressure distributions of inner jet. And outer jet causes Mach disk which does not appear for the case of single jet stream. As the stagnation pressure of outer jet increases, impact pressure undulation is severe, but the average impact pressure keeps high far downstream

  15. On estimating the molecular viscosity of the Earth's outer core: comment on the paper by D E Smylie et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    The paper 'Direct observations of the viscosity of Earth's outer core and extrapolation of measurements of the viscosity of liquid iron' by D.E. Smylie, V.V. Brazhkin, and A. Palmer [Phys. Usp. 52 (1) 79 (2009)] is subject to critique for its proposed approach to estimating the viscosity of the Earth's outer core. (methodological notes)

  16. Interplay between edge and outer core fluctuations in the tokamak Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenzi, C.; Garbet, X.; Capes, H.; Devynck, P.; Laviron, C.; Truc, A.; Gervais, F.; Hennequin, P.; Quemeneur, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the tokamak Tore Supra, when a poloidally and toroidally localized limiter, called a modular limiter, is introduced into the lower part of the scrape-off layer, density fluctuations located in the vicinity of this limiter present a specific feature with the appearance of a new spectral pattern in the associated frequency spectrum. This leads to a strong up-down asymmetry observed in both the plasma edge and the plasma outer core, with a maximum level of turbulence at the bottom of the plasma. The observed asymmetry characteristics show that magnetic connection lengths play a critical role here and that the limiter configuration has some effect on the outer core turbulence. (author)

  17. On the consequences of strong stable stratification at the top of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    1990-01-01

    The consequences of strong stable stratification at the top of the earth's fluid outer core are considered, concentrating on the generation of the geomagnetic secular variation. It is assumed that the core near the core-mantle boundary is both strongly stably stratified and free of Lorentz forces: it is found that this set of assumptions severely limits the class of possible motions, none of which is compatible with the geomagnetic secular variation. Relaxing either assumption is adequate: tangentially geostrophic flows are consistent with the secular variation if the assumption that the core is strongly stably stratified is relaxed (while retaining the assumption that Lorentz forces are negligible); purely toroidal flows may explain the secular variation if Lorentz forces are included.

  18. Conductive core of radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing, especially for nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajic, V

    1981-09-01

    A radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing was developed featuring a conductive core consisting of a hollow moulding. At the point of attachment to the bushing insulator the core moulding is widened, thus forming a ring support of a diameter larger by at least 10% than the diameter of the conductive core cylindrical section. On the outer side of the pressure body the core cavity is narrowed and tightly closed with the conductor. On the side facing the medium of higher pressure, the conductive core is provided with a thread. Core manufacture and connection of the conductor to the bushing is very simple. The bushing can be used for an environment with pressures exceeding 10 MPa.

  19. Conductive core of radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing, especially for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajic, V.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing was developed featuring a conductive core consisting of a hollow moulding. At the point of attachment to the bushing insulator the core moulding is widened, thus forming a ring support of a diameter larger by at least 10% than the diameter of the conductive core cylindrical section. On the outer side of the pressure body the core cavity is narrowed and tightly closed with the conductor. On the side facing the medium of higher pressure, the conductive core is provided with a thread. Core manufacture and connection of the conductor to the bushing is very simple. The bushing can be used for an environment with pressures exceeding 10 MPa. (J.B.)

  20. OEDGE modeling of outer wall erosion in NSTX and the effect of changes in neutral pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, J.H., E-mail: jnichols@pppl.gov; Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Abrams, T.; Skinner, C.H.; Stotler, D.P.

    2015-08-15

    Gross erosion from the outer wall is expected to be a major source of impurities for high power fusion devices due to the low redeposition fraction. Scaling studies of sputtering from the all-carbon outer wall of NSTX are reported. It is found that wall erosion decreases with divertor plasma pressure in low/mid temperature regimes, due to increasing divertor neutral opacity. Wall erosion is found to consistently decrease with reduced recycling coefficient, with outer target recycling providing the largest contribution. Upper and lower bounds are calculated for the increase in wall erosion due to a low-field-side gas puff.

  1. Investigating the Effects of I-Shaped Cores in an Outer-Rotor Transverse Flux Permanent Magnet Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyedmohsen; Moghani, Javad Shokrollahi; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of I-shaped cores in an outer-rotor transverse flux permanent magnet generator. Performance characteristics of a typical outer-rotor transverse flux permanent magnet generator are obtained in two cases; with and without I-shaped cores. The results show that altho...... the advantages and disadvantage of using I-shaped cores and emphasizes the necessity of performing a tradeoff study between using and not using I-shaped cores in practical transverse flux permanent magnet generators....

  2. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Reynolds, John G.; Roos, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the 7 S: 5 S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  3. An evolutionarily conserved glycine-tyrosine motif forms a folding core in outer membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Michalik

    Full Text Available An intimate interaction between a pair of amino acids, a tyrosine and glycine on neighboring β-strands, has been previously reported to be important for the structural stability of autotransporters. Here, we show that the conservation of this interacting pair extends to nearly all major families of outer membrane β-barrel proteins, which are thought to have originated through duplication events involving an ancestral ββ hairpin. We analyzed the function of this motif using the prototypical outer membrane protein OmpX. Stopped-flow fluorescence shows that two folding processes occur in the millisecond time regime, the rates of which are reduced in the tyrosine mutant. Folding assays further demonstrate a reduction in the yield of folded protein for the mutant compared to the wild-type, as well as a reduction in thermal stability. Taken together, our data support the idea of an evolutionarily conserved 'folding core' that affects the folding, membrane insertion, and thermal stability of outer membrane protein β-barrels.

  4. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  5. Gas Hydrate Investigations Using Pressure Core Analysis: Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Recently there have been a number of major gas hydrate expeditions, both academic and commercially oriented, that have benefited from advances in the practice of pressure coring and pressure core analysis, especially using the HYACINTH pressure coring systems. We report on the now mature process of pressure core acquisition, pressure core handling and pressure core analysis and the results from the analysis of pressure cores, which have revealed important in situ properties along with some remarkable views of gas hydrate morphologies. Pressure coring success rates have improved as the tools have been modified and adapted for use on different drilling platforms. To ensure that pressure cores remain within the hydrate stability zone, tool deployment, recovery and on-deck handling procedures now mitigate against unwanted temperature rises. Core analysis has been integrated into the core transfer protocol and automated nondestructive measurements, including P-wave velocity, gamma density, and X-ray imaging, are routinely made on cores. Pressure cores can be subjected to controlled depressurization experiments while nondestructive measurements are being made, or cores can be stored at in situ conditions for further analysis and subsampling.

  6. In-core assembly configuration having a dual-wall pressure boundary for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, W.H. Sr.; Playfoot, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes an in-core detector assembly of the type having an in-core part and an out-of-core part and having an elongated outer hollow housing tube with a wall thickness, an inner hollow calibration tube with a wall thickness and disposed concentrically within the outer tube to define an annular space therewith, and a plurality of discrete, circular, rod-like elements extending through the annular space, the improvement comprising: the elements having outer diameters and being of a number to substantially occupy the entire annular space of both the incore and out-of-core parts without significant voids between elements; each of the elements including at least an outer sheath and interior highly compacted mineral insulation for the entire length of the element; a first number of the elements also including center lead means connected to condition responsive element means in the in-core part of the length of the assembly and a second, remaining number of the elements being non-operating elements. The wall thickness of the housing tube and the wall thickness of the calibration tube, taken together with the diameter of the elements, provide a thickness dimension adequate to meet code primary pressure requirements for normal nuclear reactor in-core conditions, while the wall thickness of the calibration tube alone provides a thickness dimension less than adequate to meet such requirements

  7. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel and outer shell around the primary pressure vessel and acting as a protection for it against outside projectiles. A floor is provided internally dividing the outside shell into two upper and lower sections and an inside wall dividing the lower section into one part containing the primary pressure vessel and a second part, both made pressure tight with respect to each other and with the outside shell and forming with the latter a secondary means of containment [fr

  8. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel containing the heat source, an outer shell enclosing the primary pressure vessel and acting as a secondary means of containment for this vessel against outside projectiles. Multiple auxiliary equipment points are arranged outside the outer shell which comprises a part of a lower wall around the primary pressure vessel, an annular part integrated in the lower wall and extending outwards as from this wall and an upper part integrated in the annular part and extending above this annular part and above the primary pressure vessel. The annular part and the primary pressure vessel are formed with vertical penetrations which can be closed communicating respectively with the auxiliary equipment points and with inside the pressure vessel whilst handling gear is provided in the upper part for vertically raising reactor components through these penetrations and for transporting them over the annular part and over the primary pressure vessel [fr

  9. Large-scale fluid motion in the earth's outer core estimated from non-dipole magnetic field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    1989-01-01

    Fluid motions in the Earth's outer core can be estimated from magnetic field data at the Earth's surface based on some assumptions. The basic standpoint here is that the non-dipole magnetic field is generated by the interaction between a strong toroidal magnetic field, created by differential rotation, and the convective motion in the outer core. Large-scale convective motions are studied to express them in terms of the poloidal velocity field expanded into a series of spherical harmonics. The radial distribution of differential rotation is estimated from the balance between the effective couple due to angular momentum transfer and the electromagnetic couple. Then the radial dependence of the toroidal magnetic field is derived from the interaction between the differential rotation thus estimated and the dipole magnetic field within the outer core. Magnetic field data are applied to a secular variation model which takes into account the fluctuations of the standing and drifting parts of the non-zonal magnetic field. The velocity field in the outer core is estimated for two cases. It is revealed that the pattern of convective motions is generally characterized by large-scale motions in the quasi-steady case. In the non-steady case, the magnitude of the velocity field is much larger, indicating a more dynamic feature. (N.K.)

  10. The simultaneous measurements of core and outer core density fluctuations in L-H transition using CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostic in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, G.M.; Li, Y.D.; Zhang, X.D.; Sun, P.J.; Hu, L.Q.; Li, J.G.; Wu, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The H-mode is the projected basic operation scenario for the ITER tokamak. The turbulence de-correlation by the synergistic effect of zonal flow and equilibrium ExB flow shear is believed to be the reason for L-H transition, however, the detailed physical mechanism has not been identified so far. Tangential multi-channel CO 2 laser collective scattering diagnostic system (mainly k r measurement) was first installed to investigate electron density fluctuations on EAST tokamak. The measurements in a spontaneous dithering L-H transition show that in core plasma (0 < r/a < 0.5) the low-frequency fluctuations strengthen greatly before L-H transition; meanwhile in outer core plasma (0.2 < r/a < 1) the low-frequency fluctuations strengthen slightly. Bispectral analysis reveals that the coupling strength between low- and high-frequency fluctuations in both core and outer core plasma strengthens greatly before the transition, but the latter is greater than the former. The results indicate that the low-frequency fluctuations of the core and outer core plasma play active, but different, roles in the spontaneous L-H transition. (author)

  11. In Vitro Assembly of the Outer Core of the Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are five distinct core structures in the lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli and at least two in Salmonella isolates, which vary principally in the outer core oligosaccharide. Six outer core glycosyltransferases, E. coli K-12 WaaG, WaaB, and WaaO and Salmonella typhimurium WaaI, WaaJ, and WaaK, were cloned, overexpressed, and purified. A novel substrate for WaaG was isolated from ΔwaaG E. coli overexpressing the lipid A phosphatase lpxE and the lipid A late acyltransferase lpxM. The action of lpxE and lpxM in the ΔwaaG background yielded heptose2-1-dephospho Kdo2-lipid A, a 1-dephosphorylated hexa-acylated lipid A with the inner core sugars that is easily isolated by organic extraction. Using this structurally defined acceptor and commercially available sugar nucleotides, each outer core glycosyltransferases was assayed in vitro. We show that WaaG and WaaB add a glucose and galactose sequentially to heptose2-1-dephospho Kdo2-lipid A. E. coli K-12 WaaO and S. typhimurium WaaI add a galactose to the WaaG/WaaB product but can also add a galactose to the WaaG product directly without the branched core sugar added by WaaB. Both WaaI and WaaO require divalent metal ions for optimal activity; however, WaaO, unlike WaaI, can add several glucose residues to its lipid acceptor. Using the product of WaaG, WaaB, and WaaI, we show that S. typhimurium WaaJ and WaaK transfer a glucose and N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, to yield the full outer core. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro assembly of the outer core of the lipopolysaccharide using defined lipid A-oligosaccharide acceptors and sugar donors. PMID:24479701

  12. High-pressure metallization of FeO and implications for the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO has been experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock-wave and diamond-cell techniques. A metallic phase of FeO is observed at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood (1977 and 1979). The high pressures necessary for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the earth's accretion. Direct experimental observations at elevated pressures and temperatures indicate that core-forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  13. Gas Hydrate-Sediment Morphologies Revealed by Pressure Core Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of HYACINTH pressure cores collected on IODP Expedition 311 and NGHP Expedition 1 showed gas hydrate layers, lenses, and veins contained in fine-grained sediments as well as gas hydrate contained in coarse-grained layers. Pressure cores were recovered from sediments on the Cascadia Margin off the North American West Coast and in the Krishna-Godavari Basin in the Western Bay of Bengal in water depths of 800- 1400 meters. Recovered cores were transferred to laboratory chambers without loss of pressure and nondestructive measurements were made at in situ pressures and controlled temperatures. Gamma density, P-wave velocity, and X-ray images showed evidence of grain-displacing and pore-filling gas hydrate in the cores. Data highlights include X-ray images of fine-grained sediment cores showing wispy subvertical veins of gas hydrate and P-wave velocity excursions corresponding to grain-displacing layers and pore-filling layers of gas hydrate. Most cores were subjected to controlled depressurization experiments, where expelled gas was collected, analyzed for composition, and used to calculate gas hydrate saturation within the core. Selected cores were stored under pressure for postcruise analysis and subsampling.

  14. Thermodynamics of clathrate hydrate at low and high pressures with application to the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrate is calculated to predict the formation conditions corresponding to a range of solar system parameters. The calculations were performed using the statistical mechanical theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw (1959) and existing experimental data concerning clathrate hydrate and its components. Dissociation pressures and partition functions (Langmuir constants) are predicted at low pressure for CO clathrate (hydrate) using the properties of chemicals similar to CO. It is argued that nonsolar but well constrained noble gas abundances may be measurable by the Galileo spacecraft in the Jovian atmosphere if the observed carbon enhancement is due to bombardment of the atmosphere by clathrate-bearing planetesimals sometime after planetary formation. The noble gas abundances of the Jovian satellite Titan are predicted, assuming that most of the methane in Titan is accreted as clathrate. It is suggested that under thermodynamically appropriate conditions, complete clathration of water ice could have occurred in high-pressure nebulas around giant planets, but probably not in the outer solar nebula. The stability of clathrate in other pressure ranges is also discussed.

  15. Modelling of Outer and Inner Film Oil Pressure for Floating Ring Bearing Clearance in Turbochargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hao; Shi Zhanqun; Gu Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Floating ring bearing is widely used in turbochargers to undertake the extreme condition of high rotating speed and high operating temperature. It is also the most concerned by the designers and users alike due to its high failure rate and high maintenance cost. Any little clearance change may result in oil leakage, which in turn cause blue smoke or black smoke according to leakage types. However, there is no condition monitoring of this bearing because it is almost impossible to measure the clearance especially the inner clearance, in which the inner oil film directly bears the high speed rotation. In stead of measuring clearance directly, this paper has proposed a method that uses film pressure as a measure to monitor the bearing clearance and its variation. A non-linear mathematical model is developed by using Reynolds equations with non-linear oil film pressure. A full description of the outer and inner film is provided along both axial and radial directions. A numerical simulation is immediately carried out. Variable clearance changes are investigated using the mathematical model. Results show the relationship between clearance and film pressure.

  16. Observation of magnetic diffusion in the Earth's outer core from Magsat, Orsted, and CHAMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chulliat, A.; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The frozen flux assumption consists in neglecting magnetic diffusion in the core. It has been widely used to compute core flows from geomagnetic observations. Here we investigate the validity of this assumption over the time interval 1980-2005, using high-precision magnetic data from the Magsat......, Orsted, and CHAMP satellites. A detectable change of magnetic fluxes through patches delimited by curves of zero radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary is associated with a failure of the frozen flux assumption. For each epoch (1980 and 2005), we calculate spatially regularized models...... of the core field which we use to investigate the change of reversed magnetic flux at the core surface. The largest and most robust change of reversed flux is observed for two patches: one located under St. Helena Island (near 20 degrees S, 15 degrees E); the other, much larger, is located under the South...

  17. The high-pressure phase diagram of Fe(0.94)O - A possible constituent of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements to pressures of 83 GPa and temperatures ranging from 300 K to 4300 K confirm the presence of both crystalline and liquid metallic phases of FeO at pressures above 60-70 GPa and temperatures above 1000 K. By experimentally determinig the melting temperature of FeO to 100 GPa and of a model-core composition at 83 GPa, it is found that the solid-melt equilibria can be described by complete solid solution across the Fe-FeO system at pressures above 70 GPa. The results indicate that oxygen is a viable and likely candidate for the major light alloying element of the earth's liquid outer core. The data suggest that the temperature at the core-mantle boundary is close to 4800 K and that heat lost out of the core accounts for more than 20 percent of the heat flux observed at the surface.

  18. African Swine Fever Virus Undergoes Outer Envelope Disruption, Capsid Disassembly and Inner Envelope Fusion before Core Release from Multivesicular Endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hernáez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever virus (ASFV is a nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV that causes a highly lethal disease in domestic pigs. As other NCLDVs, the extracellular form of ASFV possesses a multilayered structure consisting of a genome-containing nucleoid successively wrapped by a thick protein core shell, an inner lipid membrane, an icosahedral protein capsid and an outer lipid envelope. This structural complexity suggests an intricate mechanism of internalization in order to deliver the virus genome into the cytoplasm. By using flow cytometry in combination with pharmacological entry inhibitors, as well as fluorescence and electron microscopy approaches, we have dissected the entry and uncoating pathway used by ASFV to infect the macrophage, its natural host cell. We found that purified extracellular ASFV is internalized by both constitutive macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Once inside the cell, ASFV particles move from early endosomes or macropinosomes to late, multivesicular endosomes where they become uncoated. Virus uncoating requires acidic pH and involves the disruption of the outer membrane as well as of the protein capsid. As a consequence, the inner viral membrane becomes exposed and fuses with the limiting endosomal membrane to release the viral core into the cytosol. Interestingly, virus fusion is dependent on virus protein pE248R, a transmembrane polypeptide of the inner envelope that shares sequence similarity with some members of the poxviral entry/fusion complex. Collective evidence supports an entry model for ASFV that might also explain the uncoating of other multienveloped icosahedral NCLDVs.

  19. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  20. Multiaxial fatigue strength of type 316 stainless steel under push–pull, reversed torsion, cyclic inner and outer pressure loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Takahiro; Itoh, Takamoto; Bao, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Multiaxial fatigue tests under non-proportional loading in which principal directions of stress and strain are changed in a cycle were carried out using a developed multiaxial fatigue testing machine which can load a push–pull and reversed torsion loading with cyclic inner and outer pressure. This paper presents the developed testing machine and experimental results under several multiaxial loading conditions including non-proportional loading. In strain control tests, the failure life is reduced in accordance with increasing inner pressure at each strain path. The failure life can be correlated by von Mises' equivalent stress amplitude relatively well independent of not only inner pressure but also loading path. In load control tests, the failure life is reduced largely by non-proportional loading but the influence of inner and outer pressure on the failure life is relative small.

  1. Viscosity measurements on metal melts at high pressure and viscosity calculations for the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, Vladimir N; Funtikov, Aleksandr I

    2004-01-01

    A review is given of experimental and calculated data on the viscosity of iron-based melts on the melting curve. The interest in these data originates in the division of opinion on whether viscosity increases rather moderately or considerably in the high-pressure range. This disagreement is especially pronounced in the interpretation of the values of molten iron and its compounds in the environment of the earth's outer core. The conclusion on a substantial rise in viscosity mostly follows from the universal law, proposed by Brazhkin and Lyapin [1], of viscosity changing along the metal melting curve in the high-pressure range. The review analyzes available experimental and computational data, including the most recent ones. Data on viscosity of metals under shock wave compression in the megabar pressure range are also discussed. It is shown that data on viscosity of metal melts point to a small increase of viscosity on the melting curve. Specifics are discussed of the phase diagram of iron made more complex by the presence of several phase transitions and by the uncertainty in the position of the melting curve in the high-pressure range. Inaccuracies that arise in extrapolating the results of viscosity measurements to the pressure range corresponding to the earth's core environment are pointed out. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. THE EFFECT OF CORE EXERCISES ON TRANSDIAPHRAGMATIC PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Strongoli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal exercises, such as sit ups and leg lifts, are used to enhance strength of the core muscles. An overlooked aspect of abdominal exercises is the compression the abdomen, leading to increased diaphragmatic work. We hypothesized that core exercises would produce a variety of transdiaphragmatic pressures. We also sought to determine if some of the easy exercises would produce pressures sufficient for a training stimulus to the diaphragm. We evaluated the effect of 13 different abdominal exercises, ranging in difficulty, on transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi, an index of diaphragmatic activity. Six healthy subjects, aged 22 to 53, participated. Each subject was instrumented with two balloon-tipped catheters to obtain gastric and esophageal pressures, from which Pdi was calculated. Prior to initiating the exercises, each subject performed a maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP maneuver. Resting Pdi was also measured. The exercises were performed from least to most difficult, with five repetitions each. There was a significant difference between the exercises and the MIP Pdi, as well as between the exercises and resting Pdi (p 50% of the Pdi during the MIP maneuver, which may provide a training stimulus to the diaphragm if used as a regular exercise. The Pdi measurements also provide insight into diaphragm recruitment during different core exercises, and may aid in the design of exercises to improve diaphragm strength and endurance

  3. A Long Gravity-Piston Corer Developed for Seafloor Gas Hydrate Coring Utilizing an In Situ Pressure-Retained Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yi Gu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A corer, which can obtain long in situ pressure-retained sediments of up to 30 m core containing gas hydrates, has been applied in the South China Sea (SCS dozens of times. The corer presented in this paper is a convenient, efficient and economical long in situ pressure-retained coring and research tool for submarine sediments, that can applied to completely cope with all sediments close to the seafloor ranging from shallow waters to the deep sea depths of 6000 m. This article mainly presents the overall structure, working principles, key pressure-retained components, coring mechanism, sea trials and outlook of the corer. The analyses found that the coring ability was affected by formation characteristics, the outer diameter of the core barrels and inner diameter of the core liners, the shapes of the cutter and the dead weight of the corer. This study can provide the practical basis for the structural optimization of this type of corer and designs for corers with greater penetrability. Sea trials showed that the developed corer presented in this paper can support the in situ pressure of the seafloor sediment core, which is an improvement over the conventional piston corer.

  4. ON THE COAGULATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE CONFINED CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu; Zhou Tingtao; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self-gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function of stars in young clusters. Similar CMFs are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. In order to follow the evolution of the CMF, we construct a numerical method to consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe Nebula. Our results indicate that in environment similar to the Pipe Nebula: (1) before the onset of their gravitational collapse, the mass distribution of the progenitor cores is similar to that of the young stars, (2) the observed CMF is a robust consequence of dynamical equilibrium between the coagulation and ablation of cores, and (3) a break in the slope of the CMF is due to the enhancement of collisional cross section and suppression of ablation for cores with masses larger than the cores' Bonnor-Ebert mass.

  5. Integration of a capacitive pressure sensing system into the outer catheter wall for coronary artery FFR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Frank; Kuisma, Heikki; Gao, Feng; Saarilahti, Jaakko; Gomes Martins, David; Kärkkäinen, Anu; Marrinan, Brendan; Pintal, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    The deadliest disease in the world is coronary artery disease (CAD), which is related to a narrowing (stenosis) of blood vessels due to fatty deposits, plaque, on the arterial walls. The level of stenosis in the coronary arteries can be assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) measurements. This involves determining the ratio between the maximum achievable blood flow in a diseased coronary artery and the theoretical maximum flow in a normal coronary artery. The blood flow is represented by a pressure drop, thus a pressure wire or pressure sensor integrated in a catheter can be used to calculate the ratio between the coronary pressure distal to the stenosis and the normal coronary pressure. A 2 Fr (0.67mm) outer diameter catheter was used, which required a high level of microelectronics miniaturisation to fit a pressure sensing system into the outer wall. The catheter has an eccentric guidewire lumen with a diameter of 0.43mm, which implies that the thickest catheter wall section provides less than 210 microns height for flex assembly integration consisting of two dies, a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor and an ASIC. In order to achieve this a very thin circuit flex was used, and the two chips were thinned down to 75 microns and flip chip mounted face down on the flex. Many challenges were involved in obtaining a flex layout that could wrap into a small tube without getting the dies damaged, while still maintaining enough flexibility for the catheter to navigate the arterial system.

  6. Simultaneous and long-lasting hydrophilization of inner and outer wall surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes by transferring atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Faze; Song, Jinlong; Huang, Shuai; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin; Xu, Sihao; Xia, Guangqing; Yang, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Plasma hydrophilization is a general method to increase the surface free energy of materials. However, only a few works about plasma modification focus on the hydrophilization of tube inner and outer walls. In this paper, we realize simultaneous and long-lasting plasma hydrophilization on the inner and outer walls of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes by atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs). Specifically, an Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to modify the PTFE tube’s outer wall and meanwhile to induce transferred He APP inside the PTFE tube to modify its inner wall surface. The optical emission spectrum (OES) shows that the plasmas contain many chemically active species, which are known as enablers for various applications. Water contact angle (WCA) measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to characterize the plasma hydrophilization. Results demonstrate that the wettability of the tube walls are well improved due to the replacement of the surface fluorine by oxygen and the change of surface roughness. The obtained hydrophilicity decreases slowly during more than 180 d aging, indicating a long-lasting hydrophilization. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of transferring APPs for surface modification of the tube’s inner and outer walls simultaneously. (paper)

  7. Effect of radiation pressure in the cores of globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeletti, L; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R; Giannone

    1981-10-01

    The possible effects of a presence of a dust cloud in the cores of globular clusters was investigated. Two cluster models were considered together with various models of clouds. The problem of radiation transfer was solved under some simplifying assumptions. Owing to a differential absorption of the star light in the cloud, radiation pressure turned out be inward-directed in some cloud models. This fact may lead to a confinement of some dust in the central regions of globular clusters.

  8. Universal viscosity growth in metallic melts at megabar pressures: the vitreous state of the Earth's inner core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhkin, Vadim V; Lyapin, A G

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on and theoretical models for the viscosity of various types of liquids and melts under pressure are reviewed. Experimentally, the least studied melts are those of metals, whose viscosity is considered to be virtually constant along the melting curve. The authors' new approach to the viscosity of melts involves the measurement of the grain size in solidified samples. Measurements on liquid metals at pressures up to 10 GPa using this method show, contrary to the empirical approach, that the melt viscosity grows considerably along the melting curves. Based on the experimental data and on the critical analysis of current theories, a hypothesis of a universal viscosity behavior is introduced for liquids under pressure. Extrapolating the liquid iron results to the pressures and temperatures at the Earth's core reveals that the Earth's outer core is a very viscous melt with viscosity values ranging from 10 2 Pa s to 10 11 Pa s depending on the depth. The Earth's inner core is presumably an ultraviscous (>10 11 Pa s) glass-like liquid - in disagreement with the current idea of a crystalline inner core. The notion of the highly viscous interior of celestial bodies sheds light on many mysteries of planetary geophysics and astronomy. From the analysis of the pressure variation of the melting and glass-transition temperatures, an entirely new concept of a stable metallic vitreous state arises, calling for further experimental and theoretical study. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Computer code for simulating pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, A.M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numerically. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistance added to the film coefficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (author)

  10. Code for the core simulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, M.A.B.

    1978-08-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numericaly. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistence added to the film coeficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (Author) [pt

  11. The stabilizing effect of core pressure on the edge pedestal in MAST plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, I.T.; Simpson, J.; Saarelma, S.; Kirk, A.; O'Gorman, T.; Scannell, R.

    2015-01-01

    The pedestal pressure measured in Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak plasmas has been shown to increase as the global plasma pressure increases. By deliberately suppressing the transition into the high-confinement regime, the core plasma pressure was systematically altered at the time of the first edge localized mode. Stability analysis shows that the enhanced Shafranov shift at higher core pressure stabilizes the ballooning modes driven by the pedestal pressure gradient, consequently allowing the pedestal to reach higher pressures. (paper)

  12. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-10-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration.

  13. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.

    1988-04-01

    Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of a test vessel (steel 1.6310=20 MnMoNi 55) with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack have been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stresse state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are compared with the experimental data. The results are analyzed with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. It will be shown that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the 'canoe effect' for a semi-elliptical crack can only be described correctly if local J R -curves are used which account for the varying triaxiality of the stress state along the crack front. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, K.C.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K Q due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail

  15. Stability of the high pressure phase Fe3S2 up to Earth's core pressures in the Fe-S-O and the Fe-S-Si systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's core is comprised of an iron-nickel alloy that contains 5-15% of a light element component. The abundance and alloying capability of sulfur, silicon and oxygen in the bulk Earth make them important core alloy candidates; therefore, the high-pressure phase equilibria of the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems are relevant for understanding the possible chemistry of Earth's core. Previously, a Fe3S2 phase was recognized as a low-pressure intermediate phase in the Fe-FeS system that is stable from 14-21 GPa, but the structure of this phase has not been resolved. We report in-situ XRD and chemical analysis of recovered samples to further examine the stability and structure of Fe3S2 as it coexists with other phases in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems. In situ high P-T synchrotron XRD experiments were conducted in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell to determine the equilibrium phases in Fe75S7O18 and Fe80S5Si15 compositions between 30 and 174 GPa and up to 3000 K. In the S,O-rich samples, an orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase coexists with hcp-Fe, Fe3S and FeO and undergoes two monoclinic distortions between 60 and 174 GPa. In the S,Si-rich samples, the orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase was observed up to 115 GPa. With increasing pressure, the Fe3S2 phase becomes stable to higher temperatures in both compositions, suggesting possible Fe3(S,O)2 or Fe3(S,Si)2 solid solutions. SEM analysis of a laser heated Fe75S7O18 sample recovered from 40 GPa and 1450 K confirms a Fe3(S,O)2 phase with O dissolved into the structure. Based on the current melting data in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems, the Fe3(S,O)2 stability field intersects the solidus in the outer core and could be a possible liquidus phase in Fe,S,O-rich planetary cores, whereas Fe3S is the stable sulfide at outer core pressures in Fe,S,Si-rich systems.

  16. Outer-selective pressure-retarded osmosis hollow fiber membranes from vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization for osmotic power generation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shipeng; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the technical breakthroughs to synthesize outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes, which is in an urgent need for osmotic power generation with the pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) process. In the first step, a defect-free thin-film composite membrane module is achieved by vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization. The PRO performance is further enhanced by optimizing the support in terms of pore size and mechanical strength and the TFC layer with polydopamine coating and molecular engineering of the interfacial polymerization solution. The newly developed membranes can stand over 20 bar with a peak power density of 7.63 W/m2, which is equivalent to 13.72 W/m2 of its inner-selective hollow fiber counterpart with the same module size, packing density, and fiber dimensions. The study may provide insightful guidelines for optimizing the interfacial polymerization procedures and scaling up of the outer-selective TFC hollow fiber membrane modules for PRO power generation. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Outer-selective pressure-retarded osmosis hollow fiber membranes from vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization for osmotic power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shi-Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-11-19

    In this paper, we report the technical breakthroughs to synthesize outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes, which is in an urgent need for osmotic power generation with the pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) process. In the first step, a defect-free thin-film composite membrane module is achieved by vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization. The PRO performance is further enhanced by optimizing the support in terms of pore size and mechanical strength and the TFC layer with polydopamine coating and molecular engineering of the interfacial polymerization solution. The newly developed membranes can stand over 20 bar with a peak power density of 7.63 W/m(2), which is equivalent to 13.72 W/m(2) of its inner-selective hollow fiber counterpart with the same module size, packing density, and fiber dimensions. The study may provide insightful guidelines for optimizing the interfacial polymerization procedures and scaling up of the outer-selective TFC hollow fiber membrane modules for PRO power generation.

  18. Outer-selective pressure-retarded osmosis hollow fiber membranes from vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization for osmotic power generation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shipeng

    2013-11-19

    In this paper, we report the technical breakthroughs to synthesize outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes, which is in an urgent need for osmotic power generation with the pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) process. In the first step, a defect-free thin-film composite membrane module is achieved by vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization. The PRO performance is further enhanced by optimizing the support in terms of pore size and mechanical strength and the TFC layer with polydopamine coating and molecular engineering of the interfacial polymerization solution. The newly developed membranes can stand over 20 bar with a peak power density of 7.63 W/m2, which is equivalent to 13.72 W/m2 of its inner-selective hollow fiber counterpart with the same module size, packing density, and fiber dimensions. The study may provide insightful guidelines for optimizing the interfacial polymerization procedures and scaling up of the outer-selective TFC hollow fiber membrane modules for PRO power generation. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. All-organic liquid crystalline radicals with a spin unit in the outer position of a bent-core system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bajzíková, A.; Kohout, M.; Tarábek, Ján; Svoboda, J.; Novotná, Vladimíra; Vejpravová, Jana; Pociecha, D.; Gorecka, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 48 (2016), s. 11540-11547 ISSN 2050-7526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02843S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : mesogenic cores * ester groups * rigid core Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.256, year: 2016

  20. The Green Bank Ammonia Survey: Dense Cores under Pressure in Orion A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Helen; Di Francesco, James [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Rd, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Friesen, Rachel K. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Pineda, Jaime E.; Caselli, Paola; Alves, Felipe O.; Chacón-Tanarro, Ana; Punanova, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Matzner, Christopher D.; Singh, Ayushi [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Myers, Philip C.; Chen, How-Huan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan; Keown, Jared [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Rd., Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Seo, Young Min [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Shirley, Yancy [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ginsburg, Adam [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Hall, Christine [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); and others

    2017-09-10

    We use data on gas temperature and velocity dispersion from the Green Bank Ammonia Survey and core masses and sizes from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Survey to estimate the virial states of dense cores within the Orion A molecular cloud. Surprisingly, we find that almost none of the dense cores are sufficiently massive to be bound when considering only the balance between self-gravity and the thermal and non-thermal motions present in the dense gas. Including the additional pressure binding imposed by the weight of the ambient molecular cloud material and additional smaller pressure terms, however, suggests that most of the dense cores are pressure-confined.

  1. The Green Bank Ammonia Survey: Dense Cores under Pressure in Orion A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, Helen; Di Francesco, James; Friesen, Rachel K.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Caselli, Paola; Alves, Felipe O.; Chacón-Tanarro, Ana; Punanova, Anna; Rosolowsky, Erik; Offner, Stella S. R.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Singh, Ayushi; Myers, Philip C.; Chen, How-Huan; Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan; Keown, Jared; Seo, Young Min; Shirley, Yancy; Ginsburg, Adam; Hall, Christine

    2017-01-01

    We use data on gas temperature and velocity dispersion from the Green Bank Ammonia Survey and core masses and sizes from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Survey to estimate the virial states of dense cores within the Orion A molecular cloud. Surprisingly, we find that almost none of the dense cores are sufficiently massive to be bound when considering only the balance between self-gravity and the thermal and non-thermal motions present in the dense gas. Including the additional pressure binding imposed by the weight of the ambient molecular cloud material and additional smaller pressure terms, however, suggests that most of the dense cores are pressure-confined.

  2. 78 FR 64027 - Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... comments were received. A companion guide, DG-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0129] Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling... (RG), 1.79, ``Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors...

  3. Analysis of stress in reactor core vessel under effect of pressure lose shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Liu Baoting

    2001-01-01

    High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is a modular High Temperature gas cooled Reactor of the new generation. In order to analyze the safety characteristics of its core vessel in case of large rupture accident, the transient performance of its core vessel under the effect of pressure lose shock wave is studied, and the transient pressure difference between the two sides of the core vessel and the transient stresses in the core vessel is presented in this paper, these results can be used in the safety analysis and safety design of the core vessel of HTR-10. (author)

  4. Sampling of reactor pressure vessel and core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhaeuser, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants is a growing business as a huge number of plants built in the 1970's have now reached their lifetime. It is well known that dismantling a nuclear power plant means an extraordinary expense for the owner respectively operator. Beside the dismantling works for itself, the disposal of activated components and other nuclear waste is very expensive. What comes next is the fact that final disposal facilities are not available yet in most countries meaning a need for interim storage on-site in specially built facilities. It can be concluded that a special attention is paid on producing a minimal radioactive waste volume. For this, optimized dismantling and packaging concepts have to be developed. AREVA is proud of versatile experience in successfully dismantling nuclear components like core internals and reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The basis of a well-founded and optimized dismantling and packaging concept must always be the detailed knowledge of the radiological condition of the component to be and in the best case a 3D activation- model. For keeping the necessary sampling effort as small as possible, but simultaneously as efficient as possible, representative sampling positions are defined in advance by theoretical radiological examinations. For this, a detailed 3D-CAD-model of the components to be dismantled has proven very helpful and effective. Under these aspects a sampling of RPV and its components is necessary to verify the theoretically calculated radiological data. The obtained results of activation and contamination are taken into account for the optimized dismantling and packaging strategy. The precise 3D-activation-model will reduce the necessary number and type of final disposal containers as security factors are minimized leading to a lower shielding effort, too. Besides, components or even parts of components may be subject of release measurement. In the end, costs can be reduced. In this context

  5. Formation of comets by radiation pressure in the outer protosun. III. Dependence on the anisotropy of the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, J.G.; Sandford, M.T. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic code with dust was used to study the effect of an anisotropic radiation field on the formation of comets in the outer protosun by the radiation pressure from the Sun and surrounding protostars. If the radiation field is isotropic, the results are very similar to those found earlier by analytic models. When the dust cloud is flanked on two sides by luminous walls of equal strength but with no radiation entering the cloud from the azimuthal direction (a radiation vise), most of the dust eventually squeezes out the sides of the vise. The sides are open to outward streaming radiation which carries the dust with it. However, the entrance of even a small amount of radiation from the sides causes the dust to drift inward to form the comet. The work given in this paper indicates that a highly anisotropic radiation field is not likely to prevent the formation of a comet. It distorts the shape of the inward drifting dust cloud. Initially, faster inward drift occurs along radii having the strongest inward radiation flux. This in turn causes the optical depth to increase faster along the perpendicular radii where the radiation field is the weakest. The increase in the optical depth eventually compensates for the low radiation flux, so as the cloud shrinks the radiation pressure increases faster at the surface of the cloud along those radius vectors where the radiation flux has a minimum. Although the dust cloud in the anisotropic radiation field attains a very irregular shape, eventually all parts of the cloud contract in unison and arrive at the center of the cloud at about the same time

  6. Method of core thermodynamic reliability determination in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, G.; Horche, W. (Ingenieurhochschule Zittau (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Kraftwerksanlagenbau und Energieumwandlung)

    1983-01-01

    A statistical model appropriate to determine the thermodynamic reliability and the power-limiting parameter of PWR cores is described for cases of accidental transients. The model is compared with the hot channel model hitherto applied.

  7. Method of core thermodynamic reliability determination in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Horche, W.

    1983-01-01

    A statistical model appropriate to determine the thermodynamic reliability and the power-limiting parameter of PWR cores is described for cases of accidental transients. The model is compared with the hot channel model hitherto applied. (author)

  8. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Pressurized water-type breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochihara, Hiroshi; Komano, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this development is the advance of the PWR core. The conversion ratio (the breeding ratio) are examined. In the case of heavy water as the coolant, the breeding ratio can be achieved about 1.1 with using a hexagonal lattice and space about 1 mm assembly fuel. In the case of light water coolant, the breeding ratio becomes about 1.0, using a hexagonal lattice and fuel space about 0.5 mm fuel assembly. Here, it reports on the situation of the examination such as the nucleus design of core, the design of fuel assembly, the heat hydraulics design of the core, the structure design and so on. (author)

  9. System pressure effects on reflooding phenomena observed in the SCTF Core-I forced flooding tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Sudo, Yukio; Sobajima, Makoto; Iwamura, Takamichi; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka

    1983-06-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermo-hydrodynamics in the core and the interaction in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a posturated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The present report described the analytical results on the effects of system pressure on reflooding phenomena observed in Tests Sl-SH2, Sl-01 and Sl-02 which are belonging to the SCTF Core-I forced-feed reflooding test series. Nominal system pressures in these tests are 0.4, 0.2 and 0.15 MPa, respectively. By comparison among the data of these three tests, the effects of system pressure on thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in the pressure vessel including the core and the primary coolant loops of the SCTF can be clarified under the forced flooding condition. Major items investigated in the present report are (1) overall temperature behaviors in the core, (2) change of heat transfer coefficient and heat flux at the rod surface before the quench, (3) two-dimensional thermo-hydrodynamic behaviors in the core and upper plenum and (4) hot leg carryover. (author)

  10. Core design of a high breeding fast reactor cooled by supercritical pressure light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someya, Takayuki, E-mail: russell@ruri.waseda.jp; Yamaji, Akifumi

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Core design concept of supercritical light water cooled fast breeding reactor is developed. • Compound system doubling time (CSDT) is applied for considering an appropriate target of breeding performance. • Breeding performance is improved by reducing fuel rod diameter of the seed assembly. • Core pressure loss is reduced by enlarging the coolant channel area of the seed assembly. - Abstract: A high breeding fast reactor core concept, cooled by supercritical pressure light water has been developed with fully-coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations, which takes into account the influence of core pressure loss to the core neutronics characteristics. Design target of the breeding performance has been determined to be compound system doubling time (CSDT) of less than 50 years, by referring to the relationship of energy consumption and economic growth rate of advanced countries such as the G7 member countries. Based on the past design study of supercritical water cooled fast breeder reactor (Super FBR) with the concept of tightly packed fuel assembly (TPFA), further improvement of breeding performance and reduction of core pressure loss are investigated by considering different fuel rod diameters and coolant channel geometries. The sensitivities of CSDT and the core pressure loss with respect to major core design parameters have been clarified. The developed Super FBR design concept achieves fissile plutonium surviving ratio (FPSR) of 1.028, compound system doubling time (CSDT) of 38 years and pressure loss of 1.02 MPa with positive density reactivity (negative void reactivity). The short CSDT indicates high breeding performance, which may enable installation of the reactors at a rate comparable to energy growth rate of developed countries such as G7 member countries.

  11. Consequences of pressure tube rupture on in-core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.G.; Hauptmann, E.G.; Lee, V.

    1982-12-01

    An investigation has been made of the consequences of pressure tube rupture in calandria vessels of heavy water cooled and moderated reactors. The study included a review of previous experimental and analytical work, as well as supplementary investigations carried out to examine the validity of previous assumptions and findings. The central questions considered were: the possibility of a propagating pressure tube failure; damage to the calandria vessel; and damage to the shut-off-rod guide tubes of the reactor shut-down system. The results of the investigation do not indicate mechanisms of sufficient strength to cause propagating failure in a well-designed, well-operated reactor following a tube burst under normal operating conditions. However, not all the details of the physical processes involved in a tube burst have been revealed by existing experimental and analytical work

  12. Successive measurements of streaming potential and electroosmotic pressure with the same core-holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chenggang; Hu, Hengshan; Yu, Chunhao; Wang, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Successive measurements of the streaming potential and electroosmotic pressure of each core sample are important for understanding the mechanisms of electrokinetic effects. In previous studies, one plug of the core-holder needs to be replaced in these two experiments, which causes the change of the fluid parameters and the boundary conditions in the core. We design a new core-holder to permit successive experiments without plug replacement, which ensures the consistency of the measurement environment. A two-direction harmonic pressure-driving source is accordingly designed. Using this new equipment, electrokinetic experiments conducted ten core samples at 0.4 mol/L NaCl solution. The results show good agreement between the electrokinetically deduced permeability and premeasured gas permeability. For high salinity saturated samples, the permeability can be inverted from electroosmotic effect instead of the streaming potential.

  13. Kinematic validation of a quasi-geostrophic model for the fast dynamics in the Earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, S.; Jackson, A.

    2017-09-01

    We derive a quasi-geostrophic (QG) system of equations suitable for the description of the Earth's core dynamics on interannual to decadal timescales. Over these timescales, rotation is assumed to be the dominant force and fluid motions are strongly invariant along the direction parallel to the rotation axis. The diffusion-free, QG system derived here is similar to the one derived in Canet et al. but the projection of the governing equations on the equatorial disc is handled via vertical integration and mass conservation is applied to the velocity field. Here we carefully analyse the properties of the resulting equations and we validate them neglecting the action of the Lorentz force in the momentum equation. We derive a novel analytical solution describing the evolution of the magnetic field under these assumptions in the presence of a purely azimuthal flow and an alternative formulation that allows us to numerically solve the evolution equations with a finite element method. The excellent agreement we found with the analytical solution proves that numerical integration of the QG system is possible and that it preserves important physical properties of the magnetic field. Implementation of magnetic diffusion is also briefly considered.

  14. Modelling Pressurized Water Reactor cores in terms of porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, G.; Collard, B.; Ricciardi, G.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a tractable model of a nuclear reactor core taking the complexity of the structure (including its nonlinear behaviour) and fluid flow coupling into account. The mechanical behaviour modelling includes the dynamics of both the fuel assemblies and the fluid. Each rod bundle is modelled in the form of a deformable porous medium; then, the velocity field of the fluid and the displacement field of the structure are defined over the whole domain. The fluid and the structure are first modelled separately, before being linked together. The equations of motion for the structure are obtained using a Lagrangian approach and, to be able to link up the fluid and the structure, the equations of motion for the fluid are obtained using an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian approach. The finite element method is applied to spatially discretize the equations. Simulations are performed to analyse the effects of the characteristics of the fluid and of the structure. Finally, the model is validated with a test involving two fuel assemblies, showing good agreement with the experimental data. (authors)

  15. Stability and anisotropy of (FexNi1-x)2O under high pressure and implications in Earth's and super-Earths' core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengxuan; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan

    2018-01-10

    Oxygen is thought to be an important light element in Earth's core but the amount of oxygen in Earth's core remains elusive. In addition, iron-rich iron oxides are of great interest and significance in the field of geoscience and condensed matter physics. Here, static calculations based on density functional theory demonstrate that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O is dynamically and mechanically stable and becomes energetically favorable with respect to the assemblage of hcp-Fe and [Formula: see text]-FeO above 270 GPa, which indicates that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O can be a strong candidate phase for stable iron-rich iron oxides at high pressure, perhaps even at high temperature. The elasticity and anisotropy of I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O at high pressures are also determined. Based on these results, we have derived the upper limit of oxygen to be 4.3 wt% in Earth's lower outer core. On the other hand, I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O with high AV S is likely to exist in a super-Earth's or an ocean planet's solid core causing the locally seismic heterogeneity. Our results not only give some clues to explore and synthesize novel iron-rich iron oxides but also shed light on the fundamental information of oxygen in the planetary core.

  16. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  17. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  18. Rates of chemical reaction and atmospheric heating during core debris expulsion from a pressurized vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockman, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1986-01-01

    Core debris may be expelled from a pressurized reactor vessel during a severe nuclear reactor accident. Experimental studies of core debris expulsion from pressurized vessels have established that the expelled material can be lofted into the atmosphere of the reactor containment as particulate 0.4 to 2 mm in diameter. These particles will vigorously react with steam and oxygen in the containment atmosphere. Data on such reactions during tests with 80 kg of expelled melt will be reported. A model of the reaction rates based on gas phase mass transport will be described and shown to account for atmospheric heating and aerosol generation observed in the tests

  19. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  20. Pressure-Coring of the Gas-bearing Devonian Black Shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, R. E.; Dixon, J. A.; McIver, R. D.

    1979-10-01

    A Christensen model pressure-retaining core barrel is being used in the drilling of two EGSP research wells. This effort supported by two other techniques is designed to evaluate the most effective technique to provide meaningful resource assessments. One well has been successfully drilled and the accumulated samples are currently being evaluated. The second well is currently being drilled.

  1. Microbial diversity in methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments core preserved in the original pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hata, T.; Nishida, H.

    2017-12-01

    In normal coring of deep marine sediments, the sampled cores are exposed to the pressure of the atmosphere, which results in dissociation of gas-hydrates and might change microbial diversity. In this study, we analyzed microbial composition in methane hydrate-bearing sediment core sampled and preserved by Hybrid-PCS (Pressure Coring System). We sliced core into three layers; (i) outside layer, which were most affected by drilling fluids, (ii) middle layer, and (iii) inner layer, which were expected to be most preserved as the original state. From each layer, we directly extracted DNA, and amplified V3-V4 region of 16S rRNA gene. We determined at least 5000 of nucleotide sequences of the partial 16S rDNA from each layer by Miseq (Illumina). In the all layers, facultative anaerobes, which can grow with or without oxygen because they can metabolize energy aerobically or anaerobically, were detected as majority. However, the genera which are often detected anaerobic environment is abundant in the inner layer compared to the outside layer, indicating that condition of drilling and preservation affect the microbial composition in the deep marine sediment core. This study was conducted as a part of the activity of the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan [MH21 consortium], and supported by JOGMEC (Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation). The sample was provided by AIST (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology).

  2. A hybrid method for in-core optimization of pressurized water reactor reload core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this research is the development of an accurate, practical, and robust method for optimization of the design of loading patterns for pressurized water reactors, a nonlinear, non-convex, integer optimization problem. The many logical constraints which may be applied during the design process are modeled herein by a network construction upon which performance objectives and safety constraints from reactor physics calculations are optimized. This thesis presents the synthesis of the strengths of previous algorithms developed for reload design optimization and extension of robustness through development of a hybrid liberated search algorithm. Development of three independent methods for reload design optimization is presented: random direct search for local improvement, liberated search by simulated annealing, and deterministic search for local improvement via successive linear assignment by branch and bound. Comparative application of the methods to a variety of problems is discussed, including an exhaustive enumeration benchmark created to allow comparison of search results to a known global optimum for a large scale problem. While direct search and determinism are shown to be capable of finding improvement, only the liberation of simulated annealing is found to perform robustly in the non-convex design spaces. The hybrid method SHAMAN is presented. The algorithm applies: determinism to shuffle an initial solution for satisfaction of heuristics and symmetry; liberated search through simulated annealing with a bounds cooling constraint treatment; and search bias through relational heuristics for the application of engineering judgment. The accuracy, practicality, and robustness of the SHAMAN algorithm is demonstrated through application to a variety of reload loading pattern optimization problems

  3. Triaxial testing system for pressure core analysis using image processing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, J.; Masui, A.; Tenma, N.; Nagao, J.

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a newly developed innovative triaxial testing system to investigate strength, deformation behavior, and/or permeability of gas hydrate bearing-sediments in deep sea is described. Transport of the pressure core from the storage chamber to the interior of the sealing sleeve of a triaxial cell without depressurization was achieved. An image processing technique was used to capture the motion and local deformation of a specimen in a transparent acrylic triaxial pressure cell and digital photographs were obtained at each strain level during the compression test. The material strength was successfully measured and the failure mode was evaluated under high confining and pore water pressures.

  4. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Trenberth, R.

    1987-12-01

    Modelling experiments have been done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Various liquids have been used to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor from a breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. High pressure air and helium have been used to simulate the discharge of steam and gas from the breach. The dispersion of liquid via the vault access shafts has been measured. Photographs have been taken of fluid flow patterns and velocity profiles have been obtained. The requirements for further experiments are indicated. (author)

  5. Early episodes of high-pressure core formation preserved in plume mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Bennett, Neil R.; Du, Zhixue; Cottrell, Elizabeth; Fei, Yingwei

    2018-01-01

    The decay of short-lived iodine (I) and plutonium (Pu) results in xenon (Xe) isotopic anomalies in the mantle that record Earth’s earliest stages of formation. Xe isotopic anomalies have been linked to degassing during accretion, but degassing alone cannot account for the co-occurrence of Xe and tungsten (W) isotopic heterogeneity in plume-derived basalts and their long-term preservation in the mantle. Here we describe measurements of I partitioning between liquid Fe alloys and liquid silicates at high pressure and temperature and propose that Xe isotopic anomalies found in modern plume rocks (that is, rocks with elevated 3He/4He ratios) result from I/Pu fractionations during early, high-pressure episodes of core formation. Our measurements demonstrate that I becomes progressively more siderophile as pressure increases, so that portions of mantle that experienced high-pressure core formation will have large I/Pu depletions not related to volatility. These portions of mantle could be the source of Xe and W anomalies observed in modern plume-derived basalts. Portions of mantle involved in early high-pressure core formation would also be rich in FeO, and hence denser than ambient mantle. This would aid the long-term preservation of these mantle portions, and potentially points to their modern manifestation within seismically slow, deep mantle reservoirs with high 3He/4He ratios.

  6. Core body temperature, skin temperature, and interface pressure. Relationship to skin integrity in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, D M

    1999-06-01

    To ascertain the effects of 1-, 1 1/2-, and 2-hour turning intervals on nursing home residents' skin over the sacrum and trochanters. (1) the higher the core body temperature, the higher the skin surface temperature; (2) the 2-hour turning interval would have significantly higher skin surface temperature; (3) there would be no relationship between skin surface temperature and interface pressure; and (4) the sacrum would have the lowest skin surface temperature. Modified Latin-square. For-profit nursing home. Convenience sample of 26 residents who scored bedridden. First Temp measured core temperature; a disposable thermistor temperature probe, skin temperature; and a digital interface pressure evaluator, the interface pressure. Negative correlation (r = -.33, P = .003) occurred between core body temperature and skin surface temperature. Skin surface temperature rose at the end of the 2-hour turning interval but was not significant (F = (2.68) = .73, P = .49). Weak negative relationship (r = -12, P = .29) occurred between skin surface temperature and interface pressure, and sacral skin surface temperature was significantly lower for the left trochanter only (F = (8.68) = 7.05, P = .002). Although hypotheses were not supported, more research is needed to understand how time in position and multiple chronic illnesses interact to affect skin pressure tolerance.

  7. Optimization of core reload design for low-leakage fuel management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Downar, T.J.; Sesonske, A.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed to optimize pressurized water reactor low-leakage core reload designs that features the decoupling and sequential optimization of the fuel arrangement and control problems. The two-stage optimization process provides the maximum cycle length for a given fresh fuel loading subject to power peaking constraints. In the first stage, a best fuel arrangement is determined at the end of cycle (EOC) in the absence of all control poisons by employing a direct search method. The constant power, Haling depletion is used to provide the cycle length and EOC power peaking for each candidate core fuel arrangement. In the second stage, the core control poison requirements to meet the core peaking constraints throughout the cycle are determined using an approximate nonlinear programming technique

  8. Plastic deformation of FeSi at high pressures: implications for planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupenko, Ilya; Merkel, Sébastien; Achorner, Melissa; Plückthun, Christian; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    The cores of terrestrial planets is mostly comprised of a Fe-Ni alloy, but it should additionally contain some light element(s) in order to explain the observed core density. Silicon has long been considered as a likely candidate because of geochemical and cosmochemical arguments: the Mg/Si and Fe/Si ratios of the Earth does not match those of the chondrites. Since silicon preferentially partition into iron-nickel metal, having 'missing' silicon in the core would solve this problem. Moreover, the evidence of present (e.g. Mercury) or ancient (e.g. Mars) magnetic fields on the terrestrial planets is a good indicator of (at least partially) liquid cores. The estimated temperature profiles of these planets, however, lay below iron melting curve. The addition of light elements in their metal cores could allow reducing their core-alloy melting temperature and, hence, the generation of a magnetic field. Although the effect of light elements on the stability and elasticity of Fe-Ni alloys has been widely investigated, their effect on the plasticity of core materials remains largely unknown. Yet, this information is crucial for understanding how planetary cores deform. Here we investigate the plastic deformation of ɛ-FeSi up to 50 GPa at room temperature employing a technique of radial x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells. Stoichiometric FeSi endmember is a good first-order approximation of the Fe-FeSi system and a good starting material to develop new experimental perspectives. In this work, we focused on the low-pressure polymorph of FeSi that would be the stable phase in the cores of small terrestrial planets. We will present the analysis of measured data and discuss their potential application to constrain plastic deformation in planetary cores.

  9. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  10. Atomic scale study of vacancies in Earth's inner core: effect of pressure and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterbex, S.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic observations of the Earth's inner core [1] remain ambiguously related to mineral physics studies of the inner core stable crystalline iron phase [2,3,4,5]. This makes it difficult to clarify the role of plastic deformation as one of the primary candidates responsible for the observed seismic anisotropy of Earth's inner core. Nonetheless, atomic self-diffusion mechanisms provide a direct link between plastic deformation and the mechanical properties of Earth's inner core stable iron phase(s). Using first-principles density functional based calculation techniques, we have studied the conjugate effect of pressure and chemistry on vacancy diffusion in HCP-, BCC- and FCC-iron by taking into account potential light alloying elements as hydrogen, silicon and sulfur. Our results show that inner core pressure highly inhibits the rate of intrinsic self-diffusion by suppressing defect concentration rather than by effecting the mobility of the defects. Moreover, we found light elements to be able to affect metallic bonding which allows for extrinsic diffusion mechanisms in iron under inner core conditions. The latter clearly enables to enhance defect concentration and hence to enhance the rate of plastic deformation. This suggests that inner core chemistry affects the rheological properties (e.g.viscosity) of iron alloys which finally should match with seismic observations. references: [1] Deuss, A., 2014. Heterogeneity and Anisotropy of Earth's inner core. An. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 42, 103-126. [2] Anzellini, S., Dewaele, A., Mezouar, M., Loubeyre, P., Morard, G., 2013. Melting of iron at Earth's inner core boundary based on fast X-ray diffraction. Science 340, 464-466. [3] Godwal, B.K., Gonzales-Cataldo, F., Verma, A.K., Stixrude, L., Jeanloz, R., 2015. Stability of iron crystal structures at 0.3-1.5 TPa. [4] Vocadlo, L., 2007. Ab initio calculations of the elasticity of iron and iron alloys at inner core conditions: evidence for a partially molten inner core

  11. A reverse depletion method for pressurized water reactor core reload design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.; Kin, Y.J.

    1986-01-01

    Low-leakage fuel management is currently practiced in over half of all pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores. The large numbers of burnable poison pins used to control the power peaking at the in-board fresh fuel positions have introduced an additional complexity to the core reload design problem. In addition to determining the best location of each assembly in the core, the designer must concurrently determine the distribution of burnable poison pins in the fresh fuel. A new method for performing core design more suitable for low-leakage fuel management is reported. A procedure was developed that uses the wellknown ''Haling depletion'' to achieve an end-of-cycle (EOC) core state where the assembly pattern is configured in the absence of all control poison. This effectively separates the assembly assignment and burnable poison distribution problems. Once an acceptable pattern at EOC is configured, the burnable and soluble poison required to control the power and core excess reactivity are solved for as unknown variables while depleting the cycle in reverse from the EOC exposure distribution to the beginning of cycle. The methods developed were implemented in an approved light water reactor licensing code to ensure the validity of the results obtained and provided for the maximum utility to PWR core reload design

  12. Cold leg injection reflood test results in the SCTF Core-I under constant system pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydrodynamics in the core and the interaction in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The present report describes the analytical results on the system behavior observed in the SCTF Core-I cold leg injection tests, S1-14 (Run 520), S1-15 (521), S1-16 (522), S1-17 (523), S1-20 (530), S1-21 (531), S1-23 (536) and S1-24 (537), performed under constant system pressure condition during transient. Major discussion items are: (1) steam binding, (2) U-tube oscillations, (3) bypass of ECC water (4) core cooling behavior, (5) effect of vent valve and (6) other parameter effects. These results give us very useful information and suggestion on reflood behavior. (author)

  13. Optimization of core reload design for low leakage fuel management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1986-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize pressurized water reactor core reload design for low leakage fuel management, a strategy recently adopted by most utilities to extend cycle length and mitigate pressurized thermal shock concerns. The method consists of a two-stage optimization process which provides the maximum cycle length for a given fresh fuel loading subject to power peaking constraints. In the first stage, a best fuel arrangement is determined at the end of cycle in the absence of burnable poisons. A direct search method is employed in conjunction with a constant power, Haling depletion. In the second stage, the core control poison requirements are determined using a linear programming technique. The solution provides the fresh fuel burnable poison loading required to meet core power peaking constraints. An accurate method of explicitly modeling burnable absorbers was developed for this purpose. The design method developed here was implemented in a currently recognized fuel licensing code, SIMULATE, that was adapted to the CYBER-205 computer. This methodology was applied to core reload design of cycles 9 and 10 for the Commonwealth Edison Zion, Unit-1 Reactor. The results showed that the optimum loading pattern for cycle 9 yielded almost a 9% increase in the cycle length while reducing core vessel fluence by 30% compared with the reference design used by Commonwealth Edison

  14. Prediction of thermoplastic failure of a reactor pressure vessel under a postulated core melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijvestijn, G.; Birchley, J.; Reichlin, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the lower head failure calculations performed for a postulated accident scenario in a commercial nuclear power plant. A postulated one inch break in the primary coolant circuit leads to dryout and subsequent meltdown of the core. The reference plant is a pressurized water reactor without penetrations in the reactor vessel lower head. The molten core material accumulates in the lower head, eventually causing failure of the vessel. The analysis investigates flow conditions in the melt pool, temperature evolution in the reactor vessel wall, and structure mechanical evaluation of the vessel under strong thermal loads and a range of internal pressures. The calculations were performed using the ADINA finite element codes. The analysis focusses on the failure processes, time and mode of failure. The most likely mode of failure at low pressure is global rupture due to gradual accumulation of creep strain over a large part of the heated area. In contrast, thermoplasticity becomes important at high pressure or following a pressure spike and can lead to earlier local failure. In situations in which part of the heat load is concentrated over a small area, resulting in a hot spot, local failure occurs, but not until the temperatures are close to the melting point. At low pressure, in particular, the hot spot area remains intact until the structure is molten across more than half of the thickness. (author) 14 figs., 16 refs

  15. Outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, A.W.; Behannon, K.W.; Lepping, R.P.; Carbary, J.F.; Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc

  16. Device for positioning ultrasonic probes and/or television cameras on the outer surface of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipser, R.; Dose, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    The device makes possible periodical in-service inspections of welding seams and material of a reactor pressure vessel without local human presence. A 'support ring' encloses the pressure vessel in a horizontal plane with free space. It is vertically moved up and down in the space between pressure vessel and thermal shield by means of tackles. At a control desk placed in a protected area its movement is controlled and its vertical position is indicated. A 'rotating track' with its own drive is rotating remote-controlled on the 'support ring'. By a combination of the vertical with the rotating movement, an ultrasonic probe placed removably on the 'rotating hack', or a television camera will be brought to any position on the cylindrical circumference of the pressure vessel. Special devices extend the radius of action, in upward direction for inspecting the welding seams of the coolant nozzles, and in downward direction for the inspection of welds on the hemispherical bottom of the pressure vessel or on the outlet pipe nozzle placed there. The device remains installed during reactor operation, but is moved down to the lower horizontal surface of the thermal shield. Parts which are sensible to radiation like probes or television cameras and special devices will then be removed respectively mounted before beginning an inspection compaign. This position may be reached by the lower access in the biological shield and through an opening in the horizontal surface of the thermal shield. (HP) [de

  17. Models of the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of seismology, high pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to strong constraints on core models. The synthesis presented here is devoted to the defense of the following properties: (1) core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; (2) the outer, liquid core is predominately iron but cannot be purely iron; (3) the inner core-outer core boundary represents a thermodynamic equilibrium between a liquid alloys and a predominanately iron solid; (4) thermodynamic and transport properties of outer core can be estimated from liquid-state theories; and (5) the outer core is probably adiabatic and uniform in composition. None of these propositions are universally accepted by geophysicists. But, the intent of this paper is to present a coherent picture which explains most of the data with the fewest ad hoc assumptions. Areas in which future progress is both essential and likely are geo- and cosmochronology, seismological determinations of core structure, fluid dynamics of the core and mantle, and condensed matter physics

  18. Evaluation of the pressure difference across the core during PWR-LOCA reflood phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1979-03-01

    The flooding rate of the core influences largely cooling of the core during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA. Since the void fraction of two-phase flow in the core is important determining the flooding rate, it is essential to examine this void fraction. The void fraction in the core during the reflood phase obtained by experiment was compared with those predicted by the correlations respectively of Akagawa, Nicklin, Zuber, Yeh, Griffice, Behringer and Jhonson. Only Yeh's correlation was found to be usable for the purpose. The pressure difference of the core during the reflood phase was calculated by reflood analyzing code REFLA-1D using Yeh's correlation. Following are the results: (1) During the steady-state period after quenching of the heaters, the prediction agrees within +-15% with the experiment. (2) During the transient period when the quench front is advancing, the prediction is not in agreement with the experiment, the difference being about +-40%. Influence of the advancing quench front upon the void fraction in the core must further be studied. (author)

  19. Development of out-of-core concepts for a supercritical-water, pressure-tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the Generation IV programs at Chalk River Laboratories has as its prime focus the development of out-of-core concepts for the SuperCritical Water (SCW) pressure tube reactor under development in Canada. A number of technical issues associated with the interface of out-of-core components and the pressure tubes of a SCW pressure tube reactor are being investigated. This article focuses on several aspects of out-of-core components and layouts, building upon concepts that have been developed during the past few years. The efforts are strongly focused on concepts for a fuel channel that can be fabricated with the tight lattice pitch (typically 230 to 250 mm) that may be required for some applications such as utilization of a thorium fuel cycle. It is not practical to adapt concepts with a tight lattice pitch while using the thicker materials required for the higher temperatures and pressures required for supercritical operation. A change in lattice pitch or configuration is required to accommodate the component size increases. This presentation will cover a number of new concepts developed to produce feeders and end fittings for the harsh conditions of a SCW pressure tube reactor. These components are then developed into conceptual models of a Gen IV pressure tube reactor mounted in both horizontal and vertical orientations. Full 3-D solid models of both concepts will be demonstrated as well as a 1/10th-scale model of one face of a horizontal concept that has been built from components made with a 3-D printer. (author)

  20. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocks, W.; Kuenecke, G.

    1989-06-01

    Continuing preceding investigations, a further elastic-plastic finite element analysis of a test vessel with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack has been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stress state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of analytical approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are used to analyze the experimental data with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. Local J R -curves of the surface flaw are compared with J R -curves of various specimens of different geometries. Again, it became evident that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the developing 'canoe shape' of the surface crack cannot be described by a single resistance curve which is assumed to be a material property. A method described in a previous report to predict the ductile crack growth by using local J R -curves which depend on the triaxiality of the stress state did not result in a satisfactory outcome, in the present case. The presumed reasons will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Compact multipurpose sub-sampling and processing of in-situ cores with press (pressurized core sub-sampling and extrusion system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, E.; Muller, W.H. [Technical Univ. of Berlin, Berlin (Germany). Chair of Continuum Mechanics and Material Theory

    2008-07-01

    Climate change, declining resources and over-consumption result in a need for sustainable resource allocation, habitat conservation and claim for new technologies and prospects for damage-containment. In order to increase knowledge of the environment and to define potential hazards, it is necessary to get an understanding of the deep biosphere. In addition, the benthic conditions of sediment structure and gas hydrates, temperature, pressure and bio-geochemistry must be maintained during the sequences of sampling, retrieval, transfer, storage and downstream analysis. In order to investigate highly instable gas hydrates, which decomposes under pressure and temperature change, a suite of research technologies have been developed by the Technische Universitat Berlin (TUB), Germany. This includes the pressurized core sub-sampling and extrusion system (PRESS) that was developed in the European Union project called HYACE/HYACINTH. The project enabled well-defined sectioning and transfer of drilled pressure-cores obtained by a rotary corer and fugro pressure corer into transportation and investigation chambers. This paper described HYACINTH pressure coring and the HYACINTH core transfer. Autoclave coring tools and HYACINTH core logging, coring tools, and sub-sampling were also discussed. It was concluded that possible future applications include, but were not limited to, research in shales and other tight formations, carbon dioxide sequestration, oil and gas exploration, coalbed methane, and microbiology of the deep biosphere. To meet the corresponding requirements and to incorporate the experiences from previous expeditions, the pressure coring system would need to be redesigned to adapt it to the new applications. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Calculation of pressure drop and flow redistribution in the core of LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.; Morgado, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    It is studied the flow redistribution through of fuel elements to the pressure drop calculation in the core of sodium cooled reactors. Using the quasi-static formulation of equations of the conservation of mass, energy and momentum, it was developed a computer program to flow redistribution calculations and pressure drop for different power levels and total flow simulating an arbitrary number of channels for sodium flowing . An optimization of the number of sufficient channels for calculations of this nature is done. The method is applied in studies of transients in the same reactor. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Influence of air pressure on soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, Peter John

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Soliton formation during dispersive compression of chirped few-picosecond pulses at the microjoule level in a hollow-core photonic bandgap (HC-PBG) fiber is studied by numerical simulations. Long-pass filtering of the emerging frequency-shifted solitons is investigated with the objective...... of obtaining pedestal-free output pulses. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of the air pressure in the HC-PBG fiber. It is found that a reduction in air pressure enables an increase in the fraction of power going into the most redshifted soliton and also improves the quality of the filtered pulse...

  4. Calculation of pressure drop and flow redistribution in the LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, O.J.

    1984-01-01

    The flow redistribution through fuel assemblies of LMFBRs: for the correct calculation of mass flow rates and pressure drop, are studied. Using a quasi-static formulation of conservation equations of mass and energy, a computer program was developed to simulate any arbitrary number of flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore f flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore, it was possible to perform thermal transient calculations for the Clinch River reactor core. The results of the calculations agree with the data found in the literature and supply accurate information about flow redistribution, average temperature, and pressure drop in the core, when the reactor is operated at conditions from the designed flow conditions, as is always the case in a load changing operation, or during transients. (Autor) [pt

  5. Pressurized water reactor in-core nuclear fuel management by tabu search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Natasha J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a tabu search implementation for PWR reload core design. • We conduct computational experiments to find optimal parameter values. • We test the performance of the algorithm on two representative PWR geometries. • We compare this performance with that given by established optimization methods. • Our tabu search implementation outperforms these methods in all cases. - Abstract: Optimization of the arrangement of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons when reloading pressurized water reactors has, in the past, been performed with many different algorithms in an attempt to make reactors more economic and fuel efficient. The use of the tabu search algorithm in tackling reload core design problems is investigated further here after limited, but promising, previous investigations. The performance of the tabu search implementation developed was compared with established genetic algorithm and simulated annealing optimization routines. Tabu search outperformed these existing programs for a number of different objective functions on two different representative core geometries

  6. Theory of adiabatic pressure-gradient soliton compression in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, John

    2009-01-01

    Adiabatic soliton compression by means of a pressure gradient in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber is investigated theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the dureation of the compressed pulse is limited mainly by the interplay between third-order dispersion and the Raman-induced soliton...... frequency shift. Analytical expressions for this limit are derived and compared with results of detailed numerical simulations for a realistic fiber structure....

  7. Atmospheric constraints for the CO2 partial pressure on terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone

    OpenAIRE

    von Paris, P.; Grenfell, J. L.; Hedelt, P.; Rauer, H.; Selsis, F.; Stracke, B.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, several potentially habitable, probably terrestrial exoplanets and exoplanet candidates have been discovered. The amount of CO2 in their atmosphere is of great importance for surface conditions and habitability. In the absence of detailed information on the geochemistry of the planet, this amount could be considered as a free parameter. Up to now, CO2 partial pressures for terrestrial planets have been obtained assuming an available volatile reservoir and outgassing scenarios...

  8. Burst shield for a pressurized nuclear-reactor core and method of operating same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beine, B.; Schilling, F.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear-reactor core stands on a base up from which extends a cylindrical side wall formed of a plurality of hollow iron castings held together by circumferential and longitudinal prestressed elements. A cylindrical space between this shield and the core serves for inspection of the core and is normally filled with cast-iron segmental slabs so that if the core bursts pieces thrown out do not acquire any dangerous kinetic energy before engaging the burst shield. The top of the shield is removably secured to the side so that it can be moved out of the way periodically for removal of the filler slabs and inspection of the core. An anchor on the upper end of each longitudinal prestressing element bears against a sleeve pressing against the uppermost side element, and a nut engageable with this anchor is engageable down over the top to hold it in place, removal of this nut leaving the element prestressed in the side wall. 11 claims, 16 drawing figures

  9. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.W.

    1987-12-01

    In previous experiments, done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel, the instrument tubes support structure built into the vault was not included. It consists of a number of grids made up of fairly massive steel girders. These have now been added to the model and experiments performed using water to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor and high-pressure air to simulate the discharge of steam or gas from the assumed breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. The results show that the tubes support structure considerably reduces the carry-over of liquid via the vault access shafts. (author)

  10. Severe accident mitigation and core melt retention in the European pressurized reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    For the mitigation of severe accidents, the FPR has adopted and improved the defense-in-depth approaches of its predecessors, the French 'N4' and the German 'Konvoi' PWR's. Beyond these evolutionary changes, it includes a new, 4-th level of defense aimed at limiting the consequences of a postulated severe accident with core melting. This involves a strengthening of the confinement function and the avoidance of large early releases, by the prevention of scenarios and events with potentially high loads on the containment, incl. RPV failure at high pressure. The remaining low-pressure accidents are mitigated by dedicated design measures. The paper gives an overview and of the measures for H 2 -mitigation and steam explosion and focuses on a detailed description of the precautions and design measures for the stabilization and long-term cooling of the molten core. In the EPR the latter is achieved by melt spreading into a large outside-cooled crucible lateral to the pit, which is passively flooded and cooled with water from the IRWST. The separation of functions between pit and spreading room not only isolates the core catcher from the various loads during RPV failure, but also avoids any risks related to an unintended initiation of flooding during power operation. A stable state of the melt is reached after a few hours. Complete solidification is achieved within days. The core catcher can optionally be cooled actively by the CHRS, which avoids further steaming into the containment and establishes ambient pressure conditions in the long term. (author)

  11. Mechanical energy yields and pressure volume and pressure time curves for whole core fuel-coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, P [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1979-10-15

    In determining the damage consequences of a whole core Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI), one measure of the strength of a FCI that can be used and is independent of the system geometry is the constant volume mixing mechanical yield (often referred to as the Hicks-Menzies yield), which represents a near upper limit to the mechanical work of a FCI. This paper presents a recalculation of the Hicks-Menzies yields for UO{sub 2} and sodium for a range of initial fuel temperatures and fuel to coolant mass ratios, using recently published UO{sub 2} and sodium equation of state data. The work presented here takes a small number of postulated FCIs with as wide range as possible of thermal interaction parameters and determines their pressure-volume P(V) and pressure-time P(t) relations, using geometrical constraints representative of the reactor. Then by examining these P(V) and P(t) curves a representative pressure-relative volume curve or range of possible curves, for use in containment analysis, is recommended

  12. An estimation of core damage frequency of a pressurized water reactor during mid-loop operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.; Chen, C.T.; Lee, M.

    2004-01-01

    The core damage frequency during mid-loop operation of a Westinghouse designed 3-loop Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) due to loss of Residual Heat Removal (RHR) events was assessed. The assessment considers two types of outages (refueling and drained maintenance), and uses failure data collected specifically for shutdown condition. Event trees were developed for five categories of loss of RHR events. Human actions to mitigate the loss of RHR events was identified and human error probabilities were quantified using HCR and THERP model. The result showed that the core damage frequency due to loss of RHR events during mid-loop operation is 3.1x10 -5 per year. The results also showed that the core damage frequency can be reduced significantly by removing a pressurizer safety valve before entering mid-loop operation. The establishment of reflux cooling, i.e. decay heat removal through steam generator secondary side also plays important role in mitigating the loss of RHR events. (author)

  13. Analytical investigation of a one-dimensional homogenized model for a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.; Schumann, U.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional homogenized model for dynamic fluid-structure interaction in a pressurized water reactor core is used to study the influence of the virtual density and spacer's stiffness. The model consists of a linear system of partial differential equations for fluid velocity, rod velocity and pressure. For these equations analytical solutions are deduced for boundary conditions prescribing either periodic wall oscillations or linearly growing wall accelerations from rest. The theoretical model for the virtual density is verified by comparison to an experiment. For zero spacer stiffness, purely acoustic oscillations appear. For positive spacer stiffness, additional oscillations arise with relative rod motions. The wavelengths of the latter oscillations are small for weak spacers. Large numerical effort would be required in a more complete three-dimensional core-model to resolve such short wave lengths. In fact in a typical core the spacer's stiffness csub(S) is small in comparison to the fluid bulk modulus K. For csub(s)/K <= 0.1 it might be appropriate to neglect the influence of the spacers. (orig.)

  14. A pressure core ultrasonic test system for on-board analysis of gas hydrate-bearing sediments under in situ pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhou, Weihua; Xue, Kaihua; Wei, Rupeng; Ling, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    The enormous potential as an alternative energy resource has made natural gas hydrates a material of intense research interest. Their exploration and sample characterization require a quick and effective analysis of the hydrate-bearing cores recovered under in situ pressures. Here a novel Pressure Core Ultrasonic Test System (PCUTS) for on-board analysis of sediment cores containing gas hydrates at in situ pressures is presented. The PCUTS is designed to be compatible with an on-board pressure core transfer device and a long gravity-piston pressure-retained corer. It provides several advantages over laboratory core analysis including quick and non-destructive detection, in situ and successive acoustic property acquisition, and remission of sample storage and transportation. The design of the unique assembly units to ensure the in situ detection is demonstrated, involving the U-type protecting jackets, transducer precession device, and pressure stabilization system. The in situ P-wave velocity measurements make the detection of gas hydrate existence in the sediments possible on-board. Performance tests have verified the feasibility and sensitivity of the ultrasonic test unit, showing the dependence of P-wave velocity on gas hydrate saturation. The PCUTS has been successfully applied for analysis of natural samples containing gas hydrates recovered from the South China Sea. It is indicated that on-board P-wave measurements could provide a quick and effective understanding of the hydrate occurrence in natural samples, which can assist further resource exploration, assessment, and subsequent detailed core analysis.

  15. A pressure core ultrasonic test system for on-board analysis of gas hydrate-bearing sediments under in situ pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhou, Weihua; Xue, Kaihua; Wei, Rupeng; Ling, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    The enormous potential as an alternative energy resource has made natural gas hydrates a material of intense research interest. Their exploration and sample characterization require a quick and effective analysis of the hydrate-bearing cores recovered under in situ pressures. Here a novel Pressure Core Ultrasonic Test System (PCUTS) for on-board analysis of sediment cores containing gas hydrates at in situ pressures is presented. The PCUTS is designed to be compatible with an on-board pressure core transfer device and a long gravity-piston pressure-retained corer. It provides several advantages over laboratory core analysis including quick and non-destructive detection, in situ and successive acoustic property acquisition, and remission of sample storage and transportation. The design of the unique assembly units to ensure the in situ detection is demonstrated, involving the U-type protecting jackets, transducer precession device, and pressure stabilization system. The in situ P-wave velocity measurements make the detection of gas hydrate existence in the sediments possible on-board. Performance tests have verified the feasibility and sensitivity of the ultrasonic test unit, showing the dependence of P-wave velocity on gas hydrate saturation. The PCUTS has been successfully applied for analysis of natural samples containing gas hydrates recovered from the South China Sea. It is indicated that on-board P-wave measurements could provide a quick and effective understanding of the hydrate occurrence in natural samples, which can assist further resource exploration, assessment, and subsequent detailed core analysis.

  16. SACI - O: A code for the analysis of transients in a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende Lobo, A.A. de; Soares, P.A.

    1979-03-01

    The SACI-O digital computer code consists basically of a pressurized water reactor core model. It is useful in the analysis of fast reactivity transients shorter than the loop transit time. The program can also be used for evaluating the core behaviour, during other transients, when the inlet coolant conditions are known. SACI-O uses point model neutron kinetics taking into account moderator and fuel reactivity effects, and fission products decay. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic equations are solved for an average fuel pin described by a single axial node. To perform a more detailed calculation, the modeling of another cooling channel, which can be divided into axial segments, is included in the program. The reactor trip system is also partially simulated. (Author) [pt

  17. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  18. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  19. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction

  20. Behavior of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber under high radial pressure for downhole application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, J., E-mail: j-sadeghi@sbu.ac.ir; Chenari, Z.; Ziaee, F. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Latifi, H., E-mail: latifi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Santos, J. L., E-mail: josantos@fc.up.pt [INESC Porto—Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Física, da Faculdade de Ciências, da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2014-02-17

    Pressure fiber sensors play an important role in downhole high pressure measurements to withstand long term operation. The purpose of this paper is to present an application of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) as a high pressure sensor head for downhole application based on dispersion variation. We used a high pressure stainless steel unit to exert pressure on the sensor. The experimental results show that different wavelengths based on sagnac loop interferometer have additive sensitivities from 5 × 10{sup −5} nm/psi at 1480 nm to 1.3 × 10{sup −3} nm/psi at 1680 nm. We developed a simulation to understand the reason for difference in sensitivity of wavelengths and also the relationship between deformation of HC-PCF and dispersion variation under pressure. For this purpose, by using the finite element method, we investigated the effect of structural variation of HC-PCF on spectral transformation of two linear polarizations under 1000 psi pressure. The simulation and experimental results show exponential decay behavior of dispersion variation from −3.4 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.3 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi and from −5 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.8 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi, respectively, which were in a good accordance with each other.

  1. Analysis of an ultrasonic level device for in-core Pressurized Water Reactor coolant detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous semi-empirical approach was undertaken to model the response of an ultrasonic level device (ULD) for application to in-core coolant detection in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). An equation is derived for the torsional wave velocity v/sub t phi/ in the ULD. Existing data reduction techniques were analyzed and compared to results from use of the derived equation. Both methods yield liquid level measurements with errors of approx. 5%. A sensitivity study on probe performance at reactor conditions predicts reduced level responsivity from data at lower temperatures

  2. Experimental study of the core grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop of the new core of the R A 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, V. P; Garcia, J. C; Delmastro, D. F

    2006-01-01

    In this work the core grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop of the new core of the R A6 reactor are experimentally studied.The experiments are performed using a 1:1 scale mock-up of an external fuel element cell.Different gaps between fuel elements are considered in order to take into account the design allowances. Different flows are considered to take into account the normal operation flow range.Measurement uncertainties are included.The results will be used to calculate the core flow distribution [es

  3. Unconstrained pulse pressure monitoring for health management using hetero-core fiber optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sonobe, Masako; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer's daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing. It was confirmed that the detected pulse waveform had a fundamental mode frequency of around 1.25 Hz over the time-varying waveform. A band-pass filter with a range of frequencies from 0.85 to 1.7 Hz was used to pick up the fundamental mode. In addition, a high-pass filter with 0.85 Hz frequency eliminated arm motion artifacts; consequently, we achieved high signal-to-noise ratio. For unrestricted daily health management, it is desirable that pulse pressure monitoring can be achieved by simply placing a device on the hand without the sensor being noticed. Two types of arrangements were developed and demonstrated in which the pulse sensors were either embedded in a base, such as an armrest, or in a wearable device. A wearable device without cuff pressure using a sensitivity-enhanced fiber sensor was successfully achieved with a sensitivity of 0.07-0.3 dB with a noise floor lower than 0.01 dB for multiple subjects.

  4. High Pressure and Temperature Core Formation as an Alternative to the "Late Veneer" Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, Kevin; Pando, K.; Humayun, M.; Danielson, L.

    2011-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the Platinum Group Elements - Pd Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os) are commonly utilized to constrain accretion processes in terrestrial differentiated bodies due to their affinity for FeNi metal [1]. These eight elements exhibit highly siderophile behavior, but nonetheless have highly diverse metal-silicate partition coefficients [2]. Therefore the near chondritic relative concentrations of HSEs in the terrestrial and lunar mantles, as well as some other bodies, are attributed to late accretion rather than core formation [1]. Evaluation of competing theories, such as high pressure metal-silicate partitioning or magma ocean hypotheses has been hindered by a lack of relevant partitioning data for this group of eight elements. In particular, systematic studies isolating the effect of one variable (e.g. temperature or melt compositions) are lacking. Here we undertake new experiments on all eight elements, using Fe metal and FeO-bearing silicate melts at fixed pressure, but variable temperatures. These experiments, as well as some additional planned experiments should allow partition coefficients to be more accurately calculated or estimated at the PT conditions and compositions at which core formation is thought to have occurred.

  5. Irradiation experiments on materials for core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Materials degradation due to the aging phenomena is one of the key issues for the life assessment and extension of the light water reactors (LWRs). This presentation introduces JAERI`s activities in the field of LWR material researches which utilize the research and testing reactors for irradiation experiments. The activities are including the material studies for the core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding. These materials are exposed to the neutron/gamma radiation and high temperature water environments so that it is worth reviewing their degradation phenomena as the continuum. Three topics are presented; For the core internal materials, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is the present major concern. At JAERI the effects of alloying elements on IASCC have been investigated through the post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in high-temperature water. The radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is still a significant issue for LWR safety, and at JAERI some factors affecting the embrittlement behavior such as a dose rate have been investigated. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel cladding is one of the limiting factors in fuel rod performance and an in-situ measurement of the corrosion rate in high-temperature water was performed in JMTR. To improve the reliability of experiments and to extent the applicability of experimental techniques, a mutual utilization of the technical achievements in those irradiation experiments is desired. (author)

  6. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Raitses, G.; Galperin, A.

    2009-01-01

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  7. Performance of core modifications to reduce the reactor pressure vessel fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiehlmann, H.D.; Lisdat, R.; Sommer, D.

    1997-01-01

    It's often discussed that nuclear power plants (NPP) are designed for an operation of 40 years equivalent to 32 full power years (FPY) assuming a load factor of 0.8. Such fixed plant life times are subjects of US operating licenses but not, as in most other countries, in the Federal Republic of Germany. Here the operating licenses are issued for an indefinite period. However, the German utilities are continuously upgrading their plants to attain a safety level that meets all current requirements. These upgrading measures also include the replacement of bigger components like e.g. the steam generator. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV), however, has a special status. Unlike most other components of a NPP which most likely will be exchanged during its service life a replacement or annealing treatment of the RPV certainly require more efforts to be economically justified. Thus the embrittlement of the RPV has an essential impact on the life time of a NPP. The end-of-life (EOL) RPV material toughness in essential depends on the steel quality and the accumulated neutron fluence. For a given NPP the reduction of the neutron flux at the inner surface of the RPV is the only way to limit its embrittlement. The resulting modifications for the core loadings in combination with the insertion of additional core components like steel elements are described and the impact on core performance and RPV fluence considered. (UK)

  8. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic analysis of pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    A computational code, named CANAL2, was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of a Pressurized Water Reactor core. The conservation equations for the control volumes are obtained by area-averaging of the two-fluid model conservation equations and reducing them to the drift-flux model formulation. The resulting equations are aproximated by finite differences and solved by a marching-type numerical scheme. The model takes into account the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between adjacent subchannels of a fuel bundle. Turbulent mixing and diversion crossflow are considered. Correlations are provided for several heat trans and flow regimes and selected according to the local conditons. During transients core power can be evaluated by a point-Kinetics model. Fuel and coolant temperatures are feedback to the neutronics. The heat conduction equation is solved in the fuel using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. Temperature-dependent correlations are provided for the fuel and cladding thermal conductivities. Several runs were made with the code CANAL2 using the available experimental and calculated data in the open literature. Results indicate that CANAL2 is a good calculational tool for the thermal-hydraulics of PWR cores. A few refinements will make the code useful for design. (Author) [pt

  9. H2 gas pressure calculation of FPM capsule failure at RSG-GAS reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastuti, Endiah Puji; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2002-01-01

    RSG-GAS has been irradiated FPM capsule for 236 times, one of those i.e. capsule number 228 has failure. The one of root cause of failure possibility is radiolysis reaction can be occurred in FPM capsule when it is filled with water during irradiation in the reactor core. The safety analysis of the radiolysis reaction in the capsule has been done. The oc cumulative hydrogen gas production can cause high pressure in the capsule then a mechanical damage occurred. The analysis was done at 10 MW of reactor power which equivalent with neutron flux of 0,6929 x 10 1 4 n/cm 2 sec and γ dose rate of 0,63x10 9 rad/hour. The assumption is the capsule is filled with water at maximum volume, i.e. 176.67 ml. The results of calculation showed that radiolysis reaction with γ and neutron produce hydrogen gas for nominal flow rate each are 494 atm and 19683 atm for γ and neutron radiolysis, respectively. H 2 gas pressure for 5% flow rate each are 723 atm. and 25772 atm., for γ and neutron radiolysis, respectively. The changing of the operation condition due to radiolysis together with one way valve' phenomena, can be produce hydrogen gas from water during irradiation in the reactor core and can be the one of root cause of capsule failure. This analysis recommended the FPM capsule preparation must be guaranteed no water or/and there is no possibility of water immersion in the capsule during irradiation in the core by more accurate leak test

  10. Reduction of PWR containment pressure after hypothetical accidents by water-cooling of the outer containment surface - annular space spray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, J.; Dietrich, D.P.; Roedder, P.

    1980-12-01

    The consequences of a core melt-out accident in the vicinity of a nuclear power station are determined by the integrity of the safety containment. This can be adversely affected by different events during the course of the core melt-out accident. The most important phenomenon is the contact between the melt and sump water. Due to the evaporation of the sump water, there is a continuous rise in pressure of the safety containment, which finally leads to failure due to excess pressure. In order to reduce the fission product release due to the resulting leakage, one must try to reduce the pressure as quickly as possible. As heat cannot be removed from the steel containment to the environment because of the thick concrete containment, it is best to bypass the insulating effect of the concrete by cooling the steel containment from outside. The aim of this investigation is therefore to work out a technically relatively simple system, which offers the possibility of backfitting, setting to work and repair. Such a system is an annular space spray system, by which the annular space between the concrete and steel containment has water pumped to the level of the dome and evenly sprayed over the top hemisphere. Mobile pumps on fire engines belonging to the fire brigade are sufficient to supply the cooling water and these will be available some hours after the accident occurs. The used spray water without any radioactive components is collected outside the reactor building and/or drained off. (orig./GL) [de

  11. All-optical pressure sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical pressure sensor comprising a waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector. Pressure sensing can then be provided by utilizing effective index modulation of the waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of light reflected from the Bragg...... reflector. Sound sensing may also be provided thereby having an all-optical microphone. One embodiment of the invention relates to an optical pressure sensor comprising at least one outer membrane and a waveguide, the waveguide comprising at least one core for confining and guiding light,at least one...... distributed Bragg reflector located in said at least one core, and at least one inner deflecting element forming at least a part of the core,wherein the pressure sensor is configured such that the geometry and/or dimension of the at least one core is changed when the at least one outer membrane is submitted...

  12. Cell-like pressure sensors reveal increase of mechanical stress towards the core of multicellular spheroids under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolega, M E; Delarue, M; Ingremeau, F; Prost, J; Delon, A; Cappello, G

    2017-01-27

    The surrounding microenvironment limits tumour expansion, imposing a compressive stress on the tumour, but little is known how pressure propagates inside the tumour. Here we present non-destructive cell-like microsensors to locally quantify mechanical stress distribution in three-dimensional tissue. Our sensors are polyacrylamide microbeads of well-defined elasticity, size and surface coating to enable internalization within the cellular environment. By isotropically compressing multicellular spheroids (MCS), which are spherical aggregates of cells mimicking a tumour, we show that the pressure is transmitted in a non-trivial manner inside the MCS, with a pressure rise towards the core. This observed pressure profile is explained by the anisotropic arrangement of cells and our results suggest that such anisotropy alone is sufficient to explain the pressure rise inside MCS composed of a single cell type. Furthermore, such pressure distribution suggests a direct link between increased mechanical stress and previously observed lack of proliferation within the spheroids core.

  13. Development of the test facilities for the measurement of core flow and pressure distribution of SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Y.J.; Euh, D.J.; Youn, Y.J.; Chu, I.C.; Kwon, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    A design of SMART reactor has been developed, of which the primary system is composed of four internal circulation pumps, a core of 57 fuel assemblies, eight cassettes of steam generators, flow mixing head assemblies, and other internal structures. Since primary design features are very different from conventional reactors, the characteristics of flow and pressure distribution are expected to be different accordingly. In order to analyze the thermal margin and hydraulic design characteristics of SMART reactor, design quantification tests for flow and pressure distribution with a preservation of flow geometry are necessary. In the present study, the design feature of the test facility in order to investigate flow and pressure distribution, named “SCOP” is described. In order to preserve the flow distribution characteristics, the SCOP is linearly reduced with a scaling ratio of 1/5. The core flow rate of each fuel assembly is measured by a venturi meter attached in the lower part of the core simulator having a similarity of pressure drop for nominally scaled flow conditions. All the 57 core simulators and 8 S/G simulators are precisely calibrated in advance of assembling in test facilities. The major parameters in tests are pressures, differential pressures, and core flow distribution. (author)

  14. Characterization of interfacial waves and pressure drop in horizontal oil-water core-annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Tabor, Rico F.; Singh, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2017-08-01

    We study the transportation of highly viscous furnace-oil in a horizontal pipe as core-annular flow (CAF) using experiments. Pressure drop and high-speed images of the fully developed CAF are recorded for a wide range of flow rate combinations. The height profiles (with respect to the centerline of the pipe) of the upper and lower interfaces of the core are obtained using a high-speed camera and image analysis. Time series of the interface height are used to calculate the average holdup of the oil phase, speed of the interface, and the power spectra of the interface profile. We find that the ratio of the effective velocity of the annular fluid to the core velocity, α , shows a large scatter. Using the average value of this ratio (α =0.74 ) yields a good estimate of the measured holdup for the whole range of flow rate ratios, mainly due to the low sensitivity of the holdup ratio to the velocity ratio. Dimensional analysis implies that, if the thickness of the annular fluid is much smaller than the pipe radius, then, for the given range of parameters in our experiments, the non-dimensional interface shape, as well as the non-dimensional wall shear stress, can depend only on the shear Reynolds number and the velocity ratio. Our experimental data show that, for both lower and upper interfaces, the normalized power spectrum of the interface height has a strong dependence on the shear Reynolds number. Specifically, for low shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with large wavelengths dominate, while, for large shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with small wavelengths dominate. Normalized variance of the interface height is higher at lower shear Reynolds numbers and tends to a constant with increasing shear Reynolds number. Surprisingly, our experimental data also show that the effective wall shear stress is, to a large extent, proportional to the square of the core velocity. Using the implied scalings for the holdup ratio and wall shear stress, we can derive

  15. Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) Characterization of Methane Gas Hydrate-Bearing Pressure Cores Collected from the Methane Production Test Site in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W. F.; Santamarina, J. C.; Dai, S.; Winters, W. J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J.; Suzuki, K.; Fujii, T.; Mason, D. H.; Bergeron, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure cores obtained at the Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, the site of the methane hydrate production test completed by the Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21) project in March 2013, were recovered from ~300 meters beneath the sea floor at close to in situ pressure. Cores were subsequently stored at ~20 MPa and ~5°C, which maintained hydrate in the cores within stability conditions. Pressure core physical properties were measured at 10 MPa and ~6°C, also within the methane hydrate stability field, using the IPTC and other Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs). Discrete IPTC measurements were carried out in strata ranging from silty sands to clayey silts within the turbidite sequences recovered in the cores. As expected, hydrate saturations were greatest in more permeable coarser-grained layers. Key results include: 1) Where hydrate saturation exceeded 40% in sandy sediments, the gas hydrate binds sediment grains within the matrix. The pressure core analyses yielded nearly in situ mechanical properties despite the absence of effective stress in the IPTC. 2) In adjacent fine-grained sediment (hydrate saturation < 15%), hydrate did not significantly bind the sediment. IPTC results in these locations were consistent with the zero effective-stress limit of comparable measurements made in PCCT devices that are designed to restore the specimen's in situ effective stress. In sand-rich intervals with high gas hydrate saturations, the measured compressional and shear wave velocities suggest that hydrate acts as a homogeneously-distributed, load-bearing member of the bulk sediment. The sands with high gas hydrate saturations were prone to fracturing (brittle failure) during insertion of the cone penetrometer and electrical conductivity probes. Authors would like to express their sincere appreciation to MH21 and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry for permitting this work to be disclosed at the 2014 Fall AGU meeting.

  16. Fluid-structure-interaction of the pressurized water reactor core internals during blowdown - numerical simulation with a homogenization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.

    1984-03-01

    A method for the numerical simulation of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core internal's behaviour during a blowdown accident is described, by which the motion of the reactor core and the interaction of the fuel elements with the core barrel and the coolant medium is calculated. Furthermore, some simple models for the support columns, lower and upper core support and the grid plate are provided. All these models have been implemented into the code Flux-4. For the solution of the very complex, coupled equations of motions for fluid and fuel rods an efficient numerical solution technique has been developed. With the new code-version Flux-5 the PWR-blowdown is parametically investigated. The calculated core barrel loadings are compared with Flux-4 results, simulating the core's inertia by a mass ring of HDR type. (orig.) [de

  17. The effect of active core exercise on fitness and foot pressure in Taekwondo club students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seong-Deok; Sung, Dong-Hun; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The effects of core training using slings and Togus on the improvement of posture control in Taekwondo club students, that is, balance ability, were investigated. To that end, changes in the Taekwondo players' balance ability resulting from active core training for eight weeks were examined through fitness and foot pressure. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with 13 male Taekwondo players of K University in Deagu, South Korea. Once the experiment process was explained, consent was obtained from those who participated voluntarily. [Methods] Air cushions (Germany), Jumpers (Germany), and Aero-Steps (Germany) were used as lumbar stabilization exercise tools. As a method of training proprioceptive senses by stimulating somatesthesia in standing postures, the subjects performed balance squats, supine pelvic lifts, and push-up plus exercise using slings while standing on an Aero-Step and performed hip extension parallel squats (Wall Gym Ball), and standing press-ups on a Togu using their own weight. The subjects performed four sets of these isometric exercises while maintaining an exercise time per set at 30 seconds in each session and repeated this session three times per week. [Result] Left grip strength significantly increased and number of sit-ups, which indicates muscle endurance, also significantly increased after the eight weeks exercise compared with before the exercise. The values measured during the sit and reach test, which indicate flexibility, also significantly increase after the eight weeks of exercise compared with before the exercise but only in the left foot. [Conclusion] The result of present study suggest that active core exercise using Slings and Togus can be applied as a very effective exercise program for enhancing balance, which is an important physical factor for Taekwondo club students.

  18. Multiobjective pressurized water reactor reload core design by nondominated genetic algorithm search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.

    1996-01-01

    The design of pressurized water reactor reload cores is not only a formidable optimization problem but also, in many instances, a multiobjective problem. A genetic algorithm (GA) designed to perform true multiobjective optimization on such problems is described. Genetic algorithms simulate natural evolution. They differ from most optimization techniques by searching from one group of solutions to another, rather than from one solution to another. New solutions are generated by breeding from existing solutions. By selecting better (in a multiobjective sense) solutions as parents more often, the population can be evolved to reveal the trade-off surface between the competing objectives. An example illustrating the effectiveness of this novel method is presented and analyzed. It is found that in solving a reload design problem the algorithm evaluates a similar number of loading patterns to other state-of-the-art methods, but in the process reveals much more information about the nature of the problem being solved. The actual computational cost incurred depends on the core simulator used; the GA itself is code independent

  19. Performance test of ex-core high temperature and high pressure water loop test equipment (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiroko; Uehara, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Tomoaki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Jinichi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency, we started research and development so as to monitor the situations in the Nuclear Plant Facilities during a severe accident, such as a radiation-resistant monitoring camera, a radiation-resistant transmission system for conveying the in-core information, and a heat-resistant signal cable. As a part of developments of the heat-resistant signal cable, we prepared ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment, which can simulate the conditions of BWRs and PWRs, for evaluating reliability and properties of sheath materials of the cable. This equipment consists of autoclave, water conditioning tank, high-pressure metering pump, preheater, heat exchanger and water purification equipment, etc. This report describes the basic design and the performance test results of ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment. (author)

  20. Basic data generation and pressure loss coefficient evaluation for HANARO core thermal-hydraulic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Kye Hong

    1999-06-01

    MATRA-h, a HANARO subchannel analysis computer code, is used to evaluate thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. It's capability includes the assessments of CHF, ONB margin, and fuel temperature. In this report, basic input data and core design parameters required to perform the subchannel analysis with MATRA-h code are collected. These data include the subchannel geometric data, thermal-hydraulic correlations, empirical constants and material properties. The friction and form loss coefficients of the fuel assemblies were determined based on the results of the pressure drop test. At the same time, different form loss coefficients at the end plates and spacers are evaluated for various subchannels. The adequate correlations are applied to the evaluation of the form loss coefficients for various subchannels, which are corrected by measured values in order to have a same pressure drop at each flow channel. These basic input data and design parameters described in this report will be applied usefully to evaluate the thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. (author). 11 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs

  1. Pressure tube type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To prevent excessive heat generation due to radiation of a pressure tube vessel. Structure: A pressure tube encasing therein a core comprises a dual construction comprising inner and outer tubes coaxially disposed. High speed cooling water is passed through the inner tube for cooling. In addition, in the outer periphery of said outer tube there is provided a forced cooling tube disposed coaxially thereto, into which cooling fluid, for example, such as moderator or reflector is forcibly passed. This forced cooling tube has its outer periphery surrounded by the vessel into which moderator or reflector is fed. By the provision of the dual construction of the pressure tube and the forced cooling tube, the vessel may be prevented from heat generation. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Experience in dismantling and packaging of pressure vessel and core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillokat, Peter; Bruhn, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Company AREVA is proud to look back on versatile experience in successfully dismantling nuclear components. After performing several minor dismantling projects and studies for nuclear power plants, AREVA completed the order for dismantling of all remaining Reactor Pressure Vessel internals at German Boiling Water Reactor Wuergassen NPP in October '08. During the onsite activities about 121 tons of steel were successfully cut and packed under water into 200l- drums, as the dismantling was performed partly in situ and partly in an underwater working tank. AREVA deployed a variety of different cutting techniques such as band sawing, milling, nibbling, compass sawing and water jet cutting throughout this project. After successfully finishing this task, AREVA dismantled the cylindrical part of the Wuergassen Pressure Vessel. During this project approximately 320 tons of steel were cut and packaged for final disposal, as dismantling was mainly performed by on air use of water jet cutting with vacuum suction of abrasive and kerfs material. The main clue during this assignment was the logistic challenge to handle and convey cut pieces from the pressure vessel to the packing area. For this, an elevator was installed to transport cut segments into the turbine hall, where a special housing was built for final storage conditioning. At the beginning of 2007, another complex dismantling project of great importance was acquired by AREVA. The contract included dismantling and conditioning for final storage of the complete RPV Internals of the German Pressurized Water Reactor Stade NPP. Very similar cutting techniques turned out to be the proper policy to cope this task. On-site activities took place in up to 5 separate working areas including areas for post segmentation and packaging to perform optimized parallel activities. All together about 85 tons of Core Internals were successfully dismantled at Stade NPP until September '09. To accomplish the best possible on

  3. The Role of Cerenkov Radiation in the Pressure Balance of Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieu, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Despite the substantial progress made recently in understanding the role of AGN feedback and associated non-thermal effects, the precise mechanism that prevents the core of some clusters of galaxies from collapsing catastrophically by radiative cooling remains unidentified. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the evolution of a cluster's cooling core, in terms of its density, temperature, and magnetic field strength, inevitably enables the plasma electrons there to quickly become Cerenkov loss dominated, with emission at the radio frequency of ≲350 Hz, and with a rate considerably exceeding free–free continuum and line emission. However, the same does not apply to the plasmas at the cluster's outskirts, which lacks such radiation. Owing to its low frequency, the radiation cannot escape, but because over the relevant scale size of a Cerenkov wavelength the energy of an electron in the gas cannot follow the Boltzmann distribution to the requisite precision to ensure reabsorption always occurs faster than stimulated emission, the emitting gas cools before it reheats. This leaves behind the radiation itself, trapped by the overlying reflective plasma, yet providing enough pressure to maintain quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium. The mass condensation then happens by Rayleigh–Taylor instability, at a rate determined by the outermost radius where Cerenkov radiation can occur. In this way, it is possible to estimate the rate at ≈2 M {sub ⊙} year{sup −1}, consistent with observational inference. Thus, the process appears to provide a natural solution to the longstanding problem of “cooling flow” in clusters; at least it offers another line of defense against cooling and collapse should gas heating by AGN feedback be inadequate in some clusters.

  4. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  5. Analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the low-pressure emergency core cooling system tank at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The low pressure emergency core cooling system tanks (LP ECCS) at WWER-440/V213 units have unique worm-shaped geometry. Analytical and experimental investigations were performed to make an adequate basis for seismic assessment of the worm-shaped tank. The full scale dynamic tests results are presented in comparison with shaking table model experiments and analytical studies. (author)

  6. Evaluation of final vapor pressures in the loss of flow accident in an irradiation device of a pool reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The reliability feature, are described for a device containing samples, at a temperatures of 300 grade centigrades, in a reactor core for a long time. After an examination of the maximum accident event, the maximum vapour pressure originated by the inlet of reactor cooling water into the experimental device, is evaluated

  7. Analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the low pressure emergency core cooling system tank at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, K.

    2001-01-01

    The low pressure emergency core cooling system tanks (LP ECCS) at WWER-440/V213 units have unique worm-shaped geometry. Analytical and experimental investigations were performed to make an adequate basis for seismic assessment of the worm-shaped tank. The full scale dynamic tests results are presented in comparison with shaking table model experiments and analytical studies. (author)

  8. Analysis of expediency to set regulators of high-pressure emergency core cooling system of WWER 1000 (B-320)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalozubov, V.I.; Komarov, Yu.A.; Tikhonova, G.G.; Nikiforov, S.N.; Bogodist, V.V.; Fol'tov, I.M.; Khadzh Faradzhallakh Dabbakh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The work shows that setting regulative valves in high-pressure emergency core cooling system of WWER 1000/B-320 can be effective only involving the additional tuning to account traverse speed of operating elements of regulator and configuration of the systems providing cooling of primary loop.

  9. An automated optimization of core fuel loading pattern for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renji

    1988-11-01

    An optimum method was adopted to search for an optimum fuel loading pattern in pressurized water reactors. A radial power peak factor was chosen as the objective function of the optimum loading. The direct search method with shuffling rules is used to find optimum solution. The search for an optimum loading pattern with the smallest radial power peak by exchanging fuel assemblies was made. The search process is divided into two steps. In the first step fresh fuels or high reactivity fuels are arranged which are placed in core interior to have a reasonable fuel loading pattern. To further reduce the radial power peak factor, the second step will be necessary to rearrange the exposed lower reactivity fuel around the assemblies which has the radial power peak. In optimum process 1.5 group coarse mesh diffusion theory or two group nodal Green function diffusion theory is utilized to calculate the two dimensional power distribution after each shuffle. Also, above two methods are combinatively utilized to calculate the state quantity. It is not only true to save CPU time, but also can obtian exact results. Besides above function, the code MSOFEL is used to search critical boron concentration and to predict burn-up. The code has been written with FORTRAN-4. The optimum loading pattern was chosen for OCONEE and QINSHAN nuclear power plants as reference examples. The validity and feasibility of MSOFEL was demonstrated

  10. Nonlinear control for core power of pressurized water nuclear reactors using constant axial offset strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Ansarifar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important operations in nuclear power plants is load following, in which an imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load following operation. In this paper, the design of a sliding mode control (SMC, which is a robust nonlinear controller, is presented. SMC is a means to control pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR power for the load following operation problem in a way that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO strategy to ensure xenon oscillations remain bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for the load following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model with a three delayed neutron groups. The stability analysis is given by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the SMC exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness, and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load following operation is so effective that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the given region.

  11. Vapor Pressure and Predicted Stability of American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Paul C.; Siegel, Paul D.; Warshaw, Erin M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Accurate patch testing is reliant on proper preparation of patch test allergens. The stability of patch test allergens is dependent on several factors including vapor pressure (VP). Objective This investigation reviews the VP of American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergens and compares stability predictions based on VP with those established through clinical testing. Methods Standard references were accessed for determining VP in millimeters of mercury and associated temperature in degrees celsius. If multiple values were listed, VP at temperatures that most approximate indoor storage conditions (20°C and 25°C) were chosen. For mixes, the individual component with the highest VP was chosen as the overall VP, assuming that the most volatile substance would evaporate first. Antigens were grouped into low (≤0.001 mm Hg), moderate (0.001 mm Hg), and high (≥1 mm Hg) volatility using arbitrary cutoff values. Conclusions This review is consistent with previously reported data on formaldehyde, acrylates, and fragrance material instability. Given lack of testing data, VP can be useful in predicting patch test compound stability. Measures such as air-tight multidose reagent containers, sealed single-application dispensers, preparation of patches immediately before application, and storage at lower temperatures may remedy some of these issues. PMID:27427821

  12. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  13. Application of the extended Kalman filtering for the estimation of core coolant flow rate in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    In-core neutron detector and core-exit temperature signals in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) satisfy the condition of observability of the core dynamic system, and can be used to estimate nonmeasurable state variables and model parameters. The extension of the Kalman filtering technique is very useful for direct parameter estimation. This approach is applied to the determination of core coolant mass flow rate in PWRs and is evaluated using in-core measurements at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor. The influence of model uncertainties on the estimation accuracy was studied using the ambiguity function analysis. A sequential discretization method was developed to achieve faster convergence to the true value, avoiding model discretization at each sample point. The performance of the extended Kalman filter and the computational innovations were evaluated using a reduced order core dynamic model of the LOFT reactor and random data simulation. The technique was then applied to the determination of LOFT core coolant flow rate from operational data at 100% and 65% flow conditions

  14. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R. [Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  15. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred

  16. Preliminary evaluation of SACI-O code for the analysis of transients in a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, P.A.; Sirimarco, L.F.; Veloso, M.A.F.

    1979-03-01

    SACI-O is a computer code which deals with the dynamics of the core of pressurized light water reactors (PWR). Its applicability is determined by the evaluation of the models used in the simulation of the several phenomena and processes which occur in the core during transients. This report presents a comparison between the results obtained with SACI-O and those presented in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of Angra dos Reis Nuclear Station, Unit 1. Although some data used in the calculations done by Westinghouse are not known, there was a good agreement between the mentioned results. (Author) [pt

  17. Contributions to the determination of the thermal core reliability of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Horche, W.; Melchior, H.; Prasser, H.M.

    1982-09-01

    The investigations in the field of thermohydraulics of PW reactors are aimed at a possible increase of economy and reliability of WWER-type-reactors. In detail the flow distribution at the core entrance, the modification of the power distribution as a result of an irregular temperature distribution at the core entrance, and based on the theory of hot spots the thermic core reliability are studied. In this connection qualitatively new methods are applied characterized by low expenditure. (author)

  18. The curvilinear relationship between work pressure and momentary task performance: the role of state and trait core self-evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmans, Joeri; Debusscher, Jonas; Dóci, Edina; Spanouli, Andromachi; De Fruyt, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several studies have demonstrated that core self-evaluations (CSE)-or one's appraisals about one's own self-worth, capabilities, and competences-relate to job outcomes, less is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. In the present study, we address this issue by examining the role of within- and between-person variation in CSE in the relationship between work pressure and task performance. We hypothesized that (a) work pressure relates to task performance in a curvilinear way, (b) state CSE mediates the curvilinear relationship between work pressure and task performance, and (c) the relationship between work pressure and state CSE is moderated by trait CSE. Our hypotheses were tested via a 10-day daily diary study with 55 employees in which trait CSE was measured at baseline, while work pressure, task performance, and state CSE were assessed on a daily basis. Bayesian multilevel path analysis showed that work pressure affects task performance via state CSE, with state CSE increasing as long as the employee feels that (s)he is able to handle the work pressure, while it decreases when the level of work pressure exceeds the employees' coping abilities. Moreover, we found that for people low on trait CSE, the depleting effect of work pressure via state CSE happens for low levels of work pressure, while for people high in trait CSE the depleting effect is located at high levels of work pressure. Together, our findings suggest that the impact of work pressure on task performance is driven by a complex interplay of between- and within-person differences in CSE.

  19. A concept of passive safety pressurized water reactor system with inherent matching nature of core heat generation and heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio; Araya, Fumimasa; Iwamura, Takamichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of manpower in operation and maintenance by simplification of the system are essential to improve the safety and the economy of future light water reactors. At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a concept of a simplified passive safety reactor system JPSR was developed for this purpose and in the concept minimization of developing work and conservation of scale-up capability in design were considered. The inherent matching nature of core heat generation and heat removal rate is introduced by the core with high reactivity coefficient for moderator density and low reactivity coefficient for fuel temperature (Doppler effect) and once-through steam generators (SGs). This nature makes the nuclear steam supply system physically-slave for the steam and energy conversion system by controlling feed water mass flow rate. The nature can be obtained by eliminating chemical shim and adopting in-vessel control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) units and a low power density core. In order to simplify the system, a large pressurizer, canned pumps, passive residual heat removal systems with air coolers as a final heat sink and passive coolant injection system are adopted and the functions of volume and boron concentration control and seal water supply are eliminated from the chemical and volume control system (CVCS). The emergency diesel generators and auxiliary component cooling system of 'safety class' for transferring heat to sea water as a final heat sink in emergency are also eliminated. All of systems are built in the containment except for the air coolers of the passive residual heat removal system. The analysis of the system revealed that the primary coolant expansion in 100% load reduction in 60 s can be mitigated in the pressurizer without actuating the pressure relief valves and the pressure in 50% load change in 30 s does not exceed the maximum allowable pressure in accidental conditions in regardless of pressure regulation. (author)

  20. Power-level regulation and simulation of nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillation using H-infinity loop shaping control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to solve the power-level control issue of a nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillations. A nonlinear pressurized water reactor core is modeled using the lumped parameter method, and a linear model of the core is then obtained through the small perturbation linearization way. The H∞loop shapingcontrolis utilized to design a robust controller of the linearized core model.The calculated H∞loop shaping controller is applied to the nonlinear core model. The nonlinear core model and the H∞ loop shaping controller build the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system.Finally, the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system is simulatedconsidering two typical load processes that are a step load maneuver and a ramp load maneuver, and simulation results show that the nonlinear control system is effective.

  1. Respiration and body movement analysis during sleep in bed using hetero-core fiber optic pressure sensors without constraint to human activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishyama, Michiko; Miyamoto, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We describe respiration monitoring in sleep using hetero-core fiber optic pressure sensors. The proposed hetero-core fiber optic sensor is highly sensitive to macrobending as a result of the core diameter difference due to stable single-mode transmission. Pressure sensors based on hetero-core fiber optics were fabricated to have a high sensitivity to small pressure changes resulting from minute body motions, such as respiration, during sleep and large pressure changes, such as those caused by a rollover. The sensors are installed in a conventional bed. The pressure characteristic performance of all the fabricated hetero-core fiber optic pressure sensors is found to show a monotonic response with weight changes. A respiration monitoring test in seven subjects efficiently demonstrates the effective use of eight hetero-core pressure sensors installed in a bed. Additionally, even in the case of different body postures, such as lying on one's side, a slight body movement due to respiration is detected by the hetero-core pressure sensors.

  2. Measuring air core characteristics of a pressure-swirl atomizer via a transparent acrylic nozzle at various Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun J.; Oh, Sang Youp; Kim, Ho Y.; Yoon, Sam S. [Dept. of Mechanical, Korea University Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbukgu, 136-713 Seoul (Korea); James, Scott C. [Thermal/Fluid Science and Engineering, Sandia National Labs, PO Box 969, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Because of thermal fluid-property dependence, atomization stability (or flow regime) can change even at fixed operating conditions when subject to temperature change. Particularly at low temperatures, fuel's high viscosity can prevent a pressure-swirl (or simplex) atomizer from sustaining a centrifugal-driven air core within the fuel injector. During disruption of the air core inside an injector, spray characteristics outside the nozzle reflect a highly unstable, nonlinear mode where air core length, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), cone angle, and discharge coefficient variability. To better understand injector performance, these characteristics of the pressure-swirl atomizer were experimentally investigated and data were correlated to Reynolds numbers (Re). Using a transparent acrylic nozzle, the air core length, SMD, cone angle, and discharge coefficient are observed as a function of Re. The critical Reynolds numbers that distinguish the transition from unstable mode to transitional mode and eventually to a stable mode are reported. The working fluids are diesel and a kerosene-based fuel, referred to as bunker-A. (author)

  3. Fuel management and core design code systems for pressurized water reactor neutronic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Arayones, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    A package of connected code systems for the neutronic calculations relevant in fuel management and core design has been developed and applied for validation to the startup tests and first operating cycle of a 900MW (electric) PWR. The package includes the MARIA code system for the modeling of the different types of PWR fuel assemblies, the CARMEN code system for detailed few group diffusion calculations for PWR cores at operating and burnup conditions, and the LOLA code system for core simulation using onegroup nodal theory parameters explicitly calculated from the detailed solutions

  4. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  5. Planning and Execution of a Marine Methane Hydrate Pressure Coring Program for the Walker Ridge and Green Canyon Areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Gary [Fugro Geoconsulting Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project (and report) is to produce a guide to developing scientific, operational, and logistical plans for a future methane hydrate-focused offshore pressure coring program. This report focuses primarily on a potential coring program in the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks where previous investigations were undertaken as part of the 2009 Department of Energy JIP Leg II expedition, however, the approach to designing a pressure coring program that was utilized for this project may also serve as a useful model for planning pressure coring programs for hydrates in other areas. The initial portion of the report provides a brief overview of prior investigations related to gas hydrates in general and at the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks in particular. The main content of the report provides guidance for various criteria that will come into play when designing a pressure coring program.

  6. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intraoperative core temperature in patients undergoing posterior spine surgery: prospective randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyungseok; Do Son, Je; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Oh, Hyung-Min; Jung, Chul-Woo; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2018-03-01

    Objective Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes carotid baroreceptor unloading, which leads to thermoregulatory peripheral vasoconstriction. However, the effects of PEEP on intraoperative thermoregulation in the prone position remain unknown. Methods Thirty-seven patients undergoing spine surgery in the prone position were assigned at random to receive either 10 cmH 2 O PEEP (Group P) or no PEEP (Group Z). The primary endpoint was core temperature 180 minutes after intubation. Secondary endpoints were delta core temperature (difference in core temperature between 180 minutes and immediately after tracheal intubation), incidence of intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature of peripheral vasoconstriction-related data. Results The median [interquartile range] core temperature 180 minutes after intubation was 36.1°C [35.9°C-36.2°C] and 36.0°C [35.9°C-36.4°C] in Groups Z and P, respectively. The delta core temperature and incidences of intraoperative hypothermia and peripheral vasoconstriction were not significantly different between the two groups. The peripheral vasoconstriction threshold (36.2°C±0.5°C vs. 36.7°C±0.6°C) was lower and the onset of peripheral vasoconstriction (66 [60-129] vs. 38 [28-70] minutes) was slower in Group Z than in Group P. Conclusions Intraoperative PEEP did not reduce the core temperature decrease in the prone position, although it resulted in an earlier onset and higher threshold of peripheral vasoconstriction.

  7. In core monitor having multi-step seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Makoto; Ono, Susumu.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To completely prevent a sensor gas sealed in a pipe from leaking in an in-core neutron detector for use with a bwr type reactor. Constitution: In an in core monitor fabricated by disposing inner and outer electrodes in a housing, forming a layer of neutron conversion material on the outer electrode, filling an ionizing gas within the space between the layer and the inner electrode and, thereafter, attaching an insulation cable and an exhaust pipe respectively by way of insulators to both ends of the housing, the exhaust pipe is sealed in two-steps through pressure bonding using a multi-stepped pincher tool having two pressure bonding bits of a step shape and the outer sealing portion is further welded. The sensor gas sealed in the pipe can thus be prevented from leaking upon pressure bonding and welding. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. In core monitor having multi-step seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, M; Ono, S

    1976-12-09

    A method to completely prevent a sensor gas sealed in a pipe from leaking in an in-core neutron detector for use with a BWR type reactor is described. In an in core monitor fabricated by disposing inner and outer electrodes in a housing, forming a layer of neutron conversion material on the outer electrode, filling an ionizing gas within the space between the layer and the inner electrode and, thereafter, attaching an insulation cable and an exhaust pipe respectively by way of insulators to both ends of the housing, the exhaust pipe is sealed in two-steps through pressure bonding using a multi-stepped pincher tool having two pressure bonding bits of a step shape and the outer sealing portion is further welded. The sensor gas sealed in the pipe can thus be prevented from leaking upon pressure bonding and welding.

  9. Investigation of mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing pressure core sediments recovered from the Eastern Nankai Trough using transparent acrylic cell triaxial testing system (TACTT-system)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, J.; Masui, A.; Konno, Y.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Tenma, N.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate-bearing pressure core sediments have been sheared in compression using a newly developed Transparent Acrylic Cell Triaxial Testing (TACTT) system to investigate the geophysical and geomechanical behavior of sediments recovered from the deep seabed in the Eastern Nankai Trough, the first Japanese offshore production test region. The sediments were recovered by hybrid pressure core system (hybrid PCS) and pressure cores were cut by pressure core analysis tools (PCATs) on board. These pressure cores were transferred to the AIST Hokkaido centre and trimmed by pressure core non-destructive analysis tools (PNATs) for TACTT system which maintained the pressure and temperature conditions within the hydrate stability boundary, through the entire process of core handling from drilling to the end of laboratory testing. An image processing technique was used to capture the motion of sediment in a transparent acrylic cell, and digital photographs were obtained at every 0.1% of vertical strain during the test. Analysis of the optical images showed that sediments with 63% hydrate saturation exhibited brittle failure, although nonhydrate-bearing sediments exhibited ductile failure. In addition, the increase in shear strength with hydrate saturation increase of natural gas hydrate is in agreement with previous data from synthetic gas hydrate. This research was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) that carries out Japan's Methane Hydrate R&D Program by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  10. Plasmas in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, J. W.; Richardson, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Barnes, A.

    1995-01-01

    We review the observed properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere, including observations from Voyager and the Pioneers, as well as from inner heliospheric probes as appropriate. These observations are crucial to modeling of the heliosphere and its interactions with the interstellar medium, since the wind ram pressure and its temporal variations are important in understanding the distance to the termination shock and heliopause and how those boundaries might vary in time. We focus on results since Solar Wind 7. Among the issues we will discuss are: (1) the time scales for and statistical properties of variations in the ram pressure in the outer heliosphere, and how those variations might affect the morphology of the heliospheric/interstellar medium interface; (2) the question of possible solar wind slowing in the outer heliosphere due to the pick-up of interstellar ions; (3) the issue of whether there is bulk heating of the solar wind associated either with interstellar ion pick-up or with continued heating due to stream-stream interactions; (4) evidence for latitudinal variations in solar wind properties; and (5) the 1.3 year periodicities apparent in the outer heliosphere, and the close correspondence with similar variations seen with inner heliospheric probes.

  11. Temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on single dopant states in hollow cylindrical core-shell quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Yadri, M.; Aghoutane, N.; El Aouami, A.; Feddi, E.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.

    2018-05-01

    This work reports on theoretical investigation of the temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on the confined donor impurity in a AlGaAs-GaAs hollow cylindrical core-shell quantum dot. The charges are assumed to be completely confined to the interior of the shell with approximately rigid walls. Within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and by using a variational approach, we have computed the donor binding energies as a function of the shell size in order to study the behavior of the electron-impurity attraction for a very small thickness under the influence of both temperature and hydrostatic pressure. Our results show that the temperature and hydrostatic pressure have a significant influence on the impurity binding energy for large shell quantum dots. It will be shown that the binding energy is more pronounced with increasing pressure and decreasing temperature for any impurity position and quantum dot size. The photoionization cross section is also analyzed by considering only the in-plane incident radiation polarization. Its behavior is investigated as a function of photon energy for different values of pressure and temperature. The opposite effects caused by temperature and hydrostatic pressure reveal a big practical interest and offer an alternative way to tuning of correlated electron-impurity transitions in optoelectronic devices.

  12. Solution NMR investigation of the response of the lactose repressor core domain dimer to hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Brian; Stetz, Matthew A; Belnavis, Zachary; Wand, A Joshua

    2017-12-01

    Previous investigations of the sensitivity of the lac repressor to high-hydrostatic pressure have led to varying conclusions. Here high-pressure solution NMR spectroscopy is used to provide an atomic level view of the pressure induced structural transition of the lactose repressor regulatory domain (LacI* RD) bound to the ligand IPTG. As the pressure is raised from ambient to 3kbar the native state of the protein is converted to a partially unfolded form. Estimates of rotational correlation times using transverse optimized relaxation indicates that a monomeric state is never reached and that the predominate form of the LacI* RD is dimeric throughout this pressure change. Spectral analysis suggests that the pressure-induced transition is localized and is associated with a volume change of approximately -115mlmol -1 and an average pressure dependent change in compressibility of approximately 30mlmol -1 kbar -1 . In addition, a subset of resonances emerge at high-pressures indicating the presence of a non-native but folded alternate state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Heat Transfer Analysis of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) Core Catcher Test Facility Volley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikkarainen, Mika; Laine, Jani; Purhonen, Heikki; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. 20 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Sairanen, Risto [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. 14 00881 Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The EPR is designed to cope with severe accidents, involving core meltdown. A specific melt spreading area has been designed within the containment. This core catcher will be flooded by water, which transfers the decay heat to the containment heat removal system. To improve cooling, horizontal flow channels made of cast iron are located also below the core catcher. STUK, the radiation and nuclear safety authority in Finland, wanted an independent study of the functionality of the core catcher design. Effect of the presence of insulation material and boric acid in the cooling water was to be studied, as well as the general behavior of the system in different phases of the flooding of the core melt spreading area. To verify the function of the core catcher design, a scaled down test facility was built at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Since there are some physical restrictions of a test facility computational tools were applied especially for the tests where steady state conditions could not be reached without endangering the integrity of the test facility. This paper introduces the Volley test facility, computational simulations and compares them with the test results. Simulated temperatures of those Volley tests, which could be run until steady state conditions, are very close to the measured temperatures. It can be concluded also, that the temperatures are evidently below the cast iron melting point with heat fluxes used in the tests, if there is a small flow inside the cooling channels or even in case when only a few adjacent cooling channels are totally dry. (authors)

  14. Heat Transfer Analysis of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) Core Catcher Test Facility Volley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikkarainen, Mika; Laine, Jani; Purhonen, Heikki; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta; Sairanen, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The EPR is designed to cope with severe accidents, involving core meltdown. A specific melt spreading area has been designed within the containment. This core catcher will be flooded by water, which transfers the decay heat to the containment heat removal system. To improve cooling, horizontal flow channels made of cast iron are located also below the core catcher. STUK, the radiation and nuclear safety authority in Finland, wanted an independent study of the functionality of the core catcher design. Effect of the presence of insulation material and boric acid in the cooling water was to be studied, as well as the general behavior of the system in different phases of the flooding of the core melt spreading area. To verify the function of the core catcher design, a scaled down test facility was built at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Since there are some physical restrictions of a test facility computational tools were applied especially for the tests where steady state conditions could not be reached without endangering the integrity of the test facility. This paper introduces the Volley test facility, computational simulations and compares them with the test results. Simulated temperatures of those Volley tests, which could be run until steady state conditions, are very close to the measured temperatures. It can be concluded also, that the temperatures are evidently below the cast iron melting point with heat fluxes used in the tests, if there is a small flow inside the cooling channels or even in case when only a few adjacent cooling channels are totally dry. (authors)

  15. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of pressurized containers made of fiberglass reinforced plastic with balsa wood cores

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of pressurized containers made of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) with balsa cores. Containers of this type are commonly used on tank trailers for the transport of hazardous chemicals. 1.2 This practice is limited to cylindrical shape containers, 0.5 m [20 in.] to 3 m [120 in.] in diameter, of sandwich construction with balsa wood core and over 30 % glass (by weight) FRP skins. Reinforcing material may be mat, roving, cloth, unidirectional layers, or a combination thereof. There is no restriction with regard to fabrication technique or method of design. 1.3 This practice is limited to containers that are designed for less than 0.520 MPa [75.4 psi] (gage) above static pressure head due to contents. 1.4 This practice does not specify a time interval between examinations for re-qualification of a pressure container. 1.5 This practice is used to determine if a container is suitable for service or if follow-up NDT is needed before that...

  16. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Knittle, Elise; Williams, Quentin

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  17. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Knittle, E.; Williams, Q.

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions

  18. Pressurized Hybrid Heat Pipe for Passive IN-Core Cooling System (PINCs) in Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The representative operating limit of the thermosyphon heat pipe is flooding limit that arises from the countercurrent flow of vapor and liquid. The effect of difference between wetted perimeter and heated perimeter on the flooding limit of the thermosyphons has not been studied; despite the effect of cross-sectional area of the vapor path on the heat transfer characteristics of thermosyphons have been studied. Additionally, the hybrid heat pipe must operate at the high temperature and high pressure environment because it will be inserted to the active core to remove the decay heat. However, the previously studied heat pipes operated below the atmospheric pressure. Therefore, the effect of the unique geometry for hybrid heat pipe and operating pressure on the heat transfer characteristics including the flooding limit of hybrid heat pipe was experimentally measured. Hybrid heat pipe as a new conceptual decay heat removal device was proposed. For the development of hybrid heat pipe operating at high temperature and high pressure conditions, the pressurized hybrid heat pipe was prepared and the thermal performances including operation limits of hybrid heat pipe were experimentally measured. Followings were obtained: (1) As operating pressure of the heat pipe increases, the evaporation heat transfer coefficient increases due to heat transfer with convective pool boiling mode. (2) Non-condensable gas charged in the test section for the pressurization lowered the condensation heat transfer by impeding the vapor flow to the condenser. (3) The deviations between experimentally measured flooding limits for hybrid heat pipes and the values from correlation for annular thermosyphon were observed.

  19. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuya; Tsuruta, Hijiri; Watanabe, Asako; Ishimine, Tomoyuki; Ueno, Tomoyuki

    2018-04-01

    We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs) for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (˜20 kHz). We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k) of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  20. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Saito

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (∼20 kHz. We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  1. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System:. [Aerial Vehicle Reconnaissance and Exploration Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles exists. Additional aerospacecraft or other aerial vehicles (UAVs, balloons, rockets, etc.) could fly through the outer planet atmospheres, for global weather observations, localized storm or other disturbance investigations, wind speed measurements, polar observations, etc. Deep-diving aircraft (built with the strength to withstand many atmospheres of pressure) powered by the excess hydrogen or helium 4 may be designed to probe the higher density regions of the gas giants. Outer planet atmospheric properties, atmospheric storm data, and mission planning for future outer planet UAVs are presented.

  2. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  3. Studies on core melt behaviour in a BWR pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Ikonen, K.; Hedberg, K.

    1999-01-01

    Core debris behaviour in the Nordic BWR lower head was investigated numerically using MELCOR and MAAP4 codes. Lower head failure due to penetration failure was studied with more detailed PASULA code taking thermal boundary conditions from MELCOR calculations. Creep rupture failure mode was examined with the two integral codes. Also, the possibility to prevent vessel failure by late reflooding was assessed in this study. (authors)

  4. A heuristic application of critical power ratio to pressurized water reactor core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Jeun, Gyoo Dong

    2002-01-01

    The approach for evaluating the critical heat flux (CHF) margin using the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) concept has been widely applied to PWR core design, while DNBR in this approach does not indicate appropriately the CHF margin in terms of the attainable power margin-to-CHF against a reactor core condition. The CHF power margin must be calculated by increasing power until the minimum DNBR reaches a DNBR limit. The Critical Power Ratio (CPR), defined as the ratio of the predicted CHF power to the operating power, is considered more reasonable for indicating the CHF margin and can be calculated by a CPR correlation based on the heat balance of a test bundle. This approach yields directly the CHF power margin, but the calculated CPR must be corrected to compensate for many local effects of the actual core, which are not considered in the CHF test and analysis. In this paper, correction of the calculated CPR is made so that it may become equal to the DNB overpower margin. Exemplary calculations showed that the correction tends to be increased as power distribution is more distorted, but are not unduly large

  5. An evaluation of designed passive Core Makeup Tank (CMT) for China pressurized reactor (CPR1000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tian, Wenxi; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Zhang, Yapei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Only PRHRS is not sufficient to maintain reactor safety in case of SGTR accident. ► The Core Makeup Tank (CMT) is designed for CPR1000. ► Joint operation of PRHRS and CMT can keep reactor safety during the SGTR transient. ► CMT is a vital supplement for CPR1000 passive safety system design. - Abstract: Emergency Passive Safety System (EPSS) is an innovative design to improve reliability of nuclear power plants. In this work, the EPSS consists of secondary passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS) and the reactor Core Makeup Tank (CMT) system. The PRHRS, which has been studied in our previous paper, can effectively remove the core residual heat and passively improve the inherent safety by passive methods. The designed CMT, representing the safety improvement for CPR1000, is used to inject cool boron-containing water into the primary system during the loss of coolant accident. In this study, the behaviors of EPSS and transient characteristics of the primary loop system during the Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accident are investigated using the nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD3.4. The results show that the designed CMT can protect the reactor primary loop from boiling and maintain primary loop coolant in single phase state. Both PRHRS and CMT operation ensures reactor safety during the SGTR accident. Results reported in this paper show that the designed CMT is a further safety improvement for CPR1000

  6. Investigation on the Effect of Underwater Acoustic Pressure on the Fundamental Mode of Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, microstructured optical fibers have become the subject of extensive research as they can be employed in many civilian and military applications. One of the recent areas of research is to enhance the normalized responsivity (NR to acoustic pressure of the optical fiber hydrophones by replacing the conventional single mode fibers (SMFs with hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBFs. However, this needs further investigation. In order to fully understand the feasibility of using HC-PBFs as acoustic pressure sensors and in underwater communication systems, it is important to study their modal properties in this environment. In this paper, the finite element solver (FES COMSOL Multiphysics is used to study the effect of underwater acoustic pressure on the effective refractive index neff of the fundamental mode and discuss its contribution to NR. Besides, we investigate, for the first time to our knowledge, the effect of underwater acoustic pressure on the effective area Aeff and the numerical aperture (NA of the HC-PBF.

  7. Modeling and analysis of neutron noise from an ex-core detector at a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Perez, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Two applications of a noise diagnostic methodology were performed using ex-core neutron detector data from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A feedback dynamics model of the neutron power spectral density (PSD) was derived from a low-order whole-plant physical model made stochastic using the Langevin technique. From a functional fit to plant data, the response of the dynamic system to changes in important physical parameters was evaluated by a direct sensitivity analysis. In addition, changes in monitored spectra were related to changes in physical parameters and detection thresholds using common surveillance discriminants were determined. A resonance model was developed from perturbation theory to give the ex-core neutron detector response for small in-core mechanical motions in terms of a pole-strength factor, a resonance asymmetry (or skewness) factor, a vibration damping factor, and a frequency of vibration. The mechanical motion parameters for several resonances were determined by a functional fit of the model to plant data taken at various times during a fuel cycle and were tracked to determine trends that indicated vibrational changes of reactor internals. In addition, the resonance model gave the ability to separate the resonant components of the PSD after the parameters had been identified. As a result, the behavior of several vibration peaks were monitored over a fuel cycle. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  8. Three-Dimensional Full Core Power Calculations for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Slaybaugh, Rachel N.

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a new multilevel parallel decomposition in the Denovo discrete ordinates radiation transport code. In concert with Krylov subspace iterative solvers, the multilevel decomposition allows concurrency over energy in addition to space-angle. The original space-angle partitioning in Denovo placed an eective limit on the scalability of the transport solver that was highly dependent on the problem size. The added phase-space concurrency combined with the high-performance Krylov solvers has enabled weak scaling to 100K cores on the Jaguar XT5 supercomputer. Furthermore, the multilevel decomposition provides enough concurrency to scale to exascale computing and beyond.

  9. Core-state models for fuel management of equilibrium and transition cycles in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Corella, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel management requires that mass, energy, and reactivity balance be satisfied in each reload cycle. Procedures for selection of alternatives, core-state models, and fuel cost calculations have been developed for both equilibrium and transition cycles. Effective cycle lengths and fuel cycle variables--namely, reload batch size, schedule of incore residence for the fuel, feed enrichments, energy sharing cycle by cycle, and discharge burnup and isotopics--are the variables being considered for fuel management planning with a given energy generation plan, fuel design, recycling strategy, and financial assumptions

  10. Physical properties of fault zone rocks from SAFOD: Tying logging data to high-pressure measurements on drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppson, T.; Tobin, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2005, Phase 2 of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole was completed and logged with wireline tools including a dipole sonic tool to measure P- and S-wave velocities. A zone of anomalously low velocity was detected from 3150 to 3414 m measured depth (MD), corresponding with the subsurface location of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ). This low velocity zone is 5-30% slower than the surrounding host rock. Within this broad low-velocity zone, several slip surfaces were identified as well as two actively deforming shear zones: the southwest deformation zone (SDZ) and the central deformation zone (CDZ), located at 3192 and 3302 m MD, respectively. The SAFZ had also previously been identified as a low velocity zone in seismic velocity inversion models. The anomalously low velocity was hypothesized to result from either (a) brittle deformation in the damage zone of the fault, (b) high fluid pressures with in the fault zone, or (c) lithological variation, or a combination of the above. We measured P- and S-wave velocities at ultrasonic frequencies on saturated 2.5 cm diameter core plug samples taken from SAFOD core obtained in 2007 from within the low velocity zone. The resulting values fall into two distinct groups: foliated fault gouge and non-gouge. Samples of the foliated fault gouge have P-wave velocities between 2.3-3.5 km/s while non-gouge samples lie between 4.1-5.4 km/s over a range of effective pressures from 5-70 MPa. There is a good correlation between the log measurements and laboratory values of P-and S wave velocity at in situ pressure conditions especially for the foliated fault gouge. For non-gouge samples the laboratory values are approximately 0.08-0.73 km/s faster than the log values. This difference places the non-gouge velocities within the Great Valley siltstone velocity range, as measured by logs and ultrasonic measurements performed on outcrop samples. As a high fluid pressure zone was not encountered during

  11. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  12. Hydrocarbon formation core protection and and transportation apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus for transporting core samples includes an outer tube having an open end and a cover removably mounted to the open end; a core tube slidable into and out ofthe outer tube when the cover is removed from the outer tube; and a stabilizing structure between the core tube and the outer tube,

  13. Turbulent heat transfer in a coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Saha, Arun K.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Exact predictions in nuclear reactors are more crucial, because of the safety aspects. It necessitates the appropriate modeling of heat transfer phenomena in the reactors core. A two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model is used to study the detailed analysis of the coolant region of a fuel pin. Governing equations are solved using Marker and Cell (MAC) method. Standard wall functions k-ε turbulence model is incorporated to consider the turbulent behaviour of the flow field. Validation of the code and a few results for a typical PWR running at normal operating conditions reported earlier. There were some discrepancies in the old calculations. These discrepancies have been resolved and updated results are presented in this work. 2D thermal-hydraulics model results have been compared with the 1D thermal-hydraulics model results and conclusions have been drawn. (author)

  14. Reloading optimization of pressurized water reactor core with burnable absorber fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiuan; Liu Zhihong; Hu Yongming

    2008-01-01

    The reloading optimization problem of PWR with burnable absorber fuel is very difficult, and common optimization algorithms are inefficient and have bad global performance for it. Characteristic statistic algorithm (CSA) is very fit for the problem. In the past, the reloading optimization using CSA has shortcomings of separating the fuel assemblies' loading pattern (LP) optimization from burnable absorber's placement (BP) optimization. In this study, LP and BP were optimized simultaneously using CSA coupled with CYCLE2D, which is a core analysis code. The corresponding reloading coupling optimization software, CSALPBP, was developed. The 10th cycle reloading design of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant was optimized using CSALPBP. The results show that CSALPBP has high efficiency and excellent global performance. (authors)

  15. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Osamu; Kumasaka, Katsuyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To remove the heat of reactor core using a great amount of moderators at the periphery of the reactor core as coolants. Constitution: Heat of a reactor core is removed by disposing a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling moderators in a moderator tank, without using additional power driven equipments. That is, a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling the moderators in the moderator tank is disposed. Further, the gap between the inner wall of a pressure tube guide pipe disposed through the vertical direction of a moderator tank and the outer wall of a pressure tube inserted through the guide pipe is made smaller than the rupture distortion caused by the thermal expansion upon overheating of the pressure tube and greater than the minimum gap required for heat shiels between the pressure tube and the pressure tube guide pipe during usual operation. In this way, even if such an accident as can not using a coolant cooling device comprising power driven equipment should occur in the pressure tube type reactor, the rise in the temperature of the reactor core can be retarded to obtain a margin with time. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  17. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  18. Analysis of proposed gamma-ray detection system for the monitoring of core water inventory in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoff, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and downcomer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region

  19. Passive device for emergency core cooling of pressurized water reactors. Pasivno ustrojstvo za bezopasnost na vodo-voden atomen reaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, D

    1984-02-28

    The device proposed ensures additional margin of reactor subcriticality in case of post-accident emergency core cooling (ECC), using concentrated solution of chemical absorber and hot water from the secondary circuit. It consists of: a) a differential cylinder with a differential piston in it, with a lid and a seal, connected to a pipeline for secondary coolant; b) a pipeline for the secondary coolant; c) a volume between the lid and the piston for the secondary coolant from the steam generator; d) a discharge pipeline with a check valve of seal type connecting the inner volume of the differential cylinder to the discharge line; and e) a pipeline from the high-pressure volume of the differential cylinder filled with concentrated chemical absorber solution, to one of the main circulation loops. The device permits ECC innovation of the operating non-standard nuclear power plants with PWR type reactors.

  20. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  1. Drill core investigations from the TMI-2 pressure vessel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, D.; Katerbau, K.H.; Maile, K.; Ruoff, H.

    1994-01-01

    For the evaluation of the results obtained in TMI-2 VIP and for the preparation of the continuing discussion in the OECD and of research measures in the national sphere but also for the appraisal of the effect of the results to date on safety philosophy and safety research in Germany, the present research project, inter alia, was commenced. In content was: a) Furtherance of the OECD-NEA-TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project in dealing with the testing programme by active collaboration in the Programme Review Group, by participation in ad-hoc meetings on the question of specimen extraction, by advice on the conduct of metallographic, metallurgical and mechanical investigations on the specimens from the RPV bottom head and by assessment of the findings. b) Investigation of specimens from the bottom head of the TMI-2 reactor pressure vessel. c) Investigation of specimens from archive material. The investigations reach the widely agreed conclusion that during the accident a hot spot developed in the bottom head of the reactor in which for a time of about 30 minutes a maximum temperature of some 1100 C or greater than 900 C prevailed. Around this zone there is a region with temperatures higher than ca. 730 C (A 1 ) whilst the predominant portion of the head had not been heated beyond the 1 temperature. (orig.) [de

  2. Advanced neutron source reactor conceptual safety analysis report, three-element-core design: Chapter 15, accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.; Harrington, R.M.

    1996-02-01

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design for the Advanced Neutron Source has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. To assess the impact of changes in the core region configuration and the thermal-hydraulic steady-state conditions, the safety analysis has been updated. This report gives the safety margins for the loss-of-off-site power and pressure-boundary fault accidents based on the RELAP5 results. AU margins are greater for the three-element-core simulations than those calculated for the two-element core

  3. RELAP5 model for advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic transients, three-element-core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1996-02-01

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. However, the total flow rate through the core is greater and the pressure drop across the core is less so that the primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers are operating at a different point in their performance curves. This report describes the new RELAP5 input for the core components.

  4. Coolant Mixing in a Pressurized Water Reactor: Deboration Transients, Steam-Line Breaks, and Emergency Core Cooling Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael; Grunwald, Gerhard; Hoehne, Thomas; Kliem, Soeren; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2003-01-01

    The reactor transient caused by a perturbation of boron concentration or coolant temperature at the inlet of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) depends on the mixing inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Initial steep gradients are partially lessened by turbulent mixing with coolant from the unaffected loops and with the water inventory of the RPV. Nevertheless the assumption of an ideal mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of the reactor leads to unrealistically small reactivity inserts. The uncertainties between ideal mixing and total absence of mixing are too large to be acceptable for safety analyses. In reality, a partial mixing takes place. For realistic predictions it is necessary to study the mixing within the three-dimensional flow field in the complicated geometry of a PWR. For this purpose a 1:5 scaled model [the Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) facility] of the German PWR KONVOI was built. Compared to other experiments, the emphasis was put on extensive measuring instrumentation and a maximum of flexibility of the facility to cover as much as possible different test scenarios. The use of special electrode-mesh sensors together with a salt tracer technique provided distributions of the disturbance within downcomer and core entrance with a high resolution in space and time. Especially, the instrumentation of the downcomer gained valuable information about the mixing phenomena in detail. The obtained data were used to support code development and validation. Scenarios investigated are the following: (a) steady-state flow in multiple coolant loops with a temperature or boron concentration perturbation in one of the running loops, (b) transient flow situations with flow rates changing with time in one or more loops, such as pump startup scenarios with deborated slugs in one of the loops or onset of natural circulation after boiling-condenser-mode operation, and (c) gravity-driven flow caused by large density gradients, e.g., mixing of cold

  5. Toward power scaling in an acetylene mid-infrared hollow-core optical fiber gas laser: effects of pressure, fiber length, and pump power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, H. W. Kushan; Dadashzadeh, Neda; Thirugnanasambandam, Manasadevi P.; Debord, Benoît.; Chafer, Matthieu; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L.; Washburn, Brian R.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of gas pressure, fiber length, and optical pump power on an acetylene mid-infrared hollow-core optical fiber gas laser (HOFGLAS) is experimentally determined in order to scale the laser to higher powers. The absorbed optical power and threshold power are measured for different pressures providing an optimum pressure for a given fiber length. We observe a linear dependence of both absorbed pump energy and lasing threshold for the acetylene HOFGLAS, while maintaining a good mode quality with an M-squared of 1.15. The threshold and mode behavior are encouraging for scaling to higher pressures and pump powers.

  6. Automatic determination of pressurized water reactor core loading patterns which maximize end-of-cycle reactivity within power peaking and burnup constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    An automated procedure for determining the optimal core loading pattern for a pressurized water reactor which maximizes end-of-cycle k/sub eff/ while satisfying constraints on power peaking and discharge burnup has been developed. The optimization algorithm combines a two energy group, two-dimensional coarse-mesh finite difference diffusion theory neutronics model to simulate core conditions, a perturbation theory approach to determine reactivity, flux, power and burnup changes as a function of assembly shuffling, and Monte Carlo integer programming to select the optimal loading pattern solution. The core examined was a typical Cycle 2 reload with no burnable poisons. Results indicate that the core loading pattern that maximizes end-of-cycle k/sub eff/ results in a 5.4% decrease in fuel cycle costs compared with the core loading pattern that minimizes the maximum relative radial power peak

  7. The Outer Space Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Negotiated at the United Nations and in force since 1967, the Outer Space Treaty has been ratified by over 100 countries and is the most important and foundational source of space law. The treaty, whose full title is "Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies," governs all of humankind's activities in outer space, including activities on other celestial bodies and many activities on Earth related to outer space. All space exploration and human spaceflight, planetary sciences, and commercial uses of space—such as the global telecommunications industry and the use of space technologies such as position, navigation, and timing (PNT), take place against the backdrop of the general regulatory framework established in the Outer Space Treaty. A treaty is an international legal instrument which balances rights and obligations between states, and exists as a kind of mutual contract of shared understandings, rights, and responsibilities between them. Negotiated and drafted during the Cold War era of heightened political tensions, the Outer Space Treaty is largely the product of efforts by the United States and the USSR to agree on certain minimum standards and obligations to govern their competition in "conquering" space. Additionally, the Outer Space Treaty is similar to other treaties, including treaties governing the high seas, international airspace, and the Antarctic, all of which govern the behavior of states outside of their national borders. The treaty is brief in nature and only contains 17 articles, and is not comprehensive in addressing and regulating every possible scenario. The negotiating states knew that the Outer Space Treaty could only establish certain foundational concepts such as freedom of access, state responsibility and liability, non-weaponization of space, the treatment of astronauts in distress, and the prohibition of non-appropriation of

  8. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  9. Convective heat transport of high-pressure flows inside active, thick walled-tubes with isothermal outer surfaces: usage of Nusselt correlation equations for an inactive, thin walled-tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, Antonio [Idaho State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Dept., Pocatello, ID (United States); Sanchez, Alejo [Universidad de los Andes, Depto. de Ingenieria Mecanica, Merida (Venezuela)

    1998-03-01

    A semi-analytical analysis was conducted for the prediction of the mean bulk- and interface temperatures of gaseous and liquid fluids moving laminarly at high pressures inside thick-walled metallic tubes. The outer surfaces of the tubes are isothermal. The central goal of this article is to critically examine the thermal response of this kind of in-tube flows utilizing two versions of the 1-D lumped model: one is differential-numerical while the other is differential-algebraic. For the former, the local Nusselt number characterizing an inactive, isothermal tube was taken from correlation equations reported in the heat transfer literature. For the latter, a streamwise-mean Nusselt number associated with an active, isothermal tube was taken from standard correlation equations that appear in text-books on basic heat transfer. For the two different versions of the 1-D lumped model tested, the computed results consistently demonstrate that the differential-algebraic, provides accurate estimates of both the mean bulk- and the interface temperatures when compared with those temperature results computed with formal 2-D differential models. (author)

  10. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core low pressure (LPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrillo G, O. E.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The present work presents the modeling and simulation of the aspersion system to low pressure of reactor of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using the nuclear code RELAP/SCDAP. The objective of the emergency systems inside a nuclear reactor is the cooling of the core, nor caring the performance of any other emergency system in the case of an accident design base for coolant loss. To obtain a simulation of the system is necessary to have a model based on their main components, pipes, pumps, valves, etc. This article describes the model for the simulation of the main line and the test line for the HPCS. At the moment we have the simulation of the reactor vessel and their systems associated to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, this work will allow to associate the emergency system model LPCS to the vessel model. The simulation of the vessel and the emergency systems will allow knowing the behavior of the reactor in the stage of the coolant loos, giving the possibility to analyze diverse scenarios. The general model will provide an auxiliary tool for the training in classroom and at distance in the operation of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  11. Computational simulation of natural convection of a molten core in lower head of a PWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Romero, Gabriel Alves; Jian Su

    2010-01-01

    Computational simulation of natural convection in a molten core during a hypothetical severe accident in the lower head of a typical PWR pressure vessel was performed for two-dimensional semi-circular geometry with isothermal walls. Transient turbulent natural convection heat transfer of a fluid with uniformly distributed volumetric heat generation rate was simulated by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYS CFX 12.0. The Boussinesq model was used for the buoyancy effect generated by the internal heat source in the flow field. The two-equation k-ω based SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model was used to mould the turbulent stresses in the Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). Two Prandtl numbers, 6:13 and 7:0, were considered. Five Rayleigh numbers were simulated for each Prandtl number used (109, 1010, 1011, 1012, and 1013). The average Nusselt numbers on the bottom surface of the semicircular cavity were in excellent agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) correlation and only at Ra = 109 the average Nusselt number on the top flat surface was in agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) and Kulacki and Emara (1975) correlations. (author)

  12. Holddown arrangement for removable cover of a pressurized nuclear-reactor core and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beine, B.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear-reactor core is surrounded by a burst shield having a side wall formed with a plurality of longitudinal passages in which are received longitudinal prestressing elements whose upper ends extend beyond the upper edge of the side wall. The cover is formed with a plurality of holes that register with the passages in the side wall so that the cover can be set over the top of the side wall with the upper ends of the prestressing elements projecting beyond the cover. Each prestressing element is provided at its upper end with an anchor body which can bear in force-transmitting relationship either with the side wall of the burst shield through a sleeve received in the cover and having a lower end standing on the upper edge of the side wall and an upper end adjacent the anchor body, or with the cover by means of a removable nut screwed on to the anchor body and engageable in force-transmitting relationship with the cover. In use the anchor body is dimensioned to pass through the cover on the top of the side wall so that when this cover is to be removed the nut is unscrewed and the anchor body bears through the sleeve on the upper edge of the side wall in order that the side wall not be destressed. 8 claims, 6 drawing figures

  13. TPS for Outer Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Ellerby, D.; Gage, P.; Gasch, M.; Hwang, H.; Prabhu, D.; Stackpoole, M.; Wercinski, Paul

    2018-01-01

    This invited talk will provide an assessment of the TPS needs for Outer Planet In-situ missions to destinations with atmosphere. The talk will outline the drivers for TPS from destination, science, mission architecture and entry environment. An assessment of the readiness of the TPS, both currently available and under development, for Saturn, Titan, Uranus and Neptune are provided. The challenges related to sustainability of the TPS for future missions are discussed.

  14. Procurement of replacement pressure vessels for MURR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.A. Jr.; Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; Schoone, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR) located in Columbia, Missouri, is the highest powered, highest steady-state flux university research reactor in the United States. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-reflected, flux trap reactor. MURR has a compact core (0.033 m 3 ) composed of eight fuel elements of the materials test reactor type arranged as an annular right circular cylinder between the inner and outer aluminum pressure vessels. Conservative engineering judgment resulted in the decision in 1988 to purchase new inner and outer pressure vessels. This paper details the difficulties encountered in procuring replacements for aluminum pressure vessels built to standards that are no longer applicable in attempting to meet nuclear standards that are not applicable to nonferrous material

  15. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data represents geographic terms used within the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA or Act). The Act defines the United States outer continental shelf...

  16. Ab-initio study of pressure evolution of structural, mechanical and magnetic properties of cementite (Fe3C) phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, S.; Ghosh, P. S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Arya, A.

    2018-04-01

    The pressure evolution of phase stability, structural and mechanical properties of Fe3C in ferro-magnetic (FM) and high pressure non magnetic (NM) phase is investigated from first principle calculations. The 2nd order FM to NM phase transition of Fe3C is identified around 60 GPa. Pressure (or density) variation of sound velocities from our ab-initio calculated single crystal elastic constants are determined to predict these parameters at Earth's outer core pressure.

  17. Experimental study of the correction factor for the grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop for the new core of the RA 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, Viviana P.; Garcia, Juan C.; Delmastro, Dario F.

    2007-01-01

    It is necessary to determine the pressure drop in the different components in order to calculate the total pressure drop of RA-6 reactor core. Some of these components have simple geometries and the calculation of its pressure drop is relatively easy. But in some cases, the sub-channels where the cooling water flows have non uniform cross sections and its geometries are not in the handbook. Due to changes in the design of components of the new nucleus of the RA-6 it was necessary to perform a new set of full-scale experiments to determine the pressure drop in some affected subchannels. Different gaps between fuel elements are considered in order to take into account the design allowances. With the obtained results we calculate correction coefficients for the pressure loss coefficients. These coefficients allow fitting the model of calculation with the results obtained in the experiments and they were used to calculate the flow distribution in the core. (author) [es

  18. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  19. Accident Source Terms for Pressurized Water Reactors with High-Burnup Cores Calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Goldmann, Andrew; Kalinich, Donald A.; Powers, Dana A.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs 2 MoO 4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU

  20. The Influence Of Temperature And Pressure On AP600 Pressure Vessel Analysis By Two Dimensional Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utaya

    1996-01-01

    Pressure vessel is an important part of nuclear power plan, and its function is as pressure boundary of cooling water and reactor core. The pressure vessel wall will get pressure and thermal stress. The pressure and thermal stress analysis at the simplified AP600 wall was done. The analysis is carried out by finite method, and then solved by computer. The analysis result show, that the pressure will give the maximum stress at the inner wall (1837 kg/cm 2 ) and decreased to the outer wall (1685 kg/cm 2 ). The temperature will decreased the stress at the inner wall (1769 kg/cm 2 ) and increased the stress at the outer wall (1749 kg/cm 2 )

  1. Measuring element for determining the internal pressure in fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckers, H.; Drexler, H.; Reiser, H.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure cell is situated inside the fuel rod, which contains a magnetic core or a core influenced by magnetism, whose position relative to an outer front surface of an end stopper of the fuel rod can vary. The fuel rod contains a pressure cell directly above the lower end stopper or connected to it. This can consist of closed bellows, where if the internal pressure in the fuel rod rises, a ferrite core moves axially. When the pressure drops, this returns to the initial position, which is precisely defined by a stop. To detect a rod defect, the position of the soft iron core relative to the lower edge of the end stopper is scanned by a special measuring device. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Comparisons with measured data of the simulated local core parameters by the coupled code ATHLET-BIPR-VVER applying a new enhanced model of the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.; Pautz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the performed comparisons of measured and simulated local core data based on the OECD/NEA Benchmark on Kalinin-3 NPP: 'Switching off of one of the four operating main circulation pumps at nominal reactor power'. The local measurements of in core self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) in 64 fuel assemblies on 7 axial levels are used for the comparisons of the assemblies axial power distributions and the thermocouples readings at 93 fuel assembly heads are applied for the fuel assembly coolant temperature comparisons. The analyses are done on the base of benchmark transient calculations performed with the coupled system code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER. In order to describe more realistically the fluid mixing phenomena in a reactor pressure vessel a new enhanced nodalization scheme is being developed. It could take into account asymmetric flow behaviour in the reactor pressure vessel structures like downcomer, reactor core inlet and outlet, control rods' guided tubes, support grids etc. For this purpose details of the core geometry are modelled. About 58000 control volumes and junctions are applied. Cross connection are used to describe the interaction between the fluid objects. The performed comparisons are of great interest because they show some advantages by performing coupled code production pseudo-3D analysis of NPPs applying the parallel thermo-hydraulic channel methodology (or 1D thermo-hydraulic system code modeling). (Authors)

  3. Sulfur in Earth's Mantle and Its Behavior During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Righter,Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The density of Earth's outer core requires that about 5-10% of the outer core be composed of elements lighter than Fe-Ni; proposed choices for the "light element" component of Earth's core include H, C, O, Si, S, and combinations of these elements [e.g. 1]. Though samples of Earth's core are not available, mantle samples contain elemental signatures left behind from the formation of Earth's core. The abundances of siderophile (metal-loving) elements in Earth's mantle have been used to gain insight into the early accretion and differentiation history of Earth, the process by which the core and mantle formed, and the composition of the core [e.g. 2-4]. Similarly, the abundance of potential light elements in Earth's mantle could also provide constraints on Earth's evolution and core composition. The S abundance in Earth's mantle is 250 ( 50) ppm [5]. It has been suggested that 250 ppm S is too high to be due to equilibrium core formation in a high pressure, high temperature magma ocean on early Earth and that the addition of S to the mantle from the subsequent accretion of a late veneer is consequently required [6]. However, this earlier work of Li and Agee [6] did not parameterize the metalsilicate partitioning behavior of S as a function of thermodynamic variables, limiting the different pressure and temperature conditions during core formation that could be explored. Here, the question of explaining the mantle abundance of S is revisited, through parameterizing existing metal-silicate partitioning data for S and applying the parameterization to core formation in Earth.

  4. Chemical Reactions Between Fe and H2O up to Megabar Pressures and Implications for Water Storage in the Earth's Mantle and Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang; Ohtani, Eiji; Ikuta, Daijo; Kamada, Seiji; Tsuchiya, Jun; Naohisa, Hirao; Ohishi, Yasuo; Suzuki, Akio

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the phase relations of the Fe-H2O system at high pressures based on in situ X-ray diffraction experiments and first-principles calculations and demonstrate that FeHx and FeO are present at pressures less than 78 GPa. A recently reported pyrite-structured FeO2 was identified in the Fe-H2O system at pressures greater than 78 GPa after laser heating. The phase observed in this study has a unit cell volume 8%-11% larger than that of FeO2, produced in the Fe-O binary system reported previously, suggesting that hydrogen might be retained in a FeO2Hx crystal structure. Our observations indicate that H2O is likely introduced into the deep Earth through reaction between iron and water during the accretion and separation of the metallic core. Additionally, reaction between Fe and H2O would occur at the core-mantle boundary, given water released from hydrous subducting slabs that intersect with the metallic core. Accumulation of volatile-bearing iron compounds may provide new insights into the enigmatic seismic structures observed at the base of the lower mantle.

  5. Management of outer space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perek, Lubos

    1993-10-01

    Various aspects of space-environment management are discussed. Attention is called to the fact that, while space radio communications are already under an adequate management by the International Communications Union, the use of nuclear power sources is regulated by the recently adopted set of principles, and space debris will be discussed in the near future at the UN COPUOS, other aspects of management of outer space received little or no attention of the international community. These include the competency of crews and technical equipment of spacecraft launched by newcomers to space exploration; monitoring of locations and motions of space objects (now in national hands), with relevant data made accessible through a computer network; and the requirement to use space only for beneficial purposes and not for promoting narrow and debatable interests damaging the outer space environment and impeding on astronomical observations. It is suggested that some of these tasks would be best performed by an international space agency within the UN system of organizations.

  6. Equation of State of Fe3C and Implications for the Carbon Content of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon is a common component in protoplanetary cores, as represented by iron meteorites. Therefore, along with silicon, oxygen, and other light elements, it is likely to be an alloying component with iron in Earth's core. Previous studies of the densities of iron carbides have not reached the combined pressure and temperature conditions relevant to Earth's core. To better understand the geophysical implications of carbon addition to Earth's core, we report P-V-T measurements of Fe3C to pressures and temperatures exceeding 110 GPa and 2500 K, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. Fitting these measurements to an equation of state and assuming 1.5% density change upon melting and a 4000 K core-mantle boundary temperature, we report a value of 6 wt% carbon necessary to match the PREM density in the outer core. This value should be considered an upper bound due to the likely presence of other light elements.

  7. Automatic determination of pressurized water reactor core loading patterns that maximize beginning-of-cycle reactivity within power-peaking and burnup constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to automatically determine a good estimate of the core loading pattern, which minimizes fuel cycle costs for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Equating fuel cycle cost minimization with core reactivity maximization, the objective is to determine the loading pattern that maximizes core reactivity while satisfying power peaking, discharge burnup, and other constraints. The method utilizes a two-dimensional, coarse-mesh, finite difference scheme to evaluate core reactivity and fluxes for an initial reference loading pattern. First-order perturbation theory is applied to determine the effects of assembly shuffling on reactivity, power distribution, end-of-cycle burnup. Monte Carlo integer programming is then used to determine a near-optimal loading pattern within a range of loading patterns near the reference pattern. The process then repeats with the new loading pattern as the reference loading pattern and terminates when no better loading pattern can be determined. The process was applied with both reactivity maximization and radial power-peaking minimization as objectives. Results on a typical large PWR indicate that the cost of obtaining an 8% improvement in radial power-peaking margin is ≅2% in fuel cycle costs, for the reload core loaded without burnable poisons that was studied

  8. Pressure-induced structural change in MgSiO3 glass at pressures near the Earth's core-mantle boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yoshio; Shibazaki, Yuki; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2018-02-20

    Knowledge of the structure and properties of silicate magma under extreme pressure plays an important role in understanding the nature and evolution of Earth's deep interior. Here we report the structure of MgSiO 3 glass, considered an analog of silicate melts, up to 111 GPa. The first (r1) and second (r2) neighbor distances in the pair distribution function change rapidly, with r1 increasing and r2 decreasing with pressure. At 53-62 GPa, the observed r1 and r2 distances are similar to the Si-O and Si-Si distances, respectively, of crystalline MgSiO 3 akimotoite with edge-sharing SiO 6 structural motifs. Above 62 GPa, r1 decreases, and r2 remains constant, with increasing pressure until 88 GPa. Above this pressure, r1 remains more or less constant, and r2 begins decreasing again. These observations suggest an ultrahigh-pressure structural change around 88 GPa. The structure above 88 GPa is interpreted as having the closest edge-shared SiO 6 structural motifs similar to those of the crystalline postperovskite, with densely packed oxygen atoms. The pressure of the structural change is broadly consistent with or slightly lower than that of the bridgmanite-to-postperovskite transition in crystalline MgSiO 3 These results suggest that a structural change may occur in MgSiO 3 melt under pressure conditions corresponding to the deep lower mantle.

  9. Electronic state and photoionization cross section of a single dopant in GaN/InGaN core/shell quantum dot under magnetic field and hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouami, A. El; Feddi, E.; Talbi, A.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we have investigated the simultaneous influence of magnetic field combined to the hydrostatic pressure and the geometrical confinement on the behavior of a single dopant confined in GaN/InGaN core/shell quantum dots. Within the scheme of the effective-mass approximation, the eigenvalues equation has solved by using the variational method with one-parameter trial wavefunctions. Variation of the ground state binding energy of the single dopant is determined according to the magnetic field and hydrostatic pressure for several dimensions of the heterostructure. The results show that the binding energy is strongly dependent on the core/shell sizes, the magnetic field, and the hydrostatic pressure. The analysis of the photoionization cross section, corresponding to optical transitions associated to the first donor energy level and the conduction band, shows clearly that the reduction of the dot dimensions and/or the simultaneous influences of applied magnetic field, combined to the hydrostatic pressure strength, cause a shift in resonance peaks towards the higher energies with important variations in the magnitude of the resonant peaks.

  10. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  11. Outer atmospheric research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The region above the earth from about 90 km to 150 km is a major part of the upper or outer atmosphere. It is relatively unexplored, being too high for balloons or aircraft and too low for persistent orbiting spacecraft. However, the concept of a tethered subsatellite, deployed downward from an orbiting, more massive craft such as the Space Shuttle, opens the possibility of a research capability that could provide global mapping of this region. The need for research in this thick spherical shell above the earth falls into two major categories: (1) scientific data for understanding and modeling the global atmosphere and thereby determining its role in the earth system, and (2) engineering data for the design of future aerospace vehicles that will operate there. This paper presents an overview and synthesis of the currently perceived research needs and the state-of-the-art of the proposed tethered research capability. 16 references

  12. An investigation of scramming the outer shutdown rods of the ANS with no reversal of flow in the manifold inlet lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsk, K.

    1992-10-01

    This report provides calculations and calculation checks on the outer shutdown system, consisting of eight shutdown rods located on the outside of the core. The function of the system is to scram the reactor, or to break the chain reaction of the fission process. The shutdown rods are clad with a neutron-absorbing material (i.e., hafnium) to achieve scram. During normal operation, the outer shutdown rods (Fig. 1) are in a nonscram, withdrawn position. This means that they are not close enough to the core to absorb a significant number of the neutrons that cause the fission process. In the case of a malfunction or an emergency, the outer control rods are moved to a position near the core. The outer shutdown system is operated with the use of springs and hydraulics. During normal operation, a constant flow of heavy water is circulated through the reflector vessel. A part of this flow provides a pressure high enough to keep the rods in their withdrawn or upper position, a nonscram status. If any signs of abnormal operation occur, the valves in the hydraulic system cut off the flow, and the springs push the rods into the scram position, stopping the chain reaction. Once the flow is restarted, the rods can be withdrawn to the nonscram position. Calculations of the mass of the outer control rod, the scram spring data, and the hydraulic pressure to hold the rods in the withdrawn position have been checked. In the case of a malfunction of the flow/pressure relief valves, a calculation was needed to show that the scram time would not exceed the time allowed. The scram time has been determined based on different values of the rod insertion length and the outside radius of the annulus was calculated. The effective force pushing the rod into the scram position, the rate of acceleration, and the actual scram time was then determined

  13. Protection of nuclear facilities against outer aggressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aussourd, P.; Candes, P.; Le Quinio, R.

    1976-01-01

    The various types of outer aggressions envisaged in safety analysis for nuclear facilities are reviewed. These outer aggressions are classified as natural and non-natural phenomena, the latter depending on the human activities in the vicinity of nuclear sites. The principal natural phenomena able to constitute aggressions are atmospheric phenomena (strong winds, snow storms, hail, frosting mists), hydrologie phenomena such as tides, surges, flood, low waters, and geologic phenomena such as earthquakes. Artificial phenomena are concerned with aircraft crashes, projectiles, fire, possible ruptures of dams, and intentional human aggressions. The protection against intentional human aggressions is of two sorts: first, the possibility of access to the installations mostly sensitive to sabotage are to be prevented or reduced, secondly redundant circuits and functions must be separated for preventing their simultaneous destruction in the case when sabotage actors have reach the core of the facility [fr

  14. An estimation of core damage frequency of a pressurized water reactor during midloop operation due to loss of residual heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.; Chen, C.T.; Lee, M.

    1995-01-01

    The core damage frequency caused by loss of residual heat removal (RHR) events was assessed during midloop operation of a Westinghouse-designed three-loop pressurized water reactor. The assessment considers two types of outages (refueling and drained maintenance) and uses failure data collected specifically for shutdown condition. Event trees were developed for five categories of loss of RHR events. Human actions to mitigate the loss of RHR events were identified and human error probabilities were quantified using the human cognitive reliability (HCR) and the technique for human error rate prediction (THERP) models. The results showed that the core damage frequency caused by loss of RHR events during midloop operation was 3.4 x 10 -5 per year. The results also showed that the core damage frequency can be reduced significantly by removing a pressurizer safety valve before entering midloop operation. The establishment of reflux cooling, i.e., decay heat removal through the steam generator secondary side, also plays an important role in mitigating the loss of RHR events during midloop operation

  15. Methods to Load Balance a GCR Pressure Solver Using a Stencil Framework on Multi- and Many-Core Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosz Ciznicki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of novel multi- and many-core architectures forces application programmers to deal with hardware-specific implementation details and to be familiar with software optimisation techniques to benefit from new high-performance computing machines. Extra care must be taken for communication-intensive algorithms, which may be a bottleneck for forthcoming era of exascale computing. This paper aims to present a high-level stencil framework implemented for the EULerian or LAGrangian model (EULAG that efficiently utilises multi- and many-cores architectures. Only an efficient usage of both many-core processors (CPUs and graphics processing units (GPUs with the flexible data decomposition method can lead to the maximum performance that scales the communication-intensive Generalized Conjugate Residual (GCR elliptic solver with preconditioner.

  16. Is the nutation of the solid inner core responsible for the 24-year libration of the pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Chuichi; Okamoto, Isao; Sasao, Tetsuo

    1975-01-01

    BUSSE's (1970) theory of the dynamical coupling between the rigid inner core and mantle of the Earth through the pressure reactions in the fluid outer core is examined. It is confirmed that the rigid inner core has the eigenfrequency, (1-rhosub(t)/rhosub(r))esub(r)Ω 0 , of nutation (Ω 0 : the mean rotation rate of the Earth, esub(r): ellipticity of the rigid inner core, and rhosub(t), rhosub(r): the densities of the fluid outer and rigid inner cores, respectively), but it is concluded to be extremely difficult to interpret the 24-yr libration of the pole suggested by MARKOWITZ (1960, 1968) in terms of the nutation with this frequency. (auth.)

  17. Vacuum Outer-Gap Structure in Pulsar Outer Magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui-Fang, Lin; Li, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We study the vacuum outer-gap structure in the outer magnetosphere of rotation-powered pulsars by considering the limit of trans-field height through a pair production process. In this case, the trans-field height is limited by the photon-photon pair production process and the outer boundary of the outer gap can be extended outside the light cylinder. By solving self-consistently the Poisson equation for electrical potential and the Boltzmann equations of electrons/positrons and γ-rays in a vacuum outer gap for the parameters of Vela pulsar, we obtain an approximate geometry of the outer gap, i.e. the trans-field height is limited by the pair-production process and increases with the radial distance to the star and the width of the outer gap starts at the inner boundary (near the null charge surface) and ends at the outer boundary which locates inside or outside the light cylinder depending on the inclination angle. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  18. Inner core tilt and polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Bloxham, Jeremy

    2002-11-01

    A tilted inner core permits exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle through gravitational and pressure torques and, as a result, changes in the direction of Earth's axis of rotation with respect to the mantle. We have developed a model to calculate the amplitude of the polar motion that results from an equatorial torque at the inner core boundary which tilts the inner core out of alignment with the mantle. We specifically address the issue of the role of the inner core tilt in the decade polar motion known as the Markowitz wobble. We show that a decade polar motion of the same amplitude as the observed Markowitz wobble requires a torque of 1020 N m which tilts the inner core by 0.07 degrees. This result critically depends on the viscosity of the inner core; for a viscosity less than 5 × 1017 Pa s, larger torques are required. We investigate the possibility that a torque of 1020 N m with decadal periodicity can be produced by electromagnetic coupling between the inner core and torsional oscillations of the flow in the outer core. We demonstrate that a radial magnetic field at the inner core boundary of 3 to 4 mT is required to obtain a torque of such amplitude. The resulting polar motion is eccentric and polarized, in agreement with the observations. Our model suggests that equatorial torques at the inner core boundary might also excite the Chandler wobble, provided there exists a physical mechanism that can generate a large torque at a 14 month period.

  19. Rapid, dynamic segregation of core forming melts: Results from in-situ High Pressure- High Temperature X-ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, H. C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and mechanisms of core formation in the Earth, as well as in Earth-forming planetesimals is a problem of significant importance in our understanding of the early evolution of terrestrial planets . W-Hf isotopic signatures in meteorites indicate that core formation in small pre-differentiated planetesimals was relatively rapid, and occurred over the span of a few million years. This time scale is difficult to achieve by percolative flow of the metallic phase through a silicate matrix in textural equilibrium. It has been suggested that during this active time in the early solar system, dynamic processes such as impacts may have caused significant deformation in the differentiating planetesimals, which could lead to much higher permeability of the core forming melts. Here, we have measured the change in permeability of core forming melts in a silicate matrix due to deformation. Mixtures of San Carlos olivine and FeS close to the equilibrium percolation threshold (~5 vol%FeS) were pre-synthesized to achieve an equilibrium microstructure, and then loaded into the rotational Drickamer apparatus at GSE-CARS, sector 13-BMD, at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory). The samples were subsequently pressed to ~2GPa, and heated to 1100°C. Alternating cycles of rotation to collect X-ray tomography images, and twisting to deform the sample were conducted until the sample had been twisted by 1080°. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the resulting 3-dimensional x-ray tomographic images to evaluate the effect of shear deformation on permeability and migration velocity. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations were conducted, and show a marked increase in the permeability with increasing deformation, which would allow for much more rapid core formation in planetesimals.

  20. Synthesis of the IRSN report on the topic of water way answers to implement in case of accident with core meltdown occurring on operating pressurized water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    This report briefly discusses the efficiency of technical measures adopted for the implementation of water ways as answers to an accident with core meltdown in operating pressurized water nuclear reactors. While mentioning the importance of the hydro-geological characteristics of the various sites, the IRSN asks EDF to plan and implement means to prevent any rejection through water ways for some of these sites, to investigate the possibility of building a geotechnical enclosure, to define a storing-control-treatment-rejection chain which would guarantee an efficient management of the water to be pumped, to study retention phenomena for strontium and caesium isotopes in sands and gravels

  1. Application of Direct Current Atmospheric Pressure Glow Microdischarge Generated in Contact with a Flowing Liquid Solution for Synthesis of Au-Ag Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzimitrowicz, Anna; Jamroz, Piotr; Nyk, Marcin; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-04-06

    A direct current atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (dc-μAPGD) generated between an Ar nozzle microjet and a flowing liquid was applied to produce Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AgCSNPs) in a continuous flow system. Firstly, operating dc-μAPGD with the flowing solution of the Au(III) ions as the cathode, the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) core was produced. Next, to produce the core-shell nanostructures, the collected AuNPs solution was immediately mixed with an AgNO₃ solution and passed through the system with the reversed polarity to fabricate the Ag nanoshell on the AuNPs core. The formation of Au@AgCSNPs was confirmed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Three localized surface plasmon resonance absorption bands with wavelengths centered at 372, 546, and 675 nm were observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of Au@AgCSNPs, confirming the reduction of both the Au(III) and Ag(I) ions. The right configuration of metals in Au@AgCSNPs was evidenced by TEM. The Au core diameter was 10.2 ± 2.0 nm, while the thickness of the Ag nanoshell was 5.8 ± 1.8 nm. The elemental composition of the bimetallic nanoparticles was also confirmed by EDS. It is possible to obtain 90 mL of a solution containing Au@AgCSNPs per hour using the applied microdischarge system.

  2. Standardization of the methodology used for fuel pressure drop evaluation to improve hydraulic calculation of heterogeneous cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Borgne, E.; Mattei, A.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous searching for safer and more efficient fuel, and diversification of fuel supply have as a consequence a possible change in the characteristics of the fuel assemblies used in nuclear reactors. By partially refueling cores with new assemblies, nuclear power plant operators are confronted with the problem of heterogeneous cores. The complexity of the problem increases as products diversify in isotopic concentration, types of alloy, size and shape of structure components. This document will focus strictly on the differences in hydraulic resistance related to the modifications in grid structures having no effect on DNB correlations. Although this is an extremely simplified approach to the problem, establishing data to evaluate the hydraulic compatibility between two different assemblies can be difficult, and if not controlled closely, can lead to false conclusions that may affect the operation and safety of the reactor. (authors). 2 figs

  3. Ultrasonic examination of defects close to the outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, P.; Serre, M.; Champigny, F.

    1986-11-01

    During the examination of a pressurized water reactor vessel with an in Service Inspection Machine (MIS), various welds are scanned with immersion ultrasonic focused transducers from the inside of the vessel. Defects close to the outer surface are sometimes detected, and sizing with the successive 6 dB drop method leads to oversize some indications; this is caused by various reflections on the outer wall; the corner echo is of particular importance here. CEA and EDF have started an experimental program in order to study the response of volumetric and planar defects located near the outer surface. We present here the first results obtained with artificial defects. 2 refs

  4. The ab initio simulation of the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfè, D; Gillan, M J; Vocadlo, L; Brodholt, J; Price, G D

    2002-06-15

    The Earth has a liquid outer and solid inner core. It is predominantly composed of Fe, alloyed with small amounts of light elements, such as S, O and Si. The detailed chemical and thermal structure of the core is poorly constrained, and it is difficult to perform experiments to establish the properties of core-forming phases at the pressures (ca. 300 GPa) and temperatures (ca. 5000-6000 K) to be found in the core. Here we present some major advances that have been made in using quantum mechanical methods to simulate the high-P/T properties of Fe alloys, which have been made possible by recent developments in high-performance computing. Specifically, we outline how we have calculated the Gibbs free energies of the crystalline and liquid forms of Fe alloys, and so conclude that the inner core of the Earth is composed of hexagonal close packed Fe containing ca. 8.5% S (or Si) and 0.2% O in equilibrium at 5600 K at the boundary between the inner and outer cores with a liquid Fe containing ca. 10% S (or Si) and 8% O.

  5. Core barrel plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolino, R.W.; Hopkins, R.J.; Congleton, R.L.; Popalis, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    A plug is described for preventing flow through a port in a core barrel of a pressurized water nuclear reactor which consists of: a substantially cylindrical body formed with a cylindrical portion and a flange and defining a tapered leading open end with the other end being closed by an end plug attached to the flange, the body defining a bore therein extending from the open end to the end plug with the bore having a smaller diameter near the open end than near the end plug, the cylindrical portion having a lip near the open end and being formed with longitudinal slots extending from the open end toward the flange and extending entirely through the thickness of the cylindrical portion, the cylindrical portion having a circumferential first groove on the outer surface thereof located near the forwardmost portion of the cylindrical portion but not in the section of the cylindrical portion that has the slots therein, and a plurality of circumferential second grooves on the outer surface thereof located in the section of the cylindrical portion that has the slots therein, the first and second grooves establishing a seal between the cylindrical portion and the inside surface of the port when the cylindrical portion is expanded, and the flange and the end plug having a passageway defined therein for introducing a fluid into the body; a metal ring disposed in each of the second grooves; a mandrel slidably disposed and captured in the body and capable of being moved toward the open end of the body when the fluid is introduced through the passageway, thereby causing the cylindrical portion to be expanded into contact with the inside surface of the port; and a locking mechanism disposed in the end plug for preventing inadvertent movement of the mandrel

  6. The OPERA loop in the OSIRIS reactor core. Pressurized-water irradiation device to study Advanced Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucot, M.; Roche, M.

    1986-09-01

    This loop is designed to allow fuel qualification test, i.d. to allow irradiation of representative parts fuel assemblies operating in thermohydraulic and chemical conditions representative of these of present pressurized water reactors or in development. This paper presents the aims of the installation, the general design and the main specifications with a brief detailed description [fr

  7. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  8. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, D.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    A high-priority topic for the nuclear industry is the safety, consequently a nuclear power plant should have the emergency systems of cooling of the core (ECCS), designed exclusively to enter in operation in the event of an accident with coolant loss, including the design base accident. The objective of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) is to provide in an autonomous way the cooling to the core maintaining for if same the coolant inventory even when a small break is presented that does not allow the depressurization of the reactor and also avoiding excessive temperatures that affect the shielding of the fuel. The present work describes the development of the model and the simulation of the HPCS using the RELAP/SCDAP code. During the process simulation, for the setting in march of the system HPCS in an accident with coolant loss is necessary to implement the main components of the system taking into account what unites them, the main pump, the filled pump, the suction and injection valves, pipes and its water sources that can be condensed storage tanks and the suppression pool. The simulation of this system will complement the model with which counts the Analysis Laboratory in Nuclear Reactors Engineering of the UNAM regarding to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde which does not have a detailed simulation of the emergency cooling systems. (Author)

  9. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  10. DISCOVERY OF PULSATIONS, INCLUDING POSSIBLE PRESSURE MODES, IN TWO NEW EXTREMELY LOW MASS, He-CORE WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Bell, Keaton J.; Harrold, Samuel T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin, E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We report the discovery of the second and third pulsating extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs (WDs), SDSS J111215.82+111745.0 (hereafter J1112) and SDSS J151826.68+065813.2 (hereafter J1518). Both have masses < 0.25 M{sub Sun} and effective temperatures below 10, 000 K, establishing these putatively He-core WDs as a cooler class of pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere WDs (DAVs, or ZZ Ceti stars). The short-period pulsations evidenced in the light curve of J1112 may also represent the first observation of acoustic (p-mode) pulsations in any WD, which provide an exciting opportunity to probe this WD in a complimentary way compared to the long-period g-modes that are also present. J1112 is a T{sub eff} =9590 {+-} 140 K and log g =6.36 {+-} 0.06 WD. The star displays sinusoidal variability at five distinct periodicities between 1792 and 2855 s. In this star, we also see short-period variability, strongest at 134.3 s, well short of the expected g-modes for such a low-mass WD. The other new pulsating WD, J1518, is a T{sub eff} =9900 {+-} 140 K and log g =6.80 {+-} 0.05 WD. The light curve of J1518 is highly non-sinusoidal, with at least seven significant periods between 1335 and 3848 s. Consistent with the expectation that ELM WDs must be formed in binaries, these two new pulsating He-core WDs, in addition to the prototype SDSS J184037.78+642312.3, have close companions. However, the observed variability is inconsistent with tidally induced pulsations and is so far best explained by the same hydrogen partial-ionization driving mechanism at work in classic C/O-core ZZ Ceti stars.

  11. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  12. Effect of the design change of the LSSBP on core flow distribution of APR+ Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kihwan; Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Hae-Seob; Kwon, Tae-Soon

    2014-01-01

    The uniform core inlet flow distribution of an Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR+) is required to prevent the failure rate of the HIPER fuel assembly and improve the core thermal margin. KEPCO-E and C and KAERI proposed a design change of the Lower Support Structure Bottom Plate (LSSBP), since the core flow rates were intense near the outer region of the intact LSSBP in a previous study. In this study, an experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of the design change of the LSSBP on the core flow distribution using the APR+ Core Flow and Pressure (ACOP) test facility. The results showed great improvement on the core flow distribution under a 4-pump balanced flow condition. Under the 4-pump balanced flow condition, fifteen tests were repeated using the ACOP test facility to verify the effect of the 50% blocked flow area at the outer region of the LSSBP on the core inlet flow distribution. The profiles of the core inlet mass flow rates were analyzed using ensemble averaged values, and compared with that of the intact LSSBP. The results showed great improvement for the overall core region. The change in design of the LSSBP is expected to improve the hydraulic performance of an APR+ reactor

  13. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Resource Capturing, Exploration, and Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system (AMOSS) has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high-energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as helium 3 (He-3) and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. 3He and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest, with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of AMOSS. These analyses included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and helium 4 (He-4) are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential exists for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles. Additional aerospacecraft or other aerial vehicles (UAVs, balloons, rockets, etc.) could fly through the outer-planet atmosphere to investigate cloud formation dynamics, global weather, localized storms or other disturbances, wind speeds, the poles, and so forth. Deep-diving aircraft (built with the strength to withstand many atmospheres of pressure) powered by the excess hydrogen or 4He may be designed to probe the higher density regions of the gas giants.

  14. Hypothesis of Piezoelectricity of Inner Core As the Origin of Geomagnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Hayakawa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel hypothesis is proposed that assumes piezoelectricity of the inner core as the origin of geomagnetism. By high pressure, electric charge is created on the surface and at the center of the earth. Inner core rotation yields a magnetic field. From the intensity and direction of geomagnetism at the present time, the surface charge density of the inner core is assumed to be -2x10-5C/m2. The rotation axis of the inner core is inclined by 10.4 degrees from that of the mantle. The inner core rotates with the mantle rotation. The reason for this is thought to be the eddy currents induced in the outer core of electrically conductive fluid that rotates with the mantle.

  15. Unique rod lens/video system designed to observe flow conditions in emergency core coolant loops of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques and equipment are described which are used for video recordings of the single- and two-phase fluid flow tests conducted with the PKL Spool Piece Measurement System designed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and EG and G Inc. The instrumented spool piece provides valuable information on what would happen in pressurized water reactor emergency coolant loops should an accident or rupture result in loss of fluid. The complete closed-circuit television video system, including rod lens, light supply, and associated spool mounting fixtures, is discussed in detail. Photographic examples of test flows taken during actual spool piece system operation are shown

  16. Hydro-mechanical properties of pressure core sediments recovered from the Krishna-Godavari Basin during India's National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition NGHP-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, J.; Oshima, M.; Kida, M.; Kato, A.; Konno, Y.; Jin, Y.; Waite, W. F.; Jang, J.; Kumar, P.; Tenma, N.

    2017-12-01

    Pressure coring and analysis technology allows for gas hydrate to be recovered from the deep seabed, transferred to the laboratory and characterized while continuously maintaining gas hydrate stability. For this study, dozens of hydrate-bearing pressure core sediment subsections recovered from the Krishna-Godavari Basin during India's National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition NGHP-02 were tested with Pressure Core Non-destructive Analysis Tools (PNATs) through a collaboration between Japan and India. PNATs, originally developed by AIST as a part of the Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI) conducted permeability, compression and consolidation tests under various effective stress conditions, including the in situ stress state estimated from downhole bulk density measurements. At the in situ effective stress, gas hydrate-bearing sediments had an effective permeability range of 0.01-10mD even at pore-space hydrate saturations above 60%. Permeability increased by 10 to 100 times after hydrate dissociation at the same effective stress, but these post-dissociation gains were erased when effective stress was increased from in situ values ( 1 MPa) to 10MPa in a simulation of the depressurization method for methane extraction from hydrate. Vertical-to-horizontal permeability anisotropy was also investigated. First-ever multi-stage loading tests and strain-rate alternation compression tests were successfully conducted for evaluating sediment strengthening dependence on the rate and magnitude of effective confining stress changes. In addition, oedometer tests were performed up to 40MPa of consolidation stress to simulate the depressurization method in ultra-deep sea environments. Consolidation curves measured with and without gas hydrate were investigated over a wide range of effective confining stresses. Compression curves for gas hydrate-bearing sediments were convex downward due to high hydrate saturations. Consolidation tests show that

  17. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry F.; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    , trees, and shrubs.In 1937, Congress authorized the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, which was established in 1953. The national seashore preserved one of the world’s best examples of a barrier island environment, and minimized the effect of erosion that was becoming a serious problem. In 1966, Congress authorized the Cape Lookout National Seashore to ensure that Core and Shackleford Banks would not undergo major development and could be preserved in their natural state.The rate of population growth along the Outer Banks in recent decades has been among the highest in North Carolina. More important, however, has been the growth in vacationers—in 2008, more than a quarter of a million visitors during a typical week. Municipalities now need to provide services to a transient population as much as six times as large as their permanent resident population.Although human activities have dominated the landscape changes observed on the Outer Banks for the past century or two, these changes must be understood in the context of the prevailing atmospheric, oceanic, and geologic processes that have governed the form and function of these islands for thousands of years. It is these natural processes that imbue the Outer Banks with their unique and dichotomous qualities of tranquility and tumult. In the presence of human occupation, it is these same processes that make the islands one of the highest natural-hazard risk zones along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.

  18. Development of CHF models for inner and outer RPV gaps in a meltdown severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Tian, W.X.; Feng, K.; Yu, H.X.; Zhang, Y.P.; Su, G.H.; Qiu, S.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A CHF model was developed to predict the CHF in hemispherical narrow gap. • The computed result was validated by the test data of Park and Köhler. • An analytical CHF model was developed to predict the CHF on the outer surface of the lower head. • The predicted CHF was compared with the experimental data of ULPU-V. • Two CHF models developed for the inner and outer CHF predict the CHF well. - Abstract: During a severe accident, the core melt relocates in the lower head and a hemispherical narrow gap may appear between the crust and the lower head because of the different material expansion ratio. The existence of this gap is very important to the integrity of the lower head. Based on the counter current flow limitation (CCFL) between the vapor phase and the liquid phase, a CHF model was developed to predict the CHF in hemispherical narrow gap. The CHF model developed was validated by the test data of Park and Köhler. The effect of key parameters, including the system pressure, radius of melt, and gap size, on the CHF were investigated. And the TMI-2 accident was also calculated by using the CHF formula. Moreover, based on the interface separation model, an analytical CHF model was developed to predict the CHF on the outer surface of the lower head. The predicted CHF was compared with the experimental data of ULPU-V. It indicated that the CHF models developed for the inner and outer CHF could predict the CHF well

  19. Hydro-ball in-core instrumentation system and method of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tower, S.N.; Veronesi, L.; Braun, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an instrumentation system. It is for a pressure vessel of nuclear reactor, the vessel having an outer enclosure defined by a generally cylindrical sidewall with a generally vertical central axis and upper and lower edges, and top and bottom heads secured in sealed relationship to the upper and lower edges, respectively, of the cylindrical sidewall, and the vessel enclosing therein a core including elongated fuel element assemblies mounted in parallel axial relationship

  20. A class-based search for the in-core fuel management optimization of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson; Rancoita, Paola; Schirru, Roberto; Gambardella, Luca Maria

    2010-01-01

    The In-Core Fuel Management Optimization (ICFMO) is a prominent problem in nuclear engineering, with high complexity and studied for more than 40 years. Besides manual optimization and knowledge-based methods, optimization metaheuristics such as Genetic Algorithms, Ant Colony Optimization and Particle Swarm Optimization have yielded outstanding results for the ICFMO. In the present article, the Class-Based Search (CBS) is presented for application to the ICFMO. It is a novel metaheuristic approach that performs the search based on the main nuclear characteristics of the fuel assemblies, such as reactivity. The CBS is then compared to the one of the state-of-art algorithms applied to the ICFMO, the Particle Swarm Optimization. Experiments were performed for the optimization of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant, located at the Southeast of Brazil. The CBS presented noticeable performance, providing Loading Patterns that yield a higher average of Effective Full Power Days in the simulation of Angra 1 NPP operation, according to our methodology.

  1. A class-based search for the in-core fuel management optimization of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson, E-mail: ameneses@lmp.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Nuclear Engineering Program, CP 68509, CEP 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rancoita, Paola [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), Galleria 2, 6982 Manno-Lugano, TI (Switzerland); Mathematics Department, Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Schirru, Roberto [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Nuclear Engineering Program, CP 68509, CEP 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gambardella, Luca Maria [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), Galleria 2, 6982 Manno-Lugano, TI (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    The In-Core Fuel Management Optimization (ICFMO) is a prominent problem in nuclear engineering, with high complexity and studied for more than 40 years. Besides manual optimization and knowledge-based methods, optimization metaheuristics such as Genetic Algorithms, Ant Colony Optimization and Particle Swarm Optimization have yielded outstanding results for the ICFMO. In the present article, the Class-Based Search (CBS) is presented for application to the ICFMO. It is a novel metaheuristic approach that performs the search based on the main nuclear characteristics of the fuel assemblies, such as reactivity. The CBS is then compared to the one of the state-of-art algorithms applied to the ICFMO, the Particle Swarm Optimization. Experiments were performed for the optimization of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant, located at the Southeast of Brazil. The CBS presented noticeable performance, providing Loading Patterns that yield a higher average of Effective Full Power Days in the simulation of Angra 1 NPP operation, according to our methodology.

  2. Irradiation of UO2 specimens with molten cores in a pressurized water loop. Test X-2-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, A.S.

    1961-08-01

    Two Zircaloy-2 clad specimens containing stoichiometric UO 2 pellets were irradiated in a pressurized water loop for 379 hours at heat ratings sufficient to cause central melting of the UO 2 . There was no appearance of localized overheating or accelerated corrosion of the sheath, but the diametral increases were considerably larger than those observed in loop specimens irradiated at lower heat ratings. The length increases, however, were approximately the same as those measured for specimens at lower ratings. There was a clearly visible demarcation between UO 2 that had been molten and that which had not. The value of ∫ 500 o C Tm kdθ = 74 ± W/cm was essentially the same as that obtained from the short-duration tests in the Hydraulic Rabbit, indicating there is no marked decrease in thermal conductivity of the UO 2 fuel in irradiations up to 379 hours. (author)

  3. Evaluation of load case ''switch-off of the high pressure pump of the emergency core cooling system'', measures of verification and in situ-test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trobitz, M.; Mattheis, A.; Kerkhof, K.; Hippelein, K.; Hofstoetter, P.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of periodic safety inspection of the Gundremmingen power station (RWE-Bayernwerk - KRB II), the load collectives used for the design of safety-relevant systems and components were checked for their consistency with latest updates of the design basis. It was found that there was no analytical information or study available describing a particular process and its effects, namely switch-off of the high-pressure feedwater pump of the emergency core cooling system. The paper reports the work performed for closing the gap, including preparatory analyses, accompanying measures such as vibration measurements during plant shut-down, as well as the preparation and performance of the in-situ test. The experimental results and the comparative evaluation of calculated and experimental data are presented. (orig./CB) [de

  4. Development of local heat transfer and pressure drop models for pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor cores - HTR2008-58296

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, B.; Worsley, M.; Stainsby, R.; Grief, A.; Dennier, A.; Macintosh, S.; Van Heerden, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient predictions for a typical coolant flow within the core of a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by examining a representative group of pebbles remote from the reflector region. The three- dimensional steady state flow and heat transfer predictions utilized in this work are obtained from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model created in the commercial software ANSYS FLUENT TM . This work utilizes three RANS turbulence models and the Chilton-Colburn analogy for heat transfer. A methodology is included in this paper for creating a quality unstructured mesh with prismatic surface layers on a random arrangement of touching pebbles. The results of the model are validated by comparing them with the correlations of the German KTA rules for a PBR. (authors)

  5. HANARO core channel flow-rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heon Il; Chae, Hee Tae; Im, Don Soon; Kim, Seon Duk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    HANARO core consists of 23 hexagonal flow tubes and 16 cylindrical flow tubes. To get the core flow distribution, we used 6 flow-rate measuring dummy fuel assemblies (instrumented dummy fuel assemblies). The differential pressures were measured and converted to flow-rates using the predetermined relationship between AP and flow-rate for each instrumented dummy fuel assemblies. The flow-rate for the cylindrical flow channels shows +-7% relative errors and that for the hexagonal flow channels shows +-3.5% relative errors. Generally the flow-rates of outer core channels show smaller values compared to those of inner core. The channels near to the core inlet pipe and outlet pipes also show somewhat lower flow-rates. For the lower flow channels, the thermal margin was checked by considering complete linear power histories. From the experimental results, the gap flow-rate was estimated to be 49.4 kg/s (cf. design flow of 50 kg/s). 15 tabs., 9 figs., 10 refs. (Author) .new.

  6. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchiani, M.; Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M. [SIET S.p.A. Piacenza (Italy)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l` Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l` Energia e l` Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test {open_quotes}2{close_quotes} Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line break{close_quotes} are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2.

  7. A porous medium approach for the fluid structure interaction modelling of a water pressurized nuclear reactor core fuel assemblies: simulation and experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, G.

    2008-10-01

    The designing of a pressurized water reactor core subjected to seismic loading, is a major concern of the nuclear industry. We propose, in this PhD report, to establish the global behaviour equations of the core, in term of a porous medium. Local equations of fluid and structure are space averaged on a control volume, thus we define an equivalent fluid and an equivalent structure, of which unknowns are defined on the whole space. The non-linear fuel assemblies behaviour is modelled by a visco-elastic constitutive law. The fluid-structure coupling is accounted for by a body force, the expression of that force is based on empirical formula of fluid forces acting on a tube subject to an axial flow. The resulting equations are solved using a finite element method. A validation of the model, on three experimental device, is proposed. The first one presents two fuel assemblies subjected to axial flow. One of the two fuel assemblies is deviated from its position of equilibrium and released, while the other is at rest. The second one presents a six assemblies row, immersed in water, placed on a shaking table that can simulate seismic loading. Finally, the last one presents nine fuel assemblies network, arranged in a three by three, subject to an axial flow. The displacement of the central fuel assembly is imposed. The simulations are in agreement with the experiments, the model reproduces the influence of the flow of fluid on the dynamics and coupling of the fuel assemblies. (author)

  8. Performance Specification Shippinpark Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders

  9. Non-universality of vacuum pressure B in hadrons, mass of dilambda and nonperturbative gluonic contribution to the repulsive NN-interaction core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Krivoruchenko, M.I.; Shchepkin, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Vacuum pressure B 6 for six-quark systems is evaluated from a restriction on the admixture of 6q-bag in the deuteron and from the data on the deuteron magnetic moment. The obtained value of B 6 is approximately twice as much as that for the three-quark systems: B 6 /B 3 =1.8-1.9. In the MIT, ITEP and chiral versions of the bag model, masses of the dilambda and the 6q-bag with the deuteron quantum numbers are calculated. The increase of the bag constant B 6 makes the dilambda mass higher by 270-330 MeV; as a consequence the dilambda is no longer bound. The non-universality of B results in an increasing height of the repulsive NN core, which rises from 300 up to 700 MeV. If the core height is 300 MeV (corresponding to B 6 =B 3 ) the derivetive of the NN scattering phase shift in the 3 S 1 channel changes its sigh at T lab ≅ 450 MeV, in contradiction to the experimental data. The behaviour of the phase shift in the interval 100-700 MeV is in a seasonable agreement with the second variant, B 6 > B 3

  10. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  11. Ejection Performance of Coated Core Pins Intended for Application on High Pressure Die Casting Tools for Aluminium Alloys Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Terek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In high pressure die casting (HPDC process of aluminium alloys cast alloy soldering severely damages tool surfaces. It hampers casting ejection, reduces the casting quality and decreases the overall production efficiency. Thin ceramic PVD (physical vapor deposition coatings applied on tool surfaces successfully reduce these effects. However, their performance is still not recognised for surfaces with various topographies. In this investigation, soldering tendency of Al-Si-Cu alloy toward EN X27CrMoV51 steel, plasma nitrided steel, CrN and TiAlN duplex PVD coatings is evaluated using ejection test. The coatings were prepared to a range of surface roughness and topographies. After the tests sample surfaces were analysed by different microscopy techniques and profilometry. It was found that the ejection performance is independent of the chemical composition of investigated materials. After the ejection, the cast alloy soldering layer was found on surfaces of all tested materials. This built-up layer formed by effects of mechanical soldering, without corrosion reactions. Coated samples displayed a pronounced dependence of ejection force on surface roughness and topography. By decreasing roughness, ejection force increased, which is a consequence of intensified adhesion effects. Presented findings are a novel information important for efficient application of PVD coatings intendent for protection of HPDC tools.

  12. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  13. Origin of Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; ( 2 ) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; ( 5 ) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  14. A volatile-rich Earth's core inferred from melting temperature of core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Clark, A. N.; Lord, O. T.; Cervera, S.; Siebert, J.; Garbarino, G.; Svitlyk, V.; Mezouar, M.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary cores are mainly constituted of iron and nickel, alloyed with lighter elements (Si, O, C, S or H). Understanding how these elements affect the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid iron provides stringent constraints on the composition of the Earth's core. In particular, melting curves of iron alloys are key parameter to establish the temperature profile in the Earth's core, and to asses the potential occurrence of partial melting at the Core-Mantle Boundary. Core formation models based on metal-silicate equilibration suggest that Si and O are the major light element components1-4, while the abundance of other elements such as S, C and H is constrained by arguments based on their volatility during planetary accretion5,6. Each compositional model implies a specific thermal state for the core, due to the different effect that light elements have on the melting behaviour of Fe. We recently measured melting temperatures in Fe-C and Fe-O systems at high pressures, which complete the data sets available both for pure Fe7 and other binary alloys8. Compositional models with an O- and Si-rich outer core are suggested to be compatible with seismological constraints on density and sound velocity9. However, their crystallization temperatures of 3650-4050 K at the CMB pressure of 136 GPa are very close to, if not higher than the melting temperature of the silicate mantle and yet mantle melting above the CMB is not a ubiquitous feature. This observation requires significant amounts of volatile elements (S, C or H) in the outer core to further reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core alloy below that of the lower mantle. References 1. Wood, B. J., et al Nature 441, 825-833 (2006). 2. Siebert, J., et al Science 339, 1194-7 (2013). 3. Corgne, A., et al Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 288, 108-114 (2009). 4. Fischer, R. a. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 167, 177-194 (2015). 5. Dreibus, G. & Palme, H. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1125-1130 (1995). 6. Mc

  15. Heating of the outer solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, E.N.

    1983-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that there must be a source of magnetic fields somewhere below the solar surface. He starts by considering present day ideas about the sun's internal structure. The sun has a radius of approximately 700,000 km, of which the outer 100,000 km or so is the convective zone, according to mixing-length models. The dynamo is believed to operate in the convective zone, across which there may be a 5-10% variation in the angular velocity. There are the stretched east-west fields similar to the ones in the earth's core. Associated with these are poloidal fields which contribute to a net dipole moment of the sun and are generated by a dynamo. The author shows that essentially no magnetic field configuration has an equilibrium; they dissipate quickly in spite of the high conductivity in fluid motions and heating. This is probably the major part of the heating of the sun's outer atmosphere. (Auth.)

  16. Nuclear fuel grid outer strap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, R.; Craver, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel assembly grid. It comprises a first outer grip strap segment end. The first end having a first tab arranged in substantially the same plane as the plane defined by the first end; a second outer grip strap end. The second end having a second slot arranged in substantially the same plane as the plane defined by the second end, with the tab being substantially disposed in the slot, defining a socket therebetween; and a fort tine interposed substantially perpendicularly in the socket

  17. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  18. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU

  19. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susuki, Akira; Murata, Shigeto; Minato, Akihiko.

    1993-01-01

    In a pressure tube reactor, a reactor core is constituted by arranging more than two units of a minimum unit combination of a moderator sealing pipe containing a calandria tube having moderators there between and a calandria tube and moderators. The upper header and a lower header of the calandria tank containing moderators are communicated by way of the moderator sealing tube. Further, a gravitationally dropping mechanism is disposed for injecting neutron absorbing liquid to a calandria gas injection portion. A ratio between a moderator volume and a fuel volume is defined as a function of the inner diameter of the moderator sealing tube, the outer diameter of the calandria tube and the diameter of fuel pellets, and has no influence to intervals of a pressure tube lattice. The interval of the pressure tube lattice is enlarged without increasing the size of the pressure tube, to improve production efficiency of the reactor and set a coolant void coefficient more negative, thereby enabling to improve self controllability and safety. Further, the reactor scram can be conducted by injecting neutron absorbing liquid. (N.H.)

  20. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  1. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space - Liquid Behavior in Microgravity. N Ananthkrishnan. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 40-45. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Outer space structure and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeldovich, J.; Novikov, I.

    1975-01-01

    A brief account is presented answering the question of what in fact the outer space we observe consists of. The principle of spatial homogeneity of the universe and the idea of non-stationary cosmology are discussed. The origin and the future development of the universe are explained using the two above mentioned and some other hypotheses. (J.K.)

  3. Outer space structure and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeldovich, J; Novikov, I

    1975-10-01

    A brief account is presented answering the question of what in fact the outer space we observe consists of. The principle of spatial homogeneity of the universe and the idea of non-stationary cosmology are discussed. The origin and the future development of the universe are explained using the two above mentioned and some other hypotheses.

  4. Outer Synchronization of Complex Networks by Impulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wen; Yan Zizong; Chen Shihua; Lü Jinhu

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates outer synchronization of complex networks, especially, outer complete synchronization and outer anti-synchronization between the driving network and the response network. Employing the impulsive control method which is uncontinuous, simple, efficient, low-cost and easy to implement in practical applications, we obtain some sufficient conditions of outer complete synchronization and outer anti-synchronization between two complex networks. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed impulsive control scheme. (general)

  5. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  6. Inner Super-Earths, Outer Gas Giants: How Pebble Isolation and Migration Feedback Keep Jupiters Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Lee, Eve J.

    2018-06-01

    The majority of gas giants (planets of masses ≳102 M ⊕) are found to reside at distances beyond ∼1 au from their host stars. Within 1 au, the planetary population is dominated by super-Earths of 2–20 M ⊕. We show that this dichotomy between inner super-Earths and outer gas giants can be naturally explained should they form in nearly inviscid disks. In laminar disks, a planet can more easily repel disk gas away from its orbit. The feedback torque from the pile-up of gas inside the planet’s orbit slows down and eventually halts migration. A pressure bump outside the planet’s orbit traps pebbles and solids, starving the core. Gas giants are born cold and stay cold: more massive cores are preferentially formed at larger distances, and they barely migrate under disk feedback. We demonstrate this using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of disk–planet interaction lasting up to 105 years: we track planet migration and pebble accretion until both come to an end by disk feedback. Whether cores undergo runaway gas accretion to become gas giants or not is determined by computing one-dimensional gas accretion models. Our simulations show that in an inviscid minimum mass solar nebula, gas giants do not form inside ∼0.5 au, nor can they migrate there while the disk is present. We also explore the dependence on disk mass and find that gas giants form further out in less massive disks.

  7. Software alignment of the LHCb Outer Tracker chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deissenroth, Marc

    2010-04-21

    This work presents an alignment algorithm that was developed to precisely determine the positions of the LHCb Outer Tracker detector elements. The algorithm is based on the reconstruction of tracks and exploits that misalignments of the detector change the residual between a measured hit and the reconstructed track. It considers different levels of granularities of the Outer Tracker geometry and fully accounts for correlations of all elements which are imposed by particle trajectories. In extensive tests, simulated shifts and rotations for different levels of the detector granularity have been used as input to the track reconstruction and alignment procedure. With about 260 000 tracks the misalignments are recovered with a statistical precision of O(10 - 100 {mu}m) for the translational degrees of freedom and of O(10{sup -2} - 10{sup -1} mrad) for rotations. A study has been performed to determine the impact of Outer Tracker misalignments on the performance of the track reconstruction algorithms. It shows that the achieved statistical precision does not decrease the track reconstruction performance in a significant way. During the commissioning of the LHCb detector, cosmic ray muon events have been collected. The events have been analysed and used for the first alignment of the 216 Outer Tracker modules. The module positions have been determined within {proportional_to} 90 {mu}m. The developed track based alignment algorithm has demonstrated its reliability and is one of the core algorithms which are used for the precise determination of the positions of the LHCb Outer Tracker elements. (orig.)

  8. Software alignment of the LHCb Outer Tracker chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deissenroth, Marc

    2010-01-01

    This work presents an alignment algorithm that was developed to precisely determine the positions of the LHCb Outer Tracker detector elements. The algorithm is based on the reconstruction of tracks and exploits that misalignments of the detector change the residual between a measured hit and the reconstructed track. It considers different levels of granularities of the Outer Tracker geometry and fully accounts for correlations of all elements which are imposed by particle trajectories. In extensive tests, simulated shifts and rotations for different levels of the detector granularity have been used as input to the track reconstruction and alignment procedure. With about 260 000 tracks the misalignments are recovered with a statistical precision of O(10 - 100 μm) for the translational degrees of freedom and of O(10 -2 - 10 -1 mrad) for rotations. A study has been performed to determine the impact of Outer Tracker misalignments on the performance of the track reconstruction algorithms. It shows that the achieved statistical precision does not decrease the track reconstruction performance in a significant way. During the commissioning of the LHCb detector, cosmic ray muon events have been collected. The events have been analysed and used for the first alignment of the 216 Outer Tracker modules. The module positions have been determined within ∝ 90 μm. The developed track based alignment algorithm has demonstrated its reliability and is one of the core algorithms which are used for the precise determination of the positions of the LHCb Outer Tracker elements. (orig.)

  9. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  10. Evaluation of the radiative transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) during the reflooding step of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerardin, J.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method of resolution of radiative transfer inside a medium of vapor-droplets surrounded by hot walls, in order to couple it with a simulation of the flow at the CFD scale. The scope is the study of the cooling of the core of nuclear reactor following a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The problem of radiative transfer can be cut into two sub problems, one concerning the evaluation of the radiative properties of the medium and a second concerning the solution of the radiative transfer equation. The radiative properties of the droplets have been computed with the use of the Mie Theory and those of the vapor have been computed with a Ck model. The medium made of vapor and droplets is an absorbing, anisotropically scattering, emissive, non grey, non homogeneous medium. Hence, owing to the possible variations of the flow properties (diameter and volumetric fraction of the droplets, temperature and pressure of the vapor), the medium can be optically thin or thick. Consequently, a method is required which solves the radiative transfer accurately, with a moderate calculation time for all of these prerequisites. The IDA has been chosen, derived from the well-known P1-approximation. Its accuracy has been checked on academical cases found in the literature and by comparison with experimental data. Simulations of LOCA flows have been conducted taking account of the radiative transfer, evaluating the radiative fluxes and showing that radiative transfer influence cannot be neglected. (author)

  11. Experimental evidence of body centered cubic iron in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, R.; Meng, Y.; Shen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is mainly composed of iron. While seismic evidence has shown a liquid outer core and a solid inner core, the crystalline nature of the solid iron at the core condition remains debated, largely due to the difficulties in experimental determination of exact polymorphs at corresponding pressure-temperature conditions. We have examined crystal structures of iron up to 220 GPa and 6000 K with x-ray diffraction using a double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. The iron sample is confined in a small chamber surrounded by single crystal MgO. The laser power can be modulated together with temperature measurements. The modulated heating of iron in an MgO single crystal matrix allows for microstructure analysis during heating and after the sample is quenched. We present experimental evidence of a body-centered-cubic (BCC) iron from about 100 GPa and 3000 K to at least 220 GPa and 4000 K. The observed BCC phase may be consistent with a theoretically predicted BCC phase that is dynamically stable in similar pressure-temperature conditions [1]. We will discuss the stability region of the BCC phase and the melting curve of iron and their implications in the nature of the Earth's inner core. References: A. B. Belonoshko et al., Nat. Geosci., 1-6 (2017).

  12. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  13. Composition of the low seismic velocity E' layer at the top of Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Evidence for a layer (E') at the top of the outer core has been available since the '90s and while different studies suggest slightly different velocity contrasts and thicknesses, the common observation is that the layer has lower velocities than the bulk outer core (PREM). Although there are no direct measurements on the density of this layer, dynamic stability requires it to be less dense than the bulk outer core under those same pressure and temperature conditions. Using ab initio simulations on Fe-Ni-S-C-O-Si liquids we constrain the origin and composition of the low-velocity layer E' at the top of Earth's outer core. We find that increasing the concentration of any light-element always increases velocity and so a low-velocity and low-density layer (for stability) cannot be made by simply increasing light element concentration. This rules out barodiffusion or upwards sedimentation of a light phase for its origin. However, exchanging elements can—depending on the elements exchanged—produce such a layer. We evaluate three possibilities. Firstly, crystallization of a light phase from a core containing more than one light element may make such a layer, but only if the crystalizing phase is very Fe-rich, which is at odds with available phase diagrams at CMB conditions. Secondly, the E' layer may result from incomplete mixing of an early Earth core with a late impactor, depending on the light element compositions of the impactor and Earth's core, but such a primordial stratification is neither supported by dynamical models of the core nor thermodynamic models of core merger after the giant impact. The last and most plausible scenario is core-mantle chemical interaction; using thermodynamic models for metal-silicate partitioning of silicon and oxygen at CMB conditions, we show that a reaction between the core and an FeO-rich basal magma ocean can enrich the core in oxygen while depleting it in silicon, in relative amounts that produce a light and slow layer

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...

  15. WORKSHOP: Inner space - outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    During the first week of May, the Fermilab theoretical astrophysics group hosted an international conference on science at the interface of particle physics and cosmology/astrophysics. The conference (Inner Space-Outer Space) was attended by a very diverse group of more than 200 physical scientists, including astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmologists, low-temperature physicists, and elementary particle theorists and experimentalists. The common interest which brought this diverse group to gether is the connection between physics on the smallest scale probed by man - the realm of elementary particle physics - and physics on the largest scale imaginable (the entire Universe) - the realm of cosmology

  16. WORKSHOP: Inner space - outer space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-09-15

    During the first week of May, the Fermilab theoretical astrophysics group hosted an international conference on science at the interface of particle physics and cosmology/astrophysics. The conference (Inner Space-Outer Space) was attended by a very diverse group of more than 200 physical scientists, including astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmologists, low-temperature physicists, and elementary particle theorists and experimentalists. The common interest which brought this diverse group to gether is the connection between physics on the smallest scale probed by man - the realm of elementary particle physics - and physics on the largest scale imaginable (the entire Universe) - the realm of cosmology.

  17. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  18. Experimental studies on the evaporative heat transfer and pressure drop of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/propane mixtures flowing upward in smooth and micro-fin tubes with outer diameter of 5 mm for an inclination angle of 45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jin Min; Kim, Min Soo [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea); Kim, Yong Jin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Heat transfer characteristics show different tendency according to the tube orientations such as horizontal, vertical, and inclined positions. In this study, evaporative heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/propane mixtures flowing upward are investigated in inclined smooth and micro-fin tubes. Smooth and micro-fin tubes with outer diameter of 5 mm and length of 1.44 m with inclination angle of 45 were chosen as test tubes. Average inner diameters of test tubes are 4.0 mm (smooth tube) and 4.13 mm (micro-fin tube). The tests were conducted at mass fluxes from 212 to 656 kg/m{sup 2} s, saturation temperatures from -10 to 30 C and heat fluxes from 15 to 60 kW/m{sup 2} for CO{sub 2}. In addition, for CO{sub 2}/propane mixtures, the test was carried out at inlet temperatures from -10 to 30 C for several compositions (75/25, 50/50, 25/75 wt%) with the same mass fluxes, heat fluxes applied for CO{sub 2}. Heat transfer coefficients in inclined tube are approximately 1.8-3 times higher than those in horizontal tube and the average pressure drop of inclined tube exists between that of horizontal and vertical tubes. (author)

  19. Fluid Core Size of Mars from Detection of the Solar Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Konopliv, A. S.; Yuan, D. N.; Standish, E. M.; Folkner, W. M.

    2003-04-01

    The solar tidal deformation of Mars, measured by its k2 potential Love number, has been obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 +/- 0.017 is large enough to rule out a solid iron core and so indicates that at least the outer part of the core is liquid. The inferred core radius is between 1520 and 1840 kilometers and is independent of many interior properties, although partial melt of the mantle is one factor that could reduce core size. Ice-cap mass changes can be deduced from the seasonal variations in air pressure and the odd gravity harmonic J3, given knowledge of cap mass distribution with latitude. The south cap seasonal mass change is about 30 to 40% larger than that of the north cap.

  20. Application of risk-informed in-service inspection approach. Pilot study on low pressure emergency core cooling system of NPP Temelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, L.; Palyza, J.; Zdarek, J.; Vizina, M.

    2004-01-01

    In-service inspection (ISI) programme of piping systems based on Riskinformed In-service Inspections (RI-ISI) approach represents for the WWER NPP licensee first overall systematic conceptual solution of the problems associated with design and design modifications of ISI programme for piping systems. The approach enables to consider possible savings and comparison of in-service inspection programmes according to more objective criteria including those calculated in PSA, in contrast to present much empiric experience collected by manufacturers, operators and ISI vendors in the past. Service experience has shown limited correlation between the deterministic ISI requirements and actual field failures or degradation mechanisms. Where field failures have been observed in piping, they have generally been due to either material concerns (e.g., Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) or stress/cycling mechanisms not identified in the original design basis documents (e.g., thermal stratification), and therefore would not be selected for inspection under current requirements. Risk-informed in-service inspections represent integrated multidisciplinary approach to the in-service inspection programme fulfilling the enhanced requirements of the Czech Regulatory Body (SUJB) for defence in depth concept applied to weld joints of safety related components, application of qualified NDT methods/techniques and introducing of inspections for cause approach. Inspections for cause take into account analysis of both active and potential degradation mechanisms specific to piping system concerned. Simultaneously, this approach enables the licensee to reach, in cases justified from safety point of view, economic savings resulting from lowering of both number and extent of performed in-service inspections and optimisation of their performance. RI ISI pilot study based in majority on EPRI methodology implemented for WWER type reactors has been performed for LP ECCS (Low Pressure Emergency

  1. In-vessel core debris retention through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel. SCDAP/RELAP5 assessment for the SBWR lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heel, A.M.J.M. van.

    1995-09-01

    In this report the results are discussed from various analyses on the feasibility and phenomenology of the External Flooding (EF) concept for an SBWR lower head, filled with a large heat generating corium mass. In applying External Flooding as an accident management strategy after or during core melt down, the lower drywell is filled with water up to a level where a large portion of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is flooded. The purpose of this method is to establish cooling of the vessel wall, that is challenged by the heat load resulting from the corium, in such a way that its structural integrity if not endangered. The analysis discussed in this report focus on the thermal response of the vessel wall and the ex-vessel boiling processes under the conditions described above. For these analyses the SCDAP/REALP5 MOD 3.1 code was used. The major outcome of the calculations is, that a major part of the vessel wall remains well below themelting temperature of carbon steel, as long as flooding of the external surface of the lower head is established. The SCDAP/RELAP5 analyses indicated that low-quality Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was not exceeded, under all the conditions that had been tested. However, a comaprison of the heat fluxes, as calculated in RELAP5, with the CHF values obtained from the Zuber correlation and the Vishnev correction factor (for boiling at inclined surfaces) proved that CHF values, based on these criteria, were exceeded in several surface points of the lower head mesh. The correlations, as resident in the current version of RELAP5 MOD 3.1, might lead to over-estimation of CHF for the EF analyses discussed in this report. The use of the more conservative Zuber correlation with the Vishnev correction factor is recommended for EF analyses. (orig.)

  2. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  3. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  4. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet Orbital Transfer and Lander Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) mining factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. For analyses of round trip OTV flights from Uranus to Miranda or Titania, a 10- Megawatt electric (MWe) OTV power level and a 200 metricton (MT) lander payload were selected based on a relative short OTV trip time and minimization of the number of lander flights. A similar optimum power level is suggested for OTVs flying from low orbit around Neptune to Thalassa or Triton. Several moon base sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  5. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  6. Torsional Oscillations of the Earths's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Boggs, Dale H.; Dickey, Jean O.

    1997-01-01

    Torsional oscillations of the Earth's liquid metallic outer core are investigated by diving the core into twenty imaginary e1qui-volume annuli coaxial with the axis of ratation of the Earth and determining temproal fluctuations in the axial component of angular memonetum of each annulus under the assumption of iso-rotation on cylindrical surfaces.

  7. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  9. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used

  10. Outer grid strap protruding spring repair apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widener, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel assembly grid spring repair apparatus for repairing a spring formed on an outer strap of a fuel assembly grid and having a portion protruding outwardly beyond the strap, the apparatus comprising: (a) a support frame defining an opening and having means defining a guide channel extending along the opening in a first direction; (b) means mounted on the frame and being adjustable for attaching the frame to the outer strap of the support grid so that the frame opening is aligned with the outwardly protruding spring on the outer strap; (c) an outer slide having a passageway defined therethrough and being mounted in the guide channel for reciprocable movement along the frame opening in the first direction for aligning the passageway with the outwardly protruding portion of the spring on the outer strap. The outer slide also has means defining a guide way extending along the passageway in a second direction generally orthogonal to the first direction; (d) a spring reset mechanism being operable for resetting the protruding spring to a nonprotruding position relative to the outer strap when the mechanism is aligned with the protruding portion of the spring; and (e) an inner slide supporting the spring reset mechanism and being mounted to the guide way for reciprocable movement along the passageway of the outer slide in the second direction for aligning the spring reset mechanism with the protruding portion of the spring on the outer strap

  11. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  12. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) for a Westinghouse type 312, three loop pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shopsky, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) is a Safeguards System designed to cool the core in the unlikely event of a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary reactor coolant system as well as to provide additional shutdown capability following a steam break accident. The system is designed for a high reliability of providing emergency coolant and shutdown reactivity to the core for all anticipated occurrences of such accidents. The ECCS by performing its intended function assures that fuel and clad damage is minimized during accident conditions thus reducing release of fission products from the fuel. The ECCS is designed to perform its function despite sustaining a single failure by the judicious use of equipment and flow path redundancy within and outside the containment structure. By the use of an analytic tool, a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), it is shown that the ECCS is in compliance with the Single Failure Criterion established for active failures of fluid systems during short and long term cooling of the reactor core following a LOCA or steam break accident. An analysis was also performed with regards to passive failure of ECCS components during long-term cooling of the core following an accident. The design of the ECCS was verified as being able to tolerate a single passive failure during long-term cooling of the reactor core following an accident. The FMEA conducted qualitatively demonstrates the reliability of the ECCS (concerning active components) to perform its intended safety function

  13. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  14. Core design of super LWR with double tube water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor with double tube water rods is developed. • Double-row fuel rod assembly and out-in fuel loading pattern are applied. • Separation plates in peripheral assemblies increase average outlet temperature. • Neutronic and thermal design criteria are satisfied during the cycle. - Abstract: Double tube water rods are employed in core design of super LWR to simplify the upper core structure and refueling procedure. The light water moderator flows up in the inner tube from the bottom of the core, then, changes the flow direction at the top of the core into the outer tube and flows out at the bottom of the core. It eliminates the moderator guide/distribution tubes into the single tube water rods from the top dome of the reactor pressure vessel of the previous super LWR design. Two rows of fuel rods are filled between the water rods in the fuel assembly. Out-in refueling pattern is adopted to flatten radial power distribution. The peripheral fuel assemblies of the core are divided into four flow zones by separation plates for increasing the average core outlet temperature. Three enrichment zones are used for axial power flattening. The equilibrium core is analyzed based on neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled model. The results show that, by applying the separation plates in peripheral fuel assemblies and low gadolinia enrichment, the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is limited to 653 °C with the average outlet temperature of 500 °C. The inherent safety is satisfied by the negative void reactivity effects and sufficient shutdown margin

  15. Improved method of measurement for outer leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Pneumatic pipeline is installed for the airborne radioactivity measurement equipment, air tightness and outer leak rate are essential for the testing of the characteristics, both in the national criteria and ISO standards, an improved practical method is available for the measurement of the outer air leak rate based on the engineering experiences for the equipment acceptance and testing procedure. (authors)

  16. LO2/LH2 propulsion for outer planet orbiter spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, P. W.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Galileo class orbiter missions (750-1500 kg) to the outer planets require a large postinjection delta-V for improved propulsion performance. The present investigation shows that a pump-fed low thrust LO2/LH2 propulsion system can provide a significantly larger net on-orbit mass for a given delta-V than a state-of-the-art earth storable, N2O4/monomethylhydrazine pressure-fed propulsion system. A description is given of a conceptual design for a LO2/LH2 pump-fed propulsion system developed for a Galileo class mission to the outer planets. Attention is given to spacecraft configuration, details regarding the propulsion system, the thermal control of the cryogenic propellants, and aspects of mission performance.

  17. Rotational instability in the outer region of protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Tomohiro [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nomura, Hideko; Takeuchi, Taku, E-mail: ono.t@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for the rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps, and an outer region of the disk. In this paper, we particularly focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find that a protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.

  18. Rotational instability in the outer region of protoplanetary disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Nomura, Hideko; Takeuchi, Taku

    2014-01-01

    We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for the rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps, and an outer region of the disk. In this paper, we particularly focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find that a protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.

  19. Experimental study and thermodynamic modeling of the phase relation in the Fe-S-Si system with implications for the distribution of S and Si in a partially solidified core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.; Fei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary cooling leads to solidification of any initially molten metallic core. Some terrestrial cores (e.g. Mercury) are formed and differentiated under relatively reduced conditions, and they are thought to be composed of Fe-S-Si. However, there are limited understanding of the phase relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature. In this study, we conducted high-pressure experiments to investigate the phase relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 25 GPa. Experimental results show that the liquidus and solidus in this study are slightly lower than those in the Fe-S binary system for the same S concentration in liquid at same pressure. The Fe3S, which is supposed to be the stable sub-solidus S-bearing phase in the Fe-S binary system above 17 GPa, is not observed in the Fe-S-Si system at 21 GPa. Almost all S prefers to partition into liquid, while the distribution of Si between solid and liquid depends on experimental P and T conditions. We obtained the partition coefficient log(KDSi) by fitting the experimental data as a function of P, T and S concentration in liquid. At a constant pressure, the log(KDSi) linearly decreases with 1/T(K). With increase of pressure, the slopes of linear correlation between log(KDSi) and 1/T(K) decreases, indicating that more Si partitions into solid at higher pressure. In order to interpolate and extrapolate the phase relations over a wide pressure and temperature range, we established a comprehensive thermodynamic model in the Fe-S-Si system. The results will be used to constrain the distribution of S and Si between solid inner core and liquid outer core for a range of planet sizes. A Si-rich solid inner core and a S-rich liquid outer core are suggested for an iron-rich core.

  20. Effects of core sealing methods on the preservation of pore water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striffler, P.; Peters, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Five general core sealing methods (using Protecore, Lexan, wax, Protecore with wax, and Protecore with Lexan) were studied over a two year period to determine their moisture retention capabilities. Results indicate that the multibarrier methods (Protecore with wax and Protecore with Lexan) and the single barrier methods (Protecore and wax) provide successful means of retaining moisture in cores. Additional testing indicated that a tight wrap of Saran is effective in: (1) protecting the outer vapor barriers from puncture, (2) containing any condensate in close proximity to where it was condensed, and (3) retarding condensation. Tests conducted to determine the moisture adsorption potential of wax and the use of applying a positive or negative pressure to Protecore packets proved inconclusive, but warrant further investigation. The importance of proper and timely handling of core samples in the field, including refrigeration and weighing of samples, can not be overstated

  1. Effects of core sealing methods on the preservation of pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striffler, Pete; Peters, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Five general core sealing methods (using Protecore, Lexan, wax, Protecore with wax, and Protecore with Lexan) were studied over a two year period to determine their moisture retention capabilities. Results indicate that the multibarrier methods (Protecore with wax and Protecore with Lexan) and the single barrier methods (Protecore and wax) provide successful means of retaining moisture in cores. Additional testing indicated that a tight wrap of Saran is effective in: 1) protecting the outer vapor barriers from puncture, 2) containing any condensate in close proximity to where it was condensed, and 3) retarding condensation. Tests conducted to determine the moisture adsorption potential of wax and the use of applying a positive or negative pressure to Protecore packets proved inconclusive, but warrant further investigation. The importance of proper and timely handling of core samples in the field, including refrigeration and weighing of samples, can not be overstated.

  2. Praying Mantis Bending Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lindermann, Randel A.

    2011-01-01

    Sampling cores requires the controlled breakoff of the core at a known location with respect to the drill end. An additional problem is designing a mechanism that can be implemented at a small scale, yet is robust and versatile enough to be used for a variety of core samples. The new design consists of a set of tubes (a drill tube, an outer tube, and an inner tube) and means of sliding the inner and outer tubes axially relative to each other. Additionally, a sample tube can be housed inside the inner tube for storing the sample. The inner tube fits inside the outer tube, which fits inside the drill tube. The inner and outer tubes can move axially relative to each other. The inner tube presents two lamellae with two opposing grabbing teeth and one pushing tooth. The pushing tooth is offset axially from the grabbing teeth. The teeth can move radially and their motion is controlled by the outer tube. The outer tube presents two lamellae with radial extrusions to control the inner tube lamellae motion. In breaking the core, the mechanism creates two support points (the grabbing teeth and the bit tip) and one push point. The core is broken in bending. The grabbing teeth can also act as a core retention mechanism. The praying mantis that is disclosed herein is an active core breaking/retention mechanism that requires only one additional actuator other than the drilling actuator. It can break cores that are attached to the borehole bottom as

  3. Rapidly changing flows in the Earth's core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, M.

    2008-01-01

    A large part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the molten outer core(1). As a result of continuous satellite measurements since 1999, the core magnetic field and its recent variations can now be described with a high resolution in space and time(2). These data have...... field occurring over only a few months, indicative of fluid flow at the top of the core, can in fact be resolved. Using nine years of magnetic field data obtained by satellites as well as Earth-based observatories, we determine the temporal changes in the core magnetic field and flow in the core. We...

  4. Observations of different core water cluster ions Y-(H2O)n (Y = O2, HOx, NOx, COx) and magic number in atmospheric pressure negative corona discharge mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Reliable mass spectrometry data from large water clusters Y(-)(H(2)O)(n) with various negative core ions Y(-) such as O(2)(-), HO(-), HO(2)(-), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), NO(3)(-)(HNO(3))(2), CO(3)(-) and HCO(4)(-) have been obtained using atmospheric pressure negative corona discharge mass spectrometry. All the core Y(-) ions observed were ionic species that play a central role in tropospheric ion chemistry. These mass spectra exhibited discontinuities in ion peak intensity at certain size clusters Y(-)(H(2)O)(m) indicating specific thermochemical stability. Thus, Y(-)(H(2)O)(m) may correspond to the magic number or first hydrated shell in the cluster series Y(-)(H(2)O)(n). The high intensity discontinuity at HO(-)(H(2)O)(3) observed was the first mass spectrometric evidence for the specific stability of HO(-)(H(2)O)(3) as the first hydrated shell which Eigen postulated in 1964. The negative ion water clusters Y(-)(H(2)O)(n) observed in the mass spectra are most likely to be formed via core ion formation in the ambient discharge area (760 torr) and the growth of water clusters by adiabatic expansion in the vacuum region of the mass spectrometers (≈1 torr). The detailed mechanism of the formation of the different core water cluster ions Y(-)(H(2)O)(n) is described. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy probed heterogeneous xenon/neon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokapanich, Wandared; Björneholm, Olle; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Binary rare gas clusters; xenon and neon which have a significant contrariety between sizes, produced by a co-expansion set up and have been studied using synchrotron radiation based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concentration ratios of the heterogeneous clusters; 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% were controlled. The core level spectra were used to determine structure of the mixed cluster and analyzed by considering screening mechanisms. Furthermore, electron binding energy shift calculations demonstrated cluster aggregation models which may occur in such process. The results showed that in the case of low mixing ratios of 3% and 5% of xenon in neon, the geometric structures exhibit xenon in the center and xenon/neon interfaced in the outer shells. However, neon cluster vanished when the concentration of xenon was increased to 10%. - Highlights: • Co-expansion setup is suitable for producing binary Xe/Ne clusters. • Appropriate temperature, pressure, and mixing ratios should be strictly controlled. • Low mixing ratio, Xe formed in the core and Xe/Ne interfacing in the outer shell. • High mixing ratio, only pure Xe clusters were detected.

  6. Special enclosure for a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.; Wedellsborg, U.W.

    1993-01-01

    A pressure vessel enclosure is described comprising a primary pressure vessel, a first pressure vessel containment assembly adapted to enclose said primary pressure vessel and be spaced apart therefrom, a first upper pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose the upper half of said first pressure vessel containment assembly and be spaced apart therefrom, said upper pressure vessel jacket having an upper rim and a lower rim, each of said rims connected in a slidable relationship to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, mean for connecting in a sealable relationship said upper rim of said first upper pressure vessel jacket to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, means for connecting in a sealable relationship said lower rim of said first upper pressure vessel jacket to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, a first lower pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose the lower half of said first pressure vessel containment assembly and be spaced apart therefrom, said lower pressure vessel jacket having an upper rim connected in a slidable relationship to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, and means for connecting in a sealable relationship said upper rim of said first lower pressure vessel jacket to the outer surface of said first pressure vessel containment assembly, a second upper pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose said first upper pressure vessel jacket and be spaced apart therefrom, said second upper pressure vessel jacket having an upper rim and a lower rim, each of said rims adapted to slidably engage the outer surface of said first upper pressure vessel jacket, means for sealing said rims, a second lower pressure vessel jacket adapted to enclose said first lower pressure vessel jacket and be spaced apart therefrom

  7. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Karaeva, A. R.; Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp"3-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  8. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Perezhogin, I. A. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Karaeva, A. R. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, 4 Leninskiy Prospekt, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-22

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp{sup 3}-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  9. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  10. Incorporation of squalene into rod outer segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, R.K.; Fliesler, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    We have reported previously that squalene is the major radiolabeled nonsaponifiable lipid product derived from [ 3 H]acetate in short term incubations of frog retinas. In the present study, we demonstrate that newly synthesized squalene is incorporated into rod outer segments under similar in vitro conditions. We show further that squalene is an endogenous constituent of frog rod outer segment membranes; its concentration is approximately 9.5 nmol/mumol of phospholipid or about 9% of the level of cholesterol. Pulse-chase experiments with radiolabeled precursors revealed no metabolism of outer segment squalene to sterols in up to 20 h of chase. Taken together with our previous absolute rate studies, these results suggest that most, if not all, of the squalene synthesized by the frog retina is transported to rod outer segments. Synthesis of protein is not required for squalene transport since puromycin had no effect on squalene incorporation into outer segments. Conversely, inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis with mevinolin had no effect on the incorporation of opsin into the outer segment. These latter results support the conclusion that the de novo synthesis and subsequent intracellular trafficking of opsin and isoprenoid lipids destined for the outer segment occur via independent mechanisms

  11. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  12. The thermal evolution of Mercury's Fe-Si core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Jurriën Sebastiaan; van Westrenen, Wim

    2018-01-01

    We have studied the thermal and magnetic field evolution of planet Mercury with a core of Fe-Si alloy to assess whether an Fe-Si core matches its present-day partially molten state, Mercury's magnetic field strength, and the observed ancient crustal magnetization. The main advantages of an Fe-Si core, opposed to a previously assumed Fe-S core, are that a Si-bearing core is consistent with the highly reduced nature of Mercury and that no compositional convection is generated upon core solidification, in agreement with magnetic field indications of a stable layer at the top of Mercury's core. This study also present the first implementation of a conductive temperature profile in the core where heat fluxes are sub-adiabatic in a global thermal evolution model. We show that heat migrates from the deep core to the outer part of the core as soon as heat fluxes at the outer core become sub-adiabatic. As a result, the deep core cools throughout Mercury's evolution independent of the temperature evolution at the core-mantle boundary, causing an early start of inner core solidification and magnetic field generation. The conductive layer at the outer core suppresses the rate of core growth after temperature differences between the deep and shallow core are relaxed, such that a magnetic field can be generated until the present. Also, the outer core and mantle operate at higher temperatures than previously thought, which prolongs mantle melting and mantle convection. The results indicate that S is not a necessary ingredient of Mercury's core, bringing bulk compositional models of Mercury more in line with reduced meteorite analogues.

  13. Validation of Heat-Flux Predictions on the Outer Air Seal of a Transonic Turbine Blade (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, John P; Polanka, Marc D; Meininger, Matthew; Praisner, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    .... So, a set of predictions of the heat flux on the Blade Outer Air Seal (BOAS) of a transonic turbine is here validated with time-resolved measurements obtained in a single-stage high pressure turbine rig...

  14. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    are key regulators of environmental stress. Recent work has revealed an intimate interplay between small RNA regulation of outer membrane proteins and the stress-induced sigmaE-signalling system, which has an essential role in the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane.......Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...

  15. Core barrel inner tube lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffers, J P

    1968-07-16

    A core drill with means for selectively lifting a core barrel inner tube consists of a lifting means connected to the core barrel inner tube assembly. It has a closable passage to permit drilling fluid normally to pass through it. The lifting means has a normally downward facing surface and a means to direct drilling fluid pressure against that surface so that on closure of the passage to fluid flow, the pressure of the drilling fluid is caused to act selectively on it. This causes the lifting means to rise and lift the core barrel. (7 claims)

  16. BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN FAILING CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of a systematic study of failing core-collapse supernovae and the formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). Using our open-source general-relativistic 1.5D code GR1D equipped with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and over 100 presupernova models, we study the effects of the choice of nuclear equation of state (EOS), zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss prescription on BH formation. We find that the outcome, for a given EOS, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing protoneutron star (PNS) structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkof equations, we find that thermal pressure support in the outer PNS core is responsible for raising the maximum PNS mass by up to 25% above the cold NS value. By artificially increasing neutrino heating, we find the critical neutrino heating efficiency required for exploding a given progenitor structure and connect these findings with ZAMS conditions, establishing, albeit approximately, for the first time based on actual collapse simulations, the mapping between ZAMS parameters and the outcome of core collapse. We also study the effect of progenitor rotation and find that the dimensionless spin of nascent BHs may be robustly limited below a* = Jc/GM 2 = 1 by the appearance of nonaxisymmetric rotational instabilities.

  17. In-core fuel management for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.F.; Visner, S.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes in-core fuel management for nuclear reactor in which the first cycle of a pressurized water nuclear power reactor has a multiplicity of elongated, square fuel assemblies supported side-by-side to form a generally cylindrical, stationary core consisting entirely of fresh fuel assemblies. Each assembly of the first type has a substantially similar low average fissile enrichment of at least about 1.8 weight percent U-235, each assembly of the second type having a substantially similar intermediate average fissile enrichment at least about 0.4 weight percent greater than that of the first type, and each assembly of the third type having a substantially similar high average fissile enrichment at least about 0.4 weight percent greater than that of the intermediate type, the arrangement of the low, intermediate, and high enrichment assembly types which consists of: a generally cylindrical inner core region consisting of approximately two-thirds the total assemblies in the core and forming a figurative checkerboard array having a first checkerboard component at least two-thirds of which consists of high enrichment and intermediate enrichment assemblies, at least some of the high enrichment assemblies containing fixed burnable poison shims, and a second checkerboard component consisting of assemblies other than the high enrichment type; and a generally annular outer region consisting of the remaining assemblies and including at least some but less than two-thirds of the high enrichment type assemblies

  18. Nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Ishibashi, Yoko; Mochida, Takaaki; Haikawa, Katsumasa; Yamanaka, Akihiro.

    1995-01-01

    A reactor core is radially divided into an inner region, an outer region and an outermost region. As a fuel, three kinds of fuels, namely, a high enrichment degree fuel at 3.4%, a middle enrichment degree fuel at 2.3% and a low enrichment degree at 1.1% of a fuel average enrichment degree of fission product are used. Each of the fuels is bisected to upper and lower portions at an axial center thereof. The difference of average enrichment degrees between upper and lower portions is 0.1% for the high enrichment degree fuel, 0.3% for the middle enrichment degree fuel and 0.2% for the low enrichment degree fuel. In addition, the composition of fuels in each of radial regions comprises 100% of the low enrichment degree fuels in the outermost region, 91% of the higher enrichment degree fuels and 9% of the middle enrichment degree fuels in the outer region, and 34% of the high enrichment degree fuels and 30% of the middle enrichment degree fuels in the inner region. With such a constitution, fuel economy can be improved while maintaining the thermal margin in an initially loaded reactor core of a BWR type reactor. (I.N.)

  19. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. A parametric study, based on physical and economic aspects, of the in-pile fuel cycle of pressurized light water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.-L.

    1978-01-01

    A method of determining the first core of a P.W.R. reactor was developed. This method is simple, inexpensive and takes the form of general laws expressing the effect of an enrichment variation from one batch to an other on the cycle characteristics (cycle length, end-of-cycle burn-up). These considerations are based upon an economic study which gives an idea of the financial consequences on the technical solution finally adopted. The parameters considered are the fuel cycle cost and the fuel investment cost. The computing methods used are based on a notion of purely theoretical core reactivity control which keeps stationary the power distributions during the cycle. A poisoned configuration involving burnable poisons, worked out on a particular case on the basis of this optimum control approach, has led to power distributions more uniform during the cycle and an appreciable limitation of the respective power peaks [fr

  1. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet In-Space Bases and Moon Bases for Resource Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. The propulsion and transportation requirements for all of the major moons of Uranus and Neptune are presented. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, factories, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) low gravity processing factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. Several artificial gravity in-space base designs and orbital sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  2. High pressure thimble/guide tube seal fitting with built-in low pressure seal especially suitable for facilitated and more efficient nuclear reactor refueling service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, P.N.; Blaushield, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a HP/LP seal arrangement for an elongated guide tube and an elongated thimble disposed therein. The guide tube and thimble extending outwardly from the core of a nuclear reactor to a seal table where the guide tube is welded to the seal table to provide a high pressure seal relative thereto. It comprises: a tubular seal fitting disposed in alignment with the guide tube with the thimble extending therethrough on the low pressure side of the seal table; first high pressure sealing means coupling one end of the fitting to an end of the guide tube to prevent leakage from within the guide tube; inwardly facing thread means disposed adjacent the other and outer end of the seal fitting; a nut having an opening through which the thimble extends and further having outwardly facing threading in mating engagement with the fitting thread means; the fitting having a seal seat spaced longitudinally inwardly from the thread means and facing the fitting outer end and further disposed annularly about the inner surface of the fitting; deformable ring seal means; second releasable high pressure sealing means coupling the thimble to the outer end portion of the guide tube

  3. Study on HANARO core conversion using U-Mo fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Lee, C.S.; Seo, C.G.; Park, S.J.; Kim, H.; Kim, C.K.

    2002-01-01

    Two types of fuel rods with different fuel meat diameter and uranium density are considered for HANARO core conversion with high density U-Mo fuel. Arranging standard fuels of 5.0 g U/cc and 6.35 mm in diameter at the inner ring of an assembly and reduced fuels of 4.3 g U/cc and 5.49 mm in diameter at the outer ring of an assembly flattens the assembly power distribution and avoids the increase of linear heat generation rate due to using higher uranium density and less number of fuel rods. The maximum linear heat generation rate is similar with the current reference core and four fuel sites at the outer core in the reflector tank is converted to the irradiation sites to suit more demand on fuel tests and radioisotope production at outer core sites. This new core has 32% longer fuel cycle than the current reference core. (author)

  4. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern...... for models of a translating inner core. Additionally, we investigate the structure at the base of the outer core and the inner core boundary by analyzing PKP-Cdiff waves. The search for observable PKP-Cdiff is particularly concentrated in regions that are predicted to be actively freezing and melting...... and Western ‘hemispheres’ of the inner core. Recent geodynamical models suggest that this hemispherical dichotomy can be explained by a fast translation of the inner core. In these models one side of the inner core is freezing, while the other side is melting, leading to the development of different seismic...

  5. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth’s core

    OpenAIRE

    Livermore, Philip W.; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Seismic probing of the earth’s deep interior has shown that the inner core, the solid core of our planet, rotates slightly faster (i.e., eastward) than the rest of the earth. Quite independently, observations of the geomagnetic field provide evidence of westward-drifting features at the edge of the liquid outer core. This paper describes a computer model that suggests that the geomagnetic field itself may provide a link between them: The associated electromagnetic torque currently is westward...

  6. Outer Electrospun Polycaprolactone Shell Induces Massive Foreign Body Reaction and Impairs Axonal Regeneration through 3D Multichannel Chitosan Nerve Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Duda, Sven; Dreyer, Lutz; Behrens, Peter; Wienecke, Soenke; Chakradeo, Tanmay; Glasmacher, Birgit; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    We report on the performance of composite nerve grafts with an inner 3D multichannel porous chitosan core and an outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell. The inner chitosan core provided multiple guidance channels for regrowing axons. To analyze the in vivo properties of the bare chitosan cores, we separately implanted them into an epineural sheath. The effects of both graft types on structural and functional regeneration across a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap were compared to autologous nerv...

  7. Contribution to the qualification of calculation methods of reactivity and of flux and power distributions in nuclear pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abit, K.

    1984-01-01

    The last stage of the creation computer methods and calculations consists of verifying the running and qualifying the results obtained. The work of the present thesis consisted of improving a coupling method between radial and axial phenomena in a PWR core, refering to three-dimensional calculations, while ensuring a perfect coherence between the programmed physical models. The calculation results have been compared to measurements of reactivity and of flux distributions realized during start-up tests. Thus, the methods have been applied to the calculation of the evolution of a burnable poison (gadolinium) in view of operation in long campaign. 13 refs [fr

  8. Core catcher for nuclear reactor core meltdown containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Bowman, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    A bed of graphite particles is placed beneath a nuclear reactor core outside the pressure vessel but within the containment building to catch the core debris in the event of failure of the emergency core cooling system. Spray cooling of the debris and graphite particles together with draining and flooding of coolant fluid of the graphite bed is provided to prevent debris slump-through to the bottom of the bed

  9. Water and Volatiles in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Guillot, T.; Fletcher, L. N.; Tosi, F.

    2017-10-01

    Space exploration and ground-based observations have provided outstanding evidence of the diversity and the complexity of the outer solar system. This work presents our current understanding of the nature and distribution of water and water-rich materials from the water snow line to the Kuiper Belt. This synthesis is timely, since a thorough exploration of at least one object in each region of the outer solar system has now been achieved. Next steps, starting with the Juno mission now in orbit around Jupiter, will be more focused on understanding the processes at work than on describing the general characteristics of each giant planet systems. This review is organized in three parts. First, the nature and the distribution of water and volatiles in giant and intermediary planets are described from their inner core to their outer envelopes. A special focus is given to Jupiter and Saturn, which are much better understood than the two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) thanks to the Galileo and Cassini missions. Second, the icy moons will be discussed. Space missions and ground-based observations have revealed the variety of icy surfaces in the outer system. While Europa, Enceladus, and maybe Titan present past or even active tectonic and volcanic activities, many other moons have been dead worlds for more than 3 billion years. Ice compositions found at these bodies are also complex and it is now commonly admitted that icy surfaces are never composed of pure ices. A detailed review of the distribution of non-ice materials on the surfaces and in the tenuous atmospheres of the moons is proposed, followed by a more focused discussion on the nature and the characteristics of the liquid layers trapped below the cold icy crusts that have been suggested in the icy Galilean moons, and in Enceladus, Dione, and Titan at Saturn. Finally, the recent observations collected by Dawn at Ceres and New Horizons at Pluto, as well as the state of knowledge of other transneptunian objects

  10. Oscillations of the Outer Boundary of the Outer Radiation Belt During Sawtooth Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hun Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three sawtooth oscillation events observed at geosynchronous orbit where we find quasi-periodic (every 2-3 hours sudden flux increases followed by slow flux decreases at the energy levels of ˜50-400 keV. For these three sawtooth events, we have examined variations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt. In order to determine L values of the outer boundary, we have used data of relativistic electron flux observed by the SAMPEX satellite. We find that the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt oscillates periodically being consistent with sawtooth oscillation phases. Specifically, the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt expands (namely, the boundary L value increases following the sawtooth particle flux enhancement of each tooth, and then contracts (namely, the boundary L value decreases while the sawtooth flux decreases gradually until the next flux enhancement. On the other hand, it is repeatedly seen that the asymmetry of the magnetic field intensity between dayside and nightside decreases (increases due to the dipolarization (the stretching on the nightside as the sawtooth flux increases (decreases. This implies that the periodic magnetic field variations during the sawtooth oscillations are likely responsible for the expansion-contraction oscillations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt.

  11. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  12. Large-scale density structures in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Gordon, G. S., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Science experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft has measured the solar wind density from 1 to 38 AU. Over this distance, the solar wind density decreases as the inverse square of the heliocentric distance. However, there are large variations in this density at a given radius. Such changes in density are the dominant cause of changes in the solar wind ram pressure in the outer heliosphere and can cause large perturbations in the location of the termination shock of the solar wind. Following a simple model suggested by Suess, we study the non-equilibrium, dynamic location of the termination shock as it responds to these pressure changes. The results of this study suggest that the termination shock is rarely if ever at its equilibrium distance and may depart from that distance by as much as 50 AU at times.

  13. Balanced pressure gerotor fuel pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raney, Michael Raymond; Maier, Eugen

    2004-08-03

    A gerotor pump for pressurizing gasoline fuel is capable of developing pressures up to 2.0 MPa with good mechanical and volumetric efficiency and satisfying the durability requirements for an automotive fuel pump. The pump has been designed with optimized clearances and by including features that promote the formation of lubricating films of pressurized fuel. Features of the improved pump include the use of a shadow port in the side plate opposite the outlet port to promote balancing of high fuel pressures on the opposite sides of the rotors. Inner and outer rotors have predetermined side clearances with the clearances of the outer rotor being greater than those of the inner rotor in order to promote fuel pressure balance on the sides of the outer rotor. Support of the inner rotor and a drive shaft on a single bushing with bearing sleeves maintains concentricity. Additional features are disclosed.

  14. Role of coupled cataclasis-pressure solution deformation in microearthquake activity along the creeping segment of the SAF: Inferences from studies of the SAFOD core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, J.; Gratier, J.; Renard, F.; Mittempregher, S.; di Toro, G.

    2009-12-01

    Rocks encountered in the SAFOD drill hole represent deformation in the southern-most extent of the creeping segment of the SAF north of the Parkfield. At the site and toward the northwest the SAF is characterized by aseismic creep as well as strain release through repeating microearthquakes Mmicroscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, X-ray fluorescence mapping, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The observed microstructural deformation that is apparently relevant to the seismological data includes clear evidence of cyclic deformation events, cataclastic flow, and pressure solution creep with attendant vein sealing and fracture healing fabrics. Friction testing of drill cuttings and modeling by others suggest that the overall creep behavior in shale-siltstone gouge may be due to low bulk friction coefficient of 0.2-0.4 for the fault rock. Furthermore, the low resistivity zone extending to about 5km beneath the SAFOD-Middle Mountain area is believed to consist of a pod of fluid-filled fractured and porous rocks. Our microstructural data indicate that the foliated shale-siltstone cataclasites are, in a highly heterogeneous way, more porous and permeable than the host rock and therefore provide for structurally controlled enhanced fluid-rock interactions. This is consistent with the observed pressure solution deformation and the microstructural indications of transiently high fluid pressures. We hypothesize that while the friction laws defining stable sliding are prevalent in bulk deformation of the creeping segment, there exist the possibility of steady conditions for repetitive healing, dilation, and rupture of populations of stress-oriented patches due to operation of pressure solution creep along the fault zone. The limitation on the total area of the locked patches at any given time would be controlled primarily by the imposed tectonic and near field rates of slip and fluid flux within the local permeability structure. The available geophysical data for the

  15. THE M33 GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM WITH PAndAS DATA: THE LAST OUTER HALO CLUSTER?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2011-01-01

    We use CFHT/MegaCam data to search for outer halo star clusters in M33 as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey. This work extends previous studies out to a projected radius of 50 kpc and covers over 40 deg 2 . We find only one new unambiguous star cluster in addition to the five previously known in the M33 outer halo (10 kpc ≤ r ≤ 50 kpc). Although we identify 2440 cluster candidates of various degrees of confidence from our objective image search procedure, almost all of these are likely background contaminants, mostly faint unresolved galaxies. We measure the luminosity, color, and structural parameters of the new cluster in addition to the five previously known outer halo clusters. At a projected radius of 22 kpc, the new cluster is slightly smaller, fainter, and redder than all but one of the other outer halo clusters, and has g' ∼ 19.9, (g' - i') ∼ 0.6, concentration parameter c ∼ 1.0, a core radius r c ∼ 3.5 pc, and a half-light radius r h ∼ 5.5 pc. For M33 to have so few outer halo clusters compared to M31 suggests either tidal stripping of M33's outer halo clusters by M31, or a very different, much calmer accretion history of M33.

  16. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  17. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  18. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  19. SCTF Core-I test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Sudo, Yukio; Iwamura, Takamichi; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Hirano, Kemmei

    1982-07-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermohydrodynamics in the core and the communication in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a posturated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In the present report, effects of system pressure on reflooding phenomena shall be discussed based on the data of Tests S1-SH2, S1-01 and S1-02 which are the parameteris tests for system pressure effects belonging to the SCTF Core-I forced flooding test series. Major items discussed in this report are (1) hydrodynamic behavior in the system, (2) core thermal behavior, (3) core heat transfer and (4) two-dimensional hydrodynamic behavior in the pressure vessel including the core. (author)

  20. Phosphate, carbonate and organic matter distribution in sediment cores off Bombay-Saurashtra coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Rao, Ch.M.

    relationship. The total phosphorus value is high in the core from the slope, almost uniform in the cores from the outer shelf and a core from the nearby basin, but poor in a core (no. 3) considered to be from a 'closed basin' within the shelf. The total...

  1. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  2. A model for osmium isotopic evolution of metallic solids at the core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, Munir

    2011-03-01

    Some plumes are thought to originate at the core-mantle boundary, but geochemical evidence of core-mantle interaction is limited to Os isotopes in samples from Hawaii, Gorgona (89 Ma), and Kostomuksha (2.7 Ga). The Os isotopes have been explained by physical entrainment of Earth's liquid outer core into mantle plumes. This model has come into conflict with geophysical estimates of the timing of core formation, high-pressure experimental determinations of the solid metal-liquid metal partition coefficients (D), and the absence of expected 182W anomalies. A new model is proposed where metallic liquid from the outer core is partially trapped in a compacting cumulate pile of Fe-rich nonmetallic precipitates (FeO, FeS, Fe3Si, etc.) at the top of the core and undergoes fractional crystallization precipitating solid metal grains, followed by expulsion of the residual metallic liquid back to the outer core. The Os isotopic composition of the solids and liquids in the cumulate pile is modeled as a function of the residual liquid remaining and the emplacement age using 1 bar D values, with variable amounts of oxygen (0-10 wt %) as the light element. The precipitated solids evolve Os isotope compositions that match the trends for Hawaii (at an emplacement age of 3.5-4.5 Ga; 5%-10% oxygen) and Gorgona (emplacement age < 1.5 Ga; 0%-5% oxygen). The Fe-rich matrix of the cumulate pile dilutes the precipitated solid metal decoupling the Fe/Mn ratio from Os and W isotopes. The advantages to using precipitated solid metal as the Os host include a lower platinum group element and Ni content to the mantle source region relative to excess iron, miniscule anomalies in 182W (<0.1 ɛ), and no effects for Pb isotopes, etc. A gradual thermomechanical erosion of the cumulate pile results in incorporation of this material into the base of the mantle, where mantle plumes subsequently entrain it. Fractional crystallization of metallic liquids within the CMB provides a consistent explanation of

  3. Outer planet probe cost estimates: First impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, J.

    1974-01-01

    An examination was made of early estimates of outer planetary atmospheric probe cost by comparing the estimates with past planetary projects. Of particular interest is identification of project elements which are likely cost drivers for future probe missions. Data are divided into two parts: first, the description of a cost model developed by SAI for the Planetary Programs Office of NASA, and second, use of this model and its data base to evaluate estimates of probe costs. Several observations are offered in conclusion regarding the credibility of current estimates and specific areas of the outer planet probe concept most vulnerable to cost escalation.

  4. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 2. TRAB-3D/SMABRE Calculation of the OECD/ NRC PWR MSLB Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, A.; Haemaelaeinen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.

    2001-01-01

    All three exercises of the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark were calculated at VTT Energy. The SMABRE thermal-hydraulics code was used for the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetics neutronics. The second exercise was calculated with the TRAB-3D three-dimensional reactor dynamics code. The third exercise was calculated with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. Both codes have been developed at VTT Energy. The results of all the exercises agree reasonably well with those of the other participants; thus, instead of reporting the results, this paper concentrates on describing the computational aspects of the calculation with the foregoing codes and on some observations of the sensitivity of the results. In the TRAB-3D neutron kinetics, the two-group diffusion equations are solved in homogenized fuel assembly geometry with an efficient two-level nodal method. The point of the two-level iteration scheme is that only one unknown variable per node, the average neutron flux, is calculated during the inner iteration. The nodal flux shapes and cross sections are recalculated only once in the outer iteration loop. The TRAB-3D core model includes also parallel one-dimensional channel hydraulics with detailed fuel models. Advanced implicit time discretization methods are used in all submodels. SMABRE is a fast-running five-equation model completed by a drift-flux model, with a time discretization based on a non-iterative semi-implicit algorithm. For the third exercise of the benchmark, the TMI-1 models of TRAB-3D and SMABRE were coupled. This was the first time these codes were coupled together. However, similar coupling of the HEXTRAN and SMABRE codes has been shown to be stable and efficient, when used in safety analyses of Finnish and foreign VVER-type reactors. The coupling used between the two codes is called a parallel coupling. SMABRE solves the thermal hydraulics both in the cooling circuit and in the core

  5. A Large Solid Inner Core at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, A.; Goossens, S.; Mazarico, E.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Kuang, W.; Sabaka, T. J.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2018-05-01

    New measurements of the polar moments of inertia of the whole planet and of the outer layers (crust+mantle), and simulations of Mercury’s magnetic field dynamo suggest the presence of a solid inner core with a Ric 0.3-0.5 Roc.

  6. 27 CFR 9.207 - Outer Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outer Coastal Plain. 9.207... Outer Coastal Plain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Outer Coastal Plain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Outer Coastal Plain” is a term of viticultural...

  7. Nitrogen partitioning during core-mantle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelmanns, I. M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Liebske, C.

    2016-12-01

    This study investiagtes nitrogen partitioing between metal and silicate melts as relevant for core segregation during the accretion of planetesimals into the Earth. On present day Earth, N belongs to the most important elements, as it is one of the key constituents of our atmosphere and forms the basis of life. However, the geochemistry of N, i.e. its distribution and isotopic fractionation between Earth's deep reservoirs is not well constrained. In order to determine the partitioning behaviour of N, a centrifuging piston cylinder was used to euqilibrate and then gravitationally separate metal-silicate melt pairs at 1250 °C, 1 GPa over the range of oxygen fugacities thought to have prevailied druing core segreagtion (IW-4 to IW). Complete segregation of the two melts was reached within 3 hours at 1000 g, the interface showing a nice meniscus The applied double capsule technique, using an outer metallic and inner non-metallic (mostly graphite) capsule, minimizes volatile loss over the course of the experiment compared to single non-metallic capsules. The two quenched melts were cut apart, cleaned at the outside and N concentrations of the melts were analysed on bulk samples by an elemental analyser. Nevertheless, the low amount of sample material and the N yield in the high pressure experiments required the developement of new analytical routines. Despite these experimental and analytical difficulties, we were able to determine a DNmetal/silicateof 13±0.25 at IW-1, N partitioning into the core froming metal. The few availible literature data [1],[2] suggest that N changes its compatibility favoring the silicate melt or magma ocean at around IW-2.5. In order to asses how much N may effectively be contained in the core and the silicate Earth, experiments characterizing N behaviour over the entire range of core formation condtitions are well under way. [1] Kadik et al., (2011) Geochemistry International 49.5: 429-438. [2] Roskosz et al., (2013) GCA 121: 15-28.

  8. Nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F

    1974-07-11

    The core of the fast neutron reactor consisting, among other components, of fuel elements enriched in plutonium is divided into modules. Each module contains a bundle of four or six elongated components (fuel elements and control rods). In the arrangement with four components, one is kept rigid while the other three are elastically yielding inclined towards the center and lean against the rigid component. In the modules with six pieces, each component is elastically yielding inclined towards a central cavity. In this way, they form a circular arc. A control rod may be placed in the cavity. In order to counteract a relative lateral movement, the outer surfaces of the components which have hexagonal cross-sections have interlocking bearing cushions. The bearing cushions consist of keyway-type ribs or grooves with the wedges or ribs gripping in the grooves of the neighbouring components. In addition, the ribs have oblique entering surfaces.

  9. Robust zero resistance in a superconducting high-entropy alloy at pressures up to 190 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Wang, Honghong; von Rohr, Fabian; Wang, Zhe; Cai, Shu; Zhou, Yazhou; Yang, Ke; Li, Aiguo; Jiang, Sheng; Wu, Qi; Cava, Robert J.; Sun, Liling

    2017-12-01

    We report the observation of extraordinarily robust zero-resistance superconductivity in the pressurized (TaNb)0.67(HfZrTi)0.33 high-entropy alloy--a material with a body-centered-cubic crystal structure made from five randomly distributed transition-metal elements. The transition to superconductivity (TC) increases from an initial temperature of 7.7 K at ambient pressure to 10 K at ˜60 GPa, and then slowly decreases to 9 K by 190.6 GPa, a pressure that falls within that of the outer core of the earth. We infer that the continuous existence of the zero-resistance superconductivity from 1 atm up to such a high pressure requires a special combination of electronic and mechanical characteristics. This high-entropy alloy superconductor thus may have a bright future for applications under extreme conditions, and also poses a challenge for understanding the underlying quantum physics.

  10. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    independent dominating set of a graph is a set of vertices of such that every vertex of ()\\ has a neighbor in and the maximum vertex degree of the subgraph induced by ()\\ is at most one. The outer-2-independent domination ...

  11. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, L.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Drukarev, E.G. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  12. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Outer-2-independent domination in graphs. MARCIN KRZYWKOWSKI1,2,∗, DOOST ALI MOJDEH3 and MARYEM RAOOFI4. 1Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of Johannesburg,. Johannesburg, South Africa. 2Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics, Gdansk University.

  13. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Drukarev, E.G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  14. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.Q.; Casadei, A.L.; Doshi, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  15. The Earth's core: its composition, formation and bearing upon the origin of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    The density of the outer core is about 3% smaller than pure iron, which implies that the core contains a substantial amount of one or more low atomic mass elements. New experimental data on the solubility of FeO in molten iron are compatible with oxygen being the other element. At atmospheric pressure FeO is extensively soluble in iron at 2500 0 C, completely miscible above 2800 0 C. Also the solubility of FeO in molten iron is considerably increased at higher pressures. The density measurements can be explained if the core contains about 35% FeO; the new data show this to be possible. A model for the formation of the core based on a high FeO content in the Bulk Earth can be explained if the Earth accreted from a mixture of two components: A, a highly reduced, metal-rich devolatilized assemblage and B, a highly oxidized, volatile-rich assemblage similar to Cl chondrites. The formation of these components in the solar nebula is discussed. The large amount of FeO now inferred to be present in the Earth was mainly produced during accretion by oxidation of metallic iron from component A by water from component B. (U.K.)

  16. ICME-driven sheath regions deplete the outer radiation belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, H.; Kilpua, E. K.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is an outstanding question in space weather and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction studies, why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the storm drivers. Traditionally drivers have been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, an 'ICME event' is a complex structure: The core is a magnetic cloud (MC; a clear flux rope structure). If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the MC. While both the sheath and the MC feature elevated solar wind speed, their other properties are very different. For instance, the sheath region has typically a much higher dynamic pressure than the magnetic cloud. Moreover, the sheath region has a high power in magnetic field and dynamic pressure Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) range fluctuations, while the MC is characterised by an extremely smooth magnetic field. Magnetic clouds have been recognised as important drivers magnetospheric activity since they can comprise long periods of very large southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that sheath regions can also act as storm drivers. In this study, we analyse the effects of ICME-driven sheath regions on the relativistic electron fluxes observed by GOES satellites on the geostationary orbit. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of 31 sheath regions from solar cycle 23. Our results show that the sheaths cause an approximately one order of magnitude decrease in the 24h-averaged electron fluxes. Typically the fluxes also stay below the pre-event level for more than two days. Further analysis reveals that the decrease does not depend on, e.g., whether the sheath interval contains predominantly northward

  17. Inner Core Tilt and Polar Motion: Probing the Dynamics Deep Inside the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, M.; Bloxham, J.

    2003-12-01

    A tilted inner core permits exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle through gravitational and pressure torques and, as a result, changes in the direction of Earth's axis of rotation with respect to the mantle. Some of the observed variations in the direction of Earth's rotation could then be caused by equatorial torques on the inner core which tilt the latter out of its alignment with the mantle. In this work, we investigate whether such a scenario could explain the decade polar motion known as the Markowitz wobble. We show that a decade polar motion of the same amplitude as the observed Markowitz wobble requires a torque of 1020 N m which tilts the inner core by 0.07 degrees. This result critically depends on the viscosity of the inner core; for a viscosity less than 5 x 1017 Pa s, larger torques are required. A torque of 1020 N m with decadal periodicity can perhaps be produced by electromagnetic coupling between the inner core and a component of the flow in the outer core known as torsional oscillations, provided that the radial magnetic field at the inner core boundary is on the order of 3 to 4 mT and satisfies certain geometrical constraints. The resulting polar motion thus produced is eccentric and polarized, in agreement with the observations. Our model suggests that equatorial torques at the inner core boundary might also excite the Chandler wobble, provided shorter wavelength torsional oscillations with higher natural frequencies have enough power or provided there exists another physical mechanism that can generate a large torque at a 14 month period.

  18. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  19. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  20. Prediction of the Effects of Radiation FOr Reactor pressure vessel and in-core Materials using multi-scale modeling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime (PERFORM-60 project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mazouzi, A.; Bugat, S.; Leclercq, S.; Massoud, J.-P.; Moinereau, D.; Lidbury, D.; Van Dyck, S.; Marini, B.; Alamo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The PERFECT project of the EURATOM framework program (FP6) is a first step through the development of a simulation platform that contains several advanced numerical tools aiming at the prediction of irradiation damage in both the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its internals using state-of-the-art knowledge. These tools allow simulation of irradiation effects on the microstructure and the constitutive behavior of the RPV low alloy steels, as well as their fracture mechanics properties. For the reactor internals, the first partial models were established, describing radiation damage to the microstructure and providing a first description of the stress corrosion behaviour of austenitic steels in primary environment, without physical linking of the radiation and corrosion effects. Thus, relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the FP7 Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop similar tools that would allow the simulation of the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals, in addition to a further improvement of the existing ones on RPV made of bainitic steels. From the managerial view point, PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects, namely (i) RPV and (ii) Internals. In addition, a Users' Group and a training scheme have been adopted in order to allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations... from Europe, USA and Japan to participate actively in the process of appraising the limits and potentialities of the developed tools as well as their validation against qualified experimental data

  1. Development of Structural Core Components for Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    Core structural materials: • The desire is to have only fuel in the core, structural material form 25% of the total core: – To support and to retain the fuel in position; – Provide necessary ducts to make coolant flow through & transfer/remove heat. • For 500 MWe FBR with Oxide fuel (Peak Linear Power 450 W/cm), total fuel pins required in the core are of the order 39277 pins (both inner & outer core Fuel SA); • Considering 217 pins/Fuel SA there are 181 Fuel SA wrapper tubes • These structural materials see hostile core with max temperature and neutron flux

  2. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorholt, Wilhelm; Luci, Raymond K.

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  3. Subharmonic excitation in an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; Curreri, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of subharmonic resonance in a series of blocks with clearance between blocks and with springs on the outer most ends is the subject of this paper. This represents an HTGR core response to an earthquake input. An analytical model of the cross section of this type of core is a series of blocks arranged horizontally between outer walls. Each block represents many graphite hexagonal core elements acting in unison as a single mass. The blocks are of unequal size to model the true mass distribution through the core. Core element elasticity and damping characteristics are modeled with linear spring and viscous damping units affixed to each block. The walls and base represent the core barell or core element containment structure. For forced response calculations, these boundaries are given prescribed motions. The clearance between each block could be the same or different with the total clearance duplicating that of the entire core. Spring packs installed between the first and last block and the boundaries model the boundary elasticity. The system non-linearity is due to the severe discontinuity in the interblock elastic forces when adjacent blocks collide. A computer program using a numerical integration scheme was developed to solve for the response of the system to arbitrary inputs

  4. Analysis of pressure distribution originated over the external plate window of the RA-10 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramajo, M A; Garcia, J.C

    2012-01-01

    The RA10 is a pool type multipurpose research reactor. The core consists of a rectangular array of MTR fuel type. The refrigeration system at full power and normal operations conditions is carried out by an ascendant flow through the core. To ensure the refrigeration in the sub-channel formed between two adjacent fuels, there is a window orifice over the outer fuel plate. Part of the coolant flow that gets into the fuel will be derived by the window orifice to the sub-channel. Due to the change in the coolant flow direction is necessary to establish the pressure distribution originated over the window In order to achieve this goal a CFD commercial code (FLUENT v6.3.26) was used to perform numerical simulations to obtain the pressure distribution over the window. A quarter of the fuel was modeled using proper symmetry and boundaries conditions (author)

  5. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  6. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. A pressure tuned stop-flow atomic layer deposition process for MoS2 on high porous nanostructure and fabrication of TiO2/MoS2 core/shell inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin; Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Wang, Zhiwei; Kei Tan, Chiew; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Kherani, Nazir P.; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2017-11-01

    MoS2 thin films are obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature range of 120-150 °C using Mo(CO)6 and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as precursors. A pressure tuned stop-flow ALD process facilitates the precursor adsorption and enables the deposition of MoS2 on high porous three dimensional (3D) nanostructures. As a demonstration, a TiO2/MoS2 core/shell inverse opal (TiO2/MoS2-IO) structure has been fabricated through ALD of TiO2 and MoS2 on a self-assembled multilayer polystyrene (PS) structure template. Due to the self-limiting surface reaction mechanism of ALD and the utilization of pressure tuned stop-flow ALD processes, the as fabricated TiO2/MoS2-IO structure has a high uniformity, reflected by FESEM and FIB-SEM characterization. A crystallized TiO2/MoS2-IO structure can be obtained through a post annealing process. As a 3D photonic crystal, the TiO2/MoS2-IO exhibits obvious stopband reflecting peaks, which can be adjusted through changing the opal diameters as well as the thickness of MoS2 layer.

  8. Research of natural resources saving by design studies of Pressurized Light Water Reactors and High Conversion PWR cores with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, V.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of innovative neutronic conception of Pressurized Light Water Reactors (PWR) of 3. generation, saving of natural resources is of paramount importance for sustainable nuclear energy production. This study consists in the one hand to design high Conversion Reactors exploiting mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and in the other hand, to elaborate multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, in order to maximize natural resources economy. This study has two main objectives: first the design of High Conversion PWR (HCPWR) with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and secondly the setting up of multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, to better natural resources economy. The approach took place in four stages. Two ways of introducing thorium into PWR have been identified: the first is with low moderator to fuel volume ratios (MR) and ThPuO 2 fuel, and the second is with standard or high MR and ThUO 2 fuel. The first way led to the design of under-moderated HCPWR following the criteria of high 233 U production and low plutonium consumption. This second step came up with two specific concepts, from which multi-recycling strategies have been elaborated. The exclusive production and recycling of 233 U inside HCPWR limits the annual economy of natural uranium to approximately 30%. It was brought to light that the strong need in plutonium in the HCPWR dedicated to 233 U production is the limiting factor. That is why it was eventually proposed to study how the production of 233 U within PWR (with standard MR), from 2020. It was shown that the anticipated production of 233 U in dedicated PWR relaxes the constraint on plutonium inventories and favours the transition toward a symbiotic reactor fleet composed of both PWR and HCPWR loaded with thorium fuel. This strategy is more adapted and leads to an annual economy of natural uranium of about 65%. (author) [fr

  9. Low-Outgassing Photogrammetry Targets for Use in Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jason N.; Sampler, Henry; Reed, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    A short document discusses an investigation of materials for photogrammetry targets for highly sensitive optical scientific instruments to be operated in outer space and in an outer-space-environment- simulating thermal vacuum chamber on Earth. A key consideration in the selection of photogrammetry-target materials for vacuum environments is the need to prevent contamination that could degrade the optical responses of the instruments. Therefore, in addition to the high levels and uniformity of reflectivity required of photogrammetry-target materials suitable for use in air, the materials sought must exhibit minimal outgassing. Commercially available photogrammetry targets were found to outgas excessively under the thermal and vacuum conditions of interest; this finding prompted the investigators to consider optically equivalent or superior, lower-outgassing alternative target materials. The document lists several materials found to satisfy the requirements, but does not state explicitly whether the materials can be used individually or must be combined in the proper sequence into layered target structures. The materials in question are an aluminized polyimide tape, an acrylic pressure- sensitive adhesive, a 500-A-thick layer of vapor-deposited aluminum, and spherical barium titanate glass beads having various diameters from 20 to 63 microns..

  10. Hybrid rocket propulsion systems for outer planet exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jens, Elizabeth T.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hubbard, G. Scott

    2016-11-01

    Outer planet exploration missions require significant propulsive capability, particularly to achieve orbit insertion. Missions to explore the moons of outer planets place even more demanding requirements on propulsion systems, since they involve multiple large ΔV maneuvers. Hybrid rockets present a favorable alternative to conventional propulsion systems for many of these missions. They typically enjoy higher specific impulse than solids, can be throttled, stopped/restarted, and have more flexibility in their packaging configuration. Hybrids are more compact and easier to throttle than liquids and have similar performance levels. In order to investigate the suitability of these propulsion systems for exploration missions, this paper presents novel hybrid motor designs for two interplanetary missions. Hybrid propulsion systems for missions to Europa and Uranus are presented and compared to conventional in-space propulsion systems. The hybrid motor design for each of these missions is optimized across a range of parameters, including propellant selection, O/F ratio, nozzle area ratio, and chamber pressure. Details of the design process are described in order to provide guidance for researchers wishing to evaluate hybrid rocket motor designs for other missions and applications.

  11. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Resource Capturing, Storage, and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as helium 3 and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate for hydrogen helium 4 and helium 3, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues.

  12. Trojan wavepackets in helium - by core-Rydberg interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinski, M.; Eberly, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The authors exhibit the existence of core-induced shape invariant wave packets in helium analogous to the Trojan wave packets predicted for hydrogen. They show that the core dipole moment oscillating with the Rabi frequency in the presence of a laser field will cause both radical and angular confinement of an outer Rydberg electron moving around a nearly circular orbit if the parameters of the orbit are properly chosen. They find the relation between the Rabi frequency of the core electron oscillations, laser field strength and the parameters of the Rydberg orbit of the outer electron

  13. Acute Zonal Cone Photoreceptor Outer Segment Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S; Sandhu, Harpal S; Serrano, Leona W; Traband, Anastasia; Lau, Marisa K; Adamus, Grazyna; Avery, Robert A

    2017-05-01

    The diagnostic path presented narrows down the cause of acute vision loss to the cone photoreceptor outer segment and will refocus the search for the cause of similar currently idiopathic conditions. To describe the structural and functional associations found in a patient with acute zonal occult photoreceptor loss. A case report of an adolescent boy with acute visual field loss despite a normal fundus examination performed at a university teaching hospital. Results of a complete ophthalmic examination, full-field flash electroretinography (ERG) and multifocal ERG, light-adapted achromatic and 2-color dark-adapted perimetry, and microperimetry. Imaging was performed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), near-infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength (SW) fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and NIR reflectance (REF). The patient was evaluated within a week of the onset of a scotoma in the nasal field of his left eye. Visual acuity was 20/20 OU, and color vision was normal in both eyes. Results of the fundus examination and of SW-FAF and NIR-FAF imaging were normal in both eyes, whereas NIR-REF imaging showed a region of hyporeflectance temporal to the fovea that corresponded with a dense relative scotoma noted on light-adapted static perimetry in the left eye. Loss in the photoreceptor outer segment detected by SD-OCT co-localized with an area of dense cone dysfunction detected on light-adapted perimetry and multifocal ERG but with near-normal rod-mediated vision according to results of 2-color dark-adapted perimetry. Full-field flash ERG findings were normal in both eyes. The outer nuclear layer and inner retinal thicknesses were normal. Localized, isolated cone dysfunction may represent the earliest photoreceptor abnormality or a distinct entity within the acute zonal occult outer retinopathy complex. Acute zonal occult outer retinopathy should be considered in patients with acute vision loss and abnormalities on NIR-REF imaging, especially if

  14. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.leclercq@edf.f [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components, Avenue des Renardieres - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Lidbury, David [SERCO Assurance - Walton House, 404 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington, Cheshire WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Van Dyck, Steven [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Material Science, Boeretang 200, BE, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Moinereau, Dominique [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components, Avenue des Renardieres - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Alamo, Ana [CEA Saclay, DEN/DSOE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mazouzi, Abdou Al [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components, Avenue des Renardieres - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations... from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach

  15. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  16. Analysis of core and core barrel heat-up under conditions simulating severe reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellaiah, S.; Viskanta, R.; Ranganathan, P.; Anand, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a model for estimating the temperature distributions in the reactor core, core barrel, thermal shield and reactor pressure vessel of a PWR during an undercooling transient. A number of numerical calculations simulating the core uncovering of the TMI-2 reactor and the subsequent heat-up of the core have been performed. The results of the calculations show that the exothermic heat release due to Zircaloy oxidation contributes to the sharp heat-up of the core. However, the core barrel temperature rise which is driven by the temperature increase of the edge of the core (e.g., the core baffle) is very modest. The maximum temperature of the core barrel never exceeded 610 K (at a system pressure of 68 bar) after a 75 minute simulation following the start of core uncovering

  17. Core clamping device for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    The core clamping device for a fast neutron reactor includes clamps to support the fuel zone against the pressure vessel. The clamps are arranged around the circumference of the core. They consist of torsion bars arranged parallel at some distance around the core with lever arms attached to the ends whose force is directed in the opposite direction, pressing against the wall of the pressure vessel. The lever arms and pressure plates also actuated by the ends of the torsion bars transfer the stress, the pressure plates acting upon the fuel elements or fuel assemblies. Coupling between the ends of the torsion bars and the pressure plates is achieved by end carrier plates directly attached to the torsion bars and radially movable. This clamping device follows the thermal expansions of the core, allows specific elements to be disengaged in sections and saves space between the core and the neutron reflectors. (DG) [de

  18. How cores grow by pebble accretion. I. Direct core growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, M. G.; Vazan, A.; Ormel, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Planet formation by pebble accretion is an alternative to planetesimal-driven core accretion. In this scenario, planets grow by the accretion of cm- to m-sized pebbles instead of km-sized planetesimals. One of the main differences with planetesimal-driven core accretion is the increased thermal ablation experienced by pebbles. This can provide early enrichment to the planet's envelope, which influences its subsequent evolution and changes the process of core growth. Aims: We aim to predict core masses and envelope compositions of planets that form by pebble accretion and compare mass deposition of pebbles to planetesimals. Specifically, we calculate the core mass where pebbles completely evaporate and are absorbed before reaching the core, which signifies the end of direct core growth. Methods: We model the early growth of a protoplanet by calculating the structure of its envelope, taking into account the fate of impacting pebbles or planetesimals. The region where high-Z material can exist in vapor form is determined by the temperature-dependent vapor pressure. We include enrichment effects by locally modifying the mean molecular weight of the envelope. Results: In the pebble case, three phases of core growth can be identified. In the first phase (Mcore mixes outwards, slowing core growth. In the third phase (Mcore > 0.5M⊕), the high-Z inner region expands outwards, absorbing an increasing fraction of the ablated material as vapor. Rainout ends before the core mass reaches 0.6 M⊕, terminating direct core growth. In the case of icy H2O pebbles, this happens before 0.1 M⊕. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pebble accretion can directly form rocky cores up to only 0.6 M⊕, and is unable to form similarly sized icy cores. Subsequent core growth can proceed indirectly when the planet cools, provided it is able to retain its high-Z material.

  19. Patterns in new dimensionless quantities containing melting temperature, and their dependence on pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. WALZER

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships existing between melting temperature and other
    macroscopic physical quantities are investigated. A new dimensionless
    quantity Q(1 not containing the Grtineisen parameter proves to be suited for serving in future studies as a tool for the determination of the melting temperature in the outer core of the Earth. The pressure dependence of more general dimensionless quantities Q„ is determined analytically and, for the chemical elements, numerically, too. The patterns of various interesting dimensionless quantities are shown in the Periodic Table and compared.

  20. Performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Arink, R; Bachmann, S.; Bagaturia, Y.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th.; Berkien, A.; Farber, Ch.; Bien, A.; Blouw, J.; Ceelie, L.; Coco, V.; Deckenhoff, M.; Deng, Z.; Dettori, F.; van Eijk, D.; Ekelhof, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Grillo, L.; Hulsbergen, W.D.; Karbach, T.M.; Koopman, R.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Langenbruch, Ch.; Lavrentyev, V.; Linn, Ch.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Meissner, M.; Michalowski, J.; Morawski, P.; Nawrot, A.; Nedos, M.; Pellegrino, A.; Polok, G.; van Petten, O.; Rovekamp, J.; Schimmel, F.; Schuylenburg, H.; Schwemmer, R.; Seyfert, P.; Serra, N.; Sluijk, T.; Spaan, B.; Spelt, J.; Storaci, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Swientek, S.; Tolk, S.; Tuning, N.; Uwer, U.; Wiedner, D.; Witek, M.; Zeng, M.; Zwart, A.

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is a gaseous detector covering an area of 5x6 m2 with 12 double layers of straw tubes. The detector with its services are described together with the commissioning and calibration procedures. Based on data of the first LHC running period from 2010 to 2012, the performance of the readout electronics and the single hit resolution and efficiency are presented. The efficiency to detect a hit in the central half of the straw is estimated to be 99.2%, and the position resolution is determined to be approximately 200 um. The Outer Tracker received a dose in the hottest region corresponding to 0.12 C/cm, and no signs of gain deterioration or other ageing effects are observed.

  1. The Outer Space as an Educational Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Melquíades; Hernández-López, Montserrat

    2017-06-01

    STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end results are students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. The Outer Space is a window to the past and the future of our travel around the history of the Universe and can be used as a educational tool in primary and secondary education. This paper talks about the integration of the resources of European Space Agency, Space Awareness, Nuclio, Scientix and Schoolnet as motivation to integrate STEAM methodology in secondary education. Keywords: STEAM, outer space, motivation, methodology

  2. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  3. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruester, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

  4. Boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma-sheet boundary layer are the primary boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere. Recent satellite observations indicate that they provide for more than 50 percent of the plasma and energy transport in the outer magnetosphere although they constitute less than 5 percent by volume. Relative to the energy density in the source regions, plasma in the magnetospheric boundary layer is predominantly deenergized whereas plasma in the plasma-sheet boundary layer has been accelerated. The reconnection hypothesis continues to provide a useful framework for comparing data sampled in the highly dynamic magnetospheric environment. Observations of 'flux transfer events' and other detailed features near the boundaries have been recently interpreted in terms of nonsteady-state reconnection. Alternative hypotheses are also being investigated. More work needs to be done, both in theory and observation, to determine whether reconnection actually occurs in the magnetosphere and, if so, whether it is important for overall magnetospheric dynamics.

  5. Boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastman, T.E.; Frank, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma-sheet boundary layer are the primary boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere. Recent satellite observations indicate that they provide for more than 50 percent of the plasma and energy transport in the outer magnetosphere although they constitute less than 5 percent by volume. Relative to the energy density in the source regions, plasma in the magnetospheric boundary layer is predominantly deenergized whereas plasma in the plasma-sheet boundary layer has been accelerated. The reconnection hypothesis continues to provide a useful framework for comparing data sampled in the highly dynamic magnetospheric environment. Observations of flux transfer events and other detailed features near the boundaries have been recently interpreted in terms of nonsteady-state reconnection. Alternative hypotheses are also being investigated. More work needs to be done, both in theory and observation, to determine whether reconnection actually occurs in the magnetosphere and, if so, whether it is important for overall magnetospheric dynamics. 30 references

  6. PERFORM 60: Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mazouzi, A.; Alamo, A.; Lidbury, D.; Moinereau, D.; Van Dyck, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Multi-scale and multi-physics modelling are adopted by PERFORM 60 to predict irradiation damage in nuclear structural materials. → PERFORM 60 allows to Consolidate the community and improve the interaction between universities/industries and safety authorities. → Experimental validation at the relevant scale is a key for developing the multi-scale modelling methodology. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, materials undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational lifetime. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and potential degradation of certain essential structures of the power plant to ensure their safe and reliable operation. So far, the monitoring and mitigation of these degradation phenomena rely mainly on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the materials behaviour in a nuclear environment. Indeed, within the PERFECT project of the EURATOM framework program (FP6), a first step has been successfully reached through the development of a simulation platform that contains several advanced numerical tools aiming at the prediction of irradiation damage in both the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its internals using available, state-of-the-art-knowledge. These tools allow simulation of irradiation effects on the nanostructure and the constitutive behaviour of the RPV low alloy steels, as well as their fracture mechanics properties. For the more highly irradiated reactor internals, which are commonly produced using austenitic stainless steels, the first partial models were established, describing radiation effects on the nanostructure and providing a first description of the

  7. Fluxgate magnetometers for outer planets exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    The exploration of the interplanetary medium and the magnetospheres of the outer planets requires the implementation of magnetic field measuring instrumentation with wide dynamic range, high stability, and reliability. The fluxgate magnetometers developed for the Pioneer 11 and Mariner-Jupiter-Saturn missions are presented. These instruments cover the range of .01 nT to 2 million nT with optimum performance characteristics and low power consumption.

  8. Outer Limits of Biotechnologies: A Jewish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Loike

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of biomedical research focuses on new biotechnologies such as gene editing, stem cell biology, and reproductive medicine, which have created a scientific revolution. While the potential medical benefits of this research may be far-reaching, ethical issues related to non-medical applications of these technologies are demanding. We analyze, from a Jewish legal perspective, some of the ethical conundrums that society faces in pushing the outer limits in researching these new biotechnologies.

  9. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  10. EXPERIMENTATION OF THREE PHASE OUTER ROTATING SWITCHED RELUCTANCE MOTOR WITH SOFT MAGNETIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. LENIN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of Soft Magnetic Composite (SMC material in Outer Rotating Switched Reluctance Motor (ORSRM. The presented stator core of the Switched Reluctance Motor was made of two types of material, the classical laminated silicon steel sheet and the soft magnetic composite material. First, the stator core made of laminated steel has been analysed. The next step is to analyse the identical geometry SRM with the soft magnetic composite material, SOMALOY for its stator core. The comparisons of both cores include the calculated torque and torque ripple, magnetic conditions, simplicity of fabrication and cost. The finite element method has been used to analyse the magnetic conditions and the calculated torque. Finally, tested results shows that SMC is a better choice for SRM in terms of torque ripple and power density.

  11. High-Pressure Geophysical Properties of Fcc Phase FeHX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. C.; Davis, A. H.; Bi, W.; Zhao, J.; Alp, E. E.; Zhang, D.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Face centered cubic (fcc) FeHX was synthesized at pressures of 18-68 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1,500 K. Thermally quenched samples were evaluated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) to determine sample composition and sound velocities to 82 GPa. To aid in the interpretation of nonideal (X ≠ 1) stoichiometries, two equations of state for fcc FeHX were developed, combining an empirical equation of state for iron with two distinct synthetic compression curves for interstitial hydrogen. Matching the density deficit of the Earth's core using these equations of state requires 0.8-1.1 wt % hydrogen at the core-mantle boundary and 0.2-0.3 wt % hydrogen at the interface of the inner and outer cores. Furthermore, a comparison of Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) to a Birch's law extrapolation of our experimental results suggests that an iron alloy containing ˜0.8-1.3 wt % hydrogen could reproduce both the density and compressional velocity (VP) of the Earth's outer core.

  12. Emergency core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi; Okataku, Yasukuni.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the fuel soundness upon loss of primary coolant accidents in a pressure tube type nuclear reactor by injecting cooling heavy water at an early stage, to suppress the temperature of fuel cans at a lower level. Constitution: When a thermometer detects the temperature rise and a pressure gauge detects that the pressure for the primary coolants is reduced slightly from that in the normal operation upon loss of coolant accidents in the vicinity of the primary coolant circuit, heavy water is caused to flow in the heavy water feed pipeway by a controller. This enables to inject the heavy water into the reactor core in a short time upon loss of the primary coolant accidents to suppress the temperature rise in the fuel can thereby maintain the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Pressure tube type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Masaoki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the safety of pressure tube type reactors by providing an additional ECCS system to an ordinary ECCS system and injecting heavy water in the reactor core tank into pressure tubes upon fractures of the tubes. Constitution: Upon fractures of pressure tubes, reduction of the pressure in the fractured tubes to the atmospheric pressure in confirmed and the electromagnetic valve is operated to completely isolate the pressure tubes from the fractured portion. Then, the heavy water in the reactor core tank flows into and spontaneously recycles through the pressure tubes to cool the fuels in the tube to prevent their meltdown. By additionally providing the separate ECCS system to the ordinary ECCS system, fuels can be cooled upon loss of coolant accidents to improve the safety of the reactors. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... initiate civil penalty proceedings; however, violations that cause injury, death, or environmental damage... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties... daily civil penalty assessment. SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to...

  15. Conceptual core model for the reactor core test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, L.D.

    1970-01-01

    Several design options for the ZrH Flight System Reactor were investigated which involved tradeoffs of core excess reactivity, reactor control, coolant mixing and cladding thickness. A design point was selected which is to be the basis for more detailed evaluation in the preliminary design phase. The selected design utilizes 295 elements with 0.670 inch element-to-element pitch, 32 mil thick Incoloy cladding, 18.00 inches long fuel meat, hydrogen content of 6.3 x 10 22 atoms/cc fuel, 10.5 w/o uranium, and a spiraled fin configuration with alternate elements having fins with spiral to the right, spiral to the left, and no fin at all (R-L-N fin configuration). Fin height is 30 mils for the center region of the core and 15 mils for the outer region. (U.S.)

  16. Melting of Fe-Si-O alloys: the Fate of Coexisting Si and O in the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arveson, S. M.; Lee, K. K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The light element budget of Earth's core plays an integral role in sustaining outer core convection, which powers the geodynamo. Many experiments have been performed on binary iron compounds, but the results do not robustly agree with seismological observations and geochemical constraints. Earth's core is almost certainly made up of multiple light elements, so the future of core composition studies lies in ternary (or higher order) systems in order to examine interactions between light elements. We perform melting experiments on Fe-Si-O alloys in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell to 80 GPa and 4000 K. Using 2D multi- wavelength imaging radiometry together with textural and chemical analysis of quenched samples, we measure the high-pressure melting curves and determine partitioning of light elements between the melt and the coexisting solid. Quenched samples are analyzed both in map view and in cross section using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) to examine the 3D melt structure and composition. Partitioning of light elements between molten and solid alloys dictates (1) the density contrast at the ICB, which drives compositional convection in the outer core and (2) the temperature of the CMB, an integral parameter for understanding the deep Earth. Our experiments suggest silicon and oxygen do not simply coexist in the melt and instead show complex solubility based on temperature. Additionally, we do not find evidence of crystallization of SiO2 at low oxygen content as was recently reported.11 Hirose, K., et al., Crystallization of silicon dioxide and compositional evolution of the Earth's core. Nature, 2017. 543(7643): p. 99-102.

  17. Constraints on The Coupled Thermal Evolution of the Earth's Core and Mantle, The Age of The Inner Core, And The Origin of the 186Os/188Os Core(?) Signal in Plume-Derived Lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal and chemical interaction between the core and mantle has played a critical role in the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's interior. Outer core convection is driven by core cooling and inner core crystallization. Core/mantle heat transfer also buffers mantle potential temperature, resulting in slower rates of mantle cooling (~50-100 K/Ga) than would be predicted from the discrepancy between current rates of surface heat loss (~44 TW) and internal radioactive heat production (~20 TW). Core/mantle heat transfer may also generate thermal mantle plumes responsible for ocean island volcanic chains such as the Hawaiian Islands. Several studies suggest that mantle plumes, in addition to transporting heat from the core/mantle boundary, also carry a chemical signature of core/mantle interaction. Elevated 186Os/188Os ratios in lavas from Hawaii, Gorgona, and in the 2.8 Ga Kostomuksha komatiites have been interpreted as reflecting incorporation of an outer core component with high time-integrated Pt/Os and Re/Os ( Brandon et al., 1999, 2003; Puchtel et al., 2005). Preferential partitioning of Os relative to Re and Pt into the inner core during inner core growth may generate elevated Re/Os and Pt/Os ratios in the residual outer core. Because of the long half-life of 190Pt (the parent of 186Os, t1/2 = 489 Ga), an elevated 186Os/188Os outer core signature in plume lavas requires that inner core crystallization began early in Earth history, most likely prior to 3.5 Ga. This in turn requires low time-averaged core/mantle heat flow (<~2.5 TW) or large quantities of heat-producing elements in the core. Core/mantle heat flow may be estimated using boundary-layer theory, by measuring the heat transported in mantle plumes, by estimating the heat transported along the outer core adiabat, or by comparing the rates of heat production, surface heat loss, and secular cooling of the mantle. All of these independent methods suggest time-averaged core/mantle heat flow of ~5

  18. Issues concerning outer space investments in international law ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issues concerning outer space investments in international law. ... Recent improvements in technology have in essence increased the viability of outer space as the next frontier for international investment and development. In addition to ... Key words: Outer Space, Investments, International Law, International Space Station ...

  19. Dark matter in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Cruikshank, D.; De Bergh, C.; Geballe, T.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a large number of small bodies in the outer solar system that are known to be covered with dark material. Attempts to identify that material have been thwarted by the absence of discrete absorption features in the reflection spectra of these planetesimals. An absorption at 2.2 micrometers that appeared to be present in several objects has not been confirmed by new observations. Three absorptions in the spectrum of the unusually red planetesimal 5145 Pholus are well-established, but their identity remains a mystery.

  20. Inner and Outer Life at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda

    2012-01-01

    involving people to people interactions offered by psychodynamic theories and methods take up a pivotal position. Psychoanalytic organisational and work life research explores how work, organisations and individuals are affected by psychic dynamics, the influence of the unconscious in the forms of human...... development and interaction situated in a societal context. Based on this substantial work I draw upon two influential psychoanalytical positions—the British Tavistock position and German psychoanalytic social psychology in order to situate and identify how to understand the inner and outer life at work...

  1. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  2. Meso- and microscale structures related to post-magmatic deformation of the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 352

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheuz, P.; Kurz, W.; Ferre, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 352 aimed to drill through the entire volcanic sequence of the Bonin fore arc. Four sites were drilled, two on the outer fore arc and two on the upper trench slope. Analysis of structures within drill cores, combined with borehole and site survey seismic data, indicates that tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc is mainly post-magmatic, associated with the development of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins. Within the magmatic basement, deformation was accommodated by shear along cataclastic fault zones, and the formation of tension fractures, hybrid (tension and shear) fractures, and shear fractures. Veins commonly form by mineral filling of tension or hybrid fractures and, generally, show no or limited observable macroscale displacement along the fracture plane. The vein filling generally consists of (Low Mg-) calcite and/or various types of zeolite as well as clay. Vein frequency varies with depth but does not seem to correlate with the proximity of faults. This may indicate that these veins are genetically related to hydrothermal activity taking place shortly after magma cooling. Host-rock fragments are commonly embedded within precipitated vein material pointing to a high fluid pressure. Vein thickness varies from < 1 mm up to 15 mm. The wider veins appear to have formed in incremental steps of extension. Calcite veins tend to be purely dilational at shallow depths, but gradually evolve towards oblique tensional veins at depth, as shown by the growth of stretched calcite and/or zeolites (idiomorphic and/or stretched) with respect to vein margins. With increasing depth, the calcite grains exhibit deformation microstructures more frequently than at shallower core intervals. These microstructures include thin twinning (type I twins), increasing in width with depth (type I and type II twins), curved twins, and subgrain boundaries indicative of incipient plastic deformation.

  3. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Reactor-core-reactivity control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Teruo; Sakuranaga, Tomonobu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactor safety upon failures of control rod drives by adapting a control rod not to drop out accidentally from the reactor core but be inserted into the reactor core. Constitution: The control rod is entered or extracted as usual from the bottom of the pressure vessel. A space is provided above the reactor core within the pressure vessel, in which the moving scope of the control rod is set between the space above the reactor core and the reactor core. That is, the control rod is situated above the reactor core upon extraction thereof and, if an accident occurs to the control rod drive mechanisms to detach the control rod and the driving rod, the control rod falls gravitationally into the reactor core to improve the reactor safety. In addition, since the speed limiter is no more required to the control rod, the driving force can be decreased to reduce the size of the rod drive mechanisms. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Cosmics in the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider studies the decay of B mesons to test the description of CP violation in the Standard Model and to search for new physics. The decay $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ has been identified as very promising in the search for new physics. An excellent invariant mass resolution is required to suppress backgrounds to this decay. This in turn requires a momentum resolution of dp/p = 0.4%. The Outer Tracker is part of the LHCb tracking system and has been commissioned with cosmic muons. The noise in the Outer Tracker is shown to be less than 0.05%. To use drift time information in the reconstruction of cosmic tracks, the event time must be known. Four methods to obtain the event time are studied and compared. It is shown that the event time can be obtained with a resolution better than 2.6 ns. Using drift time information, tracks are reconstructed with a resolution of 344 $\\mu$m. Knowledge of the event time enables the calibration of electronic time offsets and the r(t)– relati...

  6. Gamma rays from pulsar outer gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, J.; Romani, R.W.; Cheng Ho

    1993-01-01

    We describe a gamma ray pulsar code which computes the high energy photon emissivities from vacuum gaps in the outer magnetosphere, after the model outlined by Cheng, Ho and Ruderman (1986) and Ho (1989). Pair-production due to photon-photon interactions and radiation processes including curvature, synchrotron and inverse Compton processes are computed with an iterative scheme which converges to self-consistent photon and particle distributions for a sampling of locations in the outer magnetosphere. We follow the photons from these distributions as they propagate through the pulsar magnetosphere toward a distant observer. We include the effects of relativistic aberration, time-of-flight delays and reabsorption by photon-photon pair-production to determine an intensity map of the high energy pulsar emission on the sky. Using data from radio and optical observations to constrain the geometry of the magnetosphere as well as the possible observer viewing angles, we derive light curves and phase dependent spectra which can be directly compared to data from the Compton Observatory. Observations for Crab, Vela and the recently identified gamma ray pulsars Geminga, PSR1706-44 aNd PSR 1509-58 will provide important tests of our model calculations, help us to improve our picture of the relevant physics at work in pulsar magnetospheres and allow us to comment on the implications for future pulsar discoveries

  7. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, K.

    2004-01-01

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container

  8. Radioiodination of an outer membrane protein in intact Rickettsia prowazekii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.; Winkler, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Intact Rickettsia prowazekii was radiolabeled with the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase method of iodination. Separation of the rickettsial extract into cytoplasmic, outer and inner membrane fractions demonstrated that the outer membrane was preferentially labeled. Analysis of the polypeptides of these fractions on high-resolution slab polyacrylamide gels showed that most of the 125 I was in polypeptide T49, an outer membrane constituent. Additional outer membrane polypeptides were iodinated in broken envelope preparations, demonstrating that T49 is uniquely accessible to the external environment and the asymmetric polypeptide organization of the outer membrane

  9. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Aerial Vehicle Mission and Design Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles exists. The mining aerospacecraft (ASC) could fly through the outer planet atmospheres, for global weather observations, localized storm or other disturbance investigations, wind speed measurements, polar observations, etc. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) mining factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points.

  10. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  11. Components of SurA required for outer membrane biogenesis in uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Watts

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available SurA is a periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase and chaperone of Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast to other PPIases, SurA appears to have a distinct role in chaperoning newly synthesized porins destined for insertion into the outer membrane. Previous studies have indicated that the chaperone activity of SurA rests in its "core module" (the N- plus C-terminal domains, based on in vivo envelope phenotypes and in vitro binding and protection of non-native substrates.In this study, we determined the components of SurA required for chaperone activity using in vivo phenotypes relevant to disease causation by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, namely membrane resistance to permeation by antimicrobials and maturation of the type 1 pilus usher FimD. FimD is a SurA-dependent, integral outer membrane protein through which heteropolymeric type 1 pili, which confer bladder epithelial binding and invasion capacity upon uropathogenic E. coli, are assembled and extruded. Consistent with prior results, the in vivo chaperone activity of SurA in UPEC rested primarily in the core module. However, the PPIase domains I and II were not expendable for wild-type resistance to novobiocin in broth culture. Steady-state levels of FimD were substantially restored in the UPEC surA mutant complemented with the SurA N- plus C-terminal domains. The addition of PPIase domain I augmented FimD maturation into the outer membrane, consistent with a model in which domain I enhances stability of and/or substrate binding by the core module.Our results confirm the core module of E. coli SurA as a potential target for novel anti-infective development.

  12. Pressure vessel for gaseous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulten, R; Kugeler, K; Kugeler, M; Petersen, K; von der Decken, C G

    1977-07-14

    This construction of a container, which is pressure relieved by axial-central tensioning cables or reinforcing cables distributed over the circumference, makes a reduction of the wall thickness for the floor and roof, which was previously 2.5 metres by about 40% possible, and thus reduce manufacturing and cost problems. This is achieved by an appreciable increase of the prestressing exerted by the tensioning cables as this is taken up, not by the elasticity of the roof and floor, but instead by an intermediate part of pressure-resisting material. Such a container consists of a vertical cylindrical jacket of, for example, 20 metres diameter and 18 metres height, of a roof and floor of, for example, 1.50 metres thickness each and the intermediate part, which keeps the spacing of floor and roof as a central piece. This intermediate part which is taken through seals through the container can be imagined as a double tube of outside tube diameter of, for example, 4 metres and inside tube diameter of 2 metres with both tubes having thick walls. 4 tensioning cables displaced vertically by 90/sup 0/ run in the cylindrical annulus between the outer and inner tubes which are brought to the required pretension, e.g. 80,000 tonnes by nuts situated on the outside. The inner tube projects through the floor and roof. Its openings act as manholes and for the introduction of pipelines. These can, for example, carry a cooling medium for a reactor core via further ducts into the inside of the container. Container wall, floor and roof and the intermediate part in the form of a double tube are made up of cast steel segments or sectors in several layers. (RW) 891 RW.

  13. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Kugeler, K.; Kugeler, M.; Petersen, K.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1983-01-01

    This construction of a container, which is pressure-relieved by axial-central tensioning cables or reinforcing cables distributed over the circumference, makes a reduction of the wall thickness for the floor and roof, which was previously 2.5 metres by about 40% possible, and thus reduce manufacturing and cost problems. This is achieved by an appreciable increase of the prestressing exerted by the tensioning cables as this is taken up, not by the elasticity of the roof and floor, but instead by an intermediate part of pressure-resisting material. Such a container consists of a vertical cylindrical jacket of, for example, 20 metres diameter and 18 metres height, of a roof and floor of, for example, 1.50 metres thickness each and the intermediate part, which keeps the spacing of floor and roof as a central piece. This intermediate part which is taken through seals through the container can be imagined as a double tube of outside tube diameter of, for example, 4 metres and inside tube diameter of 2 metres with both tubes having thick walls. 4 tensioning cables displaced vertically by 900 run in the cylindrical annulus between the outer and inner tubes which are brought to the required pretension, e.g. 80,000 tonnes by nuts situated on the outside. The inner tube projects through the floor and roof. Its openings act as manholes and for the introduction of pipelines. These can, for example, carry a cooling medium for a reactor core via further ducts into the inside of the container. Container wall, floor and roof and the intermediate part in the form of a double tube are made up of cast steel segments or sectors in several layers. (RW)

  14. Pressure vessel for gaseous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Kugeler, K.; Kugeler, M.; Petersen, K.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1977-01-01

    This construction of a container, which is pressure relieved by axial-central tensioning cables or reinforcing cables distributed over the circumference, makes a reduction of the wall thickness for the floor and roof, which was previously 2.5 metres by about 40% possible, and thus reduce manufacturing and cost problems. This is achieved by an appreciable increase of the prestressing exerted by the tensioning cables as this is taken up, not by the elasticity of the roof and floor, but instead by an intermediate part of pressure-resisting material. Such a container consists of a vertical cylindrical jacket of, for example, 20 metres diameter and 18 metres height, of a roof and floor of, for example, 1.50 metres thickness each and the intermediate part, which keeps the spacing of floor and roof as a central piece. This intermediate part which is taken through seals through the container can be imagined as a double tube of outside tube diameter of, for example, 4 metres and inside tube diameter of 2 metres with both tubes having thick walls. 4 tensioning cables displaced vertically by 90 0 run in the cylindrical annulus between the outer and inner tubes which are brought to the required pretension, e.g. 80,000 tonnes by nuts situated on the outside. The inner tube projects through the floor and roof. Its openings act as manholes and for the introduction of pipelines. These can, for example, carry a cooling medium for a reactor core via further ducts into the inside of the container. Container wall, floor and roof and the intermediate part in the form of a double tube are made up of cast steel segments or sectors in several layers. (RW) 891 RW [de

  15. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  16. Ageing of the LHCb outer tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Blom, M R; Tuning, N

    2009-01-01

    The modules of the LHCb outer tracker have shown to suffer severe gain loss under moderate irradiation. This process is called ageing. Ageing of the modules results from contamination of the gas system by glue, araldite AY 103-1, used in their construction. In this thesis the ageing process will be shown. The schemes known to reduce, reverse, or prevent ageing have been investigated to determine their effect on the detector performance. The addition of O2 to the gas mixture lowers the detector response by an acceptable amount and does not affect the gas transport properties significantly. The ageing rate is decreased after extensive flushing and HV training could eventually repair the irradiation damage. The risks of HV training have been assessed. Furthermore, several gaseous and aquatic additions have been tested for their capability to prevent, or moderate ageing, but none showed significant improvement.

  17. The fate of the outer plasmasphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elphic, R.C.; Thomsen, M.F.; Borovsky, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Both the solar wind and the ionosphere contribute to Earth close-quote s magnetospheric plasma environment. However, it is not widely appreciated that the plasmasphere is a large reservoir of ionospheric ions that can be tapped to populate the plasma sheet. We employ empirical models of high-latitude ionospheric convection and the geomagnetic field to describe the transport of outer plasmasphere flux tubes from the dayside, over the polar cap and into the magnetotail during the early phases of a geomagnetic storm. We calculate that this process can give rise to high densities of cold plasma in the magnetotail lobes and in the near-Earth plasma sheet during times of enhanced geomagnetic activity, and especially during storms. This model can help explain both polar cap ionization patches and the presence of cold flowing ions downtail.copyright 1997 American Geophysical Union

  18. Fluctuating gravity of Earth’s core

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, we have known that Earth’s magnetic field varies with time. Edmond Halley (better known for his eponymous recurring comet) first recognized this time variation of magnetic compass needle direction and even offered a remarkable theory that required an intervening fluid between Earth’s solid outer shell and a hypothesized innermost solid core (1). For decades, consensus has emerged for an explanation of this time variation that depends on the dynamics of Earth’s liquid metallic o...

  19. Impulsive ion acceleration in earth's outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable observational evidence is found that ions are accelerated to high energies in the outer magnetosphere during geomagnetic disturbances. The acceleration often appears to be quite impulsive causing temporally brief (10's of seconds), very intense bursts of ions in the distant plasma sheet as well as in the near-tail region. These ion bursts extend in energy from 10's of keV to over 1 MeV and are closely associated with substorm expansive phase onsets. Although the very energetic ions are not of dominant importance for magnetotail plasma dynamics, they serve as an important tracer population. Their absolute intensity and brief temporal appearance bespeaks a strong and rapid acceleration process in the near-tail, very probably involving large induced electric fields substantially greater than those associated with cross-tail potential drops. Subsequent to their impulsive acceleration, these ions are injected into the outer trapping regions forming ion ''drift echo'' events, as well as streaming tailward away from their acceleration site in the near-earth plasma sheet. Most auroral ion acceleration processes occur (or are greatly enhanced) during the time that these global magnetospheric events are occurring in the magnetotail. A qualitative model relating energetic ion populations to near-tail magnetic reconnection at substorm onset followed by global redistribution is quite successful in explaining the primary observational features. Recent measurements of the elemental composition and charge-states have proven valuable for showing the source (solar wind or ionosphere) of the original plasma population from which the ions were accelerated

  20. Core support structure for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkamp, E.; Tautz, J.; Ries, H.

    1979-01-01

    A core support structure for nuclear power plants includes a grid of mutually crossing bridges and a support ring surrounding the grid and connected to ends of the outer bridges of the grid, the grid being formed of profile rod crosses having legs of given length, respective legs of pairs of adjacent crosses abutting one another endwise to form together a side of the smallest mesh opening of the grid, and weld means for securing the profile rod crosses to one another at the mutually abutting ends of the legs thereof; and method of producing the foregoing core support structure

  1. Mission operations for unmanned nuclear electric propulsion outer planet exploration with a thermionic reactor spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, R. J.; Prickett, W. Z.; Garate, J. A.; Firth, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Mission operations are presented for comet rendezvous and outer planet exploration NEP spacecraft employing in-core thermionic reactors for electric power generation. The selected reference missions are the Comet Halley rendezvous and a Jupiter orbiter at 5.9 planet radii, the orbit of the moon Io. The characteristics of the baseline multi-mission NEP spacecraft are presented and its performance in other outer planet missions, such as Saturn and Uranus orbiters and a Neptune flyby, are discussed. Candidate mission operations are defined from spacecraft assembly to mission completion. Pre-launch operations are identified. Shuttle launch and subsequent injection to earth escape by the Centaur D-1T are discussed, as well as power plant startup and the heliocentric mission phases. The sequence and type of operations are basically identical for all missions investigated.

  2. Numerical simulation of axisymmetric valve operation for different outer cone angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Emil

    One of the method of flow separation control is application of axisymmetric valve. It is composed of nozzle with core. Normally the main flow is attached to inner cone and flow by preferential collector to primary flow pipe. If through control nozzle starts flow jet (control jet) the main flow is switched to annular secondary collector. In both situation the main flow is deflected to inner or outer cone (placed at the outlet of the valve's nozzle) by Coanda effect. The paper deals with the numerical simulation of this axisymetric annular nozzle with integrated synthetic jet actuator. The aim of the work is influence examination of outer cone angle on deflection on main stream.

  3. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  4. High-pressure sodium lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1996-01-01

    A high pressure sodium lamp of the invention is provided with a discharge vessel (20) which is enclosed with intervening space (1) by an outer bulb (10), which space contains a gas-fill with at least 70 mol. % nitrogen gas. Electrodes (30a, 30b) are positioned in the discharge vessel (20) and are

  5. Solar System Exploration Augmented by Lunar and Outer Planet Resource Utilization: Historical Perspectives and Future Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Establishing a lunar presence and creating an industrial capability on the Moon may lead to important new discoveries for all of human kind. Historical studies of lunar exploration, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) and industrialization all point to the vast resources on the Moon and its links to future human and robotic exploration. In the historical work, a broad range of technological innovations are described and analyzed. These studies depict program planning for future human missions throughout the solar system, lunar launched nuclear rockets, and future human settlements on the Moon, respectively. Updated analyses based on the visions presented are presented. While advanced propulsion systems were proposed in these historical studies, further investigation of nuclear options using high power nuclear thermal propulsion, nuclear surface power, as well as advanced chemical propulsion can significantly enhance these scenarios. Robotic and human outer planet exploration options are described in many detailed and extensive studies. Nuclear propulsion options for fast trips to the outer planets are discussed. To refuel such vehicles, atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has also been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as helium 3 (3He) and hydrogen (H2) can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and H2 (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses have investigated resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. These analyses included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. With these two additional

  6. Iterative solution to the optimal poison management problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.; Levine, S.H.; Lewis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for solving the optimal poison management problem for a multiregion pressurized water reactor has been developed. The optimization objective is to maximize the end-of-cycle core excess reactivity for any given beginning-of-cycle fuel loading. The problem is treated as an optimal control problem with the region burnup and control absorber concentrations acting as the state and control variables, respectively. Constraints are placed on the power peaking, soluble boron concentration, and control absorber concentrations. The solution method consists of successive relinearizations of the system equations resulting in a sequence of nonlinear programming problems whose solutions converge to the desired optimal control solution. Application of the method to several test problems based on a simplified three-region reactor suggests a bang-bang optimal control strategy with the peak power location switching between the inner and outer regions of the core and the critical soluble boron concentration as low as possible throughout the cycle

  7. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1985-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (orig./PW)

  8. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (DG) [de

  9. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (74-90 mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments. Under severe accident loading conditions, the steel containment vessel in a typical Mark-I or Mark-II plant may deform under internal pressurization such that it contacts the inner surface of a shield building wall. (Thermal expansion from increasing accident temperatures would also close the gap between the SCV and the shield building, but temperature effects are not considered in these analyses.) The amount and location of contact and the pressure at which it occurs all affect how the combined structure behaves. A preliminary finite element model has been developed to analyze a model of a typical steel containment vessel con-ling into contact with an outer structure. Both the steel containment vessel and the outer contact structure were modelled with axisymmetric shell finite elements. Of particular interest are the influence that the contact structure has on deformation and potential failure modes of the containment vessel. Furthermore, the coefficient of friction between the two structures was varied to study its effects on the behavior of the containment vessel and on the uplift loads transmitted to the contact structure. These analyses show that the material properties of an outer contact structure and the amount

  10. New configuration for efficient and durable copper coating on the outer surface of a tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A well-adhered copper coating on stainless steel power coupler parts is required in superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerators. Radio frequency power coupler parts are complex, tubelike stainless steel structures, which require copper coating on their outer and inner surfaces. Conventional copper electroplating sometimes produces films with inadequate adhesion strength for SRF applications. Electroplating also requires a thin nickel strike layer under the copper coating, whose magnetic properties can be detrimental to SRF applications. Coaxial energetic deposition (CED and sputtering methods have demonstrated efficient conformal coating on the inner surfaces of tubes but coating the outer surface of a tube is challenging because these coating methods are line of sight. When the substrate is off axis and the plasma source is on axis, only a small section of the substrate’s outer surface is exposed to the source cathode. The conventional approach is to rotate the tube to achieve uniformity across the outer surface. This method results in poor film thickness uniformity and wastes most of the source plasma. Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC has developed a novel configuration called hollow external cathode CED (HEC-CED to overcome these issues. HEC-CED produces a film with uniform thickness and efficiently uses all eroded source material. The Cu film deposited on the outside of a stainless steel tube using the new HEC-CED configuration survived a high pressure water rinse adhesion test. HEC-CED can be used to coat the outside of any cylindrical structure.

  11. Will Outer Tropical Cyclone Size Change due to Anthropogenic Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, B. A.; Lin, N.; Chavas, D. R.; Vecchi, G. A.; Knutson, T. R.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Prior research has shown significant interbasin and intrabasin variability in outer tropical cyclone (TC) size. Moreover, outer TC size has even been shown to vary substantially over the lifetime of the majority of TCs. However, the factors responsible for both setting initial outer TC size and determining its evolution throughout the TC lifetime remain uncertain. Given these gaps in our physical understanding, there remains uncertainty in how outer TC size will change, if at all, due to anthropogenic warming. The present study seeks to quantify whether outer TC size will change significantly in response to anthropogenic warming using data from a high-resolution global climate model and a regional hurricane model. Similar to prior work, the outer TC size metric used in this study is the radius in which the azimuthal-mean surface azimuthal wind equals 8 m/s. The initial results from the high-resolution global climate model data suggest that the distribution of outer TC size shifts significantly towards larger values in each global TC basin during future climates, as revealed by 1) statistically significant increase of the median outer TC size by 5-10% (p<0.05) according to a 1,000-sample bootstrap resampling approach with replacement and 2) statistically significant differences between distributions of outer TC size from current and future climate simulations as shown using two-sample Kolmogorov Smirnov testing (p<<0.01). Additional analysis of the high-resolution global climate model data reveals that outer TC size does not uniformly increase within each basin in future climates, but rather shows substantial locational dependence. Future work will incorporate the regional mesoscale hurricane model data to help focus on identifying the source of the spatial variability in outer TC size increases within each basin during future climates and, more importantly, why outer TC size changes in response to anthropogenic warming.

  12. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  13. Outer Electrospun Polycaprolactone Shell Induces Massive Foreign Body Reaction and Impairs Axonal Regeneration through 3D Multichannel Chitosan Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Duda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the performance of composite nerve grafts with an inner 3D multichannel porous chitosan core and an outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell. The inner chitosan core provided multiple guidance channels for regrowing axons. To analyze the in vivo properties of the bare chitosan cores, we separately implanted them into an epineural sheath. The effects of both graft types on structural and functional regeneration across a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap were compared to autologous nerve transplantation (ANT. The mechanical biomaterial properties and the immunological impact of the grafts were assessed with histological techniques before and after transplantation in vivo. Furthermore during a 13-week examination period functional tests and electrophysiological recordings were performed and supplemented by nerve morphometry. The sheathing of the chitosan core with a polycaprolactone shell induced massive foreign body reaction and impairment of nerve regeneration. Although the isolated novel chitosan core did allow regeneration of axons in a similar size distribution as the ANT, the ANT was superior in terms of functional regeneration. We conclude that an outer polycaprolactone shell should not be used for the purpose of bioartificial nerve grafting, while 3D multichannel porous chitosan cores could be candidate scaffolds for structured nerve grafts.

  14. Outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell induces massive foreign body reaction and impairs axonal regeneration through 3D multichannel chitosan nerve guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Sven; Dreyer, Lutz; Behrens, Peter; Wienecke, Soenke; Chakradeo, Tanmay; Glasmacher, Birgit; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    We report on the performance of composite nerve grafts with an inner 3D multichannel porous chitosan core and an outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell. The inner chitosan core provided multiple guidance channels for regrowing axons. To analyze the in vivo properties of the bare chitosan cores, we separately implanted them into an epineural sheath. The effects of both graft types on structural and functional regeneration across a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap were compared to autologous nerve transplantation (ANT). The mechanical biomaterial properties and the immunological impact of the grafts were assessed with histological techniques before and after transplantation in vivo. Furthermore during a 13-week examination period functional tests and electrophysiological recordings were performed and supplemented by nerve morphometry. The sheathing of the chitosan core with a polycaprolactone shell induced massive foreign body reaction and impairment of nerve regeneration. Although the isolated novel chitosan core did allow regeneration of axons in a similar size distribution as the ANT, the ANT was superior in terms of functional regeneration. We conclude that an outer polycaprolactone shell should not be used for the purpose of bioartificial nerve grafting, while 3D multichannel porous chitosan cores could be candidate scaffolds for structured nerve grafts.

  15. The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haarmann, Raimund; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Stevanovic, Mara; Bredemeier, Rolf; Schleiff, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall including the outer membrane. The outer membrane is composed of two distinct monolayers where the outer layer contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the non-phospholipid Lipid A as the core. The synthesis of Lipid A is initiated in the cytosol and thereby the molecule has to be transported across the inner and outer membranes. The β-barrel lipopolysaccharide-assembly protein D (LptD) was discovered to be involved in the transfer of Lipid A into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. At present the molecular procedure of lipid transfer across the outer membrane remains unknown. Here we approached the functionality of the transfer system by an electrophysiological analysis of the outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli named ecLptD. In vitro the protein shows cation selectivity and has an estimated pore diameter of about 1.8 nm. Addition of Lipid A induces a transition of the open state to a sub-conductance state with two independent off-rates, which might suggest that LptD is able to bind and transport the molecule in vitro. To generalize our findings with respect to the Lipid A transport system of other Gram-negative bacteria we have explored the existence of the proteins involved in this pathway by bioinformatic means. We were able to identify the membrane-inserted components of the Lipid A transport system in all Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the periplasmic components appear to be species-specific. The LptD proteins of different bacteria are characterized by their periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal barrel region. The latter shows distinct sequence properties, particularly in LptD proteins of cyanobacteria, and this specific domain can be found in plant proteins as well. By electrophysiological experiments on LptD from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we are able to confirm the functional relation of anaLptD to Lipid A transport.

  16. Earth's core formation due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    A protoearth accretion stage configuration consisting of an undifferentiated solid core, an intermediate metal-melt layer, and an outer silicate-melt layer, is presently taken as the initial state in an investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced core formation. The Ida et al. (to be published) quantitative results on the instability in a self-gravitating fluid sphere are used. The instability is found to occur through the translational mode on a time-scale of about 10 hr, in the case where the metal-melt layer is greater than about 1 km; this implies that the earth's core formed due to the undifferentiated solid core's translation upon the outer layer's melting. Differentiation would then have occurred in the late accretion stage. 17 references

  17. Statistics of the outer radiation belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, D.J.; Johnstone, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The highly variable electron flux levels in the outer radiation belt come about by competition between time-dependent source and loss mechanisms. In order to identify some of the different mechanisms involved, we examine the statistics of the variability of fluxes at geostationary orbit. Data from the SEM-2 analyzer on Meteosat-3 and from GOES-7 are used. Correlation analysis is used to find time-delays between changes in flux at different energies. We see that low energy flux is added to this region during sub-storms and that higher energy fluxes appear after 2 or 3 days. Whilst the timescale for this process is brief compared to a complete cycle of the open-quote Recirculation close-quote energization process, it is consistent with the timescale of its final step endash outward radial diffusion. By isolating periods when no new injection of plasma occurs, we make an assessment of flux loss rates in a quiet magnetosphere. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Ab Initio Predictions of K, He and Ar Partitioning Between Silicate Melt and Liquid Iron Under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Z.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2017-12-01

    Element partitioning is an important property in recording geochemical processes during the core-mantle differentiation. However, experimental measurements of element partitioning coefficients under extreme temperature and pressure condition are still challenging. Theoretical modeling is also not easy, because it requires estimation of high temperature Gibbs free energy, which is not directly accessible by the standard molecular dynamics method. We recently developed an original technique to simulate Gibbs free energy based on the thermodynamics integration method[1]. We apply it to element partitioning of geochemical intriguing trace elements between molten silicate and liquid iron such as potassium, helium and argon as starting examples. Radiogenic potassium in the core can provide energy for Earth's magnetic field, convection in the mantle and outer core[2]. However, its partitioning behavior between silicate and iron remains unclear under high pressure[3,4]. Our calculations suggest that a clear positive temperature dependence of the partitioning coefficient but an insignificant pressure effect. Unlike sulfur and silicon, oxygen dissolved in the metals considerably enhances potassium solubility. Calculated electronic structures reveal alkali-metallic feature of potassium in liquid iron, favoring oxygen with strong electron affinity. Our results suggest that 40K could serve as a potential radiogenic heat source in the outer core if oxygen is the major light element therein.­­ We now further extend our technique to partitioning behaviors of other elements, helium and argon, to get insides into the `helium paradox' and `missing argon' problems. References [1] T. Taniuchi, and T. Tsuchiya, Phys.Rev.B. In press [2] B.A. Buffett, H.E. Huppert, J.R. Lister, and A.W. Woods, Geophys.Res.Lett. 29 (1996) 7989-8006. [3] V.R. Murthy, W. Westrenen, and Y. Fei, Nature. 426 (2003) 163-165. [4] A. Corgne, S.Keshav, Y. Fei, and W.F. McDonough, Earth.Planet.Sci.Lett. 256 (2007

  19. Terrestrial magma ocean and core segregation in the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Eiji; Yurimoto, Naoyoshi

    1992-01-01

    According to the recent theories of formation of the earth, the outer layer of the proto-earth was molten and the terrestrial magma ocean was formed when its radius exceeded 3000 km. Core formation should have started in this magma ocean stage, since segregation of metallic iron occurs effectively by melting of the proto-earth. Therefore, interactions between magma, mantle minerals, and metallic iron in the magma ocean stage controlled the geochemistry of the mantle and core. We have studied the partitioning behaviors of elements into the silicate melt, high pressure minerals, and metallic iron under the deep upper mantle and lower mantle conditions. We employed the multi-anvil apparatus for preparing the equilibrating samples in the ranges from 16 to 27 GPa and 1700-2400 C. Both the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) and the Secondary Ion Mass spectrometer (SIMS) were used for analyzing the run products. We obtained the partition coefficients of various trace elements between majorite, Mg-perovskite, and liquid, and magnesiowustite, Mg-perovskite, and metallic iron. The examples of the partition coefficients of some key elements are summarized in figures, together with the previous data. We may be able to assess the origin of the mantle abundances of the elements such as transition metals by using the partitioning data obtained above. The mantle abundances of some transition metals expected by the core-mantle equilibrium under the lower mantle conditions cannot explain the observed abundance of some elements such as Mn and Ge in the mantle. Estimations of the densities of the ultrabasic magma Mg-perovskite at high pressure suggest existence of a density crossover in the deep lower mantle; flotation of Mg-perovskite occurs in the deep magma ocean under the lower mantle conditions. The observed depletion of some transition metals such as V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in the mantle may be explained by the two stage process, the core-mantle equilibrium under the lower

  20. Osmium-187 enrichment in some plumes: Evidence for core-mantle interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Horan, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Calculations with data for asteroidal cores indicate that Earth's outer core may have a rhenium/osmium ratio at least 20 percent greater than that of the chondritic upper mantle, potentially leading to an outer core with an osmium-187/osmium-188 ratio at least 8 percent greater than that of chondrites. Because of the much greater abundance of osmium in the outer core relative to the mantle, even a small addition of metal to a plume ascending from the D??? layer would transfer the enriched isotopic signature to the mixture. Sources of certain plume-derived systems seem to have osmium-187/osmium-188 ratios 5 to 20 percent greater than that for chondrites, consistent with the ascent of a plume from the core-mantle boundary.

  1. High pressure mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  2. A Study on the High Temperature Irradiation Test Possibility for the HANARO Outer Core Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Cho, M. S.; Choo, K. N.; Shin, Y. T.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G

    2008-01-15

    1. Information on the neutron flux levels and the gamma heat of the concerned test holes, which have been produced from a series of nuclear analysis and tests performed at KAERI since 1993, were collected and analyzed to develop the nuclear data for the concerned test holes of HANARO and to develop the new design concepts of a capsule for the high temperature irradiation devices. 2. From the literature survey and analysis about the system design characteristics of the new concepts of irradiation devices in the ATR and MIT reactor, U.S. and the JHR reactor, France, which are helpful in understanding the key issues for the on-going R and D programmes related to a SFR and a VHTR, the most important parameters for the design of high temperature irradiation devices are identified as the neutron spectrum, the heat generation density, the fuel and cladding temperature, and the coolant chemistry. 3. From the thermal analysis of a capsule by using a finite element program ANSYS, high temperature test possibility at the OR and IP holes of HANARO was investigated based on the data collected from a literature survey. The OR holes are recommended for the tests of the SFR and VHTR nuclear materials. The IP holes could be applicable for an intermediate temperature irradiation of the SWR and LMR materials. 4. A thermal analysis for the development of a capsule with a new configuration was also performed. The size of the center hole, which is located at the thermal media of a capsule, did not cause specimen temperature changes. The temperature differences are found to be less than 2%. The introduction of an additional gap in the thermal media was able to contribute to an increase in the specimen temperature by up to 27-90 %.

  3. DENSE MOLECULAR CORES BEING EXTERNALLY HEATED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Mi-Ryang [Radio Astronomy division, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Gopinathan, Maheswar [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital 263129 (India); Jeong, Woong-Seob, E-mail: archer81@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajungro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34113 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-20

    We present results of our study of eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3–160 μ m) imaging observations with the AKARI telescope and molecular line (HCN and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) mapping observations with the KVN telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to millimeter continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosities of ∼0.3–4.4 L {sub ⊙}. The other six cores are found to remain starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3–6 K toward the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an overdominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory motion, probably due to the external heating. Most of the starless cores show a coreshine effect due to the scattering of light by the micron-sized dust grains. This may imply that the age of the cores is of the order of ∼10{sup 5} years, which is consistent with the timescale required for the cores to evolve into an oscillatory stage due to external perturbation. Our observational results support the idea that the external feedback from nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields may play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the cores.

  4. Examining Relativistic Electron Loss in the Outer Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; O'Brien, P.

    2003-12-01

    Since the discovery of earth's radiation belts researchers have sought to identify the mechanisms that dictate the seemingly erratic relativistic electron flux levels in the outer belt. Contrary to intuition, relativistic electron flux levels do not always increase during geomagnetic storms even though these storms signify enhanced energy input from the solar wind to the magnetosphere [Reeves et al., 2003; O'Brien et al., 2001]. The fickle response of the radiation belt electrons to geomagnetic activity suggests that flux levels are determined by the outcome of a continuous competition between acceleration and loss. Some progress has been made developing and testing acceleration mechanisms but little is known about how relativistic electrons are lost. We examine relativistic electron losses in the outer belt focusing our attention on flux decrease events of the type first described by Onsager et al. [2002]. The study showed a sudden decrease of geosynchronous >2MeV electron flux occurring simultaneously with local stretching of the magnetic field. The decrease was first observed near 15:00 MLT and progressed to all local times after a period of ˜10 hours. Expanding on the work of Onsager et al. [2002], we have identified ˜ 51 such flux decrease events in the GOES and LANL data and present the results of a superposed epoch analysis of solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indicators, and locally measured magnetic field and plasma data. The analysis shows that flux decreases occur after 1-2 days of quiet condition. They begin when either the solar wind dynamic pressure increases or Bz turns southward pushing hot dense plasma earthward to form a partial ring current and stretched magnetic field at dusk. Adiabatic electron motion in response to the stretched magnetic field may explain the initial flux reduction; however, often the flux does not recover with the magnetic field recovery, indicating that true loss from the magnetosphere is occurring. Using Polar and

  5. Investigating the outer-bulb discharge as ignition aid for automotive-HID lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, A; Groeger, S; Hoebing, T; Ruhrmann, C; Mentel, J; Awakowicz, P; Hechtfischer, U; Tochadse, G

    2014-01-01

    This work considers the ignition process of mercury-free high-intensity discharge lamps used for car headlights. These lamps have to run-up fast. This is achieved with a high xenon pressure of about 15 bar (cold) in the inner bulb. The high filling-gas pressure causes an increased ignition voltage compared with lower-pressure lamps used in general-lighting applications. In this paper the possibility is investigated to reduce the ignition voltage by optimizing a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) in the outer bulb working as ignition aid. A special outer bulb was built up allowing gas exchange and adjustment of the gas pressure. For diagnostic purposes different electrical and optical methods are used, namely the recording of ignition voltage, ignition current and light emission by a photo-diode signal on nanosecond time scale as well as short-time photography by a intensified charge-coupled device camera. It was found that the DBD mainly generates a potential distribution within the lamp which supports ignition by an increase in the E-field in front of the electrodes and the wall. It is shown that this effect is distinctly more effective than UV radiation potentially emitted by the DBD. (paper)

  6. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Hull Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the...

  7. Outer space and nuclear deterrence: problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini Alves, P.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation deals with the role of outer-space applications and prospects for near future developments in nuclear deterrence. Outer space capabilities of United Sates, Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, China, and United Kingdom as well as other states are analyzed. Conceptual problems of offensive and defensive doctrines are reviewed together with legal implications

  8. Long-Lived Glass Mirrors For Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Maag, Carl R.; Heggen, Philip M.

    1988-01-01

    Paper summarizes available knowledge about glass mirrors for use in outer space. Strengths and weaknesses of various types of first and second reflective surfaces identified. Second-surface glass mirrors used in outer space designed to different criteria more stringent for terrestrial mirrors. Protons, electrons, cosmic rays, meteorites, and orbiting space debris affect longevities of components. Contamination also factor in space.

  9. Newborns' Face Recognition: Role of Inner and Outer Facial Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Chiara; Macchi Cassia, Viola; Simion, Francesca; Leo, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Existing data indicate that newborns are able to recognize individual faces, but little is known about what perceptual cues drive this ability. The current study showed that either the inner or outer features of the face can act as sufficient cues for newborns' face recognition (Experiment 1), but the outer part of the face enjoys an advantage…

  10. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieselbach

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT and leukotoxin (LtxA into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  11. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  12. Nitrogen partitioning during Earth's accretion and core-mantle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelmanns, I. M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Liebske, C.

    2017-12-01

    On present day Earth, N is one of the key constituents of our atmosphere and forms the basis of life. However, the deep Earth geochemistry of N, i.e. its distribution and isotopic fractionation between Earth's deep reservoirs is not well constrained. This study investigates nitrogen partitioning between metal and silicate melts as relevant for core segregation during the accretion of planetesimals into the Earth. We have determined N-partitioning coefficients over a wide range of temperatures (1250-2000 °C), pressures (15-35 kbar) and oxygen fugacity's, the latter in the relevant range of core segregation (IW-5 to IW). Centrifuging piston cylinders were used to equilibrate and then gravitationally separate metal-silicate melt pairs. Separation of the two melts is necessary to avoid micro nugget contamination in the silicate melt at reducing conditions double capsule technique in all experiments, using an outer metallic (Pt) and inner non-metallic capsule (graphite or Al2O3), minimizes N-loss over the course of the experiments compared to single non-metallic capsules. The two quenched melts were cut apart mechanically, cleaned at the outside, their N concentrations were then analysed on bulk samples by an elemental analyser, the low abslute masses requiring careful development of analytical routines. Despite these difficulties, we were able to determine a DNmetal/silicate of 13±0.3 at IW-1 decreasing to 2.0±0.2 at IW-5.5, at 1250°C and 15 kbar, N partitioning into the core forming metal. Increasing temperature dramatically lowers the DNmetal/silicate to e.g. 0.5±0.15 at IW-4, during early core formation N was hence mildly incompatible in the metal. The results suggest that under magma ocean conditions (> 2000 oC and fO2 IW-2.5), N-partition coefficents were within a factor of 2 of unity. Hence, N did not partition into the core, which should contain negliligible quantities of N. The few available literature data [1],[2],[3] support N changing compatibility with

  13. An Equation Governing Ultralow-Velocity Zones: Implications for Holes in the ULVZ, Lateral Chemical Reactions at the Core-Mantle Boundary, and Damping of Heat Flux Variations in the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Matsui, H.

    2017-12-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZ) are increasingly illuminated by seismology, revealing surprising diversity in size, shape, and physical characteristics. The only viable hypotheses are that ULVZs are a compositionally distinct FeO-enriched dense material, which could have formed by fractional crystallization of a basal magma ocean, segregation of subducted banded iron formations, precipitation of solids from the outer core, partial melting and segregation of iron-rich melts from subducted basalts, or most likely a combination of many different processes. But many questions remain: Are ULVZ partially molten in some places, and not in others? Are ULVZ simply the thicker portions of an otherwise global thin layer, covering the entire CMB and thus blocking or moderating chemical interactions between the core and overlying mantle? Is such a layer inter-connected and able to conduct electrical currents that allow electro-magnetic coupling of core and mantle angular momentum? Are they being eroded and shrinking in size due to viscous entrainment, or is more material being added to ULVZ over time? Here we derive an advection-diffusion-like equation that governs the dynamical evolution of a chemically distinct ULVZ. Analysis of this equation shows that ULVZ should become readily swept aside by viscous mantle flows at the CMB, exposing "ordinary mantle" to the top of the core, thus inducing chemical heterogeneity that drives lateral CMB chemical reactions. These reactions are correlated with heat flux, thus maintaining large-scale pressure variations atop the core that induce cyclone-like flows centered around ULVZ and ponded subducted slabs. We suggest that turbulent diffusion across adjacent cyclone streams inside a stratified region atop the core readily accommodates lateral transport and re-distribution of components such as O and Si, in addition to heat. Our model implies that the deeper core is at least partly shielded from the influence of strong heat flux variations at

  14. Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortescue, P.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces

  15. Secular changes of LOD associated with a growth of the inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, C.; Rybicki, K. R.; Varga, P.

    2006-05-01

    From recent estimates of the age of the inner core based on the theory of thermal evolution of the core, we estimate that nowadays the growth of the inner core may perhaps contribute to the observed overall secular increase of LOD caused mainly by tidal friction (i.e., 1.72 ms per century) by a relative decrease of 2 to 7 μs per century. Another, albeit much less plausible, hypothesis is that crystallization of the inner core does not produce any change of LOD, but makes the inner core rotate differentially with respect to the outer core and mantle.

  16. The last stage of Earth's formation: Increasing the pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, S. J.; Stewart, S. T.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2017-12-01

    A range of high-energy, high-angular momentum (AM) giant impacts have been proposed as a potential trigger for lunar origin. High-energy, high-AM collisions create a previously unrecognized planetary object, called a synestia. Terrestrial synestias exceed the corotation limit for a rocky planet, forming an extended structure with a corotating inner region and disk-like outer region. We demonstrate that the internal pressures of Earth-like planets do not increase monotonically during the giant impact stage, but can vary substantially in response to changes in rotation and thermal state. The internal pressures in an impact-generated synestia are much lower than in condensed, slowly rotating planets of the same mass. For example, the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure can be as low as 60 GPa for a synestia with Earth mass and composition, compared to 136 GPa in the present-day Earth. The lower pressures are due to the low density and rapid rotation of the post-impact structure. After a high-AM Moon-forming impact, the internal pressures in the interior of the synestia would have increased to present-day Earth values in two stages: first by vapor condensation and second by removal of AM from the Earth during the tidal evolution of the Moon. The pressure evolution of the Earth has several implications. Metal-silicate equilibration after the impact would have occurred at much lower pressures than has previously been assumed. The observed moderately siderophile element abundances in the mantle may be consistent with equilibration at the bottom of a deep, lower-pressure magma ocean. In addition, the pressure at the CMB during cooling is coincident with, or lower than, the proposed intersection of liquid adiabats with the mantle liquidus. The mantle would hence freeze from the bottom up and there would be no basal magma ocean. The subsequent pressure increase and tidal heating due to the Moon's orbital evolution likely induces melting in the lowermost mantle. Increasing

  17. Pressure detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Akira.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a pressure detection device having a function of preventing discharge of reactor water in pipelines to the outside of a system when a pipeline for detecting pressure to be connected to a reactor is failed. Namely, a fluid pressure detector is disposed at the downstream of the detection pipeline. A cylindrical member having a shrinkable inner diameter is disposed to the outer circumference at the upstream. A cylindrical member having an outer diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of the detection pipeline is disposed while restricting the movement of the detection pipeline in the inner circumferential direction. Then, it fasten the detection pipeline from the outside upon failure of the pipeline thereby enabling to suppress the flow rate of the fluid in the detection pipeline. In addition, a shape memory alloy which shrinks upon elevation of temperature is used for the cylindrical member. Then, the discharge of the fluid can be prevented automatically upon rupture of the pipeline. (I.S.)

  18. Prevention of an arms race in outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The space age may be the to have begun in 1957, when for the first time a man-made object was lofted into orbit round the Earth. Since that date, the new problems of outer space have been discussed in the United Nations, particularly in the General Assembly, in the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its subsidiary bodies, and in the Conference on Disarmament. The discussions have contributed to the conclusion of a number of international agreements concerning both military and peaceful aspects of the use of outer space. This paper reports that according to the 1967 Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, known as the outer space Treaty, outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means (article II), and the parties undertake not to place in orbit around the earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of ass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner (article IV). Detailed norms for States' actions in this environment are included in the 1979 Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and other Celestial Bodies to ensure that the Moon and other celestial bodies within the solar system, other than Earth, are used exclusively for peaceful purposes

  19. Fast core rotation in red-giant stars as revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, P.G.; Montalban, J.; Kallinger, T.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; García, R.A.; Hekker, S.; Dupret, M.-A.; Mosser, B.; Eggenberger, P.; Stello, D.; Elsworth, Y.; Frandsen, S.; Carrier, F.; Hillen, M.; Gruberbauer, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Miglio, A.; Valentini, M.; Bedding, T.R.; Kjeldsen, H.; Girouard, F.R.; Hall, J.R.; Ibrahim, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant. Convection takes place over much of the star's radius. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars

  20. Drilling history core hole DC-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    Core hole DC-8 was completed in August, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Scisson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the core drilling activities, and geologic core logging for hole DC-8. Core hole DC-8 is located on the Hanford Site near the Wye Barricade and 50 feet northwest of rotary hole DC-7. The Hanford Site vation coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 mean sea level. The purpose of core hole DC-8 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing and cross-hole seismic shear and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-7. The total depth of core hole DC-8 was 4100.5 feet. Core recovery exceeded 97 percent of the total footage cored

  1. Drilling history core hole DC-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    Core hole DC-8 was completed in August, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Scisson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the core drilling activities, and geologic core logging for hole DC-8. Core hole DC-8 is located on the Hanford Site near the Wye Barricade and 50 feet northwest of rotary hole DC-7. The Hanford Site vation coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 mean sea level. The purpose of core hole DC-8 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing and cross-hole seismic shear and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-7. The total depth of core hole DC-8 was 4100.5 feet. Core recovery exceeded 97 percent of the total footage cored.

  2. Cylindrization of a PWR core for neutronic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rubens Souza dos

    2005-01-01

    In this work we propose a core cylindrization, starting from a PWR core configuration, through the use of an algorithm that becomes the process automated in the program, independent of the discretization. This approach overcomes the problem stemmed from the use of the neutron transport theory on the core boundary, in addition with the singularities associated with the presence of corners on the outer fuel element core of, existents in the light water reactors (LWR). The algorithm was implemented in a computational program used to identification of the control rod drop accident in a typical PWR core. The results showed that the algorithm presented consistent results comparing with an production code, for a problem with uniform properties. In our conclusions, we suggest, for future works, for analyzing the effect on mesh sizes for the Cylindrical geometry, and to compare the transport theory calculations versus diffusion theory, for the boundary conditions with corners, for typical PWR cores. (author)

  3. Atmospheric chemistry and transport modeling in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Tai (Anthony)

    2001-11-01

    This thesis consists of 1-D and 2-D photochemical- dynamical modeling in the upper atmospheres of outer planets. For 1-D modeling, a unified hydrocarbon photochemical model has been studied in Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Titan, by comparing with the Voyager observations, and the recent measurements of methyl radicals by ISO in Saturn and Neptune. The CH3 observation implies a kinetically sensitive test to the measured and estimated hydrocarbon rate constants at low temperatures. We identify the key reactions that control the concentrations of CH3 in the model, such as the three-body recombination reaction, CH3 + CH3 + M --> C 2H6 + M, and the recycling reaction H + CH3 + M --> CH4 + M. The results show reasonable agreement with ISO values. In Chapter 4, the detection of PH3 in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere of Jupiter has provided a photochemical- dynamical coupling model to derive the eddy diffusion coefficient in the upper troposphere of Jupiter. Using a two-layers photochemical model with updated photodissociation cross-sections and chemical rate constants for NH3 and PH 3, we find that the upper tropospheric eddy diffusion coefficient 106 cm2 sec-1, are required to match the derived PH3 vertical profile by the observation. The best-fit functional form derivation of eddy diffusion coefficient in the upper troposphere of Jupiter above 400 mbar is K = 2.0 × 104 (n/2.2 × 1019)-0.5 cm 2 sec-1. On the other hand, Chapter 5 demonstrates a dynamical-only 2-D model of C2H6 providing a complete test for the current 2-D transport models in Jovian lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (270 to 0.1 mbar pressure levels). Different combinations of residual advection, horizontal eddy dispersion, and vertical eddy mixing are examined at different latitudes.

  4. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.

  5. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahr, John

    1993-01-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  6. Multi-core MgO NPs(at)C core-shell nanospheres for selective CO2 capture under mild conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tae Kyung Kim; Kyung Joo Lee; Hoi Ri Moon; Junhan Yuh; Sang Kyu Kwak

    2014-01-01

    The core-shell structures have attracted attention in catalysis, because the outer shells isolate the catalytically active NP cores and prevent the possibility of sintering of core particles during catalytic reaction under physically and chemically harsh conditions. We aimed to adopt this core-shell system for CO 2 sorption materials. In this study, a composite material of multi-core 3 nm-sized magnesium oxide nanoparticles embedded in porous carbon nanospheres (MgO NPs(at)C) was synthesized by a gas phase reaction via a solvent-free process. It showed selective CO 2 adsorption capacity over N 2 under mild regeneration conditions. (authors)

  7. Comparison of facility characteristics between SCTF Core-I and Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics in the core and fluid behavior of carryover water out of the core including its feed-back effect to the core behavior mainly during the reflood phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Since three simulated cores are used in the SCTF Test Program and the design of these three cores are slightly different one by one, repeatability test is required to justify a direct comparison of data obtained with different cores. In the present report, data of Test S2-13 (Run 618) obtained with SCTF Core-II were compared with those of Test S1-05 (Run 511) obtained with the Core-I, which were performed under the forced-flooding condition. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors in these two tests showed quite similar characteristics of both system behavior and two-dimensional core behaviors. Therefore, the test data obtained from the two cores can be compared directly with each other. After the turnaround of clad temperatures, however, some differences were found in upper plenum water accumulation and resultant two-dimensional core cooling behaviors such as quench front propagation from bottom to top of the core. (author)

  8. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  9. Seismic Wave Velocity in Earth's Shallow Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Eaton, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of the outer core indicate that it is composed of liquid Fe and Ni alloyed with a ~10% fraction of light elements such as O, S or Si. Recently, unusual features, such as sediment accumulation, immiscible fluid layers or stagnant convection, have been predicted in the shallow core region. Secular cooling and compositional buoyancy drive vigorous convection that sustains the geodynamo, although critical details of light-element composition and thermal regime remain uncertain. Seismic velocity models can provide important constraints on the light element composition, however global reference models, such as Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM), IASP91 and AK135 vary significantly in the 200 km below the core-mantle boundary. Past studies of the outermost core velocity structure have been hampered by traveltime uncertainties due to lowermost mantle heterogeneities. The recently published Empirical Transfer Function (ETF) method has been shown to reduce the uncertainty using a waveform stacking approach to improve global observations of SmKS teleseismic waves. Here, we apply the ETF method to achieve a precise top-of-core velocity measurement of 8.05 ± 0.03 km/s. This new model accords well with PREM. Since PREM is based on the adiabatic form of the Adams-Williamson equation, it assumes a well mixed (i.e. homogeneous) composition. This result suggests a lack of heterogeneity in the outermost core due to layering or stagnant convection.

  10. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nobuaki.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor comprises a static emergency reactor core cooling system having an automatic depressurization system and a gravitationally dropping type water injection system and a container cooling system by an isolation condenser. A depressurization pipeline of the automatic depressurization system connected to a reactor pressure vessel branches in the midway. The branched depressurizing pipelines are extended into an upper dry well and a lower dry well, in which depressurization valves are disposed at the top end portions of the pipelines respectively. If loss-of-coolant accidents should occur, the depressurization valve of the automatic depressurization system is actuated by lowering of water level in the pressure vessel. This causes nitrogen gases in the upper and the lower dry wells to transfer together with discharged steams effectively to a suppression pool passing through a bent tube. Accordingly, the gravitationally dropping type water injection system can be actuated faster. Further, subsequent cooling for the reactor vessel can be ensured sufficiently by the isolation condenser. (I.N.)

  11. Melting phase relations in the Fe-S and Fe-S-O systems at core conditions in small terrestrial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Anne; Laurenz, Vera; Davies, Christopher J.; Frost, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of phase equilibria in the Fe-S and Fe-S-O systems. Experiments were performed at high temperatures (1400-1850 °C) and high pressures (14 and 20 GPa) using a multi-anvil apparatus. The results of this study are used to understand the effect of sulfur and oxygen on core dynamics in small terrestrial bodies. We observe that the formation of solid FeO grains occurs at the Fe-S liquid - Fe solid interface at high temperature ( > 1400 °C at 20 GPa). Oxygen fugacities calculated for each O-bearing sample show that redox conditions vary from ΔIW = -0.65 to 0. Considering the relative density of each phase and existing evolutionary models of terrestrial cores, we apply our experimental results to the cores of Mars and Ganymede. We suggest that the presence of FeO in small terrestrial bodies tends to contribute to outer-core compositional stratification. Depending on the redox and thermal history of the planet, FeO may also help form a transitional redox zone at the core-mantle boundary.

  12. Infrared light extinction by charged dielectric core-coat particles

    OpenAIRE

    Thiessen, Elena; Heinisch, Rafael L.; Bronold, Franz X.; Fehske, Holger

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of surplus electrons on the infrared extinction of dielectric particles with a core-coat structure and propose to use it for an optical measurement of the particle charge in a dusty plasma. The particles consist of an inner core with negative and an outer coat with positive electron affinity. Both the core and the coat give rise to strong transverse optical phonon resonances, leading to anomalous light scattering in the infrared. Due to the radial profile of the electron a...

  13. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hotpress evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity

  14. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinby, T.C.

    A tool is described for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators. The target assembly comprising a uranum foil and an aluninum-alloy substrate. The tool is composed of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

  15. Linear stability of resistive MHD modes: axisymmetric toroidal computation of the outer region matching data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletzer, A.; Bondeson, A.; Dewar, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The quest to determine accurately the stability of tearing and resistive interchange modes in two-dimensional toroidal geometry led to the development of the PEST-3 code, which is based on solving the singular, zero-frequency ideal MHD equation in the plasma bulk and determining the outer data Δ', Γ' and A' needed to match the outer region solutions to those arising in the inner layers. No assumption regarding the aspect ratio, the number of rational surfaces or the pressure are made a priori. This approach is numerically less demanding than solving the full set of resistive equations, and has the major advantage of non-MHD theories of the non-ideal layers. Good convergence is ensured by the variational Galerkin scheme used to compute the outer matching data. To validate the code, we focus on the growth rate calculations of resistive kink modes which are reproduced in good agreement with those obtained by the full resistive MHD code MARS. (author) 11 figs., 27 refs

  16. Influence of the outer bath on the eigenfrequencies of rotating axisymmetric liquid bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanero, J.M. [Departamento de Electronica e Ingenieria Electromecanica, Universidad de Extremadura, E-06071, Badajoz (Spain)

    2004-04-01

    In experiments with liquid bridges, the neutral buoyancy technique has frequently been used to simulate microgravity conditions. In this technique the liquid bridge is surrounded by an outer liquid with similar density to compensate partially for the effect of the hydrostatic pressure over the interface. The outer bath is expected to play a relevant role not only in the static problem, but also in the dynamical behaviour of this fluid configuration. In the present contribution the eigenfrequencies characterizing the oscillation modes of a rotating axisymmetric liquid bridge are calculated. The analysis focuses on the influence of the outer bath and the liquid bridge equilibrium shape on those quantities. The results are obtained numerically by solving the inviscid two-dimensional model by means of a finite difference scheme. The method provides accurate results as is shown by comparison with the analytical solution for the cylindrical configuration. The comparison between the theoretical predictions for the first eigenfrequency and the experimental data obtained by Perales and Meseguer (1992) shows the capability of the model to describe the dynamics of real liquid bridges. (orig.)

  17. Outer hair cell piezoelectricity: frequency response enhancement and resonance behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Erik K; Tasker, Ron; Brownell, William E

    2003-09-01

    Stretching or compressing an outer hair cell alters its membrane potential and, conversely, changing the electrical potential alters its length. This bi-directional energy conversion takes place in the cell's lateral wall and resembles the direct and converse piezoelectric effects both qualitatively and quantitatively. A piezoelectric model of the lateral wall has been developed that is based on the electrical and material parameters of the lateral wall. An equivalent circuit for the outer hair cell that includes piezoelectricity shows a greater admittance at high frequencies than one containing only membrane resistance and capacitance. The model also predicts resonance at ultrasonic frequencies that is inversely proportional to cell length. These features suggest all mammals use outer hair cell piezoelectricity to support the high-frequency receptor potentials that drive electromotility. It is also possible that members of some mammalian orders use outer hair cell piezoelectric resonance in detecting species-specific vocalizations.

  18. Inner and Outer Recursive Neural Networks for Chemoinformatics Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Gregor; Subrahmanya, Niranjan; Baldi, Pierre

    2018-02-26

    Deep learning methods applied to problems in chemoinformatics often require the use of recursive neural networks to handle data with graphical structure and variable size. We present a useful classification of recursive neural network approaches into two classes, the inner and outer approach. The inner approach uses recursion inside the underlying graph, to essentially "crawl" the edges of the graph, while the outer approach uses recursion outside the underlying graph, to aggregate information over progressively longer distances in an orthogonal direction. We illustrate the inner and outer approaches on several examples. More importantly, we provide open-source implementations [available at www.github.com/Chemoinformatics/InnerOuterRNN and cdb.ics.uci.edu ] for both approaches in Tensorflow which can be used in combination with training data to produce efficient models for predicting the physical, chemical, and biological properties of small molecules.

  19. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods: Three patients with a normal ophthalmoscopic fundus appearance, a history of photopsia, and visual field loss compatible with AZOOR were examined using optical coherence tomography, automated perimetry...

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Pressure Distribution in the Reactor Vessel Downcomer Region Fluctuated by the Reactor Coolant Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Dong Hwa; Jung, Byung Ryul; Jang, Ho Cheol; Yune, Seok Jeong; Kim, Eun Kee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the numerical simulation of the pressure distribution in the downcomer region resulting from the pressure pulsation by the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) is performed using the Finite Difference Method (FDM). Simulation is carried out for the cylindrical shaped 2-dimensional model equivalent to the outer surface of the Core Support Barrel (CSB) of APR1400 and a 1/2 model is adopted based on the bilateral symmetry by the inlet nozzle. The fluid temperature is 555 .deg. F and the forcing frequencies are 120Hz, 240Hz, 360Hz and 480Hz. Simulation results of the axial pressure distributions are provided as the Root Mean Square (RMS) values at the five locations of 0°, 45°, 90°, 135° and 180° in the circumferential direction from the inlet nozzle location. In the study, the numerical simulation of pressure distributions in the downcomer region induced by the RCP was performed using FDM and the results were reviewed. The interference of the waves returned from both boundaries in the axial direction and the source of the sinusoidal wave is shown on the inlet nozzle interface pressure point. It seems that the maximum pressures result from the superposition of the waves reflected from the seating surface and the waves newly arrived from the inlet nozzle interface pressure location.